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Sample records for predicting shear type

  1. Prediction of hemolysis in turbulent shear orifice flow.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, M; Akamatsu, T; Saitoh, K

    1996-06-01

    This study proposes a method of predicting hemolysis induced by turbulent shear stress (Reynolds stress) in a simplified orifice pipe flow. In developing centrifugal blood pumps, there has been a serious problem with hemolysis at the impeller or casing edge; because of flow separation and turbulence in these regions. In the present study, hemolysis caused by turbulent shear stress must occur at high shear stress levels in regions near the edge of an orifice pipe flow. We have computed turbulent shear flow using the low-Reynolds number k-epsilon model. We found that the computed turbulent shear stress near the edge was several hundreds times that of the laminar shear stress (molecular shear stress). The peak turbulent shear stress is much greater than that obtained in conventional hemolysis testing using a viscometer apparatus. Thus, these high turbulent shear stresses should not be ignored in estimating hemolysis in this blood flow. Using an integrated power by shear force, it is optimal to determine the threshold of the turbulent shear stress by comparing computed stress levels with those of hemolysis experiments or pipe orifice blood flow.

  2. Wind shear predictive detector technology study status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolfi, C.

    1990-01-01

    Among the different elements to be investigated when considering the Wind Shear hazard, the Aeronautical Navigation Technical Service (STNA/3E), whose task is to participate in the development of new technologies and equipments, focused its effort on airborne and ground sensors for the detection of low-level wind shear. The first task, initiated in 1986, consists in the evaluation of three candidate techniques for forward-looking sensors: lidar, sodar, and radar. No development is presently foreseen for an infrared based air turbulence advance warning system although some flight experiments took place in the 70's. A Thomson infrared radiometer was then installed on an Air France Boeing 707 to evaluate its capability of detecting clear air turbulence. The conclusion showed that this technique was apparently able to detect cloud layers but that additional experiments were needed; on the other hand, the rarity of the phenomenon and the difficulty in operating on a commercial aircraft were also mentioned.

  3. Prediction of plantar shear stress distribution by artificial intelligence methods.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Metin; Ocak, Hasan; Hetherington, Vincent J; Davis, Brian L

    2009-09-01

    Shear forces under the human foot are thought to be responsible for various foot pathologies such as diabetic plantar ulcers and athletic blisters. Frictional shear forces might also play a role in the metatarsalgia observed among hallux valgus (HaV) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Due to the absence of commercial devices capable of measuring shear stress distribution, a number of linear models were developed. All of these have met with limited success. This study used nonlinear methods, specifically neural network and fuzzy logic schemes, to predict the distribution of plantar shear forces based on vertical loading parameters. In total, 73 subjects were recruited; 17 had diabetic neuropathy, 14 had HaV, 9 had RA, 11 had frequent foot blisters, and 22 were healthy. A feed-forward neural network (NN) and adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (NFIS) were built. These systems were then applied to a custom-built platform, which collected plantar pressure and shear stress data as subjects walked over the device. The inputs to both models were peak pressure, peak pressure-time integral, and time to peak pressure, and the output was peak resultant shear. Root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were calculated to test the models' accuracy. RMSE/actual shear ratio varied between 0.27 and 0.40 for NN predictions. Similarly, NFIS estimations resulted in a 0.28-0.37 ratio for local peak values in all subject groups. On the other hand, error percentages for global peak shear values were found to be in the range 11.4-44.1. These results indicate that there is no direct relationship between pressure and shear magnitudes. Future research should aim to decrease error levels by introducing shear stress dependent variables into the models. PMID:19725696

  4. Prediction of residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Ashhad; Azad, Abul Kalam

    2016-09-01

    With the aim of providing experimental data on the shear capacity and behavior of corroded reinforced concrete beams that may help in the development of strength prediction models, the test results of 13 corroded and four un-corroded beams are presented. Corrosion damage was induced by accelerated corrosion induction through impressed current. Test results show that loss of shear strength of beams is mostly attributable to two important damage factors namely, the reduction in stirrups area due to corrosion and the corrosion-induced cracking of concrete cover to stirrups. Based on the test data, a method is proposed to predict the residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams in which residual shear strength is calculated first by using corrosion-reduced steel area alone, and then it is reduced by a proposed reduction factor, which collectively represents all other applicable corrosion damage factors. The method seems to yield results that are in reasonable agreement with the available test data.

  5. Advanced technology wind shear prediction system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gering, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The program overviews: (1) American Airline (AA)/Turbulence Prediction Systems (TPS), which have installed forward looking infrared predictive windshear system on 3 MD-80 aircraft; (2) AA/TPS AWAS III evaluation, which is a joint effort and is installed in the noise landing gear (NLG) area and a data recorder installed in the E/E compartment.

  6. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions.

  7. Shear Strength Prediction By Modified Plasticity Theory For SFRC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Colajanni, Piero; Recupero, Antonino; Spinella, Nino

    2008-07-08

    the plastic Crack Sliding Model (CSM) is extended for derivation of a physical model for the prediction of ultimate shear strength of SFRC beams, by assuming that the critical cracks is modeled by a yield lines. To this aim, the CSM is improved in order to take into account the strength increases due to the arch effect for deep beam. Then, the effectiveness factors for the concrete under biaxial stress are calibrated for fibrous concrete. The proposed model, able to provide the shear strength and the position of the critical cracks, is validate by a large set of test results collected in literature.

  8. Predicting Buoyant Shear Flows Using Anisotropic Dissipation Rate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhao, C. Y.; Gatski, T. B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the modeling of two-dimensional homogeneous stratified turbulent shear flows using the Reynolds-stress and Reynolds-heat-flux equations. Several closure models have been investigated-, the emphasis is placed on assessing the effect of modeling the dissipation rate tensor in the Reynolds-stress equation. Three different approaches are considered: one is an isotropic approach while the other two are anisotropic approaches. The isotropic approach is based on Kolmogorov's hypothesis and a dissipation rate equation modified to account for vortex stretching. One of the anisotropic approaches is based on an algebraic representation of the dissipation rate tensor, while another relies on solving a modeled transport equation for this tensor. In addition, within the former anisotropic approach, two different algebraic representations are examined one is a function of the Reynolds-stress anisotropy tensor, and the other is a function of' the mean velocity gradients. The performance of these closure models is evaluated against experimental and direct numerical simulation data of pure shear flows. pure buoyant flows and buoyant shear flows. Calculations have been carried out over a range of Richardson numbers (Ri) and two different Prandtl numbers (Pr); thus the effect of Pr on the development of counter-gradient heat flux in a stratified shear flow can be assessed. At low Ri, the isotropic model performs well in the predictions of stratified shear flows; however, its performance deteriorates as Ri increases. At high Ri, the transport equation model for the dissipation rate tensor gives the best result. Furthermore, the results also lend credence to the algebraic dissipation rate model based on the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor. Finally, it is found that Pr has an effect on the development of counter-gradient heat flux. The calculations show that, under the action of shear, counter-gradient heat flux does not occur even at Ri = 1 in an air flow.

  9. Prediction of the ionic polymer transducer sensing of shear loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrilli, U.; Weiland, L. M.

    2011-09-01

    While ionic polymer transducers (IPTs) have often been studied as actuators, they also show considerable promise as sensors. In addition to responding to bending, IPT sensors can also detect compression, tension and shear. Existing IPT models focus primarily on actuation, while the few available sensing models are limited to bending. This is due in part to the lack of a viable hypothesis for a physical mechanism that can explain the existence of a sensing signal in all deformation modes. Identification of the fundamental sensing mechanism is desirable as it could ultimately be exploited to design IPT sensors with an optimized response. Here it is hypothesized that the dominant physical mechanism for sensing is streaming potential, as it holds promise for explaining the existence of IPT sensing in any mode of deformation. We present a model for predicting the current developed when an IPT is subject to shear deformation, the creation of which has previously been elusive. The presented study employs a finite element approach to predict diluent flow with respect to the surrounding hydrophobic amorphous region under shear loading. Assessment of multiple flow path orientations with respect to load is used to impose volume averaging, and subsequently to project transducer current. Both peak and transient response are considered. Model predictions compare well with previously reported experimental results.

  10. Predicting Shear Failure of Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Sung, Ji Hyun; Matlock, D. K.; Kim, Daeyong; Wagoner, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are being used increasingly to make automotive panels because of their advantageous combinations of high ductility (for forming) and high strength (for service). However, their adoption has been limited because of failures during die tryout that are unpredicted by the usual methods of finite element modeling and forming limit diagrams. The failures, often called "shear failures" occur at regions of high curvature (low R/t) where sheet of thickness t is drawn over a tool radius R. Recent work revealed that the type of failure and the formability of DP steels depend not only on R/t, but also on strain rate, an effect derived from the propensity of these steels to locally heat in areas of high strain when strain rates are sufficiently high to limit heat transfer. The formability is reduced significantly by the thermal effect for rates greater than approximately 0.1/s. This result explains at least partially why forming limit diagrams, which are measured quasi-statically (and thus isothermally) do not reflect the behavior of DP steels formed industrially (at typical strain rates of approximately 10/s). In order to apply laboratory test results of draw-bend formability to industrial forming operations, the inputs to commercial finite element codes (constitutive equations, forming limits) must be adapted to the reality of the material (DP steel) and underlying physics (thermal effects on constitutive behavior). Toward this end, two procedures have been developed and tested, one numerical and one analytical. Together they predict similar forming limits and provide a path for understanding the applied formability of DP steels.

  11. Predicting boundary shear stress and sediment transport over bed forms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, S.R.; Wolfe, S.R.; Nelson, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of the internal boundary layer with semiempirical structure functions to predict the velocity at the crest of a bedform, where the flow is most similar to a uniform boundary layer. Significantly, the methodology is directed toward making specific predictions only at the bed-form crest, and as a result it avoids the difficulty and questionable validity of spatial averaging. The model provides an accurate estimate of the skin friction at the crest where transport rates are highest. Simple geometric constraints can be used to derive the mean transport rates as long as bed load is dominant.To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of

  12. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  13. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  14. Relationship between types of surface shear stress profiles and membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Chan, C C V; Bérubé, P R; Hall, E R

    2011-12-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as an important parameter in controlling particle back-transport from membrane surfaces. However, little is known of the relationship between transient shear conditions induced by air sparging and fouling control near membrane surfaces. In this paper, the different types of surface shear stress profiles that had beneficial effects on minimizing reversible surface fouling were examined. The relationship between different statistical shear parameters (e.g. time-averaged shear, standard deviation of shear and amplitude of shear) and fouling control that have been used by others were examined as well. It was found that the fouling rate for membranes subjected to transient shear conditions was lower than for membranes subjected to constant shear conditions. The magnitude, duration and frequency of the shear conditions were found to have an impact on the fouling rate of membranes. It was also found that although some statistical shear parameters could generally be used to relate shear and fouling, they were inadequate to relate surface shear stress to fouling, for all transient shear conditions examined.

  15. Improved prediction of the turbulence-shear contribution to wind noise pressure spectra.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao; Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy; Abbott, JohnPaul

    2011-12-01

    In previous research [Raspet et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123(3), 1260-1269 (2008)], predictions of the low frequency turbulence-turbulence and turbulence-mean shear interaction pressure spectra measured by a large wind screen were developed and compared to the spectra measured using large spherical wind screens in the flow. The predictions and measurements agreed well except at very low frequencies where the turbulence-mean shear contribution dominated the turbulence-turbulence interaction pressure. In this region the predicted turbulence-mean shear interaction pressure did not show consistent agreement with microphone measurements. The predicted levels were often much larger than the measured results. This paper applies methods developed to predict the turbulence-shear interaction pressure measured at the ground [Yu et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129(2), 622-632 (2011)] to improve the prediction of the turbulence-shear interaction pressure above the ground surface by incorporating a realistic wind velocity profile and realistic turbulence anisotropy. The revised prediction of the turbulence-shear interaction pressure spectra compares favorably with wind-screen microphone measurements in large wind screens at low frequency.

  16. Predictions of axisymmetric free turbulent shear flows using a generalized eddy-viscosity approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The generalized eddy viscosity approach is described and results are presented of test cases which show that predictions obtained by this approach are adequate for most engineering applications. Because of the importance of starting computations from the injection station where experimentally determined mean and turbulence parameters are rarely available, a very simple core model applicable to simple step-type (slug) profiles was developed. Agreement between predicted and experimental mean profiles was generally almost as good for calculations made by using this model throughout the core region and the transition model for all subsequent regions as predictions made by starting from experimental profiles in the transition region. The generalized eddy-viscosity model, which was developed in part through correlation of turbulence parameters, successfully predicted turbulent shear stress, turbulent intensity, and mean velocity profiles for a 0.040-inch-diameter microjet. Therefore, successful scaling by the model was demonstrated since data used in its development was for jet areas up to 90,000 times as large as the microjet and velocities only 1/20th as high.

  17. Prediction of Anomalous Blood Viscosity in Confined Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaud, Marine; Shen, Zaiyi; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-06-01

    Red blood cells play a major role in body metabolism by supplying oxygen from the microvasculature to different organs and tissues. Understanding blood flow properties in microcirculation is an essential step towards elucidating fundamental and practical issues. Numerical simulations of a blood model under a confined linear shear flow reveal that confinement markedly modifies the properties of blood flow. A nontrivial spatiotemporal organization of blood elements is shown to trigger hitherto unrevealed flow properties regarding the viscosity η, namely ample oscillations of its normalized value [η]=(η-η0)/(η0ϕ) as a function of hematocrit ϕ (η0=solvent viscosity). A scaling law for the viscosity as a function of hematocrit and confinement is proposed. This finding can contribute to the conception of new strategies to efficiently detect blood disorders, via in vitro diagnosis based on confined blood rheology. It also constitutes a contribution for a fundamental understanding of rheology of confined complex fluids.

  18. Approximate methods for predicting interlaminar shear stiffness of laminated and sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ajit K.; Verchery, Georges

    1993-01-01

    Several approximate closed form expressions exist in the literature for predicting the effective interlaminar shear stiffness (G13) of laminated composite beams. The accuracy of these approximate methods depends on the number of layers present in the laminated beam, the relative layer thickness and layer stacking sequence, and the beam length to depth ratio. The objective of this work is to evaluate approximate methods for predicting G13 by comparing its predictions with that of an accurate method, and then find the range where the simple closed form expressions for predicting G13 can be applicable. A comparative study indicates that all the approximate methods included here give good prediction of G13 when the laminate is made of a large number of repeated sublaminates. Further, the parabolic shear stress distribution function yields a reasonably accurate prediction of G13 even for a relatively small number of layers in the laminate. A similar result is also presented for sandwich beams.

  19. A Simple Method to Predict Threshold Shear Velocity in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Okin, G. S.; Herrick, J. E.; Miller, M. E.; Munson, S. M.; Belnap, J.

    2009-12-01

    A very important parameter in predicting wind erosion is the threshold shear velocity, which is the minimal shear velocity required to initiate deflation of soil particles. Modeling and wind tunnel are primary methods in predicting threshold shear velocity. However, most models have limited applications in the presence of roughness elements, and running a wind tunnel in the field is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Soil crust (both physical and biological) is known to be a crucial factor affecting soil stability and threshold shear velocity. In this report, a simple and portable field method was tested in multiple locations of Utah for the estimation of threshold shear velocity. This method includes measuring size of holes (length and width) induced by shooting a “bullet ball” or “BB” gun, applying a pocket penetrometer, and a torvane on soil surface in the field. In the first stage of the experiment, a conventional wind tunnel was run in combination with BB gun, penetrometer, and torvane in field conditions for a range of soil texture. Results from both the BB gun and penetrometer applied at 45 degree to the ground were significantly correlated with the threshold shear velocity obtained using the wind tunnel (R2=0.70, P<0.001). In the second stage, BB gun and penetrometer method was applied to a serial of sites which have BSNE wind erosion monitors and known horizontal sediment fluxes. Our results showed that a combination of BB gun and penetrometer is able to provide decent prediction of threshold shear velocity in the presence of vegetation under different soil physical and biological conditions.

  20. Red blood cell damage by shear stress for different blood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Bedkowski, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    In surgical practice, blood damage caused by medical devices is often a limiting factor in the duration of an acute procedure or in chronic exposures such as hemodialysis. In order to establish guidelines for designing medical devices, a study was conducted to determine the relationship between shear stress and damage to red blood cells using a concentric Couette device. By measuring the hemolysis level for various shear stresses and exposure times, a non-dimensional relationship between shear stress and blood damage for different blood types was established. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  1. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Soto-Aquino, D; Rosso, D; Rinaldi, C

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe<2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  2. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: Predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rosso, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe≪2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  3. Plasticity Tool for Predicting Shear Nonlinearity of Unidirectional Laminates Under Multiaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Bomarito, Geoffrey F.

    2016-01-01

    This study implements a plasticity tool to predict the nonlinear shear behavior of unidirectional composite laminates under multiaxial loadings, with an intent to further develop the tool for use in composite progressive damage analysis. The steps for developing the plasticity tool include establishing a general quadratic yield function, deriving the incremental elasto-plastic stress-strain relations using the yield function with associated flow rule, and integrating the elasto-plastic stress-strain relations with a modified Euler method and a substepping scheme. Micromechanics analyses are performed to obtain normal and shear stress-strain curves that are used in determining the plasticity parameters of the yield function. By analyzing a micromechanics model, a virtual testing approach is used to replace costly experimental tests for obtaining stress-strain responses of composites under various loadings. The predicted elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios are in good agreement with experimental data. The substepping scheme for integrating the elasto-plastic stress-strain relations is suitable for working with displacement-based finite element codes. An illustration problem is solved to show that the plasticity tool can predict the nonlinear shear behavior for a unidirectional laminate subjected to multiaxial loadings.

  4. Compressional and shear-wave velocity versus depth relations for common rock types in northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents new empirical compressional and shear-wave velocity (Vp and Vs) versus depth relationships for the most common rock types in northern California. Vp versus depth relations were developed from borehole, laboratory, seismic refraction and tomography, and density measurements, and were converted to Vs versus depth relations using new empirical relations between Vp and Vs. The relations proposed here account for increasing overburden pressure but not for variations in other factors that can influence velocity over short distance scales, such as lithology, consolidation, induration, porosity, and stratigraphic age. Standard deviations of the misfits predicted by these relations thus provide a measure of the importance of the variability in Vp and Vs caused by these other factors. Because gabbros, greenstones, basalts, and other mafic rocks have a different Vp and Vs relationship than sedimentary and granitic rocks, the differences in Vs between these rock types at depths below 6 or 7 km are generally small. The new relations were used to derive the 2005 U.S. Geological Survey seismic velocity model for northern California employed in the broadband strong motion simulations of the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes; initial tests of the model indicate that the Vp model generally compares favorably to regional seismic tomography models but that the Vp and Vs values proposed for the Franciscan Complex may be about 5% too high.

  5. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  6. Prediction of Shear-induced Crack Initiation in AHSS Deep Drawing Operation with a Phenomenological Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Li, Yaning; Gerlach, Joerg; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) draws enormous attentions in automotive industry because it has great potential in reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency. Nonetheless, their relatively low formability also causes many problems in manufacturing processes, such as shear-induced fracture during deep drawing or stamping. This type of fracture could not be predicted using traditional necking-based Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), which is commonly used by the forming community. In the present paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC)[1] ductile fracture model is employed to make up the deficiency of FLD. In the limiting case of plane stress, the MMC fracture locus consists of four branches when represented on the plane of the equivalent strain to fracture and the stress triaxiality. A transformation of above 2D fracture locus to the space of principal strains was performed which revealed the existence of two new branches not known before. The existence of those branches explains the formation of shear-induced fracture. As an illustration of this new approach, initiation and propagation of cracks in a series of deep drawing tests is predicted and compared with the experimental observations. It was shown that the location of fracture as well as the magnitude of punch travel corresponding to first fracture was correctly predicted by MMC fracture model for both square and circular punch cases.

  7. Effects of different vegetation types on the shear strength of root-permeated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank; Rickli, Christian; Springman, Sarah M.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of vegetation and, in particular, of forests on the stability of slopes are well recognized and have been widely studied in recent decades. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the underlying processes that occur prior to triggering superficial failures in root-permeated soil. Thus, appropriate quantification of the vegetation effects on the shear strength of soil is crucial in order to be able to evaluate the stability of a vegetated slope. Direct shear testing is widely employed to determine the shearing response of root-permeated soil. However, mechanical aspects of direct shear apparatuses may affect the shear strength parameters derived, which often remains unnoticed and hampers direct comparison between different studies. A robust Inclinable Large-scale Direct Shear Apparatus (ILDSA), with dimensions of 500x500x400 mm, was built in order to shear root-permeated soil specimens and to analyse the influence of the machine setup on the results, too. Two different sets of planted specimens were prepared using moraine (SP-SM) from a recent landslide area in Central Switzerland: a first set consisting of Alnus incana, Trifolium pratense, Poa pratensis and a second set, consisting of these three species complemented with Salix appendiculata, Achillea millefolium, Anthyllis vulneraria. Direct shear tests were conducted on specimens planted with the different vegetation types, at a constant rate of horizontal displacement of 1 mm/min up to a maximum horizontal displacement of 190 mm, and under three different applied normal stresses: 6 kPa, 11 kPa and 16 kPa. Artificial rainfall was applied at a constant intensity (100 mm/h) prior to shearing. Tensiometers had been installed close to the shear surface and were monitored continuously to obtain the matric suction during the saturation process. Suctions were reduced as close to 0 kPa as possible, in order to simulate the loss of strength after a heavy period of rainfall. The analyses of the above

  8. Effect of oil type and fatty acid composition on dynamic and steady shear rheology of vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Hasan; Toker, Omer Said; Dogan, Mahmut

    2012-01-01

    In this study, effect of fatty acid composition on dynamic and steady shear rheology of oils was studied. For this aim, different types of vegetable oils (soybean, sunflower, olive, hazelnut, cottonseed and canola), were used. Rheological properties of oil samples were identified by rheometer (Thermo-Haake) at 25°C and fatty acid composition of oils was determined by GC (Agilent 6890). Steady shear rheological properties of oil samples were measured at shear rate range of 0.1-100 s⁻¹. Viscosity of olive, hazelnut, cottonseed, canola, soybean and sunflower was 61.2 mPa.s, 59.7 mPa.s, 57.3 mPa.s, 53.5 mPa.s, 48.7 mPa.s and 48.2 mPa.s, respectively. There was a significant difference between viscosity of oils except soybean and sunflower. As a result it was seen that there was a correlation between viscosity and monounsaturated (R=0.89), polyunsaturated (R=-0.97) fatty acid composition of oils, separately. Equation was found to predict viscosity of the oils based on mono and polyunsaturation composition of oils. In addition the dynamic rheological properties of oils were also examined. G', G'' and tan δ (G''/G') values were measured at 0.3 Pa (in viscoelastic region) and 0.1-1 Hz. As a result of multiple regression analysis another equations were found between tan δ, viscosity and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  9. A Pian-Sumihara type element for modeling shear bands at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2014-05-01

    A monolithic numerical solution of a partial differential equation (PDE) model for shear bands, which includes a thermal softening rate dependent plastic flow rule and finite thermal conductivity, is presented. The formulation accounts for large deformation kinematics and includes incrementally objective treatment of the hypoplastic constitutive relations. Regularization is achieved by including finite thermal conductivity, which informs the PDE system of a length scale, governed by competition between shear heating and thermal diffusion. The monolithic solution scheme is then used to eliminate splitting errors during the solution of the discretized system. The scheme is presented in a general, mixed formulation, which allows for many choices of shape functions. We study and compare two elements, which have been implemented with the monolithic nonlinear solver: the Irreducible Shear Band Quad (ISBQ) and the Pian Sumihara Shear Band Quad (PSSBQ). ISBQ employs the same interpolation as an irreducible four node quad while PSSBQ is a mixed, assumed stress element. The algorithmic approximations to the Lie derivative and Jaumann rate of Kirchhoff stress are available in the literature for ISBQ type elements, and are derived in this paper for the PSSBQ. These expressions are used to achieve an incrementally objective formulation. It is found that the PSSBQ converges faster than the ISBQ with mesh refinement, and that the convergence of the ISBQ can be improved with a remeshing procedure.

  10. EFFECT OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS ON PREDICTED COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM SHEAR PEAK STATISTICS WITH LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; Chang, C.; Kahn, S. M.; Gilmore, K.; Marshall, S.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Huffenberger, K. M.; May, M.; AlSayyad, Y.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R. R.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Lorenz, S.; Haiman, Z.; Jernigan, J. G.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We study the effect of galaxy shape measurement errors on predicted cosmological constraints from the statistics of shear peak counts with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We use the LSST Image Simulator in combination with cosmological N-body simulations to model realistic shear maps for different cosmological models. We include both galaxy shape noise and, for the first time, measurement errors on galaxy shapes. We find that the measurement errors considered have relatively little impact on the constraining power of shear peak counts for LSST.

  11. Prediction of plastic instabilities under thermo-mechanical loadings in tension and simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manach, P. Y.; Mansouri, L. F.; Thuillier, S.

    2016-08-01

    Plastic instabilities like Portevin-Le Châtelier were quite thoroughly investigated experimentally in tension, under a large range of strain rates and temperatures. Such instabilities are characterized both by a jerky flow and a localization of the strain in bands. Similar phenomena were also recorded for example in simple shear [1]. Modelling of this phenomenon is mainly performed at room temperature, taking into account the strain rate sensitivity, though an extension of the classical Estrin-Kubin-McCormick was proposed in the literature, by making some of the material parameters dependent on temperature. A similar approach is considered in this study, furthermore extended for anisotropic plasticity with Hill's 1948 yield criterion. Material parameters are identified at 4 different temperatures, ranging from room temperature up to 250°C. The identification procedure is split in 3 steps, related to the elasticity, the average stress level and the magnitude of the stress drops. The anisotropy is considered constant in this temperature range, as evidenced by experimental results [2]. The model is then used to investigate the temperature dependence of the critical strain, as well as its capability to represent the propagation of the bands. Numerical predictions of the instabilities in tension and simple shear at room temperature and up to 250°C are compared with experimental results [3]. In the case of simple shear, a monotonic loading followed by unloading and reloading in the reverse direction (“Bauschinger-type” test) is also considered, showing that (i) kinematic hardening should be taken into account to fully describe the transition at re-yielding (ii) the modelling of the critical strain has to be improved.

  12. Turbulence Modeling Effects on the Prediction of Equilibrium States of Buoyant Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, C. Y.; So, R. M. C.; Gatski, T. B.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of turbulence modeling on the prediction of equilibrium states of turbulent buoyant shear flows were investigated. The velocity field models used include a two-equation closure, a Reynolds-stress closure assuming two different pressure-strain models and three different dissipation rate tensor models. As for the thermal field closure models, two different pressure-scrambling models and nine different temperature variance dissipation rate, Epsilon(0) equations were considered. The emphasis of this paper is focused on the effects of the Epsilon(0)-equation, of the dissipation rate models, of the pressure-strain models and of the pressure-scrambling models on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. Equilibrium turbulence is defined by the time rate (if change of the scaled Reynolds stress anisotropic tensor and heat flux vector becoming zero. These conditions lead to the equilibrium state parameters. Calculations show that the Epsilon(0)-equation has a significant effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. For a particular Epsilon(0)-equation, all velocity closure models considered give an equilibrium state if anisotropic dissipation is accounted for in one form or another in the dissipation rate tensor or in the Epsilon(0)-equation. It is further found that the models considered for the pressure-strain tensor and the pressure-scrambling vector have little or no effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence.

  13. Effect of solid contents on the controlled shear stress rheological properties of different types of sludge.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Wang, Yili; Dong, Yujing

    2012-01-01

    Controlled shear stress (CSS) test was used to study the effect of solid contents on the corresponding rheological parameters for sludge. Three types of sludge with or without conditioning, including activated sludge (AS), anaerobic digested sludge (ADS), and water treatment residuals (WTRs), were collected for the CSS test. Results showed that the yield stress and the cohesion energy of the sludge networks were improved with increased total suspending solid (TSS) contents in most cases. For the conditioned AS/ADS and the raw WTRs, exponential law was observed in the relationships between cohesion energy of material networks or yield stress and the TSS contents, whereas for the conditioned WTRs, only exponential law dependence was found between the parameters of shear modulus or critical strain and the TSS contents.

  14. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    PubMed

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  15. Full-field predictions of ice dynamic recrystallisation under simple shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Maria-Gema; Griera, Albert; Bons, Paul D.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Evans, Lynn A.; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the flow of ice on the microstructural scale is essential for improving our knowledge of large-scale ice dynamics, and thus our ability to predict future changes of ice sheets. Polar ice behaves anisotropically during flow, which can lead to strain localisation. In order to study how dynamic recrystallisation affects to strain localisation in deep levels of polar ice sheets, we present a series of numerical simulations of ice polycrystals deformed under simple-shear conditions. The models explicitly simulate the evolution of microstructures using a full-field approach, based on the coupling of a viscoplastic deformation code (VPFFT) with dynamic recrystallisation codes. The simulations provide new insights into the distribution of stress, strain rate and lattice orientation fields with progressive strain, up to a shear strain of three. Our simulations show how the recrystallisation processes have a strong influence on the resulting microstructure (grain size and shape), while the development of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) appears to be less affected. Activation of non-basal slip systems is enhanced by recrystallisation and induces a strain hardening behaviour up to the onset of strain localisation and strain weakening behaviour. Simulations demonstrate that the strong intrinsic anisotropy of ice crystals is transferred to the polycrystalline scale and results in the development of strain localisation bands than can be masked by grain boundary migration. Therefore, the finite-strain history is non-directly reflected by the final microstructure. Masked strain localisation can be recognised in ice cores, such as the EDML, from the presence of stepped boundaries, microshear and grains with zig-zag geometries.

  16. Systematic experimental study of pure shear type dielectric elastomer membranes with different electrode and film thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgins, M.; Seelecke, S.

    2016-09-01

    An approach to reduce the voltage required for dielectric elastomer actuators is to reduce film thickness. However, if the electrode thickness is not similarly reduced, the electrode’s mechanical behavior can increasingly and negatively impact the overall actuator behavior. This effect is yet to be studied and quantified for pure shear type specimens; a type recommended in a recent DE standardization journal publication. Therefore, in this work, using pure shear specimens, a comparative study of membrane actuators of different film thickness (20, 50 and 100 μm) is performed. Electrodes of different thicknesses are screen printed and tested in a uniaxial test device. The stiffening effect due to the solid-state electrodes is demonstrated by performing force-elongation tests for specimens with and without electrodes. Additionally the importance of thin electrodes (relative to film thickness) was demonstrated through a number of electromechanical tests. Isotonic tests revealed a lower electro-mechanical sensitivity for the 20 μm film when compared with the 50 and 100 μm films. This was attributed to the relatively thick electrodes. Best actuation results were achieved when the total electrode thickness was at least 15x thinner than the dielectric membrane thickness.

  17. A technique for predicting mode I energy release rates using a first-order shear deformable plate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, B. D.; Schapery, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Utilizing a first order shear deformable plate theory, a technique is described for predicting the distribution of the energy release rate along a curved or straight mode I planar crack in the plane of a plate (such as a delamination crack). Accuracy of the technique is assessed by comparing the distributions of energy release rate with those predicted by two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses of double cantilever beam specimens with straight crack fronts.

  18. Shear-thinning and constant viscosity predictions for rotating sphere flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garduño, Isaías E.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, Hamid R.; Webster, Michael F.

    2016-02-01

    The steady motion of a rotating sphere is analysed through two contrasting viscoelastic models, a constant viscosity (FENE-CR) model and a shear-thinning (LPTT) model. Giesekus (Rheol. Acta 9:30-38, 1970) presented an intriguing rotating viscoelastic flow, which to date has not been completely explained. In order to investigate this flow, sets of parameters have been explored to analyse the significant differences introduced with the proposed models, while the momentum-continuity-stress equations are solved through a hybrid finite-element/finite volume numerical scheme. Solutions are discussed for first, sphere angular velocity increase (\\varOmega), and second, through material velocity-scale increase (α). Numerical predictions for different solvent-ratios (β) show significant differences as the sphere angular velocity increases. It is demonstrated that an emerging equatorial anticlockwise vortex emerges in a specific range of \\varOmega. As such, this solution matches closely with the Giesekus experimental findings. Additionally, inside the emerging inertial vortex, a contrasting positive second normal stress-difference (N2 ( dot{γ} ) = τ_{rr} - τ_{θθ}) region is found compared against the negative N2-enveloping layer.

  19. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  20. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, L.G.; Harvey, J.W.; Crimaldi, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  1. Incoherent holography by a Michelson type interferometer with a lens for a radial shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kaho; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    The modified Michelson type interferometer with lenses for a radial shear to record incoherent holograms is proposed. It enables us to record a hologram by self-interference without coherent illumination such as a laser. The interferometer has two wave plates which can realize phase-shifting incoherent holography. The feature can avoid a very large bias term and the twin image, which are the inherent problem of incoherent holography by self-interference. The advantages of the proposed method using lenses and wave plates are easy adjustment of the zone plate and simplification of the optical system. A preliminary experiment using an LED as an incoherent object was performed to confirm the four step phase-shifting by wave plates.

  2. Theory to Predict Shear Stress on Cells in Turbulent Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark Jr., David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally. PMID:25171175

  3. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  4. An equilibrium method for prediction of transverse shear stresses in a thick laminated plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    First two equations of equilibrium are utilized to compute the transverse shear stress variation through thickness of a thick laminated plate after in-plane stresses have been computed using an assumed quadratic displacement triangular element based on transverse inextensibility and layerwise constant shear angle theory (LCST). Centroid of the triangle is the point of exceptional accuracy for transverse shear stresses. Numerical results indicate close agreement with elasticity theory. An interesting comparison between the present theory and that based on assumed stress hybrid finite element approach suggests that the latter does not satisfy the condition of free normal traction at the edge. Comparison with numerical results obtained by using constant shear angle theory suggests that LCST is close to the elasticity solution while the CST is closer to classical (CLT) solution. It is also demonstrated that the reduced integration gives faster convergence when the present theory is applied to a thin plate.

  5. The theoretical tensile strength of fcc crystals predicted from shear strength calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, M.; Pokluda, J.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a simple way of estimating uniaxial tensile strength on the basis of theoretical shear strength calculations, taking into account its dependence on a superimposed normal stress. The presented procedure enables us to avoid complicated and time-consuming analyses of elastic stability of crystals under tensile loading. The atomistic simulations of coupled shear and tensile deformations in cubic crystals are performed using first principles computational code based on pseudo-potentials and the plane wave basis set. Six fcc crystals are subjected to shear deformations in convenient slip systems and a special relaxation procedure controls the stress tensor. The obtained dependence of the ideal shear strength on the normal tensile stress seems to be almost linearly decreasing for all investigated crystals. Taking these results into account, the uniaxial tensile strength values in three crystallographic directions were evaluated by assuming a collapse of the weakest shear system. Calculated strengths for \\langle 001\\rangle and \\langle 111\\rangle loading were found to be mostly lower than previously calculated stresses related to tensile instability but rather close to those obtained by means of the shear instability analysis. On the other hand, the strengths for \\langle 110\\rangle loading almost match the stresses related to tensile instability.

  6. Type 1 diabetes: A predictable disease

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Kimber M; Michels, Aaron W

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by loss of insulin producing beta cells and reliance on exogenous insulin for survival. T1D is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood and the incidence is increasing, especially in children less than 5 years of age. In individuals with a genetic predisposition, an unidentified trigger initiates an abnormal immune response and the development of islet autoantibodies directed against proteins in insulin producing beta cells. There are currently four biochemical islet autoantibodies measured in the serum directed against insulin, glutamic decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, and zinc transporter 8. Development of islet autoantibodies occurs before clinical diagnosis of T1D, making T1D a predictable disease in an individual with 2 or more autoantibodies. Screening for islet autoantibodies is still predominantly done through research studies, but efforts are underway to screen the general population. The benefits of screening for islet autoantibodies include decreasing the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis that can be life threatening, initiating insulin therapy sooner in the disease process, and evaluating safe and specific therapies in large randomized clinical intervention trials to delay or prevent progression to diabetes onset. PMID:25897349

  7. Examination of the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 in endothelial responses to shear forces

    PubMed Central

    Baratchi, Sara; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Grace, Megan S.; Darby, William; Almazi, Juhura; Mitchell, Arnan; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress is the major mechanical force applied on vascular endothelial cells by blood flow, and is a crucial factor in normal vascular physiology and in the development of some vascular pathologies. The exact mechanisms of cellular mechano-transduction in mammalian cells and tissues have not yet been elucidated, but it is known that mechanically sensitive receptors and ion channels play a crucial role. This paper describes the use of a novel and efficient microfluidic device to study mechanically-sensitive receptors and ion channels in vitro, which has three independent channels from which recordings can be made and has a small surface area such that fewer cells are required than for conventional flow chambers. The contoured channels of the device enabled examination of a range of shear stresses in one field of view, which is not possible with parallel plate flow chambers and other previously used devices, where one level of flow-induced shear stress is produced per fixed flow-rate. We exposed bovine aortic endothelial cells to different levels of shear stress, and measured the resulting change in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) using the fluorescent calcium sensitive dye Fluo-4AM. Shear stress caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i that was proportional to the level of shear experienced. The response was temperature dependant such that at lower temperatures more shear stress was required to elicit a given level of calcium signal and the magnitude of influx was reduced. We demonstrated that shear stress-induced elevations in [Ca2+]i are largely due to calcium influx through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 ion channel. PMID:25379102

  8. Opening-mode fracture patterns and their shearing: an assessment of the state of knowledge and prediction capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.

    2012-12-01

    Two common opening-mode fracture patterns include those comprising one set (Figure 1a) and two orthogonal sets (Figure 1b). It is also possible to have three mutually orthogonal opening-mode fractures, but this situation is rare. The prediction of the orientation and dimensional attributes of these simple systems requires a basic knowledge of the medium in which they occur (lithology, bedding, shape and distribution of initial flaws, elastic modulus, subcritical index and other environmental conditions) and the driving stresses or strains responsible for their formation. The issues related to fracture patterns become more complex when initial patterns of predominantly opening-mode fractures were later subjected to shearing. Shearing of a single set of opening-mode fractures (Figure 1c) produces splay fractures whose orientations and lengths show a significant variation. Given the attributes of the initial set and the orientation and relative magnitudes of the new stress components responsible for the shearing, and the mechanical behavoir of the fractures, it is possible to constrain the splay geometry. It turns out that the natural progression of the system is such that the new splays are sheared in a sequential manner to form remarkably consistent fracture domain patterns, which may be called "apparent conjugate." Well-documented case studies, some of which will be used in this presentation as templates, indicate that these fracture domain patterns can be visualized, but mapping their variation (local orientation and geometry of the individual components) is not a trivial task and may require knowledge both of some of the parameters referred to above and of the stress distribution about larger regional structures such as folds and faults. The shearing of orthogonal arrays of opening-mode fractures produces splay fractures diagonal to both orthogonal sets (Figure 1d). New through-going shear fractures, again in apparent conjugate patterns, utilize both members of

  9. A shear lag analysis predicts the strong size effect on the persistence length of microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin

    2012-08-01

    As one essential component in cytoskeleton, the persistence length of a microtubule was reported to strongly depend on its contour length. To understand this intriguing size effect, here we develop a composite model for a microtubule with an adapted shear lag analysis. A characteristic length is identified, over which the persistence length of a microtubule monotonously increases with its contour length until it saturates, in consistency with the experimental data. This work clearly shows that shear lag between neighboring protofilaments due to the highly anisotropy leads to the strong size effect on the persistence lengths of microtubules.

  10. Impact of turbulence on the prediction of linear aeroacoustic interactions: Acoustic response of a turbulent shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikadi, Jannis; Föller, Stephan; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    A powerful model to predict aeroacoustic interactions in the linear regime is the perturbed compressible linearized Navier-Stokes equations. Thus far, the frequently employed derivation suggests that the effect of turbulence and its associated Reynolds stresses is neglected and a quasi-laminar model is employed. In this paper, dynamic perturbation equations are derived incorporating the effect of turbulence and its interaction with perturbation quantities. This is done by employing a triple decomposition of the instantaneous variables. The procedure results in a closure problem for the Reynolds stresses for which a linear eddy-viscosity model is proposed. The resulting perturbation equations are applied to a grazing flow in a T-joint for which strong shear layer instabilities at certain frequencies are experimentally observed. Passive scattering properties of the grazing flow are validated against the experiments performed by Karlsson and Åbom and perturbation equations being quasi-laminar. We find that prediction models must include the effect of Reynolds stresses to capture the aeroacoustic interaction effects correctly. Neglecting its effect naturally results in the over prediction of vortex growth at the frequencies of shear layer instability and therewith in an over prediction of aeroacoustic interactions.

  11. A study of the second and third order closure models of turbulence for prediction of separated shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The hybrid model of the Reynolds-stress turbulence closure is tested for the computation of the flows over a step and disk. Here it is attempted to improve the redistributive action of the turbulence energy among the Reynolds stresses. By evaluating the existing models for the pressure-strain correlation, better coefficients are obtained for the prediction of separating shear flows. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of the Reynolds stresses is reevaluated adopting several algebraic correlations for the triple-velocity products. The models of Cormack et al., Daly-Harlow, Hanjalic-Launder, and Shir were tested for the reattaching shear flows. It was generally observed that all these algebraic models give considerably low values of the triple-velocity products. This is attributed to the fact that none of the algebraic models can take the convective effect of the triple-velocity products into account in the separating shear flows, thus resulting in much lower diffusion rate than Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the evaluation of these quantities correction factors are introduced based on the comparison with some experimental data.

  12. Predicting wind shear effects: A study of Minnesota wind data collected at heights up to 70 meters

    SciTech Connect

    Artig, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Minnesota Department of Public Service (DPS) collects wind data at carefully selected sites around the state and analyzes the data to determine Minnesota`s wind power potential. DPS recently installed advanced new monitoring equipment at these sites and began to collect wind data at 30, 50, and 70 meters above ground level, with two anemometers at each level. Previously, the Department had not collected data at heights above ground level higher than 30 meters. DPS also, with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), installed four sophisticated monitoring sites as part of a Tall Tower Wind Shear Study that is assessing the effects of wind shear on wind power potential. At these sites, wind data are being collected at the 10, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 meter heights. This paper presents the preliminary results of the analysis of wind data from all sites. These preliminary results indicate that the traditional 1/7 power law does not effectively predict wind shear in Minnesota, and the result is an underestimation of Minnesota`s wind power potential at higher heights. Using a power factor of 1/5 or 1/4 may be more accurate and provide sound justification for installing wind turbines on taller towers in Minnesota.

  13. Explicit use of the Biot coefficient in predicting shear-wave velocity of water-saturated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the shear-wave (S-wave) velocity is important in seismic modelling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration and engineering applications. Under the low-frequency approximation, the classical Biot-Gassmann theory relates the Biot coefficient to the bulk modulus of water-saturated sediments. If the Biot coefficient under in situ conditions can be estimated, the shear modulus or the S-wave velocity can be calculated. The Biot coefficient derived from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity of water-saturated sediments often differs from and is less than that estimated from the S-wave velocity, owing to the interactions between the pore fluid and the grain contacts. By correcting the Biot coefficients derived from P-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments measured at various differential pressures, an accurate method of predicting S-wave velocities is proposed. Numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agreewell with measured velocities. ?? 2006 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  14. Prediction of free shear flows: A comparison of the performance of six turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launder, B. E.; Morse, A.; Rodi, W.; Spalding, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    The performance is evaluated of three distinct classes of turbulence model. These classes are: (1) Turbulent-viscosity models in which the length scale of turbulence is found by way of algebraic formulas, (2) turbulent-viscosity models in which the length scale of turbulence is found from a partial differential equation of transport, and (3) models in which the shear stress itself is the dependent variable of a partial differential conservation equation. Two models were examined in each class; thus, six different models were tested. A complete mathematical statement of these models is provided and a brief commentary on the models is included.

  15. Static compressive strength prediction of open-hole structure based on non-linear shear behavior and micro-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wangnan; Cai, Hongneng; Li, Chao

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the strength of the constituents of carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (CFRP), and a prediction of the static compressive strength of open-hole structure of polymer composites. The approach combined with non-linear analysis in macro-level and a linear elastic micromechanical failure analysis in microlevel (non-linear MMF) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy. A face-centered cubic micromechanics model is constructed to analyze the stresses in fiber and matrix in microlevel. Non-interactive failure criteria are proposed to characterize the strength of fiber and matrix. The non-linear shear behavior of the laminate is studied experimentally, and a novel approach of cubic spline interpolation is used to capture significant non-linear shear behavior of laminate. The user-defined material subroutine UMAT for the non-linear share behavior is developed and combined in the mechanics analysis in the macro-level using the Abaqus Python codes. The failure mechanism and static strength of open-hole compressive (OHC) structure of polymer composites is studied based on non-linear MMF. The UTS50/E51 CFRP is used to demonstrate the application of theory of non-linear MMF.

  16. Energy consumption in terms of shear stress for two types of membrane bioreactors used for municipal wastewater treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas; Bentzen, Thomas R.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Two types of submerged membrane bioreactors (MBR): hollow fiber (HF) and hollow sheet (HS), have been studied and compared in terms of energy consumption and average shear stress over the membrane wall. The analysis of energy consumption was made using the correlation to determine the blower power and the blower power demand per unit of permeate volume. Results showed that for the system geometries considered, in terms the of the blower power, the HF MBR requires less power compared to HS MBR. However, in terms of blower power per unit of permeate volume, the HS MBR requires less energy. The analysis of shear stress over the membrane surface was made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. Experimental measurements for the HF MBR were compared with the CFD model and an error less that 8% was obtained. For the HS MBR, experimental measurements of velocity profiles were made and an error of 11% was found. This work uses an empirical relationship to determine the shear stress based on the ratio of aeration blower power to tank volume. This relationship is used in bubble column reactors and it is extrapolate to determine shear stress on MBR systems. This relationship proved to be overestimated by 28% compared to experimental measurements and CFD results. Therefore, a corrective factor is included in the relationship in order to account for the membrane placed inside the bioreactor.

  17. Parameterization of sheared entrainment in a well-developed CBL. Part II: A simple model for predicting the growth rate of the CBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Sun, Jianning; Shen, Lidu

    2016-10-01

    Following the parameterization of sheared entrainment obtained in the companion paper, Liu et al. (2016), the present study aims to further investigate the characteristics of entrainment, and develop a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. The relative stratification, defined as the ratio of the stratification in the free atmosphere to that in the entrainment zone, is found to be a function of entrainment flux ratio ( A e). This leads to a simple expression of the entrainment rate, in which A e needs to be parameterized. According to the results in Liu et al. (2016), A e can be simply expressed as the ratio of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL to that in the shear-free CBL. The parameterization of the convective velocity scale in the sheared CBL is obtained by analytically solving the bulk model with several assumptions and approximations. Results indicate that the entrainment process is influenced by the dynamic effect, the interaction between mean shear and environmental stratification, and one other term that includes the Coriolis effect. These three parameterizations constitute a simple model for predicting the growth rate of a well-developed and sheared CBL. This model is validated by outputs of LESs, and the results show that it performs satisfactorily. Compared with bulk models, this model does not need to solve a set of equations for the CBL. It is more convenient to apply in numerical models.

  18. A grillage model for predicting wrinkles in annular graphene under circular shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Duan, W. H.; Wang, C. M.

    2013-01-07

    This paper is concerned with a Timoshenko grillage model for modeling the wrinkling phenomenon in annular graphene under circular shearing applied at its inner edge. By calibrating the grillage model results against the molecular mechanics (MM) results, the grillage model comprising beams of elliptical cross-section orientated along the carbon-carbon bond has section dimensions of 0.06 nm for the major axis length and 0.036 nm for the minor axis length. Moreover, the beams are connected to one another at 0.00212 nm from the geometric centric. This eccentric connection of beams allows the proposed grillage model to cater for the cross-couplings among bonds that produce the out-of-plane wrinkling pattern. The out-of-plane to in-plane bending stiffnesses' ratio is 0.36, and the cross bending stiffness provided by the ellipse eccentricity is 0.025 times that of the in-plane bending stiffness. Besides furnishing identical wave numbers as well as amplitudes and wavelengths that are in good agreement with MM results, the grillage model can capture wrinkling patterns with a boundary layer, whereas plate and membrane models could not mimic the boundary layer.

  19. Automatic Earthquake Shear Stress Measurement Method Developed for Accurate Time- Prediction Analysis of Forthcoming Major Earthquakes Along Shallow Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serata, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Serata Stressmeter has been developed to measure and monitor earthquake shear stress build-up along shallow active faults. The development work made in the past 25 years has established the Stressmeter as an automatic stress measurement system to study timing of forthcoming major earthquakes in support of the current earthquake prediction studies based on statistical analysis of seismological observations. In early 1982, a series of major Man-made earthquakes (magnitude 4.5-5.0) suddenly occurred in an area over deep underground potash mine in Saskatchewan, Canada. By measuring underground stress condition of the mine, the direct cause of the earthquake was disclosed. The cause was successfully eliminated by controlling the stress condition of the mine. The Japanese government was interested in this development and the Stressmeter was introduced to the Japanese government research program for earthquake stress studies. In Japan the Stressmeter was first utilized for direct measurement of the intrinsic lateral tectonic stress gradient G. The measurement, conducted at the Mt. Fuji Underground Research Center of the Japanese government, disclosed the constant natural gradients of maximum and minimum lateral stresses in an excellent agreement with the theoretical value, i.e., G = 0.25. All the conventional methods of overcoring, hydrofracturing and deformation, which were introduced to compete with the Serata method, failed demonstrating the fundamental difficulties of the conventional methods. The intrinsic lateral stress gradient determined by the Stressmeter for the Japanese government was found to be the same with all the other measurements made by the Stressmeter in Japan. The stress measurement results obtained by the major international stress measurement work in the Hot Dry Rock Projects conducted in USA, England and Germany are found to be in good agreement with the Stressmeter results obtained in Japan. Based on this broad agreement, a solid geomechanical

  20. On the predictive capabilities of the shear modified Gurson and the modified Mohr-Coulomb fracture models over a wide range of stress triaxialities and Lode angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunand, Matthieu; Mohr, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    The predictive capabilities of the shear-modified Gurson model [Nielsen and Tvergaard, Eng. Fract. Mech. 77, 2010] and the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture model [Bai and Wierzbicki, Int. J. Fract. 161, 2010] are evaluated. Both phenomenological fracture models are physics-inspired and take the effect of the first and third stress tensor invariants into account in predicting the onset of ductile fracture. The MMC model is based on the assumption that the initiation of fracture is determined by a critical stress state, while the shear-modified Gurson model assumes void growth as the governing mechanism. Fracture experiments on TRIP-assisted steel sheets covering a wide range of stress states (from shear to equibiaxial tension) are used to calibrate and validate these models. The model accuracy is quantified based on the predictions of the displacement to fracture for experiments which have not been used for calibration. It is found that the MMC model predictions agree well with all experiments (less than 4% error), while less accurate predictions are observed for the shear-modified Gurson model. A comparison of plots of the strain to fracture as a function of the stress triaxiality and the normalized third invariant reveals significant differences between the two models except within the vicinity of stress states that have been used for calibration.

  1. Prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force using principal component regression analysis in Brahman-influenced Venezuelan cattle.

    PubMed

    Jerez-Timaure, N; Huerta-Leidenz, N; Ortega, J; Rodas-González, A

    2013-03-01

    A database consisting of 331 beef animals (Brahman-crossbred) was used to determine the multivariate relationships between carcass and beef palatability traits of Venezuelan cattle and to develop prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The first three principal components (PC) explained 77.53% of the standardized variance. Equations were obtained for each sex class and the total variability observed in WBSF could be explained by its orthogonal regression with carcass weight (CW), fat cover (FC), fat thickness (FT), and skeletal maturity (SM). Prediction equations were: WBSF(steers)=3.566+0.003(CW)-0.033(FC)-0.015(FT)+0.0004(SM); WBSF(heifers)=4.824+0.002(CW)-0.229(FC)+0.096(FT)-0.064(SM); WBSF(bulls)=3.516+0.009(CW)+0.154(FC)-0.129(FT)-0.006(SM). A higher proportion of the variation was explained by the PC when variables of greater weight were selected to define each PC. The equation set presented herein could become an important tool to improve the Venezuelan carcass grading system. PMID:23261538

  2. Prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force using principal component regression analysis in Brahman-influenced Venezuelan cattle.

    PubMed

    Jerez-Timaure, N; Huerta-Leidenz, N; Ortega, J; Rodas-González, A

    2013-03-01

    A database consisting of 331 beef animals (Brahman-crossbred) was used to determine the multivariate relationships between carcass and beef palatability traits of Venezuelan cattle and to develop prediction equations for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The first three principal components (PC) explained 77.53% of the standardized variance. Equations were obtained for each sex class and the total variability observed in WBSF could be explained by its orthogonal regression with carcass weight (CW), fat cover (FC), fat thickness (FT), and skeletal maturity (SM). Prediction equations were: WBSF(steers)=3.566+0.003(CW)-0.033(FC)-0.015(FT)+0.0004(SM); WBSF(heifers)=4.824+0.002(CW)-0.229(FC)+0.096(FT)-0.064(SM); WBSF(bulls)=3.516+0.009(CW)+0.154(FC)-0.129(FT)-0.006(SM). A higher proportion of the variation was explained by the PC when variables of greater weight were selected to define each PC. The equation set presented herein could become an important tool to improve the Venezuelan carcass grading system.

  3. Use of weather types to disaggregate general circulation model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, L.E.; McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.; Ayers, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed that uses weather-type analysis as a tool to spatially disaggregate GCM predictions to make them useful for water resource studies. The method has been applied to the Delaware River basin to predict the effects of doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide on precipitation patterns in the region. An application of the technique to the Delaware River basin indicates that future climate conditions will show minimal changes in weather-type frequency, implying that air circulation patterns will remain unchanged -from Authors

  4. Predictive Effects of Online Peer Feedback Types on Performance Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the individual and combined predictive effects of two types of feedback (i.e., quantitative ratings and descriptive comments) in online peer-assessment learning systems on the quality of produced work. A total of 233 students participated in the study for six weeks. An online learning system that allows students to contribute…

  5. The shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Nimish; Chaman, Chandrakar; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Singh, Udai Pratap; Sharma, Apoorv

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength of MTA with three different types of adhesive systems- self-adhering flowable composite, etch and rinse adhesive system and self etch adhesive system. Methodology: MTA specimens (n = 60) were prepared using cylindrical acrylic blocks, having a central cavity with 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth. MTA was mixed and placed in the prepared cavity, and was covered with a moist cotton pellet and temporary filling material. The specimens were divided into 3 groups which were further divided into 2 sub-groups (45 Minutes and 24 hours). After the application of bonding agents composite resin was placed over the MTA surface. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength and readings were statically analyzed. Result: After 24 hrs the mean value of etch and rinse group was significantly higher than self etch and the self adhering composite groups. Among the 45 minutes groups there were no significant difference. Conclusion: In single visit after 45 minutes self adhering flowable can be used successfully as a final restorative material in place of conventional flowable composite without using any alternative adhesive system over MTA. PMID:27099417

  6. Do different facets of impulsivity predict different types of aggression?

    PubMed

    Derefinko, Karen; DeWall, C Nathan; Metze, Amanda V; Walsh, Erin C; Lynam, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relations between impulsivity-related traits (as assessed by the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale) and aggressive behaviors. Results indicated that UPPS-P Lack of Premeditation and Sensation Seeking were important in predicting general violence. In contrast, UPPS-P Urgency was most useful in predicting intimate partner violence. To further explore relations between intimate partner violence and Urgency, a measure of autonomic response to pleasant and aversive stimuli and facets of Neuroticism from the NEO PI-R were used as control variables. Autonomic responsivity was correlated with intimate partner violence at the zero-order level, and predicted significant variance in intimate partner violence in regression equations. However, UPPS-P Urgency was able to account for unique variance in intimate partner violence, above and beyond measures of Neuroticism and arousal. Implications regarding the use of a multifaceted conceptualization of impulsivity in the prediction of different types of violent behavior are discussed. PMID:21259270

  7. Prediction of Type II Burst Radiation for Large CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Type IIs are associated with shocks in the corona and solar wind, either driven by CMEs or else blast waves. Recent quantitative theories for type II radiation show that the amount of radiation depends on the speed and spatial extent of the 3D shock, as well as on the background plasma, magnetic field configuration, and the number of superthermal electrons available for acceleration by the shock. In principle, then, Type II bursts may provide 1-3 day warnings of large and fast CMEs that might produce space weather at Earth. In this paper we couple the advanced 3D MHD BATS-R-US code of Toth, Gombosi, and colleagues with our new ``bolt-on'' theory for type II emission. The modeling includes initialization with coronal and active region magnetic fields reconstructed from solar magnetograms, coronal densities determined by 1 AU data, and CMEs modelled using STEREO coronagraph data. Two events with type IIs and strong CMEs are analyzed: 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for both type II bursts. This strongly supports the type II theory, implies real understanding of the physics involved, and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  8. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  9. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-01

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  10. A predictive model for biomimetic plate type broadband frequency sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Riaz U.; Banerjee, Sourav

    2016-04-01

    In this work, predictive model for a bio-inspired broadband frequency sensor is developed. Broadband frequency sensing is essential in many domains of science and technology. One great example of such sensor is human cochlea, where it senses a frequency band of 20 Hz to 20 KHz. Developing broadband sensor adopting the physics of human cochlea has found tremendous interest in recent years. Although few experimental studies have been reported, a true predictive model to design such sensors is missing. A predictive model is utmost necessary for accurate design of selective broadband sensors that are capable of sensing very selective band of frequencies. Hence, in this study, we proposed a novel predictive model for the cochlea-inspired broadband sensor, aiming to select the frequency band and model parameters predictively. Tapered plate geometry is considered mimicking the real shape of the basilar membrane in the human cochlea. The predictive model is intended to develop flexible enough that can be employed in a wide variety of scientific domains. To do that, the predictive model is developed in such a way that, it can not only handle homogeneous but also any functionally graded model parameters. Additionally, the predictive model is capable of managing various types of boundary conditions. It has been found that, using the homogeneous model parameters, it is possible to sense a specific frequency band from a specific portion (B) of the model length (L). It is also possible to alter the attributes of `B' using functionally graded model parameters, which confirms the predictive frequency selection ability of the developed model.

  11. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mütze, Annekathrin Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  12. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  13. Risk Prediction for Early CKD in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peggy; Lee, Shun Fu; Heinze, Georg; Clase, Catherine M.; Tobe, Sheldon; Teo, Koon K.; Gerstein, Hertzel; Mann, Johannes F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Quantitative data for prediction of incidence and progression of early CKD are scarce in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, two risk prediction models were developed for incidence and progression of CKD after 5.5 years and the relative effect of predictors were ascertained. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Baseline and prospective follow-up data of two randomized clinical trials, ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) and Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN), were used as development and independent validation cohorts, respectively. Individuals aged ≥55 years with type 2 diabetes and normo- or microalbuminuria at baseline were included. Incidence or progression of CKD after 5.5 years was defined as new micro- or macroalbuminuria, doubling of creatinine, or ESRD. The competing risk of death was considered as an additional outcome state in the multinomial logistic models. Results Of the 6766 ONTARGET participants with diabetes, 1079 (15.9%) experienced incidence or progression of CKD, and 1032 (15.3%) died. The well calibrated, parsimonious laboratory prediction model incorporating only baseline albuminuria, eGFR, sex, and age exhibited an externally validated c-statistic of 0.68 and an R2 value of 10.6%. Albuminuria, modeled to depict the difference between baseline urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and the threshold for micro- or macroalbuminuria, was mostly responsible for the predictive performance. Inclusion of clinical predictors, such as glucose control, diabetes duration, number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs, previous vascular events, or vascular comorbidities, increased the externally validated c-statistic and R2 value only to 0.69 and 12.1%, respectively. Explained variation was largely driven by renal and not clinical predictors. Conclusions Albuminuria and eGFR were the most important factors to predict onset and

  14. Heavy-tailed prediction error: a difficulty in predicting biomedical signals of 1/f noise type.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Biao

    2012-01-01

    A fractal signal x(t) in biomedical engineering may be characterized by 1/f noise, that is, the power spectrum density (PSD) divergences at f = 0. According the Taqqu's law, 1/f noise has the properties of long-range dependence and heavy-tailed probability density function (PDF). The contribution of this paper is to exhibit that the prediction error of a biomedical signal of 1/f noise type is long-range dependent (LRD). Thus, it is heavy-tailed and of 1/f noise. Consequently, the variance of the prediction error is usually large or may not exist, making predicting biomedical signals of 1/f noise type difficult. PMID:23251226

  15. Prediction of Zeolite Framework Types by a Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujiang; Lach-Hab, Mohammed; Vaisman, Iosif; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2009-03-01

    Zeolites are microporous crystalline materials with highly regular framework structures consisting of molecular-sized pores and channels. Characteristic framework types of zeolites are traditionally determined by the combined information of coordination sequences and vertex symbols. Here we present a machine learning model for classifying zeolite crystals according to their framework types. An eighteen-dimensional feature vector is defined including topological descriptors and physical/chemical properties of zeolite crystals [Microporous and Mesoporous Materials 117, 339 (2009)]. Trained with crystallographic data of known zeolites, the new model can predict the framework types of unknown zeolite crystals with up to 98 % accuracy. Compared with conventional methods, the machine learning model is more robust handling crystal disorder and/or crystal defects in a more effective manner. This model can be adapted for classifying and clustering other crystalline species.

  16. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  17. Increased Inlet Blood Flow Velocity Predicts Low Wall Shear Stress in the Cephalic Arch of Patients with Brachiocephalic Fistula Access

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Watson, Sydeaka; Funaki, Brian; Doshi, Taral; Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Hines, Jane; Coe, Fredric

    2016-01-01

    Background An autogenous arteriovenous fistula is the optimal vascular access for hemodialysis. In the case of brachiocephalic fistula, cephalic arch stenosis commonly develops leading to access failure. We have hypothesized that a contribution to fistula failure is low wall shear stress resulting from post-fistula creation hemodynamic changes that occur in the cephalic arch. Methods Twenty-two subjects with advanced renal failure had brachiocephalic fistulae placed. The following procedures were performed at mapping (pre-operative) and at fistula maturation (8–32 weeks post-operative): venogram, Doppler to measure venous blood flow velocity, and whole blood viscosity. Geometric and computational modeling was performed to determine wall shear stress and other geometric parameters. The relationship between hemodynamic parameters and clinical findings was examined using univariate analysis and linear regression. Results The percent low wall shear stress was linearly related to the increase in blood flow velocity (p < 0.01). This relationship was more significant in non-diabetic patients (p < 0.01) than diabetic patients. The change in global measures of arch curvature and asymmetry also evolve with time to maturation (p < 0.05). Conclusions The curvature and hemodynamic changes during fistula maturation increase the percentage of low wall shear stress regions within the cephalic arch. Low wall shear stress may contribute to subsequent neointimal hyperplasia and resultant cephalic arch stenosis. If this hypothesis remains tenable with further studies, ways of protecting the arch through control of blood flow velocity may need to be developed. PMID:27074019

  18. Ultrawide-Band Resonators Using Shear Horizontal-Type Plate Wave and Their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, Michio; Ogami, Takashi; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2013-07-01

    Currently, mobile or smart phones with multibands and a cognitive radio system require a tunable filter with a wide tunable range to simplify their circuits. An ultrawide-band resonator is an important device to realize the tunable filter. The relative bandwidths (BWs) of 12 to 17% of previously reported surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are not sufficient to realize the tunable filter. This time, the authors studied an SH0 mode plate wave in a LiNbO3 plate. As a result, plate wave resonators with a large electro-mechanical coupling factor (k2) of 0.55 (55%), an ultrawide bandwidth of 29%, a high Q of 700, and a large impedance ratio of 98 dB between resonance (fr) and anti-resonance (fa) frequencies were realized for the first time using 27.5-30°YX-LiNbO3 plates. Applying these resonators to a ladder-type tunable filter, a wide tunable range of 19% was obtained.

  19. An approximate semi-analytical method for prediction of interlaminar shear stresses in an arbitrarily laminated thick plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, Reaz A.; Seide, Paul

    1987-01-01

    An approximate semianalytical method for determination of interlaminar shear stress distribution through the thickness of an arbitrarily laminated thick plate has been presented. The method is based on the assumptions of transverse inextensibility and layerwise constant shear angle theory (LCST) and utilizes an assumed quadratic displacement potential energy based finite element method (FEM). Centroid of the triangular surface has been proved from a rigorous mathematical point of view (Aubin-Nitsche theory), to be the point of exceptional accuracy for the interlaminar shear stresses. Numerical results indicate close agreement with the available three-dimensional elasticity theory solutions. A comparison between the present theory and that due to an assumed stress hybrid FEM suggest that the (normal) traction-free-edge condition is not satisfied in the latter approach. Furthermore, the present paper is the first to present the results for interlaminar shear stresses in a two-layer thick square plate of balanced unsymmetric angle-ply construction. A comparison with the recently proposed Equilibrium Method (EM) indicates the superiority of the present method, because the latter assures faster convergence as well as simultaneous vanishing of the transverse shear stresses on both of the exposed surfaces of the laminate. Superiority of the present method over the EM, in the case of a symmetric laminate, is limited to faster convergence alone. It has also been demonstrated that the combination of the present method and the reduced (quadratic order) numerical integration scheme yields convergence of the interlaminar shear stresses almost as rapidly as that of the nodal displacements, in the case of a thin plate.

  20. Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca's, Wernicke's, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients' aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine - SVM) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. PMID:26465238

  1. Application of a soft computing technique in predicting the percentage of shear force carried by walls in a rectangular channel with non-homogeneous roughness.

    PubMed

    Khozani, Zohreh Sheikh; Bonakdari, Hossein; Zaji, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Two new soft computing models, namely genetic programming (GP) and genetic artificial algorithm (GAA) neural network (a combination of modified genetic algorithm and artificial neural network methods) were developed in order to predict the percentage of shear force in a rectangular channel with non-homogeneous roughness. The ability of these methods to estimate the percentage of shear force was investigated. Moreover, the independent parameters' effectiveness in predicting the percentage of shear force was determined using sensitivity analysis. According to the results, the GP model demonstrated superior performance to the GAA model. A comparison was also made between the GP program determined as the best model and five equations obtained in prior research. The GP model with the lowest error values (root mean square error ((RMSE) of 0.0515) had the best function compared with the other equations presented for rough and smooth channels as well as smooth ducts. The equation proposed for rectangular channels with rough boundaries (RMSE of 0.0642) outperformed the prior equations for smooth boundaries. PMID:26744942

  2. Application of a soft computing technique in predicting the percentage of shear force carried by walls in a rectangular channel with non-homogeneous roughness.

    PubMed

    Khozani, Zohreh Sheikh; Bonakdari, Hossein; Zaji, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Two new soft computing models, namely genetic programming (GP) and genetic artificial algorithm (GAA) neural network (a combination of modified genetic algorithm and artificial neural network methods) were developed in order to predict the percentage of shear force in a rectangular channel with non-homogeneous roughness. The ability of these methods to estimate the percentage of shear force was investigated. Moreover, the independent parameters' effectiveness in predicting the percentage of shear force was determined using sensitivity analysis. According to the results, the GP model demonstrated superior performance to the GAA model. A comparison was also made between the GP program determined as the best model and five equations obtained in prior research. The GP model with the lowest error values (root mean square error ((RMSE) of 0.0515) had the best function compared with the other equations presented for rough and smooth channels as well as smooth ducts. The equation proposed for rectangular channels with rough boundaries (RMSE of 0.0642) outperformed the prior equations for smooth boundaries.

  3. Single-molecule binding of CD44 to fibrin versus P-selectin predicts their distinct shear-dependent interactions in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Phrabha S.; Alves, Christina S.; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    P-selectin and fibrin(ogen) have pivotal roles in the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. CD44 variant isoforms, CD44v, have been identified as the major functional P-selectin ligands and fibrin receptors on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. The molecular recognition of CD44v by fibrin mediates firm adhesion at low shear, whereas CD44v–P-selectin binding supports transient rolling interactions at elevated shear stresses and low site densities of P-selectin. We used single-molecule force spectroscopy to provide a molecular interpretation for these two distinct adhesion events. The CD44v–P-selectin bond has a longer unstressed equilibrium lifetime, a lower reactive compliance and a higher tensile strength relative to the CD44v–fibrin bond. These intrinsic differences confer the ability to the CD44v–P-selectin pair to mediate binding at higher shear stresses. Increasing the duration of receptor–ligand contact (2–200 milliseconds) did not affect the micromechanical properties of the CD44v–P-selectin bond, but it increased the tensile strength and the depth of the free energy barrier of the CD44v–fibrin bond and decreased its reactive compliance. This bond strengthening at longer interaction times might explain why CD44v binding to immobilized fibrin occurs at low shear. Single-molecule characterization of receptor–ligand binding can predict the shear-dependent adhesive interactions between cells and substrates observed both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21558419

  4. The Origin of Olivine B-Type Fabric in Naturally Deformed Peridotite: Insight from the Ronda Large-Scale Mantle Shear Zone (spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Précigout, J.; Hirth, G.

    2011-12-01

    Strain-induced olivine Lattice Preferred Orientation (LPO) mostly controls the propagation of seismic waves in the mantle. Hence, it strongly affects the imaging of mantle structures through analyzing of elastic waves coming from deep earthquakes (Ismaïl and Mainprice, 1998). Understanding the relationships between mantle deformation and olivine LPO is thus crucial to objectively interpret the deep mantle structures. Here, based on detailed documentation of olivine LPOs in the Ronda peridotite (southern Spain), we provide evidences of flow-normal a-axis LPO, i.e., B-type fabric, within a kilometer-scale ductile shear zone. This fabric occurs upon entering the shear zone and describes a progressive transition from A-type fabric (parallel-flow a-axis LPO) to B-type fabric. While B-type fabrics have been described from several localities, to our knowledge this is the first olivine fabric transition ever observed in naturally deformed peridotites. Furthermore, while the olivine fabric strength (Jindex) increases in the A-type fabric domain towards the center of the shear zone, the Jindex progressively decreases in the B-type fabric domain. Based on deformation experiments, A-type fabric occurs during high-temperature/low-stress deformation of anhydrous olivine aggregates (Jung and Karato, 2001). In contrast, the B-type fabrics have been observed under a wide range of conditions: 1) at high-temperature/low stress conditions in the presence of melt (Kohlstedt and Holtzman, 2009); 2) at high-stress in the presence of water (Jung and Karato, 2001); 3) under dry conditions at very high pressure (> 3 GPa; Jung et al., 2009); and 4) during diffusion-creep in the presence of orthopyroxene (Sundberg and Cooper, 2008). In our natural example, we conclude that the B-type fabric arises from enhancing diffusion creep at the expense of dislocation creep, because: 1) the B-type fabric is observed to overprint the typical fabric of anhydrous peridotite (A-type), 2) the Ronda

  5. Flight in low-level wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of studies of wind shear hazard to aircraft operation are summarized. Existing wind shear profiles currently used in computer and flight simulator studies are reviewed. The governing equations of motion for an aircraft are derived incorporating the variable wind effects. Quantitative discussions of the effects of wind shear on aircraft performance are presented. These are followed by a review of mathematical solutions to both the linear and nonlinear forms of the governing equations. Solutions with and without control laws are presented. The application of detailed analysis to develop warning and detection systems based on Doppler radar measuring wind speed along the flight path is given. A number of flight path deterioration parameters are defined and evaluated. Comparison of computer-predicted flight paths with those measured in a manned flight simulator is made. Some proposed airborne and ground-based wind shear hazard warning and detection systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of systems are discussed.

  6. Computational prediction shines light on type III secretion origins

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Tatyana; Rost, Burkhard; Bromberg, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion system is a key bacterial symbiosis and pathogenicity mechanism responsible for a variety of infectious diseases, ranging from food-borne illnesses to the bubonic plague. In many Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system transports effector proteins into host cells, converting resources to bacterial advantage. Here we introduce a computational method that identifies type III effectors by combining homology-based inference with de novo predictions, reaching up to 3-fold higher performance than existing tools. Our work reveals that signals for recognition and transport of effectors are distributed over the entire protein sequence instead of being confined to the N-terminus, as was previously thought. Our scan of hundreds of prokaryotic genomes identified previously unknown effectors, suggesting that type III secretion may have evolved prior to the archaea/bacteria split. Crucially, our method performs well for short sequence fragments, facilitating evaluation of microbial communities and rapid identification of bacterial pathogenicity – no genome assembly required. pEffect and its data sets are available at http://services.bromberglab.org/peffect. PMID:27713481

  7. Enhanced computational prediction of polyethylene wear in hip joints by incorporating cross-shear and contact pressure in additional to load and sliding distance: effect of head diameter.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lu; Galvin, Alison L; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2009-05-11

    A new definition of the experimental wear factor was established and reported as a function of cross-shear motion and contact pressure using a multi-directional pin-on-plate wear testing machine for conventional polyethylene in the present study. An independent computational wear model was developed by incorporating the cross-shear motion and contact pressure-dependent wear factor into the Archard's law, in additional to load and sliding distance. The computational prediction of wear volume was directly compared with a simulator testing of a polyethylene hip joint with a 28 mm diameter. The effect of increasing the femoral head size was subsequently considered and was shown to increase wear, as a result of increased sliding distance and reduced contact pressure. PMID:19261286

  8. A- to B-Type Olivine Fabric Transitions Associated with Hydration, Dehydration and Shear Above the Farallon Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, W. M.; Smith, D.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate mantle rocks associated with hydration, dehydration and shear above the Farallon flat-slab at its contact with the base of North America. The rocks we focus on are ultramafic inclusions hosted within serpentinized ultramafic microbreccia diatremes of the Navajo Volcanic Field (New Mexico) that erupted to the surface at the waning stages of the Laramide orogeny. A large number of petrological and geochronological studies have pinpointed the origin of these rocks to the hydrated mantle wedge above the Farallon slab as well as tectonically eroded and entrained fragments of the plate interface. We combine petrological observations and EBSD measurements of olivine grainsize and LPO to examine the effects of hydration on olivine fabric development in different parts of the supra-subduction zone mantle. The rocks examined include weakly deformed to strongly foliated tectonites we interpret to represent partially hydrated fragments of the upper plate mantle; and mylonites and ultramylonites we interpret to represent deformed fragments of the plate interface. The rocks deformed at temperatures ranging from 500-900°C based on thermometry, and olivine compositions in some record heating just before incorporation in the diatreme mix. We observe the following: Tectonites exhibit A-type bulk olivine LPOs, but show transitions to B-type LPO in local, fine-grained, dynamically recrystallized regions associated with hydrous minerals. Mylonites and ultramylonites with stable chlorite and/or antigorite and recrystallized grainsizes of less than 10μm show strong B-type olivine LPOs. A single mylonite with recrystallized grainsizes of ~35μm shows evidence for prograde metamorphism and dehydration through the chlorite breakdown reaction at temperatures above ~770°C. It contains no hydrous minerals and shows a strong A-type olivine LPO. Together these rocks demonstrate a strong correlation between hydration under high stress conditions, and B-type olivine LPO

  9. Analysis of orthotropic plates with nonlinear shear characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Raouf, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents an analytical study of the response of orthotropic plates with nonlinear shear characteristics to transverse loading. The shear stress-shear strain relationship is based on experimental results available in the literature. It is nonlinear and of the polynomial type. The symbolic manipulator Mathematics is used to implement a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure to derive a set of approximate nonlinear algebraic equations of equilibrium for the plate under a uniformly distributed load. The equations of equilibrium show that the nonlinearity introduces a coupling between the in-plane displacements and the transverse displacement. The studied case shows that the nonlinearity has a hardening effect on the transverse displacements but a softening effect on the in-plane displacements. Moreover, the studied case shows that the linear solution underestimates the magnitude of shear stress. The nonlinear solution indicates that the in-plane shear stress predicted by the nonlinear analysis is higher than those predicted by the linear theory.

  10. Replicability and 40-Year Predictive Power of Childhood ARC Types

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Goldberg, Lewis R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined three questions surrounding the Undercontrolled, Overcontrolled, and Resilient--or Asendorpf-Robins-Caspi (ARC)--personality types originally identified by Block (1971). In analyses of the teacher personality assessments of over 2,000 children in 1st through 6th grade in 1959-1967, and follow-up data on general and cardiovascular health outcomes in over 1,100 adults recontacted 40 years later, we found: (1) Bootstrapped internal replication clustering suggested that Big Five scores were best characterized by a tripartite cluster structure corresponding to the ARC types; (2) this cluster structure was fuzzy, rather than discrete, indicating that ARC constructs are best represented as gradients of similarity to three prototype Big Five profiles; and (3) ARC types and degrees of ARC prototypicality showed associations with multiple health outcomes 40 years later. ARC constructs were more parsimonious, but neither better nor more consistent predictors than the dimensional Big Five traits. Forty-year incident cases of heart disease could be correctly identified with 68% accuracy by personality information alone, a figure approaching the 12-year accuracy of a leading medical cardiovascular risk model. Findings support the theoretical validity of ARC constructs, their treatment as continua of prototypicality rather than discrete categories, and the need for further understanding the robust predictive power of childhood personality traits for mid-life health. PMID:21744975

  11. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto, Waluyo

    2015-04-01

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone's spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  12. Predicting the liquefaction phenomena from shear velocity profiling: Empirical approach to 6.3 Mw, May 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hartantyo, Eddy; Brotopuspito, Kirbani S.; Sismanto; Waluyo

    2015-04-24

    The liquefactions phenomena have been reported after a shocking 6.5Mw earthquake hit Yogyakarta province in the morning at 27 May 2006. Several researchers have reported the damage, casualties, and soil failure due to the quake, including the mapping and analyzing the liquefaction phenomena. Most of them based on SPT test. The study try to draw the liquefaction susceptibility by means the shear velocity profiling using modified Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW). This paper is a preliminary report by using only several measured MASW points. The study built 8-channel seismic data logger with 4.5 Hz geophones for this purpose. Several different offsets used to record the high and low frequencies of surface waves. The phase-velocity diagrams were stacked in the frequency domain rather than in time domain, for a clearer and easier dispersion curve picking. All codes are implementing in Matlab. From these procedures, shear velocity profiling was collected beneath each geophone’s spread. By mapping the minimum depth of shallow water table, calculating PGA with soil classification, using empirical formula for saturated soil weight from shear velocity profile, and calculating CRR and CSR at every depth, the liquefaction characteristic can be identify in every layer. From several acquired data, a liquefiable potential at some depth below water table was obtained.

  13. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  14. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors. PMID:27598004

  15. Laboratory Investigation on Shear Behavior of Rock Joints and a New Peak Shear Strength Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Jiang, Qinghui; Chen, Na; Wei, Wei; Feng, Xixia

    2016-09-01

    In this study, shear tests on artificial rock joints with different roughness were conducted under five normal stress levels. Test results showed that the shear strength of rock joints had a positive correlation with roughness and the applied normal stress. Observation of joint specimens after shear tests indicated that asperity damage was mainly located in the steep areas facing the shear direction. The damaged joint surfaces tend to be rough, which implies that tensile failure plays an important role in shear behavior. As a result of the anisotropic characteristic of joint roughness, two quantitative 2D roughness parameters, i.e., the revised root-mean-square of asperity angle tan-1( Z 2r) and the maximum contact coefficient C m, were proposed considering the shear direction. The proposed roughness parameters can capture the difference of roughness in forward and reverse directions along a single joint profile. The normalized tensile strength and the proposed roughness parameters were used to perform a rational derivation of peak dilatancy angle. A negative exponential-type function was found to be appropriate to model the peak dilatancy angle. Using the new model of peak dilatancy angle, we obtained a new criterion for peak shear strength of rock joints. The good agreement between test results and predicted results by the new criterion indicated that the proposed criterion is capable of estimating the peak shear strength of rock joints. Comparisons between the new criterion and published models from available literature revealed that the proposed criterion has a good accuracy for predicting the peak shear strength of joints investigated in this study.

  16. LOADS: a computer program for determining the shear, bending moment and axial loads for fuselage type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    LOADS determines rigid body vehicle shears, bending moments and axial loads on a space vehicle due to aerodynamic loads and propellant inertial loads. An example hand calculation is presented and was used to check LOADS. A brief description of the program and the equations used are presented. LOADS is operational on the Univac 1110, occupies 10505 core and typically takes less than one(1) second of CAU time to execute.

  17. Prediction of fracture healing under axial loading, shear loading and bending is possible using distortional and dilatational strains as determining mechanical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Niemeyer, Frank; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models of secondary fracture healing are based on mechanoregulatory algorithms that use distortional strain alone or in combination with either dilatational strain or fluid velocity as determining stimuli for tissue differentiation and development. Comparison of these algorithms has previously suggested that healing processes under torsional rotational loading can only be properly simulated by considering fluid velocity and deviatoric strain as the regulatory stimuli. We hypothesize that sufficient calibration on uncertain input parameters will enhance our existing model, which uses distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, to properly simulate fracture healing under various loading conditions including also torsional rotation. Therefore, we minimized the difference between numerically simulated and experimentally measured courses of interfragmentary movements of two axial compressive cases and two shear load cases (torsional and translational) by varying several input parameter values within their predefined bounds. The calibrated model was then qualitatively evaluated on the ability to predict physiological changes of spatial and temporal tissue distributions, based on respective in vivo data. Finally, we corroborated the model on five additional axial compressive and one asymmetrical bending load case. We conclude that our model, using distortional and dilatational strains as determining stimuli, is able to simulate fracture-healing processes not only under axial compression and torsional rotation but also under translational shear and asymmetrical bending loading conditions. PMID:23825112

  18. gamma-Turn types prediction in proteins using the support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jahandideh, Samad; Sarvestani, Amir Sabet; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Jahandideh, Mina; Barfeie, Mahdyar

    2007-12-21

    Recently, two different models have been developed for predicting gamma-turns in proteins by Kaur and Raghava [2002. An evaluation of beta-turn prediction methods. Bioinformatics 18, 1508-1514; 2003. A neural-network based method for prediction of gamma-turns in proteins from multiple sequence alignment. Protein Sci. 12, 923-929]. However, the major limitation of previous methods is inability in predicting gamma-turns types. Thus, there is a need to predict gamma-turn types using an approach which will be useful in overall tertiary structure prediction. In this work, support vector machines (SVMs), a powerful model is proposed for predicting gamma-turn types in proteins. The high rates of prediction accuracy showed that the formation of gamma-turn types is evidently correlated with the sequence of tripeptides, and hence can be approximately predicted based on the sequence information of the tripeptides alone. PMID:17936305

  19. Prediction and prevention of type 1 diabetes: update on success of prediction and struggles at prevention.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron; Zhang, Li; Khadra, Anmar; Kushner, Jake A; Redondo, Maria J; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the archetypal example of a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by selective destruction of pancreatic β cells. The pathogenic equation for T1DM presents a complex interrelation of genetic and environmental factors, most of which have yet to be identified. On the basis of observed familial aggregation of T1DM, it is certain that there is a decided heritable genetic susceptibility for developing T1DM. The well-known association of T1DM with certain human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was a major step toward understanding the role of inheritance in T1DM. Type 1 diabetes is a polygenic disease with a small number of genes having large effects (e.g., HLA) and a large number of genes having small effects. Risk of T1DM progression is conferred by specific HLA DR/DQ alleles [e.g., DRB1*03-DQB1*0201 (DR3/DQ2) or DRB1*04-DQB1*0302 (DR4/DQ8)]. In addition, the HLA allele DQB1*0602 is associated with dominant protection from T1DM in multiple populations. A concordance rate lower than 100% between monozygotic twins indicates a potential involvement of environmental factors on disease development. The detection of at least two islet autoantibodies in the blood is virtually pre-diagnostic for T1DM. The majority of children who carry these biomarkers, regardless of whether they have an a priori family history of the disease, will develop insulin-requiring diabetes. Facilitating pre-diagnosis is the timing of seroconversion which is most pronounced in the first 2 yr of life. Unfortunately the significant progress in improving prediction of T1DM has not yet been paralleled by safe and efficacious intervention strategies aimed at preventing the disease. Herein we summarize the chequered history of prediction and prevention of T1DM, describing successes and failures alike, and thereafter examine future trends in the exciting, partially explored field of T1DM prevention.

  20. Predicting Student Academic Performance in an Engineering Dynamics Course: A Comparison of Four Types of Predictive Mathematical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shaobo; Fang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Predicting student academic performance has long been an important research topic in many academic disciplines. The present study is the first study that develops and compares four types of mathematical models to predict student academic performance in engineering dynamics--a high-enrollment, high-impact, and core course that many engineering…

  1. A Leonard-Sanders-Budiansky-Koiter-Type Nonlinear Shell Theory with a Hierarchy of Transverse-Shearing Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed exposition on a refined nonlinear shell theory suitable for nonlinear buckling analyses of laminated-composite shell structures is presented. This shell theory includes the classical nonlinear shell theory attributed to Leonard, Sanders, Koiter, and Budiansky as an explicit proper subset. This approach is used in order to leverage the exisiting experience base and to make the theory attractive to industry. In addition, the formalism of general tensors is avoided in order to expose the details needed to fully understand and use the theory. The shell theory is based on "small" strains and "moderate" rotations, and no shell-thinness approximations are used. As a result, the strain-displacement relations are exact within the presumptions of "small" strains and "moderate" rotations. The effects of transverse-shearing deformations are included in the theory by using analyst-defined functions to describe the through-the-thickness distributions of transverse-shearing strains. Constitutive equations for laminated-composite shells are derived without using any shell-thinness approximations, and simplified forms and special cases are presented.

  2. Representation of Vegetation and Other Nonerodible Elements in Aeolian Shear Stress Partitioning Models for Predicting Transport Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, William G.; Gillies, John A.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of nonerodible elements is well understood to be a reducing factor for soil erosion by wind, but the limits of its protection of the surface and erosion threshold prediction are complicated by the varying geometry, spatial organization, and density of the elements. The predictive capabilities of the most recent models for estimating wind driven particle fluxes are reduced because of the poor representation of the effectiveness of vegetation to reduce wind erosion. Two approaches have been taken to account for roughness effects on sediment transport thresholds. Marticorena and Bergametti (1995) in their dust emission model parameterize the effect of roughness on threshold with the assumption that there is a relationship between roughness density and the aerodynamic roughness length of a surface. Raupach et al. (1993) offer a different approach based on physical modeling of wake development behind individual roughness elements and the partition of the surface stress and the total stress over a roughened surface. A comparison between the models shows the partitioning approach to be a good framework to explain the effect of roughness on entrainment of sediment by wind. Both models provided very good agreement for wind tunnel experiments using solid objects on a nonerodible surface. However, the Marticorena and Bergametti (1995) approach displays a scaling dependency when the difference between the roughness length of the surface and the overall roughness length is too great, while the Raupach et al. (1993) model's predictions perform better owing to the incorporation of the roughness geometry and the alterations to the flow they can cause.

  3. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  4. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. PMID:25934322

  5. Predicted Unusual Magnetoresponse in Type-II Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Shengyuan A.

    2016-08-01

    We show several distinct signatures in the magnetoresponse of type-II Weyl semimetals. The energy tilt tends to squeeze the Landau levels (LLs), and, for a type-II Weyl node, there always exists a critical angle between the B field and the tilt, at which the LL spectrum collapses, regardless of the field strength. Before the collapse, signatures also appear in the magneto-optical spectrum, including the invariable presence of intraband peaks, the absence of absorption tails, and the special anisotropic field dependence.

  6. Predicted Unusual Magnetoresponse in Type-II Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Ming; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Shengyuan A

    2016-08-12

    We show several distinct signatures in the magnetoresponse of type-II Weyl semimetals. The energy tilt tends to squeeze the Landau levels (LLs), and, for a type-II Weyl node, there always exists a critical angle between the B field and the tilt, at which the LL spectrum collapses, regardless of the field strength. Before the collapse, signatures also appear in the magneto-optical spectrum, including the invariable presence of intraband peaks, the absence of absorption tails, and the special anisotropic field dependence. PMID:27563994

  7. Slide rule-type color chart predicts reproduced photo tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Slide rule-type color chart determines the final reproduced gray tones in the production of briefing charts that are photographed in black and white. The chart shows both the color by drafting paint manufacturers name and mixture number, and the gray tone resulting from black and white photographic reproduction.

  8. Using Word Prediction Software to Increase Typing Fluency with Students with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumlin, Jennifer; Heller, Kathryn Wolff

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of word prediction software to increase typing speed and decrease spelling errors for students who have physical disabilities that affect hand use. Student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of word prediction was examined as well as their typing rates and spelling accuracy. Four students with…

  9. Efron-type measures of prediction error for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerds, Thomas A; Schumacher, Martin

    2007-12-01

    Estimates of the prediction error play an important role in the development of statistical methods and models, and in their applications. We adapt the resampling tools of Efron and Tibshirani (1997, Journal of the American Statistical Association92, 548-560) to survival analysis with right-censored event times. We find that flexible rules, like artificial neural nets, classification and regression trees, or regression splines can be assessed, and compared to less flexible rules in the same data where they are developed. The methods are illustrated with data from a breast cancer trial.

  10. A refined nonlinear theory of plates with transverse shear deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    A higher-order shear deformation theory of plates accounting for the von Karman strains is presented. The theory contains the same dependent unknowns as in the Hencky-Mindlin type first-order shear deformation theory and accounts for parabolic distribution of the transverse shear strains through the thickness of the plate. Exact solutions of simply supported plates are obtained using the linear theory and the results are compared with the exact solutions of three-dimensional elasticity theory, the first order shear deformation theory, and the classical plate theory. The present theory predicts the deflections, stresses, and frequencies more accurately when compared to the first-order theory and the classical plate theory.

  11. Holographic lateral shear interferometer.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Mallick, S

    1976-11-01

    A new type of lateral shear holographic interferometer is described. It can be used to test lenses as well as spherical and aspherical surfaces. A null pattern with straight fringes can be obtained for an aspherical surface, provided one has a prototype that can be used for making the hologram.

  12. NOXclass: prediction of protein-protein interaction types

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Domingues, Francisco S; Sommer, lngolf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background Structural models determined by X-ray crystallography play a central role in understanding protein-protein interactions at the molecular level. Interpretation of these models requires the distinction between non-specific crystal packing contacts and biologically relevant interactions. This has been investigated previously and classification approaches have been proposed. However, less attention has been devoted to distinguishing different types of biological interactions. These interactions are classified as obligate and non-obligate according to the effect of the complex formation on the stability of the protomers. So far no automatic classification methods for distinguishing obligate, non-obligate and crystal packing interactions have been made available. Results Six interface properties have been investigated on a dataset of 243 protein interactions. The six properties have been combined using a support vector machine algorithm, resulting in NOXclass, a classifier for distinguishing obligate, non-obligate and crystal packing interactions. We achieve an accuracy of 91.8% for the classification of these three types of interactions using a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Conclusion NOXclass allows the interpretation and analysis of protein quaternary structures. In particular, it generates testable hypotheses regarding the nature of protein-protein interactions, when experimental results are not available. We expect this server will benefit the users of protein structural models, as well as protein crystallographers and NMR spectroscopists. A web server based on the method and the datasets used in this study are available at . PMID:16423290

  13. Novel Diabetes Autoantibodies and Prediction of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies are currently the most robust biomarkers of type 1 diabetes and are frequently used to establish entry criteria for the participation of genetically at-risk individuals in secondary prevention/intervention clinical trials. Since their original description almost 40 years ago, considerable efforts have been devoted toward identifying the precise molecular targets that are recognized. Such information can have significant benefit for developing improved metrics for identifying/stratifying of at-risk subjects, developing potential therapeutic targets, and advancing understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Currently, four major molecular targets ([pro]insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8) have been confirmed, with approximately 94% of all subjects with a clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes expressing autoantibodies to at least one of these molecules at clinical onset. In this review, we summarize some of the salient properties of these targets that might contribute to their autoantigenicity and methods that have been used in attempts to identify new components of the humoral autoresponse. PMID:23900975

  14. Mineralization stages of the unique shear zone-hosted "Felsit-type" Sn-polymetallic mineralization in the eastern Erzgebirge, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Járóka, Tom; Seifert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The polymetallic cassiterite-bearing mineralization of the "Felsit-type" is located in the NW of the Freiberg mining district within the Großschirma area. The mineralization is hosted by metamorphic rocks of the Preßnitzer Group unit that form the most northeastern part of the Erzgebirge metamorphic core complex. This geological unit is in the Großschirma area predominantly composed of two-mica gneisses and mica schists, whereas intercalations of muscovite-gneiss ("red gneiss"), amphibolites and metacarbonates occur less commonly. These metamorphic rocks were deformed by several NE-SW striking fault zones. The hydrothermal Sn-bearing fluids migrated within shear zones that developed primarily at the contact between different lithotypes. The shear zones are characterized by strong pervasive metasomatic alterations which were triggered by small chlorite-cassiterite-quartz-sulfide-veins. The rock-forming minerals are strongly corroded and displaced by the ore and gangue minerals within the shear zones. The bulk geochemistry of selected drill core samples feature grades up to 0.28 wt. % Sn, 0.15 wt. % Cu, 300 ppm Pb, 140 ppm Zn, 1.1 wt. % F, 250 ppm Li, 820 ppm Rb, 90 ppm Cs, and 130 ppm W. Microscopic and geochemical studies of the samples show that the Sn-polymetallic mineralization of the "Felsit-type" can be distinguished into three different mineralization stages. The first one is dominated by chlorite and quartz. Cassiterite probably appears in two generations with different grain shapes: acicular (< 1 - 100 µm) and isometric cassiterite (< 10 - 650 µm). Smaller amounts of fluorite, rutile, apatite, and scheelite are also associated with the first stage. The second mineralization stage is dominated by pyrite which is the most abundant ore mineral of this paragenesis, while marcasite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, bismuthinite, and magnetite appear only subordinately. The third stage is dominated by carbonates that are often

  15. Application of a model of plastic porous materials including void shape effects to the prediction of ductile failure under shear-dominated loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Léo; Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-09-01

    An extension of Gurson's famous model (Gurson, 1977) of porous plastic solids, incorporating void shape effects, has recently been proposed by Madou and Leblond (Madou and Leblond, 2012a, 2012b, 2013; Madou et al., 2013). In this extension the voids are no longer modelled as spherical but ellipsoidal with three different axes, and changes of the magnitude and orientation of these axes are accounted for. The aim of this paper is to show that the new model is able to predict softening due essentially to such changes, in the absence of significant void growth. This is done in two steps. First, a numerical implementation of the model is proposed and incorporated into the SYSTUS® and ABAQUS® finite element programmes (through some freely available UMAT (Leblond, 2015) in the second case). Second, the implementation in SYSTUS® is used to simulate previous "numerical experiments" of Tvergaard and coworkers (Tvergaard, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2015a; Dahl et al., 2012; Nielsen et al., 2012) involving the shear loading of elementary porous cells, where softening due to changes of the void shape and orientation was very apparent. It is found that with a simple, heuristic modelling of the phenomenon of mesoscopic strain localization, the model is indeed able to reproduce the results of these numerical experiments, in contrast to Gurson's model disregarding void shape effects.

  16. DNA methylation status predicts cell type-specific enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Wiench, Malgorzata; John, Sam; Baek, Songjoon; Johnson, Thomas A; Sung, Myong-Hee; Escobar, Thelma; Simmons, Catherine A; Pearce, Kenneth H; Biddie, Simon C; Sabo, Pete J; Thurman, Robert E; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hager, Gordon L

    2011-01-01

    Cell-selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding to distal regulatory elements is associated with cell type-specific regions of locally accessible chromatin. These regions can either pre-exist in chromatin (pre-programmed) or be induced by the receptor (de novo). Mechanisms that create and maintain these sites are not well understood. We observe a global enrichment of CpG density for pre-programmed elements, and implicate their demethylated state in the maintenance of open chromatin in a tissue-specific manner. In contrast, sites that are actively opened by GR (de novo) are characterized by low CpG density, and form a unique class of enhancers devoid of suppressive effect of agglomerated methyl-cytosines. Furthermore, treatment with glucocorticoids induces rapid changes in methylation levels at selected CpGs within de novo sites. Finally, we identify GR-binding elements with CpGs at critical positions, and show that methylation can affect GR–DNA interactions in vitro. The findings present a unique link between tissue-specific chromatin accessibility, DNA methylation and transcription factor binding and show that DNA methylation can be an integral component of gene regulation by nuclear receptors. PMID:21701563

  17. Recycling and utilisation of industrial solid waste: an explorative study on gold deposit tailings of ductile shear zone type in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Huang, Fei; Du, Runxiang; Zhao, Chunming; Li, Yongli; Yu, Haoran

    2015-06-01

    Tailings are solid waste arising from mineral processing. This type of waste can cause severe damage to the environment during stockpiling as a result of the leaching of something harmful into the ecosystem. Gold deposit of ductile shear zone type is an important type of gold deposit, and the recycling of its tailings has been challenging researchers for a long time. In this article, the characteristics of this type of tailings were systematically studied by using modern technical means. Considering the characteristics of the tailings, clay was selected to make up for the shortcomings of the tailings and improve their performance. Water and raw materials were mixed to produce green bodies, which are subsequently sintered into ceramic bodies at 980 °C~1020 °C (sintering temperature). The results showed that some new kinds of mineral phases, such as mullite, anorthite and orthoclase, appear in ceramic bodies. Furthermore, the ceramic bodies have a surface hardness of 5 to 6 (Mohs scale), and their water absorption and modulus of rupture can meet some technical requirements of ceramic materials described in ISO 13006-2012 and GB 5001-1985. These gold mine tailings can be made into ceramic tiles, domestic ceramic bodies, and other kinds of ceramic bodies for commercial and industrial purposes after further improvements.

  18. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  19. Prediction of β-turn types in protein by using composite vector.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobo; Hu, Xiuzhen; Li, Shaobo; Liu, Xingxing

    2011-10-01

    Protein secondary structure prediction is an intermediate step in the overall process of tertiary structure prediction. β-turns are important components of the secondary structure of a protein. Development of an accurate method of prediction of β-turn types would be helpful for predicting the overall tertiary structure of proteins. In this work, we constructed a database of 2805 protein chains. Our work improved the previous input parameters and used the support vector machine algorithm to predict the β-turn types; we obtained the overall prediction accuracy of 98.1%, 96.0%, 96.1%, 98.7%, 99.1%, 86.8%, 99.2% and 73.2% with the Matthews Correlation Coefficient values of 0.398, 0.460, 0.043, 0.463, 0.355, 0.172, 0.109 and 0.247, respectively, for types I, II, VIII, I', II', IV, VI and non-β-turn, respectively. In addition, we also used same method to predict the β-turn types in three databases of 426, 547 and 823 protein chains and found that our prediction results were better than other predictions.

  20. Predicting The Type Of Pregnancy Using Flexible Discriminate Analysis And Artificial Neural Networks: A Comparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hooman, A.; Mohammadzadeh, M

    2008-01-30

    Some medical and epidemiological surveys have been designed to predict a nominal response variable with several levels. With regard to the type of pregnancy there are four possible states: wanted, unwanted by wife, unwanted by husband and unwanted by couple. In this paper, we have predicted the type of pregnancy, as well as the factors influencing it using three different models and comparing them. Regarding the type of pregnancy with several levels, we developed a multinomial logistic regression, a neural network and a flexible discrimination based on the data and compared their results using tow statistical indices: Surface under curve (ROC) and kappa coefficient. Based on these tow indices, flexible discrimination proved to be a better fit for prediction on data in comparison to other methods. When the relations among variables are complex, one can use flexible discrimination instead of multinomial logistic regression and neural network to predict the nominal response variables with several levels in order to gain more accurate predictions.

  1. Are quartz LPOs predictably oriented with respect to the shear zone boundary?: A test from the Alpine Fault mylonites, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Prior, David J.; Toy, Virginia G.

    2016-03-01

    The Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has a known slip kinematics. Within ˜1 km of the fault, the mylonitic foliation is subparallel to the boundary of the amphibolite-facies ductile shear zone in which it formed. Using EBSD, we analyzed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations [LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the Alpine Fault. All LPOs feature a strongest girdle of [c]-axes that is forward-inclined ˜28 ± 4° away from the pole to the fault. A maximum of axes is inclined at the same angle relative the fault. The [c]-axis girdle is perpendicular to extensional (C') shear bands and the maximum is parallel to their slip direction. [c]-axis girdles do not form perpendicular to the SZB. Schmid factor analysis suggests that σ1 was arranged at 60-80° to the Alpine Fault. These observations indicate ductile transpression in the shear zone. The inclined arrangement of [c]-axis girdles, axes, and C' planes relative to the fault can be explained by their alignment relative to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate in a general shear zone, a significant new insight regarding shear zones and how LPO fabrics may generally develop within them. For the Alpine mylonite zone, our data imply a kinematic vorticity number (Wk) of ˜0.7 to ˜0.85. Inversions of seismic focal mechanisms in the brittle crust of the Southern Alps indicate that σ1 is oriented ˜60° to the Alpine Fault; that shear bands form at ˜30° to this direction, and that σ2 and σ3 flip positions between the brittle and ductile parts of the crust.

  2. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  3. Shear modulus estimation with vibrating needle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Insana, Michael

    2010-06-01

    An ultrasonic shear wave imaging technique is being developed for estimating the complex shear modulus of biphasic hydropolymers including soft biological tissues. A needle placed in the medium is vibrated along its axis to generate harmonic shear waves. Doppler pulses synchronously track particle motion to estimate shear wave propagation speed. Velocity estimation is improved by implementing a k-lag phase estimator. Fitting shear-wave speed estimates to the predicted dispersion relation curves obtained from two rheological models, we estimate the elastic and viscous components of the complex shear modulus. The dispersion equation estimated using the standard linear solid-body (Zener) model is compared with that from the Kelvin-Voigt model to estimate moduli in gelatin gels in the 50 to 450 Hz shear wave frequency bandwidth. Both models give comparable estimates that agree with independent shear rheometer measurements obtained at lower strain rates. PMID:20529711

  4. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J.; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. Results: There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range. PMID:27195231

  5. A multi-label classifier for prediction membrane protein functional types in animal.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-Liang

    2014-11-01

    Membrane protein is an important composition of cell membrane. Given a membrane protein sequence, how can we identify its type(s) is very important because the type keeps a close correlation with its functions. According to previous studies, membrane protein can be divided into the following eight types: single-pass type I, single-pass type II, single-pass type III, single-pass type IV, multipass, lipid-anchor, GPI-anchor, peripheral membrane protein. With the avalanche of newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic age, it is urgent to develop an automatic and effective computational method to rapid and reliable prediction of the types of membrane proteins. At present, most of the existing methods were based on the assumption that one membrane protein only belongs to one type. Actually, a membrane protein may simultaneously exist at two or more different functional types. In this study, a new method by hybridizing the pseudo amino acid composition with multi-label algorithm called LIFT (multi-label learning with label-specific features) was proposed to predict the functional types both singleplex and multiplex animal membrane proteins. Experimental result on a stringent benchmark dataset of membrane proteins by jackknife test show that the absolute-true obtained was 0.6342, indicating that our approach is quite promising. It may become a useful high-through tool, or at least play a complementary role to the existing predictors in identifying functional types of membrane proteins.

  6. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vinod Babu; Ramachandran, S; Indira, R; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of bonded amalgam helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim: Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods: Four chemical cure glass ionomers are used: GC Fuji I, GC Fuji II, GC Fuji III and GC Fuji VII, and are compared with unbonded amalgam. The push-out bond strength was tested using the Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that the use of glass ionomer to bond amalgam resulted in an increase in the bond strength of amalgam. The Type VII glass ionomer showed the highest bond strength in comparison with the other glass ionomers. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer bonds to amalgam and shows a beneficial increase in the bond strength of the restoration in comparison with unbonded amalgam. PMID:22144798

  7. Epstein-Barr virus latency type and spontaneous reactivation predict lytic induction levels.

    PubMed

    Phan, An T; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Keck, Kristin M; Miranda, Jj L

    2016-05-20

    The human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) evades the immune system by entering a transcriptionally latent phase in B cells. EBV in tumor cells expresses distinct patterns of genes referred to as latency types. Viruses in tumor cells also display varying levels of lytic transcription resulting from spontaneous reactivation out of latency. We measured this dynamic range of lytic transcription with RNA deep sequencing and observed no correlation with EBV latency types among genetically different viruses, but type I cell lines reveal more spontaneous reactivation than isogenic type III cultures. We further determined that latency type and spontaneous reactivation levels predict the relative amount of induced reactivation generated by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs. Our work has potential implications for personalizing medicine against EBV-transformed malignancies. Identifying latency type or measuring spontaneous reactivation may provide predictive power in treatment contexts where viral production should be either avoided or coerced. PMID:27091426

  8. Instability Analysis and Free Volume Simulations of Shear Band Directions and Arrangements in Notched Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predicts the onset of strain localization and the free-volume-based finite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. A mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state. PMID:27721462

  9. Instability Analysis and Free Volume Simulations of Shear Band Directions and Arrangements in Notched Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-10-01

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predicts the onset of strain localization and the free-volume-based finite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. A mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state.

  10. Dynamics of a deformable active particle under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Menzel, Andreas M; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-09-14

    The motion of a deformable active particle in linear shear flow is explored theoretically. Based on symmetry considerations, we propose coupled nonlinear dynamical equations for the particle position, velocity, deformation, and rotation. In our model, both, passive rotations induced by the shear flow as well as active spinning motions, are taken into account. Our equations reduce to known models in the two limits of vanishing shear flow and vanishing particle deformability. For varied shear rate and particle propulsion speed, we solve the equations numerically in two spatial dimensions and obtain a manifold of different dynamical modes including active straight motion, periodic motions, motions on undulated cycloids, winding motions, as well as quasi-periodic and chaotic motions induced at high shear rates. The types of motion are distinguished by different characteristics in the real-space trajectories and in the dynamical behavior of the particle orientation and its deformation. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on self-propelled droplets exposed to a linear shear flow.

  11. How do the strength and type of ENSO affect SST predictability in coupled models

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Soo-Jin; Tam, Chi-Yung; Jeong, Hye-In

    2016-01-01

    The effects of amplitude and type of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on sea surface temperature (SST) predictability on a global scale were investigated, by examining historical climate forecasts for the period 1982–2006 from air-sea coupled seasonal prediction systems. Unlike in previous studies, SST predictability was evaluated in different phases of ENSO and for episodes with various strengths. Our results reveal that the seasonal mean Niño 3.4 index is well predicted in a multi-model ensemble (MME), even for four-month lead predictions. However, coupled models have particularly low skill in predicting the global SST pattern during weak ENSO events. During weak El Niño events, which are also El Niño Modoki in this period, a number of models fail to reproduce the associated tri-pole SST pattern over the tropical Pacific. During weak La Niña periods, SST signals in the MME tend to be less persistent than observations. Therefore, a good ENSO forecast does not guarantee a good SST prediction from a global perspective. The strength and type of ENSO need to be considered when inferring global SST and other climate impacts from model-predicted ENSO information. PMID:27650415

  12. How do the strength and type of ENSO affect SST predictability in coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Soo-Jin; Tam, Chi-Yung; Jeong, Hye-In

    2016-09-01

    The effects of amplitude and type of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on sea surface temperature (SST) predictability on a global scale were investigated, by examining historical climate forecasts for the period 1982–2006 from air-sea coupled seasonal prediction systems. Unlike in previous studies, SST predictability was evaluated in different phases of ENSO and for episodes with various strengths. Our results reveal that the seasonal mean Niño 3.4 index is well predicted in a multi-model ensemble (MME), even for four-month lead predictions. However, coupled models have particularly low skill in predicting the global SST pattern during weak ENSO events. During weak El Niño events, which are also El Niño Modoki in this period, a number of models fail to reproduce the associated tri-pole SST pattern over the tropical Pacific. During weak La Niña periods, SST signals in the MME tend to be less persistent than observations. Therefore, a good ENSO forecast does not guarantee a good SST prediction from a global perspective. The strength and type of ENSO need to be considered when inferring global SST and other climate impacts from model-predicted ENSO information.

  13. How do the strength and type of ENSO affect SST predictability in coupled models.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Soo-Jin; Tam, Chi-Yung; Jeong, Hye-In

    2016-01-01

    The effects of amplitude and type of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on sea surface temperature (SST) predictability on a global scale were investigated, by examining historical climate forecasts for the period 1982-2006 from air-sea coupled seasonal prediction systems. Unlike in previous studies, SST predictability was evaluated in different phases of ENSO and for episodes with various strengths. Our results reveal that the seasonal mean Niño 3.4 index is well predicted in a multi-model ensemble (MME), even for four-month lead predictions. However, coupled models have particularly low skill in predicting the global SST pattern during weak ENSO events. During weak El Niño events, which are also El Niño Modoki in this period, a number of models fail to reproduce the associated tri-pole SST pattern over the tropical Pacific. During weak La Niña periods, SST signals in the MME tend to be less persistent than observations. Therefore, a good ENSO forecast does not guarantee a good SST prediction from a global perspective. The strength and type of ENSO need to be considered when inferring global SST and other climate impacts from model-predicted ENSO information. PMID:27650415

  14. Prediction of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses using statistical model of protein "sequence space".

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Hai, Yabing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Nanfang; Yao, Yuhua; He, Pingan; Dai, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Discrimination of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses plays an important role in the diagnosis and remedy of cervical cancer. Recently, several computational methods have been proposed based on protein sequence-based and structure-based information, but the information of their related proteins has not been used until now. In this paper, we proposed using protein "sequence space" to explore this information and used it to predict high-risk types of HPVs. The proposed method was tested on 68 samples with known HPV types and 4 samples without HPV types and further compared with the available approaches. The results show that the proposed method achieved the best performance among all the evaluated methods with accuracy 95.59% and F1-score 90.91%, which indicates that protein "sequence space" could potentially be used to improve prediction of high-risk types of HPVs.

  15. Interdecadal change of interannual variability and predictability of two types of ENSO using a MME method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H. I.; Ahn, J. B.; Lee, J. Y.; Alessandri, A.; Hendon, H.

    2014-12-01

    A significant interdecadal climate shift of interannual variability and predictability of two types of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), namely the canonical or eastern Pacific (EP)-type and Modoki or central Pacific (CP) type, are investigated. Using the retrospective forecasts of six-state-of-the-art coupled models and their multi-model ensemble (MME) for December-January-February during the period of 1972-2005 along with corresponding observed and reanalyzed data, we examine the climate regime shift that occurred in the winter of 1988/1989 and how the shift affected interannual variability and predictability of two types of ENSO for the two periods of 1972-1988 (hereafter PRE) and 1989-2005 (hereafter POST). The result first shows substantial interdecadal changes of observed sea surface temperature (SST) in mean state and variability over the western and central Pacific attributable to the significant warming trend in the POST period. In the POST period, the SST variability increased (decreased) significantly over the western (eastern) Pacific. The MME realistically reproduces the observed interdecadal changes with 1- and 4-month forecast lead time. It is found that the CP-type ENSO was more prominent and predictable during the POST than the PRE period while there was no apparent difference in the variability and predictability of the EP-type ENSO between two periods. Note that the second empirical orthogonal function mode of the Pacific SST during the POST period represents the CP-type ENSO but that during the PRE period captures the ENSO transition phase. The MME better predicts the former than the latter. We also investigate distinctive regional impacts associated with the two types of ENSO during the two periods.

  16. Interdecadal change of interannual variability and predictability of two types of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hye-In; Ahn, Joong-Bae; Lee, June-Yi; Alessandri, Andrea; Hendon, Harry H.

    2015-02-01

    A significant interdecadal climate shift of interannual variability and predictability of two types of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), namely the canonical or eastern Pacific (EP)-type and Modoki or central Pacific (CP) type, are investigated. Using the retrospective forecasts of six-state-of-the-art coupled models and their multi-model ensemble (MME) for December-January-February during the period of 1972-2005 along with corresponding observed and reanalyzed data, we examine the climate regime shift that occurred in the winter of 1988/1989 and how the shift affected interannual variability and predictability of two types of ENSO for the two periods of 1972-1988 (hereafter PRE) and 1989-2005 (hereafter POST). The result first shows substantial interdecadal changes of observed sea surface temperature (SST) in mean state and variability over the western and central Pacific attributable to the significant warming trend in the POST period. In the POST period, the SST variability increased (decreased) significantly over the western (eastern) Pacific. The MME realistically reproduces the observed interdecadal changes with 1- and 4-month forecast lead time. It is found that the CP-type ENSO was more prominent and predictable during the POST than the PRE period while there was no apparent difference in the variability and predictability of the EP-type ENSO between two periods. Note that the second empirical orthogonal function mode of the Pacific SST during the POST period represents the CP-type ENSO but that during the PRE period captures the ENSO transition phase. The MME better predicts the former than the latter. We also investigate distinctive regional impacts associated with the two types of ENSO during the two periods.

  17. Matrix production and collagen structure are enhanced in two types of osteogenic progenitor cells by a simple fluid shear stress stimulus.

    PubMed

    Delaine-Smith, R M; MacNeil, S; Reilly, G C

    2012-08-03

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells play a vital role in bone regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies. To be clinically useful osteoprogenitors should be readily available with the potential to form bone matrix. While mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow have shown promise for tissue engineering, they are obtained in small numbers and there is risk of donor site morbidity. Osteogenic progenitor cells derived from dermal tissue may provide a more abundant and easily expandable source of cells. Bone turnover in vivo is regulated by mechanical forces, particularly oscillatory fluid shear stresses (FSS), and in vitro osteogenic progenitors have been shown to be regulated by mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to assess what effect osteogenic media and FSS, generated by a simple rocking platform, had on cell behaviour and matrix production in human progenitor dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and the embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (hES-MP). Osteogenic media stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and calcium deposition in HDFs. The addition of FSS further enhanced ALP activity and mineralised matrix deposition in both progenitor cells cultured in osteogenic media. Both types of progenitor cell subjected to FSS showed increases in collagen secretion and apparent collagen organisation as imaged by second harmonic generation.

  18. A model for shear-band formation and high-explosive initiation in a hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes work in progress to develop a shear band model for MESA-2D. The object of this work is (1) to predict the formation of shear bands and their temperature in high explosive (HE) during a MESA-2D calculation, (2) to then assess whether the HE would initiate, and (3) to allow a detonation wave initiated from a shear band to propagate. This requires developing a model that uses average cell data to estimate the size and temperature of narrow region (generally much narrower than the cell size) that is undergoing shear within the cell. The shear band temperature (rather than the average cell temperature) can be used to calculate the flow stress of the material in the cell or to calculate heat generation from reactive materials. Modifications have been made to MESA-2D to calculate shear band size and temperature, and to initiate HE detonation when conditions warrant. Two models have been used for shear-band size and temperature calculation, one based on an independent estimate of the shear band width and a second based on the temperature distribution around the shear band. Both models have been tested for calculations in which shear band formation occurs in steel. A comparison of the measured and calculated local temperature rise in a shear band has been made. A model for estimating the time to initiation of the HE based on the type of HE and the temperature distribution in a shear band has also been added to MESA-2D. Calculations of conditions needed to initiate HE in projectile-impact tests have been done and compared with experimental data. Further work is d to test the model.

  19. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R.; Owens, Cullen B.; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the ‘anticipatory’ period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  20. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Broersen, Robin; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R; Owens, Cullen B; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the 'anticipatory' period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  1. Tensile-shear correlations obtained from shear punch test technique using a modified experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, V.; Visweswaran, P.; Vijayraghavan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Shear punch testing has been a very useful technique for evaluating mechanical properties of irradiated alloys using a very small volume of material. The load-displacement data is influenced by the compliance of the fixture components. This paper describes a modified experimental approach where the compliances of the punch and die components are eliminated. The analysis of the load-displacement data using the modified setup for various alloys like low carbon steel, SS316, modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo indicate that the shear yield strength evaluated at 0.2% offset of normalized displacement relates to the tensile YS as per the Von Mises yield relation ( σys = 1.73 τys). A universal correlation of type UTS = mτmax where m is a function of strain hardening exponent, is seen to be obeyed for all the materials in this study. The use of analytical models developed for blanking process are explored for evaluating strain hardening exponent from the load-displacement data. This study is directed towards rationalizing the tensile-shear empirical correlations for a more reliable prediction of tensile properties from shear punch tests.

  2. Apparatus for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Metz, III, Curtis F.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type comprising an array of fuel pins disposed within an outer metal shell or shroud. A spent fuel assembly is first compacted in a known manner and then incrementally sheared using fixed and movable shear blades having matched laterally projecting teeth which slidably intermesh to provide the desired shearing action. Incremental advancement of the fuel assembly after each shear cycle is limited to a distance corresponding to the lateral projection of the teeth to ensure fuel assembly breakup into small uniform segments which are amenable to remote chemical processing.

  3. Experimental validation of acoustic radiation force induced shear wave interference patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Hah, Zaegyoo; Hazard, Chris; Parker, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    A novel elasticity imaging system founded on the use of acoustic radiation forces from a dual beam arrangement to generate shear wave interference patterns is described. Acquired pulse-echo data and correlation-based techniques were used to estimate the resultant deformation and to visualize tissue viscoelastic response. The use of normal versus axicon focal configurations was investigated for effects on shear wave generation. Theoretical models were introduced and shown in simulation to accurately predict shear wave propagation and interference pattern properties. In a tissue-mimicking phantom, experimental results are in congruence with theoretical predictions. Using dynamic acoustic radiation force excitation, results confirm that shear wave interference patterns can be produced remotely in a particular tissue region of interest (ROI). Overall, preliminary results are encouraging and the system described may prove feasible for interrogating the viscoelastic properties of normal and diseased tissue types.

  4. Collective school-type identity: predicting students' motivation beyond academic self-concept.

    PubMed

    Knigge, Michel; Hannover, Bettina

    2011-06-01

    In Germany, according to their prior achievement students are tracked into different types of secondary school that provide profoundly different options for their future educational careers. In this paper we suggest that as a result, school tracks clearly differ in their social status or reputation. This should translate into different collective school-type identities for their students, irrespective of the students' personal academic self-concepts. We examine the extent to which collective school-type identity systematically varies as a function of the school track students are enrolled in, and the extent to which students' collective school-type identity makes a unique contribution beyond academic self-concept and school track in predicting scholastic motivation. In two cross-sectional studies a measure of collective school-type identity is established and applied to explain motivational differences between two school tracks in Berlin. In Study 1 (N = 39 students) the content of the collective school-type identity is explored by means of an open format questionnaire. Based on these findings a structured instrument (semantic differential) to measure collective school-type identity is developed. In Study 2 (N = 1278 students) the assumed structure with four subscales (Stereotype Achievement, Stereotype Motivation, Stereotype Social, and Compensation) is proved with confirmatory factor analysis. This measure is used to compare the collective school-type identity across school tracks and predict motivational outcomes. Results show large differences in collective school-type identity between students of different school tracks. Furthermore, these differences can explain motivational differences between school tracks. Collective school-type identity has incremental predictive power for scholastic motivation, over and above the effects of academic self-concept and school track.

  5. Prediction of turn types in protein structure by machine-learning classifiers.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Michael; Koch, Oliver; Klebe, Gerhard; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-02-01

    We present machine learning approaches for turn prediction from the amino acid sequence. Different turn classes and types were considered based on a novel turn classification scheme. We trained an unsupervised (self-organizing map) and two kernel-based classifiers, namely the support vector machine and a probabilistic neural network. Turn versus non-turn classification was carried out for turn families containing intramolecular hydrogen bonds and three to six residues. Support vector machine classifiers yielded a Matthews correlation coefficient (mcc) of approximately 0.6 and a prediction accuracy of 80%. Probabilistic neural networks were developed for beta-turn type prediction. The method was able to distinguish between five types of beta-turns yielding mcc > 0.5 and at least 80% overall accuracy. We conclude that the proposed new turn classification is distinct and well-defined, and machine learning classifiers are suited for sequence-based turn prediction. Their potential for sequence-based prediction of turn structures is discussed.

  6. Dominant simple-shear deformation during peak metamorphism for the lower portion of the Greater Himalayan Sequence in West Nepal: New implications for hybrid channel flow-type mechanisms in the Dolpo region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassi, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    I conducted new vorticity and deformation temperatures studies to test competing models of the exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks exposed in the Dolpo region (West Nepal). My results indicate that the Main Central Thrust is located ∼5 km structurally below the previous mapped locations. Deformation temperature increasing up structural section from ∼450 °C to ∼650 °C and overlap with peak metamorphic temperature indicating that penetrative shearing was responsible for the exhumation of the GHS occurred at "close" to peak metamorphic conditions. I interpreted the telescoping and the inversion of the paleo-isotherms at the base of the GHS as produced mainly by a sub-simple shearing (Wm = 0.88-1) pervasively distributed through the lower portion of the GHS. My results are consistent with hybrid channel flow-type models where the boundary between lower and upper portions of the GHS, broadly corresponding to the tectonometamorphic discontinuity recently documented in west Nepal, represents the limit between buried material, affected by dominant simple shearing, and exhumed material affected by a general flow dominates by pure shearing. This interpretation is consistent with the recent models suggesting the simultaneous operation of channel flow- and critical wedge-type processes at different structural depth.

  7. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  8. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D Score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  9. Types of Parent Verbal Responsiveness that Predict Language in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Andrea; Yoder, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined short-term predictive associations between 5 different types of parent verbal responsiveness and later spoken vocabulary for 32 young children with a confirmed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: Parent verbal utterances were coded from videotapes of naturalistic parent-child play sessions using…

  10. Does Self-Determination Predict the School Engagement of Four Different Motivation Types in Adolescence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raufelder, Diana; Regner, Nicola; Drury, Kate; Eid, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance our understanding of inter-individual differences in scholastic motivation, this study examined if self-determination predicts the school engagement of four different motivation types (MT) in a large sample of adolescent students (N = 1088) from Brandenburg, Germany: (1) peer-dependent MT, (2) teacher-dependent MT, (3)…

  11. Nucleosynthesis Predictions for Intermediate-Mass AGB Stars: Comparison to Observations of Type I Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; vanRaai, Mark A.; Lugaro, Maria; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    2008-01-01

    Type I planetary nebulae (PNe) have high He/H and N/O ratios and are thought to be descendants of stars with initial masses of approx. 3-8 Stellar Mass. These characteristics indicate that the progenitor stars experienced proton-capture nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope, in addition to the slow neutron capture process operating in the He-shell (the s-process). We compare the predicted abundances of elements up to Sr from models of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to measured abundances in Type I PNe. In particular, we compare predictions and observations for the light trans-iron elements Se and Kr, in order to constrain convective mixing and the s-process in these stars. A partial mixing zone is included in selected models to explore the effect of a C-13 pocket on the s-process yields. The solar-metallicity models produce enrichments of [(Se, Kr)/Fe] less than or approx. 0.6, consistent with Galactic Type I PNe where the observed enhancements are typically less than or approx. 0.3 dex, while lower metallicity models predict larger enrichments of C, N, Se, and Kr. O destruction occurs in the most massive models but it is not efficient enough to account for the greater than or approx. 0.3 dex O depletions observed in some Type I PNe. It is not possible to reach firm conclusions regarding the neutron source operating in massive AGB stars from Se and Kr abundances in Type I PNe; abundances for more s-process elements may help to distinguish between the two neutron sources. We predict that only the most massive (M grester than or approx.5 Stellar Mass) models would evolve into Type I PNe, indicating that extra-mixing processes are active in lower-mass stars (3-4 Stellar Mass), if these stars are to evolve into Type I PNe.

  12. Prediction of Type II Radio Bursts Associated with Large CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Iver; Schmidt, Joachim

    Type II radio bursts are associated with shocks in the corona and solar wind, either driven by CMEs or else by blast waves. Recently we coupled the advanced 3D MHD BATS-R-US code of Toth, Gombosi, and colleagues with our kinetic ``bolt-on'' theory for type II emission. Initialising the simulation code with event specific coronal and CME data, the combined code can be used to predict the dynamic spectrum of type II emission for a specific radio event. We demonstrate very good agreement with Wind spacecraft observations for three type II bursts, one on 15 February 2011 and two on 7 March 2012 (associated with successive CMEs from different sides of the same active region). The intensities, frequencies, and times of fundamental and harmonic type II emission are predicted very well from the high corona to 1 AU (frequencies ~ 20 MHz - 30 kHz). The islands of increased emission correspond to different regions of the shock interacting with coronal structures, with streamers typically corresponding to reduced emission. The results provide strong evidence that both the type II theory and the BATS-R-US (driven with event-specific data) are accurate. They also provide strong evidence that the observation and detailed theoretical modelling of type II bursts can in principle provide warnings with lead-times of over a day for large and fast CMEs that might produce space weather at Earth. The MHD code can also predict whether the CME will hit Earth's magnetopause and the magnetic field direction at the magnetopause as the shock, sheath, and CME, vital quantities for predicting space weather at Earth.

  13. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  14. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  15. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  16. Higher Fibrinogen Levels Predict Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, T.C.; Snell-Bergeon, J.K.; Maahs, D.M; Kinney, G.L.; Rewers, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine whether fibrinogen levels predict independently progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Data from a prospective cohort - the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study - were evaluated. Fibrinogen levels at baseline were separated into quartiles. CAC was measured twice and averaged at baseline and at follow-up 2.4 ± 0.4 years later. CAC progressors were defined as participants whose square-root transformed CAC volume increased by ≥ 2.53 or development mm of clinical coronary artery disease during the follow-up period. Results Fibrinogen levels were higher in progressors than in non-progressors (276 ± 61 mg/dl versus 259 ± 61 mg/dl, p = 0.0003). CAC progression, adjusted for known cardiovascular risk factors, increased in the highest quartile. Conclusions Higher fibrinogen levels predict CAC progression in type 1 diabetes subjects, independent of standard cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20079495

  17. Instability analysis and free volume simulations of shear band directions and arrangements in notched metallic glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-10-10

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predictsmore » the onset of strain localization and the free-volume- based nite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. In conclusion, a mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state.« less

  18. [Prediction and prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus: initial results and recent prospects].

    PubMed

    Madácsy, László

    2011-11-27

    Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes mellitus is rising worldwide. The increase in incidence has been most prominent in the youngest age group of childhood. Prediction of type 1a autoimmune diabetes can be established by a positive family history or by genetic, immunological or metabolic markers. Prevention of type 1 diabetes can be implemented at three different levels of pathogenesis: primary prevention in individuals without any sign of beta-cell damage, secondary prevention in individuals with signs of beta-cell destruction and tertiary prevention in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. In recent years our knowledge of the disease pathogenesis has grown quickly, and several new prevention trials have been initiated worldwide. Immunologic intervention for type 1 diabetes will prove to be probably the most effective.

  19. Surface and downhole shear wave seismic methods for thick soil site investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, J.A.; Benjumea, B.; Harris, J.B.; Miller, R.D.; Pullan, S.E.; Burns, R.A.; Good, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave velocity-depth information is required for predicting the ground motion response to earthquakes in areas where significant soil cover exists over firm bedrock. Rather than estimating this critical parameter, it can be reliably measured using a suite of surface (non-invasive) and downhole (invasive) seismic methods. Shear wave velocities from surface measurements can be obtained using SH refraction techniques. Array lengths as large as 1000 m and depth of penetration to 250 m have been achieved in some areas. High resolution shear wave reflection techniques utilizing the common midpoint method can delineate the overburden-bedrock surface as well as reflecting boundaries within the overburden. Reflection data can also be used to obtain direct estimates of fundamental site periods from shear wave reflections without the requirement of measuring average shear wave velocity and total thickness of unconsolidated overburden above the bedrock surface. Accurate measurements of vertical shear wave velocities can be obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer in soft sediments, or with a well-locked geophone array in a borehole. Examples from thick soil sites in Canada demonstrate the type of shear wave velocity information that can be obtained with these geophysical techniques, and show how these data can be used to provide a first look at predicted ground motion response for thick soil sites. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Prediction of lithology types at the Hanford 300 Area using a clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thai, J.; Rockhold, M. L.; Vermeul, V.; Johnson, T. E.; Zachara, J. M.; Rubin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to find an optimal method for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of lithology at the Hanford IFRC site 300 Area based on surrogate measurements. We considered 6 types of measurements for this analysis: gamma ray, concentration of U-238 (609), K-40, U-238 (1764), Th-232, and the hydraulic conductivity. To decide which combinations of variables are best suited for determining lithology type, we trained our classification method using training sets that included several wells with lithological information. A clustering analysis was applied to each training set and the lithology types for each cluster of the training set were fitted with a probability distribution function. The lithology type at each point in the testing set was selected to be the one linked with the mode of the distribution at the corresponding cluster. The predictions were then checked against the data of the testing set. This process was applied repeatedly using different numbers of clusters. In addition, many different configurations of training sets and testing sets were used to establish confidence in the predictive ability of the clustering and classification methods. Our best success rates as measured by matching predictions with observations were obtained for 2 or 3 clusters, and the following measurements: concentration of U-238 (609), K-40, U-238 (1764), and Th-232, and were consistently around 80%.

  1. Computational approaches for classification and prediction of P-type ATPase substrate specificity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zinati, Zahra; Alemzadeh, Abbas; KayvanJoo, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    As an extended gamut of integral membrane (extrinsic) proteins, and based on their transporting specificities, P-type ATPases include five subfamilies in Arabidopsis, inter alia, P4ATPases (phospholipid-transporting ATPase), P3AATPases (plasma membrane H(+) pumps), P2A and P2BATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) and P1B ATPases (heavy metal pumps). Although, many different computational methods have been developed to predict substrate specificity of unknown proteins, further investigation needs to improve the efficiency and performance of the predicators. In this study, various attribute weighting and supervised clustering algorithms were employed to identify the main amino acid composition attributes, which can influence the substrate specificity of ATPase pumps, classify protein pumps and predict the substrate specificity of uncharacterized ATPase pumps. The results of this study indicate that both non-reduced coefficients pertaining to absorption and Cys extinction within 280 nm, the frequencies of hydrogen, Ala, Val, carbon, hydrophilic residues, the counts of Val, Asn, Ser, Arg, Phe, Tyr, hydrophilic residues, Phe-Phe, Ala-Ile, Phe-Leu, Val-Ala and length are specified as the most important amino acid attributes through applying the whole attribute weighting models. Here, learning algorithms engineered in a predictive machine (Naive Bays) is proposed to foresee the Q9LVV1 and O22180 substrate specificities (P-type ATPase like proteins) with 100 % prediction confidence. For the first time, our analysis demonstrated promising application of bioinformatics algorithms in classifying ATPases pumps. Moreover, we suggest the predictive systems that can assist towards the prediction of the substrate specificity of any new ATPase pumps with the maximum possible prediction confidence. PMID:27186030

  2. A shear deformable theory of laminated composite shallow shell-type panels and their response analysis. I - Free vibration and buckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Khdeir, A. A.; Frederick, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with the substantiation of a shear deformable theory of cross-ply laminated composite shallow shells. While the developed theory preserves all the advantages of the first order transverse shear deformation theory it succeeds in eliminating some of its basic shortcomings. The theory is further employed in the analysis of the eigenvibration and static buckling problems of doubly curved shallow panels. In this context, the state space concept is used in conjunction with the Levy method, allowing one to analyze these problems in a unified manner, for a variety of boundary conditions. Numerical results are presented and some pertinent conclusions are formulated.

  3. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-09-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models show a strong dependence on the level of hydrostatic tension. Even though the reason for this pressure dependence is different in the two models, as the shear-extended Gurson model does not describe voids flattening out and the associated failure mechanism by micro-cracks interacting with neighbouring micro-cracks, it is shown that the trends of the predictions are in good agreement.

  4. Support vector machines for the classification and prediction of beta-turn types.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Xue-Biao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2002-07-01

    The support vector machines (SVMs) method is proposed because it can reflect the sequence-coupling effect for a tetrapeptide in not only a beta-turn or non-beta-turn, but also in different types of beta-turn. The results of the model for 6022 tetrapeptides indicate that the rates of self-consistency for beta-turn types I, I', II, II', VI and VIII and non-beta-turns are 99.92%, 96.8%, 98.02%, 97.75%, 100%, 97.19% and 100%, respectively. Using these training data, the rate of correct prediction by the SVMs for a given protein: rubredoxin (54 residues. 51 tetrapeptides) which includes 12 beta-turn type I tetrapeptides, 1 beta-turn type II tetrapeptide and 38 non-beta-turns reached 82.4%. The high quality of prediction of the SVMs implies that the formation of different beta-turn types or non-beta-turns is considerably correlated with the sequence of a tetrapeptide. The SVMs can save CPU time and avoid the overfitting problem compared with the neural network method.

  5. A Gram-Negative Bacterial Secreted Protein Types Prediction Method Based on PSI-BLAST Profile

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of secreted protein types based solely on sequence data remains to be a challenging problem. In this study, we extract the long-range correlation information and linear correlation information from position-specific score matrix (PSSM). A total of 6800 features are extracted at 17 different gaps; then, 309 features are selected by a filter feature selection method based on the training set. To verify the performance of our method, jackknife and independent dataset tests are performed on the test set and the reported overall accuracies are 93.60% and 100%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the existing method shows that our method provides the favorable performance for secreted protein type prediction. PMID:27563663

  6. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on a truss-type aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Schuster, L. S.; Carter, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    A test structure representing a portion of a hypersonic vehicle was instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples. This test structure was then subjected to laboratory heating representative of supersonic and hypersonic flight conditions. A finite element computer model of this structure was developed using several types of elements with the NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) computer program. Temperature inputs from the test were used to generate predicted model thermal stresses and these were correlated with the test measurements.

  7. The potential of novel biomarkers to improve risk prediction of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Herder, Christian; Kowall, Bernd; Tabak, Adam G; Rathmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes can be reduced substantially by implementing preventive measures in high-risk individuals, but this requires prior knowledge of disease risk in the individual. Various diabetes risk models have been designed, and these have all included a similar combination of factors, such as age, sex, obesity, hypertension, lifestyle factors, family history of diabetes and metabolic traits. The accuracy of prediction models is often assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) as a measure of discrimination, but AROCs should be complemented by measures of calibration and reclassification to estimate the incremental value of novel biomarkers. This review discusses the potential of novel biomarkers to improve model accuracy. The range of molecules that serve as potential predictors of type 2 diabetes includes genetic variants, RNA transcripts, peptides and proteins, lipids and small metabolites. Some of these biomarkers lead to a statistically significant increase of model accuracy, but their incremental value currently seems too small for routine clinical use. However, only a fraction of potentially relevant biomarkers have been assessed with regard to their predictive value. Moreover, serial measurements of biomarkers may help determine individual risk. In conclusion, current risk models provide valuable tools of risk estimation, but perform suboptimally in the prediction of individual diabetes risk. Novel biomarkers still fail to have a clinically applicable impact. However, more efficient use of biomarker data and technological advances in their measurement in clinical settings may allow the development of more accurate predictive models in the future.

  8. The utility and accuracy of oral reading fluency score types in predicting reading comprehension.

    PubMed

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kim, Young-Suk

    2011-02-01

    This study used data from the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS; Good & Kaminski, 2002) oral reading fluency (ORF) probes to examine variation among different ORF score types (i.e., the median of three passages, the mean of all three passages, the mean of passages 2 and 3, and the score from passage 3) in predicting reading comprehension as a function of student reading fluency level and to compare the screening accuracy of these score types in predicting student reading comprehension. The results revealed that the relation between oral reading fluency and reading comprehension varied as a function of students' oral reading fluency and that different score types had varying predictive validity for year-end reading comprehension. The mean of all three passages demonstrated a marginally better balance in screening efficiency from September to December of grade one (especially for low-performing students), whereas in grades two and three, the median score was the best predictor. Furthermore, across all grades, increasing reading rates were observed for the three administered passages within an assessment period. The observed patterns mimicked previous experimental studies (Francis et al., 2008; Jenkins, Graff, & Miglioretti, 2009), suggesting that practice effects are an important consideration in the administration of multiple passages assessing oral reading fluency.

  9. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  10. Organized motions underlying turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waleffe, F.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the nature and significance of the organized motions underlying turbulent shear flow. There is considerable experimental evidence for the existence of such motions. In particular, one consistently observes longitudinal streaks with a spacing of about 100 in wall units in the near-wall region of wall-bounded shear flows. Recently, an analysis based on the direct resonance mechanism has predicted the appearance of streaks with precisely such a spacing. Also, the minimum channel simulations of Jimenez and Moin have given a strong dynamical significance to that spanwise length scale. They have shown that turbulent-like flows can not be maintained when the spanwise wavelength of the motion is constrained to be less than about that critical number. A critical review of the direct resonance ideas and the non-linear theory of Benney and Gustavsson is presented first. It is shown how this leads to the later mean flow-first harmonic theory of Benney. Finally, we note that a different type of analysis has led to the prediction streaks with a similar spacing. This latter approach consists of looking for optimum fields and directly provides deep insights into why a particular structure or a particular scale should be preferred.

  11. T346Hunter: a novel web-based tool for the prediction of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    T346Hunter (Type Three, Four and Six secretion system Hunter) is a web-based tool for the identification and localisation of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems (T3SS, T4SS and T6SS, respectively) clusters in bacterial genomes. Non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS) and T6SS are complex molecular machines that deliver effector proteins from bacterial cells into the environment or into other eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells, with significant implications for pathogenesis of the strains encoding them. Meanwhile, T4SS is a more functionally diverse system, which is involved in not only effector translocation but also conjugation and DNA uptake/release. Development of control strategies against bacterial-mediated diseases requires genomic identification of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic bacteria, with T3SS, T4SS and T6SS being major determinants in this regard. Therefore, computational methods for systematic identification of these specialised machines are of particular interest. With the aim of facilitating this task, T346Hunter provides a user-friendly web-based tool for the prediction of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS clusters in newly sequenced bacterial genomes. After inspection of the available scientific literature, we constructed a database of hidden Markov model (HMM) protein profiles and sequences representing the various components of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS. T346Hunter performs searches of such a database against user-supplied bacterial sequences and localises enriched regions in any of these three types of secretion systems. Moreover, through the T346Hunter server, users can visualise the predicted clusters obtained for approximately 1700 bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. T346Hunter offers great help to researchers in advancing their understanding of the biological mechanisms in which these sophisticated molecular machines are involved. T346Hunter is freely available at http://bacterial-virulence-factors.cbgp.upm.es/T346Hunter.

  12. Systems analysis and the prediction and prevention of Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Richard N; Stefanovski, Darko; Kim, Stella P

    2014-08-01

    Prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has increased at an alarming rate, highlighting the need to correctly predict the development of this disease in order to allow intervention and thus, slow progression of the disease and resulting metabolic derangement. There have been many recent 'advances' geared toward the detection of pre-diabetes, including genome wide association studies and metabolomics. Although these approaches generate a large amount of data with a single blood sample, studies have indicated limited success using genetic and metabolomics information alone for identification of disease risk. Clinical assessment of the disposition index (DI), based on the hyperbolic law of glucose tolerance, is a powerful predictor of Type 2 diabetes, but is not easily assessed in the clinical setting. Thus, it is evident that combining genetic or metabolomic approaches for a more simple assessment of DI may provide a useful tool to identify those at highest risk for Type 2 diabetes, allowing for intervention and prevention.

  13. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  14. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model.

    PubMed

    Albaret, T; Tanguy, A; Boioli, F; Rodney, D

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now. PMID:27300968

  15. Shear-Induced Unfolding and Enzymatic Cleavage of Full-Length VWF Multimers.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Svenja; Radtke, Matthias; Obser, Tobias; Kleemeier, Lars; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich; Netz, Roland R; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-02-01

    Proteolysis of the multimeric blood coagulation protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF) by ADAMTS13 is crucial for prevention of microvascular thrombosis. ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF within the mechanosensitive A2 domain, which is believed to open under shear flow. In this study, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and a microfluidic shear cell to monitor real-time kinetics of full-length VWF proteolysis as a function of shear stress. For comparison, we also measure the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of ADAMTS13 cleavage of wild-type VWF in the absence of shear but partially denaturing conditions. Under shear, ADAMTS13 activity on full-length VWF arises without denaturing agent as evidenced by FCS and gel-based multimer analysis. In agreement with Brownian hydrodynamics simulations, we find a sigmoidal increase of the enzymatic rate as a function of shear at a threshold shear rate γ˙1/2 = 5522/s. The same flow-rate dependence of ADAMTS13 activity we also observe in blood plasma, which is relevant to predict hemostatic dysfunction. PMID:26840720

  16. Failure mechanisms of laminated carbon-carbon composites; 2: Under shear loads

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, K.; Gupta, V.; Dartford, D. . Thayer School of Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    Failure mechanisms under both interlaminar and in-plane shear loading are determined for two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites by using a direct shear set-up. This set-up is applicable for both types of shear loading as manufactured laminate thickness can be tested without the need to make long samples by gluing different pieces together. A detailed finite element analysis, which considers the microstructure of the composite shows that for woven laminates, the initial crimp angle morphology does not allow the composite to deform in a state of simple shear. In fact, normal tensile and compressive stresses of almost twice the magnitude of the peak shear stress are produced in the vicinity of the crimped bundles. Consistent with these predictions, the authors observed the shear fault following the crimp boundaries in 0[degree]/90[degree] and quasi-isotropic laminates. Therefore, experimental techniques which can secure a state of pure shear stress in aligned, unkinked, uniaxial fiber composites cannot do so in woven laminated composites.

  17. [Prediction of lipases types by different scale pseudo-amino acid composition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangya; Li, Hongchun; Gao, Jiaqiang; Fang, Baishan

    2008-11-01

    Lipases are widely used enzymes in biotechnology. Although they catalyze the same reaction, their sequences vary. Therefore, it is highly desired to develop a fast and reliable method to identify the types of lipases according to their sequences, or even just to confirm whether they are lipases or not. By proposing two scales based pseudo amino acid composition approaches to extract the features of the sequences, a powerful predictor based on k-nearest neighbor was introduced to address the problems. The overall success rates thus obtained by the 10-fold cross-validation test were shown as below: for predicting lipases and nonlipase, the success rates were 92.8%, 91.4% and 91.3%, respectively. For lipase types, the success rates were 92.3%, 90.3% and 89.7%, respectively. Among them, the Z scales based pseudo amino acid composition was the best, T scales was the second. They outperformed significantly than 6 other frequently used sequence feature extraction methods. The high success rates yielded for such a stringent dataset indicate predicting the types of lipases is feasible and the different scales pseudo amino acid composition might be a useful tool for extracting the features of protein sequences, or at lease can play a complementary role to many of the other existing approaches. PMID:19256347

  18. Predicting hydration free energies of amphetamine-type stimulants with a customized molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jipeng; Fu, Jia; Huang, Xing; Lu, Diannan; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-09-01

    Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are a group of incitation and psychedelic drugs affecting the central nervous system. Physicochemical data for these compounds are essential for understanding the stimulating mechanism, for assessing their environmental impacts, and for developing new drug detection methods. However, experimental data are scarce due to tight regulation of such illicit drugs, yet conventional methods to estimate their properties are often unreliable. Here we introduce a tailor-made multiscale procedure for predicting the hydration free energies and the solvation structures of ATS molecules by a combination of first principles calculations and the classical density functional theory. We demonstrate that the multiscale procedure performs well for a training set with similar molecular characteristics and yields good agreement with a testing set not used in the training. The theoretical predictions serve as a benchmark for the missing experimental data and, importantly, provide microscopic insights into manipulating the hydrophobicity of ATS compounds by chemical modifications.

  19. iMem-Seq: A Multi-label Learning Classifier for Predicting Membrane Proteins Types.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Zou, Hong-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Predicting membrane protein type is a challenging problem, particularly when the query proteins may simultaneously have two or more different types. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Actually, multiple-label proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special functions worthy of in-depth studies. By introducing the "multi-labeled learning" and hybridizing evolution information through Grey-PSSM, a novel predictor called iMem-Seq is developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single and multiple types of membrane proteins. As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iMem-Seq on a benchmark dataset of membrane proteins classified into the eight types, where some proteins belong to two or there types, but none has ≥25% pairwise sequence identity to any other in a same subset. It was demonstrated via the rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed all its counterparts. As a user-friendly web-server, iMem-Seq is freely accessible to the public at the website http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iMem-Seq .

  20. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  1. Using vegetation cover type to predict and scale peatland methane dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArthur, K. J.; McCalley, C. K.; Palace, M. W.; Varner, R. K.; Herrick, C.; DelGreco, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Permafrost ecosystems contain about 50% of the global soil carbon. As these northern ecosystems experience warmer temperature, permafrost thaws and may result in an increase in atmospheric methane. We examined a thawing and discontinuous permafrost boundary at Stordalen Mire, in Northern Sweden, in an effort to better understand methane emissions. Stable isotope analysis of methane in peatland porewater can give insights into the pathway of methane production. By measuring δ13CH4 we can predict whether a system is dominated by either hydrogenotrophic or acetaclastic methane production. Currently, it is a challenge to scale these isotopic patterns, thus, atmospheric inversion models simply assume that acetoclastic production dominates. We analyzed porewater samples collected across a range of vegetation cover types for δ13CH4 using a QCL (Quantum Cascade Laser Spectrometer) in conjunction with highly accurate GPS (3-10cm) measurements and high-resolution UAV imaging. We found δ13CH4 values ranging from -88‰ to -41‰, with averages based on cover type and other vegetation features showing differences of up to -15‰. We then used a computer neural network to predict cover types across Stordalen Mire from UAV imagery based on field-based plot measurements and training samples.. This prediction map was used to scale methane flux and isotope measurements. Our results suggest that the current values used in atmospheric inversion studies may oversimplify the relationship between plant and microbial communities in complex permafrost landscapes. As we gain a deeper understanding of how vegetation relates to methanogenic communities, understanding the spatial component of ecosystem methane metabolism and distribution will be increasingly valuable.

  2. Wind shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techniques for forecasting and detecting a type of wind shear called microbursts are being tested this month in an operational program at Denver's Stapleton International Airport as part of an effort to reduce hazards to airplanes and passengers.Wind shear, which can be spawned by convective storms, can occur as a microburst. These downbursts of cool air are usually recognizable as a visible rain shaft beneath a thundercloud. Sometimes, however, the rain shaft evaporates before reaching the ground, leaving the downdraft invisible. Although thunderstorms are traditionally avoided by airplane pilots, these invisible downdrafts also harbor hazards in what usually appear to be safe skies. When the downdraft reaches the earth's surface, the downdraft spreads out horizontally, much like a stream of water gushing from a garden hose on a concrete surface, explained John McCarthy, director of the operational program. Airplanes can encounter trouble when the downdraft from the microburst causes sudden shifts in wind direction, which may reduce lift on the wing, an especially dangerous situation during takeoff.

  3. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  4. Prediction of bacterial type IV secreted effectors by C-terminal features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria can deliver pathogenic proteins (effectors) through type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to eukaryotic cytoplasm, causing host diseases. The inherent property, such as sequence diversity and global scattering throughout the whole genome, makes it a big challenge to effectively identify the full set of T4SS effectors. Therefore, an effective inter-species T4SS effector prediction tool is urgently needed to help discover new effectors in a variety of bacterial species, especially those with few known effectors, e.g., Helicobacter pylori. Results In this research, we first manually annotated a full list of validated T4SS effectors from different bacteria and then carefully compared their C-terminal sequential and position-specific amino acid compositions, possible motifs and structural features. Based on the observed features, we set up several models to automatically recognize T4SS effectors. Three of the models performed strikingly better than the others and T4SEpre_Joint had the best performance, which could distinguish the T4SS effectors from non-effectors with a 5-fold cross-validation sensitivity of 89% at a specificity of 97%, based on the training datasets. An inter-species cross prediction showed that T4SEpre_Joint could recall most known effectors from a variety of species. The inter-species prediction tool package, T4SEpre, was further used to predict new T4SS effectors from H. pylori, an important human pathogen associated with gastritis, ulcer and cancer. In total, 24 new highly possible H. pylori T4S effector genes were computationally identified. Conclusions We conclude that T4SEpre, as an effective inter-species T4SS effector prediction software package, will help find new pathogenic T4SS effectors efficiently in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24447430

  5. Kernel mixture survival models for identifying cancer subtypes, predicting patient's cancer types and survival probabilities.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    One important application of microarray gene expression data is to study the relationship between the clinical phenotype of cancer patients and gene expression profiles on the whole-genome scale. The clinical phenotype includes several different types of cancers, survival times, relapse times, drug responses and so on. Under the situation that the subtypes of cancer have not been previously identified or known to exist, we develop a new kernel mixture modeling method that performs simultaneously identification of the subtype of cancer, prediction of the probabilities of both cancer type and patient's survival, and detection of a set of marker genes on which to base a diagnosis. The proposed method is successfully performed on real data analysis and simulation studies.

  6. Weak Intraplate Volcanism Caused by Shear-Driven Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, T. A.; Conrad, C. P.; Smith, E. I.; Wessel, P.

    2011-12-01

    Statistical analysis shows that there is an unusually high incidence of recent (<10 Ma), intraplate volcanism over asthenosphere that is predicted to be rapidly shearing. This result is heavily influenced by the large number of small seamounts west of the Eastern Pacific Rise, and small-volume basaltic volcanism throughout the Western United States. Here we explore one relationship that may explain why small-volume volcanism preferentially occurs above rapidly-shearing asthenosphere. Numerical models show that asthenospheric shear can be deflected upward by lateral viscosity variations within the asthenosphere, producing "shear-driven upwelling" (SDU). To constrain the rate, duration, and surface expression of intraplate volcanism caused by SDU, we simulated 2D flow and peridotite melting in the upper 200 km of the mantle. Asthenospheric shear is driven by lithospheric plates with different thicknesses moving at 3 to 9 cm/yr, and the initial low-viscosity region is a rectangular-shaped pocket with an imposed viscosity that is two orders of magnitude smaller than the surrounding asthenosphere. Melting decreases as the pocket deforms, and reaches steady state after 3 to 12 Myr. The age progression of surface volcanism is nearly stationary in the reference frame of the plate, which distinguishes SDU from hotspot volcanism. Similar steady-state behavior occurs if the viscosity heterogeneity is induced by variations in the water content of mantle peridotite. If the pocket's low viscosity is caused by excess temperature, buoyant upwelling of the entire pocket dominates volcanism, which decreases exponentially with time. Differences in the time dependence of volcanism associated with damp and warm pockets may help identify which type of mantle heterogeneity and associated dynamic process best explains weak, intermittent, intraplate volcanism with no obvious age progression. We suggest that asthenospheric shear induced by plate motions and global mantle flow, by exciting

  7. Spatially-resolved microstructure in shear banding wormlike micellar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Helgeson, Matthew E.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Wagner, Norman J.; Kaler, Eric W.

    2008-07-07

    Recently proposed theories for shear banding in wormlike micellar solutions (WLMs) rely on a shear-induced isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase separation as the mechanism for banding. Critical tests of such theories require spatially-resolved measurements of flow-kinematics and local mesoscale microstructure within the shear bands. We have recently developed such capabilities using a short gap Couette cell for flow-small angle neutron scattering (flow-SANS) measurements in the 1-2 plane of shear with collaborators at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. This work combines flow-SANS measurements with rheology, rheo-optics and velocimetry measurements to present the first complete spatially-resolved study of WLMs through the shear banding transition for a model shear banding WLM solution near the I-N phase boundary. The shear rheology is well-modeled by the Giesekus constitutive equation, with incorporated stress diffusion to predict shear banding. By fitting the stress diffusivity at the onset of banding, the model enables prediction of velocity profiles in the shear banded state which are in quantitative agreement with measured flow-kinematics. Quantitative analysis of the flow-SANS measurements shows a critical segmental alignment for banding and validates the Giesekus model predictions, linking segmental orientation to shear banding and providing the first rigorous evidence for the shear-induced I-N transition mechanism for shear banding.

  8. Physical activity related information sources predict physical activity behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini; Boule, Normand G

    2010-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a key management strategy for type 2 diabetes. Despite the known benefits, PA levels are low. Whether the low level of PA is related to lack of knowledge or support is not fully understood. This study was conducted to describe where and how often adults with type 2 diabetes receive and seek information related to PA and examine the relationships between the source and quality of PA information with PA behaviors. A series of questions related to the source and quality of PA information were added to a baseline survey distributed to the participants (N = 244) of the Canadian Aerobic and Resistance Training in Diabetes (CARED) study. Physicians and television were found to be the main sources of PA-related information. In our cross-sectional model, sources of PA-related information other than that from health care professionals explained 14% (p = .05) and 16% (p < .05) of the variance for aerobic-based and resistance training behaviors and 22% (p < .01) and 15% (p < .05) for these behaviors in our longitudinal model. Physical activity (PA)-related information is widely available to adults with type 2 diabetes. Neither the quantity nor the quality of the PA information provided by health care professionals predicted PA behavior. These data provide further insight into the modes with which PA can be promoted to adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21170787

  9. T346Hunter: A Novel Web-Based Tool for the Prediction of Type III, Type IV and Type VI Secretion Systems in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    T346Hunter (Type Three, Four and Six secretion system Hunter) is a web-based tool for the identification and localisation of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems (T3SS, T4SS and T6SS, respectively) clusters in bacterial genomes. Non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS) and T6SS are complex molecular machines that deliver effector proteins from bacterial cells into the environment or into other eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells, with significant implications for pathogenesis of the strains encoding them. Meanwhile, T4SS is a more functionally diverse system, which is involved in not only effector translocation but also conjugation and DNA uptake/release. Development of control strategies against bacterial-mediated diseases requires genomic identification of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic bacteria, with T3SS, T4SS and T6SS being major determinants in this regard. Therefore, computational methods for systematic identification of these specialised machines are of particular interest. With the aim of facilitating this task, T346Hunter provides a user-friendly web-based tool for the prediction of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS clusters in newly sequenced bacterial genomes. After inspection of the available scientific literature, we constructed a database of hidden Markov model (HMM) protein profiles and sequences representing the various components of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS. T346Hunter performs searches of such a database against user-supplied bacterial sequences and localises enriched regions in any of these three types of secretion systems. Moreover, through the T346Hunter server, users can visualise the predicted clusters obtained for approximately 1700 bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. T346Hunter offers great help to researchers in advancing their understanding of the biological mechanisms in which these sophisticated molecular machines are involved. T346Hunter is freely available at http://bacterial-virulence-factors.cbgp.upm.es/T346Hunter. PMID:25867189

  10. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  11. Novel Tubular Biomarkers Predict Renal Progression in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aramsaowapak, Kasemsan; Tangwonglert, Theerasak; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tubulointerstitial injury is both a key feature of diabetic nephropathy and an important predictor of renal dysfunction. Novel tubular biomarkers related to renal injury in diabetic nephropathy could improve risk stratification and prediction. Methods. A total of 303 type 2 diabetic patients were followed up. The baseline urine values of cystatin-C to creatinine ratio (UCCR), angiotensinogen to creatinine ratio (UANG), NGAL to creatinine ratio (UNGAL), and KIM-1 to creatinine ratio (UKIM-1) were measured. The primary outcome was a decline in estimated GFR of ≥25% yearly from baseline. Results. Urine tubular biomarkers of UCCR, UANG, UNGAL, and UKIM-1 were significantly higher according to the degree of albuminuria and all were significantly higher among patients with rapid decline in estimated GFR of ≥25% yearly from baseline. All biomarkers predicted primary outcomes with ROC for UCCR of 0.72; 95% CI 0.64–0.79, for UANG of 0.71; 95% CI 0.63–0.79, for UNGAL of 0.64; 95% CI 0.56–0.72, and for UKIM-1 of 0.71; 95% CI 0.63–0.79. Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, the number of patients with rapid renal progression was higher among those in the upper quartiles of all biomarkers than in those in the lower quartiles. Conclusions. Type 2 diabetic patients with high levels of urine tubular biomarkers had a more rapid decline in renal function.

  12. Novel Tubular Biomarkers Predict Renal Progression in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aramsaowapak, Kasemsan; Tangwonglert, Theerasak; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tubulointerstitial injury is both a key feature of diabetic nephropathy and an important predictor of renal dysfunction. Novel tubular biomarkers related to renal injury in diabetic nephropathy could improve risk stratification and prediction. Methods. A total of 303 type 2 diabetic patients were followed up. The baseline urine values of cystatin-C to creatinine ratio (UCCR), angiotensinogen to creatinine ratio (UANG), NGAL to creatinine ratio (UNGAL), and KIM-1 to creatinine ratio (UKIM-1) were measured. The primary outcome was a decline in estimated GFR of ≥25% yearly from baseline. Results. Urine tubular biomarkers of UCCR, UANG, UNGAL, and UKIM-1 were significantly higher according to the degree of albuminuria and all were significantly higher among patients with rapid decline in estimated GFR of ≥25% yearly from baseline. All biomarkers predicted primary outcomes with ROC for UCCR of 0.72; 95% CI 0.64–0.79, for UANG of 0.71; 95% CI 0.63–0.79, for UNGAL of 0.64; 95% CI 0.56–0.72, and for UKIM-1 of 0.71; 95% CI 0.63–0.79. Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, the number of patients with rapid renal progression was higher among those in the upper quartiles of all biomarkers than in those in the lower quartiles. Conclusions. Type 2 diabetic patients with high levels of urine tubular biomarkers had a more rapid decline in renal function. PMID:27672664

  13. Hypoglycemia prediction using machine learning models for patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sudharsan, Bharath; Peeples, Malinda; Shomali, Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the occurrence of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes is a challenging task since these patients typically check only 1 to 2 self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) readings per day. We trained a probabilistic model using machine learning algorithms and SMBG values from real patients. Hypoglycemia was defined as a SMBG value < 70 mg/dL. We validated our model using multiple data sets. In addition, we trained a second model, which used patient SMBG values and information about patient medication administration. The optimal number of SMBG values needed by the model was approximately 10 per week. The sensitivity of the model for predicting a hypoglycemia event in the next 24 hours was 92% and the specificity was 70%. In the model that incorporated medication information, the prediction window was for the hour of hypoglycemia, and the specificity improved to 90%. Our machine learning models can predict hypoglycemia events with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. These models-which have been validated retrospectively and if implemented in real time-could be useful tools for reducing hypoglycemia in vulnerable patients.

  14. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  15. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  16. Predictive Properties of Plasma Amino Acid Profile for Cardiovascular Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Shinji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Ono, Nobukazu; Shinhara, Atsuko; Muramatsu, Takahiko; Araki, Hisazumi; Isshiki, Keiji; Nakamura, Kazuki; Miyano, Hiroshi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Ugi, Satoshi; Kawai, Hiromichi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important therapeutic object of diabetes care. This study assessed whether an index based on plasma free amino acid (PFAA) profiles could predict the onset of CVD in diabetic patients. The baseline concentrations of 31 PFAAs were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry in 385 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes registered in 2001 for our prospective observational follow-up study. During 10 years of follow-up, 63 patients developed cardiovascular composite endpoints (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, worsening of heart failure and stroke). Using the PFAA profiles and clinical information, an index (CVD-AI) consisting of six amino acids to predict the onset of any endpoints was retrospectively constructed. CVD-AI levels were significantly higher in patients who did than did not develop CVD. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of CVD-AI (0.72 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64–0.79]) showed equal or slightly better discriminatory capacity than urinary albumin excretion rate (0.69 [95% CI: 0.62–0.77]) on predicting endpoints. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that the high level of CVD-AI was identified as an independent risk factor for CVD (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.86 [95% CI: 1.57–5.19]). This predictive effect of CVD-AI was observed even in patients with normoalbuminuria, as well as those with albuminuria. In conclusion, these results suggest that CVD-AI based on PFAA profiles is useful for identifying diabetic patients at risk for CVD regardless of the degree of albuminuria, or for improving the discriminative capability by combining it with albuminuria. PMID:24971671

  17. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  18. A probability score for preoperative prediction of type 2 diabetes remission following RYGB surgery

    PubMed Central

    Still, Christopher D.; Wood, G. Craig; Benotti, Peter; Petrick, Anthony T.; Gabrielsen, Jon; Strodel, William E.; Ibele, Anna; Seiler, Jamie; Irving, Brian A.; Celaya, Melisa P.; Blackstone, Robin; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Argyropoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease with significant medical complications. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is one of the few interventions that remit T2D in ~60% of patients. However, there is no accurate method for predicting preoperatively the probability for T2D remission. METHODS A retrospective cohort of 2,300 RYGB patients at Geisinger Clinic was used to identify 690 patients with T2D and complete electronic data. Two additional T2D cohorts (N=276, and N=113) were used for replication at 14 months following RYGB. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used in the primary cohort to create survival curves until remission. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the hazard ratios on T2D remission. FINDINGS Using 259 preoperative clinical variables, four (use of insulin, age, HbA1c, and type of antidiabetic medication) were sufficient to develop an algorithm that produces a type 2 diabetes remission (DiaRem) score over five years. The DiaRem score spans from 0 to 22 and was divided into five groups corresponding to five probability-ranges for T2D remission: 0–2 (88%–99%), 3–7 (64%–88%), 8–12 (23%–49%), 13–17 (11%–33%), 18–22 (2%–16%). The DiaRem scores in the replication cohorts, as well as under various definitions of diabetes remission, conformed to the DiaRem score of the primary cohort. INTERPRETATION The DiaRem score is a novel preoperative method for predicting the probability (from 2% to 99%) for T2D remission following RYGB surgery. FUNDING This research was supported by the Geisinger Health System and the National Institutes of Health. PMID:24579062

  19. Comparing various artificial neural network types for water temperature prediction in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Maciej J.; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw J.; Osuch, Marzena

    2015-10-01

    A number of methods have been proposed for the prediction of streamwater temperature based on various meteorological and hydrological variables. The present study shows a comparison of few types of data-driven neural networks (multi-layer perceptron, product-units, adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference systems and wavelet neural networks) and nearest neighbour approach for short time streamwater temperature predictions in two natural catchments (mountainous and lowland) located in temperate climate zone, with snowy winters and hot summers. To allow wide applicability of such models, autoregressive inputs are not used and only easily available measurements are considered. Each neural network type is calibrated independently 100 times and the mean, median and standard deviation of the results are used for the comparison. Finally, the ensemble aggregation approach is tested. The results show that simple and popular multi-layer perceptron neural networks are in most cases not outperformed by more complex and advanced models. The choice of neural network is dependent on the way the models are compared. This may be a warning for anyone who wish to promote own models, that their superiority should be verified in different ways. The best results are obtained when mean, maximum and minimum daily air temperatures from the previous days are used as inputs, together with the current runoff and declination of the Sun from two recent days. The ensemble aggregation approach allows reducing the mean square error up to several percent, depending on the case, and noticeably diminishes differences in modelling performance obtained by various neural network types.

  20. Predicting polarization signatures for double-detonation and delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.; Pakmor, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Taubenberger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Calculations of synthetic spectropolarimetry are one means to test multidimensional explosion models for Type Ia supernovae. In a recent paper, we demonstrated that the violent merger of a 1.1 and 0.9 M⊙ white dwarf binary system is too asymmetric to explain the low polarization levels commonly observed in normal Type Ia supernovae. Here, we present polarization simulations for two alternative scenarios: the sub-Chandrasekhar mass double-detonation and the Chandrasekhar mass delayed-detonation model. Specifically, we study a 2D double-detonation model and a 3D delayed-detonation model, and calculate polarization spectra for multiple observer orientations in both cases. We find modest polarization levels (<1 per cent) for both explosion models. Polarization in the continuum peaks at ˜0.1-0.3 per cent and decreases after maximum light, in excellent agreement with spectropolarimetric data of normal Type Ia supernovae. Higher degrees of polarization are found across individual spectral lines. In particular, the synthetic Si II λ6355 profiles are polarized at levels that match remarkably well the values observed in normal Type Ia supernovae, while the low degrees of polarization predicted across the O I λ7774 region are consistent with the non-detection of this feature in current data. We conclude that our models can reproduce many of the characteristics of both flux and polarization spectra for well-studied Type Ia supernovae, such as SN 2001el and SN 2012fr. However, the two models considered here cannot account for the unusually high level of polarization observed in extreme cases such as SN 2004dt.

  1. Predicting major outcomes in type 1 diabetes: a model development and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Costacou, Tina; Miller, Rachel G.; Zgibor, Janice; Chaturvedi, Nish; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fuller, John H.; Moons, Karel G.M.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 1 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of major vascular complications and death. A reliable method that predicts these outcomes early in the disease process would be helpful in risk classification. We therefore developed such a prognostic model and quantified its performance in independent cohorts. Methods Data were analysed of 1,973 participants with type 1 diabetes who were followed for seven years in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. Strong prognostic factors of major outcomes were combined in a Weibull regression model. The model performance was tested in three different prospective cohorts: Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study (EDC, n=554), Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy study (FinnDiane, n=2,999) and Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study (CACTI, n=580). Major outcomes included major coronary heart disease, stroke, end-stage renal failure, amputations, blindness and all-cause death. Results 95 EURODIAB patients with type 1 diabetes developed major outcomes during follow-up. Prognostic factors were age, glycated haemoglobin, waist-hip ratio, albumin/creatinine ratio, and HDL cholesterol. A high risk group could be identified with 15% risk after 3-years of follow-up, 24% after 5-years and 32% after 7-years. The discriminative ability of the model was adequate with a C-statistic of 0.74. Discrimination was similar or even better in the independent cohorts: EDC, C-statistic = 0.79; FinnDiane, 0.82; and CACTI, 0.73. Conclusions/Interpretation Our prognostic model that uses easily accessible clinical features can discriminate between type 1 diabetes patients with good and poor prognosis. Such a prognostic model may be helpful in clinical practice and for risk stratification in clinical trials. PMID:25186291

  2. Modeling Shear-Enhanced Permeability as the Mechanism for Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs - A Promising Improvement to Predicting Reservoir Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate geomechanical reservoir model including constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, mechanical rock properties, and the orientations and characteristics of natural fractures is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low permeability reservoirs such as crystalline basement geothermal or oil and gas reservoirs. In these low permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. These hydraulic properties of the fractures, their width, stiffness and strength are often difficult to quantify, leading to large uncertainties in predicted response to stimulation of fractured reservoirs. A well-constrained and calibrated fracture model makes it possible not only to predict reservoir response to stimulation, including the shape and orientation of the stimulated region, but also to predict the required stimulation pressure. Such a model also makes it possible to predict the change in flow properties during production due to depletion, resulting in better predictions of production rate and ultimate recovery. As part of the evaluation process of a compartmentalized fractured basement reservoir, wellbore image and other data were used to develop a 3D geomechanical model of stress and natural fractures through the reservoir volume. Although the results clearly defined the optimal directions in which to drill wells to exploit pre-existing natural fractures, large uncertainties in the models resulted in significant uncertainties in predictions of stimulation response. Because the pre-existing natural fractures were insufficiently permeable and operational constraints precluded the use of hydraulic fracturing to stimulate the reservoir, an innovative approach was taken to determine the extent to which injection at pressures below

  3. Predicting days of high allergenic risk during Betula pollination using weather types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaidi, K.

      The aim of this study was to build up a picture of the influence of meteorological conditions on pollen and pollinosis, taking account of weather types, pollen concentrations in the air and pollinosis symptoms, with the aim of preventing allergic responses. The study took place in Burgundy from 1996 to 1998, during the pollination of the birch (Betula), which is the most important arborean allergen in this region. We used daily pollen data from four Hirst volumetric traps, identified weather types by Bénichou's classification, and obtained data on the occurrence of rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma and coughing from a sample of 100 patients. These data were analysed by multiple-component analysis. The results show that pollen dispersal is favoured by windy conditions, low relative humidity, precipitation below 2 mm and temperatures above 6°C. Such weather also favours pollinosis, but other particular meteorological situations, even if they do not assist pollen dispersal, can act directly on the development of symptoms: a decrease of temperature (3°C) led to the development of rhinitis and conjunctivitis, while strong winds were associated with many cases of conjunctivitis and asthma, owing to the irritant effect of cold or wind; asthma was favoured by temperature inversions with fog, probably because such weather corresponds to high levels of pollution, which act on bronchial hyperreactivity. Because the weather types favouring pollination and pollinosis are predicted by the meteorological office, this can constitute a tool for reducing the effect of high-risk allergenic days.

  4. Prediction of type-2 diabetes based on several element levels in blood and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Tan, Chao

    2012-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the levels of eight elements including lithium, zinc, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel and vanadium in whole blood of type-2 diabetes patients, to compare them with age-matched healthy controls and to investigate the feasibility of combining them with an ensemble model for diagnosing purpose. A dataset involving 158 samples, among which 105 were taken from healthy adults and the remaining 53 from patients with type-2 diabetes, was collected. All samples were split into the training set and the test set with the equal size. Based on a simple variable selection, two elements, i.e., chromium and iron, are also picked out as the most important elements. Three kinds of algorithms, i.e., fisher linear discriminate analysis (FLDA), support vector machine (SVM) and decision tree (DT), were used for constructing member models. The best ensemble classifiers constructed on the training set were validated on the independent test set, and the prediction results were compared with those from clinical diagnostics on the same subjects. The results reveal that almost all ensemble classifiers exhibit similar performance, implying that these elements coupled with an appropriate ensemble classifier can serve as a valuable tool of diagnosing diabetes type-2.

  5. Gate-tunable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaojia; Liu, Erfu; Liu, Huimei; Pan, Yiming; Zhang, Longqiang; Zeng, Junwen; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Miao; Xu, Kang; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Zhenlin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xing, Dingyu; Wang, Baigeng; Wan, Xiangang; Miao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The progress in exploiting new electronic materials has been a major driving force in solid-state physics. As a new state of matter, a Weyl semimetal (WSM), in particular a type-II WSM, hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles and may harbour novel electrical transport properties. Nevertheless, such a type-II WSM material has not been experimentally observed. In this work, by performing systematic magneto-transport studies on thin films of a predicted material candidate WTe2, we observe notable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, which can be attributed to the chiral anomaly in WSM. This phenomenon also exhibits strong planar orientation dependence with the absence along the tungsten chains, consistent with the distinctive feature of a type-II WSM. By applying a gate voltage, we demonstrate that the Fermi energy can be in-situ tuned through the Weyl points via the electric field effect. Our results may open opportunities for implementing new electronic applications, such as field-effect chiral devices.

  6. Identifying Precipitation Types Using Dual-Polarization-Based Radar and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, B. C.; Bradley, A.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    The recent upgrade of dual-polarization with NEXRAD radars has assisted in improving the characterization of microphysical processes in precipitation and thus has enabled precipitation estimation based on the identified precipitation types. While this polarimetric capability promises the potential for the enhanced accuracy in quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), recent studies show that the polarimetric estimates are still affected by uncertainties arising from the radar beam geometry/sampling space associated with the vertical variability of precipitation. The authors, first of all, focus on evaluating the NEXRAD hydrometeor classification product using ground reference data (e.g., ASOS) that provide simple categories of the observed precipitation types (e.g., rain, snow, and freezing rain). They also investigate classification uncertainty features caused by the variability of precipitation between the ground and the altitudes where radar samples. Since this variability is closely related to the atmospheric conditions (e.g., temperature) at near surface, useful information (e.g., critical thickness and temperature profile) that is not available in radar observations is retrieved from the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model data such as Rapid Refresh (RAP)/High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR). The NWP retrieved information and polarimetric radar data are used together to improve the accuracy of precipitation type identification at near surface. The authors highlight major improvements and discuss limitations in the real-time application.

  7. Gate-tunable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal WTe2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaojia; Liu, Erfu; Liu, Huimei; Pan, Yiming; Zhang, Longqiang; Zeng, Junwen; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Miao; Xu, Kang; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Zhenlin; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Xing, Dingyu; Wang, Baigeng; Wan, Xiangang; Miao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The progress in exploiting new electronic materials has been a major driving force in solid-state physics. As a new state of matter, a Weyl semimetal (WSM), in particular a type-II WSM, hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles and may harbour novel electrical transport properties. Nevertheless, such a type-II WSM material has not been experimentally observed. In this work, by performing systematic magneto-transport studies on thin films of a predicted material candidate WTe2, we observe notable negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, which can be attributed to the chiral anomaly in WSM. This phenomenon also exhibits strong planar orientation dependence with the absence along the tungsten chains, consistent with the distinctive feature of a type-II WSM. By applying a gate voltage, we demonstrate that the Fermi energy can be in-situ tuned through the Weyl points via the electric field effect. Our results may open opportunities for implementing new electronic applications, such as field-effect chiral devices. PMID:27725682

  8. Earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The state of the art in earthquake prediction is discussed. Short-term prediction based on seismic precursors, changes in the ratio of compressional velocity to shear velocity, tilt and strain precursors, electromagnetic precursors, hydrologic phenomena, chemical monitors, and animal behavior is examined. Seismic hazard assessment is addressed, and the applications of dynamical systems to earthquake prediction are discussed.

  9. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  10. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ , and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  11. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    initial T of 600 to 850 C, this produced periodic viscous shear heating events with periods of 100's to 1000's of years. Strain rates during these events approach 1 per second as temperatures reach 1400. Cooling between events returns the shear zone almost to its initial temperature, though ultimately shear zone temperature between events exceeds 850 C resulting in stable viscous creep. Analysis shows that our system of equations jumps from one steady state to another, depending on a non-dimensional number relating the rate of shear heating to the rate of diffusive cooling. This year, Kelemen and Hirth show that the rate of stress drop during shear heating events is greater than the rate of elastic stress relaxation, so that shear heating events are a runaway instability. Rather than capping the temperature at 1400 C, we parameterize melt fraction as a function of T, and shear viscosity as a function of melt fraction. A problem with our 1D model is that predicted displacements are too large (1 to 20 m) during shear heating events, essentially because there is no resistance at shear zone ends. To address this, Coon and Spiegelman have embarked on a 3D model, incorporating a pre-existing fine-grained, tabular shear zone of finite extent, with a visco-elastic rheology for both shear zone and wall rocks. Preliminary 1D models using this approach show that the more complicated rheology yields the same result as the simpler model. We will present preliminary results, and determine the Maxwell time for this problem, since low strain rates could produce viscous relaxation in both shear zone and wall rocks with negligible shear heating.

  12. Real-Time Shear Wave versus Transient Elastography for Predicting Fibrosis: Applicability, and Impact of Inflammation and Steatosis. A Non-Invasive Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Poynard, Thierry; Pham, Tam; Perazzo, Hugo; Munteanu, Mona; Luckina, Elena; Elaribi, Djamel; Ngo, Yen; Bonyhay, Luminita; Seurat, Noemie; Legroux, Muriel; Ngo, An; Deckmyn, Olivier; Thabut, Dominique; Ratziu, Vlad; Lucidarme, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Real-time shear wave elastography (2D-SWE) is a two-dimensional transient elastography and a competitor as a biomarker of liver fibrosis in comparison with the standard reference transient elastography by M probe (TE-M). The aims were to compare several criteria of applicability, and to assess inflammation and steatosis impact on elasticity values, two unmet needs. Methods We took FibroTest as the fibrosis reference and ActiTest and SteatoTest as quantitative estimates of inflammation and steatosis. After standardization of estimates, analyses used curve fitting, quantitative Lin concordance coefficient [LCC], and multivariate logistic regression. Results A total of 2,251 consecutive patients were included. We validated the predetermined 0.2 kPa cut-off as a too low minimal elasticity value identifying not-reliable 2D-SWE results (LCC with FibroTest = 0.0281[-0.119;0.175]. Other criteria, elasticity CV, body mass index and depth of measures were not sufficiently discriminant. The applicability of 2D-SWE (95%CI) 89.6%(88.2–90.8), was significantly higher than that of TE, 85.6%(84.0–87.0; P<0.0001). In patients with non-advanced fibrosis (METAVIR F0F1F2), elasticity values estimated by 2D-SWE was less impacted by inflammation and steatosis than elasticity value estimated by TE-M: LCC (95%CI) 0.039 (0.021;0.058) vs 0.090 (0.068;0.112;P<0.01) and 0.105 (0.068;0.141) vs 0.192 (0.153;0.230; P<0.01) respectively. The three analyses methods gave similar results. Conclusions Elasticity results including very low minimal signal in the region of interest should be considered not reliable. 2D-SWE had a higher applicability than TE, the reference elastography, with less impact of inflammation and steatosis especially in patients with non-advanced fibrosis, as presumed by blood tests. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01927133 PMID:27706177

  13. An approximate solution to improve computational efficiency of impedance-type payload load prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The computational efficiency of the impedance type loads prediction method was studied. Three goals were addressed: devise a method to make the impedance method operate more efficiently in the computer; assess the accuracy and convenience of the method for determining the effect of design changes; and investigate the use of the method to identify design changes for reduction of payload loads. The method is suitable for calculation of dynamic response in either the frequency or time domain. It is concluded that: the choice of an orthogonal coordinate system will allow the impedance method to operate more efficiently in the computer; the approximate mode impedance technique is adequate for determining the effect of design changes, and is applicable for both statically determinate and statically indeterminate payload attachments; and beneficial design changes to reduce payload loads can be identified by the combined application of impedance techniques and energy distribution review techniques.

  14. Simple shear of deformable square objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagus, Susan H.; Lan, Labao

    2003-12-01

    Finite element models of square objects in a contrasting matrix in simple shear show that the objects deform to a variety of shapes. For a range of viscosity contrasts, we catalogue the changing shapes and orientations of objects in progressive simple shear. At moderate simple shear ( γ=1.5), the shapes are virtually indistinguishable from those in equivalent pure shear models with the same bulk strain ( RS=4), examined in a previous study. In theory, differences would be expected, especially for very stiff objects or at very large strain. In all our simple shear models, relatively competent square objects become asymmetric barrel shapes with concave shortened edges, similar to some types of boudin. Incompetent objects develop shapes surprisingly similar to mica fish described in mylonites.

  15. The effect of fibre and gelatinised starch type on amylolysis and apparent viscosity during in vitro digestion at a physiological shear rate.

    PubMed

    Hardacre, Allan K; Yap, Sia-Yen; Lentle, Roger G; Monro, John A

    2015-06-01

    An in vitro system was used to determine if the addition of insoluble or soluble fibre to aqueous suspensions of gelatinised starch affected the rate at which the starch was digested. Pre-gelatinised potato or corn starch suspensions were digested with porcine pancreatic amylase in the presence of either finely milled insoluble fibres from various sources or with guar gum. In vitro digestion was conducted at 37°C in a rheometer at a low and constant shear rate of 10s(-1) and the quantity of glucose released measured. The rates of starch digestion and suspension viscosity declined asymptotically and were unaffected by the addition of wheat fibre, but were considerably reduced by the addition of wood and AllBran(®) fibre and to a much greater extent (60%) by the addition of guar. The latter effect may be due to inhibition of amylase activity by non starch polysaccharide sequences.

  16. Is Vocabulary a Strong Variable Predicting Reading Comprehension and Does the Prediction Degree of Vocabulary Vary According to Text Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Kasim; Yildiz, Mustafa; Ates, Seyit

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether there was a significant correlation between vocabulary and reading comprehension in terms of text types as well as whether the vocabulary was a predictor of reading comprehension in terms of text types. In this regard, the correlational research design was used to explain specific research…

  17. Prediction of Intimal Tear Site by Computed Tomography in Acute Aortic Dissection Type A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Sung; Lim, Cheong; Kim, Dong Jin; Jung, Yochun; Shin, Yoon Cheol; Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Yoo, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Preoperative identification of intimal tear site in acute type A dissection will help procedural planning. The objective of this study was to determine the key findings of computed tomography (CT)-based prediction for tear site and compare the accuracy between radiologists and surgeons. Subjects and Methods Multi-detector CT (MDCT) images from 50 patients who underwent surgical repair of type A aortic dissection were retrospectively reviewed by 4 cardiac surgeons with limited experience or by 3 radiologists specialized in cardiovascular imaging. Surgical findings of intimal tear site were used as references. Results In surgical findings, the locations of intimal tear that were identified in 43 patients included aorta (n=25), ascending with arch (n=7), and arch only (n=11). The rest were retrograde dissections from the tear of descending aorta. Key CT findings that were most frequently found were defect in the intimal flap shadow (30.0±4.0 patients/reviewer, accuracy 87.0±11.7%) and differential filling of false lumen by phase and location (9.4±2.9 patients/reviewer, 84.8±10.4%). Surgeons predicted tear site (75.0±7.7% vs. 86.7±1.2%, p=0.055) and specified flap defect (80.5±10.3% vs. 95.7±7.4%, p=0.073) with lower accuracy than radiologists. Conclusions With MDCT imaging, well-educated surgeons could be accurate in three fourths of cases. There was room for improvement through experience. Considering the substantial possibility of inaccuracy, critical decisions on CT images should be made through thorough reviewing by as many experienced radiologists and surgeons as possible. PMID:26798385

  18. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  19. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37±11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing. PMID:26789839

  20. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing. PMID:26789839

  1. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions. PMID:27338739

  2. A Predictive Metabolic Signature for the Transition From Gestational Diabetes Mellitus to Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allalou, Amina; Nalla, Amarnadh; Prentice, Kacey J; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming; Dai, Feihan F; Ning, Xian; Osborne, Lucy R; Cox, Brian J; Gunderson, Erica P; Wheeler, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 3-14% of pregnancies, with 20-50% of these women progressing to type 2 diabetes (T2D) within 5 years. This study sought to develop a metabolomics signature to predict the transition from GDM to T2D. A prospective cohort of 1,035 women with GDM pregnancy were enrolled at 6-9 weeks postpartum (baseline) and were screened for T2D annually for 2 years. Of 1,010 women without T2D at baseline, 113 progressed to T2D within 2 years. T2D developed in another 17 women between 2 and 4 years. A nested case-control design used 122 incident case patients matched to non-case patients by age, prepregnancy BMI, and race/ethnicity. We conducted metabolomics with baseline fasting plasma and identified 21 metabolites that significantly differed by incident T2D status. Machine learning optimization resulted in a decision tree modeling that predicted T2D incidence with a discriminative power of 83.0% in the training set and 76.9% in an independent testing set, which is far superior to measuring fasting plasma glucose levels alone. The American Diabetes Association recommends T2D screening in the early postpartum period via oral glucose tolerance testing after GDM, which is a time-consuming and inconvenient procedure. Our metabolomics signature predicted T2D incidence from a single fasting blood sample. This study represents the first metabolomics study of the transition from GDM to T2D validated in an independent testing set, facilitating early interventions.

  3. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past. PMID:25864448

  4. Computational and Experimental Prediction of Human C-Type Lectin Receptor Druggability

    PubMed Central

    Aretz, Jonas; Wamhoff, Eike-Christian; Hanske, Jonas; Heymann, Dario; Rademacher, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian C-type lectin receptors (CTLRS) are involved in many aspects of immune cell regulation such as pathogen recognition, clearance of apoptotic bodies, and lymphocyte homing. Despite a great interest in modulating CTLR recognition of carbohydrates, the number of specific molecular probes is limited. To this end, we predicted the druggability of a panel of 22 CTLRs using DoGSiteScorer. The computed druggability scores of most structures were low, characterizing this family as either challenging or even undruggable. To further explore these findings, we employed a fluorine-based nuclear magnetic resonance screening of fragment mixtures against DC-SIGN, a receptor of pharmacological interest. To our surprise, we found many fragment hits associated with the carbohydrate recognition site (hit rate = 13.5%). A surface plasmon resonance-based follow-up assay confirmed 18 of these fragments (47%) and equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Encouraged by these findings we expanded our experimental druggability prediction to Langerin and MCL and found medium to high hit rates as well, being 15.7 and 10.0%, respectively. Our results highlight limitations of current in silico approaches to druggability assessment, in particular, with regard to carbohydrate-binding proteins. In sum, our data indicate that small molecule ligands for a larger panel of CTLRs can be developed. PMID:25071783

  5. Prediction of the crystal structure types of equiatomic ternary silicides and germanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyova, N. N.; Stolyarenko, A. V.; Sen'ko, O. V.; Dokukin, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    New unsynthesized equiatomic ABX ( A and B are various metals; X = Si or Ge) compounds are predicted, and their types of crystal structure are forecasted under standard conditions. Only the data on the properties of the elements—components of compounds are used for their prediction. The calculations are performed using a special-purpose software package of computer analysis of information intended for searching for regularities in databases on the properties of inorganic compounds, and this package is based on the methods of precedent pattern recognition. Computer analysis of the data on the well-known compounds shows that the functions that are most important for the classification of systems in the sign of formation or absence of equiatomic compounds are M( A) × M( B) and I( A) × I( X), where M is the Mendeleev-Pettifor number of element A or B and I is the thermal conductivity of element A or X. The parameters that most strongly separate compounds for crystal chemical classification are functions T( A) + T( B) (where T is the melting temperature of element A or B), I( A), M( A) × M( B), and I( A) × I( X).

  6. Predicting the continuous values of breast cancer relapse time by type-2 fuzzy logic system.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodian, Hamid

    2012-06-01

    Microarray analysis and gene expression profile have been widely used in tumor classification, survival analysis and ER statues of breast cancer. Sample discrimination as well as identification of significant genes have been the focus of most previous studies. The aim of this research is to propose a fuzzy model to predict the relapse time of breast cancer by using breast cancer dataset published by van't Veer. Fuzzy rule mining based on support vector machine has been used in a hybrid method with rule pruning and shown its ability to divide the samples in many subgroups. To handle the existence of uncertainties in linguistic variables and fuzzy sets, the TSK model of Interval type-2 fuzzy logic system has been used and a new simple method is also developed to consider the uncertainties of the rules which have been optimized by genetic algorithm. B632 validation method is applied to estimate the error of the model. The results with 95 % confidence interval show a reasonable accuracy in prediction.

  7. Prediction of moisture content of natural gases using simple Arrhenius-type function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Natural gas extracted from underground reservoirs is saturated with water. The accurate prediction of moisture content in natural gas is extremely important. The presence of water vapor can lead to potentially disastrous consequences. The lifetime of a pipeline is governed by the rate at which corrosion occurs, which is directly linked to the available moisture in the gas resulting in oxidation. In addition, the formation of hydrates due to presence of water in natural gas can lead to safety hazards to production/transportation systems and to substantial economic risks. In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop an easy-to-use Arrhenius-type asymptotic exponential function combined with the Vandermonde matrix to arrive at an appropriate estimation of saturated water content of sour natural gases for pressures up to 69000 kPa and the temperature range between 20 to 180°C. Percent average absolute deviation of the proposed method is found to be around 2%, demonstrating the excellent performance of the developed predictive tool. The tool will be of great practical value for chemical and petroleum engineers to have a quick check on the water content of sour natural gases at various temperatures and pressures without performing any experimental measurements.

  8. Established and emerging biomarkers for the prediction of type 1 diabetes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    WATKINS, RENECIA A.; EVANS-MOLINA, CARMELLA; BLUM, JANICE S.; DIMEGLIO, LINDA A.

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease with a prolonged and variable latent period that culminates in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells and the development of hyperglycemia. There is a need for diagnostic biomarkers to detect more accurately detect individuals with prediabetes to expedite targeting for prevention and intervention strategies. To assess the current ability to predict the insidious development of T1D, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review for established and prospective predictive markers of T1D using the Medline, OVID, and EMBASE databases. Resulting citations were screened for relevance to subject. Our research generated five major categories of markers that are either currently used or forthcoming: genetic, autoantibodies, risk score quantification, cellular immunity, and β-cell function. The current standard used to assess T1D onset or predisposition focuses on autoimmune pathology and disease-associated autoantibodies. Research studies in general go beyond autoantibody screening and assess genetic predisposition, and quantitate risk of developing disease based on additional factors. However, there are few currently used techniques that assess the root of T1D: β-cell destruction. Thus, novel techniques are discussed with the potential to gauge degrees of β-cell stress and failure via protein, RNA, and DNA analyses. PMID:24662515

  9. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  10. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  11. Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, R. B.; Giacomin, A. J.; Schmalzer, A. M.; Aumnate, C.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the simplest relevant molecular model for large-amplitude shear (LAOS) flow of a polymeric liquid: the suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian solvent. We find explicit analytical expressions for the shear rate amplitude and frequency dependences of the first and third harmonics of the alternating shear stress response. We include a detailed comparison of these predictions with the corresponding results for the simplest relevant continuum model: the corotational Maxwell model. We find that the responses of both models are qualitatively similar. The rigid dumbbell model relies entirely on the dumbbell orientation to explain the viscoelastic response of the polymeric liquid, including the higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Our analysis employs the general method of Bird and Armstrong ["Time-dependent flows of dilute solutions of rodlike macromolecules," J. Chem. Phys. 56, 3680 (1972)] for analyzing the behavior of the rigid dumbbell model in any unsteady shear flow. We derive the first three terms of the deviation of the orientational distribution function from the equilibrium state. Then, after getting the "paren functions," we use these for evaluating the shear stress for LAOS flow. We find the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops predicted to be reasonable.

  12. Prediction of protective sensory loss, neuropathy and foot ulceration in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paisey, R B; Darby, T; George, A M; Waterson, M; Hewson, P; Paisey, C F; Thomson, M P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine clinical and biochemical characteristics associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy, loss of protective sensation, and foot ulceration in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) over 7 years. Research design and methods Graded monofilament (MF) testing, vibration perception threshold, and neuropathy symptom questionnaires were undertaken in 206 participants with type 2 DM without peripheral vascular disease or history of foot ulceration and 71 healthy participants without DM at baseline and after 7 years. 6 monthly glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and annual serum lipid profiles were measured during follow-up of those with DM. Incident foot ulceration was recorded at follow-up. Results Taller stature and higher quartiles of serum triglyceride and HbA1c levels were associated with neuropathy at follow-up (p=0.008). Remission of baseline neuropathy was observed in 7 participants at follow-up. 9 participants with type 2 DM developed foot ulcers by the end of the study, only 1 at low risk. Mean HbA1c levels were higher in those who developed foot ulceration (p<0.0001). 1 participant with neuropathy throughout developed a Charcot foot. Failure to perceive 2 or more 2, 4 and 6 g MF stimuli at baseline predicted loss of protective sensation at follow-up. Conclusions Tall stature and worse metabolic control were associated with progression to neuropathy. Mean HbA1c levels were higher in those who developed foot ulcers. Graded MF testing may enrich recruitment to clinical trials and assignation of high risk for foot ulceration. PMID:27239314

  13. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  14. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  15. Method for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Watson, Clyde D.

    1977-01-01

    A method is disclosed for shearing spent nuclear fuel assemblies of the type wherein a plurality of long metal tubes packed with ceramic fuel are supported in a spaced apart relationship within an outer metal shell or shroud which provides structural support to the assembly. Spent nuclear fuel assemblies are first compacted in a stepwise manner between specially designed gag-compactors and then sheared into short segments amenable to chemical processing by shear blades contoured to mate with the compacted surface of the fuel assembly.

  16. Health-risk behaviors among a sample of US pre- adolescents: Types, frequency, and predictive factors

    PubMed Central

    Riesch, Susan K.; Kedrowski, Karen; Brown, Roger L.; Temkin, Barbara Myers; Wang, Kevin; Henriques, Jeffrey; Jacobson, Gloria; Giustino-Kluba, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Background Children as young as 10 years old report curiosity and participation in health-risk behaviors, yet most studies focus upon adolescent samples. Objective To document the types and frequencies of health risk behavior among pre-adolescents and to examine the child, family, and environment factors that predict them. Method A sample of 297 pre-adolescents (mean age = 10.5, SD = 0.6) from two Midwestern US cities and their parents (child-parent dyads) provided data about demographic characteristics, health risk behavior participation, child self-esteem, child pubertal development, child and adult perception of their neighborhood, and parent monitoring. Their participation was at intake to a 5-year clustered randomized controlled trial. Results Pre-adolescents participated in an average of 3.7 health-risk behaviors (SD = 2.0), primarily those that lead to unintentional (helmet and seatbelt use) and intentional (feeling unsafe, having something stolen, and physical fighting) injury. Factors predictive of unintentional injury risk behavior were self-esteem, pubertal development, parent monitoring, and parent perception of the neighborhood environment. Boys were 1.8 times less likely than girls to use helmets and seatbelts. Pre-adolescents whose parents were not partnered were 2.8 times more likely than pre-adolescents whose parents were partnered to report intentional risk behavior. Recommendations These data demonstrate trends that cannot be ignored. We recommend, focused specifically upon boys and non-partnered families, that (a) developmentally-appropriate, appealing prevention messages be developed and delivered for parents and pre-adolescents and community interventions targeting both parent and pre-adolescent together be provided to help them establish and monitor behavioral expectations and (b) organized nursing endorse policy in the US and globally that assures adequate family environments for children. PMID:23177901

  17. Plasma 1-deoxysphingolipids are predictive biomarkers for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Alaa; Saely, Christoph H; Muendlein, Axel; Vonbank, Alexander; Drexel, Heinz; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Objective Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) catalyzes the condensation of serine and palmitoyl coenzyme A, the first step in the de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Apart from these canonical substrates, SPT can also metabolize alanine and other acyl coenzyme As. This forms a spectrum of atypical sphingoid bases which are altered in the context of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We investigated whether atypical sphingolipids can be used as prospective markers to predict the incidence of T2DM. Research design and methods Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we analyzed the sphingoid base profile in a prospective cohort with 339 individuals. All individuals were followed up for a period of 8 years. Results Confirming earlier results, we found 1-deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySLs) to be significantly elevated in patients with MetS, impaired fasting glucose, and T2DM. Patients who developed T2DM during the follow-up period (n=32) showed significantly higher 1-deoxySL levels at baseline compared with those who did not develop T2DM until the end of the study (n=70). 1-Deoxysphingosine levels were independent predictors for T2DM even after adjusting for glycated hemoglobin (standardized adjusted OR=2.1, CI 95% (1.19 to 3.71); p=0.010), MetS (standardized adjusted OR=1.97, CI 95% (1.13 to 3.43); p=0.017), and other risk factors such as age, sex, BMI, and lipid-lowering drugs. Similar results were observed for the 1-deoxysphinganine levels. Conclusions Our results support a novel role for 1-deoxySL as predictive biomarkers for the development of T2DM in risk patients and warrants further larger prospective trials in lower risk cohorts. PMID:25815206

  18. Third-moment closure of turbulence for predictions of separating and reattaching shear flows: A study of Reynolds-stress closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.; Goel, P.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study of computations in backward-facing steps with flow separation and reattachment, using the Reynolds stress closure is presented. The highlight of this study is the improvement of the Reynold-stress model (RSM) by modifying the diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses through the formulation, solution and subsequent incorporation of the transport equations of the third moments, bar-u(i)u(j)u(k), into the turbulence model. The diffusive transport of the Reynolds stresses, represented by the gradients of the third moments, attains greater significance in recirculating flows. The third moments evaluated by the development and solution of the complete transport equations are superior to those obtained by existing algebraic correlations. A low-Reynolds number model for the transport equations of the third moments is developed and considerable improvement in the near-wall profiles of the third moments is observed. The values of the empirical constants utilized in the development of the model are recommended. The Reynolds-stress closure is consolidated by incorporating the equations of k and e, containing the modified diffusion coefficients, and the transport equations of the third moments into the Reynolds stress equations. Computational results obtained by the original k-e model, the original RSM and the consolidated and modified RSM are compared with experimental data. Overall improvement in the predictions is seen by consolidation of the RMS and a marked improvement in the profiles of bar-u(i)u(j)u(k) is obtained around the reattachment region.

  19. Estimated insulin sensitivity predicts regression of albuminuria in Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, P.; Maahs, D. M.; Johnson, R. J.; Rewers, M.; Snell-Bergeon, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To test the hypothesis that greater baseline insulin sensitivity would predict regression of albuminuria over 6 years in adults with Type 1 diabetes. Method We enrolled 81 people aged 30–48 years with albuminuria at baseline in the present study and re-examined them 6 years later. Urinary albumin excretion rate was measured and albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin excretion rate ≥20 µg/min. Regression of albuminuria was defined as normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate <20µg/min) at follow-up. Predictors of regression of albuminuria were examined in stepwise logistic regression. The variables age, diabetes duration, sex, serum uric acid, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, BMI, baseline albumin excretion rate, estimated insulin sensitivity at baseline, change in estimated insulin sensitivity from baseline to follow-up and angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker use were considered for inclusion in the model. Results Estimated insulin sensitivity was significantly higher at both baseline (4.6±1.2 vs 3.4±1.7; P=0.002) and follow-up (5.2±1.9 vs. 3.5±1.7; P<0.0001) in people who had regression of albuminuria vs those who did not. HbA1c (odds ratio 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.8; P=0.006), estimated insulin sensitivity (odds ratio 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–4.9; P=0.006) at baseline and change in estimated insulin sensitivity from baseline to follow-up (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.4–5.3; P=0.003) were independently associated with regression of albuminuria in a multivariable stepwise model. Conclusions In conclusion, over 6 years, higher baseline estimated insulin sensitivity and change in estimated insulin sensitivity independently predicted regression of albuminuria. Improving insulin sensitivity in people with Type 1 diabetes is a potential therapeutic target to increase rates of regression of albuminuria. PMID:25303233

  20. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  1. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Farzad; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H; Tahir, M M

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed.

  2. MemType-2L: a web server for predicting membrane proteins and their types by incorporating evolution information through Pse-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2007-08-24

    Given an uncharacterized protein sequence, how can we identify whether it is a membrane protein or not? If it is, which membrane protein type it belongs to? These questions are important because they are closely relevant to the biological function of the query protein and to its interaction process with other molecules in a biological system. Particularly, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the Post-Genomic Age and the relatively much slower progress in using biochemical experiments to determine their functions, it is highly desired to develop an automated method that can be used to help address these questions. In this study, a 2-layer predictor, called MemType-2L, has been developed: the 1st layer prediction engine is to identify a query protein as membrane or non-membrane; if it is a membrane protein, the process will be automatically continued with the 2nd-layer prediction engine to further identify its type among the following eight categories: (1) type I, (2) type II, (3) type III, (4) type IV, (5) multipass, (6) lipid-chain-anchored, (7) GPI-anchored, and (8) peripheral. MemType-2L is featured by incorporating the evolution information through representing the protein samples with the Pse-PSSM (Pseudo Position-Specific Score Matrix) vectors, and by containing an ensemble classifier formed by fusing many powerful individual OET-KNN (Optimized Evidence-Theoretic K-Nearest Neighbor) classifiers. The success rates obtained by MemType-2L on a new-constructed stringent dataset by both the jackknife test and the independent dataset test are quite high, indicating that MemType-2L may become a very useful high throughput tool. As a Web server, MemType-2L is freely accessible to the public at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemType.

  3. Influence of magnetic shear on impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, H.; Fueloep, T.; Candy, J.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic shear dependence of impurity transport in tokamaks is studied using a quasilinear fluid model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron (TE) mode driven turbulence in the collisionless limit and the results are compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic results using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys 186, 545 (2003)]. It is shown that the impurity transport is sensitive to the magnetic shear, in particular for weak, negative, and large positive shear where a strong reduction of the effective impurity diffusivity is obtained. The fluid and gyrokinetic results are in qualitative agreement, with the gyrokinetic diffusivities typically a factor 2 larger than the fluid diffusivities. The steady state impurity profiles in source-free plasmas are found to be considerably less peaked than the electron density profiles for moderate shear. Comparisons between anomalous and neoclassical transport predictions are performed for ITER-like profiles [R. Aymar, P. Barabaschi, and Y. Shimomura, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)].

  4. B-type natriuretic peptide to predict ductus intervention in infants <28 weeks.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Christoph; Lemmer, Julia; Metze, Boris; Koehne, Petra S; Mueller, Christian; Obladen, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is frequent in neonates with gestational age of less than 28 wk. Clinical and echocardiographic signs define hemodynamic significance of PDA, but do not reveal the need for PDA intervention in the first days of life. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been proposed as a screening tool for PDA in preterm infants. To determine whether BNP can predict the need for PDA intervention, plasma BNP was measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay in 67 preterm infants <28 wk (median 26) on the second day of life in a prospective blinded study. PDA intervention was based on specified clinical and echocardiographic findings. Twenty-four patients (intervention group) received treatment for PDA and 43 patients (controls) remained without intervention. BNP concentrations were higher in the intervention (median 1069 pg/mL) than in the control group (247 pg/mL, p < 0.001). BNP correlated positively with ductal size (R = 0.46, p < 0.001) and atrial/aortic root ratio (R = 0.54, p < 0.001). In conclusion, plasma BNP proved to be a good predictor for ductus intervention (area under the curve: 0.86) with the best cutoff at 550 pg/mL on the second day of life in ventilated infants less than 28 wk gestation (sensitivity: 83%; specificity: 86%).

  5. Predicting Health Resilience in Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: A Test of the Resilience Model Framework

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan; Dolan, Lawrence; Reeves, Grafton; Drotar, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This research examined whether individual and family-level factors during the transition from late childhood to early adolescence protected individuals from an increased risk of poor glycemic control across time, which is a predictor of future diabetes-related complications (i.e., health resilience). Methods This longitudinal, multisite study included 239 patients with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers. Glycemic control was based on hemoglobin A1c. Individual and family-level factors included: demographic variables, youth behavioral regulation, adherence (frequency of blood glucose monitoring), diabetes self-management, level of parental support for diabetes autonomy, level of youth mastery and responsibility for diabetes management, and diabetes-related family conflict. Results Longitudinal mixed-effects logistic regression indicated that testing blood glucose more frequently, better self-management, and less diabetes-related family conflict were indicators of health resilience. Conclusions Multiple individual and family-level factors predicted risk for future health complications. Future research should develop interventions targeting specific individual and family-level factors to sustain glycemic control within recommended targets, which reduces the risk of developing future health complications during the transition to adolescence and adulthood. PMID:26152400

  6. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, M.; Reichstein, M.; Davidson, E. A.; Grünzweig, J.; Jung, M.; Carbone, M. S.; Epron, D.; Misson, L.; Nouvellon, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Savage, K.; Trumbore, S. E.; Gimeno, C.; Yuste, J. Curiel; Tang, J.; Vargas, R.; Janssens, I. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) constitutes the largest flux of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. However, there still exist considerable uncertainties as to its actual magnitude, as well as its spatial and interannual variability. Based on a reanalysis and synthesis of 80 site-years for 57 forests, plantations, savannas, shrublands and grasslands from boreal to tropical climates we present evidence that total annual SR is closely related to SR at mean annual soil temperature (SRMAT), irrespective of the type of ecosystem and biome. This is theoretically expected for non water-limited ecosystems within most of the globally occurring range of annual temperature variability and sensitivity (Q10). We further show that for seasonally dry sites where annual precipitation (P) is lower than potential evapotranspiration (PET), annual SR can be predicted from wet season SRMAT corrected for a factor related to P/PET. Our finding indicates that it can be sufficient to measure SRMAT for obtaining a well constrained estimate of its annual total. This should substantially increase our capacity for assessing the spatial distribution of soil CO2 emissions across ecosystems, landscapes and regions, and thereby contribute to improving the spatial resolution of a major component of the global carbon cycle. PMID:23293656

  7. Prediction of the radiation situation during conditioned radioactive waste storage in hangar-type storage facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosnovskii, S. V.; Bulka, S. K.

    2014-02-01

    An original technology for the conditioning of solidified radioactive waste was developed by the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. The technology provides for waste placement inside NZK-150-1.5P containers with their further storage at light hangar-type storage facilities. A number of technical solutions were developed that allow for reducing the gamma-radiation dose rate from the package formed. A methodology for prediction of the radiation situation around hangars, depending on the radiation characteristics of irrecoverable shielding containers (ISCs) located in the peripheral row of a storage facility, was developed with the purpose of assuring safe storage. Based on empirical data, the field background gamma-radiation dose rate at an area as a function of the average dose rate at the hangar surface and the average dose rate close packages, placed in the peripheral row of the storage facility, was calculated. The application of the developed methodology made it possible to reduce by ten times the expenditures for the conditioning and holding of solidified radioactive waste (SRW) while unconditionally providing storage safety.

  8. Simulation of two- and three-dimensional dense-fluid shear flows via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: Comparison of time-and-space-averaged stresses from homogeneous Doll's and Sllod shear algorithms with those from boundary-driven shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Petravic, Janka

    2008-10-01

    Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate dvx/dy ) are generated with the Doll’s and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear normal-stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, Pxx-Pyy , depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll’s and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this normal-stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures: Txx>Tzz>Tyy .

  9. Bingham and Response Characteristics of ER Fluids in Shear and Flow Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. G.; Choi, S. B.; Han, S. S.; Kim, J. H.; Suh, M. S.

    This paper presents field-dependent Bingham and response characteristics of ER fluid under shear and flow modes. Two different types of electroviscometers are designed and manufactured for the shear mode and flow mode, respectively. An ER fluid consisting of soluble chemical starches (particles) and silicon oil is made and its field-dependent yield stress is experimentally distilled at two different temperatures using the electroviscometers. Time responses of the ER fluid to step electric fields are also evaluated under two operating modes. In addition, a cylindrical ER damper, which is operated under the flow mode, is adopted and its measured damping force is compared with predicted one obtained from Bingham model of the shear and flow mode, respectively.

  10. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear

    PubMed Central

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  11. Haptic Edge Detection Through Shear.

    PubMed

    Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Lipson, Hod; Hayward, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Most tactile sensors are based on the assumption that touch depends on measuring pressure. However, the pressure distribution at the surface of a tactile sensor cannot be acquired directly and must be inferred from the deformation field induced by the touched object in the sensor medium. Currently, there is no consensus as to which components of strain are most informative for tactile sensing. Here, we propose that shape-related tactile information is more suitably recovered from shear strain than normal strain. Based on a contact mechanics analysis, we demonstrate that the elastic behavior of a haptic probe provides a robust edge detection mechanism when shear strain is sensed. We used a jamming-based robot gripper as a tactile sensor to empirically validate that shear strain processing gives accurate edge information that is invariant to changes in pressure, as predicted by the contact mechanics study. This result has implications for the design of effective tactile sensors as well as for the understanding of the early somatosensory processing in mammals. PMID:27009331

  12. A void coalescence model for combined tension and shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, C.; Chen, Z. T.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of shear loading on damage development in Gurson-based models has long been neglected resulting in inadequate fracture strain predictions at low triaxiality where shear effects become significant. The plastic limit-load fracture criterion used in advanced Gurson models neglects the influence of shear loading and overestimates the fracture strain and porosity at low triaxiality. In this paper, we extend the recently proposed shear damage model of Xue [1] to provide a stronger physical foundation by removing the simplifying assumptions. Then we directly modify the plastic limit-load fracture criterion by coupling with the extended shear damage model to account for shear weakening and failure of the intervoid ligament in void coalescence. We apply the modified plastic limit-load criterion to predict the necking of sheet tensile specimens and find very good agreement with the available experimental results.

  13. T-type calcium channels promote predictive homeostasis of input-output relations in thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Z; Kim, Haram R; Fiorillo, Christopher D

    2014-01-01

    A general theory views the function of all neurons as prediction, and one component of this theory is that of "predictive homeostasis" or "prediction error." It is well established that sensory systems adapt so that neuronal output maintains sensitivity to sensory input, in accord with information theory. Predictive homeostasis applies the same principle at the cellular level, where the challenge is to maintain membrane excitability at the optimal homeostatic level so that spike generation is maximally sensitive to small gradations in synaptic drive. Negative feedback is a hallmark of homeostatic mechanisms, as exemplified by depolarization-activated potassium channels. In contrast, T-type calcium channels exhibit positive feedback that appears at odds with the theory. In thalamocortical neurons of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), T-type channels are capable of causing bursts of spikes with an all-or-none character in response to excitation from a hyperpolarized potential. This "burst mode" would partially uncouple visual input from spike output and reduce the information spikes convey about gradations in visual input. However, past observations of T-type-driven bursts may have resulted from unnaturally high membrane excitability. Here we have mimicked within rat brain slices the patterns of synaptic conductance that occur naturally during vision. In support of the theory of predictive homeostasis, we found that T-type channels restored excitability toward its homeostatic level during periods of hyperpolarization. Thus, activation of T-type channels allowed two retinal input spikes to cause one output spike on average, and we observed almost no instances in which output count exceeded input count (a "burst"). T-type calcium channels therefore help to maintain a single optimal mode of transmission rather than creating a second mode. More fundamentally our results support the general theory, which seeks to predict the properties of a neuron's ion channels and

  14. The Research of Improved Grey GM (1, 1) Model to Predict the Postprandial Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yannian; Wei, Fenfen; Sun, Changqing; Li, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes may result in some complications and increase the risk of many serious health problems. The purpose of clinical treatment is to carefully manage the blood glucose concentration. If the blood glucose concentration is predicted, treatments can be taken in advance to reduce the harm to patients. For this purpose, an improved grey GM (1, 1) model is applied to predict blood glucose with a small amount of data, and especially in terms of improved smoothness it can get higher prediction accuracy. The original data of blood glucose of type 2 diabetes is acquired by CGMS. Then the prediction model is established. Finally, 50 cases of blood glucose from the Henan Province People's Hospital are predicted in 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes, respectively, in advance to verify the prediction model. The prediction result of blood glucose is evaluated by the EGA, MSE, and MAE. Particularly, the prediction results of postprandial blood glucose are presented and analyzed. The result shows that the improved grey GM (1, 1) model has excellent performance in postprandial blood glucose prediction. PMID:27314034

  15. Preeclampsia Prediction in Type 1 Diabetes and Diurnal Blood Pressure Methodology.

    PubMed

    Lauszus, Finn Friis

    2016-01-01

    The most recent Cochrane reviews on oral antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy conclude that no substantial benefits for the mother or fetus are demonstrated so far. Whether this applies for a high-risk and diabetic pregnancy is doubtful. The aim of this short review is an introduction to the field of ambulatory blood pressure measurements in pregnancy and in particular in women with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic pregnancy is complicated with a 50% risk of hypertension/preeclampsia. In the nonpregnant, diabetic women minute increases in blood pressure as well as in albuminuria are forerunners for incipient and overt nephropathy. Medication is essential and can conserve renal function, modifying the risk of renal insufficiency. During pregnancy, renal insufficiency in women with diabetes leads to termination of pregnancy. Therefore, detection of minute changes based on reliable measurements in this high-risk population is invaluable to protect the mother's kidney function and, if possible, prolong pregnancy for the benefit of the fetus. Estimates of risk by blood pressure evaluation in these women are influenced by pregnancy per se and diabetes vasculopathy. Several factors have to be considered as few monitors are validated for use in pregnancy and not many of the different methodologies have undergone thorough investigation. The use of absolute values of blood pressure have the advantage that fewer assumptions are necessary on how blood pressure behaves due to modes of evaluation and biological rhythm. Monitors should be chosen with care considering the clinical setting, timing, and population, which influences the outcome, thus, the monitors ought to be validated for the specific condition they are applied for. The strategy for the studies used for safe conclusions in this brief review was chosen with priority of the papers with the best, validated methodology on BP measurements, which is by no way guaranteed in numerous recent publications. Inherent characteristics of

  16. Angular shear plate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruda, Mitchell C.; Greynolds, Alan W.; Stuhlinger, Tilman W.

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  17. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  18. Prediction of protein secondary structure based on residue pair types and conformational states using dynamic programming algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Parto, Sahar; Arab, Shahriar; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2005-06-20

    We have used a statistical approach for protein secondary structure prediction based on information theory and simultaneously taking into consideration pairwise residue types and conformational states. Since the prediction of residue secondary structure by one residue window sliding make ambiguity in state prediction, we used a dynamic programming algorithm to find the path with maximum score. A score system for residue pairs in particular conformations is derived for adjacent neighbors up to ten residue apart in sequence. The three state overall per-residue accuracy, Q3, of this method in a jackknife test with dataset created from PDBSELECT is more than 70%.

  19. Shear-Induced Collapse in a Lyotropic Lamellar Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Porcar, L.; Warr, G.G.; Hamilton, W.A.; Butler, P.D.

    2005-08-12

    An entropically stabilized cetylpyridinium chloride, hexanol, and heavy brine lyotropic lamellar phase subjected to shear flow has been observed here by small angle neutron scattering to undergo collapse of smectic order above a threshold shear rate. The results are compared with theories predicting that such a lamellar phase sheared above a critical rate should lose its stability by a loss of resistance to compression due to the suppression of membrane fluctuations.

  20. Dental age estimation and different predictive ability of various tooth types in the Czech population: data mining methods.

    PubMed

    Velemínská, Jana; Pilný, Ales; Cepek, Miroslav; Kot'ová, Magdaléna; Kubelková, Radka

    2013-01-01

    Dental development is frequently used to estimate age in many anthropological specializations. The aim of this study was to extract an accurate predictive age system for the Czech population and to discover any different predictive ability of various tooth types and their ontogenetic stability during infancy and adolescence. A cross-sectional panoramic X-ray study was based on developmental stages assessment of mandibular teeth (Moorrees et al. 1963) using 1393 individuals aged from 3 to 17 years. Data mining methods were used for dental age estimation. These are based on nonlinear relationships between the predicted age and data sets. Compared with other tested predictive models, the GAME method predicted age with the highest accuracy. Age-interval estimations between the 10th and 90th percentiles ranged from -1.06 to +1.01 years in girls and from -1.13 to +1.20 in boys. Accuracy was expressed by RMS error, which is the average deviation between estimated and chronological age. The predictive value of individual teeth changed during the investigated period from 3 to 17 years. When we evaluated the whole period, the second molars exhibited the best predictive ability. When evaluating partial age periods, we found that the accuracy of biological age prediction declines with increasing age (from 0.52 to 1.20 years in girls and from 0.62 to 1.22 years in boys) and that the predictive importance of tooth types changes, depending on variability and the number of developmental stages in the age interval. GAME is a promising tool for age-interval estimation studies as they can provide reliable predictive models. PMID:24466642

  1. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  2. Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications: Speedy Nonlinear Analysis of Postbuckled Panels in Shear (SNAPPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, Dave; Sobel, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A simple and rapid analysis method, consisting of a number of modular, 'strength-of-materials-type' models, is presented for predicting the nonlinear response and stiffener separation of postbuckled, flat, composite, shear panels. The analysis determines the maximum principal tensile stress in the skin surface layer under to toe. Failure is said to occur when this stress reaches the mean transverse tensile strength of the layer. The analysis methodology consists of a number of closed-form equations that can easily be used in a 'hand analysis. For expediency, they have been programmed into a preliminary design code called SNAPPS (Speedy Nonlinear Analysis of Postbuckled Panels in Shear), which rapidly predicts postbuckling response of the panel for each value of the applied shear load. SNAPPS response and failure predictions were found to agree well with test results for three panels with widely different geometries, laminates and stiffnesses. Design guidelines are given for increasing the load-carrying capacity of stiffened, composite shear panels.

  3. Analysis of some predictive factors of quality of life among type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tol, Azar; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Eslami, Ahmadali; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Alhani, Fatemeh; Tehrani, Mohamadreza Mohajeri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Considering the chronic nature of diabetes and its significant effect on quality of life of patients, the present study was conducted to evaluate predictors of quality of life in these patients in order to facilitate planning health promotion intervention programs. Materials and Methods: The present study was designed as a cross-sectional study on 140 type 2 diabetic patients of Om-ol-Banin Diabetes Center of Isfahan. Data collection tool was a multidimensional questionnaire including demographic and disease related data (12 items), the standard scale for diabetes distress (17 items), the standard scale for self-efficacy in diabetic patients (8 items), and standard scale for specific quality of life of diabetic patients (15 items). Collected data were evaluated by SPSS version 11.5 using the Chi-square test, Independent T-test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Results showed that the quality of life of diabetic patients had a statistically significant correlation with diabetes distress variable (P < 0.001) and self-efficacy variable (P < 0.001). In this study R2 (predictive power) was 0.66. Multivariate regression model indicated diabetes distress (β = -0.277, P = 0.01) and self-efficacy (β = -0.161, P < 0.001) as variables influencing adjusted self-management for other variables. Conclusion: The result of the present study urges that in planning health promotion interventions in the field of diabetes, more attention be paid to self-efficacy and diabetes distress variables in order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the interventions carried out. PMID:25767820

  4. Stable plume rise in a shear layer.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J

    2007-03-01

    Solutions are given for plume rise assuming a power-law wind speed profile in a stably stratified layer for point and finite sources with initial vertical momentum and buoyancy. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume rise equations in a stable atmosphere. In a shear layer, the point of maximum rise occurs further downwind and is slightly lower compared with the plume rise with a constant wind speed equal to the wind speed at the top of the stack. If the predictions with shear are compared with predictions for an equivalent average wind speed over the depth of the plume, the plume rise with shear is higher than plume rise with an equivalent average wind speed.

  5. Complex shear modulus of a magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. Y.

    2004-10-01

    In our previous study (Zhou 2003 Smart Mater. Struct. 12 139-46), a technique to extract the field-induced shear modulus through an experiment testing the responded acceleration of a system composed of a magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) and a cuprous mass was introduced. In this paper, we present a different data processing method, based on the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method, to recover the complex shear modulus of an MRE in the frequency domain through the measured force excitation and responded acceleration of the mass in the above-mentioned experiment. The recovered complex shear modulus is analyzed in three ranges of the frequency domain: low-frequency range, moderate-frequency range, and high-frequency range. In the low-frequency range (<250 Hz), the shear modulus is a bell-type curve rising with the applied magnetic field. The average shear modulus over this frequency range is proportional to the applied magnetic field until magnetic saturation is reached. The maximum change of the average shear modulus over this range is found to be above 55% of the zero-field value. The above phenomenon reaffirms that the subquadratic field dependence, which arises from the saturation of the magnetization near the poles of closely spaced pairs of spheres, must be taken into account. In the moderate-frequency range and high-frequency range, the shear modulus is too complex to be analyzed completely by the proposed method. However, some interesting phenomena are also revealed by the proposed method. For instance, the shear modulus increases with frequency at least with the order of a quadratic polynomial, and the shear modulus is not significantly affected by the applied magnetic field.

  6. Performance of a Single Assay for Both Type III and Type VI TMPRSS2:ERG Fusions in Noninvasive Prediction of Prostate Biopsy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jarrod P.; Munson, Kristofer W.; Gu, Jessie W.; Lamparska-Kupsik, Katarzyna; Chan, Kevin G.; Yoshida, Jeffrey S.; Kawachi, Mark H.; Crocitto, Laura E.; Wilson, Timothy G.; Feng, Ziding; Smith, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND TMPRSS2:ERG fusions are promising prostate cancer biomarkers. Because they can occur in multiple forms in a single cancer specimen, we developed a quantitative PCR test that detects both type III and type VI TMPRSS2:ERG fusions. The assay is quantified from a standard curve determined with a plasmid-cloned type III TMPRSS2:ERG fusion target. METHODS We collected expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) under an institutional review board–approved, blinded, prospective study from 74 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for prostate cancer. We compared the characteristic performance of the test for type III and type VI TMPRSS2:ERG fusions in predicting biopsy outcome and distinguishing between high and low Gleason scores with similar tests for the expression of PCA3 and DNA methylation levels of the APC, RARB, RASSF1, and GSTP1 genes. We used logistic regression to analyze the effects of multiple biomarkers in linear combinations. RESULTS Each test provided a significant improvement in characteristic performance over baseline digital rectal examination (DRE) plus serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA); however, the test for type III and type VI TMPRSS2:ERG fusions yielded the best performance in predicting biopsy outcome [area under the curve (AUC) 0.823, 95% CI 0.728–0.919, P < 0.001] and Gleason grade >7 (AUC 0.844, 95% CI 0.740–0.948, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Although each test appears to have diagnostic value, PSA plus DRE plus type III and type VI TMPRSS2:ERG provided the best diagnostic performance in EPS specimens. PMID:18948370

  7. Effective temperature dynamics of shear bands in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Daub, Eric G; Klaumünzer, David; Löffler, Jörg F

    2014-12-01

    We study the plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses with shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a physical model for plasticity in amorphous systems, and compare it with experimental data. In STZ theory, plastic deformation occurs when localized regions rearrange due to applied stress and the density of these regions is determined by a dynamically evolving effective disorder temperature. We compare the predictions of STZ theory to experiments that explore the low-temperature deformation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses via shear bands at various thermal temperatures and strain rates. By following the evolution of effective temperature with time, strain rate, and temperature through a series of approximate and numerical solutions to the STZ equations, we successfully model a suite of experimentally observed phenomena, including shear-band aging as apparent from slide-hold-slide tests, a temperature-dependent steady-state flow stress, and a strain-rate- and temperature-dependent transition from stick-slip (serrated flow) to steady-sliding (nonserrated flow). We find that STZ theory quantitatively matches the observed experimental data and provides a framework for relating the experimentally measured energy scales to different types of atomic rearrangements. PMID:25615110

  8. Haptoglobin genotype predicts development of coronary artery calcification in a prospective cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease has been linked with genotypes for haptoglobin (Hp) which modulates extracorpuscular hemoglobin. We hypothesized that the Hp genotype would predict progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods CAC was measured three times in six years among 436 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects participating in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study. Hp typing was performed on plasma samples by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results The Hp 2-2 genotype predicted development of significant CAC only in subjects with diabetes who were free of CAC at baseline (OR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.07-3.56, p = 0.03), compared to those without the Hp 2-2 genotype, controlling for age, sex, blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Hp 2 appeared to have an allele-dose effect on development of CAC. Hp genotype did not predict CAC progression in individuals without diabetes. Conclusions Hp genotype may aid prediction of accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with type 1 diabetes. PMID:22098782

  9. Predicting the Use of Single Versus Multiple Types of Violence Towards Children in a Representative Sample of Quebec Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Marie-Eve; Bouchard, Camil

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine which factors best predict parental use of single versus multiple types of violence. Methodology: The study uses data from a Quebec telephone survey conducted with a representative sample of 2,469 mothers of children aged 0-17 years. The interview covered topics such as mother's attitudes and…

  10. Critical shear stress for erosion of cohesive soils subjected to temperatures typical of wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Dungan, Smith J.; Ragan, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Increased erosion is a well-known response after wildfire. To predict and to model erosion on a landscape scale requires knowledge of the critical shear stress for the initiation of motion of soil particles. As this soil property is temperature-dependent, a quantitative relation between critical shear stress and the temperatures to which the soils have been subjected during a wildfire is required. In this study the critical shear stress was measured in a recirculating flume using samples of forest soil exposed to different temperatures (40??-550??C) for 1 hour. Results were obtained for four replicates of soils derived from three different types of parent material (granitic bedrock, sandstone, and volcanic tuffs). In general, the relation between critical shear stress and temperature can be separated into three different temperature ranges (275??C), which are similar to those for water repellency and temperature. The critical shear stress was most variable (1.0-2.0 N m-2) for temperatures 2.0 N m-2) between 175?? and 275??C, and was essentially constant (0.5-0.8 N m-2) for temperatures >275??C. The changes in critical shear stress with temperature were found to be essentially independent of soil type and suggest that erosion processes in burned watersheds can be modeled more simply than erosion processes in unburned watersheds. Wildfire reduces the spatial variability of soil erodibility associated with unburned watersheds by eliminating the complex effects of vegetation in protecting soils and by reducing the range of cohesion associated with different types of unburned soils. Our results indicate that modeling the erosional response after a wildfire depends primarily on determining the spatial distribution of the maximum soil temperatures that were reached during the wildfire. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Type D Personality Predicts Poor Medication Adherence in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Shengfa; Xu, Huiwen; Tang, Xinfeng; Zhou, Huixuan; Yuan, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaohua; Qu, Zhiyong; Wang, Fugang; Zhu, He; Guo, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Background Type D personality and medication nonadherence have been shown to be associated with poor health outcomes. Type D personality is associated with poor medication adherence in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. However, the relationship between type D personality and medication adherence in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) remains unknown. This study aims to examine whether type D personality was associated with medication adherence in patients with T2DM. Design and Settings A follow-up study was conducted in general hospital of the People's Liberation Army in Beijing. Methods 412 T2DM patients (205 females), who were recruited by circular systematic random sampling, provided demographic and baseline data about medical information and completed measures of Type D personality. Then, 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence at the sixth month after baseline data collection. Chi-square test, t tests, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted, as needed. Results Patients with type D personality were significantly more likely to have poor medication adherence (p<0.001). Type D personality predicts poor medication adherence before and after controlling for covariates when it was analyzed as a categorical variable. However, the dimensional construct of type D personality was not associated with medication adherence when analyzed as a continuous variable. Conclusion Although, as a dimensional construct, type D personality may not reflect the components of the personality associated with poor medication adherence in patients with T2DM, screening for type D personality may help to identify those who are at higher risk of poor medication adherence. Interventions, aiming to improve medication adherence, should be launched for these high-risk patients. PMID:26894925

  12. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  13. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  14. Defining patch mosaic functional types to predict invasion patterns in a forest landscape.

    PubMed

    Chabrerie, Olivier; Roulier, Frédéric; Hoeblich, Hélène; Sebert-Cuvillier, Emmanuelle; Closset-Kopp, Déborah; Leblanc, Isabelle; Jaminon, Jérôme; Decocq, Guillaume

    2007-03-01

    Alien plant invasions contribute significantly to global changes by often affecting biodiversity and ecosystem processes. Operational methods for identifying landscape attributes that promote or constrain plant invasions are urgently needed to predict their future spread and manage them efficiently. We combined landscape and functional ecology concepts to define patch mosaic functional types (PMFTs) as groups of cells showing the same response to a plant invasion in a heterogeneous forest landscape. The invasion of a European temperate forest by the American black cherry (Prunus serotina) has been chosen as a case study. A set of variables was collected, mapped using a Geographic Information System, and analyzed with multivariate analyses to correlate landscape traits with Prunus serotina abundance in each cell of a grid overlaid on the forest. A risk index was derived and mapped for three invasion levels: seedling colonization, tree establishment, and ecosystem invasion. Five PMFTs were identified and characterized by a set of traits related to soil properties, land use, disturbance, and invasion history. Scots pine plantations on podzols were the most invasible, while cells dominated by hydromorphic or calcareous soils were the most resistant. Most colonized patch mosaics provided suitable conditions for future establishment and invasion. Being strongly spatially connected, suitable patches provide corridors for Prunus serotina to colonize new parts of the forest. Conversely, the most resistant PMFTs were spatially agglomerated in the south of the forest and could act as a barrier. Colonization, establishment, and invasion risk maps were finally obtained by combining partial risks associated with each landscape trait at the cell scale. Within a heterogeneous landscape, we defined and organized PMFTs into a hierarchy, according to their associated risk for colonization, establishment, or invasion by a given invasive species. Each hierarchical level should be

  15. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  16. Simplified Shear Solution for Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Composite Panel from the Applied Shear Resultant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate or panel based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  17. PREDICTION OF TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURSTS BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND KINETIC RADIO EMISSION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Hillan, D. S.

    2013-08-20

    Type II solar radio bursts are the primary radio emissions generated by shocks and they are linked with impending space weather events at Earth. We simulate type II bursts by combining elaborate three-dimensional MHD simulations of realistic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun with an analytic kinetic radiation theory developed recently. The modeling includes initialization with solar magnetic and active region fields reconstructed from magnetograms of the Sun, a flux rope of the initial CME dimensioned with STEREO spacecraft observations, and a solar wind driven with averaged empirical data. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the CME and type II burst observed on 2011 February 15. This implies real understanding of the physical processes involved regarding the radio emission excitation by shocks and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  18. A heuristic for gene selection and visual prediction of sample type.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianping; Grinstein, Georges; Marx, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a heuristic method for gene selection. We target this method, coupled with RadViz visualisation, to the visual prediction of tissue samples which may exist in normal and disease states. As a result of this coupling, the gene selection process, predictive model training and evaluation as well as the model's application for tissue sample prediction can all be intuitively visualised. Such integrated visual analytics enhance the insight provided by classical statistics and machine learning methods. The case study shows our proposed method is cost effective and achieves competitive performance when compared with several widely used techniques.

  19. When is a type III functional response stabilizing? Theory and practice of predicting plankton dynamics under enrichment.

    PubMed

    Uszko, Wojciech; Diehl, Sebastian; Pitsch, Nadine; Lengfellner, Kathrin; Müller, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The curvature of generalized Holling type functional response curves is controlled by a shape parameter b yielding hyperbolic type II (b = 1) to increasingly sigmoid type III (b > 1) responses. Empirical estimates of b vary considerably across taxa. Larger consumer-resource body mass ratios have been suggested to generate more pronounced type III responses and therefore to promote dynamic stability. The dependence of consumer- resource stability on b has, however, not been systematically explored, and the accurate empirical determination of b is challenging. Specifically, the shape of the functional response of the pelagic grazer Daphnia feeding on phytoplankton, and its consequences for stability, remain controversial. We derive a novel analytical condition relating b to local stability of consumer-resource interactions and use it to predict stability of empirically parameterized models of Daphnia and phytoplankton under enrichment. Functional response parameters were experimentally derived for two species of Daphnia feeding separately on single cultures of two different phytoplankton species. All experimentally studied Daphnia-algae systems exhibited type III responses. Parameterized type III responses are predicted to stabilize the modeled Daphnia-phytoplankton dynamics in some species pairs but not in others. Remarkably, stability predictions differ depending on whether functional response parameters are derived from clearance vs. ingestion rates. Accurate parameter estimation may therefore require fitting to both rates. In addition, our estimates of b for filter-feeding Daphnia are much smaller than predicted for actively hunting predators at similar consumer-resource body mass ratios. This suggests that the relationship between functional response shape and body mass ratios may vary with predation mode. PMID:26909430

  20. Shear banding in titanium with controlled elongations at 10/sup 6//sec

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Gray, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Adiabatic shear bands were obtained in titanium with controlled strains to 10.8%. Two types of shear bands were observed and characterized. In general the quantity and shear band width increased with increasing elongation. At elongations below /approximately/5% the shear bands were typically characteristic of shear bands observed at lower strain rates. Above 5% elongations many of the shear bands contained a boundary regime adjacent to the shear band and increased in width with increasing total elongation. This effect was attributed to the strain heat. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information.

  2. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. PMID:26142818

  3. Weakly sheared active suspensions: hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: the apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration. PMID:21517529

  4. Weakly sheared active suspensions: Hydrodynamics, stability, and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2011-03-01

    We present a kinetic model for flowing active suspensions and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak steady shear. Asymptotic solutions are sought in Deborah number expansions. At the leading order, we explore the steady states and perform their stability analysis. We predict the rheology of active systems including an activity thickening or thinning behavior of the apparent viscosity and a negative apparent viscosity depending on the particle type, flow alignment, and the anchoring conditions, which can be tested on bacterial suspensions. We find remarkable dualities that show that flow-aligning rodlike contractile (extensile) particles are dynamically and rheologically equivalent to flow-aligning discoid extensile (contractile) particles for both tangential and homeotropic anchoring conditions. Another key prediction of this work is the role of the concentration of active suspensions in controlling the rheological behavior: The apparent viscosity may decrease with the increase of the concentration.

  5. Using the health action process approach to predict and improve health outcomes in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    MacPhail, Mariana; Mullan, Barbara; Sharpe, Louise; MacCann, Carolyn; Todd, Jemma

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the predictive utility of the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) and test a HAPA-based healthy eating intervention, in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods The study employed a prospective, randomized, controlled trial design. The 4-month intervention consisted of self-guided HAPA-based workbooks in addition to two telephone calls to assist participants with the program implementation, and was compared to “treatment as usual”. Participants (n=87) completed health measures (diet, body mass index [BMI], waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, lipid levels, and diabetes distress) and HAPA measures prior to the intervention and again upon completion 4 months later. Results The overall HAPA model predicted BMI, although only risk awareness and recovery self-efficacy were significant independent contributors. Risk awareness, intentions, and self-efficacy were also independent predictors of health outcomes; however, the HAPA did not predict healthy eating. No significant time × condition interaction effects were found for diet or any HAPA outcome measures. Conclusion Despite the success of HAPA in predicting health outcomes for those with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the intervention was unsuccessful in changing healthy eating or any of the other measured variables, and alternative low-cost health interventions for those with type 2 diabetes mellitus should be explored. PMID:25342914

  6. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type.

  7. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  8. HbA1c Predicts Time to Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes in Children at Risk.

    PubMed

    Helminen, Olli; Aspholm, Susanna; Pokka, Tytti; Hautakangas, Milla-Riikka; Haatanen, Nora; Lempainen, Johanna; Ilonen, Jorma; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta

    2015-05-01

    Prediction of type 1 diabetes is based on the detection of multiple islet autoantibodies in subjects who are at increased genetic risk. Prediction of the timing of diagnosis is challenging, however. We assessed the utility of HbA1c levels in predicting the clinical disease in genetically predisposed children with multiple autoantibodies. Cord blood samples from 168,055 newborn infants were screened for class II HLA genotypes in Finland, and 14,876 children with increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes were invited to participate in regular follow-ups, including screening for diabetes-associated autoantibodies. When two or more autoantibodies were detected, HbA1c levels were analyzed at each visit. During follow-up, multiple (two or more) autoantibodies developed in 466 children; type 1 diabetes was diagnosed in 201 of these children (43%, progressors), while 265 children remained disease free (nonprogressors) by December 2011. A 10% increase in HbA1c levels in samples obtained 3-12 months apart predicted the diagnosis of clinical disease (hazard ratio [HR] 5.7 [95% CI 4.1-7.9]) after a median time of 1.1 years (interquartile range [IQR] 0.6-3.1 years) from the observed rise of HbA1c. If the HbA1c level was ≥5.9% (41 mmol/mol) in two consecutive samples, the median time to diagnosis was 0.9 years (IQR 0.3-1.5, HR 11.9 [95% CI 8.8-16.0]). In conclusion, HbA1c is a useful biochemical marker when predicting the time to diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children with multiple autoantibodies.

  9. Wind shear and wet and dry thermodynamic indices as predictors of thunderstorm motion and severity and application to the AVE 4 experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, J. R.; Ey, L.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of parameters are computed and mapped for use in assessing their individual merits as predictors of occurrence and severity of thunderstorms. The first group is comprised of equivalent potential temperature, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and wind speed. Equivalent potential temperature maxima and strong gradients of equivalent potential temperature at the surface correlate well with regions of thunderstorm activity. The second type, comprised of the energy index, shear index, and energy shear index, incorporates some model dynamics of thunderstorms, including nonthermodynamic forcing. The energy shear index is found to improve prediction of tornadic and high-wind situations slightly better than other indices. It is concluded that further development and refinement of nonthermodynamic aspects of predictive indices are definitely warranted.

  10. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    PubMed

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p < 0.005) improvement in model prediction for any fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p < 0.0001), with AUC increasing from 0.71 to 0.77 for trochanteric fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model

  11. Free volume under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems — particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  12. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  13. Effects of movement distance, duration, velocity, and type on action prediction in 12-month-olds.

    PubMed

    Daum, Moritz M; Gampe, Anja; Wronski, Caroline; Attig, Manja

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to test the influence of the spatial and temporal dynamics of observed manual actions on infants' action prediction. Twelve-month-old infants were presented with reach-and-transport actions performed by a human agent. Movement distance, duration, and - resulting from the two - movement velocity were systematically varied. Action prediction was measured via the latency of gaze arrival at target in relation to agent's hand. The results showed a general effect of all parameters on the infants' perception of goal-directed actions: Infants were more likely to predict the action goal the longer the movement distance was, the longer the movement duration was, and the slower the movement velocity was. In addition, they were more likely to predict the goal of a reaching than a transport action. The present findings extent previous findings by showing that infants are not only sensitive to differences in distances, durations, and velocities at early age but that these factors have a strong impact on the prediction of the goal of observed actions.

  14. Electrochemical Li insertion studies on WNb{sub 12}O{sub 33}-A shear ReO{sub 3} type structure

    SciTech Connect

    Saritha, D.; Pralong, V.; Varadaraju, U.V.; Raveau, B.

    2010-05-15

    Electrochemical lithium insertion studies on WNb{sub 12}O{sub 33} synthesized by solid state reaction (SSR) are carried out in the voltage range 1.0-3.2 V. During first discharge 15.6 Li are inserted with a specific capacity of 221 mAh/g. WNb{sub 12}O{sub 33} is also synthesized by sol-gel (SG) technique with a view to enhance the rate capability and cycling properties. The SSR and SG samples are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and galvanostatic cycling. Electrochemical cycling performance of SG samples is superior to that of the SSR sample at high 'C' rates. The sample synthesized by SG method exhibits high specific capacity of 142 mAh/g after 20 cycles at 20C rate. - Graphical abstract: The projected structure can be described as 3x4xinfinity ReO{sub 3} type blocks of NbO{sub 6} octahedra sharing corners, joined with identical blocks via tetrahedrally coordinated tungsten atoms.

  15. Separated shear layer transition over an airfoil at a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Yarusevych, Serhiy

    2012-08-01

    Shear layer development over a NACA 0018 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 100 000 was investigated using a combination of flow visualization, velocity field mapping, surface pressure fluctuation measurements, and stability analysis. The results provide a detailed description of shear layer transition on an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. An extensive comparison of measured surface pressure and velocity fluctuations demonstrated that time-resolved surface pressure sensor arrays can be used to identify the presence of flow separation, estimate the extent of the separated flow region, and measure disturbance growth rate spectra in significantly less time than is required by conventional techniques. Surface pressure sensor measurements of disturbance growth rate, wave number, and convection speed are found to compare well with predictions of linear stability theory, supporting the claim that convection speeds measured in separation bubbles over low Reynolds number airfoils are associated with wave packets of growing disturbances propagating through the shear layer. Through a comparison of measured convection speeds in this investigation and prior low Reynolds number airfoil experiments, it is shown that disturbance convection speeds of between 30% and 50% of the edge velocity are typical for this type of flow, consistent with phase speed estimates from previous analytical studies on transitional separation bubbles. Modal RMS velocity profiles were measured and found to be reasonably predicted by stability theory. The results suggest that, even for the relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil profile, disturbance development over the majority of the laminar separated shear layer is primarily governed by a linear inviscid mechanism.

  16. Quality of life among long-term survivors of breast cancer: Different types of antecedents predict different classes of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Smith, Roselyn G; Petronis, Vida M; Antoni, Michael H

    2006-09-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has many aspects, both in the short-term and in the long-term. Different aspects of QOL may have different types of precursors: demographic, medical, and psychosocial. We examined this possibility in a group of long-term breast cancer survivors. Early-stage breast cancer patients (N = 163) who had provided information about medical, demographic, and psychosocial variables during the year after surgery completed a multidimensional measure of QOL 5-13 years later. Initial chemotherapy and higher stage predicted greater financial problems and greater worry about appearance at follow-up. Being partnered at diagnosis predicted many psychosocial benefits at follow-up. Hispanic women reported greater distress and social avoidance at follow-up. Initial trait optimism predicted diverse aspects of better psychosocial QOL at follow-up, but not other aspects of QOL. Thus, different aspects of QOL at long-term follow-up had different antecedents. Overall, psychological outcomes were predicted by psychosocial variables, presence of a partner at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Financial outcomes, in contrast, were predicted by medical variables, which otherwise predicted little about long-term QOL. This divergence among aspects of QOL should receive closer attention in future work. PMID:16304622

  17. Predicting the types of J-proteins using clustered amino acids.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Zuo, Yongchun

    2014-01-01

    J-proteins are molecular chaperones and present in a wide variety of organisms from prokaryote to eukaryote. Based on their domain organizations, J-proteins can be classified into 4 types, that is, Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV. Different types of J-proteins play distinct roles in influencing cancer properties and cell death. Thus, reliably annotating the types of J-proteins is essential to better understand their molecular functions. In the present work, a support vector machine based method was developed to identify the types of J-proteins using the tripeptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet. In the jackknife cross-validation, the maximum overall accuracy of 94% was achieved on a stringent benchmark dataset. We also analyzed the amino acid compositions by using analysis of variance and found the distinct distributions of amino acids in each family of the J-proteins. To enhance the value of the practical applications of the proposed model, an online web server was developed and can be freely accessed.

  18. Types of Workplace Social Support in the Prediction of Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, J. Irene; Winskowski, Ann Marie; Engdahl, Brian E.

    2007-01-01

    Research on social support and job satisfaction has yielded mixed results, partly because studies have rarely examined different types of workplace social support, such as collegial support, task support, coaching, and career mentoring. This study identified the relative contributions of different types of social support to job satisfaction and…

  19. Prediction of intimate partner violence by type of substance use disorder.

    PubMed

    Kraanen, Fleur L; Vedel, Ellen; Scholing, Agnes; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated whether (combinations of) specific substance use disorders predicted any and severe perpetration and victimization in males and females entering substance abuse treatment. All patients (N = 1799) were screened for IPV perpetration and victimization; almost one third of the sample committed or experienced any IPV in the past year. For males, an alcohol use disorder in combination with a cannabis and/or cocaine use disorder significantly predicted any IPV (perpetration and/or victimization) as well as severe IPV perpetration. For females, alcohol and cocaine abuse/dependence predicted both any IPV (perpetration and/or victimization) and severe IPV perpetration. Results from the present study emphasize the importance of routinely assessing IPV in patients in substance abuse treatment and demonstrate that clinicians should be particularly alert for IPV in patients with specific substance use disorder combinations. PMID:24365101

  20. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  1. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  2. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  3. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  4. First-principles prediction of a promising p-type transparent conductive material CsGeCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dan; Zhao, Yu-Jun; Ju, Zhi-Ping; Gan, Li-Yong; Chen, Xin-Man; Li, Chang-Sheng; Yao, Chun-mei; Guo, Jin

    2014-04-01

    Most reported p-type transparent conductive materials are Cu-based compounds such as CuAlO2 and CuCrO2. Here, we report that compounds based on ns2 cations with low binding energy can also possess high valence band maximum, which is crucial for the p-type doping according to the doping limit rules. In particular, CsGeCl3, a compound with valence band maximum from ns2 cations, is predicted as a promising p-type transparent conductive material by first-principles calculations. Our results show that the p-type defect Ge vacancy dominates its intrinsic defects with a shallow transition level, and the calculated hole effective masses are low in CsGeCl3.

  5. Weighted-support vector machines for predicting membrane protein types based on pseudo-amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yang, Jie; Liu, Guo-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Jie; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2004-06-01

    Membrane proteins are generally classified into the following five types: (1) type I membrane proteins, (2) type II membrane proteins, (3) multipass transmembrane proteins, (4) lipid chain-anchored membrane proteins and (5) GPI-anchored membrane proteins. Prediction of membrane protein types has become one of the growing hot topics in bioinformatics. Currently, we are facing two critical challenges in this area: first, how to take into account the extremely complicated sequence-order effects, and second, how to deal with the highly uneven sizes of the subsets in a training dataset. In this paper, stimulated by the concept of using the pseudo-amino acid composition to incorporate the sequence-order effects, the spectral analysis technique is introduced to represent the statistical sample of a protein. Based on such a framework, the weighted support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is applied. The new approach has remarkable power in dealing with the bias caused by the situation when one subset in the training dataset contains many more samples than the other. The new method is particularly useful when our focus is aimed at proteins belonging to small subsets. The results obtained by the self-consistency test, jackknife test and independent dataset test are encouraging, indicating that the current approach may serve as a powerful complementary tool to other existing methods for predicting the types of membrane proteins.

  6. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  7. Development of conjugate shear bands during bulk simple shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, L. B.; Cobbold, P. R.

    In rocks possessing a strong planar fabric, shear bands of constant shear sense and oriented at an oblique angle to the foliation are considered by many authors to be characteristic of a non-coaxial bulk deformation history, whereas conjugate shear bands are considered to indicate coaxial shortening. However, in two areas where bulk deformation history appears to be non-coaxial (Cap Corse, Corsica and Ile de Groix, Brittany), conjugate shear bands are observed. In order to investigate this problem, experiments were performed by bulk simple shearing using Plasticine as a rock analogue. When slip between layers of the model is permitted, shear bands of normal-fault geometry form with both the same and opposite shear sense as the bulk simple shearing at approximately the same angle with the layering (40°) irrespective of layer orientation in the undeformed state (for initial orientations of 50, 30 and 15°). Shear bands are initially formed within individual layers and may propagate across layer interfaces when further movement along these is inhibited. The existence of conjugate shear bands in Corsica and Ile de Groix is therefore not incompatible with a model of bulk simple shearing for these two regions. In field studies, one should perhaps exercise care in using shear bands to determine the kind of motion or the sense of bulk shearing.

  8. Application of strainrange partitioning to the prediction of creep-fatigue lives of AISI types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    As a demonstration of the predictive capabilities of the method of Strainrange Partitioning, published high-temperature, low cycle, creep-fatigue test results on AISI Types 304 and 316 stainless steel were analyzed and calculated, cyclic lives compared with observed lives. Predicted lives agreed with observed lives within factors of two for 76 percent, factors of three for 93 percent, and factors of four for 98 percent of the laboratory tests analyzed. Agreement between observed and predicted lives is judged satisfactory considering that the data are associated with a number of variables (two alloys, several heats and heat treatments, a range of temperatures, different testing techniques, etc.) that are not directly accounted for in the calculations.

  9. Application of Strainrange Partitioning to the prediction of creep-fatigue lives of AISI Types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    As a demonstration of the predictive capabilities of the method of Strainrange Partitioning, published high-temperature, low cycle, creep-fatigue test results on AISI Types 304 and 316 stainless steel were analyzed and calculated cyclic lives compared with observed lives. Predicted lives agreed with observed lives within factors of two for 76 percent, factors of three for 93 percent, and factors of four for 98 percent of the laboratory tests analyzed. Agreement between observed and predicted lives is judged satisfactory considering that the data are associated with a number of variables (two alloys, several heats and heat treatments, a range of temperatures, different testing techniques, etc.) that are not directly accounted for in the calculations.

  10. Mobile Devices in the Classroom: Learning Motivations Predict Specific Types of Multicommunicating Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keri K.; Pantoja, Gabriel E.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a first look into how learning motivations are associated with different ways that students use mobile devices to carry on multiple conversations--multicommunicate--while in class. We use self-determination theory to make predictions linking intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and amotivation, to classroom mobile device…

  11. Shear rheology of molten crumb chocolate.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J E; Van Damme, I; Johns, M L; Routh, A F; Wilson, D I

    2009-03-01

    The shear rheology of fresh molten chocolate produced from crumb was studied over 5 decades of shear rate using controlled stress devices. The Carreau model was found to be a more accurate description than the traditional Casson model, especially at shear rates between 0.1 and 1 s(-1). At shear rates around 0.1 s(-1) (shear stress approximately 7 Pa) the material exhibited a transition to a solid regime, similar to the behavior reported by Coussot (2005) for other granular suspensions. The nature of the suspension was explored by investigating the effect of solids concentration (0.20 < phi < 0.75) and the nature of the particles. The rheology of the chocolate was then compared with the rheology of (1) a synthetic chocolate, which contained sunflower oil in place of cocoa butter, and (2) a suspension of sugar of a similar size distribution (volume mean 15 mum) in cocoa butter and emulsifier. The chocolate and synthetic chocolate showed very similar rheological profiles under both steady shear and oscillatory shear. The chocolate and the sugar suspension showed similar Krieger-Dougherty dependency on volume fraction, and a noticeable transition to a stiff state at solids volume fractions above approximately 0.5. Similar behavior has been reported by Citerne and others (2001) for a smooth peanut butter, which had a similar particle size distribution and solids loading to chocolate. The results indicate that the melt rheology of the chocolate is dominated by hydrodynamic interactions, although at high solids volume fractions the emulsifier may contribute to the departure of the apparent viscosity from the predicted trend.

  12. Quantitative prediction of type II solar radio emission from the Sun to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are frequently associated with shocks and type II solar radio bursts. Despite involving fundamental plasma physics and being the archetype for collective radio emission from shocks, type II bursts have resisted detailed explanation for over 60 years. Between 29 November and 1 December 2013 the two widely separated spacecraft STEREO A and B observed a long lasting, intermittent, type II radio burst from ≈4 MHz to 30 kHz (harmonic), including an intensification when the CME-driven shock reached STEREO A. We demonstrate the first accurate and quantitative simulation of a type II burst from the high corona (near 11 solar radii) to 1 AU for this event with a combination of a data-driven three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation for the CME and plasma background and an analytic quantitative kinetic model for the radio emission.

  13. Plasma Triglycerides Predict Incident Albuminuria and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Eckel, Robert H.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease and diabetic nephropathy, which are thought to share pathogenic mechanisms, remain the most common causes of mortality in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Data from basic and clinical studies indicate that hypertriglyceridemia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications, but the role of triglycerides (TG) in the normal range remains unresolved in T1D. Objective We hypothesized that fasting TG would independently predict cardiorenal disease in adults with T1D and normal-to-low levels of TG. Methods Subjects (N=652) were 19–56 years old at baseline and reexamined 6-years later. Urinary albumin excretion was measured, and categorized as microalbuminuria or greater. Progression of coronary artery calcification (CACp), measured using electron beam CT, was defined as a change in the square root transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. The association of low-density-lipoprotein-C (LDL-C), high-density-lipoprotein-C (HDL-C), apolipoprotein B, nonHDL-C, lnTG, ln(TG/HDL-C) ratio with CACp and incident albuminuria were examined in logistic regression. The models were adjusted for age, sex, T1D-duration, hemoglobin A1c, SBP, DBP, BP-medications, statins and smoking status. Integrated discrimination index and net-reclassification improvement were used to examine prediction performance. Results Incident albuminuria was independently associated with CACp. LnTG independently predicted both incident albuminuria (OR: 1.53, 1.02–2.30, p=0.04) and CACp (1.41, 1.11–1.80, p=0.006). The addition of lnTG to ABC risk factors (HbA1c, SBP, DBP and LDL-C) moderately improved discrimination and reclassification of CACp and incident albuminuria. Conclusion In adults with type 1 diabetes, fasting TG independently predicted cardiorenal disease over 6 years and improved reclassification of risk by conventional risk factors. PMID:25499940

  14. Predicting ground contact events for a continuum of gait types: An application of targeted machine learning using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Osis, Sean T; Hettinga, Blayne A; Ferber, Reed

    2016-05-01

    An ongoing challenge in the application of gait analysis to clinical settings is the standardized detection of temporal events, with unobtrusive and cost-effective equipment, for a wide range of gait types. The purpose of the current study was to investigate a targeted machine learning approach for the prediction of timing for foot strike (or initial contact) and toe-off, using only kinematics for walking, forefoot running, and heel-toe running. Data were categorized by gait type and split into a training set (∼30%) and a validation set (∼70%). A principal component analysis was performed, and separate linear models were trained and validated for foot strike and toe-off, using ground reaction force data as a gold-standard for event timing. Results indicate the model predicted both foot strike and toe-off timing to within 20ms of the gold-standard for more than 95% of cases in walking and running gaits. The machine learning approach continues to provide robust timing predictions for clinical use, and may offer a flexible methodology to handle new events and gait types. PMID:27131183

  15. Shear-Driven Reconnection in Kinetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Germaschewski, K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Bessho, N.

    2015-12-01

    The explosive energy release in solar eruptive phenomena is believed to be due to magnetic reconnection. In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field countered by a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection disrupts this force balance; therefore, it is critical for understanding CME/flare initiation, to model the onset of reconnection driven by the build-up of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic-field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are dominant in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is challenging, however, and indicates the necessity of a true multiscale model for such processes in the solar environment. The field must be sheared self-consistently and indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. Plasma instabilities can arise nonetheless. In the work presented here, we show that we can control this instability and generate a predicted out-of-plane magnetic flux. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. AGS-1331356.

  16. A Refined Shear Deformation Plate Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-04-01

    An improved higher-order shear deformation theory of plates is presented in this paper. The theory is developed from the transverse shear deformation theory presented by Ambartsumian [11]. The present plate theory contains kinematics of higher-order displacement field of plates, a system of higher-order differential equilibrium equations in terms of the three generalized displacements of bending plates, and a system of boundary conditions at each edge of plate boundaries. The present shear deformation theory of plates is validated by applying it to solve torsional plates and simply supported plates. The obtained solutions using the present theory are compared with the solutions of other shear-deformation theories. A good agreement is achieved through these comparisons and the advantages of the present theory are clearly verified. The shear deformation plate theory presented here can be applied to the analysis of laminated composite plates to better predict their dynamic and static behaviors. The proposed theory should also be supplemented to the theory of finite element analysis for developing new shell elements.

  17. History of wind shear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusimano, Lou

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Flight Operations, Flight Technical Programs Div., at the FAA Headquarters, interfaces with industry, R&D communities and air carriers during the introduction of new types of equipment into operational services. A brief highlight of the need which FAA operations sees for new wind shear and turbulence data sets from the viewpoint of equipment certification and simulation is presented.

  18. Effects of shear elasticity on sea bed scattering: numerical examples.

    PubMed

    Ivakin, A N; Jackson, D R

    1998-01-01

    It is known that marine sediments can support both compressional and shear waves. However, published work on scattering from irregular elastic media has not examined the influence of shear on sea bed scattering in detail. A perturbation model previously developed by the authors for joint roughness-volume scattering is used to study the effects of elasticity for three sea bed types: sedimentary rock, sand with high shear speed, and sand with "normal" shear wave speed. Both bistatic and monostatic cases are considered. For sedimentary rock it is found that shear elasticity tends to increase the importance of volume scattering and decrease the importance of roughness scattering relative to the fluid case. Shear effects are shown to be small for sands.

  19. On the need for another type of predictive model in structured foods.

    PubMed

    Dens, E J; Van Impe, J F

    2001-03-20

    Most of the models discussed up till now in predictive microbiology do not take into account the variability of microbial growth with respect to space. In structured (solid) foods, microbial growth can strongly depend on the position in the food and the assumption of homogeneity can thus not be accepted: space must be considered as an independent variable. Indeed, experimental evidence exists of bacteria competition on agar not showing the same behavior as the competition in a well-mixed liquid culture system. It is conjectured that this is due to the spatially structured habitat. Therefore, in the current paper, a prototype two species competition model proposed in previous work by the authors is extended to take space into account. The extended model describes two phenomena: (i) local evolution of biomass and (ii) transfer of biomass through the medium. The structure of the food product is taken into account by limiting the diffusion through the medium. The smaller mobility of the micro-organisms in solid foods allows spatial segregation which causes pattern formation. Evidence is given for the fact that taking space into account indeed has an influence on the behavior (coexistence/extinction) of the populations. Although the reported simulations are by no means to be interpreted as accurate predictions, the proposed model structure allows one to highlight (i) important characteristics of microbial growth in structured foods and (ii) future research trends in predictive microbiology.

  20. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  1. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning-a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates-is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates. PMID:27636496

  2. Shear Fractures of Extreme Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-10-01

    Natural and laboratory observations show that shear ruptures (faults) can propagate with extreme dynamics (up to intersonic rupture velocities) through intact materials and along pre-existing faults with frictional and coherent (bonded) interfaces. The rupture propagation is accompanied by significant fault strength weakening in the rupture head. Although essential for understanding earthquakes, rock mechanics, tribology and fractures, the question of what physical processes determine how that weakening occurs is still unresolved. The general approach today to explain the fault weakening is based upon the strong velocity-weakening friction law according to which the fault strength drops rapidly with slip velocity. Different mechanisms of strength weakening caused by slip velocity have been proposed including thermal effect, high-frequency compressional waves, expansion of pore fluid, macroscopic melting and gel formation. This paper proposes that shear ruptures of extreme dynamics propagating in intact materials and in pre-existing frictional and coherent interfaces are governed by the same recently identified mechanism which is associated with an intensive microcracking process in the rupture tip observed for all types of extreme ruptures. The microcracking process creates, in certain conditions, a special fan-like microstructure shear resistance of which is extremely low (up to an order of magnitude less than the frictional strength). The fan-structure representing the rupture head provides strong interface weakening and causes high slip and rupture velocities. In contrast with the velocity-weakening dependency, this mechanism provides the opposite weakening-velocity effect. The fan-mechanism differs remarkably from all reported earlier mechanisms, and it can provide such important features observed in extreme ruptures as: extreme slip and rupture velocities, high slip velocity without heating, off-fault tensile cracking, transition from crack-like to pulse

  3. Elevated galanin may predict the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus for development of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. Epidemiological and clinical studies demonstrated that type 2 diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, i.e., the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are frequently companied with Alzheimer's disease symptoms. Despite many studies recently probed into the comorbid state of both diseases, so far the precise mechanism for this association is poorly understood. Emerging evidences suggest that defects in galanin play a central role on type 2 diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. This review provides a new insight into the multivariate relationship among galanin, type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the effect of galanin system on the cross-talk between both diseases in human and rodent models. The current data support that activating central GalR2 attenuates insulin resistance and Alzheimer's disease feature in animal models. These may help us better understanding the pathogenesis of both diseases and provide useful hints for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Drought prediction using a wavelet based approach to model the temporal consequences of different types of droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Rajib; Suman, Mayank; Verma, Nitesh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Droughts are expected to propagate from one type to another - meteorological to agricultural to hydrological to socio-economic. However, they do not possess a universal, straightforward temporal dependence. Rather, assessment of one type of drought (successor) from another (predecessor) is a complex problem depending on the basin's physiographic and climatic characteristics, such as, spatial extent, topography, land use, land cover and climate regime. In this paper, a wavelet decomposition based approach is proposed to model the temporal dependence between different types of droughts. The idea behind is to separate the rapidly and slowly moving components of drought indices. It is shown that the temporal dependence of predecessor (say meteorological drought) on the successor (say hydrological drought) can be better captured at its constituting components level. Such components are obtained through wavelet decomposition retaining its temporal correspondence. Thus, in the proposed approach, predictand drought index is predicted using the decomposed components of predecessor drought. Several alternative models are investigated to arrive at the best possible model structure for predicting different types of drought. The proposed approach is found to be very useful for foreseeing the agricultural or hydrological droughts knowing the meteorological drought status, offering the scope for better management of drought consequences. The mathematical framework of the proposed approach is general in nature and can be applied to different basins. However, the limitation is the requirement of region/catchment specific calibration of some parameters before using the proposed model, which is not very difficult and uncommon though.

  5. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  6. The Validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator for Predicting Expressed Marital Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Frazier M., IV; Douglass, Robin

    1993-01-01

    Examined assertions made concerning Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) use with couples in marital therapy. Sixty-seven couples completed MBTI and questionnaire concerning marital problems. Results were not consistent with assertions found in MBTI literature. Few spouses in couples were same on all four preferences and number of opposite…

  7. The Role of Vocabulary Size in Predicting Performance on TOEFL Reading Item Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Akbarian, Is'haaq

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to examine a) whether vocabulary knowledge, captured in the Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT), is related to the performance on the five types of reading comprehension items tested in TOEFL, i.e., Guessing Vocabulary, Main Idea, Inference, Reference, and Stated Detail; and b) whether EFL learners with different levels of vocabulary…

  8. The Utility and Accuracy of Oral Reading Fluency Score Types in Predicting Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Kim, Young-Suk

    2011-01-01

    This study used data from the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS; Good & Kaminski, 2002) oral reading fluency (ORF) probes to examine variation among different ORF score types (i.e., the median of three passages, the mean of all three passages, the mean of passages 2 and 3, and the score from passage 3) in predicting…

  9. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics. PMID:27695073

  10. Consumption of sweetened beverages and intakes of fructose and glucose predict type 2 diabetes occurrence.

    PubMed

    Montonen, Jukka; Järvinen, Ritva; Knekt, Paul; Heliövaara, Markku; Reunanen, Antti

    2007-06-01

    The role of intakes of different sugars in the development of type 2 diabetes was studied in a cohort of 4,304 men and women aged 40-60 y and initially free of diabetes at baseline in 1967-1972. Food consumption data were collected using a dietary history interview covering the habitual diet during the previous year. The intakes of different sugars were calculated and divided in quartiles. During a 12-y follow-up, 177 incidents of type 2 diabetes cases were identified from a nationwide register. Combined intake of fructose and glucose was associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes but no significant association was observed for intakes of sucrose, lactose, or maltose. The relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles of combined fructose and glucose intake was 1.87 (95% [CI] = 1.19, 2.93; P = 0.003). The corresponding relative risks between the extreme quartiles of consumption of food items contributing to sugar intakes were 1.69 (95% [CI] = 1.17, 2.43; P < 0.001) for sweetened berry juice and 1.67 (95% [CI] = 0.98, 2.87; P = 0.01) for soft drinks. Our findings support the view that higher intake of fructose and glucose and sweetened beverages may increase type 2 diabetes risk. PMID:17513405

  11. MemHyb: predicting membrane protein types by hybridizing SAAC and PSSM.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Maqsood; Khan, Asifullah

    2012-01-01

    About 50% of available drugs are targeted against membrane proteins. Knowledge of membrane protein's structure and function has great importance in biological and pharmacological research. Therefore, an automated method is exceedingly advantageous, which can help in identifying the new membrane protein types based on their primary sequence. In this paper, we tackle the interesting problem of classifying membrane protein types using their sequence information. We consider both evolutionary and physicochemical features and provide them to our classification system based on support vector machine (SVM) with error correction code. We employ a powerful sequence encoding scheme by fusing position specific scoring matrix and split amino acid composition to effectively discriminate membrane protein types. Linear, polynomial, and RBF based-SVM with Bose, Chaudhuri, Hocquenghem coding are trained and tested. The highest success rate of 91.1% and 93.4% on two datasets is obtained by RBF-SVM using leave-one-out cross-validation. Thus, our proposed approach is an effective tool for the discrimination of membrane protein types and might be helpful to researchers/academicians working in the field of Drug Discovery, Cell Biology, and Bioinformatics. The web server for the proposed MemHyb-SVM is accessible at http://111.68.99.218/MemHyb-SVM.

  12. Studies of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.

    1986-03-01

    The objective of the work reported is construction of zonal models for accurate prediction of turbulent flows in rapid-running computer programs. The work follows the ideas set down in the discussion of zonal modeling by S. J. Kline in Vol. 2 of the Proceedings of the 1980-81 AFOSR-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows. This discussion noted that the fast-running models available lack sufficient span to predict all classes of turbulent flows of engineering importance in a standard, invariant form. It therefore suggested that the models be treated as zonal. In the zonal approach, the constants in th models are adjusted for each important zone of the flow, where the word zone implies a region with a particular type of flow physics. In the proposal for the work, it was also noted that the parametrization of the flows and the selection of appropriate constants would ultimately need to be guided by the domain over which accurate results could be obtained, and that might well be different from pre-conceptions embodied in conventional taxonomies of the flows.

  13. The use of circulation weather types to predict upwelling activity along the Western Iberian Peninsula coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre M.; Cordeiro Pires, Ana; Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is a phenomenon that occurs in most western oceanic coasts due to the presence of mid-latitude high-pressure systems that generate equatorward winds along the coast and consequent offshore displacement of surface waters that in turn cause deeper, colder, nutrient-rich waters to arise. In western Iberian Peninsula (IP) the high-pressure system associated to northerly winds occurs mainly during spring and summer. Upwelling systems are economically relevant, being the most productive regions of the world ocean and crucial for fisheries. In this work, we evaluate the intra- and inter-annual variability of the Upwelling Index (UI) off the western coast of the IP considering four locations at various latitudes: Rias Baixas, Aveiro, Figueira da Foz and Cabo da Roca. In addition, the relationship between the variability of the occurrence of several circulation weather types (Ramos et al., 2011) and the UI variability along this coast was assessed in detail, allowing to discriminate which types are frequently associated with strong and weak upwelling activity. It is shown that upwelling activity is mostly driven by wind flow from the northern quadrant, for which the obtained correlation coefficients (for the N and NE types) are higher than 0.5 for the four considered test locations. Taking into account these significant relationships, we then developed statistical multi-linear regression models to hindcast upwelling series (April to September) at the four referred locations, using monthly frequencies of circulation weather types as predictors. Modelled monthly series reproduce quite accurately observational data, with correlation coefficients above 0.7 for all locations, and relatively small absolute errors. Ramos AM, Ramos R, Sousa P, Trigo RM, Janeira M, Prior V (2011) Cloud to ground lightning activity over Portugal and its association with Circulation Weather Types. Atmospheric Research 101:84-101. doi: 10.1016/j.atmosres.2011.01

  14. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  15. Prediction of Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) type for elimination in the aeronautics manufacturing environment through logistic regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Natalia V.

    Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) is a costly and high-risk problem that aeronautics industries such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, among others are facing at their production lines every day. They spend an average of $350 thousand dollars per year fixing FOD problems. FOD can put pilots, passengers and other crews' lives into high-risk. FOD refers to any type of foreign object, particle, debris or agent in the manufacturing environment, which could contaminate/damage the product or otherwise undermine quality control standards. FOD can be in the form of any of the following categories: panstock, manufacturing debris, tools/shop aids, consumables and trash. Although aeronautics industries have put many prevention plans in place such as housekeeping and "clean as you go" philosophies, trainings, use of RFID for tooling control, etc. none of them has been able to completely eradicate the problem. This research presents a logistic regression statistical model approach to predict probability of FOD type under given specific circumstances such as workstation, month and aircraft/jet being built. FOD Quality Assurance Reports of the last three years were provided by an aeronautical industry for this study. By predicting type of FOD, custom reduction/elimination plans can be put in place and by such means being able to diminish the problem. Different aircrafts were analyzed and so different models developed through same methodology. Results of the study presented are predictions of FOD type for each aircraft and workstation throughout the year, which were obtained by applying proposed logistic regression models. This research would help aeronautic industries to address the FOD problem correctly, to be able to identify root causes and establish actual reduction/elimination plans.

  16. HDPE geomembrane/geotextile interface shear strength

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, T.D.; Eid, H.T.; Williamson, T.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes torsional ring shear tests on interfaces comprised of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes/nonwoven geotextiles and a drainage geocomposite. Four textured geomembranes with three different manufacturing techniques are utilized to investigate the effect of geomembrane texturing on interface shear resistance. In addition, the effects of geotextile fiber type, fabric style, polymer composition, calendering, and mass per unit area on textured HDPE geomembrane interface strengths are investigated. The textured HDPE geomembrane/nonwoven geotextile and drainage geocomposite interfaces exhibited a large post-peak strength loss. This strength loss is attributed to pulling out or tearing of filaments from the nonwoven geotextile and orienting them parallel to shear and polishing of the texturing on the geomembrane. At high normal stresses, the strength loss can be caused by damage to or removal of the texturing on the geomembrane surface.

  17. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  18. Repeated buckling of composite shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Josef; Weller, Tanchum

    1990-01-01

    Failures in service of aerospace structures and research at the Technion Aircraft Structures Laboratory have revealed that repeatedly buckled stiffened shear panels might be susceptible to premature fatigue failures. Extensive experimental and analytical studies have been performed at Technion on repeated buckling, far in excess of initial buckling, for both metal and composite shear panels with focus on the influence of the surrounding structure. The core of the experimental investigation consisted of repeated buckling and postbuckling tests on Wagner beams in a three-point loading system under realistic test conditions. The effects of varying sizes of stiffeners, of the magnitude of initial buckling loads, of the panel aspect ratio and of the cyclic shearing force, V sub cyc, were studied. The cyclic to critical shear buckling ratios, (V sub cyc/V sub cr) were on the high side, as needed for efficient panel design, yet all within possible flight envelopes. The experiments were supplemented by analytical and numerical analyses. For the metal shear panels the test and numerical results were synthesized into prediction formulas, which relate the life of the metal shear panels to two cyclic load parameters. The composite shear panels studied were hybrid beams with graphite/epoxy webs bonded to aluminum alloy frames. The test results demonstrated that composite panels were less fatigue sensitive than comparable metal ones, and that repeated buckling, even when causing extensive damage, did not reduce the residual strength by more than 20 percent. All the composite panels sustained the specified fatigue life of 250,000 cycles. The effect of local unstiffened holes on the durability of repeatedly buckled shear panels was studied for one series of the metal panels. Tests on 2024 T3 aluminum panels with relatively small unstiffened holes in the center of the panels demonstrated premature fatigue failure, compared to panels without holes. Preliminary tests on two graphite

  19. Relationship of quartz LPO fabrics in mylonites near the Alpine Fault, New Zealand to the attitude of the shear zone boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Prior, D. J.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    The active Alpine fault self-exhumes its own ductile shear zone roots and has known kinematics. Within ~1 km of the fault, the foliation is subparallel to the shear zone boundary in which it formed at amphibolite-facies conditions. Using EBSD, we analysed quartz Lattice Preferred Orientations (LPOs) of mylonites along a central part of the fault. The samples were mostly taken from naturally outcropping rocks, complemented by a few sections from core from the DFDP-2B hole—rocks that accommodated a range of finite strains and that have diverse quartz contents. All the LPOs feature a single (or strongest) girdle of c-axes hat is inclined ~28 ±4° away from the pole to the shear zone boundary (SZB) in a sense that is synthetic to the bulk shear. A point maximum of a-axes is inclined at the same angle relative to the shearing direction. This girdle is perpendicular to C' extensional shear bands in the rock, not to the bulk shear zone boundary, whereas the maximum is parallel to the slip direction of the shear bands. These relationships prevail across large variations in quartz content and finite shear strain magnitude. We infer that quartz LPOs are not always reliable indicators of SZB attitude, and they do not necessarily undergo an obvious rotation relative to the SZB as a function of increasing finite strain. Both the C' shears and the LPOs formed as late-incremental features at orientations controlled by the instantaneous geometry of a non-simple shear flow. We suggest that that the C' planes were aligned to planes of maximum shear-strain-rate. The data can be explained by flow in a thinning and stretching shear zone that deforms in plane strain at a Wk of ~0.7 to ~0.85. In support of this, inversions of seismic focal mechanism data yield an orientation of σ1 for the brittle crust of the central Southern Alps "natural laboratory" that approximately coincides with the predicted orientation of the contractional instantaneous stretching axis for the above

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Benjamin Lenihan

    This dissertation describes the characterization of an inherently inhomogeneous medium capable of shear thickening. An aqueous suspension of cornstarch represents an important exemplar of such physical systems. The physics underlying the behavior of such shear thickening suspensions is incompletely understood. Characterization of these suspensions may provide valuable clues into the underlying mechanisms that result in shear thickening behavior. The goal of this thesis is to characterize the acoustic properties of suspensions of cornstarch in density-matched cesium chloride aqueous solutions. A review of the literature indicated that almost no information concerning the ultrasonic characteristics of suspensions of starches had been reported other than studies monitoring the gelatinization of starches not relevant to the shear stiffening of ungelatinized suspensions. Each chapter began with a discussion and validation of the specific experimental techniques and methods of analysis necessary for each type of measurement. Ultrasonic measurement of the group velocity, the frequency-dependent attenuation properties, the frequency-dependent phase velocity, and the frequency-dependent backscatter properties of the suspensions of cornstarch are reported. Initially counterintuitive results including negative (phase velocity) dispersion and a decrease in the measured backscatter coefficient with increasing particle concentration are understood in terms of widely accepted physical models. In sum, these studies represent an advancement of the understanding of the physics underlying the interaction between ultrasound and suspensions and lay the groundwork for future studies probing the physics of the shear thickening.

  1. Colloidal Aggregate Structure under Shear by USANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha; van Dyk, Antony K.; Ginzburg, Valeriy V.; Nakatani, Alan I.

    2015-03-01

    Paints are complex formulations of polymeric binders, inorganic pigments, dispersants, surfactants, colorants, rheology modifiers, and other additives. A commercially successful paint exhibits a desired viscosity profile over a wide shear rate range from 10-5 s-1 for settling to >104 s-1 for rolling, and spray applications. Understanding paint formulation structure is critical as it governs the paint viscosity profile. However, probing paint formulation structure under shear is a challenging task due to the formulation complexity containing structures with different hierarchical length scales and their alterations under the influence of an external flow field. In this work mesoscale structures of paint formulations under shear are investigated using Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (rheo-USANS). Contrast match conditions were utilized to independently probe the structure of latex binder particle aggregates and the TiO2 pigment particle aggregates. Rheo-USANS data revealed that the aggregates are fractal in nature and their self-similarity dimensions and correlations lengths depend on the chemistry of the binder particles, the type of rheology modifier present and the shear stress imposed upon the formulation. These results can be explained in the framework of diffusion and reaction limited transient aggregates structure evolution under simple shear.

  2. Epigenetic age predictions based on buccal swabs are more precise in combination with cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures

    PubMed Central

    Eipel, Monika; Mayer, Felix; Arent, Tanja; Ferreira, Marcelo R. P.; Birkhofer, Carina; Gerstenmaier, Uwe; Costa, Ivan G.; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is reflected by highly reproducible DNA methylation (DNAm) changes that open new perspectives for estimation of chronological age in legal medicine. DNA can be harvested non-invasively from cells at the inside of a person's cheek using buccal swabs – but these specimens resemble heterogeneous mixtures of buccal epithelial cells and leukocytes with different epigenetic makeup. In this study, we have trained an age predictor based on three age-associated CpG sites (associated with the genes PDE4C, ASPA, and ITGA2B) for swab samples to reach a mean absolute deviation (MAD) between predicted and chronological age of 4.3 years in a training set and of 7.03 years in a validation set. Subsequently, the composition of buccal epithelial cells versus leukocytes was estimated by two additional CpGs (associated with the genes CD6 and SERPINB5). Results of this “Buccal-Cell-Signature” correlated with cell counts in cytological stains (R2 = 0.94). Combination of cell type-specific and age-associated CpGs into one multivariate model enabled age predictions with MADs of 5.09 years and 5.12 years in two independent validation sets. Our results demonstrate that the cellular composition in buccal swab samples can be determined by DNAm at two cell type-specific CpGs to improve epigenetic age predictions. PMID:27249102

  3. Influences of word predictability and type of masker noise on intelligibility of sung text in live concerts.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Antje; Knight, Sarah; Hawkins, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Vocal music is often intended to convey meaning, but how effectively this is achieved is poorly understood. This study systematically assessed the influence of three non-phonetic factors on the intelligibility of sung words in six public concerts in different venues: word predictability from sentence context, type of masker noise (spoken babble, sung vowels, [∫(w)]), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Stimuli were sung live by a professional a cappella ensemble with one male singing target sentences and five others (two female) producing the masker sounds. The concert audiences (N = 319) reported the final word of each sentence using a handheld voting device, from four phonetically- and semantically-controlled written alternatives projected onto a screen after the sentence was sung. Although overall accuracy differed between performances, intelligibility patterns were robust across concerts. They included predicted main effects of masker noise type ([∫(w)] masking least disruptive, babble most), SNR (high > low), semantic predictability (high > low), listener age (young > old), and listener language status (native > non-native), and some strong interactions. These results suggest that, despite acoustic differences between sung and spoken words and the unusual and varied experimental venues, key findings from traditional speech research apply to sung words, given appropriate musical composition. PMID:26520319

  4. Influences of word predictability and type of masker noise on intelligibility of sung text in live concerts.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Antje; Knight, Sarah; Hawkins, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Vocal music is often intended to convey meaning, but how effectively this is achieved is poorly understood. This study systematically assessed the influence of three non-phonetic factors on the intelligibility of sung words in six public concerts in different venues: word predictability from sentence context, type of masker noise (spoken babble, sung vowels, [∫(w)]), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Stimuli were sung live by a professional a cappella ensemble with one male singing target sentences and five others (two female) producing the masker sounds. The concert audiences (N = 319) reported the final word of each sentence using a handheld voting device, from four phonetically- and semantically-controlled written alternatives projected onto a screen after the sentence was sung. Although overall accuracy differed between performances, intelligibility patterns were robust across concerts. They included predicted main effects of masker noise type ([∫(w)] masking least disruptive, babble most), SNR (high > low), semantic predictability (high > low), listener age (young > old), and listener language status (native > non-native), and some strong interactions. These results suggest that, despite acoustic differences between sung and spoken words and the unusual and varied experimental venues, key findings from traditional speech research apply to sung words, given appropriate musical composition.

  5. PREDICTING THE DETECTABILITY OF OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS OBSERVED BY KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, W. J.; Elsworth, Y.; Verner, G. A.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; Appourchaux, T.; Garcia, R. A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Thompson, M. J.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Bryson, S. T.; Brown, T. M.

    2011-05-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we outline how to make an estimate of the detectability of solar-like oscillations in any given Kepler target, using rough estimates of the temperature and radius, and the Kepler apparent magnitude.

  6. Diabetic Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy Predicts Recurrent Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seon-Ah; Yun, Jae-Seung; Lim, Tae-Seok; Min, Kyoungil; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Park, Yong-Moon; Ahn, Yu-Bae

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study evaluated the relationship between CAN and recurrent CVD in type 2 diabetes. A total of 206 patients with type 2 diabetes who had a history of CVD within 3 years of enrollment were consecutively recruited from January 2001 to December 2009 and followed-up until December 2015. Cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed using the following heart rate variability parameters: expiration-to-inspiration ratio, response to Valsalva maneuver and standing. We estimated the recurrence of CVD events during the follow-up period. A total of 159 (77.2%) of the 206 patients enrolled completed the follow up, and 78 (49.1%) patients had recurrent episodes of CVD, with an incidence rate of 75.6 per 1,000 patient-years. The mean age and diabetes duration were 62.5 ± 8.7 and 9.2 ± 6.9 years, respectively. Patients who developed recurrent CVD also exhibited hypertension (P = 0.004), diabetic nephropathy (P = 0.012), higher mean systolic blood pressure (P = 0.006), urinary albumin excretion (P = 0.015), and mean triglyceride level (P = 0.035) than did patients without recurrent CVD. Multivariable Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that definite CAN was significantly associated with an increased risk of recurrent CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 3.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39−6.60; P = 0.005). Definite CAN was an independent predictor for recurrent CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes who had a known prior CVD event. PMID:27741306

  7. Predicting the Detectability of Oscillations in Solar-type Stars Observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Bedding, T. R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; Appourchaux, T.; Elsworth, Y.; García, R. A.; Houdek, G.; Karoff, C.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Thompson, M. J.; Verner, G. A.; Batalha, N.; Borucki, W. J.; Brown, T. M.; Bryson, S. T.; Christiansen, J. L.; Clarke, B. D.; Jenkins, J. M.; Klaus, T. C.; Koch, D.; An, D.; Ballot, J.; Basu, S.; Benomar, O.; Bonanno, A.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Campante, T. L.; Corsaro, E.; Creevey, O. L.; Esch, L.; Gai, N.; Gaulme, P.; Hale, S. J.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Huber, D.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; New, R.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Pricopi, D.; Quirion, P.-O.; Régulo, C.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Salabert, D.; Stello, D.; Suran, M. D.

    2011-05-01

    Asteroseismology of solar-type stars has an important part to play in the exoplanet program of the NASA Kepler Mission. Precise and accurate inferences on the stellar properties that are made possible by the seismic data allow very tight constraints to be placed on the exoplanetary systems. Here, we outline how to make an estimate of the detectability of solar-like oscillations in any given Kepler target, using rough estimates of the temperature and radius, and the Kepler apparent magnitude.

  8. Analysis and prediction of lightning strike distributions associated with synoptic map types over Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reap, R.M.

    1994-08-01

    The temporal and spatial distributions of lightning activity associated with specific synoptic regimes of low-level wind flow were analyzed as part of an experiment to develop improved statistical thunderstorm forecasts for Florida. The synoptic regimes were identified by means of a linear correlation technique that was used to perform pattern classification or `map typing` of 18- and 30-h sea level pressure forecasts from the National Meteorological Center`s Nested Grid Model (NGM). Lightning location data for the 1987-90 warm seasons were subsequently analyzed on a 12-km grid to determine the thunderstorm distribution for each of the predetermined map types. The analysis revealed organized coastal maxima in lightning activity related to land-sea-breeze convergence zones that form in direct response to the low-level wind flow. Surface effects were also indicated by the persistent minima in lightning activity over Lake Okeechobee and by the lightning maxima found in regions with shoreline curvature favoring localized convergence. Experimental thunderstorm probability equations for Florida were subsequently developed from climatological lightning frequencies and NGM forecast fields. The lightning frequencies were combined with the K stability index to form interactive predictors that take into account the temporal and spatial variations in lightning occurrence for each map type but modulate the climatology in response to the daily large-scale synoptic situation. The statistical forecast equations were developed for each map type in an attempt to simulate the effects of small-scale processes, such as land-sea-breeze convergence zones, on the subsequent development of peninsular-scale convection.

  9. ABC goal achievement predicts microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Vascular complications of type 1 diabetes are thought to cluster. We examined the prevalence and incidence of vascular complications and American Diabetes Association’s ABC goal achievements in a prospective cohort of adults with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that ABC achievement at baseline would predict both micro- and macrovascular complications over 6-years. Methods Participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Microvascular complications included diabetic nephropathy (DN), defined as incident albuminuria (AER≥20μg/min) or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) by CKD-EPI cystatin C and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), defined as laser eye-therapy. Macrovascular complications were defined as coronary artery calcium progression (CACp), measured by electron-beam computed-tomography. ABC goals were defined as HbA1c<7.0%, BP<130/80 mmHg, LDL-C<100mg/dL. Results ABC control was suboptimal with only 6% meeting all goals. Meeting no ABC goals at baseline compared to meeting all goals was associated with increased odds of developing microvascular complications (OR: 8.5, 2.3–31.5, p=0.001), but did not reach significance for CACp (OR: 1.7, 0.8–3.9, p=0.19). Conclusion ABC achievement at baseline strongly predicted microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic targets to complement conventional risk factors in treating macrovascular complications. PMID:25270733

  10. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  11. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  12. Differential Predictive Roles of A- and B-Type Nuclear Lamins in Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Saarinen, Irena; Mirtti, Tuomas; Seikkula, Heikki; Boström, Peter J.; Taimen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men in western countries. While active surveillance is increasingly utilized, the majority of patients are currently treated with radical prostatectomy. In order to avoid over-treatment, there is an indisputable need for reliable biomarkers to identify the potentially aggressive and lethal cases. Nuclear intermediate filament proteins called lamins play a role in chromatin organization, gene expression and cell stiffness. The expression of lamin A is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer but to date the prognostic value of the lamins has not been tested in other solid tumors. Methods We studied the expression of different lamins with immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray material of 501 PCa patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and lymph node dissection. Patients were divided into two staining categories (low and high expression). The correlation of lamin expression with clinicopathological variables was tested and the association of lamin status with biochemical recurrence (BCR) and disease specific survival (DSS) was further analyzed. Results Low expression of lamin A associated with lymph node positivity (p<0.01) but not with other clinicopathological variables and low expression had a borderline independent significant association with DSS (HR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2–1.0; p = 0.052). Similarly, low lamin C expression associated with poorer survival (HR = 0.2; 95% CI 0.1–0.6; p = 0.004). Lamin B1 expression did not associate with clinicopathological variables but high expression independently predicted BCR in multivariable Cox regression analysis (HR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.1–2.9; p = 0.023). Low expression of lamin B2 correlated with lymph node positivity (p<0.01) and predicted unfavorable DSS (HR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2–1.0; p = 0.047). Conclusions These results suggest differential roles for lamins in PCa progression. Reduced amounts of lamin A/C and B2 increase risk for lymph node

  13. Plant functional types do not predict biomass responses to removal and fertilization in Alaskan tussock tundra.

    PubMed

    Bret-Harte, M Syndonia; Mack, Michelle C; Goldsmith, Gregory R; Sloan, Daniel B; Demarco, Jennie; Shaver, Gaius R; Ray, Peter M; Biesinger, Zy; Chapin, F Stuart

    2008-07-01

    Plant communities in natural ecosystems are changing and species are being lost due to anthropogenic impacts including global warming and increasing nitrogen (N) deposition. We removed dominant species, combinations of species and entire functional types from Alaskan tussock tundra, in the presence and absence of fertilization, to examine the effects of non-random species loss on plant interactions and ecosystem functioning.After 6 years, growth of remaining species had compensated for biomass loss due to removal in all treatments except the combined removal of moss, Betula nana and Ledum palustre (MBL), which removed the most biomass. Total vascular plant production returned to control levels in all removal treatments, including MBL. Inorganic soil nutrient availability, as indexed by resins, returned to control levels in all unfertilized removal treatments, except MBL.Although biomass compensation occurred, the species that provided most of the compensating biomass in any given treatment were not from the same functional type (growth form) as the removed species. This provides empirical evidence that functional types based on effect traits are not the same as functional types based on response to perturbation. Calculations based on redistributing N from the removed species to the remaining species suggested that dominant species from other functional types contributed most of the compensatory biomass.Fertilization did not increase total plant community biomass, because increases in graminoid and deciduous shrub biomass were offset by decreases in evergreen shrub, moss and lichen biomass. Fertilization greatly increased inorganic soil nutrient availability.In fertilized removal treatments, deciduous shrubs and graminoids grew more than expected based on their performance in the fertilized intact community, while evergreen shrubs, mosses and lichens all grew less than expected. Deciduous shrubs performed better than graminoids when B. nana was present, but not when

  14. Flirting with disaster: short-term mating orientation and hostile sexism predict different types of sexual harassment.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Charlotte; Rees, Jonas; Bohner, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    We combine evolutionary and sociocultural accounts of sexual harassment, proposing that sexuality-related and hostility-related motives lead to different types of harassment. Specifically, men's short-term mating orientation (STMO) was hypothesized to predict only unwanted sexual attention but not gender harassment, whereas men's hostile sexism (HS) was hypothesized to predict both unwanted sexual attention and gender harassment. As part of an alleged computer-chat task, 100 male students could send sexualized personal remarks (representing unwanted sexual attention), sexist jokes (representing gender harassment), or nonharassing material to an attractive female target. Independently, participants' STMO, HS, and sexual harassment myth acceptance (SHMA) were assessed. Correlational and path analyses revealed that STMO specifically predicted unwanted sexual attention, whereas HS predicted both unwanted sexual attention and gender harassment. Furthermore, SHMA fully mediated the effect of HS on gender harassment, but did not mediate effects of STMO or HS on unwanted sexual attention. Results are discussed in relation to motivational explanations for sexual harassment and antiharassment interventions.

  15. Evaluation of artificial neural network algorithms for predicting METs and activity type from accelerometer data: validation on an independent sample

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory provided a “proof of concept” for use of artificial neural networks (nnets) to estimate metabolic equivalents (METs) and identify activity type from accelerometer data (Staudenmayer J, Pober D, Crouter S, Bassett D, Freedson P, J Appl Physiol 107: 1330–1307, 2009). The purpose of this study was to develop new nnets based on a larger, more diverse, training data set and apply these nnet prediction models to an independent sample to evaluate the robustness and flexibility of this machine-learning modeling technique. The nnet training data set (University of Massachusetts) included 277 participants who each completed 11 activities. The independent validation sample (n = 65) (University of Tennessee) completed one of three activity routines. Criterion measures were 1) measured METs assessed using open-circuit indirect calorimetry; and 2) observed activity to identify activity type. The nnet input variables included five accelerometer count distribution features and the lag-1 autocorrelation. The bias and root mean square errors for the nnet MET trained on University of Massachusetts and applied to University of Tennessee were +0.32 and 1.90 METs, respectively. Seventy-seven percent of the activities were correctly classified as sedentary/light, moderate, or vigorous intensity. For activity type, household and locomotion activities were correctly classified by the nnet activity type 98.1 and 89.5% of the time, respectively, and sport was correctly classified 23.7% of the time. Use of this machine-learning technique operates reasonably well when applied to an independent sample. We propose the creation of an open-access activity dictionary, including accelerometer data from a broad array of activities, leading to further improvements in prediction accuracy for METs, activity intensity, and activity type. PMID:21885802

  16. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  17. Serum Gamma-glutamyltransferase Levels Predict the Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gang, Li; Wei-Hua, Lu; Rong, Ai; Jian-Hong, Yang; Zi-Hua, Zhou; Zhong-Zhi, Tang

    2015-08-01

    Progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) may be more predictive of future coronary heart disease events than a baseline CAC score. We determined whether serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity can independently predict the progression of CAC in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients (n = 326) without symptomatic cardiovascular (CV) disease were evaluated by CAC imaging. The CAC scores were assessed at baseline and after 20 ± 4 months. Serum GGT activities were significantly higher in progressors compared with nonprogressors (39 ± 16 vs. 27 ± 11 U/L, P < .001). Multivariable analyses demonstrated that GGT activity retained a strong association with CAC progression after adjustment for CV risk factors. Additionally, there was a graded association between GGT activity quartile and annualized CAC progression. In asymptomatic patients with T2DM, we prospectively found that serum GGT activity may be an independent predictor of CAC progression but not a predictor of CAC incidence.

  18. Mathematical analysis of mural thrombogenesis. Concentration profiles of platelet-activating agents and effects of viscous shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Folie, B J; McIntire, L V

    1989-01-01

    The concentration profiles of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thromboxane A2 (TxA2), thrombin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) released extracellularly from the platelet granules or produced metabolically on the platelet membrane during thrombus growth, were estimated using finite element simulation of blood flow over model thrombi of various shapes and dimensions. The wall fluxes of these platelet-activating agents were estimated for each model thrombus at three different wall shear rates (100 s-1, 800 s-1, and 1,500 s-1), employing experimental data on thrombus growth rates and sizes. For that purpose, whole human blood was perfused in a parallel-plate flow chamber coated with type l fibrillar human collagen, and the kinetic data collected and analyzed by an EPl-fluorescence video microscopy system and a digital image processor. It was found that thrombin concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation. Although heparin significantly accelerated thrombin inhibition by antithrombin lll, the remaining thrombin levels were still significantly above the minimum threshold required for irreversible platelet aggregation. While ADP concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation at low shear rates and for small aggregate sizes, TxA2 concentrations were only sufficient to induce platelet shape change over the entire range of wall shear rates and thrombi dimensions studied. Our results also indicated that the local concentration of vWF multimers released from the platelet alpha-granules could be sufficient to modulate platelet aggregation at low and intermediate wall shear rates (less than 1,000 s-1). The sizes of standing vortices formed adjacent to a growing aggregate and the embolizing stresses and the torque, acting at the aggregate surface, were also estimated in this simulation. It was found that standing vortices developed on both sides of the thrombus even at low wall shear rates. Their sizes increased with

  19. Temperature-Dependent Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio of p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12 and n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3 Skutterudite Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Robert; Case, Eldon D; Ni, Jennifer E.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Effective models of the mechanical behavior of thermoelectric materials under device conditions require knowledge of the temperature-dependent elastic properties.Between room temperature and 600 K, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) measurements of the Young s and shear moduli of three skutterudite thermoelectric materials, n-type Co0.95Pd0.05Te0.05Sb3(both with and without 0.1 atomic % cerium dopant) and p-type Ce0.9Fe3.5Co0.5Sb12, decreased linearly with temperature at a rate between -0.011 GPa/K and -0.013 GPa/K. In contrast the Poisson s ratio was approximately 0.22 for the three materials and was relatively insensitive to temperature.For temperatures > 600 K, the elastic moduli decreased more rapidly and resonance peaks broadened indicating the onset of viscoelastic behavior.The viscoelastic relaxation of the moduli was least for Ce-doped n-type material, for which grain boundary precipitates may inhibit grain boundary sliding which in turn has important implications concerning creep resistance. In addition, powder processing of the n- and p-type materials should be done cautiously since submicron-sized powders of both the n- and p-type powders were pyrophoric

  20. Novel Urinary Protein Biomarkers Predicting the Development of Microalbuminuria and Renal Function Decline in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela; Maahs, David M.; Chance, Mark R.; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Li, Xiaolin; Hazlett, Fred; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To define a panel of novel protein biomarkers of renal disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults with type 1 diabetes in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study who were initially free of renal complications (n = 465) were followed for development of micro- or macroalbuminuria (MA) and early renal function decline (ERFD, annual decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate of ≥3.3%). The label-free proteomic discovery phase was conducted in 13 patients who progressed to MA by the 6-year visit and 11 control subjects, and four proteins (Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, α-1 acid glycoprotein, clusterin, and progranulin) identified in the discovery phase were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 74 subjects: group A, normal renal function (n = 35); group B, ERFD without MA (n = 15); group C, MA without ERFD (n = 16); and group D, both ERFD and MA (n = 8). RESULTS In the label-free analysis, a model of progression to MA was built using 252 peptides, yielding an area under the curve (AUC) of 84.7 ± 5.3%. In the validation study, ordinal logistic regression was used to predict development of ERFD, MA, or both. A panel including Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (odds ratio 2.9, 95% CI 1.3–6.2, P = 0.008), progranulin (1.9, 0.8–4.5, P = 0.16), clusterin (0.6, 0.3–1.1, P = 0.09), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (1.6, 0.7–3.7, P = 0.27) improved the AUC from 0.841 to 0.889. CONCLUSIONS A panel of four novel protein biomarkers predicted early renal damage in type 1 diabetes. These findings require further validation in other populations for prediction of renal complications and treatment monitoring. PMID:22238279

  1. The Role of Shear in Shock Initiation of Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cart, E. J.; Lee, R. J.; Gustavson, P. K.; Coffey, C. S.; Sutherland, G. T.

    2004-07-01

    This describes an experiment to test the hypothesis that the energy dissipated due to shear driven plastic deformation provides the hot spots needed for shock initiation of explosives. To develop controlled shear, sinusoidal shock wave fronts were generated and used to initiate PBXN-110 explosive charges. A threshold level was found for nearly flat shock wave fronts that did not initiate the explosive charges yet sinusoidal shock waves of lower amplitude caused initiation in the regions of maximum shear and not in the regions of minimum shear in identical explosive charges. As predicted, initiation occurred as long rows centered over the regions of maximum slope — maximum shear of the corrugated sinusoidal surface. These experiments will be discussed in detail.

  2. Shear band in sand with spatially varying density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Ronaldo I.; Song, Xiaoyu; Rechenmacher, Amy L.; Abedi, Sara; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Bifurcation theory is often used to investigate the inception of a shear band in a homogeneously deforming body. The theory predicts conjugate shear bands that have the same likelihood of triggering. For structures loaded symmetrically the choice of which of the two conjugate shear bands will persist is arbitrary. In this paper we show that spatial density variation could be a determining factor for the selection of the persistent shear band in a symmetrically loaded localizing sand body. We combine experimental imaging on rectangular sand specimens loaded in plane strain compression with mesoscale finite element modeling on symmetrically loaded sand specimens to show that spatial heterogeneity in density does have a profound impact on the persistent shear band.

  3. Cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes: prevalence, prediction and management in an ageing population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siang Ing; Patel, Mitesh; Jones, Christopher M.; Narendran, Parth

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). However, evidence of its risks and management is often extrapolated from studies in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients or the general population. This approach is unsatisfactory given that the underlying pathology, demographics and natural history of the disease differ between T1D and T2D. Furthermore, with a rising life expectancy, a greater number of T1D patients are exposed to the cardiovascular (CV) risk factors associated with an ageing population. The aim of this review is to examine the existing literature around CVD in T1D. We pay particular attention to CVD prevalence, how well we manage risk, potential biomarkers, and whether the studies included the older aged patients (defined as aged over 65). We also discuss approaches to the management of CV risk in the older aged. The available data suggest a significant CVD burden in patients with T1D and poor management of CV risk factors. This is underpinned by a poor evidence base for therapeutic management of CV risk specifically for patients with T1D, and in the most relevant population – the older aged patients. We would suggest that important areas remain to be addressed, particularly exploring the risks and benefits of therapeutic approaches to CVD management in the older aged. PMID:26568811

  4. A Risk Prediction Model Based on Lymph-Node Metastasis in Poorly Differentiated–Type Intramucosal Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Choi, Min Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ahn, Hyeon Seon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for undifferentiated type early gastric cancer is regarded as an investigational treatment. Few studies have tried to identify the risk factors that predict lymph-node metastasis (LNM) in intramucosal poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas (PDC). This study was designed to develop a risk scoring system (RSS) for predicting LNM in intramucosal PDC. Methods From January 2002 to July 2015, patients diagnosed with mucosa-confined PDC, among those who underwent curative gastrectomy with lymph node dissection were reviewed. A risk model based on independent predicting factors of LNM was developed, and its performance was internally validated using a split sample approach. Results Overall, LNM was observed in 5.2% (61) of 1169 patients. Four risk factors [Female sex, tumor size ≥ 3.2 cm, muscularis mucosa (M3) invasion, and lymphatic-vascular involvement] were significantly associated with LNM, which were incorporated into the RSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting LNM after internal validation was 0.69 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59–0.79]. A total score of 2 points corresponded to the optimal RSS threshold with a discrimination of 0.75 (95% CI 0.69–0.81). The LNM rates were 1.6% for low risk (<2 points) and 8.9% for high-risk (≥2 points) patients, with a negative predictive value of 98.6% (95% CI 0.98–1.00). Conclusions A RSS could be useful in clinical practice to determine which patients with intramucosal PDC have low risk of LNM. PMID:27228258

  5. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  6. Microbial community composition and in silico predicted metabolic potential reflect biogeochemical gradients between distinct peatland types.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Zuzana; Bárta, Jiří

    2014-12-01

    It is not well understood how the ecological status and microbial community composition of spruce swamp forests (SSF) relate to those found in bogs and fens. To clarify this, we investigated biogeochemical parameters and microbial community composition in a bog, a fen and two SSF using high throughput barcoded sequencing of the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) variable region V4. The results demonstrated that the microbial community of SSF is positioned between those of bogs and fens, and this was confirmed by in silico predicted metabolic potentials. This corresponds well with the position of SSF on the trophic gradient and reflects distinct responses of microbial communities to environmental variables. Species richness and microbial diversity increased significantly from bog to fen, with SSF in between, reflecting the variation in pH, nutrient availability and peat decomposability. The archaeal community, dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogens, was more similar in SSF and the bog compared with the fen. The composition of the bacterial community of SSF was intermediate between those of bog and fen. However, the production of CO2 (an indicator of peat decomposability) did not differ between SSF and bog, suggesting the limiting effect of low pH and poor litter quality on the functioning of the bacterial community in SSF. These results help to clarify the transitional position of SSF between bogs and fens and showed the strong effect of environmental conditions on microbial community composition and functioning.

  7. Collagen Type XI Alpha 1 Expression in Intraductal Papillomas Predicts Malignant Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Freire, Javier; García-Berbel, Lucia; García-Berbel, Pilar; Pereda, Saray; Azueta, Ainara; García-Arranz, Pilar; De Juan, Ana; Vega, Alfonso; Hens, Ángela; Enguita, Ana; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Gómez-Román, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress achieved in the treatment of breast cancer, there are still many unsolved clinical issues, being the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of papillary diseases, one of the highest challenges. Because of its unpredictable clinical behavior, treatment of intraductal papilloma has generated a great controversy. Even though considered as a benign lesion, it presents high rate of malignant recurrence. This is the reason why there are clinicians supporting a complete excision of the lesion, while others support an only expectant follow-up. Previous results of our group suggested that procollagen 11 alpha 1 (pro-COL11A1) expression correlates with infiltrating phenotype in breast lesions. We analyzed the correlation between expression of pro-COL11A1 in intraductal papilloma and their risk of malignant recurrence. Immunohistochemistry of pro-COL11A1 was performed in 62 samples of intraductal papilloma. Ten out 11 cases relapsed as carcinoma presents positive staining for COL11A1, while just 17 out of 51 cases with benign behaviour present immunostaining. There were significant differences (P < 0.0001) when comparing patients with malignant recurrence versus nonmalignant relapse patients. These data suggest that pro-COL11A1 expression is a highly sensitive biomarker to predict malignant relapse of intraductal papilloma and it can be used as indicative factor for prevention programs.

  8. Collagen Type XI Alpha 1 Expression in Intraductal Papillomas Predicts Malignant Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Javier; García-Berbel, Lucia; García-Berbel, Pilar; Pereda, Saray; Azueta, Ainara; García-Arranz, Pilar; De Juan, Ana; Vega, Alfonso; Hens, Ángela; Enguita, Ana; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Gómez-Román, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Despite the progress achieved in the treatment of breast cancer, there are still many unsolved clinical issues, being the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of papillary diseases, one of the highest challenges. Because of its unpredictable clinical behavior, treatment of intraductal papilloma has generated a great controversy. Even though considered as a benign lesion, it presents high rate of malignant recurrence. This is the reason why there are clinicians supporting a complete excision of the lesion, while others support an only expectant follow-up. Previous results of our group suggested that procollagen 11 alpha 1 (pro-COL11A1) expression correlates with infiltrating phenotype in breast lesions. We analyzed the correlation between expression of pro-COL11A1 in intraductal papilloma and their risk of malignant recurrence. Immunohistochemistry of pro-COL11A1 was performed in 62 samples of intraductal papilloma. Ten out 11 cases relapsed as carcinoma presents positive staining for COL11A1, while just 17 out of 51 cases with benign behaviour present immunostaining. There were significant differences (P < 0.0001) when comparing patients with malignant recurrence versus nonmalignant relapse patients. These data suggest that pro-COL11A1 expression is a highly sensitive biomarker to predict malignant relapse of intraductal papilloma and it can be used as indicative factor for prevention programs. PMID:26448946

  9. Combining Information from Common Type 2 Diabetes Risk Polymorphisms Improves Disease Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Weedon, Michael N; McCarthy, Mark I; Hitman, Graham; Walker, Mark; Groves, Christopher J; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Rayner, N. William; Shields, Beverley; Owen, Katharine R; Hattersley, Andrew T; Frayling, Timothy M

    2006-01-01

    Background A limited number of studies have assessed the risk of common diseases when combining information from several predisposing polymorphisms. In most cases, individual polymorphisms only moderately increase risk (~20%), and they are thought to be unhelpful in assessing individuals' risk clinically. The value of analyzing multiple alleles simultaneously is not well studied. This is often because, for any given disease, very few common risk alleles have been confirmed. Methods and Findings Three common variants (Lys23 of KCNJ11, Pro12 of PPARG, and the T allele at rs7903146 of TCF7L2) have been shown to predispose to type 2 diabetes mellitus across many large studies. Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.30 to 0.88 in controls. To assess the combined effect of multiple susceptibility alleles, we genotyped these variants in a large case-control study (3,668 controls versus 2,409 cases). Individual allele odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 1.23) to 1.48 (95% CI, 1.36 to 1.60). We found no evidence of gene-gene interaction, and the risks of multiple alleles were consistent with a multiplicative model. Each additional risk allele increased the odds of type 2 diabetes by 1.28 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.35) times. Participants with all six risk alleles had an OR of 5.71 (95% CI, 1.15 to 28.3) compared to those with no risk alleles. The 8.1% of participants that were double-homozygous for the risk alleles at TCF7L2 and Pro12Ala had an OR of 3.16 (95% CI, 2.22 to 4.50), compared to 4.3% with no TCF7L2 risk alleles and either no or one Glu23Lys or Pro12Ala risk alleles. Conclusions Combining information from several known common risk polymorphisms allows the identification of population subgroups with markedly differing risks of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those obtained using single polymorphisms. This approach may have a role in future preventative measures for common, polygenic diseases. PMID:17020404

  10. Predicting the age of the mutation for Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Nouri, N.; Risch, N.J.; Pelias, M.Z.

    1994-09-01

    The locus for Usher syndrome type I (USH1C) in the Acadian population is in the p15.1-p14 region of chromosome 11. This recessive disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and pigmentary retinopathy. Three separate loci have been localized for Usher syndrome type I. All Acadian, but no non-Acadian, families show linkage to the 11p locus, suggesting a founder effect in the Acadian population. Linkage and haplotype analyses of eight markers spanning 10 centiMorgans demonstrate that USH1C lies between D11S1397 and D11S1310. Based on analyses of Usher and CEPH families the most likely linkage map for the eight markers is: D11S569-(.02)-D11S861-(.01)-D11S419-(.01)-D11S1397-(.004)-D11S921-(.007)-D11S1310-(.01)-D11S899-(.04)-D11S928. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium with USH1C was found for all markers, indicating a recent origin of a unique mutation. Parental haplotypes were separated into those with the disease allele and those with the normal allele at the USH1C locus. Of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele, 17 had an identical haplotype for the eight markers. All but one of the haplotypes on the remaining 37 chromosomes could be explained by a few recombination events, suggesting that a single mutation is responsible for nearly all cases of Usher syndrome type I in the Acadian population. The same alleles were found at D11S921 and D11S1310 on 50 of the 54 chromosomes with the disease allele and on only 5 of the 50 chromosomes with the normal allele. Analysis of recombination and linkage disequilibrium between USH1C and each of the markers suggests that the age of the mutation is approximately 15 generations, which corresponds with the time that the Acadians arrived in the Canadian territory of Acadia. The analysis indicates that this mutation was already established in the Acadians who made their way to Louisiana after 1755.

  11. Prediction of silo-vibrations using a modified lambdameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäckel, Stefan; Schünemann, Ralf; Mütze, Thomas; Peuker, Urs A.

    2013-06-01

    Predicting silo-vibrations is not yet universally possible but only to a very limited extent. A mechanism of excitation of silo vibrations can be found in oscillating shear stresses between the bulk solid and the inner silo wall, the so-called "wall-stick-slip" effect. So if this wall-stick-slip occurs during shear experiments in shear testers, the probability of silo-vibrations in silos will be high. However if there is no slip-stick effect observed, this will not consequently exclude silo-vibrations. The influences on a stable stick-slip were studied in wall friction experiments with a rotational shear tester and in a specially developed silo model based on a lambdameter. The examined parameters are normal stress, shear velocity, wall roughness and particle shape. Plastic pellets which are known to honk (PET, PA) and plastic pellets that do not honk (PE) are considered [1]. It is shown that the silo model based on a lambdameter is more suitable for initiation and measurement of stable wall-stick-slip of granular media than the conventional rotational shear tester. The industrial experiences in respect of silo vibrations are proved in the silo model for all tested types of plastic pellets. So, if the origin of silo vibrations is wall-stick-slip, the silo model based on a lambdameter gives a better opportunity for predicting silo vibrations. This paper gives a summary on the results obtained with the new method.

  12. Beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin: predictive markers for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in children?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, M M; Campos, J M; Josephs, S; Rifai, N

    1990-01-01

    The value of beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin concentrations in serum for early diagnosis of infants born to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected mothers was assessed. Concentrations of both markers were measured in serum samples from pediatric patients (Centers for Disease Control classifications P0, P1, and P2), as well as in age-matched normal subjects. Both beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin were significantly increased in HIV-1-infected symptomatic subjects (P2) compared to controls. Seventy-five percent of asymptomatic patients (P1) also had increased values. On the other hand, a significant overlap in concentrations of both markers in serum was found between controls and P0 patients. Thirty-eight percent of the P0 patients had values comparable to those of the P2 group. Persistently high concentrations of both markers in P0 patients may be indicative of HIV-1 infection. PMID:2229344

  13. Predicting lipase types by improved Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Ya; Li, Hong-Chun; Gao, Jia-Qiang; Fang, Bai-Shan

    2008-01-01

    By proposing a improved Chou's pseudo amino acid composition approach to extract the features of the sequences, a powerful predictor based on k-nearest neighbor was introduced to identify the types of lipases according to their sequences. To avoid redundancy and bias, demonstrations were performed on a dataset where none of the proteins has > or =25% sequence identity to any other. The overall success rate thus obtained by the 10-fold cross-validation test was over 90%, indicating that the improved Chou's pseudo amino acid composition might be a useful tool for extracting the features of protein sequences, or at lease can play a complementary role to many of the other existing approaches. PMID:19075826

  14. Strain localization across main continental strike-slip shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P.; Rozel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Whether deformation within the deep continental crust is fundamentally concentrated in narrow shear zones or distributed in wide zones stays a major controversy of the earth sciences. This is in part because direct measurements of ductile shear or strain rate are difficult, especially when deformation is intense as it is the case in ductile shear zones. The QPSRM (quartz paleo strain rates metry) method allows indirect measurements of strain rates in natural rocks, using shear stress, an estimation of the temperature of deformation, and assuming a flow law. This method has been recently calibrated for ductile continental shear zones conditions, giving the users the best power flow law/ piezometer combination to calculate accurate local strain rates. By comparing the local strain rates with the equivalent global strain rates, measured by dividing the shear rates (mm/yr) by the shear zone width, we estimated the amount of strain localization across ductile shear zones. We applied this method to two major shear zones located in the India-Asia collision zone: the Ailao Shan Red River shear zone (ASRR, SE Asia) and the Karakorum shear zone (Ksz, SW Tibet). We used the Hirth et al. (2001) flow law and the Twiss (1977) piezometer. Within the ASRR, a gradient of strain rates is observed between the shear zone border (5.4 x10-15 s-1) and the shear zone center (3.6 x10-12 s-1). The equivalent global strain rates range between 8.0 x10-15 and 1.7 x10-13 s-1, assuming a shear rate of ~1 cm/yr and a homogenous deformation across the ~15 km-large shear zone. We interpret the local strain rates, which are higher than the global strain rates, as strain localization. The strain localization in the core of the ASRR shear zone had been observed by field studies, and also predicted by numerical models. This study brings a measurement of this strain localization. Within the Ksz, the equivalent shear rate is 4.4 x10-14 s-1, assuming a shear rate of ~11 mm/yr and a homogenous deformation

  15. Testosterone measured in infancy predicts subsequent sex-typed behavior in boys and in girls.

    PubMed

    Lamminmäki, Annamarja; Hines, Melissa; Kuiri-Hänninen, Tanja; Kilpeläinen, Leena; Dunkel, Leo; Sankilampi, Ulla

    2012-04-01

    The testes are active during gestation, as well as during early infancy. Testosterone elevation during fetal development has been shown to play a role in human neurobehavioral sexual differentiation. The role of early postnatal gonadal activation in human psychosexual development is largely unknown, however. We measured testosterone in 48 full term infants (22 boys, 26 girls) by monthly urinary sampling from day 7 postnatal to age 6 months, and related the area under the curve (AUC) for testosterone during the first 6 months postnatal to subsequent sex-typed behavior, at the age of 14 months, using the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI), and playroom observation of toy choices. In boys, testosterone AUC correlated significantly with PSAI scores (Spearman's rho = 0.54, p = 0.04). In addition, play with a train and with a baby doll showed the anticipated sex differences, and play with the train correlated significantly and positively with testosterone AUC in girls (Spearman's rho = 0.43, p = 0.05), while play with the doll correlated significantly and negatively with testosterone AUC in boys (Spearman's rho = -0.48, p < 0.03). These results may support a role for testosterone during early infancy in human neurobehavioral sexual differentiation.

  16. Transcriptional Signatures as a Disease-Specific and Predictive Inflammatory Biomarker for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Hara; Wang, Xujing; Kaldunski, Mary; Jia, Shuang; Kramer, Joanna; Pavletich, Scott J.; Reske, Melissa; Gessel, Trevor; Yassai, Maryam; Quasney, Michael W.; Dahmer, Mary K.; Gorski, Jack; Hessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The complex milieu of inflammatory mediators associated with many diseases is often too dilute to directly measure in the periphery, necessitating development of more sensitive measurements suitable for mechanistic studies, earlier diagnosis, guiding therapeutic decisions, and monitoring interventions. We previously demonstrated that plasma samples from recent-onset Type 1 diabetes (RO T1D) patients induce a proinflammatory transcriptional signature in freshly drawn peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) relative to that of unrelated healthy controls (HC). Here, using cryopreserved PBMC, we analyzed larger RO T1D and HC cohorts, examined T1D progression in pre-onset samples, and compared the RO T1D signature to those associated with three disorders characterized by airway infection and inflammation. The RO T1D signature, consisting of interleukin-1 cytokine family members, chemokines involved in immunocyte chemotaxis, immune receptors, and signaling molecules, was detected during early pre-diabetes and found to resolve post-onset. The signatures associated with cystic fibrosis patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, patients with confirmed bacterial pneumonia, and subjects with H1N1 influenza all reflected immunological activation, yet each were distinct from one another and negatively correlated with that of T1D. This study highlights the remarkable capacity of cells to serve as biosensors capable of sensitively and comprehensively differentiating immunological states. PMID:22972474

  17. Shear-lag analysis about an internally-dropped ply

    SciTech Connect

    Vizzini, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The region around a terminated ply is modeled as several elastic layers separated by shear regions. A shear-lag analysis is then performed allowing for the thickness of the elastic and shear layers to vary. Boundary conditions, away for the ply drop, are based on the deflections determined by a finite element model. The interlaminar stresses are compared against those generated by the finite element model for tapered laminates under pure extension, pure bending, and extension-bending coupling. The shear-lag analysis predicts the interlaminar shear at and near the ply drop for pure extension and in cases involving bending if the deflections due to bending are removed. The interlaminar shear stress and force equilibrium are used to determine the interlaminar normal stress. The trends in the interlaminar normal stress shown by the finite element model are partially captured by the shear-lag analysis. This simple analysis indicates that the mechanism for load transfer about a ply drop is primarily due to shear transfer through the resin rich areas.

  18. The Evaluation of Tools Used to Predict the Impact of Missense Variants Is Hindered by Two Types of Circularity

    PubMed Central

    Azencott, Chloé‐Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cooper, David N.; Stenson, Peter D.; Daly, Mark J.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Duncan, Laramie E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen‐2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster‐2, MutationAssessor, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, LRT, phyloP, and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of 10 tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  19. Reduced Heart Rate Variability Predicts Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes and Controls Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Ehrlich, James; Hunter, Cortney M.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rewers, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is a manifestation of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, a known complication of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We evaluated whether HRV predicted coronary artery calcium (CAC) progression. Methods Subjects between 19 and 56 years of age with T1D or those without diabetes from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study underwent supine deep breathing 12-lead electrocardiograms. The SD of consecutive RR intervals was used as a measure of HRV. CAC was measured at two visits 6.0 ± 0.5 years apart. Progression of CAC was defined as an increase in square root transformed CAC volume of ≥2.5 mm3, excluding patients who had cardiovascular events during follow-up. Results Reduced HRV was associated with older age, higher hemoglobin A1c, elevated albuminuria, CAC volume at baseline, and increased fibrinogen. Higher HRV at baseline was associated with lower likelihood CAC progression (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.56–0.90, P = 0.005), and the adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors did not change this strong association, including adjustment for inflammatory markers. Conclusions Reduced HRV predicted progression of CAC in adults with and without T1D. This association further supports the participation of autonomic neuropathy in the atherosclerosis process. PMID:21128843

  20. The evaluation of tools used to predict the impact of missense variants is hindered by two types of circularity

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Dominik G.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cooper, David N.; Stenson, Peter D.; Daly, Mark J.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Duncan, Laramie E.; Borgwardt, Karsten M.

    2015-01-01

    Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen-2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster-2, MutationAssessor, CADD, LRT, phyloP and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of ten tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity-confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  1. The evaluation of tools used to predict the impact of missense variants is hindered by two types of circularity.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Dominik G; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Cooper, David N; Stenson, Peter D; Daly, Mark J; Smoller, Jordan W; Duncan, Laramie E; Borgwardt, Karsten M

    2015-05-01

    Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen-2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster-2, MutationAssessor, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, LRT, phyloP, and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of 10 tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  2. Development of an in Silico Model of DPPH• Free Radical Scavenging Capacity: Prediction of Antioxidant Activity of Coumarin Type Compounds.

    PubMed

    Goya Jorge, Elizabeth; Rayar, Anita Maria; Barigye, Stephen J; Jorge Rodríguez, María Elisa; Sylla-Iyarreta Veitía, Maité

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of the 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) radical scavenging ability of 1373 chemical compounds, using DRAGON molecular descriptors (MD) and the neural network technique, a technique based on the multilayer multilayer perceptron (MLP), was developed. The built model demonstrated a satisfactory performance for the training ( R 2 = 0.713 ) and test set ( Q ext 2 = 0.654 ) , respectively. To gain greater insight on the relevance of the MD contained in the MLP model, sensitivity and principal component analyses were performed. Moreover, structural and mechanistic interpretation was carried out to comprehend the relationship of the variables in the model with the modeled property. The constructed MLP model was employed to predict the radical scavenging ability for a group of coumarin-type compounds. Finally, in order to validate the model's predictions, an in vitro assay for one of the compounds (4-hydroxycoumarin) was performed, showing a satisfactory proximity between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values. PMID:27338348

  3. Development of an in Silico Model of DPPH• Free Radical Scavenging Capacity: Prediction of Antioxidant Activity of Coumarin Type Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Goya Jorge, Elizabeth; Rayar, Anita Maria; Barigye, Stephen J.; Jorge Rodríguez, María Elisa; Sylla-Iyarreta Veitía, Maité

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of the 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) radical scavenging ability of 1373 chemical compounds, using DRAGON molecular descriptors (MD) and the neural network technique, a technique based on the multilayer multilayer perceptron (MLP), was developed. The built model demonstrated a satisfactory performance for the training (R2=0.713) and test set (Qext2=0.654), respectively. To gain greater insight on the relevance of the MD contained in the MLP model, sensitivity and principal component analyses were performed. Moreover, structural and mechanistic interpretation was carried out to comprehend the relationship of the variables in the model with the modeled property. The constructed MLP model was employed to predict the radical scavenging ability for a group of coumarin-type compounds. Finally, in order to validate the model’s predictions, an in vitro assay for one of the compounds (4-hydroxycoumarin) was performed, showing a satisfactory proximity between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values. PMID:27338348

  4. Using the optimal receiver operating characteristic curve to design a predictive genetic test, exemplified with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Elston, Robert C

    2008-03-01

    Current extensive genetic research into common complex diseases, especially with the completion of genome-wide association studies, is bringing to light many novel genetic risk loci. These new discoveries, along with previously known genetic risk variants, offer an important opportunity for researchers to improve health care. We describe a method of quick evaluation of these new findings for potential clinical practice by designing a new predictive genetic test, estimating its classification accuracy, and determining the sample size required for the verification of this accuracy. The proposed predictive test is asymptotically more powerful than tests built on any other existing method and can be extended to scenarios where loci are linked or interact. We illustrate the approach for the case of type 2 diabetes. We incorporate recently discovered risk factors into the proposed test and find a potentially better predictive genetic test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of the proposed test is estimated to be higher (AUC = 0.671) than for the existing test (AUC = 0.580).

  5. Predicted Aerodynamic Characteristics of a NACA 0015 Airfoil Having a 25% Integral-Type Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Using the two-dimensional ARC2D Navier-Stokes flow solver analyses were conducted to predict the sectional aerodynamic characteristics of the flapped NACA-0015 airfoil section. To facilitate the analyses and the generation of the computational grids, the airfoil with the deflected trailing edge flap was treated as a single element airfoil with no allowance for a gap between the flap's leading edge and the base of the forward portion of the airfoil. Generation of the O-type computational grids was accomplished using the HYGRID hyperbolic grid generation program. Results were obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers, angles of attack and flap deflections. The predicted sectional lift, drag and pitching moment values for the airfoil were then cast in tabular format (C81) to be used in lifting-line helicopter rotor aerodynamic performance calculations. Similar were also generated for the flap. Mathematical expressions providing the variation of the sectional lift and pitching moment coefficients for the airfoil and for the flap as a function of flap chord length and flap deflection angle were derived within the context of thin airfoil theory. The airfoil's sectional drag coefficient were derived using the ARC2D drag predictions for equivalent two dimensional flow conditions.

  6. The prediction of bacteria type and culture growth phase by an electronic nose with a multi-layer perceptron network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. W.; Craven, M.; Dow, C.; Hines, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the use of an electronic nose to predict the class and growth phase of two potentially pathogenic micro-organisms, Eschericha coli ( E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), has been performed. In order to do this we have developed an automated system to sample, with a high degree of reproducibility, the head space of bacterial cultures grown in a standard nutrient medium. Head spaces have been examined by using an array of six different metal oxide semiconducting gas sensors and classified by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) with a back-propagation (BP) learning algorithm. The performance of 36 different pre-processing algorithms has been studied on the basis of nine different sensor parameters and four different normalization techniques. The best MLP was found to classify successfully 100% of the unknown S. aureus samples and 92% of the unknown E. coli samples, on the basis of a set of 360 training vectors and 360 test vectors taken from the lag, log and stationary growth phases. The real growth phase of the bacteria was determined from optical cell counts and was predicted from the head space samples with an accuracy of 81%. We conclude that these results show considerable promise in that the correct prediction of the type and growth phase of pathogenic bacteria may help both in the more rapid treatment of bacterial infections and in the more efficient testing of new anti-biotic drugs.

  7. Predictive Potential of Twenty-Two Biochemical Biomarkers for Coronary Artery Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Bertolami, Marcelo Chiara; Faludi, André Arpad; Monte, Osmar; Xavier, Hermes Toros; Pereira, Tiago Veiga

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the potential of a panel of 22 biomarkers to predict the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients. The study enrolled 96 DM2 patients with (n = 75) and without (n = 21) evidence of CAD. We assessed a biochemical profile that included 22 biomarkers: total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, LDL/HDL, triglycerides, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fructosamine, homocysteine, cysteine, methionine, reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione, L-arginine, asymmetric dimethyl-L-arginine, symmetric dimethyl-L-arginine, asymmetric dimethyl-L-arginine/L-arginine, nitrate plus nitrite, S-nitrosothiols, nitrotyrosine, and n-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. Prediction models were built using logistic regression models. We found that eight biomarkers (methionine, nitratate plus nitrite, n-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, BMI, LDL, HDL, reduced glutathione, and L-arginine/asymmetric dimethyl-L-arginine) along with gender and BMI were significantly associated with the odds of CAD in DM2. These preliminary findings support the notion that emerging biochemical markers might be used for CAD prediction in patients with DM2. Our findings warrant further investigation with large, well-designed studies. PMID:26089875

  8. A Panel of Novel Biomarkers Representing Different Disease Pathways Improves Prediction of Renal Function Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Michelle J.; Heinzel, Andreas; Heinze, Georg; Alkhalaf, Alaa; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Perco, Paul; Mayer, Bernd; de Zeeuw, Dick; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify a novel panel of biomarkers predicting renal function decline in type 2 diabetes, using biomarkers representing different disease pathways speculated to contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Research Design and Methods A systematic data integration approach was used to select biomarkers representing different disease pathways. Twenty-eight biomarkers were measured in 82 patients seen at an outpatient diabetes center in The Netherlands. Median follow-up was 4.0 years. We compared the cross-validated explained variation (R2) of two models to predict eGFR decline, one including only established risk markers, the other adding a novel panel of biomarkers. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) was used for model estimation. The C-index was calculated to assess improvement in prediction of accelerated eGFR decline defined as <-3.0 mL/min/1.73m2/year. Results Patients’ average age was 63.5 years and baseline eGFR was 77.9 mL/min/1.73m2. The average rate of eGFR decline was -2.0 ± 4.7 mL/min/1.73m2/year. When modeled on top of established risk markers, the biomarker panel including matrix metallopeptidases, tyrosine kinase, podocin, CTGF, TNF-receptor-1, sclerostin, CCL2, YKL-40, and NT-proCNP improved the explained variability of eGFR decline (R2 increase from 37.7% to 54.6%; p=0.018) and improved prediction of accelerated eGFR decline (C-index increase from 0.835 to 0.896; p=0.008). Conclusions A novel panel of biomarkers representing different pathways of renal disease progression including inflammation, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and endothelial function improved prediction of eGFR decline on top of established risk markers in type 2 diabetes. These results need to be confirmed in a large prospective cohort. PMID:25973922

  9. Autonomic dysfunction independently predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes in the DIAD study

    PubMed Central

    Wackers, Frans JTh; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Jose, Powell; Weiss, Curtis; Davey, Janice A; Heller, Gary V; Iskandrian, Ami E; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this secondary analysis was to determine whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes. Additional aims include the determination of the correlation of standard autonomic testing measures and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the association of diabetes-related and cardiac risk factors with cardiac autonomic neuropathy measures. Methods: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed at the study entry into the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study, using autonomic heart rate and blood pressure testing, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. All participants were prospectively followed for the composite clinical outcome of cardiac death, acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, or coronary revascularization. Results: Over 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 1119 (8.4%) subjects developed symptomatic cardiac disease. In unadjusted bivariate analyses, abnormalities in several cardiac autonomic neuropathy tests, including lower Valsalva and Standing Heart Rate Ratios, higher resting Heart Rate, greater systolic blood pressure decrease on standing, and lower low-frequency power, were predictive of symptomatic disease. Independent predictors of poor cardiac outcome were a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio, non-Black ethnicity, longer diabetes duration, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin use, reported numbness in the extremities, higher pulse pressure, family history of coronary artery disease, and higher waist-to-hip ratio. Clinical factors independently associated with a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio were insulin use, clinical proteinuria, higher pulse pressure, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and non-Black ethnicity. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes without known cardiac disease. Clinical variables may help to

  10. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  11. High pressure structures of "111" type iron-based superconductors predicted from first-principles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2012-11-21

    The high-pressure crystal structures of the "111" type iron-based superconductors: NaFeAs, LiFeP and LiFeAs have been systematically explored by using particle-swarm structural searches. It was found that though these iron-based superconductors are chemically similar, they adopted distinct structural phase transitions: P4/nmm→Cmcm→P3m1 for NaFeAs, P4/nmm→Cmcm→I4mm for LiFeP, and P4/nmm→P3m1 →I4mm→P6(3)/mmc for LiFeAs under high pressure. The high pressure orthorhombic Cmcm phase preserved the structural features of FeX(4)(X = As, P) tetrahedral layers present in the ambient-pressure P4/nmm structure. However, the FeX(4) tetrahedrons in the Cmcm phase were clearly distorted, leading to changes in the electronic behavior around the Fermi level. Under higher pressures, the FeX(4) layered structural features were no longer persistent and three-dimensional crystal structures were stabilized in other P3m1, I4mm, and P6(3)/mmc phases, which featured FeAs(5)/FeAs(6) hexahedron and octahedrons, FeX(5) tetragonal pyramids, and FeAs(6) octahedrons, respectively. Analysis of the electronic density of states suggests that most of the high pressure phases are metallic except for the tetragonal I4mm phase, which possesses a narrow band gap. This semiconducting state might relate to the tetragonal pyramid structure formed by FeX(5) unit, which might be favorable for charge localization.

  12. Elasticity in portion selection is predicted by severity of anorexia and food type in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Herzog, M; Douglas, C R; Kissileff, H R; Brunstrom, J M; Halmi, K A

    2016-08-01

    The size of portions that people select is an indicator of underlying mechanisms controlling food intake. Fears of eating excessive portions drive down the sizes of portions patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) can tolerate eating significantly below those of healthy controls (HC) (Kissileff et al., 2016). To determine whether patients with AN will also reduce the sizes of typical or ideal portions below those of controls, ANOVA was used to compare maximum tolerable, typical, and ideal portions of four foods (potatoes, rice, pizza, and M&M's) in the same group of 24 adolescent AN patients and 10 healthy adolescent controls (HC), on which only the maximal portion data were previously reported. Typical and ideal portion sizes did not differ on any food for AN, but for HC, typical portions sizes (kcals) became larger than ideal as the energy density of the food increased, and were significant for the most energy dense food. Ideal portions of low energy dense foods were the same for AN as for in HC. There was a significant 3-way (group × food × portion type) interaction, such that HC selected larger maximum than typical portions only for pizza. We therefore proposed that individuals of certain groups, depending on the food, can be flexible in the amounts of food chosen to be eaten. We call this difference between maximum-tolerable, and typical portion sizes selected "elasticity." Elasticity was significantly smaller for AN patients compared to HC for pizza and was significantly inversely correlated with severity of illness. This index could be useful for clinical assessment of AN patients, and those with eating problems such as in obesity and bulimia nervosa and tracking their response to treatment. PMID:27037222

  13. High-molecular-weight adiponectin does not predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Aso, Yoshimasa; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Inukai, Toshihiko; Brix, Johanna; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2009-04-01

    Low circulating high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HMW adiponectin and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. The investigation took place in a specialized outpatient clinic for metabolic diseases and included 147 patients with T2DM following a cross-sectional and a prospective study protocol. Ninety patients had macrovascular disease at baseline defined as preexisting coronary artery disease, previous stroke, or peripheral artery disease. HMW adiponectin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan) and routine clinical parameters were determined in all patients at baseline. The occurrence of new cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and all-cause mortality) during the follow-up period was evaluated. No significant correlations between traditional cardiovascular risk markers and HMW adiponectin could be detected. HMW adiponectin did not differ between subjects with and without macrovascular disease at baseline (3.5 [interquartile range [IQR]: 2.2-5.7] mg/L vs 4.0 [IQR: 2.5-7.1] mg/L). During a follow-up of 19.3 (IQR: 16-25) months, 61 endpoints (41 myocardial infarctions, 10 strokes, and 10 deaths) were observed. A 1-standard-deviation increment of log-transformed HMW adiponectin was not significantly associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events (Adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.54; P = 0.835). In conclusion, HMW adiponectin was not related to present macrovascular disease and is not associated with future cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with T2DM. It is unlikely that HMW adiponectin has significant vasoprotective effects in these patients.

  14. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Chua, Wei Huan; Seo, Yongsok

    2015-05-01

    A new rheological model was applied to the analysis of the electrorheological behavior of a fluid containing silica nanoparticle-decorated polyaniline nanofibers. A model's predictions were compared with the experimental data, revealing that the proposed model correctly predicted the shear stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. The shear stress data of the electrorheological fluid showing aligned fibers' structural reformation as a function of the shear rate agreed well with the new model which required fewer parameters than the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. The static yield stress was found to be quadratically dependent on the field strength, in agreement with the predictions of the polarization model. A scaling function was used to model the yield stress behavior of the electrorheological fluid over a range of electric fields, and it correctly predicted the static yield stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  15. Hydroecological model predictions indicate wetter and more diverse soil water regimes and vegetation types following floodplain restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Eric G.; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2012-06-01

    Transitions between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems represent zones where soil moisture is a dominant factor influencing vegetation composition. Niche models based on hydrological and vegetation observations can be powerful tools for guiding management of these zones, especially when they are linked with physically based hydrological models. Floodplain restoration represents a unique opportunity to utilize such a predictive vegetation tool when a site's hydrology is altered to create a wetter environment. A variably saturated groundwater flow model was developed and used to simulate the soil moisture regime across a floodplain in Wisconsin where post-settlement alluvium was removed with the intent of increasing regionally threatened wetland plant species. Hydrological niche models based on simultaneous observations of vegetation composition and surface effective saturation were used to predict probability of presence for two plant species (Carex vulpinoidea (fox sedge) and Elymus canadensis(Canada wildrye)) and wetland indicator score (a composite indicator of relative frequency of species in five habitat categories) based on simulated surface effective saturation. The vegetation predictions following restoration are more wetland-species dominant overall. However, zones of the study site where a confining layer is present that decouples groundwater from the near-surface soil zone tend to be drier following restoration due to restricted upward groundwater flow and less soil water storage above the confining layer. As reflected by an increase in the interquartile range in the predicted wetland indicator score, this restoration technique may increase the site-scale spatial diversity of plant community types while simultaneously accomplishing the goal of increasing wetland plant species occurrence.

  16. Differential effects of two types of formative assessment in predicting performance of first-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Krasne, Sally; Wimmers, Paul F; Relan, Anju; Drake, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    Formative assessments are systematically designed instructional interventions to assess and provide feedback on students' strengths and weaknesses in the course of teaching and learning. Despite their known benefits to student attitudes and learning, medical school curricula have been slow to integrate such assessments into the curriculum. This study investigates how performance on two different modes of formative assessment relate to each other and to performance on summative assessments in an integrated, medical-school environment. Two types of formative assessment were administered to 146 first-year medical students each week over 8 weeks: a timed, closed-book component to assess factual recall and image recognition, and an un-timed, open-book component to assess higher order reasoning including the ability to identify and access appropriate resources and to integrate and apply knowledge. Analogous summative assessments were administered in the ninth week. Models relating formative and summative assessment performance were tested using Structural Equation Modeling. Two latent variables underlying achievement on formative and summative assessments could be identified; a "formative-assessment factor" and a "summative-assessment factor," with the former predicting the latter. A latent variable underlying achievement on open-book formative assessments was highly predictive of achievement on both open- and closed-book summative assessments, whereas a latent variable underlying closed-book assessments only predicted performance on the closed-book summative assessment. Formative assessments can be used as effective predictive tools of summative performance in medical school. Open-book, un-timed assessments of higher order processes appeared to be better predictors of overall summative performance than closed-book, timed assessments of factual recall and image recognition. PMID:16729243

  17. Validating prediction scales of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Spain: the SPREDIA-2 population-based prospective cohort study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Mostaza Prieto, José; Lahoz Rallo, Carlos; Abánades-Herranz, Juan Carlos; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; Laguna Cuesta, Fernando; Estirado De Cabo, Eva; García Iglesias, Francisca; González Alegre, Teresa; Fernández Puntero, Belén; Montesano Sánchez, Luis; Vicent López, David; Cornejo Del Río, Víctor; Fernández García, Pedro J; Sabín Rodríguez, Concesa; López López, Silvia; Patrón Barandío, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide. When diagnosed, many patients already have organ damage or advance subclinical atherosclerosis. An early diagnosis could allow the implementation of lifestyle changes and treatment options aimed at delaying the progression of the disease and to avoid cardiovascular complications. Different scores for identifying undiagnosed diabetes have been reported, however, their performance in populations of southern Europe has not been sufficiently evaluated. The main objectives of our study are: to evaluate the screening performance and cut-off points of the main scores that identify the risk of undiagnosed T2DM and prediabetes in a Spanish population, and to develop and validate our own predictive models of undiagnosed T2DM (screening model), and future T2DM (prediction risk model) after 5-year follow-up. As a secondary objective, we will evaluate the atherosclerotic burden of the population with undiagnosed T2DM. Methods and analysis Population-based prospective cohort study with baseline screening, to evaluate the performance of the FINDRISC, DANISH, DESIR, ARIC and QDScore, against the gold standard tests: Fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance and/or HbA1c. The sample size will include 1352 participants between the ages of 45 and 74 years. Analysis: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio positive, likelihood ratio negative and receiver operating characteristic curves and area under curve. Binary logistic regression for the first 700 individuals (derivation) and last 652 (validation) will be performed. All analyses will be calculated with their 95% CI; statistical significance will be p<0.05. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Carlos III Hospital (Madrid). The score performance and predictive model will be presented in medical conferences, workshops

  18. Sixty-five common genetic variants and prediction of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Talmud, Philippa J; Cooper, Jackie A; Morris, Richard W; Dudbridge, Frank; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; White, Jon; McLachlan, Stela; Zabaneh, Delilah; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken K; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V; Lawlor, Debbie A; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Wannamethee, S Goya; Strachan, Mark W J; Kumari, Meena; Whittaker, John C; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Humphries, Steve E

    2015-05-01

    We developed a 65 type 2 diabetes (T2D) variant-weighted gene score to examine the impact on T2D risk assessment in a U.K.-based consortium of prospective studies, with subjects initially free from T2D (N = 13,294; 37.3% women; mean age 58.5 [38-99] years). We compared the performance of the gene score with the phenotypically derived Framingham Offspring Study T2D risk model and then the two in combination. Over the median 10 years of follow-up, 804 participants developed T2D. The odds ratio for T2D (top vs. bottom quintiles of gene score) was 2.70 (95% CI 2.12-3.43). With a 10% false-positive rate, the genetic score alone detected 19.9% incident cases, the Framingham risk model 30.7%, and together 37.3%. The respective area under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.60 (95% CI 0.58-0.62), 0.75 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.77), and 0.76 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78). The combined risk score net reclassification improvement (NRI) was 8.1% (5.0 to 11.2; P = 3.31 × 10(-7)). While BMI stratification into tertiles influenced the NRI (BMI ≤24.5 kg/m(2), 27.6% [95% CI 17.7-37.5], P = 4.82 × 10(-8); 24.5-27.5 kg/m(2), 11.6% [95% CI 5.8-17.4], P = 9.88 × 10(-5); >27.5 kg/m(2), 2.6% [95% CI -1.4 to 6.6], P = 0.20), age categories did not. The addition of the gene score to a phenotypic risk model leads to a potentially clinically important improvement in discrimination of incident T2D. PMID:25475436

  19. Sixty-Five Common Genetic Variants and Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jackie A.; Morris, Richard W.; Dudbridge, Frank; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; White, Jon; McLachlan, Stela; Zabaneh, Delilah; Wong, Andrew; Ong, Ken K.; Gaunt, Tom; Holmes, Michael V.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Langenberg, Claudia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Strachan, Mark W.J.; Kumari, Meena; Whittaker, John C.; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Price, Jacqueline F.; Humphries, Steve E.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a 65 type 2 diabetes (T2D) variant–weighted gene score to examine the impact on T2D risk assessment in a U.K.-based consortium of prospective studies, with subjects initially free from T2D (N = 13,294; 37.3% women; mean age 58.5 [38–99] years). We compared the performance of the gene score with the phenotypically derived Framingham Offspring Study T2D risk model and then the two in combination. Over the median 10 years of follow-up, 804 participants developed T2D. The odds ratio for T2D (top vs. bottom quintiles of gene score) was 2.70 (95% CI 2.12–3.43). With a 10% false-positive rate, the genetic score alone detected 19.9% incident cases, the Framingham risk model 30.7%, and together 37.3%. The respective area under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.60 (95% CI 0.58–0.62), 0.75 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.77), and 0.76 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78). The combined risk score net reclassification improvement (NRI) was 8.1% (5.0 to 11.2; P = 3.31 × 10−7). While BMI stratification into tertiles influenced the NRI (BMI ≤24.5 kg/m2, 27.6% [95% CI 17.7–37.5], P = 4.82 × 10−8; 24.5–27.5 kg/m2, 11.6% [95% CI 5.8–17.4], P = 9.88 × 10−5; >27.5 kg/m2, 2.6% [95% CI −1.4 to 6.6], P = 0.20), age categories did not. The addition of the gene score to a phenotypic risk model leads to a potentially clinically important improvement in discrimination of incident T2D. PMID:25475436

  20. Gamma-ray diagnostics of Type Ia supernovae. Predictions of observables from three-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, A.; Ulyanov, A.; Kromer, M.; Boyer, S.; Röpke, F. K.; Sim, S. A.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Mannheim, K.; Pakmor, R.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Diehl, R.; Maeda, K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Although the question of progenitor systems and detailed explosion mechanisms still remains a matter of discussion, it is commonly believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are production sites of large amounts of radioactive nuclei. Even though the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of SNe Ia, gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they directly lead to deeper insight into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Aims: We study the evolution of gamma-ray line and continuum emission of SNe Ia with the objective of analyzing the relevance of observations in this energy range. We seek to investigate the chances for the success of future MeV missions regarding their capabilities for constraining the intrinsic properties and the physical processes of SNe Ia. Methods: Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we used three-dimensional explosion models and performed radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. We examine the gamma-ray spectra with respect to their distinct features and draw connections to certain characteristics of the explosion models. Applying diagnostics, such as line and hardness ratios, the detection prospects for future gamma-ray missions with higher sensitivities in the MeV energy range are discussed. Results: In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be quite different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occurring in SNe Ia permits additional constraints concerning several explosion model properties

  1. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  2. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasbi, Farzad; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.; Tahir, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed. PMID:27478894

  3. Shear Capacity of C-Shaped and L-Shaped Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Farzad; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H; Tahir, M M

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the behaviour of C-shaped and L-shaped angle shear connectors embedded in solid concrete slabs. An effective finite element model is proposed to simulate the push out tests of these shear connectors that encompass nonlinear material behaviour, large displacement and damage plasticity. The finite element models are validated against test results. Parametric studies using this nonlinear model are performed to investigate the variations in concrete strength and connector dimensions. The finite element analyses also confirm the test results that increasing the length of shear connector increases their shear strength proportionately. It is observed that the maximum stress in L-shaped angle connectors takes place in the weld attachment to the beam, whereas in the C-shaped angle connectors, it is in the attached leg. The location of maximum concrete compressive damage is rendered in each case. Finally, a new equation for prediction of the shear capacity of C-shaped angle connectors is proposed. PMID:27478894

  4. Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels predict cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 10-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Seok; Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Song, Ki-Ho; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) level is known to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the data that has been reported on the association between the Lp(a) level and CVD in type 2 diabetes has been limited and incoherent. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the Lp(a) concentration and new onset CVD in type 2 diabetes. Methods From March 2003 to December 2004, patients with type 2 diabetes without a prior history of CVD were consecutively enrolled. CVD was defined as the occurrence of coronary artery disease or ischemic stroke. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify the associations between the Lp(a) and CVD after adjusting for confounding variables. Results Of the 1,183 patients who were enrolled, 833 participants were evaluated with a median follow-up time of 11.1 years. A total of 202 participants were diagnosed with CVD (24.2%). The median Lp(a) level for 1st and 4th quartile group was 5.4 (3.5 to 7.1) and 55.7 mg/dL (43.1 to 75.3). Compared with patients without CVD, those with CVD were older, had a longer duration of diabetes and hypertension, and used more insulin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers at baseline. A Cox hazard regression analysis revealed that the development of CVD was significantly associated with serum Lp(a) level (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26 to 2.92; p < 0.001, comparing the 4th vs. 1st quartile of Lp[a]). Conclusions Elevated Lp(a) level was an independent predictable risk factor for CVD in type 2 diabetes. Other cardiovascular risk factors should be treated more intensively in type 2 diabetic patients with high Lp(a) levels. PMID:27756118

  5. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  6. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  7. Contrasting magma types and steady-state, volume-predictable, basaltic volcanism along the Great Rift, Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuntz, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Spiker, E. C.; Lefebvre, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Great Rift is an 85 km-long, 2-8 km-wide volcanic rift zone in the Snake River Plain, Idaho. Three basaltic lava fields, latest Pleistocene to Holocene, are located along the Great Rift: Craters of the Moon, Kings Bowl and Wapi. Craters of the Moon is the largest, covering 1600 km2 and containing approx 30 km3 of lava flows and pyroclastics. Field, radiocarbon and palaeomagnetic data show that this lava field formed in eight eruptive periods, each lasted several hundred years with a recurrence interval of several hundred to approx 3000 yr. The first eruption began approx 15 000 yr B.P. and the last ended at approx 2100 yr B.P. The other two lava fields formed approx 2250 yr B.P. Three magma types fed flows along the Great Rift. A contaminated and a fractionated type were erupted at the Craters of the Moon lava field. The third, little-fractionated Snake River Plain magma-type was erupted at the other two lava fields. The Craters of the Moon segment of the Great Rift has experienced quasi-steady state, volume-predictable volcanism for the last 15 000 yr. Based on this, about 5-6 km3 of lava will be erupted within the next 1000 yr.-L.C.H.

  8. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  9. Prediction of Golgi-resident protein types using general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions: Approaches with minimal redundancy maximal relevance feature selection.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ya-Sen; Du, Pu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made in predicting Golgi-resident proteins. However, it is still a challenging task to identify the type of a Golgi-resident protein. Precise prediction of the type of a Golgi-resident protein plays a key role in understanding its molecular functions in various biological processes. In this paper, we proposed to use a mutual information based feature selection scheme with the general form Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions to predict the Golgi-resident protein types. The positional specific physicochemical properties were applied in the Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions. We achieved 91.24% prediction accuracy in a jackknife test with 49 selected features. It has the best performance among all the present predictors. This result indicates that our computational model can be useful in identifying Golgi-resident protein types. PMID:27155042

  10. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  11. Tunable shear thickening in suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neil Y C; Ness, Christopher; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-09-27

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomenon in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allows for tuning of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to 2 decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a route toward creating materials whose mechanical properties can be controlled. PMID:27621472

  12. Spurious Shear in Weak Lensing with LSST

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Kahn, S.M.; Jernigan, J.G.; Peterson, J.R.; AlSayyad, Y.; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Gibson, R.R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Hodge, M.A.; Jee, M.J.; Jones, L.; Krughoff, S.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, P.J.; Marshall, S.; Meert, A.

    2012-09-19

    The complete 10-year survey from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will image {approx} 20,000 square degrees of sky in six filter bands every few nights, bringing the final survey depth to r {approx} 27.5, with over 4 billion well measured galaxies. To take full advantage of this unprecedented statistical power, the systematic errors associated with weak lensing measurements need to be controlled to a level similar to the statistical errors. This work is the first attempt to quantitatively estimate the absolute level and statistical properties of the systematic errors on weak lensing shear measurements due to the most important physical effects in the LSST system via high fidelity ray-tracing simulations. We identify and isolate the different sources of algorithm-independent, additive systematic errors on shear measurements for LSST and predict their impact on the final cosmic shear measurements using conventional weak lensing analysis techniques. We find that the main source of the errors comes from an inability to adequately characterise the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) due to its high frequency spatial variation on angular scales smaller than {approx} 10{prime} in the single short exposures, which propagates into a spurious shear correlation function at the 10{sup -4}-10{sup -3} level on these scales. With the large multi-epoch dataset that will be acquired by LSST, the stochastic errors average out, bringing the final spurious shear correlation function to a level very close to the statistical errors. Our results imply that the cosmological constraints from LSST will not be severely limited by these algorithm-independent, additive systematic effects.

  13. Unsteady behavior of a reattaching shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, D. M.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Marvin, J.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the unsteadiness in a reattaching, turbulent shear layer is reported. Laser-Doppler velocimeter measurements were conditionally sampled on the basis of instantaneous flow direction near reattachment. Conditions of abnormally short reattachment and abnormally long reattachment were considered. Ensemble-averaging of measurements made during these conditions was used to obtain mean velocities and Rreynolds stresses. In the mean flow, conditional streamlines show a global change in flow pattern which correlates with wall-flow direction. This motion can loosely be described as a 'flapping' of the shear layer. Tuft probes show that the flow direction reversals occur quite randomly and are shortlived. Streses shown also vary with the change in flow pattern. Yet, the global'flapping' motion does not appear to contribute significantly to the stress in the flow. A second type of unsteady motion was identified. Spectral analysis of both wall static pressure and streamwise velocity shows that most of the energy in the flow resides in frequencies that are significantly lower than that of the turbulence. The dominant frequency is at a Strouhal number equal to 0.2, which is the characteristic frequency of roll-up and pairing of vortical structure seen in free shear layers. It is conjectured that the 'flapping' is a disorder of the roll-up and pairing process occurring in the shear layer.

  14. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  15. Excitation of fundamental shear horizontal wave by using face-shear (d36) piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Dong, Shuxiang; Li, Faxin

    2016-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is extremely useful for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) as it is non-dispersive. However, currently, the SH0 wave is usually excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) whose energy conversion efficiency is fairly low. The face-shear ( d 36 ) mode piezoelectrics is more promising for SH0 wave excitation, but this mode cannot appear in conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Recently, by modifying the symmetry of poled PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering, we realized the face-shear d 36 mode in both soft and hard PZT ceramics. In this work, we further improved the face-shear properties of PZT-4 and PZT-5H ceramics via lateral compression under elevated temperature. It was found that when bonded on a 1 mm-thick aluminum plate, the d 36 type PZT-4 exhibited better face-shear performance than PZT-5H. We then successfully excite SH0 wave in the aluminum plate using a face-shear PZT-4 square patch and receive the wave using a face-shear 0.72[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-0.28[PbTiO3] (PMN-PT) patch. The frequency response and directionality of the excited SH0 wave were also investigated. The SH0 wave can be dominated over the Lamb waves (S0 and A0 waves) from 160 kHz to 280 kHz. The wave amplitude reaches its maxima along the two main directions (0° and 90°). The amplitude can keep over 80% of the maxima when the deviate angle is less than 30°, while it vanishes quickly at the 45° direction. The excited SH0 wave using piezoelectric ceramics could be very promising in the fields of NDT and SHM.

  16. Predictive Validity of Personality Types versus Personality Dimensions from Early Childhood to Adulthood: Implications for the Distinction between Core and Surface Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asendorpf, Jens B.; Denissen, Jaap J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the long-term predictive validity of person-centered personality types and variable-centered personality dimensions assessed between ages 4-6 years in a population sample of 154 children. Results indicated that the predictive power of both approaches was remarkably robust between age 17 and 22, and even increased in the case of…

  17. Wind shear and turbulence around airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Williamson, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    A two part study was conducted to determine the feasibility of predicting the conditions under which wind/turbulence environments hazardous to aviation operations exist. The computer model used to solve the velocity temperature, and turbulence distributions in the atmospheric boundary layer is described, and the results of a parameteric analysis to determine the expected range of wind shear and turbulence to be encountered in the vicinity of airports are given. The second part describes the delineation of an ensemble of aircraft accidents in which low level wind shear and/or turbulence appeared to be causative factors. This set of accidents, encompassing a wide range of meteorological conditions, should prove useful in developing techniques for reconstructing hazardous wind environments for aircraft safety investigation purposes.

  18. Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangani, A. S.; Kushch, V. I.; Hoffmann, M.; Nahra, H.; Koch, D. L.; Tsang, Y.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment to be carried out aboard the International Space Station is described. A suspension consisting of millimeter-sized bubbles in water containing some dissolved salt, which prevents bubbles from coalescing, will be sheared in a Couette cylindrical cell. Rotation of the outer cylinder will produce centrifugal force which will tend to accumulate the bubbles near the inner wall. The shearing will enhance collisions among bubbles creating thereby bubble phase pressure that will resist the tendency of the bubbles to accumulate near the inner wall. The bubble volume fraction and velocity profiles will be measured and compared with the theoretical predictions. Ground-based research on measurement of bubble phase properties and flow in vertical channel are described.

  19. The role of disc-type crystal shape for micromechanical predictions of elasticity and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian; Dormieux, Luc

    2010-04-28

    The successful design of ceramic bone biomaterials is challenged by two competing requirements: on the one hand, such materials need to be stiff and strong, which would suggest a low porosity (of pore sizes in the 10-100 microm range) to be targeted; on the other hand, bone biomaterials need to be bioactive (in particular vascularized), which suggests a high porosity of such materials. Conclusively, reliable information on how porosity drives the stiffness and strength properties of ceramic bone biomaterials (tissue engineering scaffolds) is of great interest. In this context, mathematical models are increasingly being introduced into the field. Recently, self-consistent continuum micromechanics formulations have turned out as expressedly efficient and reliable tools to predict hydroxyapatite biomaterials' stiffness and strength, as a function of the biomaterial-specific porosity, and of the 'universal' properties of the individual hydroxyapatite crystals: their stiffness, strength and shape. However, the precise crystal shape can be suitably approximated by specific ellipsoidal shapes: while it was shown earlier that spherical shapes do not lead to satisfactory results, and that acicular shapes are an appropriate choice, we here concentrate on disc-type crystal shape as, besides needles, plates are often reported in micrographs of hydroxyapatite biomaterials. Disc-based model predictions of a substantial set of experimental data on stiffness and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials almost attain the quality of the very satisfactory needle-based models. This suggests that, as long as the crystal shape is clearly non-spherical, its precise shape is of secondary importance if stiffness and strength of hydroxyapatite biomaterials are predicted on the basis of continuum micromechanics, from their micromorphology and porosity.

  20. Shear strength of irradiated insulation under combined shear/compression loading

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.; Fabian, P.; Hazelton, C.

    1997-06-01

    The shear strengths of irradiated insulation systems were measured at 4 K under combined shear and compression loads. Sandwich-type (316LN/bonded insulation/316LN) specimens were irradiated at 4 K and tested at 4 K after storage at room temperature. Some specimens were stored at room temperature; others, at 77 K. Insulation systems included diglycidylether of bisphenol-A and tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane epoxies and polyimide resins reinforced with S-2 glass. Some contained polyimide film or mica electrical barriers. All specimens were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.8 X 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2}. Insulation systems are compared on the basis of their irradiated and unirradiated shear strengths.

  1. Variation in trait trade-offs allows differentiation among predefined plant functional types: implications for predictive ecology.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Lieneke M; Aerts, Rien; Bönisch, Gerhard; Kattge, Jens; Van Bodegom, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Plant functional types (PFTs) aggregate the variety of plant species into a small number of functionally different classes. We examined to what extent plant traits, which reflect species' functional adaptations, can capture functional differences between predefined PFTs and which traits optimally describe these differences. We applied Gaussian kernel density estimation to determine probability density functions for individual PFTs in an n-dimensional trait space and compared predicted PFTs with observed PFTs. All possible combinations of 1-6 traits from a database with 18 different traits (total of 18 287 species) were tested. A variety of trait sets had approximately similar performance, and 4-5 traits were sufficient to classify up to 85% of the species into PFTs correctly, whereas this was 80% for a bioclimatically defined tree PFT classification. Well-performing trait sets included combinations of correlated traits that are considered functionally redundant within a single plant strategy. This analysis quantitatively demonstrates how structural differences between PFTs are reflected in functional differences described by particular traits. Differentiation between PFTs is possible despite large overlap in plant strategies and traits, showing that PFTs are differently positioned in multidimensional trait space. This study therefore provides the foundation for important applications for predictive ecology. PMID:26352461

  2. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  3. Simultaneous shear and pressure sensor array for assessing pressure and shear at foot/ground interface.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jeffrey R; Davis, Brian L

    2006-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a diabetic complication estimated to result in over $1 billion worth of medical expenses per year in the United States alone. This multifaceted problem involves the response of plantar soft tissue to both external forces applied to the epidermis and internal changes such as vascular supply and neuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that a combination of elevated external forces (pressure and shear) and altered tissue properties is key to the etiology of foot ulcers. The overall goal of this research is to develop a platform-type hardware system that will allow a clinician to measure three-dimensional stress tensors (i.e. pressure and shear patterns) on the plantar surface and identify areas of concern. Experimental results have demonstrated that an optical approach can provide clear indication of both shear and pressure from 50 to 400 kPa with a frequency response of 100 Hz, a stress measurement accuracy of 100 Pa and a spatial resolution of 8.0mm. Initial evaluation of the system shows strong correlation between (i) applied shear and normal stress loads and (ii) the optical phase retardance computed for each stress axis of the polymer-based stress-sensing elements. These special sensing elements are designed to minimize the need for repeated calibration procedures-an issue that has plagued other attempts to develop multisensor shear and pressure systems. PMID:16297920

  4. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  5. Application of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to Uniform Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk K.; Sur, Jeanman; Lee, Sangjun; Kim, Kipom

    1996-11-01

    We study the application of photon correlation spectroscopy to a system of randomly diffusing particles suspended in a uniform shear flow fluid. Unifrom shear flow is generated in Zimm viscometer type Taylor Couette cell. Detecting the scattered intensity from the diffusing particles through a single slit or multiple slit, one can not only study the uniform shear nature of Taylor-Couette flow but also transform the spatial information of the scattering volume into the time information using a photon correlation technique. We discuss useful applications of this technique.

  6. Genetic markers predicting sulphonylurea treatment outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients: current evidence and challenges for clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Loganadan, N K; Huri, H Z; Vethakkan, S R; Hussein, Z

    2016-06-01

    The clinical response to sulphonylurea, an oral antidiabetic agent often used in combination with metformin to control blood glucose in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients, has been widely associated with a number of gene polymorphisms, particularly those involved in insulin release. We have reviewed the genetic markers of CYP2C9, ABCC8, KCNJ11, TCF7L2 (transcription factor 7-like 2), IRS-1 (insulin receptor substrate-1), CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B, KCNQ1 and NOS1AP (nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein) genes that predict treatment outcomes of sulphonylurea therapy. A convincing pattern for poor sulphonylurea response was observed in Caucasian T2DM patients with rs7903146 and rs1801278 polymorphisms of the TCF7L2 and IRS-1 genes, respectively. However, limitations in evaluating the available studies including dissimilarities in study design, definitions of clinical end points, sample sizes and types and doses of sulphonylureas used as well as ethnic variability make the clinical applications challenging. Future studies need to address these limitations to develop personalized sulphonylurea medicine for T2DM management. PMID:26810132

  7. Comparison of Human and Bovine Insulin Amyloidogenesis under Uniform Shear.

    PubMed

    McBride, Samantha A; Tilger, Christopher F; Sanford, Sean P; Tessier, Peter M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2015-08-20

    A diverse range of proteins can assemble into amyloid fibrils, a process that generally results in a loss of function and an increase in toxicity. The occurrence and rate of conversion is strongly dependent on several factors including molecular structure and exposure to hydrodynamic forces. To investigate the origins of shear-induced enhancement in the rate of fibrillization, a stable rotating Couette flow was used to evaluate the kinetics of amyloid formation under uniform shear for two similar insulin species (human and bovine) that demonstrate unique fibrillization kinetics. The presence of shear-induced nuclei predicted by previous studies is supported by observations of a lag between the consumption of soluble insulin and the precipitation of amyloid aggregates. The apparent fibrillization rate generally increases with shear. However, a two-parameter kinetic model revealed that the nucleation rate has a maximum value at intermediate shear rates. The fibril elongation rate increases monotonically with shear and is similar for both insulin variants, suggesting that increased elongation rates are related to mixing. Differences between human and bovine insulin kinetics under shear are attributable to the nucleation step. PMID:26225416

  8. Roles of wind shear at different vertical levels: Cloud system organization and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Fan, Jiwen; Hagos, Samson; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding critical processes that contribute to the organization of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) is important for accurate weather forecasts and climate predictions. In this study, we investigate the effects of wind shear at different vertical levels on the organization and properties of convective systems using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with spectral bin microphysics. Based on a control run for a MCS with weak wind shear (Ctrl), we find that increasing wind shear at the lower troposphere (L-shear) leads to a more organized quasi-line convective system. Strong wind shear in the middle troposphere (M-shear) tends to produce large vorticity and form a mesocyclone circulation and an isolated strong storm that leans toward supercellular structure. By increasing wind shear at the upper vertical levels only (U-shear), the organization of the convection is not changed much, but the convective intensity is weakened. Increasing wind shear in the middle troposphere for the selected case results in a significant drying, and the drying is more significant when conserving moisture advection at the lateral boundaries, contributing to the suppressed convective strength and precipitation relative to Ctrl. Precipitation in the L-shear and U-shear does not change much from Ctrl. Evident changes of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties in the strong wind shear cases are mainly due to large changes in convective organization and water vapor. The insights obtained from this study help us better understand the major factors contributing to convective organization and precipitation.

  9. Material properties of the shear-thickened state in concentrated near hard-sphere colloidal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Cwalina, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Reversible shear thickening is common in concentrated dispersions of Brownian hard-spheres at high shear rates. We confirm the existence of a well-defined colloidal shear-thickened state through experimental measurements of the shear stress and the first and second normal stress differences in the shear-thickened state as a function of the particle volume fraction for a model dispersion of near hard-spheres. The shear stress and normal stress differences are observed to grow linearly with the shear rate in the shear-thickened state and both normal stress differences are observed to be negative. Our experimental results show the shear-thickened state of colloidal dispersions can be described by three material properties--the shear viscosity and first and second normal stress difference coefficients--that are a function of the volume fraction. All three material properties are found to diverge with a power law scaling with the approach to maximum packing,which is found to be 0.54 +/- 0.01. We find the magnitude of the relative shear viscosity is greater than the magnitude of the dimensionless second normal stress difference, which is greater than the magnitude of the dimensionless first normal stress difference. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions for shear thickening by hydrocluster formation and quantitatively comparable to Stokesian Dynamics simulations. We further postulate and show that these material properties are consistent with those measured for non-Brownian suspensions.

  10. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ≧30 years, and free of ESRD (n = 31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012. After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile. One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  11. Shear flow by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1985-08-01

    A detailed comparison is made between a number of methods for generating shear flow in Molecular Dynamics computer simulation. Algorithms which closely mimic most experimental methods for producing shear flow are those by Trozzi and Ciccotti, and Ashurst and Hoover. They employ hard wall boundaries and fluid walls respectively (with sheared cell periodicity being only in two dimensions). The sheared fluid properties are therefore inextricably linked with interfacial effects. These problems are largely eliminated by the Lees and Edwards scheme which creates a pseudo-infinite sheared material. There are a number of derivatives of this model including one favoured by the author for investigating non-linear viscoelastic phenomena. A number of results from this scheme pertaining to the Lennard-Jones liquid are presented.

  12. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Mampallil, Dileep; van den Ende, Dirk

    2013-01-15

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls. Chemical modification is obtained by treating the channel wall with a cationic polymer. In case of electric modification, we used gate electrodes embedded in the channel wall. By applying a voltage to the gate electrode, the zeta potential can be varied and a controllable, uniform shear stress can be applied to the liquid in the channel. The strength of the shear stress depends on both the gate voltage and the applied field which drives the electroosmotic shear flow. Although the stress range is still limited, such a microchannel device can be used in principle as an in situ micro-rheometer for lab on a chip purposes. PMID:23089595

  13. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  14. Measurements of Shear Reduction of 2D Vortex Diffusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, C. F.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2001-11-01

    Experiments with magnetized ion columns in the 2-dimensional regime demonstrate shear reduction of vortex diffusion, in close correspondence with recent theory.(D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Lett. A 284), 112 (2001). Here, the ions move in ( r, θ ) as point vortices, and we can accurately control the vorticity ζ (r), fluid rotation Ω (r), and shear S (r) ≡ r ; partial Ω / partial r. Moreover, individual ions can be ``tagged,'' so that the vortex diffusion rate D can be measured directly. For flows with low shear, i.e. S / Ω <= 10-3, the measured diffusion is close to the Taylor-McNamara prediction for a homogeneous gas of N point vortices.(J.B. Taylor and B. McNamara, Phys. Fluids 14), 1492 (1971). As the shear is increased, the measured diffusion decreases by up to 100×, in factor-of-three correspondence with the predicted D ∝ S-1. For very large shear, the ions can no longer be treated as 2D point vortices, since their shear separation is faster than their axial transversal of the trap. In this limit, the measured diffusion agrees quantitatively with the theory of long-range 3D Coulomb collisions.

  15. Shear Capacity as Prognostic of Nocturnal Boundary Layer Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooijdonk, Ivo; Donda, Judith; Bosveld, Fred; Moene, Arnold; Clercx, Herman; van de Wiel, Bas

    2015-04-01

    After sunset the surface temperature can drop rapidly in some nights and may lead to ground frost. This sudden drop is closely related to the occurrence of fundamentally different behaviour of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer. Recent theoretical findings predict the appearance of two different regimes: the continuously turbulent (weakly stable) boundary layer and the relatively 'quiet' (very stable) boundary layer. Field observations from a large number of nights (approx. 4500 in total) are analysed using an ensemble averaging technique. The observations support the existence of these two fundamentally different regimes: weakly stable (turbulent) nights rapidly reach a steady state (within 2-3 hours). In contrast, very stable nights reach a steady state much later after a transition period (2-6 hours). During this period turbulence is weak and non-stationary. To characterise the regime a new parameter is introduced: the Shear Capacity. This parameter compares the actual shear after sunset with the minimum shear needed to sustain continuous turbulence. In turn, the minimum shear is dictated by the heat flux demand at the surface (net radiative cooling), so that the Shear Capacity combines flow information with knowledge on the boundary condition. It is shown that the Shear Capacity enables prediction of the flow regimes. The prognostic strength of this non-dimensional parameter appears to outperform the traditional ones like z/L and Ri as regime indicator.

  16. The in-plane shear properties of pultruded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Baik-Soon

    1998-12-01

    This thesis presents the details for a new in-plane shear test method applicable to pultruded materials reinforced with continuous strand mat (CSM) and rovings. The loading system and the size of the specimen are different from those currently used in the ASTM D-5379 specification in order to reduce the effect of the inherent heterogeneity of the pultruded materials. Then, the performance of the ASTM D-5379 V-notched beam test fixture and that of the newly developed test fixture at the Georgia Institute of Technology will be discussed. The thesis also presents various predicted techniques for estimating the in-plane shear modulus of pultruded materials from the properties of the constituents. Finally, a third-order polynomial shear stress---shear strain (tau - gamma) equation is proposed for more accurate structural analysis of pultruded materials reinforced with rovings and continuous strand mats.

  17. Imaging Faults and Shear Zones Using Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, Vera; Mahan, Kevin H.

    2014-11-01

    The geometry of faults at seismogenic depths and their continuation into the ductile zone is of interest for a number of applications ranging from earthquake hazard to modes of lithospheric deformation. Teleseismic passive source imaging of faults and shear zones can be useful particularly where faults are not outlined by local seismicity. Passive seismic signatures of faults may arise from abrupt changes in lithology or foliation orientation in the upper crust, and from mylonitic shear zones at greater depths. Faults and shear zones with less than near-vertical dip lend themselves to detection with teleseismic mode-converted waves (receiver functions) provided that they have either a contrast in isotropic shear velocity ( V s), or a contrast in orientation or strength of anisotropic compressional velocity ( V p). We introduce a detection method for faults and shear zones based on receiver functions. We use synthetic seismograms to demonstrate common features of dipping isotropic interfaces and contrasts in dipping foliation that allows determination of their strike and depth without making further assumptions about the model. We proceed with two applications. We first image a Laramide thrust fault in the western U.S. (the Wind River thrust fault) as a steeply dipping isotropic velocity contrast in the middle crust near the surface trace of the fault; further downdip and across the range, where basin geometry suggests the fault may sole into a subhorizontal shear zone, we identify a candidate shear zone signal from midcrustal depths. The second application is the use of microstructural data from exhumed ductile shear zones in Scotland and in the western Canadian Shield to predict the character of seismic signatures of present-day deep crustal shear zones. Realistic anisotropy in observed shear fabrics generates a signal in receiver functions that is comparable in amplitude to first-order features like the Moho. Observables that can be robustly constrained without

  18. Recrystallization fabrics of sheared quartz veins with a strong pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation from a seismogenic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Nancy A.; Song, Won Joon; Johnson, Scott E.; Gerbi, Christopher C.; Beane, Rachel J.; West, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural investigations were carried out on quartz veins in schist, protomylonite, and mylonite samples from an ancient seismogenic strike-slip shear zone (Sandhill Corner shear zone, Norumbega fault system, Maine, USA). We interpret complexities in the microstructural record to show that: (1) pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in the host rock may persist in the new CPO patterns of the shear zone and (2) the inner and outer parts of the shear zone followed diverging paths of fabric development. The host rocks bounding the shear zone contain asymmetrically-folded quartz veins with a strong CPO. These veins are increasingly deformed and recrystallized with proximity to the shear zone core. Matrix-accommodated rotation and recrystallization may position an inherited c-axis maximum in an orientation coincident with rhomb < a > or basal < a > slip. This inherited CPO likely persists in the shear zone fabric as a higher concentration of poles in one hemisphere of the c-axis pole figure, leading to asymmetric crossed girdle or paired maxima c-axis patterns about the foliation plane. Three observed quartz grain types indicate a general trend of localization with decreasing temperature: (1) large (> 100 μm), low aspect ratio (<~5) and (2) high aspect ratio (~ 5-20) grains overprinted by (3) smaller (<~80 μm), low aspect ratio (<~4) grains through subgrain rotation-dominated recrystallization. In the outer shear zone, subgrain rotation recrystallization led to a well-developed c-axis crossed girdle pattern. In the inner shear zone, the larger grains are completely overprinted by smaller grains, but the CPO patterns are relatively poorly developed and are associated with distinctively different misorientation angle histogram profiles ("flat" neighbor-pair profile with similar number fraction for angles from 10 to 90°). This may reflect the preferential activation of grain size sensitive deformation processes in the inner-most part of the

  19. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  20. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  1. Application of a computer model to predict optimum slaughter end points for different biological types of feeder cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Bennett, G L

    1995-10-01

    A bioeconomic model was developed to predict slaughter end points of different genotypes of feeder cattle, where profit/rotation and profit/day were maximized. Growth, feed intake, and carcass weight and composition were simulated for 17 biological types of steers. Distribution of carcass weight and proportion in four USDA quality and five USDA yield grades were obtained from predicted carcass weights and composition. Average carcass value for each genotype was calculated from these distributions under four carcass pricing systems that varied from value determined on quality grade alone to value determined on yield grade alone. Under profitable market conditions, rotation length was shorter and carcass weights lighter when the producer's goal was maximum profit/day, compared with maximum profit/rotation. A carcass value system based on yield grade alone resulted in greater profit/rotation and in lighter and leaner carcasses than a system based on quality grade alone. High correlations ( > .97) were obtained between breed profits obtained with different sets of input/output prices and carcass price discount weight ranges. This suggests that breed rankings on the basis of breed profits may not be sensitive to changes in input/output market prices. Steers that were on a grower-stocker system had leaner carcasses, heavier optimum carcass weight, greater profits, and less variation in optimum carcass weights between genotypes than steers that were started on a high-energy finishing diet at weaning. Overall results suggest that breed choices may change with different carcass grading and value systems and postweaning production systems. This model has potential to provide decision support in marketing fed cattle.

  2. The PCC assay can be used to predict radiosensitivity in biopsy cultures irradiated with different types of radiation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential biomarkers for radiosensitivity using the relationship between cell killing and the yield of excess chromatin fragments detected with the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. This method was applied to primary cultured cells obtained from biopsies from patients. Six primary culture biopsies were obtained from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix before starting radiotherapy. The cultures were irradiated with two different LET carbon-ion beams (LET = 13 keV/microm, 77.1+/-2.8 keV/microm) and 200 kV X-rays. The carbon-ion beams were produced by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). PCC was performed using the polyethylene glycol-mediated cell fusion technique. The yield of excess chromatin fragments were measured by counting the number of unrejoined chromatin fragments detected with the PCC technique after a 24-h post-irradiation incubation period. Obtained results indicated that cultures which were more sensitive to killing were also more susceptible to the induction of excess chromatin fragments. Furthermore there was a good correlation between cell killing and excess chromatin fragments among the 6 cell cultures examined. There is also evidence that the induction of excess chromatin fragments increased with increasing LET as well as cell-killing effect in the same cell culture. The data reported here support the idea that the yield of excess chromatin fragments detected with the PCC technique might be useful for predicting the radiosensitivity of cells contained in tumor tissue, and to predict responses to different radiation types. PMID:17089052

  3. Impacts of different plant functional types on ambient ozone predictions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas (SMAs), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-K.; Woo, J.-H.; Park, R. S.; Song, C. H.; Kim, J.-H.; Ban, S.-J.; Park, J.-H.

    2014-07-01

    Plant functional type (PFT) distributions affect the results of biogenic emission modeling as well as O3 and particulate matter (PM) simulations using chemistry-transport models (CTMs). This paper analyzes the variations of both surface biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions and O3 concentrations due to changes in the PFT distributions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas, Korea. The Fifth-Generation NCAR/Pennsylvania State Meso-scale Model (MM5)/the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN)/the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE)/the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations were implemented over the Seoul Metropolitan Areas in Korea to predict surface O3 concentrations for the period of 1 May to 31 June 2008. Starting from a performance check of CTM predictions, we consecutively assessed the effects of PFT area deviations on the MEGAN BVOC and CTM O3 predictions, and we further considered the basis of geospatial and statistical analyses. The three PFT data sets considered were (1) the Korean PFT, developed with Korea-specific vegetation database; (2) the CDP PFT, adopted from the community data portal (CDP) of US National Center for Atmospheric Research in the United States (NCAR); (3) MODIS PFT, reclassified from the NASA Terra and Aqua combined land cover products. Although the CMAQ performance check reveals that all of the three different PFT data sets are applicable choices for regulatory modeling practice, noticeable primary data (i.e., PFT and Leaf Area Index (LAI)) was observed to be missing in many geographic locations. Based on the assessed effect of such missing data on CMAQ O3 predictions, we found that this missing data can cause spatially increased bias in CMAQ O3. Thus, it must be resolved in the near future to obtain more accurate biogenic emission and chemistry transport modeling results. Comparisons of MEGAN biogenic emission results with the three different PFT data showed that broadleaf

  4. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  5. Yielding of colloidal gels under steady and oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petekidis, George; Moghimi, Esmaeel; Koumakis, Nick; Forth Team

    2015-03-01

    The structural and rheological properties of intermediate volume fraction colloid polymer gels are examined during and after steady and oscillatory shear flow using rheometry, confocal microscopy, light scattering and Brownian Dynamics simulations. Our main objective is to rationalize the microscopic mechanisms through which one can tune the mechanical properties of such metastable colloidal gels by imposing different types of external shear and flow. Experimentally, the gels consist of model hard sphere particle dispersions of φ = 0.44 with the addition of non-adsorbing linear chains, while BD simulations are conducted for hard spheres with the superposition of an AO potential for depletion attractions. Structural analysis shows that variation of the applied shear rate produces strong changes in the structure of the gels both when under shear and during gel reformation at cessation. Larger rates are characterized by disperse particles and the total breakage of structures at rest, which after cessation evolve with time into strong solids with relatively homogeneous structures. However, smaller rates show large inhomogeneous structures under flow, which do not evolve after cessation and additionally exhibit reduced elasticity and as such are weaker solids. Furthermore oscillatory shear is far more efficient than steady shear creating gels with stronger differences in their elastic modulus. Thus by tuning the way a gel is sheared, one may vary the final strength and structure of the resulting gel. Work in collaboration with R. Besseling, W. C. K. Poon and J. F. Brady

  6. Multidirectional direct simple shear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeGroot, D.J.; Germaine, J.T.; Ladd, C.C.

    1993-09-01

    The paper describes a new simple shear testing device, the multidirectional direct simple shear (MDSS) apparatus, for testing soil specimens under conditions that simulate, at the element level, the state of stress acting within the foundation soil of an offshore Arctic gravity structure. The MDSS uses a circular specimen that is consolidated under both a vertical effective stress ({sigma}{sub vc}{prime}) and a horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 1}). The specimen is subsequently sheared undrained by applying a second independent horizontal shear stress ({tau}{sub 2}) at an angle {theta} relative to the horizontal consolidation shear stress {tau}{sub 1}. Evaluation of the MDSS first compares conventional K{sub D}-consolidated undrained direct simple shear (CK{sub 0}UDSS) test data ({tau}{sub 1} = 0) on normally consolidated Boston blue clay (BBC) with results obtained in the Geonor DSS device. The MDSS gives lower secant Young`s modulus values and on average 8% lower strengths, but produces remarkably less scatter in the test results than the Geonor DSS. Kinematic proof tests with an elastic material (rubber) confirm that the setup procedure, application of forces, and strain measurement systems in the MDSS work properly and produce repeatable results. Results from a MDSS test program on BBC wherein specimens were first normally consolidated with {sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and {tau}{sub 1} = 0.2{sigma}{sub vc}{prime} and then sheared undrained at {theta} varing in 30{degree} increments from zero (shear in same direction) to 150{degree} show dramatic differences in the response of the soil as a function of {theta}. The peak undrained strength varies almost twofold from 0 = 0 to 120{degree}, while the deformation behavior varies from very brittle at low {theta} angles to becoming ductile at higher angles. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Pure shear and simple shear calcite textures. Comparison of experimental, theoretical and natural data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenk, H.-R.; Takeshita, T.; Bechler, E.; Erskine, B.G.; Matthies, S.

    1987-01-01

    The pattern of lattice preferred orientation (texture) in deformed rocks is an expression of the strain path and the acting deformation mechanisms. A first indication about the strain path is given by the symmetry of pole figures: coaxial deformation produces orthorhombic pole figures, while non-coaxial deformation yields monoclinic or triclinic pole figures. More quantitative information about the strain history can be obtained by comparing natural textures with experimental ones and with theoretical models. For this comparison, a representation in the sensitive three-dimensional orientation distribution space is extremely important and efforts are made to explain this concept. We have been investigating differences between pure shear and simple shear deformation incarbonate rocks and have found considerable agreement between textures produced in plane strain experiments and predictions based on the Taylor model. We were able to simulate the observed changes with strain history (coaxial vs non-coaxial) and the profound texture transition which occurs with increasing temperature. Two natural calcite textures were then selected which we interpreted by comparing them with the experimental and theoretical results. A marble from the Santa Rosa mylonite zone in southern California displays orthorhombic pole figures with patterns consistent with low temperature deformation in pure shear. A limestone from the Tanque Verde detachment fault in Arizona has a monoclinic fabric from which we can interpret that 60% of the deformation occurred by simple shear. ?? 1987.

  8. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  9. An Empirical Correction Method for Improving off-Axes Response Prediction in Component Type Flight Mechanics Helicopter Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Tischler, Mark B.

    1997-01-01

    Historically, component-type flight mechanics simulation models of helicopters have been unable to satisfactorily predict the roll response to pitch stick input and the pitch response to roll stick input off-axes responses. In the study presented here, simple first-order low-pass filtering of the elemental lift and drag forces was considered as a means of improving the correlation. The method was applied to a blade-element model of the AH-64 APache, and responses of the modified model were compared with flight data in hover and forward flight. Results indicate that significant improvement in the off-axes responses can be achieved in hover. In forward flight, however, the best correlation in the longitudinal and lateral off-axes responses required different values of the filter time constant for each axis. A compromise value was selected and was shown to result in good overall improvement in the off-axes responses. The paper describes both the method and the model used for its implementation, and presents results obtained at hover and in forward flight.

  10. A microcomputer-based data acquisition and control system for the direct shear, ring shear, triaxial shear, and consolidation tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Philip S.

    1983-01-01

    This report is intended to provide internal documentation for the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory's automatic data acquisition system. The operating procedures for each type of test are designed to independently lead a first-time user through the various stages of using the computer to control the test. Continuing advances in computer technology and the availability of desktop microcomputers with a wide variety of peripheral equipment at a reasonable cost can create an efficient automated geotechnical testing environment. A geotechnical testing environment is shown in figure 1. Using an automatic data acquisition system, laboratory test data from a variety of sensors can be collected, and manually or automatically recorded on a magnetic device at the same apparent time. The responses of a test can be displayed graphically on a CRT in a matter of seconds, giving the investigator an opportunity to evaluate the test data, and to make timely, informed decisions on such matters as whether to continue testing, abandon a test, or modify procedures. Data can be retrieved and results reported in tabular form, or graphic plots, suitable for publication. Thermistors, thermocouples, load cells, pressure transducers, and linear variable differential transformers are typical sensors which are incorporated in automated systems. The geotechnical tests which are most practical to automate are the long-term tests which often require readings to be recorded outside normal work hours and on weekends. Automation applications include incremental load consolidation tests, constant-rate-of-strain consolidation tests, direct shear tests, ring shear tests, and triaxial shear tests.

  11. Impacts of different plant functional types on ambient ozone predictions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas (SMA), Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.-K.; Woo, J.-H.; Park, R. S.; Song, C. H.; Kim, J.-H.; Ban, S.-J.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-09-01

    Plant functional type (PFT) distributions affect the results of biogenic emission modeling as well as O3 and PM simulations using chemistry-transport models (CTMs). This paper analyzes the variations of both surface biogenic VOC emissions and O3 concentrations due to changes in the PFT distributions in the Seoul Metropolitan Areas, Korea. Also, this paper attempts to provide important implications for biogenic emissions modeling studies for CTM simulations. MM5-MEGAN-SMOKE-CMAQ model simulations were implemented over the Seoul Metropolitan Areas in Korea to predict surface O3 concentrations for the period of 1 May to 31 June 2008. Starting from MEGAN biogenic emissions analysis with three different sources of PFT input data, US EPA CMAQ O3 simulation results were evaluated by surface O3 monitoring datasets and further considered on the basis of geospatial and statistical analyses. The three PFT datasets considered were "(1)KORPFT", developed with a region specific vegetation database; (2) CDP, adopted from US NCAR; and (3) MODIS, reclassified from the NASA Terra and Aqua combined land cover products. Comparisons of MEGAN biogenic emission results with the three different PFT data showed that broadleaf trees (BT) are the most significant contributor, followed by needleleaf trees (NT), shrub (SB), and herbaceous plants (HB) to the total biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). In addition, isoprene from BT and terpene from NT were recognized as significant primary and secondary BVOC species in terms of BVOC emissions distributions and O3-forming potentials in the study domain. Multiple regression analyses with the different PFT data (δO3 vs. δPFTs) suggest that KORPFT can provide reasonable information to the framework of MEGAN biogenic emissions modeling and CTM O3 predictions. Analyses of the CMAQ performance statistics suggest that deviations of BT areas can significantly affect CMAQ isoprene and O3 predictions. From further evaluations of the isoprene and O

  12. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  13. A piezoelectric shear stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress, suppressing effects of normal stress components, by applying opposite poling vectors to the piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces where it demonstrated high sensitivity to shear stress (91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-33%PT, d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also exhibited negligible sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is up to 800 Hz.

  14. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  15. Shear-Induced Chiral Migration of Particles with Anisotropic Rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watari, Nobuhiko; Larson, Ronald G.

    2009-06-01

    We report that an achiral particle with anisotropic rigidity can migrate in the vorticity direction in shear flow. A minimal “tetrumbbell” model of such a particle is constructed from four beads and six springs to make a tetrahedral structure. A combination of two different spring constants corresponding to “hard” and “soft” springs yields ten distinguishable tetrumbbells, which when simulated in shear flow with hydrodynamic interactions between beads but no Brownian motion at zero Reynolds number, produces five different types of behavior in which seven out of ten tetrumbbell structures migrate in the vorticity direction due to shear-induced chirality. Some of the structures migrate in the same direction along the vorticity direction even when the shear flow is reversed, which is impossible for permanently chiral objects.

  16. The underexpanded jet Mach disk and its associated shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Honnery, Damon R.; Soria, Julio

    2014-09-01

    High resolution planar particle image velocimetry is used to measure turbulent quantities in the region downstream of the Mach disk in an axisymmetric underexpanded jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The internal annular shear layer generated by the slip line emanating from the triple point is shown to persist across multiple shock cells downstream. A triple decomposition based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition shows that the external helical structure associated with the screech tone generated by the jet exerts a strong influence on velocity fluctuations in the initial region of the annular shear layer. This influence manifests as the external vortices producing oscillatory motion of the Mach disk, and thus a forcing of the internal annular shear layer. The internal shear layer is characterized by a number of azimuthal modes of varying wavenumber and type, including both helical and axisymmetric modes. Finally, the possibility of a previously hypothesized recirculation region behind the Mach disk is investigated, with no evidence found to support its existence.

  17. Shear viscosity of molten alkali halides from equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galamba, N.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.; Ely, James F.

    2005-06-01

    The shear viscosity of molten NaCl and KCl was calculated through equilibrium (EMD) and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (NEMD) simulations in the canonical (N,V,T) ensemble. Two rigid-ion potentials were investigated, namely, the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi potential and the Michielsen-Woerlee-Graaf-Ketelaar potential with the parameters proposed by Ladd. The NEMD simulations were performed using the SLLOD equations of motion [D. J. Evans and G. P. Morriss, Phys. Rev. A 30, 1528 (1984)] with a Gaussian isokinetic thermostat and the results are compared with those obtained from Green-Kubo EMD (N,V,T) simulations and experimental shear viscosity data. The NEMD zero strain rate shear viscosity, η(0), was obtained by fitting a simplified Carreau-type equation and by application of mode-coupling theory, i.e., a η-γ1/2 linear relationship. The values obtained from the first method are found to be significantly lower than those predicted by the second. The agreement between the EMD and NEMD results with experimental data is satisfactory for the two potentials investigated. The ion-ion radial distribution functions obtained with the two rigid-ion potentials for both molten salts are discussed in terms of the differences between the two models.

  18. Simulation of three-dimensional shear flow around a nozzle-afterbody at high speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Baysal, O.; Hoffman, W.B. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, turbulent shear flows at supersonic and hypersonic speeds around a nozzle-afterbody are simulated. The three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a finite-volume and implicit method. The convective and the pressure terms are differenced by an upwind-biased algorithm. The effect of turbulence is incorporated by a modified Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model. The success of the standard Baldwin-Lomax model for this flow type is shown by comparing it to a laminar case. These modifications made to the model are also shown to improve flow prediction when compared to the standard Baldwin-Lomax model. These modifications to the model reflect the effects of high compressibility, multiple walls, vortices near walls, and turbulent memory effects in the shear layer. This numerically simulated complex flowfield includes a supersonic duct flow, a hypersonic flow over an external double corner, a flow through a non-axisymmetric, internal-external nozzle, and a three-dimensional shear layer. The specific application is for the flow around the nozzle-afterbody of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The computed pressure distributions compared favorably with the experimentally obtained surface and off-surface flow surveys.

  19. Shear modulus of neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiko, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    The shear modulus of solid neutron star crust is calculated by the thermodynamic perturbation theory, taking into account ion motion. At a given density, the crust is modelled as a body-centred cubic Coulomb crystal of fully ionized atomic nuclei of one type with a uniform charge-compensating electron background. Classic and quantum regimes of ion motion are considered. The calculations in the classic temperature range agree well with previous Monte Carlo simulations. At these temperatures, the shear modulus is given by the sum of a positive contribution due to the static lattice and a negative ∝ T contribution due to the ion motion. The quantum calculations are performed for the first time. The main result is that at low temperatures the contribution to the shear modulus due to the ion motion saturates at a constant value, associated with zero-point ion vibrations. Such behaviour is qualitatively similar to the zero-point ion motion contribution to the crystal energy. The quantum effects may be important for lighter elements at higher densities, where the ion plasma temperature is not entirely negligible compared to the typical Coulomb ion interaction energy. The results of numerical calculations are approximated by convenient fitting formulae. They should be used for precise neutron star oscillation modelling, a rapidly developing branch of stellar seismology.

  20. Epitope predictions indicate the presence of two distinct types of epitope-antibody-reactivities determined by epitope profiling of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Luštrek, Mitja; Lorenz, Peter; Kreutzer, Michael; Qian, Zilliang; Steinbeck, Felix; Wu, Di; Born, Nadine; Ziems, Bjoern; Hecker, Michael; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Cao, Zhiwei; Glocker, Michael O; Li, Yixue; Fuellen, Georg; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR) of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM) analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR) were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR.

  1. COMPARISON OF SHEAR STRENGTH OF CERAMIC JOINTS DETERMINED BY VARIOUS TEST METHODS WITH SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Kiggans Jr, James O; Khalifa, Hesham; Back, Christina A.; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ferraris, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Four different shear test methods i.e. doubled notched shear test, asymmetrical four point bend test, Iosipescu test, and torsion test, were investigated for their ability to evaluate one standard SiC to SiC ceramic brittle joint while using small size specimens. Double notched shear test showed higher stress concentration at the notch base and a lower nominal shear strength. Both asymmetrical four point bend test and Iosipescu test utilized epoxy jointed metal extensors, which failed during test and caused misalignment and tensile type of failure. Torsion test can deliver true shear loading. However, base material failure was observed for the torsion joint samples in this study. None of the tests can successfully induce true shear failure of the joint because the joint is stronger and tougher than the SiC substrate. Torsion test appears to be promising because of the pure shear loading, less stress concentration, and easy alignment.

  2. Rheological properties of micro-/nanofibrillated cellulose suspensions: wall-slip and shear banding phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nechyporchuk, Oleksandr; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Pignon, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    The rheological properties of enzymatically hydrolyzed and TEMPO-oxidized microfibrillated/nanofibrillated cellulose (MFC/NFC) aqueous suspensions were investigated in oscillation and steady-flow modes and were compared with the morphology of the studied materials. The flow instabilities, which introduce an error in the rheological measurements, were discovered during flow measurements. A wall-slip (interfacial slippage on the edge of geometry tools and suspension) was detected at low shear rates for two types of NFC suspensions while applying cone-plate geometry. A roughening of the tool surfaces was performed to overcome the aforementioned problem. Applying to TEMPO-oxidized NFC, a stronger suspension response was detected at low shear rates with higher values of measured shear stress. However, a shear banding (localization of shear within a sample volume) became more pronounced. The use of serrated tools for enzymatically hydrolyzed NFC produced lower shear stress at the moderate shear rates, which was influenced by water release from the suspension.

  3. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Matthias Peter; Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  4. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  5. Composite Interlaminar Shear Fracture Toughness, G(sub 2c): Shear Measurement of Sheer Myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The concept of G2c as a measure of the interlaminar shear fracture toughness of a composite material is critically examined. In particular, it is argued that the apparent G2c as typically measured is inconsistent with the original definition of shear fracture. It is shown that interlaminar shear failure actually consists of tension failures in the resin rich layers between plies followed by the coalescence of ligaments created by these failures and not the sliding of two planes relative to one another that is assumed in fracture mechanics theory. Several strain energy release rate solutions are reviewed for delamination in composite laminates and structural components where failures have been experimentally documented. Failures typically occur at a location where the mode 1 component accounts for at least one half of the total G at failure. Hence, it is the mode I and mixed-mode interlaminar fracture toughness data that will be most useful in predicting delamination failure in composite components in service. Although apparent G2c measurements may prove useful for completeness of generating mixed-mode criteria, the accuracy of these measurements may have very little influence on the prediction of mixed-mode failures in most structural components.

  6. Shear-limited test particle diffusion in 2-dimensional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Francois; Driscoll, C. Fred; Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of test-particle diffusion in pure ion plasmas show 2D enhancements over the 3D rates, limited by shear in the plasma rotation ωE(r). The diffusion is due to "long-range" ion-ion collisions in the quiescent, steady-state Mg+ plasma. For short plasma length Lp and low shear S≡r∂ωE/∂r, thermal ions bounce axially many times before shear separates them in θ, so the ions move in (r,θ) as bounce averaged "rods" of charge (i.e. 2D point vortices). Experimentally, we vary the number of bounces over the range 0.2⩽Nb⩽10,000. For long plasmas with Nb⩽1, we observe diffusion in quantitative agreement with the 3D theory of long-range E×B drift collisions. For shorter plasmas or lower shear, with Nb>1, we measure diffusion rates enhanced by up to 100×. For exceedingly small she0ar, i.e. Nb⩾1000, we observe diffusion rates consistent with the Taylor-McNamara estimates for a shear-free thermal plasma. Overall, the data shows fair agreement with Dubin's new theory of 2D diffusion in shear, which predicts an enhancement of D2D/D3D≈Nb up to the Taylor-McNamara limit.

  7. Computational prediction of secretion systems and secretomes of Brucella: identification of novel type IV effectors and their interaction with the host.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause brucellosis in various mammals including humans. Brucella survive inside the host cells by forming vacuoles and subverting host defence systems. This study was aimed to predict the secretion systems and the secretomes of Brucella spp. from 39 complete genome sequences available in the databases. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify the type IV secretion effectors and their interactions with host proteins. We predicted the secretion systems of Brucella by the KEGG pathway and SecReT4. Brucella secretomes and type IV effectors (T4SEs) were predicted through genome-wide screening using JVirGel and S4TE, respectively. Protein-protein interactions of Brucella T4SEs with their hosts were analyzed by HPIDB 2.0. Genes coding for Sec and Tat pathways of secretion and type I (T1SS), type IV (T4SS) and type V (T5SS) secretion systems were identified and they are conserved in all the species of Brucella. In addition to the well-known VirB operon coding for the type IV secretion system (T4SS), we have identified the presence of additional genes showing homology with T4SS of other organisms. On the whole, 10.26 to 14.94% of total proteomes were found to be either secreted (secretome) or membrane associated (membrane proteome). Approximately, 1.7 to 3.0% of total proteomes were identified as type IV secretion effectors (T4SEs). Prediction of protein-protein interactions showed 29 and 36 host-pathogen specific interactions between Bos taurus (cattle)-B. abortus and Ovis aries (sheep)-B. melitensis, respectively. Functional characterization of the predicted T4SEs and their interactions with their respective hosts may reveal the secrets of host specificity of Brucella.

  8. Far-from-equilibrium sheared colloidal liquids: disentangling relaxation, advection, and shear-induced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neil Y C; Goyal, Sushmit; Cheng, Xiang; Zia, Roseanna N; Escobedo, Fernando A; Cohen, Itai

    2013-12-01

    Using high-speed confocal microscopy, we measure the particle positions in a colloidal suspension under large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Using the particle positions, we quantify the in situ anisotropy of the pair-correlation function, a measure of the Brownian stress. From these data we find two distinct types of responses as the system crosses over from equilibrium to far-from-equilibrium states. The first is a nonlinear amplitude saturation that arises from shear-induced advection, while the second is a linear frequency saturation due to competition between suspension relaxation and shear rate. In spite of their different underlying mechanisms, we show that all the data can be scaled onto a master curve that spans the equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium regimes, linking small-amplitude oscillatory to continuous shear. This observation illustrates a colloidal analog of the Cox-Merz rule and its microscopic underpinning. Brownian dynamics simulations show that interparticle interactions are sufficient for generating both experimentally observed saturations.

  9. [Effects of different land-use types on soil organic carbon and its prediction in the mountainous areas in the middle reaches of Lancang River].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-liang; An, Nan-nan; Yang, Jue-jie; Dong, Yu-hong; Wang, Cong

    2015-04-01

    Based on the analysis of 210 surface soil samples (0-20 cm) according to field investigation in 2011, soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution under four different land-use types in the middle reaches of Lancang River were studied. Combining with the correlation analysis, relationships among SOC content, land-use type, topographical factors and NDVI were revealed. Furthermore, multiple linear regression and Kriging method were used to predict the SOC contents distribution in the mountainous areas in the middle reaches of Lancang River. The results exhibited that the rank order of SOC content under the four land-use types was forestland > scrubland > grassland > farmland. The important factors influencing the SOC content were land-use type, aspect, slope and curvature. Comparing the accuracy of these two models, we found that the multiple regression model performed better than geo-statistics in prediction of the SOC content in the mountainous region.

  10. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  11. Interfacial shear stress measurement using high spatial resolution multiphase PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-06-01

    In multiphase flows, form drag and viscous shear stress transfer momentum between phases. For numerous environmental and man-made flows, it is of primary importance to predict this transfer at a liquid-gas interface. In its general expression, interfacial shear stress involves local velocity gradients as well as surface velocity, curvature, and surface tension gradients. It is therefore a challenging quantity to measure experimentally or compute numerically. In fact, no experimental work to date has been able to directly resolve all the terms contributing to the shear stress in the case of curved and moving surfaces. In an attempt to fully resolve the interface shear stress when surface tension gradients are negligible, high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are acquired simultaneously on both sides of a water-air interface. The flow consists of a well-conditioned uniform and homogeneous water jet discharging in quiescent air, which exhibits two-dimensional surface waves as a result of a shear layer instability below the surface. PIV provides velocity fields in both phases, while planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to track the interface and obtain its curvature. To compute the interfacial shear stress from the data, several processing schemes are proposed and compared, using liquid and/or gas phase data. Vorticity at the surface, which relates to the shear stress through the dynamic boundary condition at the surface, is also computed and provides additional strategies for estimating the shear. The various schemes are in agreement within the experimental uncertainties, validating the methodology for experimentally resolving this demanding quantity.

  12. A model and simulation to predict 3D imaging LADAR sensor systems performance in real-world type environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Dippel, George F.; Russo, Leonard E.

    2006-08-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. Accurate methods to model and simulate performance from 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation here is developed expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) detector noise figure; 4) detector gain; 5) target attributes; 6) atmospheric transmission; 7) atmospheric backscatter; 8) atmospheric turbulence; 9) obscurants; 10) obscurant path length, and; 11) platform motion. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel. Here, noise sources and gain are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel for the entire array. Model outputs are 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array.

  13. How well does B-type natriuretic peptide predict death and cardiac events in patients with heart failure: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doust, Jenny A; Pietrzak, Eva; Dobson, Annette; Glasziou, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess how well B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) predicts prognosis in patients with heart failure. Design Systematic review of studies assessing BNP for prognosis in patients with heart failure or asymptomatic patients. Data sources Electronic searches of Medline and Embase from January 1994 to March 2004 and reference lists of included studies. Study selection and data extraction We included all studies that estimated the relation between BNP measurement and the risk of death, cardiac death, sudden death, or cardiovascular event in patients with heart failure or asymptomatic patients, including initial values and changes in values in response to treatment. Multivariable models that included both BNP and left ventricular ejection fraction as predictors were used to compare the prognostic value of each variable. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. Data synthesis 19 studies used BNP to estimate the relative risk of death or cardiovascular events in heart failure patients and five studies in asymptomatic patients. In heart failure patients, each 100 pg/ml increase was associated with a 35% increase in the relative risk of death. BNP was used in 35 multivariable models of prognosis. In nine of the models, it was the only variable to reach significance—that is, other variables contained no prognostic information beyond that of BNP. Even allowing for the scale of the variables, it seems to be a strong indicator of risk. Conclusion Although systematic reviews of prognostic studies have inherent difficulties, including the possibility of publication bias, the results of the studies in this review show that BNP is a strong prognostic indicator for both asymptomatic patients and for patients with heart failure at all stages of disease. PMID:15774989

  14. Predicting nitrogen leaching losses from intensifying agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa: the role of soils and fertilizer type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, K. L.; Russo, T. A.; Palm, C.; Neill, C.

    2014-12-01

    Fertilizer use is rapidly increasing in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, we currently have little understanding of the consequences of increased nitrogen (N) fertilizer use on surface and groundwater resource quality in these tropical croplands. This is because there are few field studies that examine N dynamics in SSA, and extrapolation is difficult because soil biogeochemistry and land management differ from the regions where most of our understanding of N losses from agriculture has been developed. We present data on N leaching losses in the vadose zone from a high-clay soil in western Kenya and a low-clay soil in mid-western Tanzania. Experimental fields were established in both sites with fertilizer rates ranging from 0 to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1. We combine measuring soil pore water concentrations from tension lysimeters with a variably saturated hydrologic flow model to estimate N leaching losses under different fertilizer scenarios in two soil types. Vertical N fluxes are given at the soil surface, within, and below the root zone. We find N losses from high-clay soils to be nearly two orders of magnitude lower than low-clay soils likely due to lower fluid flux and higher anion exchange in the high-clay soils. Organic material additions (from leguminous tree prunings) reduced N leaching losses substantially in low-clay soils likely by changing the timing of N-release and by increasing soil organic matter (and thus improving water retention and the formation of soil aggregates). Predicting the fate of added N in SSA is very important as N application is poised to increase in this vulnerable and under-studied region.

  15. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those

  16. A rational approach to the use of Prandtl's mixing length model in free turbulent shear flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, D. H.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    Prandtl's basic mixing length model was used to compute 22 test cases on free turbulent shear flows. The calculations employed appropriate algebraic length scale equations and single values of mixing length constant for planar and axisymmetric flows, respectively. Good agreement with data was obtained except for flows, such as supersonic free shear layers, where large sustained sensitivity changes occur. The inability to predict the more gradual mixing in these flows is tentatively ascribed to the presence of a significant turbulence-induced transverse static pressure gradient which is neglected in conventional solution procedures. Some type of an equation for length scale development was found to be necessary for successful computation of highly nonsimilar flow regions such as jet or wake development from thick wall flows.

  17. Waist-to-hip ratio is a better anthropometric index than body mass index for predicting the risk of type 2 diabetes in Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chien-Hsiang; Ho, Chien-Chang; Yang, Chin-Feng; Huang, Yi-Chia; Lai, Cheng-Hsiu; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2010-09-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has been reported to be related to the risk of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. However, waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) can better reflect the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat and might be a better predictor than BMI of the risk of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that other anthropometric indices rather than BMI could more accurately predict the risk of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to determine which anthropometric index can be a better predictor for forecasting the risk of type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Taiwanese population. We conducted a cross-sectional study and reviewed data derived from the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan, 1993-1996. The subjects were 2545 men and 2562 women, aged 18 to 96 years. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to measure the predictive diabetic and hypertensive performance of each anthropometric measurement based on the area under the curve (AUC). Among 5 anthropometric indices, WHR had a significantly adjusted odds ratio (OR) and the highest AUC (0.72 for men and 0.80 for women) to predict the risk of type 2 diabetes. Although BMI had a significantly adjusted OR, the AUC was not the highest among the 5 anthropometric indices used to predict the risk of hypertension. Our findings suggested that WHR is a better anthropometric index for predicting the risk of type 2 diabetes, and the optimal cutoff values of WHR are considered as 0.89 for men and 0.82 for women in the Taiwanese population.

  18. [Propagation of shear waves in the muscle tissue].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, D A; Tsaturian, A K

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model of the propagation of acoustic shear waves in muscle tissue is considered. The muscle is modelled by an incompressible transversely isotropic viscoelastic continuum with quasi-one-dimensional active tension. Two types of shear waves in an infinite medium have been established. The waves of the second type (transverse) propagate without attenuation even when myofibril viscosity is taken into account. A problem of standing transverse waves in a rectangular layer has been investigated numerically. The values of the problem parameters have been found for which the active tension or muscle tonus is easily estimated from the characteristics of standing waves. This value is informative for the diagnosis of muscle state.

  19. Origin of shear thickening in semidilute wormlike micellar solutions and evidence of elastic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M.; Pérez-González, José; Rodríguez-González, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The origin of shear thickening in an equimolar semidilute wormlike micellar solution of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium salicylate was investigated in this work by using Couette rheometry, flow visualization, and capillary Rheo-particle image velocimetry. The use of the combined methods allowed the discovery of gradient shear banding flow occurring from a critical shear stress and consisting of two main bands, one isotropic (transparent) of high viscosity and one structured (turbid) of low viscosity. Mechanical rheometry indicated macroscopic shear thinning behavior in the shear banding regime. However, local velocimetry showed that the turbid band increased its viscosity along with the shear stress, even though barely reached the value of the viscosity of the isotropic phase. This shear band is the precursor of shear induced structures that subsequently give rise to the average increase in viscosity or apparent shear thickening of the solution. Further increase in the shear stress promoted the growing of the turbid band across the flow region and led to destabilization of the shear banding flow independently of the type of rheometer used, as well as to vorticity banding in Couette flow. At last, vorticity banding disappeared and the flow developed elastic turbulence with chaotic dynamics.

  20. A failure criterion for laminates governed by free edge interlaminar shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, J. W.; Sun, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    Interlaminar shear stresses in balanced and symmetric laminates with free edges and failure due to these stresses were studied. It was shown that the average interlaminar shear stress near the free edge is linearly related to the mismatch of the extension-shear coupling of the top and bottom sublaminates separated by the interface of interest. A simple failure criterion based on the mismatch of the extension shear coupling was introduced to predict laminate failure stress and strain. The validity of this criterion was verified by experiments using AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy composite laminates.

  1. Physical mechanism of anisotropic sensitivity in pentaerythritol tetranitrate from compressive-shear reaction dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybin, Sergey V.; Goddard, William A.; Xu, Peng; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2010-02-01

    We propose computational protocol (compressive shear reactive dynamics) utilizing the ReaxFF reactive force field to study chemical initiation under combined shear and compressive load. We apply it to predict the anisotropic initiation sensitivity observed experimentally for shocked pentaerythritol tetranitrate single crystals. For crystal directions known to be sensitive we find large stress overshoots and fast temperature increase that result in early bond-breaking processes whereas insensitive directions exhibit small stress overshoot, lower temperature increase, and little bond dissociation. These simulations confirm the model of steric hindrance to shear and capture the thermochemical processes dominating the phenomena of shear-induced chemical initiation.

  2. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-06-28

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics. PMID:27222249

  3. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-06-28

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics.

  4. Suppression of Shear Banding and Transition to Necking and Homogeneous Flow in Nanoglass Nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Adibi, Sara; Branicio, Paulo S.; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the properties of metallic glasses (MG) a new type of MG structure, composed of nanoscale grains, referred to as nanoglass (NG), has been recently proposed. Here, we use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tensile loading to investigate the deformation and failure mechanisms of Cu64Zr36 NG nanopillars with large, experimentally accessible, 50 nm diameter. Our results reveal NG ductility and failure by necking below the average glassy grain size of 20 nm, in contrast to brittle failure by shear band propagation in MG nanopillars. Moreover, the results predict substantially larger ductility in NG nanopillars compared with previous predictions of MD simulations of bulk NG models with columnar grains. The results, in excellent agreement with experimental data, highlight the substantial enhancement of plasticity induced in experimentally relevant MG samples by the use of nanoglass architectures and point out to exciting novel applications of these materials. PMID:26503114

  5. Suppression of Shear Banding and Transition to Necking and Homogeneous Flow in Nanoglass Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibi, Sara; Branicio, Paulo S.; Joshi, Shailendra P.

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the properties of metallic glasses (MG) a new type of MG st