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Sample records for predictive oncology multidisciplinary

  1. Current multidisciplinary oncology series

    PubMed Central

    Sebio, Ana

    2014-01-01

    “Cancers of the Colon and Rectum: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Diagnosis and Management” represents a truly multidisciplinary compendium of the management of these tumors that will be of value both for any physician involved in providing care for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients as well as for trainees of many medical disciplines.

  2. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  3. [Novel quality assurance method in oncology: the two-level, multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system].

    PubMed

    Mangel, László; Kövér, Erika; Szilágyi, István; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Bércesi, Eva; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Holcz, Tibor; Karádi, Oszkár; Farkas, Róbert; Csák, Szilvia; Csere, Tibor; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-12-16

    By now therapy decision taken by a multi-disciplinary oncology team in cancer care has become a routine method in worldwide. However, multi-disciplinary oncology team has to face more and more difficulties in keeping abreast with the fast development in oncology science, increasing expectations, and financial considerations. Naturally the not properly controlled decision mechanisms, the permanent lack of time and shortage of professionals are also hindering factors. Perhaps it would be a way out if the staff meetings and discussions of physicians in the oncology departments were transformed and provided with administrative, legal and decision credentials corresponding to those of multi-disciplinary oncology team. The new form of the oncotherapy oncoteam might be able to decide the optimal and particular treatment after previous consultation with the patient. The oncotherapy oncoteam is also suitable to carry out training and tasks of a cancer centre and by diminishing the psychological burden of the doctors it contributes to an improved patient care. This study presents the two-level multi-disciplinary and oncotherapy oncology team system at the University of Pécs including the detailed analysis of the considerations above.

  4. Integrated media presentation in multidisciplinary head and neck oncology meetings.

    PubMed

    Simo, Ricard; Morgan, Peter; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Odell, Edward; Harrison, John; Almeida, Bernice; McGurk, Mark; Lyons, Andrew; Hussain, Karim; Gleeson, Michael; O'Connell, Mary; Calman, Frances; Ng, Roy; Roblin, Paul; Connor, Steve; Fenlon, Michael; Burke, Mary; Chandra, Ashish; Herbert, Amanda; Patt, Sarah; Steward-Bagley, Lizzie; Donnelly, Rachael; Freeman, Lesley; Twinn, Claire; Mason, Carolyn

    2009-02-01

    Multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs) are an essential part of the management of head and neck cancer. Practice care guidance set up by the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists has recommended that MDMs should have appropriate projection equipment for computer-generated images so that all members of group have access to the same information. The aim of this paper is to review our experience with the integrated visual presentation of head and neck oncology patients and to demonstrate its advantages over conventional approaches. Digital photographs are taken of patients and of their index tumour at presentation or at the time of diagnostic endoscopy. All relevant pre-treatment digitised images from tumour sites and radiological images and histological slides are incorporated into a single presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint software. During the past 2 years, on-line radiological scans have also become accessible for the meeting to aid treatment planning. Subsequently, all peri-operative pictures and post-surgical macroscopic and microscopic histopathological images are added to each patient's presentation, which is then hyperlinked into the agenda. The Guy's and St Thomas' Head and Neck Cancer Centre treats over 400 patients a year, and since 2002, all new cancer diagnoses have been discussed in the weekly MDM as described above. A total of 1,638 presentations have been incorporated in a centralized database that is updated in the event of recurrence, further primary tumours or other clinical developments. Satisfactory documentation and staging of head and neck tumours must include a verbal description, accurate measurement, diagrammatic representation, photographic recording and appropriate radiological imaging. Integrated presentation at MDM collates all relevant findings for clinical management decisions on patients with head and neck cancer. This approach is also an extremely valuable adjunct to long-term clinical monitoring.

  5. Interventional oncology in multidisciplinary cancer treatment in the 21(st) century.

    PubMed

    Adam, Andreas; Kenny, Lizbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Interventional oncology is an evolving branch of interventional radiology, which relies on rapidly evolving, highly sophisticated treatment tools and precise imaging guidance to target and destroy malignant tumours. The development of this field has important potential benefits for patients and the health-care system, but as a new discipline, interventional oncology has not yet fully established its place in the wider field of oncology; its application does not have a comprehensive evidence base, or a clinical or quality-assurance framework within which to operate. In this regard, radiation oncology, a cornerstone of modern cancer care, has a lot of important information to offer to interventional oncologists. A strong collaboration between radiation oncology and interventional oncology, both of which aim to cure or control tumours or to relieve symptoms with as little collateral damage to normal tissue as possible, will have substantial advantages for both disciplines. A close relationship with radiation oncology will help facilitate the development of a robust quality-assurance framework and accumulation of evidence to support the integration of interventional oncology into multidisciplinary care. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional oncology and radiation oncology fields will have great benefits to practitioners, people affected by cancer, and to the wider field of oncology.

  6. [Clinical prediction in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    González Barón, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Predictive factors (PF) are variables that give information about survival, treatment response or toxicity and future complications on cancer patients. The foremost utility of PF takes root in the possibility to furnish an individualized treatment schedule with higher succeeding options. They include clinical characteristics of the patient, tumour features, treatment administrated, classical pathological and new molecular data obtained from patients clinical samples. Clinical parameters comprise age, sex, underlying diseases and performance status among others, and in concurrence with tumour pathology and clinical stage (TNM) usually define the best treatment options. Also, chemotherapy response can modify natural history of several tumours, and thus is a PF. Modifications in evolving PF typically induce a variation in patient outcome. Hence, surgical tumour size reduction or neoadjuvant down-staging improve survival in several cancers. In the other side, treatment adjustment to steady PF should offers better outcome than "standard therapies". Recent advances on cancer research have generated a great deal of biological data that help us to search new treatment and diagnostic modalities. Biotechnology offers a great amount of possibilities in the next future and probably a true individualized therapy. Conversely, there are a small amount of molecular evidences that imply a creal variation in current clinical practice. Hence, more scientific and financial efforts are necessary to exploit to the full knowledge spurting up from basic science. In summary, the prediction in oncology is a hard task derived from clinical observation, tumour behaviour, treatment schedules and biological evidences that must offer realistic predictions on a concrete cancer patient. Oncologists have a duty to know all these variables to accomplish this thorny assignment. This review will focus on classical and recent biological PF in cancer.

  7. Development of an Integrated Subspecialist Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology Service

    PubMed Central

    Price, Stephen J; Guilfoyle, Mathew; J Jefferies, Sarah; Harris, Fiona; Oberg, Ingela; G Burnet, Neil; Santarius, Thomas; Watts, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the poor outcome for patients with malignant brain tumours led to therapeutic nihilism. In turn, this resulted in lack of interest in neurosurgical oncology subspecialisation, and less than ideal patient pathways. One problem of concern was the low rate of tumour resection. Between 1997 and 2006, 685 treated glioblastomas were identified. In the first four years only 40% of patients underwent tumour resection, rising to 55% in the last four years. Before revision of the pathway, the median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and 35% of patients received the results of their histology outside of a clinic setting. A pathway of care was established, in which all patients were discussed pre-operatively in an MDT meeting and then directed into a new surgical neuro-oncology clinic providing first point of contact. This limited the number of surgeons operating on adult glioma patients and aided recruitment into research studies. Now, three consultant neurosurgeons run this service, easily fulfilling IOG requirement to spend >50% of programmed activities in neuro-oncology. Nursing support has been critical to provide an integrated service. This model has allowed increased recruitment to clinical trials. The introduction of this service led to an increase in patients discussed pre-operatively in an MDT (66% rising to 87%; P=0.027), an increase in the rate of surgical resection (from 40% to 80%) and more patients being admitted electively (from 25% to 80%; P<0.001). There was a reduction in the median length of stay (8 days reduced to 4.5 days; P<0.001). For the cohort of GBM patients that went on to have chemoradiotherapy we improved median survival to 18 months, with 35% of patients alive at two years, comparable to international outcomes. Implementing a specialist neurosurgical oncology service begins with understanding the patient care pathway. Our patients have benefitted from the culture of subspecialisation and the excellent inter-disciplinary working

  8. Work-related stress and reward: an Australian study of multidisciplinary pediatric oncology healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Bowden, M J; Mukherjee, S; Williams, L K; DeGraves, S; Jackson, M; McCarthy, M C

    2015-11-01

    Managing staff stress and preventing long-term burnout in oncology staff are highly important for both staff and patient well-being. Research addressing work-related stress in adult oncology is well documented; however, less is known about this topic in the pediatric context. This study examined sources of work-related stress and reward specific to multidisciplinary staff working in pediatric oncology in Australia. Participants were 107 pediatric oncology clinicians, including medical, nursing, and allied health staff from two Australian pediatric oncology centers. Participants completed an online survey using two newly developed measures: the work stressors scale-pediatric oncology and the work rewards scale-pediatric oncology. The most commonly reported sources of both stress and reward are related to patient care and interactions with children. Results indicated that levels of work-related stress and reward were similar between the professional disciplines and between the two hospitals. Regression analyses revealed no demographic or organizational factors that were associated with either stress or reward. Work-related stress and reward are not mutually exclusive; particular situations and events can be simultaneously stressful and rewarding for healthcare providers. Although patient care and interactions with children was found to be the most stressful aspect of working in this speciality, it was also the greatest source of reward. Results are discussed in relation to workplace approaches to staff well-being and stress reduction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Vienna Summer School on Oncology: how to teach clinical decision making in a multidisciplinary environment.

    PubMed

    Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Kaiser, Philipp A; Machacek, Alexandra; Waldstein, Cora; Pötter, Richard; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2017-06-06

    Clinical decision making in oncology is based on both inter- and multidisciplinary approach. Hence teaching future doctors involved in oncology or general health practice is crucial. The aim of the Vienna Summer School on Oncology (VSSO) as an international, integrated, undergraduate oncology course is to teach medical students interdisciplinary team communication and application of treatment concepts/algorithms in a multidisciplinary setting. The teaching is based on an inter- and multidisciplinary faculty and a multimodal education approach to address different learning styles. The participants rated their satisfaction of the program voluntarily after finishing the course according to a grading scale from one (not good) to five (very good). The learning success was assessed by a compulsory pre-VSSO and post-VSSO single choice questionnaire. Program organisation was rated with a mean score of 4.47 out of 5.0 (SD 0.51), composition of the program and range of topics with a mean score of 4.68 (SD 0.58) and all teachers with a mean score of 4.36 (SD 0.40) points. Student evaluation at the beginning and end of the program indicated significant knowledge acquisition -i.e., general aspects of cancer: median 8.75 points (IQR 7.5-9.4) vs.10.0 points (IQR 9.4-10.0) p = 0.005; specific aspects of cancer: median 4.87 points (IQR 3.33-5.71) vs. 8.72 points (IQR 6.78-9.49) p ≤ 0.001, respectively. Even though the participants represent a selection of students with special interest in cancer, the results of the VSSO indicate the benefit of an inter- and multidisciplinary teaching approach within an oncology module.

  10. Implementation of a Novel Medical School Multidisciplinary and Interprofessional Oncology Curriculum: a Mixed Method Study.

    PubMed

    McKillip, Ryan P; Hahn, Olwen M; Bartkowiak, Bartlomiej; Rosenberg, Carol A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Arora, Vineet M; Golden, Daniel W

    2017-08-22

    As the population of patients with cancer and survivors grows, physician knowledge of oncology clinical care and research is increasingly important. Despite this patient population growth, medical students and non-oncology physicians report insufficient oncologic and survivorship care training. First-year students at a single US medical school completing a summer research experience were invited to participate in integrated Scholars in Oncology-Associated Research (SOAR) program. SOAR seeks to broaden students' understanding of multidisciplinary and interprofessional oncology clinical care and research. SOAR consists of three components: structured didactics, multidisciplinary tumor board attendance, and interprofessional shadowing. A mixed-methods approach investigated whether student knowledge improved after SOAR. Thirty-three students enrolled in SOAR (20 in 2015, 13 in 2016) and completed pre-assessments. Twenty-five (75.8%) students completed SOAR and post-assessments. Self-reported understanding of clinical (2[2, 3] vs. 4[4], p < 0.01) and research oncology (2[2, 3] vs. 4[4], p < 0.01) improved after SOAR. Understanding of individual disciplines also significantly improved. When describing clinical oncology, responses written post-SOAR were more comprehensive, averaging 3.7 themes per response vs. 2.8 on pre-assessments (p = 0.03). There were more references to "survivorship" as a component of oncology on post-assessments (0[0.0%] vs. 7[28.0%], p < 0.01) and "screening/prevention" (2[6.1%] vs. 7[28.0%], p = 0.03). Additionally, students more often described cancer care as a continuum on post-assessments (4[12.1%] vs. 11[44.0%], p = 0.01). A structured didactic and experiential introduction to oncology, SOAR, was successfully piloted. SOAR improved participant understanding of oncology and its distinct clinical and research disciplines. Future work will focus on expanding SOAR into a longitudinal oncology curriculum.

  11. Multidisciplinary team and team oncology medicine research and development in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Peipei; Wu, Qiang; Huang, Yong

    2010-08-01

    In the context of transition from "Biomedical Model" to "Biology-Psychology-Society Medical Model", the treatment model of malignant tumors has changed from single-subject treatment to multidisciplinary collaboration treatment led by a Multidisciplinary Team (MDT). On this basis, the concept of "Team Oncology Medicine" strengthens the focus of malignant tumor treatment. This is not only improving cure rate and extending life span, but also paying close attention to patients' actual demands to improve their quality of life. There are many good studies and practices of Multidisciplinary Team and Team Oncology Medicine in the world. China is currently in the exploratory phase of the malignant tumor Multidisciplinary Team treatment model. Many hospitals have investigated and practiced a Multidisciplinary Team treatment model. China is faced with many problems to scientifically construct a malignant tumor treatment model which conforms to national conditions. These conditions include a medical model, a medical care insurance system, public hospitals reform, hospital management approaches, personnel framework, concern with patients' psychosis and psychology, and whether to tell patients their actual condition and how they should express their will, and so on.

  12. Oncologic multidisciplinary team meetings: evaluation of quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Ottevanger, Nelleke; Hilbink, Mirrian; Weenk, Mariska; Janssen, Romy; Vrijmoeth, Talitha; de Vries, Antoinette; Hermens, Rosella

    2013-12-01

    To develop a guideline with quality criteria for an optimal structure and functioning of a multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM), and to assess to what extent the Dutch MTMs complied with these criteria. A literature search and expert opinions were used to develop a guideline for optimal MTMs. In order to assess adherence to the guideline, we conducted interviews with MTM chairs and observed general and tumour-specific MTMs in seven hospitals. The new guideline included the following domains: (i) organization of the MTMs; (ii) membership of the MTM and roles and responsibilities of the members; (iii) the meeting itself; and (iv) documentation of meeting-recommendations. We observed good adherence to the quality criteria on the organization of the MTMs. Only the required coordinator/administrative support was often absent, particularly during general MTMs. Regarding membership of MTMs and roles, the recommended average attendance of 100% of the core disciplines was never reached and particularly the role of the chair needs improvement. Regarding the meeting itself, many interruptions took place and relevant information about the diagnoses of the cases was not available in 4-5% of the cases. Concerning the documentation of meeting-recommendations, only in a quarter of the meetings a specific form was used for the documentation. We found a lot of diversity in the organization of MTMs. The variation in compliance with the quality criteria may decrease with better knowledge about the quality criteria around MTMs and by overcoming practical barriers for the effective organization of MTMs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Validation workflow for a clinical Bayesian network model in multidisciplinary decision making in head and neck oncology treatment.

    PubMed

    Cypko, Mario A; Stoehr, Matthaeus; Kozniewski, Marcin; Druzdzel, Marek J; Dietz, Andreas; Berliner, Leonard; Lemke, Heinz U

    2017-02-15

    Oncological treatment is being increasingly complex, and therefore, decision making in multidisciplinary teams is becoming the key activity in the clinical pathways. The increased complexity is related to the number and variability of possible treatment decisions that may be relevant to a patient. In this paper, we describe validation of a multidisciplinary cancer treatment decision in the clinical domain of head and neck oncology. Probabilistic graphical models and corresponding inference algorithms, in the form of Bayesian networks, can support complex decision-making processes by providing a mathematically reproducible and transparent advice. The quality of BN-based advice depends on the quality of the model. Therefore, it is vital to validate the model before it is applied in practice. For an example BN subnetwork of laryngeal cancer with 303 variables, we evaluated 66 patient records. To validate the model on this dataset, a validation workflow was applied in combination with quantitative and qualitative analyses. In the subsequent analyses, we observed four sources of imprecise predictions: incorrect data, incomplete patient data, outvoting relevant observations, and incorrect model. Finally, the four problems were solved by modifying the data and the model. The presented validation effort is related to the model complexity. For simpler models, the validation workflow is the same, although it may require fewer validation methods. The validation success is related to the model's well-founded knowledge base. The remaining laryngeal cancer model may disclose additional sources of imprecise predictions.

  14. [A multidisciplinary mModule for oncological documentation within a hospital information system].

    PubMed

    Kunze, U; Ganslandt, T; Preusser, P; Bürkle, T; Prokosch, H U; Senninger, N; Haier, J

    2004-01-01

    The follow-up documentation of oncological patients in Germany is inadequate in many cases: it is usually limited to a minimal dataset mandated by the epidemiological tumor registers; it is carried out in a paper-based fashion and rarely in a multi-disciplinary context. Parallel documentation efforts can result in redundant or erroneous data and excess work. The introduction of hospital information systems (HIS) allows the implementation of digital oncological documentation systems integrated in surrounding clinical workflows that can provide access to existing data sources as well as data entry and presentation across departmental boundaries. This concept enables the integration of tumor documentation, quality assurance and process optimization within HIS. Feasibility requirements include a high flexibility and adaptability of the underlying HIS to reach a seamless integration of oncological documentation forms within routine clinical workflows. This paper presents the conceptual design and implementation of a modular oncological documentation system at the Muenster University Hospital that is capable of integrating the documentation requirements of multiple departments within the hospital.

  15. Impact of the lung oncology multidisciplinary team meetings on the management of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ung, Kim Ann; Campbell, Belinda A; Duplan, Danny; Ball, David; David, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are increasingly regarded as a component of multidisciplinary cancer care. We aimed to prospectively measure the impact of MDT meetings on clinicians' management plans for lung oncology patients, and the implementation rate of the meeting recommendations. Consecutive patient cases presented at the weekly lung oncology MDT meetings were prospectively enrolled. Investigators compared the clinicians' management plans pre-meeting with the consensus plans post-meeting. The meeting was considered to have an impact on management plans if ≥1 of the following changes were detected: tumor stage, histology, treatment intent or treatment modality, or if additional investigations were recommended. Investigators reviewed hospital patient records at 4 months to determine if the meeting recommendations were implemented. Reasons for non-implementation were also recorded. Of the 55 eligible cases, the MDT meeting changed management plans in 58% (CI 45-71%; P < 0.005). These changes included: additional investigations (59%), or changes in treatment modality (19%), treatment intent (9%), histology (6%) or tumor stage (6%). The meeting recommendations were implemented in 72% of cases. Reasons for non-implementation included deteriorating patient performance status, clinician's preference, the influence of new clinical information obtained after the meeting or patient decision. MDT meetings significantly impact on the management plans for lung oncology patients. The majority of MDT recommendations (72%) were implemented into patient care. These findings provide further evidence to support the role of MDT meetings as an essential part of the decision-making process for the optimal multidisciplinary management of patients with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Initiation of a multidisciplinary summer studentship in palliative and supportive care in oncology.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Alysa; Watanabe, Sharon; Chambers, Carole; Yurick, Janice; Lem, Lisa; Tachynski, Patty

    2012-01-01

    The optimal setting for interprofessional education (IPE) for prelicensure health care trainees is unclear, especially in a field as complex and emotionally challenging as oncology. In this article, the authors describe the initiation of the Cross Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Summer Studentship in Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology, a 6-week, multidisciplinary team-based clinical placement in supportive care, designed to incorporate features of best practice cooperative learning. A steering committee established goals, structure, eligibility criteria, application process, funding, and a consensus approach to instruction and evaluation for the IPE program. Studentship components included mandatory and flexible clinical time, an exploratory investigation, discussion groups, and a presentation. Two senior students per iteration were selected from clinical nutrition, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, respiratory therapy, social work, and speech-language pathology applicants. These students completed questionnaires investigating their views of their own and others' professions at baseline, at the end of the rotation, and 6 months after the studentship. Eight students from medicine, clinical nutrition, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology have participated to date. At the elective's end, students have described a more positive view of multidisciplinary team practice, with each participating discipline perceived as both more caring and more subservient than at baseline. In general, changes in attitudes were maintained 6 months after completion of the placement. This 6-week multidisciplinary placement is feasible, successful, and potentially transferable to other academic settings. The results of this study suggest that even over as short a period as 6 weeks, objective attitudinal and perceptual change is seen.

  17. OECI accreditation at Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV -- IRCCS, general framework and multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Chiusole, Daniela; Cioffredi, Piero; Basso, Umberto; Bortolami, Alberto; Crivellari, Gino; Gennaro, Gisella; Spina, Romina; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the accreditation process of the Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) according to the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) model, with particular reference to the standards for the multidisciplinary approach. Through the analysis of the process and the activities of each multidisciplinary team (MDT) and the development, at a regional level, of diagnostic, therapeutic, and care pathways (PDTA), all the necessary steps to meet the OECI standards have been determined. Adjustment is ongoing. We are working on the inclusion of the MDT registration forms in the electronic medical records and on the possibility to extend the OECI model to the MDT not based at IOV, but participated in by IOV professionals. The sarcoma MDT has achieved results demonstrating that the OECI framework has allowed the professionals involved in the multidisciplinary meeting to systematically share the clinical information of the patient, who can benefit from better continuity of care. The model has also provided greater clarity in the management of patients who are enrolled in clinical trials and deviate from Guide Lines (GL)/PDTA. The accreditation process according to the OECI model has added value to the IOV's already well-developed multidisciplinary activities.

  18. Multidisciplinary team management in thoracic oncology: more than just a concept?

    PubMed

    Powell, Helen A; Baldwin, David R

    2014-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) management in thoracic oncology has been introduced over the past two decades with the aim of improving outcomes for patients. While MDT management has become the standard of care in some countries, not all healthcare systems have adopted this practice. In this article we review the history and implementation of MDT care in thoracic oncology and explore the evidence for, and challenges associated with, this system of working. There are many advantages of an MDT both to the patient, the clinicians and the wider population, but it is difficult to demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcomes such as treatment rates or survival given the substantial number of coexistent changes in the management of thoracic malignancies over the same time period. There are also some disadvantages associated with MDT working, particularly the costs of setting up the service and the time commitment from each of the healthcare professionals involved. Barriers to effective MDT working include poor attendance by some specialists, inadequate preparation and poor quality information about the patient. Variation in quality of MDTs has been reported so it is important that practice is monitored and areas for improvement identified.

  19. Work stress and well-being in oncology settings: a multidisciplinary study of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Jones, Martyn C; Wells, Mary; Gao, Chuan; Cassidy, Bernadette; Davie, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Staff working in oncology report high levels of work-related stress. This arises partly from the nature of clinical work, including practitioner perceptions of high demand and low control or high effort and low reward. This comparative study investigated the correlates of work stress in a multidisciplinary group of staff and the associations between staff perceptions of the work environment, emotional distress, job satisfaction and work-based social support. This questionnaire study combined quantitative and qualitative assessment in a cohort sample of multidisciplinary staff (N = 85) working in a cancer centre in North East Scotland. Ethical approval was granted by the local Research Ethics Committee. This paper reports on the quantitative element of the study, Response rate was 50.6% (N = 85). Older, female and nursing and support staff were more likely to participate. Support staff reported the lowest perceptions of control, job satisfaction and managerial support. Radiographers reported the highest levels of job satisfaction, co-worker and managerial support. Nurses perceived lower decision control and job satisfaction than allied health professionals or doctors. In general, perceptions of decisional control and reward were protective of job satisfaction, particularly when work demands were high. Co-worker support was associated with perceptions of reduced effort, greater reward and increased satisfaction. Managerial support was also associated with greater control beliefs. Overall, sickness absence exceeded the 5% rates seen in other National Health Service surveys, whereas turnover intention rates were similar. The development and introduction of multilevel strategies to reduce demand, improve control and support perceptions are warranted, particularly for support staff. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Palliative care in paediatric oncology: perceptions, expertise and practices from the perspective of the multidisciplinary team].

    PubMed

    Silva, Adriana Ferreira da; Issi, Helena Becker; Motta, Maria da Graça Corso da; Botene, Daisy Zanchi de Abreu

    2015-06-01

    To reveal the perceptions, expertise and practices of multi-professional teams providing palliative care to children in a paediatric oncology unit. The research questions were based on everyday care, facilitations and difficulties, essential aspects of professional approaches, and the inter-disciplinary focus of care for children in palliative care and their families. Qualitative, exploratory and descriptive research. Data were collected from June to October 2013 from nine professional multidisciplinary team members by means of a semi-structured interview submitted to thematic analysis. The following four themes emerged from analysis: palliative care: conceptions of the multi-professional team; the construction of singular care; the facilitations and difficulties experienced by the team and significant lessons learned. The subjects revealed that the team also suffers with the death of a child and, like the family, moves toward the construction of coping mechanisms for the elaboration of mourning. Paradoxically, the team shares knowledge to determine the foundations of a singular therapeutic project and inserts the family in this process so that it can be the protagonist of the child's care.

  1. Robotic oncologic complexity score - a new tool for predicting complications in computer-enhanced oncologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sgarbura, Olivia; Tomulescu, Victor; Popescu, Irinel

    2016-06-01

    While there is little doubt that robotic interventions have already opened new horizons in surgery due to its inherent complexity, there is still an unmet need for tools allowing center-to-center performance comparisons. A complexity score could be a valuable instrument for further research. The items of the robotic oncologic complexity score (ROCS) were based on risk factors identified in previous studies. We attempt to build the score and validate it on 400 consecutive cases of robotic oncologic surgery. The primary endpoint is to assess the value of ROCS in predicting major complications. The mean ROCS in the group was 3.3(+/-1.4). Different correlations were calculated: the score and the complications (r=0.38), the major complications (r=0.42), Clavien grade (r=0.5), the operating time (r=0.35), and the length of stay (r=0.47). On the ROC-curve a score >4 has the best specificity and sensibility for predicting major complications (P<0.05). ROCS has potential in predicting complications and hospital length of stay, as well as a role in classifying oncologic robotic surgical interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Multi-disciplinary summit on genetics services for women with gynecologic cancers: A Society of Gynecologic Oncology White Paper.

    PubMed

    Randall, Leslie M; Pothuri, Bhavana; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Diaz, John P; Buchanan, Adam; Witkop, Catherine T; Bethan Powell, C; Smith, Ellen Blair; Robson, Mark E; Boyd, Jeff; Coleman, Robert L; Lu, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To assess current practice, advise minimum standards, and identify educational gaps relevant to genetic screening, counseling, and testing of women affected by gynecologic cancers. The Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) organized a multidisciplinary summit that included representatives from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Society Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), and patient advocacy groups, BrightPink and Facing our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE). Three subject areas were discussed: care delivery models for genetic testing, barriers to genetic testing, and educational opportunities for providers of genetic testing. The group endorsed current SGO, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), and NSGC genetic testing guidelines for women affected with ovarian, tubal, peritoneal cancers, or DNA mismatch repair deficient endometrial cancer. Three main areas of unmet need were identified: timely and universal genetic testing for women with ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal cancers; education regarding minimum standards for genetic counseling and testing; and barriers to implementation of testing of both affected individuals as well as cascade testing of family members. Consensus building among all stakeholders resulted in an action plan to address gaps in education of gynecologic oncology providers and delivery of cancer genetics care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Integrating anatomy training into radiation oncology residency: considerations for developing a multidisciplinary, interactive learning module for adult learners.

    PubMed

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation oncology and medical physics residents. Instructional design was based on established learning theories, with the intent of integrating knowledge of specific anatomical regions with radiology and radiation oncology practice. Each session included presentations by a radiologist and a radiation oncologist, as well as hands-on exploration of anatomical specimens with guidance from anatomists. Pre- and post-tests distributed during each session showed significant short-term knowledge retention. According to qualitative surveys and exit interviews, participants felt more comfort' with delineating structures, gross anatomy, and radiograph interpretation at the end of each session. Overall participant experience was positive, and the modules were considered effective for learning radiologic anatomy. Suggestions for future interventions include more time, increased clinical application, additional contouring practice and feedback, and improved coordination between each of the three disciplines. Results and conclusions from this study will be used to inform the design of a future multi-day national workshop for Canadian radiation oncology residents.

  4. Developing a multidisciplinary geriatric oncology program in a community cancer center.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mary Pat; Marcone, Dana; Kagan, Sarah H

    2007-12-01

    Cancer is a disease of older adults, and with unprecedented growth in the number of people entering late adulthood, an increasing need exists for specialized services and programs to address the needs of older adults with cancer. Few examples in the literature detail development of a geriatric oncology program. This article describes a pilot project undertaken by a community cancer center to develop a specialized program for older adults with cancer by identifying local demographics and population needs. It also describes a replicable plan for the development of a geriatric oncology program, which demonstrates how nursing can benefit from collaboration with other disciplines such as social work and psychology in service provision.

  5. Oncology Teaching: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Second-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkort, Richard; Mozden, Peter J.

    1975-01-01

    A Boston University School of Medicine course in oncology is described which covers basic science correlates, diagnostic approaches, treatment modalities, and psycho-social aspects. Based on five years experience, the course is considered a successful means of correlating basic and clinical information for second- and third-year medical students.…

  6. Oncology Teaching: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Second-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkort, Richard; Mozden, Peter J.

    1975-01-01

    A Boston University School of Medicine course in oncology is described which covers basic science correlates, diagnostic approaches, treatment modalities, and psycho-social aspects. Based on five years experience, the course is considered a successful means of correlating basic and clinical information for second- and third-year medical students.…

  7. Repression predicts outcome following multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Burns, J W

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether repression predicts outcome following multidisciplinary treatment for chronic pain and whether links between anxiety and outcome are obscured by repressors. Ninety-three chronic pain patients completed a 4-week pain program. Lifting capacity, walking endurance, depression, pain severity, and activity were measured at pre- and posttreatment. Low-anxious, repressor, high-anxious, and defensive/high-anxious groups were formed from median splits of Anxiety Content (ACS) and Lie scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989). Significant ACS x Lie interactions were found for lifting capacity, depression, and pain severity changes. Planned comparisons showed that both repressors and high-anxious patients performed poorly on lifting capacity; repressors alone recovered poorly on depression and pain severity. Results imply that repression may interfere with the process and outcome of pain programs.

  8. Multidisciplinary team meetings in Oncology: first analysis of benefits and evaluation of activity in a Dermatology unit in France.

    PubMed

    Caudron, Anne; Chaby, Guillaume; Dadban, Ali; Andrejak, Claire; Dhaille, Florie; Bagot, Martine; Lok, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Improving Multi-Disciplinary Meetings (MDM) is one of the 70 clauses of the French Cancer Plan of 2003-2007. The French High Authority of Health (HAS) and the National Cancer Institute (INCa) have established guidelines to standardize MDM concerning cancer care. No objective assessment of cutaneous cancer (dermato-oncology) MDM has been published yet, despite the growing numbers in the incidence of skin cancers. This study aims to analyze two of our center's MDM concerns: its decisions and its compliance with HAS guidelines. A retrospective study of all skin tumors discussed in MDM held at Amiens University Hospital between 2006-2007 analyzed epidemiological data, MDM decisions (recommendations), and their compliance. 349 MDM conclusion reports concerning 228 patients were analyzed. The cases consisted of 132 melanomas, 27 basal cell carcinomas, 19 squamous cell carcinomas, 5 Merkel cell carcinomas, 8 sarcomas, 16 cutaneous lymphomas, and 21 other tumors. 45.7% of MDM had at least 3 different specialists present. Patients were present in 49.4% of discussions. 88% of the MDMs' recommendations were implemented. More than 94% of these decisions were according to the guidelines. MDM recommendations contributed to: making 13.6% of diagnoses, 74.7% of treatment decisions, 45.6% of investigations requested, and 48.2% of long-term follow-up decisions. Treatment recommendations were: surgery in 50.6% of patients, chemotherapy in 45.0% and radiotherapy in 12.5%. The MDM's therapeutic decisions tended to follow the specialty of the referring physician; e.g. patients were likely to have surgery when referred by a surgeon, etc (p < 0.0001). Dermato-oncology MDM at Amiens University Hospital comply with most of the guidelines, however, patient attendance at MDM, participation of different specialists and the formal function and structure, all have room for improvement.

  9. Digitization and its discontents: future shock in predictive oncology.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard J

    2010-02-01

    Clinical cancer care is being transformed by a high-technology informatics revolution fought out between the forces of personalized (biomarker-guided) and depersonalized (bureaucracy-controlled) medicine. Factors triggering this conflict include the online proliferation of treatment algorithms, rising prices of biological drug therapies, increasing sophistication of genomic-based predictive tools, and the growing entrepreneurialism of offshore treatment facilities. The resulting Napster-like forces unleashed within the oncology marketplace will deliver incremental improvements in cost-efficacy to global healthcare consumers. There will also be a price to pay, however, as the rising wave of digitization encourages third-party payers to make more use of biomarkers for tightening reimbursement criteria. Hence, as in other digitally transformed industries, a new paradigm of professional service delivery-less centered on doctor-patient relationships than in the past, and more dependent on pricing and marketing for standardized biomarker-defined indications-seems set to emerge as the unpredicted deliverable from this brave new world of predictive oncology.

  10. Pelvic radiculopathies, lumbosacral plexopathies, and neuropathies in oncologic disease: a multidisciplinary approach to a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jonathan; Nisbet, Angus; Bloomfield, David; Burkill, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with the anatomy of the major pelvic nerves and the clinical features of associated lumbosacral plexopathies. To demonstrate this we illustrate several cases of malignant lumbosacral plexopathy on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A new lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with a prior history of abdominal or pelvic malignancy is usually of malignant etiology. Biopsies may be required to definitively differentiate tumour from posttreatment fibrosis, and in cases of inconclusive sampling or where biopsies are not possible, follow-up imaging may be necessary. In view of the complexity of clinical findings often confounded by a history of prior surgery and/or radiotherapy, a multidisciplinary approach between oncologists, neurologists, and radiologists is often required for what can be a diagnostic challenge. PMID:24433993

  11. Predictors of Treatment Decisions in Multidisciplinary Oncology Meetings: A Quantitative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Tayana; Lamb, Benjamin W; Sarkar, Somita; Arora, Sonal; Shah, Sujay; Darzi, Ara; Green, James S A; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-12-01

    In many healthcare systems, treatment recommendations for cancer patients are formulated by multidisciplinary tumor boards (MTBs). Evidence suggests that interdisciplinary contributions to case reviews in the meetings are unequal and information-sharing suboptimal, with biomedical information dominating over information on patient comorbidities and psychosocial factors. This study aimed to evaluate how different elements of the decision process affect the teams' ability to reach a decision on first case review. This was an observational quantitative assessment of 1045 case reviews from 2010 to 2014 in cancer MTBs using a validated tool, the Metric for the Observation of Decision-making. This tool allows evaluation of the quality of information presentation (case history, radiological, pathological, and psychosocial information, comorbidities, and patient views), and contribution to discussion by individual core specialties (surgeons, oncologists, radiologists, pathologists, and specialist cancer nurses). The teams' ability to reach a decision was a dichotomous outcome variable (yes/no). Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the significant positive predictors of the teams' ability to reach a decision were patient psychosocial information (odds ratio [OR] 1.35) and the inputs of surgeons (OR 1.62), radiologists (OR 1.48), pathologists (OR 1.23), and oncologists (OR 1.13). The significant negative predictors were patient comorbidity information (OR 0.83) and nursing inputs (OR 0.87). Multidisciplinary inputs into case reviews and patient psychosocial information stimulate decision making, thereby reinforcing the role of MTBs in cancer care in processing such information. Information on patients' comorbidities, as well as nursing inputs, make decision making harder, possibly indicating that a case is complex and requires more detailed review. Research should further define case complexity and determine ways to better integrate patient psychosocial

  12. [Targeted therapies, prognostic and predictive factors in endocrine oncology].

    PubMed

    Hescot, S; Baudin, E; Borson-Chazot, F; Lombès, M

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding of molecular mechanisms responsible for tumorigenesis has allowed the development of targeted drugs designed to improve the outcome of cancer. In endocrine tumors, several molecules have demonstrated efficacy in terms of progression free survival during phase III trials such as vandetanib and cabozantinib in medullary thyroid carcinoma, sorafenib in differentiated thyroid carcinoma and everolimus or sunitinib for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Rare cancer network has allowed ongoing phase III trials in malignant pheochromocytoma and adrenocortical carcinoma. However, to date no specific predictive biomarker has yet been identified for a personalized cancer medicine. We review recent advances in endocrine oncology concerning molecular targets identification, targeted therapies and predictive or prognostic markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The Experiences of Specialist Nurses Working Within the Uro-oncology Multidisciplinary Team in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Punshon, Geoffrey; Endacott, Ruth; Aslett, Phillippa; Brocksom, Jane; Fleure, Louisa; Howdle, Felicity; Masterton, Morven; O'Connor, Anita; Swift, Adrian; Trevatt, Paul; Leary, Alison

    United Kingdom prostate cancer nursing care is provided by a variety of urology and uro-oncology nurses. The experience of working in multidisciplinary teams (MDT) was investigated in a national study. The study consisted of a national survey with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A secondary analysis of a data subset from a UK whole population survey was undertaken (n = 285) of the specialist nursing workforce and the services they provide. Data were collected on the experience of working in the MDT. Forty-five percent of the respondents felt that they worked in a functional MDT, 12% felt that they worked in a dysfunctional MDT, and 3.5% found the MDT meeting intimidating. Furthermore, 34% of the nurses felt that they could constructively challenge all members of the MDT in meetings. Themes emerging from open-ended questions were lack of interest in nonmedical concerns by other team members, ability to constructively challenge decisions or views within the meeting, and little opportunity for patients' wishes to be expressed. Despite expertise and experience, nurses had a variable, often negative, experience of the MDT. It is necessary to ensure that all participants can contribute and are heard and valued. More emphasis should be given to patients' nonmedical needs.

  14. The Experiences of Specialist Nurses Working Within the Uro-oncology Multidisciplinary Team in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Geoffrey; Endacott, Ruth; Aslett, Phillippa; Brocksom, Jane; Fleure, Louisa; Howdle, Felicity; Masterton, Morven; O’Connor, Anita; Swift, Adrian; Trevatt, Paul; Leary, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: United Kingdom prostate cancer nursing care is provided by a variety of urology and uro-oncology nurses. The experience of working in multidisciplinary teams (MDT) was investigated in a national study. Design: The study consisted of a national survey with descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Methods: A secondary analysis of a data subset from a UK whole population survey was undertaken (n = 285) of the specialist nursing workforce and the services they provide. Data were collected on the experience of working in the MDT. Results: Forty-five percent of the respondents felt that they worked in a functional MDT, 12% felt that they worked in a dysfunctional MDT, and 3.5% found the MDT meeting intimidating. Furthermore, 34% of the nurses felt that they could constructively challenge all members of the MDT in meetings. Themes emerging from open-ended questions were lack of interest in nonmedical concerns by other team members, ability to constructively challenge decisions or views within the meeting, and little opportunity for patients’ wishes to be expressed. Conclusions: Despite expertise and experience, nurses had a variable, often negative, experience of the MDT. It is necessary to ensure that all participants can contribute and are heard and valued. More emphasis should be given to patients’ nonmedical needs. PMID:28594672

  15. Experiences of hospital-based multidisciplinary team meetings in oncology: An interview study among participating general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Belche, Jeanluc; Duchesnes, Christiane; Kohn, Laurence; Sercu, Marij; Deveugele, Myriam

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care has become complex, requiring healthcare professionals to collaborate to provide high-quality care. Multidisciplinary oncological team (MDT) meetings in the hospital have been implemented to coordinate individual cancer patients' care. General practitioners (GPs) are invited to join, but their participation is minimal. Aim of this study is to explore participating GPs' perceptions of their current role and to understand their preferences towards effective role execution during MDT meetings. In May to June 2014, semi-structured interviews (n = 16) were conducted involving GPs with MDT experience in Belgium. The analysis was done according to qualitative content analysis principles. Attendance of an MDT meeting is perceived as part of the GP's work, especially for complex patient care situations. Interprofessional collaborative relationships and the GP's perceived benefit to the MDT meeting discussions are important motivators to participate. Enhanced continuity of information flow and optimized organizational time management were practical aspects triggering the GP's intention to participate. GPs valued the communication with the patient before and after the meeting as an integral part of the MDT dynamics. GPs perceive attendance of the MDT meeting as an integral part of their job. Suggestions are made to enhance the efficiency of the meetings.

  16. The impact of multidisciplinary team meetings on patient assessment, management and outcomes in oncology settings: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Brindha; Wootten, Addie C; Crowe, Helen; Corcoran, Niall; Tran, Ben; Bowden, Patrick; Crowe, Jane; Costello, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Conducting regular multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings requires significant investment of time and finances. It is thus important to assess the empirical benefits of such practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the literature regarding the impact of MDT meetings on patient assessment, management and outcomes in oncology settings. Relevant studies were identified by searching OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE databases from 1995 to April 2015, using the keywords: multidisciplinary team meeting* OR multidisciplinary discussion* OR multidisciplinary conference* OR case review meeting* OR multidisciplinary care forum* OR multidisciplinary tumour board* OR case conference* OR case discussion* AND oncology OR cancer. Studies were included if they assessed measurable outcomes, and used a comparison group and/or a pre- and post-test design. Twenty-seven articles met inclusion criteria. There was limited evidence for improved survival outcomes of patients discussed at MDT meetings. Between 4% and 45% of patients discussed at MDT meetings experienced changes in diagnostic reports following the meeting. Patients discussed at MDT meetings were more likely to receive more accurate and complete pre-operative staging, and neo-adjuvant/adjuvant treatment. Quality of studies was affected by selection bias and the use of historical cohorts impacted study quality. MDT meetings impact upon patient assessment and management practices. However, there was little evidence indicating that MDT meetings resulted in improvements in clinical outcomes. Future research should assess the impact of MDT meetings on patient satisfaction and quality of life, as well as, rates of cross-referral between disciplines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Cancer Literature Reflect Multidisciplinary Practice? A Systematic Review of Oncology Studies in the Medical Literature Over a 20-Year Period

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Ahmed, Awad A.; Yoo, Stella K.; Jagsi, Reshma; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Quality cancer care is best delivered through a multidisciplinary approach requiring awareness of current evidence for all oncologic specialties. The highest impact journals often disseminate such information, so the distribution and characteristics of oncology studies by primary intervention (local therapies, systemic therapies, and targeted agents) were evaluated in 10 high-impact journals over a 20-year period. Methods and Materials: Articles published in 1994, 2004, and 2014 in New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Oncology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and European Journal of Surgical Oncology were identified. Included studies were prospectively conducted and evaluated a therapeutic intervention. Results: A total of 960 studies were included: 240 (25%) investigated local therapies, 551 (57.4%) investigated systemic therapies, and 169 (17.6%) investigated targeted therapies. More local therapy trials (n=185 [77.1%]) evaluated definitive, primary treatment than systemic (n=178 [32.3%]) or targeted therapy trials (n=38 [22.5%]; P<.001). Local therapy trials (n=16 [6.7%]) also had significantly lower rates of industry funding than systemic (n=207 [37.6%]) and targeted therapy trials (n=129 [76.3%]; P<.001). Targeted therapy trials represented 5 (2%), 38 (10.2%), and 126 (38%) of those published in 1994, 2004, and 2014, respectively (P<.001), and industry-funded 48 (18.9%), 122 (32.6%), and 182 (54.8%) trials, respectively (P<.001). Compared to publication of systemic therapy trial articles, articles investigating local therapy (odds ratio: 0.025 [95% confidence interval: 0.012-0.048]; P<.001) were less likely to be found in high-impact general medical journals. Conclusions: Fewer studies evaluating local therapies, such as surgery and radiation, are published in

  18. Does Cancer Literature Reflect Multidisciplinary Practice? A Systematic Review of Oncology Studies in the Medical Literature Over a 20-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Emma B; Ahmed, Awad A; Yoo, Stella K; Jagsi, Reshma; Hoffman, Karen E

    2015-07-15

    Quality cancer care is best delivered through a multidisciplinary approach requiring awareness of current evidence for all oncologic specialties. The highest impact journals often disseminate such information, so the distribution and characteristics of oncology studies by primary intervention (local therapies, systemic therapies, and targeted agents) were evaluated in 10 high-impact journals over a 20-year period. Articles published in 1994, 2004, and 2014 in New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Oncology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and European Journal of Surgical Oncology were identified. Included studies were prospectively conducted and evaluated a therapeutic intervention. A total of 960 studies were included: 240 (25%) investigated local therapies, 551 (57.4%) investigated systemic therapies, and 169 (17.6%) investigated targeted therapies. More local therapy trials (n=185 [77.1%]) evaluated definitive, primary treatment than systemic (n=178 [32.3%]) or targeted therapy trials (n=38 [22.5%]; P<.001). Local therapy trials (n=16 [6.7%]) also had significantly lower rates of industry funding than systemic (n=207 [37.6%]) and targeted therapy trials (n=129 [76.3%]; P<.001). Targeted therapy trials represented 5 (2%), 38 (10.2%), and 126 (38%) of those published in 1994, 2004, and 2014, respectively (P<.001), and industry-funded 48 (18.9%), 122 (32.6%), and 182 (54.8%) trials, respectively (P<.001). Compared to publication of systemic therapy trial articles, articles investigating local therapy (odds ratio: 0.025 [95% confidence interval: 0.012-0.048]; P<.001) were less likely to be found in high-impact general medical journals. Fewer studies evaluating local therapies, such as surgery and radiation, are published in high-impact oncology and medicine literature. Further

  19. Through a glass darkly: predicting the future of radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Peters, L J

    1995-01-15

    To position ourselves professionally for the inevitable transition to managed care demands serious self-appraisal. Like most procedural medical specialties, radiation oncology is currently ill prepared for a capitated system of payment. To prosper under capitation, we need to increase the utility of radiation therapy per unit cost. This can be achieved by making the following adaptive responses: (a) we must ensure that the needs of medical practice drive the use of costly technology and not vice versa; (b) we must subordinate firmly held beliefs and prejudices to solid scientific data and be prepared to modify our practice when more cost-effective alternative exist; and (c) we must be increasingly conscious of outcome, not process, in deciding among treatment options; and (d) we must acknowledge the need to prioritize the use of finite resources so that the maximum effort is expended on those who have the most to gain from treatment. These changes will permit us to develop guidelines for appropriate use of radiation therapy, and to demonstrate the excellent value of the service we can provide, which is the ultimate key to success. Though the future may at times seem bleak, we can shape it with our actions: the best way to predict the future is to create it.

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Multidisciplinary Cancer Management Course: Connecting Lives, Cancer Care, Education, and Compassion in Zimbabwe-A Pilot for Efforts of Sustainable Benefit?

    PubMed

    Ndarukwa, Sandra; Nyakabau, Anna Mary; Chagpar, Anees B; Raben, David; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Kadzatsa, Webster; Eaton, Vanessa J; Mafunda, Paida; Razis, Evangelia

    2017-08-01

    The burden of cancer in low- to middle-income countries is growing and is expected to rise dramatically while resources to manage this disease remain inadequate. All authorities for the management of cancer recommend multidisciplinary care. Educational efforts by international organizations to assist local professionals in caring for their patients tend to have a lasting impact because they empower local professionals and enhance their skills. A multidisciplinary cancer management course was designed by American Society of Clinical Oncology staff and local experts to provide a roadmap for cross-specialty interaction and coordination of care in Zimbabwe. The outcome of the course was measured through feedback obtained from participants and impact on local workforce. The cancer management course was relevant to daily practice and fostered long-lasting partnerships and collaborations. Furthermore, it resulted in a more motivated local workforce and strengthened existing multidisciplinary practices. Cancer care is in a critical state in low- to middle-income countries. Educational efforts and collaborative partnerships may provide a cost-effective strategy with sustainable benefits. A multidisciplinary approach to optimize therapy is desirable. Evaluation of the course impact after a period of 6 months to 1 year is needed to determine the sustainability and impact of such efforts.

  1. Brain Tumor Epidemiology - A Hub within Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology. Report on the 15th Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) Annual Meeting, Vienna, 2014.

    PubMed

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Lau, Ching C; Prayer, Daniela; Bauchet, Luc; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Capper, David; Fisher, Paul G; Kool, Marcel; Müller, Martin; Kros, Johan M; Kruchko, Carol; Wiemels, Joseph; Wrensch, Margaret; Danysh, Heather E; Zouaoui, Sonia; Heck, Julia E; Johnson, Kimberly J; Qi, Xiaoyang; O'Neill, Brian P; Afzal, Samina; Scheurer, Michael E; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Nousome, Darryl; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2015-01-01

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) is an open scientific forum, which fosters the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations. BTEC aims to develop a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors (http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/btec/). The 15th annual Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Meeting, hosted by the Austrian Societies of Neuropathology and Neuro-oncology, was held on September 9 - 11, 2014 in Vienna, Austria. The meeting focused on the central role of brain tumor epidemiology within multidisciplinary neuro-oncology. Knowledge of disease incidence, outcomes, as well as risk factors is fundamental to all fields involved in research and treatment of patients with brain tumors; thus, epidemiology constitutes an important link between disciplines, indeed the very hub. This was reflected by the scientific program, which included various sessions linking brain tumor epidemiology with clinical neuro-oncology, tissue-based research, and cancer registration. Renowned experts from Europe and the United States contributed their personal perspectives stimulating further group discussions. Several concrete action plans evolved for the group to move forward until next year's meeting, which will be held at the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, MN, USA.

  2. Integrating Anatomy Training into Radiation Oncology Residency: Considerations for Developing a Multidisciplinary, Interactive Learning Module for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation…

  3. Integrating Anatomy Training into Radiation Oncology Residency: Considerations for Developing a Multidisciplinary, Interactive Learning Module for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labranche, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Palma, David; D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir

    2015-01-01

    Radiation oncologists require an in-depth understanding of anatomical relationships for modern clinical practice, although most do not receive formal anatomy training during residency. To fulfill the need for instruction in relevant anatomy, a series of four multidisciplinary, interactive learning modules were developed for a cohort of radiation…

  4. Interaction prediction optimization in multidisciplinary design optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Meng, Debiao; Zhang, Xiaoling; Huang, Hong-Zhong; Wang, Zhonglai; Xu, Huanwei

    2014-01-01

    The distributed strategy of Collaborative Optimization (CO) is suitable for large-scale engineering systems. However, it is hard for CO to converge when there is a high level coupled dimension. Furthermore, the discipline objectives cannot be considered in each discipline optimization problem. In this paper, one large-scale systems control strategy, the interaction prediction method (IPM), is introduced to enhance CO. IPM is utilized for controlling subsystems and coordinating the produce process in large-scale systems originally. We combine the strategy of IPM with CO and propose the Interaction Prediction Optimization (IPO) method to solve MDO problems. As a hierarchical strategy, there are a system level and a subsystem level in IPO. The interaction design variables (including shared design variables and linking design variables) are operated at the system level and assigned to the subsystem level as design parameters. Each discipline objective is considered and optimized at the subsystem level simultaneously. The values of design variables are transported between system level and subsystem level. The compatibility constraints are replaced with the enhanced compatibility constraints to reduce the dimension of design variables in compatibility constraints. Two examples are presented to show the potential application of IPO for MDO.

  5. IL-8 predicts pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia at low risk for bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cost, Carrye R; Stegner, Martha M; Leonard, David; Leavey, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Despite a low bacteremia rate, pediatric oncology patients are frequently admitted for febrile neutropenia. A pediatric risk prediction model with high sensitivity to identify patients at low risk for bacteremia is not available. We performed a single-institution prospective cohort study of pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia to create a risk prediction model using clinical factors, respiratory viral infection, and cytokine expression. Pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia were enrolled between March 30, 2010 and April 1, 2011 and managed per institutional protocol. Blood samples for C-reactive protein and cytokine expression and nasopharyngeal swabs for respiratory viral testing were obtained. Medical records were reviewed for clinical data. Statistical analysis utilized mixed multiple logistic regression modeling. During the 12-month period, 195 febrile neutropenia episodes were enrolled. There were 24 (12%) episodes of bacteremia. Univariate analysis revealed several factors predictive for bacteremia, and interleukin (IL)-8 was the most predictive variable in the multivariate stepwise logistic regression. Low serum IL-8 predicted patients at low risk for bacteremia with a sensitivity of 0.9 and negative predictive value of 0.98. IL-8 is a highly sensitive predictor for patients at low risk for bacteremia. IL-8 should be utilized in a multi-institution prospective trial to assign risk stratification to pediatric patients admitted with febrile neutropenia.

  6. Evaluating the impact of an integrated multidisciplinary head & neck competency-based anatomy & radiology teaching approach in radiation oncology: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Leah; Jaswal, Jasbir; Chan, Francis; Johnson, Marjorie; Tay, Keng Yeow; Fung, Kevin; Palma, David

    2014-06-26

    Modern radiation oncology demands a thorough understanding of gross and cross-sectional anatomy for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Complex anatomic sites present challenges for learners and are not well-addressed in traditional postgraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team (MDT) based head-and-neck gross and radiologic anatomy program for radiation oncology trainees was developed, piloted, and empirically assessed for efficacy and learning outcomes. Four site-specific MDT head-and-neck seminars were implemented, each involving a MDT delivering didactic and case-based instruction, supplemented by cadaveric presentations. There was no dedicated contouring instruction. Pre- and post-testing were performed to assess knowledge, and ability to apply knowledge to the clinical setting as defined by accuracy of contouring. Paired analyses of knowledge pretests and posttests were performed by Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Fifteen post-graduate trainees participated. A statistically significant (p < 0.001) mean absolute improvement of 4.6 points (17.03%) was observed between knowledge pretest and posttest scores. Contouring accuracy was analyzed quantitatively by comparing spatial overlap of participants' pretest and posttest contours with a gold standard through the dice similarity coefficient. A statistically significant improvement in contouring accuracy was observed for 3 out of 20 anatomical structures. Qualitative and quantitative feedback revealed that participants were more confident at contouring and were enthusiastic towards the seminars. MDT seminars were associated with improved knowledge scores and resident satisfaction; however, increased gross and cross-sectional anatomic knowledge did not translate into improvements in contouring accuracy. Further research should evaluate the impact of hands-on contouring sessions in addition to dedicated instructional sessions to develop competencies.

  7. Evaluating the impact of an integrated multidisciplinary head & neck competency-based anatomy & radiology teaching approach in radiation oncology: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern radiation oncology demands a thorough understanding of gross and cross-sectional anatomy for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Complex anatomic sites present challenges for learners and are not well-addressed in traditional postgraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team (MDT) based head-and-neck gross and radiologic anatomy program for radiation oncology trainees was developed, piloted, and empirically assessed for efficacy and learning outcomes. Methods Four site-specific MDT head-and-neck seminars were implemented, each involving a MDT delivering didactic and case-based instruction, supplemented by cadaveric presentations. There was no dedicated contouring instruction. Pre- and post-testing were performed to assess knowledge, and ability to apply knowledge to the clinical setting as defined by accuracy of contouring. Paired analyses of knowledge pretests and posttests were performed by Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results Fifteen post-graduate trainees participated. A statistically significant (p < 0.001) mean absolute improvement of 4.6 points (17.03%) was observed between knowledge pretest and posttest scores. Contouring accuracy was analyzed quantitatively by comparing spatial overlap of participants’ pretest and posttest contours with a gold standard through the dice similarity coefficient. A statistically significant improvement in contouring accuracy was observed for 3 out of 20 anatomical structures. Qualitative and quantitative feedback revealed that participants were more confident at contouring and were enthusiastic towards the seminars. Conclusions MDT seminars were associated with improved knowledge scores and resident satisfaction; however, increased gross and cross-sectional anatomic knowledge did not translate into improvements in contouring accuracy. Further research should evaluate the impact of hands-on contouring sessions in addition to dedicated instructional sessions to develop competencies. PMID

  8. Will the presence of the patient at multidisciplinary meetings influence the decision in head and neck oncology management?

    PubMed

    Massoubre, Julie; Lapeyre, Michel; Pastourel, Rémy; Dupuch, Vincent; Biau, Julian; Dillies, Anne-Francoise; Mom, Thierry; Pereira, Bruno; Gilain, Laurent; Saroul, Nicolas

    2017-10-05

    Multidisciplinary team meetings (MTM) are essential in the choice of a therapeutic strategy in head and neck cancer. In many centres patients attend MTMs and are examined by the team. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the patient's presence on therapeutic decisions. Prospective study of 119 consecutive patients. Two therapeutic situations were compared: the therapeutic decision taken following discussion of the patient's file in the MTM (D1) and the therapeutic decision taken after examination of the patient during MTMs (D2). Concordance between the two situations was measured. Concordance between D1 and D2 was 97%. No factors likely to decrease concordance were identified. Decisions taken during MTMs were acted upon for 97% of the patients. The presence of the patient during MTMs is not essential if the files are thoroughly presented and discussed.

  9. The 2008 European School of Oncology inside track conference, "predictive modeling in prostate cancer".

    PubMed

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Scardino, Peter T; Denis, Louis

    2009-07-01

    The European School of Oncology (ESO) Inside Track Conference, "Predictive Modeling in Prostate Cancer," the first event ever dedicated to prediction in prostate cancer, was organized in collaboration with the Prostate Program of Milan National Cancer Institute and the American Italian Cancer Foundation in the wonderful scenario of the Excelsior Lido Hotel in Venice on April 17 through 19, 2008. More than 240 participants from 23 countries attended this 3-day conference, which convened an exceptional group of experts from all over the world whose presentations provided a framework for understanding the state of the art in predictive modeling of prostate cancer and displayed future research trends in the uro-oncologic community. Cancer 2009;115(13 suppl):3035-8. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  10. Lung nodules in pediatric oncology patients: a prediction rule for when to biopsy.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Zaria; Dickie, Belinda; Dasgupta, Roshni

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a prediction rule regarding the factors that most accurately predict the diagnosis of a malignancy in a lung nodule in the pediatric oncology patient. A retrospective review of pediatric oncology patients that underwent lung nodule resection between 1998 and 2007 was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to create a prediction rule. Fifty pediatric oncology patients underwent 21 thoracotomies and 48 thoracoscopies to resect discrete lung nodules seen on computed tomographic scans during workup for metastasis or routine surveillance. The mean nodule size was 10.43 ± 7.08 mm. The most significant predictors of malignancy in a nodule were peripheral location (odds ratio [OR], 9.1); size between 5 and 10 mm (OR, 2.78); location within the right lower lobe (OR, 2.43); and patients with osteosarcoma (OR, 10.8), Ewing sarcoma (OR, 3.05), or hepatocellular carcinoma (OR, 2.38). Lesions that are between 5 and 10 mm in size and peripherally located in patients with osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, or hepatocellular carcinoma are most likely to be malignant. Use of a prediction rule can help guide clinical practice by determining which patients should undergo surgical resection of lung nodules and which patients may be closely observed with continued radiologic studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of Modified Early Warning Score in predicting outcomes in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cooksley, Tim; Kitlowski, Emma; Haji-Michael, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Patients at risk of rapid deterioration and critical illness often have preceding changes in physiological parameters. Track and trigger systems, such as the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) used in the UK, have been demonstrated to have some utility in identifying these patients particularly among general medical and surgical patients. Assess the effectiveness of MEWS and the proposed (NHS Early Warning Score) in oncology patients. Identify the key physiological parameters that predict outcome in this cohort. We performed a retrospective analysis at a specialist oncology hospital in the North West of England. The data for 840 patients reviewed by the Outreach Team between April 2009 and January 2011 was analysed. The effectiveness of the MEWS in predicting Critical Care admission and 30 day mortality was assessed. Statistical analysis to identify the key physiological parameters in predicting these two outcomes was also performed. The MEWS score was statistically significant in predicting both outcome measures (CCU admission P = 0.037 and 30 day mortality P = 0.004). Respiratory rate (P = 0.0003/P = 0.0001) and temperature (P = 0.033/P ≤ 0.0001) were the key physiological variables in predicting clinical deterioration. Blood pressure (P = 0.999/P = 0.619) and pulse rate (P = 0.446/P = 0.051) did not have statistical significance in predicting either outcome. However, analysis of receiver operator curves showed that MEWS had poor value in predicting both outcomes (0.55 and 0.6, respectively). The currently used track and trigger systems have poor discriminatory value in identifying Oncological patients at risk of deterioration. An adapted score more focused upon the key predictive physiological parameters in this population needs to be developed to produce a more effective tool.

  12. Establishing physician to patient ratios and predicting workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology-oncology programs.

    PubMed

    Halton, Jacqueline M; Hand, Jack; Byron, Patricia; Strother, Douglas; Blanchette, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A Human Resources (HR) Committee of C17, the national network of Canadian academic pediatric hematology/oncology programs, obtained comprehensive data enabling analysis and planning for the physician workforce. This study establishes physician to patient ratios and predicts workforce needs for Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology programs. Over a 10-year period, six surveys were sent to the 17 pediatric tertiary care centers treating children with cancer and blood disorders. Data were obtained on physician demographics, full time equivalent (FTE) positions, and time spent in clinical, research, education, and administrative activities. Survey results were debated at the C17 national meetings to obtain consensus on workload ratios. Since 1999, the pediatric hematologist/oncologist workforce has increased from 71 FTE (43 oncology, 20 hematology, 8 BMT) to 109.5 FTE positions (69.7 oncology, 29.4 hematology, and 10.4 BMT). The median age of pediatric hematologists/oncologists increased from 46 years to 52 years and the male to female ratio changed from 1.8:1 to 0.9:1. The 2011 job profile showed the median time spent on activities was 60% clinical, 15% education, 15% research, and 10% administration. After assessing workload, models of care, and optimal physician FTE per program, the C17 HR Committee recommended a ratio of one oncologist per 15 newly diagnosed patients with malignancy and a ratio of one BMT physician per 15 transplants. For every 2.5 oncologists, a 1.0 hematologist is the minimum required. Physician staffing ratios for pediatric hematology/oncology programs have been established and should be adopted across Canadian academic institutions as a standard. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Patients' Non-Medical Characteristics Contribute to Collective Medical Decision-Making at Multidisciplinary Oncological Team Meetings.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Léa; Apostolidis, Thémis; Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Garciaz, Sylvain; Aurran, Thérèse; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of patients' non-medical characteristics to individual physicians' decision-making has attracted considerable attention, but little information is available on this topic in the context of collective decision-making. Medical decision-making at cancer centres is currently carried out using a collective approach, at MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) meetings. The aim of this study was to determine how patients' non-medical characteristics are presented at MDT meetings and how this information may affect the team's final medical decisions. Observations were conducted at a French Cancer Centre during MDT meetings at which non-standard cases involving some uncertainty were discussed from March to May 2014. Physicians' verbal statements and predefined contextual parameters were collected with a non-participant observational approach. Non numerical data collected in the form of open notes were then coded for quantitative analysis. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. In the final sample of patients' records included and discussed (N = 290), non-medical characteristics were mentioned in 32.8% (n = 95) of the cases. These characteristics corresponded to demographics in 22.8% (n = 66) of the cases, psychological data in 11.7% (n = 34), and relational data in 6.2% (n = 18). The patient's age and his/her "likeability" were the most frequently mentioned characteristics. In 17.9% of the cases discussed, the final decision was deferred: this outcome was positively associated with the patients' non-medical characteristics and with uncertainty about the outcome of the therapeutic options available. The design of the study made it difficult to draw definite cause-and-effect conclusions. The Social Representations approach suggests that patients' non-medical characteristics constitute a kind of tacit professional knowledge that may be frequently mobilised in physicians' everyday professional practice. The links observed between patients

  14. Patients’ Non-Medical Characteristics Contribute to Collective Medical Decision-Making at Multidisciplinary Oncological Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Restivo, Léa; Apostolidis, Thémis; Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Garciaz, Sylvain; Aurran, Thérèse; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of patients’ non-medical characteristics to individual physicians’ decision-making has attracted considerable attention, but little information is available on this topic in the context of collective decision-making. Medical decision-making at cancer centres is currently carried out using a collective approach, at MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) meetings. The aim of this study was to determine how patients’ non-medical characteristics are presented at MDT meetings and how this information may affect the team’s final medical decisions. Design Observations were conducted at a French Cancer Centre during MDT meetings at which non-standard cases involving some uncertainty were discussed from March to May 2014. Physicians’ verbal statements and predefined contextual parameters were collected with a non-participant observational approach. Non numerical data collected in the form of open notes were then coded for quantitative analysis. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Results In the final sample of patients’ records included and discussed (N = 290), non-medical characteristics were mentioned in 32.8% (n = 95) of the cases. These characteristics corresponded to demographics in 22.8% (n = 66) of the cases, psychological data in 11.7% (n = 34), and relational data in 6.2% (n = 18). The patient’s age and his/her “likeability” were the most frequently mentioned characteristics. In 17.9% of the cases discussed, the final decision was deferred: this outcome was positively associated with the patients’ non-medical characteristics and with uncertainty about the outcome of the therapeutic options available. Limitations The design of the study made it difficult to draw definite cause-and-effect conclusions. Conclusion The Social Representations approach suggests that patients’ non-medical characteristics constitute a kind of tacit professional knowledge that may be frequently mobilised in physicians

  15. Development and Validation of a Multidisciplinary Tool for Accurate and Efficient Rotorcraft Noise Prediction (MUTE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Diskin, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based, systematically coupled, multidisciplinary prediction tool (MUTE) for rotorcraft noise was developed and validated with a wide range of flight configurations and conditions. MUTE is an aggregation of multidisciplinary computational tools that accurately and efficiently model the physics of the source of rotorcraft noise, and predict the noise at far-field observer locations. It uses systematic coupling approaches among multiple disciplines including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD), and high fidelity acoustics. Within MUTE, advanced high-order CFD tools are used around the rotor blade to predict the transonic flow (shock wave) effects, which generate the high-speed impulsive noise. Predictions of the blade-vortex interaction noise in low speed flight are also improved by using the Particle Vortex Transport Method (PVTM), which preserves the wake flow details required for blade/wake and fuselage/wake interactions. The accuracy of the source noise prediction is further improved by utilizing a coupling approach between CFD and CSD, so that the effects of key structural dynamics, elastic blade deformations, and trim solutions are correctly represented in the analysis. The blade loading information and/or the flow field parameters around the rotor blade predicted by the CFD/CSD coupling approach are used to predict the acoustic signatures at far-field observer locations with a high-fidelity noise propagation code (WOPWOP3). The predicted results from the MUTE tool for rotor blade aerodynamic loading and far-field acoustic signatures are compared and validated with a variation of experimental data sets, such as UH60-A data, DNW test data and HART II test data.

  16. A newly introduced comprehensive consultation fee in the national health insurance system in Japan: a promotive effect of multidisciplinary medical care in the field of radiation oncology--results from a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Dokiya, Takushi; Nemoto, Kenji; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    The consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy was newly introduced in the national health insurance system in Japan in April 2012. We conducted a survey on the use of this consultation fee and its effect on clinical practices. The health insurance committee of the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology conducted a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire form was mailed to 160 councilors of the Society, the target questionees. A total of 94 answers (58% of the target questionees) sent back were used for analyses. The analyses revealed that 75% of the hospitals charged most of the patients who receive radiotherapy in an outpatient setting a consultation fee. The introduction of the consultation fee led to some changes in radiation oncology clinics, as evidenced by the response of 'more careful observations by medical staff' in 37% of questionees and a 12% increase in the number of full-time radiation oncology nurses. It was also shown that the vast majority (92%) of radiation oncologists expected a positive influence of the consultation fee on radiation oncology clinics in Japan. Our questionnaire survey revealed the present status of the use of a newly introduced consultation fee for outpatient radiotherapy, and the results suggested its possible effect on promoting a multidisciplinary medical care system in radiation oncology departments in Japan.

  17. Postoperative vomiting in pediatric oncologic patients: prediction by a fuzzy logic model.

    PubMed

    Bassanezi, Betina S B; de Oliveira-Filho, Antônio G; Jafelice, Rosana S M; Bustorff-Silva, Joaquim M; Udelsmann, Artur

    2013-01-01

    To report a fuzzy logic mathematical model to predict postoperative vomiting (POV) in pediatric oncologic patients and compare with preexisting scores. Although POV has a high incidence in children and may decrease parental satisfaction after surgeries, there is only one specific score that predicts POV in children: the Eberhart's score. In this study, we report a fuzzy model that intends to predict the probability of POV in pediatric oncologic patients. Fuzzy logic is a mathematical theory that recognizes more than simple true and false values and takes into account levels of continuous variables such as age or duration of the surgery. The fuzzy model tries to account for subjectiveness in the variables. Preoperative potential risk factors for POV in 198 children (0-19 year old) with malignancies were collected and analyzed. Data analysis was performed with the chi-square test and logistic regression to evaluate probable risk factors for POV. A system based on fuzzy logic was developed with the risk factors found in the logistic regression, and a computational interface was created to calculate the probability of POV. The model showed a good performance in predicting POV. After the analysis, the model was compared with Eberhart's score in the same population and showed a better performance. The fuzzy score can predict the chance of POV in children with cancer with good accuracy, allowing better planning for postoperative prophylaxis of vomiting. The computational interface is available for free download at the internet and is very easy to use. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Two-year experience of multi-disciplinary team (MDT) outcomes for brain metastases in a tertiary neuro-oncology centre.

    PubMed

    Loh, Daniel; Hogg, Florence; Edwards, Penelope; MacColl, Jillian; Brogna, Christian; Bhangoo, Ranjeev; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Vergani, Francesco

    2017-08-24

    Brain metastases (BMs) are the most common intracranial tumour in adults and form a significant proportion of the neuro-oncology workload. Their management has progressed significantly in the last few decades but a gold-standard evidence-based management strategy has not been defined to date and several guidelines based on available evidence exist to support clinical decision-making. This paper evaluates the decision-making process of the neuro-oncology multi-disciplinary team (MDT) in a tertiary neuro-oncology centre over a two-year period. A retrospective review of all patients with BM discussed in the MDT was conducted. Data on patient demographics, tumour characteristics and MDT decision were collected from the MDT database, clinical notes and imaging studies. Patients were stratified into the three recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes and according to the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) score. MDT decisions were analysed by RPA class and for GPA score as well as single versus multiple BM. There were 362 patients with BM, representing 22% of the total cases discussed at the MDT. Decision-making was largely consistent with available guidelines. A concrete treatment decision was reached in 77.5% of patients and 32.2% of these received neurosurgical input. More patients with solitary BM underwent surgery compared to multiple BM (p = 0.001), and more patients in RPA classes I and II had surgical resection compared to class III (p = 0.005 and 0.001, respectively). Surgical patients also had higher GPA scores compared to palliative patients (p = 0.005). A greater absolute number and proportion of patients in RPA class II vs. class I underwent neurosurgical intervention. These patients were stratified into class II because of their age but would otherwise have been placed into class I. Survival data were available for 195 patients (53.8%) at 1 year post MDT discussion. A pattern of declining survival was observed along RPA classes which was

  19. Population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling in oncology: a tool for predicting clinical response

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Brendan C; Schindler, Emilie; Friberg, Lena E

    2015-01-01

    In oncology trials, overall survival (OS) is considered the most reliable and preferred endpoint to evaluate the benefit of drug treatment. Other relevant variables are also collected from patients for a given drug and its indication, and it is important to characterize the dynamic effects and links between these variables in order to improve the speed and efficiency of clinical oncology drug development. However, the drug-induced effects and causal relationships are often difficult to interpret because of temporal differences. To address this, population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling and parametric time-to-event (TTE) models are becoming more frequently applied. Population PKPD and TTE models allow for exploration towards describing the data, understanding the disease and drug action over time, investigating relevance of biomarkers, quantifying patient variability and in designing successful trials. In addition, development of models characterizing both desired and adverse effects in a modelling framework support exploration of risk-benefit of different dosing schedules. In this review, we have summarized population PKPD modelling analyses describing tumour, tumour marker and biomarker responses, as well as adverse effects, from anticancer drug treatment data. Various model-based metrics used to drive PD response and predict OS for oncology drugs and their indications are also discussed. PMID:24134068

  20. Germline genetic testing to predict drug response and toxicity in oncology--reality or fiction?

    PubMed

    Soh, Thomas I P; Yong, Wei Peng

    2011-08-01

    In addition to 6-mercaptopurine, 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has recently recommended label change for tamoxifen, to include pharmacogenetic information on treatment outcome. With the increasing availability of pharmacogenetic testing, on germline as well as somatic mutations, oncologists are now able to identify individuals at risk of severe treatment toxicity or poor treatment response. However, there are still knowledge gaps to fill before rationalised therapy based on pharmacogenetics can be fully integrated into clinical practice. This review provides an overview on the application of pharmacogenetic testing for germ line mutations in oncology to predict response and toxicity.

  1. Guidelines for Developing and Reporting Machine Learning Predictive Models in Biomedical Research: A Multidisciplinary View.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Phung, Dinh; Tran, Truyen; Gupta, Sunil; Rana, Santu; Karmakar, Chandan; Shilton, Alistair; Yearwood, John; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Ho, Tu Bao; Venkatesh, Svetha; Berk, Michael

    2016-12-16

    As more and more researchers are turning to big data for new opportunities of biomedical discoveries, machine learning models, as the backbone of big data analysis, are mentioned more often in biomedical journals. However, owing to the inherent complexity of machine learning methods, they are prone to misuse. Because of the flexibility in specifying machine learning models, the results are often insufficiently reported in research articles, hindering reliable assessment of model validity and consistent interpretation of model outputs. To attain a set of guidelines on the use of machine learning predictive models within clinical settings to make sure the models are correctly applied and sufficiently reported so that true discoveries can be distinguished from random coincidence. A multidisciplinary panel of machine learning experts, clinicians, and traditional statisticians were interviewed, using an iterative process in accordance with the Delphi method. The process produced a set of guidelines that consists of (1) a list of reporting items to be included in a research article and (2) a set of practical sequential steps for developing predictive models. A set of guidelines was generated to enable correct application of machine learning models and consistent reporting of model specifications and results in biomedical research. We believe that such guidelines will accelerate the adoption of big data analysis, particularly with machine learning methods, in the biomedical research community.

  2. Guidelines for Developing and Reporting Machine Learning Predictive Models in Biomedical Research: A Multidisciplinary View

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background As more and more researchers are turning to big data for new opportunities of biomedical discoveries, machine learning models, as the backbone of big data analysis, are mentioned more often in biomedical journals. However, owing to the inherent complexity of machine learning methods, they are prone to misuse. Because of the flexibility in specifying machine learning models, the results are often insufficiently reported in research articles, hindering reliable assessment of model validity and consistent interpretation of model outputs. Objective To attain a set of guidelines on the use of machine learning predictive models within clinical settings to make sure the models are correctly applied and sufficiently reported so that true discoveries can be distinguished from random coincidence. Methods A multidisciplinary panel of machine learning experts, clinicians, and traditional statisticians were interviewed, using an iterative process in accordance with the Delphi method. Results The process produced a set of guidelines that consists of (1) a list of reporting items to be included in a research article and (2) a set of practical sequential steps for developing predictive models. Conclusions A set of guidelines was generated to enable correct application of machine learning models and consistent reporting of model specifications and results in biomedical research. We believe that such guidelines will accelerate the adoption of big data analysis, particularly with machine learning methods, in the biomedical research community. PMID:27986644

  3. Standardized data collection to build prediction models in oncology: a prototype for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Meldolesi, Elisa; van Soest, Johan; Damiani, Andrea; Dekker, Andre; Alitto, Anna Rita; Campitelli, Maura; Dinapoli, Nicola; Gatta, Roberto; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Lanzotti, Vito; Lambin, Philippe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The advances in diagnostic and treatment technology are responsible for a remarkable transformation in the internal medicine concept with the establishment of a new idea of personalized medicine. Inter- and intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and the clinical outcome and/or treatment's toxicity's complexity, justify the effort to develop predictive models from decision support systems. However, the number of evaluated variables coming from multiple disciplines: oncology, computer science, bioinformatics, statistics, genomics, imaging, among others could be very large thus making traditional statistical analysis difficult to exploit. Automated data-mining processes and machine learning approaches can be a solution to organize the massive amount of data, trying to unravel important interaction. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategy to collect and analyze data properly for decision support and introduce the concept of an 'umbrella protocol' within the framework of 'rapid learning healthcare'.

  4. Accuracy of a multidisciplinary team-led discussion in predicting postmastectomy radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dordea, M; Light, A; Serra, MP; Aspinall, SR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is performed increasingly following mastectomy for breast cancer. The literature suggests higher reconstructive failure and poorer cosmesis in the subgroup of patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following IBR. We set out to determine the accuracy of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion in predicting PMRT. Methods Preoperative MDT discussions were recorded prospectively over a 12-month period (from February 2011) in a symptomatic breast unit. The estimated need for PMRT was stratified into ‘PMRT not required’, ‘PMRT possibly required’, ‘PMRT probably required’ and ‘PMRT required’ groups. Results Of 156 referrals included in the study, 76 patients (49%) underwent mastectomy: 61 simple mastectomy, 10 skin sparing mastectomy (SSM) and delayed-immediate breast reconstruction, 3 SSM and implant-based IBR, and 2 mastectomy IBR with an autologous flap. The IBR rate was therefore 19.7%. The proportion of patients who received PMRT was 14% (3/21) in the ‘PMRT not required’, 30% (7/23) in the ‘PMRT possibly required’, 65% (9/14) in the ‘PMRT probably required’ and 94% (17/18) in the ‘PMRT required’ groups. Assigning a linear numerical score (1–4) to these groups (higher score representing greater likelihood of receiving PMRT), the predicted need for PMRT correlated with the proportion of patients who ultimately received PMRT (linear regression r2=0.98, p=0.01). Conclusions This study has examined the factors influencing MDT discussions regarding IBR, demonstrating that the MDT is reasonably accurate at predicting need for PMRT. Whether such accuracy is clinically adequate and/or reproducible across units is debatable. PMID:26263804

  5. The systematic early integration of palliative care into multidisciplinary oncology care in the hospital setting (IPAC), a randomized controlled trial: the study protocol.

    PubMed

    Vanbutsele, Gaëlle; Van Belle, Simon; De Laat, Martine; Surmont, Veerle; Geboes, Karen; Eecloo, Kim; Pardon, Koen; Deliens, Luc

    2015-12-15

    Previous studies in the US and Canada, have shown the positive impact of early palliative care programs for advanced cancer patients on quality of life (QoL) and even survival time. There has been a lack of similar research in Europe. In order to generalize the findings from the US and Canada research on a larger scale, similar studies are needed in different countries with different care settings. The aim of this paper is to describe the research protocol of a randomized controlled trial, situated in Flanders, Belgium, evaluating the effect of systematic early integration of palliative care in standard oncology care. A randomized controlled trial will be conducted as follows: 182 patients with advanced cancer will be recruited from the departments of Medical Oncology, Digestive Oncology and Thoracic Oncology of the Ghent University Hospital. The trial will randomize patients to either systematic early integration of palliative care in standard oncology care or standard oncology care alone. Patients and informal caregivers will be asked to fill out questionnaires on QoL, mood, illness understanding and satisfaction with care at baseline, 12 weeks and every six weeks thereafter. Other outcome measures are end-of-life care decisions and overall survival time. This trial will be the first randomized controlled trial in the Belgian health care setting to evaluate the effect of systematic early integration of palliative care for advanced cancer patients. The results will enable us to evaluate whether systematic early integration of palliative care has positive effects on QoL, mood and patient illness-understanding and which components of the intervention contribute to these effects. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01865396 , registered 24(th) of May, 2013.

  6. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. STUDY DESIGN. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. CONCLUSIONS. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials. PMID:8514498

  7. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    PubMed

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-06-01

    This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials.

  8. Education of trainees, training and fellowships for head and neck oncologic and surgical training in the UK: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Simo, R; Robson, A; Woodwards, B; Niblock, P; Matteucci, P

    2016-05-01

    Since the previous edition of these guidelines, significant changes have taken place in the training and assessment of surgeons and oncologists who treat patients with head and neck cancer. For those intending to become head and neck surgeons, a fellowship in head and neck surgery is virtually mandatory. This paper summarises the current career structure to specialise in head and neck oncology and surgery in the UK. Recommendation • Trainees applying for head and neck surgical oncology consultant posts should have completed additional training in the subspecialty.

  9. SU-F-P-20: Predicting Waiting Times in Radiation Oncology Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, A; Herrera, D; Hijal, T; Kildea, J; Hendren, L; Leung, A; Wainberg, J; Sawaf, M; Gorshkov, M; Maglieri, R; Keshavarz, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Waiting times remain one of the most vexing patient satisfaction challenges facing healthcare. Waiting time uncertainty can cause patients, who are already sick or in pain, to worry about when they will receive the care they need. These waiting periods are often difficult for staff to predict and only rough estimates are typically provided based on personal experience. This level of uncertainty leaves most patients unable to plan their calendar, making the waiting experience uncomfortable, even painful. In the present era of electronic health records (EHRs), waiting times need not be so uncertain. Extensive EHRs provide unprecedented amounts of data that can statistically cluster towards representative values when appropriate patient cohorts are selected. Predictive modelling, such as machine learning, is a powerful approach that benefits from large, potentially complex, datasets. The essence of machine learning is to predict future outcomes by learning from previous experience. The application of a machine learning algorithm to waiting time data has the potential to produce personalized waiting time predictions such that the uncertainty may be removed from the patient’s waiting experience. Methods: In radiation oncology, patients typically experience several types of waiting (eg waiting at home for treatment planning, waiting in the waiting room for oncologist appointments and daily waiting in the waiting room for radiotherapy treatments). A daily treatment wait time model is discussed in this report. To develop a prediction model using our large dataset (with more than 100k sample points) a variety of machine learning algorithms from the Python package sklearn were tested. Results: We found that the Random Forest Regressor model provides the best predictions for daily radiotherapy treatment waiting times. Using this model, we achieved a median residual (actual value minus predicted value) of 0.25 minutes and a standard deviation residual of 6.5 minutes

  10. Implementation of a Precision Pathology Program Focused on Oncology-Based Prognostic and Predictive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael J; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Personalized or precision medicine as a diagnostic and therapeutic paradigm was introduced some 10-15 years ago, with the advent of biomarker discovery as a mechanism for identifying prognostic and predictive attributes associated with treatment indication and outcome. While the concept is not new, the successful development and implementation of novel 'companion diagnostics', especially in oncology, continues to represent a significant challenge and is currently at the forefront of smart trial design and therapeutic choice. The ability to determine patient selection for a specific therapy has broad implications including better chances for a positive outcome, limited exposure to potentially toxic drugs and improved health economics. Importantly, a significant step in this paradigm is the role of predictive pathology or the accurate assessment of morphology at the microscopic level. In breast cancer, this has been most useful where histologic attributes such as the classification of tubular and cribriform carcinoma dictates surgery while neoadjuvant studies suggest that patients with lobular carcinoma are not likely to benefit from chemotherapy. The next level of 'personalized pathology' at the tissue-cellular level is the use of 'protein biomarker panels' to classify the disease process and ultimately drive tumor characterization and treatment. The following review article will focus on the evolution of predictive pathology from a subjective, 'opinion-based' approach to a quantitative science. In addition, we will discuss the individual components of the precise pathology platform including advanced image analysis, biomarker quantitation with mathematical modeling and the integration with fluid-based (i.e. blood, urine) analytics as drivers of next generation precise patient phenotyping.

  11. Precision Oncology: Identifying Predictive Biomarkers for the Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Parth K.; Farber, Nicholas J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of multiple new pharmaceutical agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has left physicians with several options for first- and second- line therapy. With limited head-to-head comparisons, however, there is a paucity of evidence to recommend the use of one agent over another. To address this knowledge gap, Voss et al. identified serum biomarkers from specimens collected during the RECORD-3 trial, a comparative study of first-line sunitinib versus first-line everolimus. Of the biomarkers identified, the 5 most strongly associated with first-line everolimus progression-free survival (PFS1L) were combined to form a composite biomarker score (CBS). The CBS was significantly associated with everolimus PFS1L in multivariate regression analysis. This study is an example of the additional value offered by a randomized trial with prospective biospecimen collection and a significant step towards identifying predictive biomarkers for the treatment of metastatic RCC. As further comparative trials are performed, it will be essential that biomarkers are appropriately identified and validated in order to further the goal of precision oncology. PMID:27540511

  12. A Review of Modeling Approaches to Predict Drug Response in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Model-based approaches have emerged as important tools for quantitatively understanding temporal relationships between drug dose, concentration, and effect over the course of treatment, and have now become central to optimal drug development and tailored drug treatment. In oncology, the therapeutic index of a chemotherapeutic drug is typically narrow and a full dose–response relationship is not available, often because of treatment failure. Noting the benefits of model-based approaches and the low therapeutic index of oncology drugs, in recent years, modeling approaches have been increasingly used to streamline oncologic drug development through early identification and quantification of dose–response relationships. With this background, this report reviews publications that used model-based approaches to evaluate drug treatment outcome variables in oncology therapeutics, ranging from tumor size dynamics to tumor/biomarker time courses and survival response. PMID:27873489

  13. A multiplex cytokine score for the prediction of disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qun; Shi, Shu-Wen; Zhao, Ning; Liao, Chan

    2013-11-01

    Although many inflammatory cytokines are prognostic in sepsis, the utility of cytokines in evaluating disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock was rarely studied. On the other hand, a single particular cytokine is far from ideal in guiding therapeutic intervention, but combination of multiple biomarkers improves the accuracy. In this prospective observational study, 111 episodes of septic shock in pediatric hematology/oncology patients were enrolled from 2006 through 2012. Blood samples were taken for inflammatory cytokine measurement by cytometric bead array (CBA) technology at the initial onset of septic shock. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in majority of patients, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were markedly increased in patients with high pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM2) score and non-survivors. All the four cytokines paralleled the PIM2 score and differentially correlated with hemodynamic disorder and fatal outcomes. The pediatric multiplex cytokine score (PMCS), which integrated the four cytokines into one score system, was related to hemodynamic disorder and mortality as well, but showed more powerful prediction ability than each of the four cytokines. PMCS was an independent predictive factor for fatal outcome, presenting similar discriminative power with PIM2, with accuracy of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.94). In conclusion, this study develops a cytokine scoring system based on CBA technique, which performs well in disease severity and fatality prediction in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

  14. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  15. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  16. Predicting ectotherm disease vector spread—benefits from multidisciplinary approaches and directions forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephanie Margarete; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of ectotherm disease vectors outside of their previous distribution area and the emergence of vector-borne diseases can be increasingly observed at a global scale and are accompanied by a growing number of studies which investigate the vast range of determining factors and their causal links. Consequently, a broad span of scientific disciplines is involved in tackling these complex phenomena. First, we evaluate the citation behaviour of relevant scientific literature in order to clarify the question "do scientists consider results of other disciplines to extend their expertise?" We then highlight emerging tools and concepts useful for risk assessment. Correlative models (regression-based, machine-learning and profile techniques), mechanistic models (basic reproduction number R 0) and methods of spatial regression, interaction and interpolation are described. We discuss further steps towards multidisciplinary approaches regarding new tools and emerging concepts to combine existing approaches such as Bayesian geostatistical modelling, mechanistic models which avoid the need for parameter fitting, joined correlative and mechanistic models, multi-criteria decision analysis and geographic profiling. We take the quality of both occurrence data for vector, host and disease cases, and data of the predictor variables into consideration as both determine the accuracy of risk area identification. Finally, we underline the importance of multidisciplinary research approaches. Even if the establishment of communication networks between scientific disciplines and the share of specific methods is time consuming, it promises new insights for the surveillance and control of vector-borne diseases worldwide.

  17. Predicting ectotherm disease vector spread--benefits from multidisciplinary approaches and directions forward.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephanie Margarete; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of ectotherm disease vectors outside of their previous distribution area and the emergence of vector-borne diseases can be increasingly observed at a global scale and are accompanied by a growing number of studies which investigate the vast range of determining factors and their causal links. Consequently, a broad span of scientific disciplines is involved in tackling these complex phenomena. First, we evaluate the citation behaviour of relevant scientific literature in order to clarify the question "do scientists consider results of other disciplines to extend their expertise?" We then highlight emerging tools and concepts useful for risk assessment. Correlative models (regression-based, machine-learning and profile techniques), mechanistic models (basic reproduction number R0) and methods of spatial regression, interaction and interpolation are described. We discuss further steps towards multidisciplinary approaches regarding new tools and emerging concepts to combine existing approaches such as Bayesian geostatistical modelling, mechanistic models which avoid the need for parameter fitting, joined correlative and mechanistic models, multi-criteria decision analysis and geographic profiling. We take the quality of both occurrence data for vector, host and disease cases, and data of the predictor variables into consideration as both determine the accuracy of risk area identification. Finally, we underline the importance of multidisciplinary research approaches. Even if the establishment of communication networks between scientific disciplines and the share of specific methods is time consuming, it promises new insights for the surveillance and control of vector-borne diseases worldwide.

  18. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  19. Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO): A Web-based Omics Analysis Tool for Clinical Phenotype Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Fitzpatrick, Michael R; Pappas, Luke; Chan, Warren; Kung, Jessica; Snyder, Michael

    2017-09-12

    Precision oncology is an approach that accounts for individual differences to guide cancer management. Omics signatures have been shown to predict clinical traits for cancer patients. However, the vast amount of omics information poses an informatics challenge in systematically identifying patterns associated with health outcomes, and no general-purpose data-mining tool exists for physicians, medical researchers, and citizen scientists without significant training in programming and bioinformatics. To bridge this gap, we built the Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO), a web-based system to mine the quantitative omics information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This system effectively visualizes patients' clinical profiles, executes machine-learning algorithms of choice on the omics data, and evaluates the prediction performance using held-out test sets. With this tool, we successfully identified genes strongly associated with tumor stage, and accurately predicted patients' survival outcomes in many cancer types, including mesothelioma and adrenocortical carcinoma. By identifying the links between omics and clinical phenotypes, this system will facilitate omics studies on precision cancer medicine and contribute to establishing personalized cancer treatment plans. This web-based tool is available at http://tinyurl.com/oasispro ;source codes are available at http://tinyurl.com/oasisproSourceCode .

  20. The organisation of head and neck oncology services in the UK: The Royal College of Surgeons of England and British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists' preliminary multidisciplinary head and neck oncology audit.

    PubMed

    Birchall, Martin; Brown, Peter M; Browne, John

    2003-05-01

    This study was a collaboration between The Royal College of Surgeons of England Clinical Effectiveness Unit and the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists (BAHNO). We created a multidisciplinary database through an enquiry to all 49 UK radiotherapy centres. A questionnaire audit identified teams and individuals in the UK involved with treatment of head and neck cancer. A questionnaire on their organisation, and intentions for change was sent to the 108 teams (90% response) and 11 sole practitioners (45% response) identified. Overall, 335 surgical consultants were involved in the treatment of 7500 cases per annum, with large variations in size of catchment populations served by teams. Mean length of time spent with each out-patient was 11 min. Of respondents, 58% were already using the BAHNO basic dataset and more indicated intention to use it, but only 32% could actually deliver information on their work-load. More computerisation of data collection is essential, and national audit may bridge the data gap.

  1. The organisation of head and neck oncology services in the UK: The Royal College of Surgeons of England and British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists' preliminary multidisciplinary head and neck oncology audit.

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, Martin; Brown, Peter M.; Browne, John

    2003-01-01

    This study was a collaboration between The Royal College of Surgeons of England Clinical Effectiveness Unit and the British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists (BAHNO). We created a multidisciplinary database through an enquiry to all 49 UK radiotherapy centres. A questionnaire audit identified teams and individuals in the UK involved with treatment of head and neck cancer. A questionnaire on their organisation, and intentions for change was sent to the 108 teams (90% response) and 11 sole practitioners (45% response) identified. Overall, 335 surgical consultants were involved in the treatment of 7500 cases per annum, with large variations in size of catchment populations served by teams. Mean length of time spent with each out-patient was 11 min. Of respondents, 58% were already using the BAHNO basic dataset and more indicated intention to use it, but only 32% could actually deliver information on their work-load. More computerisation of data collection is essential, and national audit may bridge the data gap. PMID:12831485

  2. Biopsies in oncology.

    PubMed

    de Bazelaire, C; Coffin, A; Cohen, S; Scemama, A; de Kerviler, E

    2014-01-01

    Imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies in patients in oncology provide an accurate diagnosis of malignant tumors. Percutaneous biopsy results are improved by correct use of sampling procedures. The risks of percutaneous biopsy are low and its complications are generally moderate. These risks can be reduced using aids such as blund tip introducers, hydrodissection and correct patient positioning. The multidisciplinary team meetings dialogue between oncologist, surgeon and radiologist correctly defines the indications in order to improve the treatment strategies.

  3. Identification of an N staging system that predicts oncologic outcome in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated which N staging system was the most accurate at predicting survival in pancreatic cancer patients. Lymph node (LN) metastasis is known to be one of the important prognostic factors in resected pancreatic cancer. There are several LN evaluation systems to predict oncologic impact. From January 1992 to December 2014, 77 medical records of patients who underwent radical pancreatectomy for left-sided pancreatic cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Clinicopathologic variables including pN stage, total number of retrieved LNs (N-RLN), lymph node ratio (LNR), and absolute number of LN metastases (N-LNmet) were evaluated. Disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed according to these 4 LN staging systems. In univariate analysis, pN stage (pN0 vs pN1: 17.5 months vs 7.9 months, P = 0.001), LNR (<0.08 vs ≥0.08: 17.5 months vs 4.4 months, P < 0.001), and N-LNmet (#N = 0 vs #N = 1 vs #N≥2: 17.5 months vs 11.0 months vs 6.4 months, P = 0.002) had a significant effect on DFS, whereas the pN stage (pN0 vs pN1: 35.3 months vs 16.7 months, P = 0.001), LNR (<0.08 vs ≥0.08: 37.1 months vs 15.0 months, P < 0.001), and N-LNmet (#N = 0 vs #N = 1 vs #N≥2: 35.3 months vs 18.4 months vs 16.4 months, P = 0.001) had a significant effect on DSS. In multivariate analysis, N-LNmet (#N≥2) was identified as an independent prognostic factor of oncologic outcome (DFS and DSS: Exp (β) = 2.83, P = 0.001, and Exp (β) = 3.17, P = 0.001, respectively). Absolute number of lymph node metastases predicted oncologic outcome in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:27368029

  4. Medical Knowledge Assessment by Hematology and Medical Oncology In-Training Examinations Are Better Than Program Director Assessments at Predicting Subspecialty Certification Examination Performance.

    PubMed

    Collichio, Frances A; Hess, Brian J; Muchmore, Elaine A; Duhigg, Lauren; Lipner, Rebecca S; Haist, Steven; Hawley, Janine L; Morrison, Carol A; Clayton, Charles P; Raymond, Marilyn J; Kayoumi, Karen M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires training programs to demonstrate that fellows are achieving competence in medical knowledge (MK), as part of a global assessment of clinical competency. Passing American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examinations is recognized as a metric of MK competency. This study examines several in-training MK assessment approaches and their ability to predict performance on the ABIM Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Results of a Hematology In-Service Examination (ISE) and an Oncology In-Training Examination (ITE), program director (PD) ratings, demographic variables, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), and ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) Certification Examination were compared. Stepwise multiple regression and logistic regression analyses evaluated these assessment approaches as predictors of performance on the Hematology or Medical Oncology Certification Examinations. Hematology ISE scores were the strongest predictor of Hematology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.41) (passing odds ratio [OR], 1.012; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.008-1.015), and the Oncology ITE scores were the strongest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.45) (passing OR, 1.013; 95 % CI, 1.011-1.016). PD rating of MK was the weakest predictor of Medical Oncology Certification Examination scores (β = 0.07) and was not significantly predictive of Hematology Certification Examination scores. Hematology and Oncology ITEs are better predictors of certification examination performance than PD ratings of MK, reinforcing the effectiveness of ITEs for competency-based assessment of MK.

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification.

    PubMed

    Kamps, Rick; Brandão, Rita D; Bosch, Bianca J van den; Paulussen, Aimee D C; Xanthoulea, Sofia; Blok, Marinus J; Romano, Andrea

    2017-01-31

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing in Oncology: Genetic Diagnosis, Risk Prediction and Cancer Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Rick; Brandão, Rita D.; van den Bosch, Bianca J.; Paulussen, Aimee D. C.; Xanthoulea, Sofia; Blok, Marinus J.; Romano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has expanded in the last decades with significant improvements in the reliability, sequencing chemistry, pipeline analyses, data interpretation and costs. Such advances make the use of NGS feasible in clinical practice today. This review describes the recent technological developments in NGS applied to the field of oncology. A number of clinical applications are reviewed, i.e., mutation detection in inherited cancer syndromes based on DNA-sequencing, detection of spliceogenic variants based on RNA-sequencing, DNA-sequencing to identify risk modifiers and application for pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, cancer somatic mutation analysis, pharmacogenetics and liquid biopsy. Conclusive remarks, clinical limitations, implications and ethical considerations that relate to the different applications are provided. PMID:28146134

  7. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  8. Educating medical students about radiation oncology: initial results of the oncology education initiative.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Singh, Deeptej; Ozonoff, Al; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2007-10-01

    Multidisciplinary cancer care requires the integration of teaching across established educational boundaries. Because exposure to oncology and radiation oncology is limited in the undergraduate medical curriculum, the authors introduced an oncology education initiative at their institution. They report on the addition of structured multidisciplinary oncology education to the required radiology core clerkship. An institutional-based cohort study of fourth-year medical students rotating through a required clerkship in radiology at Boston University School of Medicine was conducted, beginning with the class of 2007. An educational questionnaire measuring the perceived quality of oncology education before and after exposure to a structured didactic program was administered. Of the 149 fourth-year students, 121 (81%) have completed the didactics of the initiative. Although 68 of 121 (56%) students reported having limited exposure to cancer care in the clinical years, 107 of 121 (88%) were motivated to learn more about the subject, and 100 of 121 (83%) reported a better understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of cancer care after this oncology education initiative. One hundred ten of 121 (91%) felt that the radiology clerkship was an opportune time to receive oncology and radiation oncology teaching. As a result of the initiative, 32% of the students pursued advanced training in radiation oncology. Of students who before the initiative were not planning on taking oncology electives, 70 of 99 (71%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to learn more about the subject, and 43 of 99 (43%) agreed or strongly agreed that the lecture motivated them to take oncology electives. Systematic exposure to multidisciplinary oncology education as part of a radiology core clerkship provides an excellent opportunity for the integrated teaching of oncologic principles and patient management. This type of experience addresses an important yet underrepresented

  9. Estimating glomerular filtration rate in oncology patients receiving Cisplatin chemotherapy: Predicted creatinine clearance against 99mTc-DTPA methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaidah Syed Sahab, Sharifah; Manap, Mahayuddin; Hamzah, Fadzilah

    2017-05-01

    The therapeutic potential of cisplatin as the best anticancer treatment for solid tumor is limited by its potential nephrotoxicity. This study analyses the incidence of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in oncology patients through GFR estimation using 99mTc-DTPA plasma sampling (reference method) and to compare with predicted creatinine clearance and Tc-99m renal scintigraphy. A prospective study of 33 oncology patients referred for GFR estimation in Penang Hospital. The incidence of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity was analysed via radionuclide and creatinine based method. Of 33 samples, only 21 selected for the study. The dose of cisplatin given was 75 mg/m2 for each cycle. The mean difference of GFR pre and post chemotherapy (PSC 2) was 13.38 (-4.60, 31.36) ml/min/1.73m2 (p 0.136). Of 21 patients, 3 developed severe nephrotoxicity (GFR < 50ml/min/1.73 m2) contributing 14.3% of incidence. Bland-Altman plot showed only PSC 1 is in agreement with PSC 2 technique. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) also showed that PSC 1 has high degree of reliability in comparison to PSC 2 (p < 0.001). The other methods do not show reliability and agreement in comparison to PSC 2 (p < 0.05). 3 of 21 patients (14.3%) developed severe nephrotoxicity post cisplatin chemotherapy. This percentage is much less than the reported 20 - 25% of cases from other studies, probably due to small sample size and biased study population due to strict exclusion criteria. Radionuclide method for evaluating GFR is the most sensitive method for the detection of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity by showing 3 of 21 patients developing severe nephrotoxicity. PSC 1 was found to be a reliable substitute of PSC 2. The other methods are not reliable for detection of early nephrotoxicity. We will recommend the use of single plasma sampling method (PSC 1) for GFR estimation in monitoring post cisplatin chemotherapy patients.

  10. Computational prediction of multidisciplinary team decision-making for adjuvant breast cancer drug therapies: a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank P Y; Pokorny, Adrian; Teng, Christina; Dear, Rachel; Epstein, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are used to optimise expert decision-making about treatment options, but such expertise is not digitally transferable between centres. To help standardise medical decision-making, we developed a machine learning model designed to predict MDT decisions about adjuvant breast cancer treatments. We analysed MDT decisions regarding adjuvant systemic therapy for 1065 breast cancer cases over eight years. Machine learning classifiers with and without bootstrap aggregation were correlated with MDT decisions (recommended, not recommended, or discussable) regarding adjuvant cytotoxic, endocrine and biologic/targeted therapies, then tested for predictability using stratified ten-fold cross-validations. The predictions so derived were duly compared with those based on published (ESMO and NCCN) cancer guidelines. Machine learning more accurately predicted adjuvant chemotherapy MDT decisions than did simple application of guidelines. No differences were found between MDT- vs. ESMO/NCCN- based decisions to prescribe either adjuvant endocrine (97%, p = 0.44/0.74) or biologic/targeted therapies (98%, p = 0.82/0.59). In contrast, significant discrepancies were evident between MDT- and guideline-based decisions to prescribe chemotherapy (87%, p < 0.01, representing 43% and 53% variations from ESMO/NCCN guidelines, respectively). Using ten-fold cross-validation, the best classifiers achieved areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.940 for chemotherapy (95% C.I., 0.922-0.958), 0.899 for the endocrine therapy (95% C.I., 0.880-0.918), and 0.977 for trastuzumab therapy (95% C.I., 0.955-0.999) respectively. Overall, bootstrap aggregated classifiers performed better among all evaluated machine learning models. A machine learning approach based on clinicopathologic characteristics can predict MDT decisions about adjuvant breast cancer drug therapies. The discrepancy between MDT- and guideline-based decisions

  11. Organisational design for an integrated oncological department

    PubMed Central

    Meiss-de Haas, Ch.L.; Falkmann, H.; Douma, J.; van Gassel, J.G.; Peters, W.G.; van Mierlo, R.; van Turnhout, J.M.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Objective The outcomes of a Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threat (SWOT) analysis of three Integrated Oncological Departments were compared with their present situation three years later to define factors that can influence a successful implementation and development of an Integrated Oncological Department in- and outside (i.e. home care) the hospital. Research design Comparative Qualitative Case Study. Methods Auditing based on care-as-usual norms by an external, experienced auditing committee. Research setting Integrated Oncological Departments of three hospitals. Results Successful multidisciplinary care in an integrated, oncological department needs broad support inside the hospital and a well-defined organisational plan. PMID:16896411

  12. Weight change during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy predicts obesity: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Withycombe, Janice S; Smith, Lynette M; Meza, Jane L; Merkle, Carrie; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia; Ritter, Leslie; Seibel, Nita L; Moore, Ki

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a well documented problem associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with increasing body mass index often observed during therapy. This study aims to evaluate if weight gain, early in therapy, is predictive of obesity at the end of treatment. In this secondary analysis, data from 1,017 high-risk ALL patients previously treated on a Children's Oncology Group protocol (CCG study 1961) were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to examine whether change in BMI z-score at Induction or Delayed Intensification (DI) 1 were predictive of obesity at the end of therapy. The BMI z-score at the beginning of Induction and the change in BMI z-score during Induction were both significant predictors of obesity at the end of therapy. The change in BMI z-score during cycle 1 of DI was not found to be associated with obesity. It is well know that obesity at the beginning of therapy is predictive of obesity at the end of ALL therapy. The new, and more important, finding from this study is that even after adjusting for baseline weight, the increase in BMI z-scores during induction was an independent predictor of obesity at the end of therapy. Most researchers agree that prevention is the best form of treatment for obesity as it is difficult to reverse once it is present. This study suggests that monitoring weight trends during Induction may be useful in guiding healthcare practitioners in identifying which patients are at highest risk for obesity development so that early intervention may occur. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  14. Computational oncology.

    PubMed

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  15. Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, James M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Dunnick, N. Reed; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2011-02-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring 'Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology.' Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia.

  16. Imaging opportunities in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Balter, James M; Haffty, Bruce G; Dunnick, N Reed; Siegel, Eliot L

    2011-02-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring "Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology." Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The AFHSC-Division of GEIS Operations Predictive Surveillance Program: a multidisciplinary approach for the early detection and response to disease outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System Operations (AFHSC-GEIS) initiated a coordinated, multidisciplinary program to link data sets and information derived from eco-climatic remote sensing activities, ecologic niche modeling, arthropod vector, animal disease-host/reservoir, and human disease surveillance for febrile illnesses, into a predictive surveillance program that generates advisories and alerts on emerging infectious disease outbreaks. The program’s ultimate goal is pro-active public health practice through pre-event preparedness, prevention and control, and response decision-making and prioritization. This multidisciplinary program is rooted in over 10 years experience in predictive surveillance for Rift Valley fever outbreaks in Eastern Africa. The AFHSC-GEIS Rift Valley fever project is based on the identification and use of disease-emergence critical detection points as reliable signals for increased outbreak risk. The AFHSC-GEIS predictive surveillance program has formalized the Rift Valley fever project into a structured template for extending predictive surveillance capability to other Department of Defense (DoD)-priority vector- and water-borne, and zoonotic diseases and geographic areas. These include leishmaniasis, malaria, and Crimea-Congo and other viral hemorrhagic fevers in Central Asia and Africa, dengue fever in Asia and the Americas, Japanese encephalitis (JE) and chikungunya fever in Asia, and rickettsial and other tick-borne infections in the U.S., Africa and Asia. PMID:21388561

  18. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bosscher, Marianne R F; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2015-01-01

    For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  19. Multidisciplinary optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.; Lewis, R.M.; Cramer, E.J.; Frank, P.M.; Shubin, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    This talk will use aeroelastic design and reservoir characterization as examples to introduce some approaches to MDO, or Multidisciplinary Optimization. This problem arises especially in engineering design, where it is considered of paramount importance in today`s competitive global business climate. It is interesting to an optimizer because the constraints involve coupled dissimilar systems of parameterized partial differential equations each arising from a different discipline, like structural analysis, computational fluid dynamics, etc. Usually, these constraints are accessible only through pde solvers rather than through algebraic residual calculations as we are used to having. Thus, just finding a multidisciplinary feasible point is a daunting task. Many such problems have discrete variable disciplines, multiple objectives, and other challenging features. After discussing some interesting practical features of the design problem, we will give some standard ways to formulate the problem as well as some novel ways that lend themselves to divide-and-conquer parallelism.

  20. Patient and practice characteristics predict the frequency of general practice multidisciplinary referrals of patients with chronic diseases: a multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mark F; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Chan, Bibiana C; Proudfoot, Judy; Crookes, Patrick; Zwar, Nick; Powell Davies, Gawaine

    2011-07-01

    Chronic diseases require a multidisciplinary approach to provide optimal patient care in general practice. In Australian general practice, this usually involves referral to an allied health provider outside the practice. This study explored the patient and practice factors associated with referral of patients with diabetes, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or hypertension to external allied health providers (AHPs). A multilevel analysis of data collected as part of a quasi-experimental study was conducted in 26 practices in Sydney. The frequency of patient-reported referral to AHPs 6-months post-intervention was measured against patient and practice characteristics assessed by patients and practice staff questionnaires. Seven per cent of the total variance in the referrals was due to differences between practices and 93% attributed to differences between patients. Previous referral, age over 45 years, multiple conditions, longer illness duration, poor mental and physical health were associated with the likelihood of referral to AHPs but not socio-economic status, patient self-assessment of care and the intervention. Those attending practices with over three GPs were more likely to be referred. Referral to multidisciplinary care for patients with long term conditions was appropriately linked to the complexity, duration and impact of these conditions. The lack of association between the intervention and the frequency of referral suggests that factors other than knowledge and communication such as the accessibility of the allied health services may have been more important in determining referral. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Galen's oncology].

    PubMed

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  2. Role of culture of postoperative drainage fluid in the prediction of infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Candau-Alvarez, A; Linares-Sicilia, M J; Dean-Ferrer, A; Pérez-Navero, J L

    2015-02-01

    Infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck increases mortality and morbidity. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to assess the efficacy of culturing the exudate from the drain after cervical neck dissection to see if it predicted such infection. We studied 40/112 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who were treated during the last two years and met our inclusion criteria. Six patients developed infections (15%). Reconstruction with pedicled rather than local or microvascular flaps, duration of operation of over 7 hours, the presence of a tracheostomy, and bilateral neck dissection were considered risk factors (p=0.01). Culture of drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 that grew no pathogens predicted that the site would not become infected, with a negative predictive value of 96%. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multisite external validation of a risk prediction model for the diagnosis of blood stream infections in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Zhao, Zhiguo; Aftandilian, Catherine; Saab, Raya; Wattier, Rachel L; Beauchemin, Melissa; Miller, Tamara P; Wilkes, Jennifer J; Kelly, Michael J; Fernbach, Alison; Jeng, Michael; Schwartz, Cindy L; Dvorak, Christopher C; Shyr, Yu; Moons, Karl G M; Sulis, Maria-Luisa; Friedman, Debra L

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are at an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection due to immunosuppression. The risk of such infection in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count ≥ 500/μL) is not well established and a validated prediction model for blood stream infection (BSI) risk offers clinical usefulness. A 6-site retrospective external validation was conducted using a previously published risk prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia: the Esbenshade/Vanderbilt (EsVan) model. A reduced model (EsVan2) excluding 2 less clinically reliable variables also was created using the initial EsVan model derivative cohort, and was validated using all 5 external validation cohorts. One data set was used only in sensitivity analyses due to missing some variables. From the 5 primary data sets, there were a total of 1197 febrile episodes and 76 episodes of bacteremia. The overall C statistic for predicting bacteremia was 0.695, with a calibration slope of 0.50 for the original model and a calibration slope of 1.0 when recalibration was applied to the model. The model performed better in predicting high-risk bacteremia (gram-negative or Staphylococcus aureus infection) versus BSI alone, with a C statistic of 0.801 and a calibration slope of 0.65. The EsVan2 model outperformed the EsVan model across data sets with a C statistic of 0.733 for predicting BSI and a C statistic of 0.841 for high-risk BSI. The results of this external validation demonstrated that the EsVan and EsVan2 models are able to predict BSI across multiple performance sites and, once validated and implemented prospectively, could assist in decision making in clinical practice. Cancer 2017;123:3781-3790. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Predicting oncologic outcomes by stratifying mesorectal extension in patients with pT3 rectal cancer: a Japanese multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Yoshito; Shirouzu, Kazuo; Fujita, Shin; Ueno, Hideki; Takii, Yasumasa; Komori, Koji; Ito, Masaaki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the clinical significance of mesorectal extension in pT3 rectal cancer. This currently remains unclear. Data from 975 consecutive patients with pT3 rectal cancer that underwent curative surgery at 28 institutes were reviewed. The distance of the mesorectal extension (DME) was measured histologically. The optimal prognostic cut-off point of the DME for oncologic outcomes was determined using the receiver operating characteristic curve and Cox regression analysis. When patients were subdivided into two groups according to the optimal cut-off point, DME≤4 mm and DME>4 mm, DME was found to be a powerful independent risk factor for postoperative recurrence. A DME>4 mm was significantly correlated with distant and local recurrences at Stage IIA and IIIB diseases. The recurrence-free 5-year-survival rate was significantly higher in patients with a DME≤4 mm [86.6% at Stage IIA (p=0.00015), and 68.7% at Stage IIIB (p<0.0001)] than in patients with a DME>4 mm (71.3% at Stage IIA and 49.1% at Stage IIIB). No significant difference was noted in the oncologic outcomes between the two groups at Stage IIIC. A value of 4 mm provides the best prognostic cut-off point for patient stratification and for the prediction of oncologic outcomes. A subclassification based on a 4-mm cut-off point may improve the utility of the TNM 7th staging system except for Stage IIIC. These findings warrant further prospective studies to determine the reliability and validity of this cut-off point. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  5. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  6. A text-based data mining and toxicity prediction modeling system for a clinical decision support in radiation oncology: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cao, Yuan Jie

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is an integrated research for text-based data mining and toxicity prediction modeling system for clinical decision support system based on big data in radiation oncology as a preliminary research. The structured and unstructured data were prepared by treatment plans and the unstructured data were extracted by dose-volume data image pattern recognition of prostate cancer for research articles crawling through the internet. We modeled an artificial neural network to build a predictor model system for toxicity prediction of organs at risk. We used a text-based data mining approach to build the artificial neural network model for bladder and rectum complication predictions. The pattern recognition method was used to mine the unstructured toxicity data for dose-volume at the detection accuracy of 97.9%. The confusion matrix and training model of the neural network were achieved with 50 modeled plans (n = 50) for validation. The toxicity level was analyzed and the risk factors for 25% bladder, 50% bladder, 20% rectum, and 50% rectum were calculated by the artificial neural network algorithm. As a result, 32 plans could cause complication but 18 plans were designed as non-complication among 50 modeled plans. We integrated data mining and a toxicity modeling method for toxicity prediction using prostate cancer cases. It is shown that a preprocessing analysis using text-based data mining and prediction modeling can be expanded to personalized patient treatment decision support based on big data.

  7. Degree of hydronephrosis predicts adverse pathological features and worse oncologic outcomes in patients with high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Chung, Paul H; Krabbe, Laura-Maria; Darwish, Oussama M; Westerman, Mary E; Bagrodia, Aditya; Gayed, Bishoy A; Haddad, Ahmed Q; Kapur, Payal; Sagalowsky, Arthur I; Lotan, Yair; Margulis, Vitaly

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate degree of hydronephrosis (HN) as a surrogate for adverse pathological features and oncologic outcomes in patients with high-grade (HG) and low-grade (LG) upper tract urothelial carcinomas (UTUCs). We retrospectively reviewed 141 patients with localized UTUCs that underwent extirpative surgery at a tertiary referral center. Preoperative imaging was used to evaluate presence and degree of ipsilateral HN. We evaluated degree of HN (none/mild vs. moderate/severe), pathological findings, and oncologic outcomes. HG UTUC was present in 113 (80%) patients, muscle-invasive disease (≥pT2) in 49 (35%), and non-organ-confined disease (≥pT3) in 41 (29%). At a median follow-up of 34 months, 49 (35%) patients experienced intravesical recurrence, 28 (20%) developed local/systemic recurrence, and 24 (17%) died of UTUC. HN was graded as none/mild in 77 (55%) patients and moderate/severe in 64 (45%). In patients with HG UTUC, but not LG, degree of HN was associated with advanced pathological stage (P<0.001), positive lymph nodes (P = 0.01), local/systemic recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.5, P = 0.02), and cancer-specific survival (HR = 5.2, P = 0.02). On multivariable analysis of preoperative factors, degree of HN in patients with HG UTUC was associated with muscle invasion (HR = 9.3; 95% CI: 3.08-28.32; P<0.001), non-organ-confined disease (HR = 4.5; 95% CI: 1.66-12.06; P = 0.003), local/systemic recurrence-free survival (HR = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.07-5.64; P = 0.04), and cancer-specific survival (HR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.05-6.22; P = 0.04). Degree of HN can serve as a surrogate for advanced disease and predict worse oncologic outcomes in HG UTUC. Degree of HN was not predictive of intravesical or local/systemic recurrence in LG UTUC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Current Management of Surgical Oncologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. Method A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. Results In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. Conclusion In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy. PMID:25933135

  10. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  11. Phenotype in combination with genotype improves outcome prediction in acute myeloid leukemia: a report from Children's Oncology Group protocol AAML0531.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Andrew P; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Menssen, Andrew J; Wilson, Elisabeth R; Kahwash, Samir; Raimondi, Susana C; Hirsch, Betsy A; Gamis, Alan S; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A; Loken, Michael R

    2017-09-07

    Diagnostic biomarkers can be used to determine relapse risk in acute myeloid leukemia, and certain genetic aberrancies have prognostic relevance. A diagnostic immunophenotypic expression profile, which quantifies the amounts of distinct gene products, not just their presence or absence, was established to improve outcome prediction for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The immunophenotypic expression profile, which defines each patient's leukemia as a location in 15-dimensional space, was generated for 769 patients enrolled in the Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 protocol. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering grouped patients with similar immunophenotypic expression profiles into eleven patient cohorts, demonstrating high associations among phenotype, genotype, morphology, and outcome. Of 95 patients with inv(16), 79% segregated in Cluster A. Of 109 patients with t(8;21), 92% segregated in Clusters A and B. Of 152 patients with 11q23 alterations, 78% segregated in Clusters D, E, F, G, or H. For both inv(16) and 11q23 abnormalities, differential phenotypic expression identified patient groups with different survival characteristics (P<0.05). Clinical outcome analysis revealed that Cluster B (predominantly t(8;21)) was associated with favorable outcome (P<0.001) and Clusters E, G, H, and K were associated with adverse outcomes (P<0.05). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that Clusters E, G, H, and K were independently associated with worse survival (P range <0.001 to 0.008). The Children's Oncology Group AAML0531 trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00372593. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. Integrative Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gabriel; Mao, Jun J; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Integrative oncology helps support the health of patients with cancer and their caregivers through an evidence-informed approach to lifestyle and behavior modification and the use of complementary health therapies as part of conventional cancer care. Integrative approaches can provide patients relief from cancer and cancer treatment-related symptoms, leading to improvements in their physical and psychosocial health. An evidence-informed approach is important when recommending an integrative cancer plan. Efforts at enhancing communication between patients and health care providers, as well as between integrative practitioners and conventional health care teams, are critical to achieving optimal health and healing for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SeaRISE: A Multidisciplinary Research Initiative to Predict Rapid Changes in Global Sea Level Caused by Collapse of Marine Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The results of a workshop held to discuss the role of the polar ice sheets in global climate change are reported. The participants agreed that the most important aspect of the ice sheets' involvement in climate change is the potential of marine ice sheets to cause a rapid change in global sea level. To address this concern, a research initiative is called for that considers the full complexity of the coupled atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere-lithosphere system. This initiative, called SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) has the goal of predicting the contribution of marine ice sheets to rapid changes in global sea level in the next decade to few centuries. To attain this goal, a coordinated program of multidisciplinary investigations must be launched with the linked objectives of understanding the current state, internal dynamics, interactions, and history of this environmental system. The key questions needed to satisfy these objectives are presented and discussed along with a plan of action to make the SeaRISE project a reality.

  14. Prediction of optimal gene functions for osteosarcoma using network-based- guilt by association method based on gene oncology and microarray profile.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinrang

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, we planned to predict the optimal gene functions for osteosarcoma (OS) by integrating network-based method with guilt by association (GBA) principle (called as network-based gene function inference approach) based on gene oncology (GO) data and gene expression profile. To begin with, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were extracted using linear models for microarray data (LIMMA) package. Then, construction of differential co-expression network (DCN) relying on DEGs was implemented, and sub-DCN was identified using Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC). Subsequently, GO annotations for OS were collected according to known confirmed database and DEGs. Ultimately, gene functions were predicted by means of GBA principle based on the area under the curve (AUC) for GO terms, and we determined GO terms with AUC >0.7 as the optimal gene functions for OS. Totally, 123 DEGs and 137 GO terms were obtained for further analysis. A DCN was constructed, which included 123 DEGs and 7503 interactions. A total of 105 GO terms were identified when the threshold was set as AUC >0.5, which had a good classification performance. Among these 105 GO terms, 2 functions had the AUC >0.7 and were determined as the optimal gene functions including angiogenesis (AUC =0.767) and regulation of immune system process (AUC =0.710). These gene functions appear to have potential for early detection and clinical treatment of OS in the future.

  15. Assessing Tumor Oxygenation for Predicting Outcome in Radiation Oncology: A Review of Studies Correlating Tumor Hypoxic Status and Outcome in the Preclinical and Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Colliez, Florence; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is recognized as a limiting factor for the efficacy of radiotherapy, because it enhances tumor radioresistance. It is strongly suggested that assessing tumor oxygenation could help to predict the outcome of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Strategies have also been developed to alleviate tumor hypoxia in order to radiosensitize tumors. In addition, oxygen mapping is critically needed for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in which the most hypoxic regions require higher radiation doses and the most oxygenated regions require lower radiation doses. However, the assessment of tumor oxygenation is not yet included in day-to-day clinical practice. This is due to the lack of a method for the quantitative and non-invasive mapping of tumor oxygenation. To fully integrate tumor hypoxia parameters into effective improvements of the individually tailored radiation therapy protocols in cancer patients, methods allowing non-invasively repeated, safe, and robust mapping of changes in tissue oxygenation are required. In this review, non-invasive methods dedicated to assessing tumor oxygenation with the ultimate goal of predicting outcome in radiation oncology are presented, including positron emission tomography used with nitroimidazole tracers, magnetic resonance methods using endogenous contrasts (R1 and R2*-based methods), and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry; the goal is to highlight results of studies establishing correlations between tumor hypoxic status and patients’ outcome in the preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:28180110

  16. [Medical oncology: is it a new medical speciality in Africa?

    PubMed

    Brahmi, Sami Aziz; Ziani, Fatima Zahra; Seddik, Youssef; Afqir, Said

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem in Africa. Advances in the treatment of cancers over the last decade are undeniable. Multidisciplinary approach is essential for improved patient's management. Medical oncology is a recently-recognized speciality in Africa Indeed, many African countries do not have doctors or a sufficient number of doctors qualified to practice in this medical specialty. The fight against cancer in Africa involves oncology speciality training and the development of curricula in order to ensure optimum patient management.

  17. Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Ariel A; Howard, Lauren E; Tay, Kae Jack; Tsivian, Efrat; Sze, Christina; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Freedland, Stephen J; Polascik, Thomas J

    2017-06-29

    A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P < .001) as well as increased biochemical recurrence, secondary therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P < .001). There were no significant interactions with race in predicting measured outcomes. The 5-tier GG system predicted multiple long-term endpoints after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. The predictive value was consistent across races. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Childhood Hodgkin International Prognostic Score (CHIPS) Predicts event-free survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Cindy L; Chen, Lu; McCarten, Kathleen; Wolden, Suzanne; Constine, Louis S; Hutchison, Robert E; de Alarcon, Pedro A; Keller, Frank G; Kelly, Kara M; Trippet, Tanya A; Voss, Stephan D; Friedman, Debra L

    2017-04-01

    Early response to initial chemotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) measured by computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography (PET) after two to three cycles of chemotherapy may inform therapeutic decisions. Risk stratification at diagnosis could, however, allow earlier and potentially more efficacious treatment modifications. We developed a predictive model for event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric/adolescent HL using clinical data known at diagnosis from 1103 intermediate-risk HL patients treated on Children's Oncology Group protocol AHOD0031 with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC) chemotherapy and radiation. Independent predictors of EFS were identified and used to develop and validate a prognostic score (Childhood Hodgkin International Prognostic Score [CHIPS]). A training cohort was randomly selected to include approximately half of the overall cohort, with the remainder forming the validation cohort. Stage 4 disease, large mediastinal mass, albumin (<3.5), and fever were independent predictors of EFS that were each assigned one point in the CHIPS.  Four-year EFS was 93.1% for patients with CHIPS = 0, 88.5% for patients with CHIPS = 1, 77.6% for patients with CHIPS = 2, and 69.2% for patients with CHIPS = 3. CHIPS was highly predictive of EFS, identifying a subset (with CHIPS 2 or 3) that comprises 27% of intermediate-risk patients who have a 4-year EFS of <80% and who may benefit from early therapeutic augmentation.  Furthermore, CHIPS identified higher risk patients who were not identified by early PET or CT response. CHIPS is a robust and inexpensive approach to predicting risk in patients with intermediate-risk HL that may improve ability to tailor therapy to risk factors known at diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  20. The predictive value of soluble biomarkers (CD14 subtype, interleukin-2 receptor, human leucocyte antigen-G) and procalcitonin in the detection of bacteremia and sepsis in pediatric oncology patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Urbonas, Vincas; Eidukaitė, Audronė; Tamulienė, Indrė

    2013-04-01

    Prediction of bacteremia/sepsis in childhood oncology patients with febrile neutropenia still remains a challenge for the medical community due to the lack of reliable biomarkers, especially at the beginning of infectious process. The objective of this study was to evaluate diagnostic value of soluble biomarkers (CD14 subtype, interleukin-2 receptor, HLA-G) and procalcitonin (PCT) in the identification of infectious process at the beginning of a febrile episode in pediatric oncology patients. A total of 62 episodes of febrile neutropenia in 37 childhood oncology patients were enrolled in this study. Serum samples were collected at presentation after confirmation of febrile neutropenia and analyzed according to recommendations of manufacturers. Patients were classified into bacteremia/sepsis and fever of unknown origin groups. Median of PCT and sIL-2R were considerably higher in bacteremia/sepsis group compared to fever of unknown origin group, whereas median of sHLA-G and presepsin levels between investigated groups did not differ sufficiently. PCT and sIL-2R determination might be used as an additional diagnostic tool for the detection of bacteremia/sepsis in childhood oncology patients with febrile neutropenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Predictive and Prognostic Implications of Variant Philadelphia Translocations in CML: Experience From a Tertiary Oncology Center in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Kanakasetty, Govind Babu; Kuntejowdahalli, Lakshmaiah; Thanky, Aditi Harsh; Dasappa, Lokanatha; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Mallekavu, Suresh Babu; Kumari, Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome with classical t(9;22)(q34;q11) seen in up to 90% of cases. However 5% to 10% of patients who present with variant Ph translocations (vPh) have been an area of research for their significance in predicting response to various therapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as prognosticating survival outcomes for many years involving varied patient populations, with conflicting results. We retrospectively analyzed our data from January 2002 to December 2014. Patients with vPh in chronic phase of CML (CML-CP) were analyzed with respect to their demographic parameters, response to imatinib therapy, and survival and their data were compared with data of patients with classical Ph translocation (cPh). Of 615 patients diagnosed with CML-CP, 72 patients (11.7%) showed vPh. Most common chromosomes involved in these translocations were 14 (13.9%), 11 (12.5%), 19 (9.7%), and 7 (8.3%). Rates of complete hematological response, complete cytogenetic response, and major molecular response were not statistically different between the groups. At 5 years, event-free survival, failure-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 60% versus 67.9%, 62.7% versus 69.7%, 84.7% versus 92.1%, and 87.5% versus 92.4%, respectively, in vPh and cPh. The differences in survival were statistically not significant. To our knowledge, this is the largest series of variant translocations in CML-CP, pertaining to the Indian population. Our data suggest that the presence of vPh in CML has no significant effect in predicting response to imatinib as well as in prognosticating survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Positive Surgical Margins in Radical Prostatectomy Patients Do Not Predict Long-term Oncological Outcomes: Results from SEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Mithal, Prabhakar; Howard, Lauren E.; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs) on long-term outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP), including metastasis, castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Materials and Methods Retrospective study of 4,051 men in SEARCH treated by RP from 1988–2013. Proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios of PSMs in predicting BCR, CRPC, metastases, and PCSM. To determine if PSMs were more predictive in certain patients, analyses were stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, and pre-operative PSA. Results Median follow-up was 6.6 years (IQR 3.2–10.6) and 1,127 patients had over 10 years of follow-up. During this time, 302 (32%) men experienced BCR, 112 (3%) developed CRPC, 144 (4%) developed metastases, and 83 (2%) died of PC. There were 1600 (40%) men with PSMs. In unadjusted models, PSMs were significantly associated with all adverse outcomes: BCR, CRPC, metastases and PCSM (all p ≤ 0.001). After adjusting for demographic and pathological characteristics, margins were associated with increased risk of only BCR (HR 1.98, p<0.001), and not CRPC, metastases, or PCSM (HR ≤ 1.20, p>0.18). Similar results were seen when stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, or PSA, and when patients who underwent adjuvant therapy were excluded. Conclusions PSMs after RP are not an independent risk factor for CRPC, metastasis, or PCSM overall or within any subset. In the absence of other high-risk features, PSMs alone may not be an indication for adjuvant treatment. PMID:26010160

  4. Quantitatively and qualitatively augmenting medical student knowledge of oncology and radiation oncology: an update on the impact of the oncology education initiative.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Ariel E; Handal, Roxane; Daniels, Janeen; Levin-Epstein, Rebecca; Denunzio, Nicholas J; Dillon, Johanne; Shaffer, Kitt; Bishop, Pauline Mulleady

    2012-02-01

    The Oncology Education Initiative was established in 2007 in an effort to advance oncology and radiation oncology education at the undergraduate level. As a continuation of the initiative, the aim of this study was to determine whether these structured didactics would continue to increase overall medical student knowledge about oncologic topics. Preclerkship and postclerkship tests examining concepts in general oncology, radiation oncology, breast cancer, and prostate cancer were administered. The 21-question, multiple-choice examination was administered at the beginning and end of the radiology clerkship, during which a 1.5-hour didactic session was given by an attending radiation oncologist. Changes in individual question responses, student responses, and overall categorical responses were analyzed. All hypothesis tests were two tailed with a significance level of .05. In the 2009-2010 academic year, 155 third-year and fourth-year students had average examination score improvements from 62% to 68.9% (P < .0001). Every topic (100%) showed improvement in scores, with the largest absolute improvement seen in the radiation oncology category, which increased from 56.5% to 71.8% (P < .0001). As the year proceeded, average examination scores increased among third-year students and decreased among fourth-year students. In the successive years since its inception, the Oncology Education Initiative continues to show a significant improvement in medical students' knowledge of cancer. The initiative has also succeeded in providing radiation oncology education to all graduating medical students at the authors' institution. Dedicated oncology education in the undergraduate medical curriculum provides students with a better understanding of multidisciplinary oncology management. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  6. Implementation of the pediatric early warning scoring system on a pediatric hematology/oncology unit.

    PubMed

    Demmel, Kathleen M; Williams, Lucinda; Flesch, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Despite improved outcomes for pediatric Hematology/Oncology patients over the past 15-20 years, sepsis and other acute events continue to cause serious illness in these children. Implementing a pediatric early warning scoring tool (PEWS) with an associated multi-disciplinary action algorithm in a pediatric Hematology/Oncology unit helped to remove barriers that prevented timely referral of children who are clinically deteriorating and requiring immediate help, enhanced multi-disciplinary team communication, and has led to a more than 3-fold increase in days between codes on the Hematology/Oncology unit.

  7. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  8. Policy statement on multidisciplinary cancer care.

    PubMed

    Borras, Josep M; Albreht, Tit; Audisio, Riccardo; Briers, Erik; Casali, Paolo; Esperou, Hélène; Grube, Birgitte; Hamoir, Marc; Henning, Geoffrey; Kelly, Joan; Knox, Susan; Nabal, Maria; Pierotti, Marco; Lombardo, Claudio; van Harten, Wim; Poston, Graeme; Prades, Joan; Sant, Milena; Travado, Luzia; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bogaert, Saskia; van den Bulcke, Marc; van Hoof, Elke; van den Neucker, Ingrid; Wilson, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Cancer care is undergoing an important paradigm shift from a disease-focused management to a patient-centred approach, in which increasingly more attention is paid to psychosocial aspects, quality of life, patients' rights and empowerment and survivorship. In this context, multidisciplinary teams emerge as a practical necessity for optimal coordination among health professionals and clear communication with patients. The European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an initiative launched by the European Commission in 2009, addressed the multidisciplinary care from a policy perspective in order to define the core elements that all tumour-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) should include. To that effect, a working group conference was held in January 2013 within the EPAAC Work Package 7 (on Healthcare) framework. The consensus group consisted of high-level representatives from the following European scientific societies, patient associations and stakeholders: European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European SocieTy for Radiology & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG), European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS), International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS),European Cancer Patient Coalition (ECPC), EuropaColon, Europa Donna - The European Breast Cancer Coalition, Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL), Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), EUSOMA - European Society of Breast Cancer Specialists, European Hospital and Healthcare Federation (HOPE) and EPAAC Work Packages 5 (Health promotion and prevention), 7, 8 (Research), 9 (Information systems) and 10 (Cancer plans). A background document with a list of 26 core issues drawn from a systematic review of the literature was used to guide the discussion. Five areas related to MDTs were covered: care objectives, organisation

  9. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  10. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. Study population DNOR has registered clinical data on diagnostics and treatment of all adult patients diagnosed with glioma since January 1, 2009, which numbers approximately 400 patients each year. Main variables The database contains information about symptoms, presurgical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, performance status, surgical procedures, residual tumor on postsurgical MRI, postsurgical complications, diagnostic and histology codes, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Descriptive data DNOR publishes annual reports on descriptive data. During the period of registration, postoperative MRI is performed in a higher proportion of the patients (Indicator II), and a higher proportion of patients have no residual tumor after surgical resection of the primary tumor (Indicator IV). Further data are available in the annual reports. The indicators reflect only minor elements of handling brain tumor patients. Another advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. Conclusion The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality in handling primary brain tumor patients in Denmark by reporting indicators and facilitating a better multidisciplinary collaboration at a national level. DNOR provides a valuable resource for research. PMID:27822109

  11. Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko V.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Grignon, David J.; McGowan, David G.; Roach, Mack; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Sandler, Howard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

  12. Direct-to-consumer advertising in oncology.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Penson, Richard T; Joffe, Steven; Schapira, Lidia; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J

    2006-02-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to patients and support to caregivers while encouraging the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum in which caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. Increasingly, cancer patients are subjected to advertisements related to oncologic therapies and other cancer-related products in the popular media. Such direct-to-consumer advertising is controversial: while it may inform, educate, and perhaps even empower patients, it also has the ability to misinform patients, and strain their relationships with oncology providers. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that direct-to-consumer advertising provide a balanced presentation of a product's benefits, risks, and side effects, but this can be difficult to achieve. Through a discussion of this topic by an oncology fellow, ethicist, cancer survivor, and senior oncologist, the role of direct-to-consumer advertising and its often subtle effects on clinical practice in oncology are explored. Although sparse, the medical literature on this increasingly prevalent type of medical communication is also reviewed.

  13. Evidence-based paediatric surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Losty, Paul D

    2016-10-01

    Surgeons play a pivotal role in the decision-making and multidisciplinary management of childhood solid tumours.(1) Evidence-based medicine-"aims to optimise decision making by emphasising on the use of best evidence from well-designed conducted research." This article offers a brief overview in an effort to demonstrate how a selection of well-conducted, recently published studies can help address some topical and controversial themes in paediatric surgical oncology practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements.

  15. ESTRO 2012 strategy meeting: vision for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Bourhis, Jean; Hollywood, Donal

    2012-04-01

    Access to modern radiation oncology treatment programmes is now recognised as an essential component of high-quality cancer treatment and central to optimal patient care. Looking to the future, ESTRO strongly believes that further development of the discipline will be critically important to the future strategic development of multidisciplinary cancer care. On behalf of the Board and membership of ESTRO, this document outlines the Society's Vision for the development of the discipline of Radiation and Clinical Oncology together with the associated priority action areas that will collectively and strategically direct the Society's activities in the forthcoming years.

  16. Secondary traumatic stress in oncology staff.

    PubMed

    Quinal, Leonida; Harford, Stephanie; Rutledge, Dana N

    2009-01-01

    As empathetic caregivers, oncology staff may be prone to secondary traumatic stress (STS). Secondary traumatic stress results from exposure to persons who have experienced trauma and from giving care to such persons. The presence of STS among oncology staff has not been documented. This correlational descriptive study examined STS among oncology staff at a 500-bed Magnet-designated community hospital by determining the presence of individual symptoms and frequency with which diagnostic criteria for STS are met. Also determined were associations between STS demographic characteristics and specific stress-reduction activities.In this study, 43 staff members from an inpatient oncology unit completed mailed surveys. The Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale assessed the frequency of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms associated with STS; also assessed were use/helpfulness of stress-reduction activities. In this first study to document the prevalence of STS among oncology staff, prevalence ranged from 16% (Bride's method) to 37% (cutoff-score method). Most common symptoms were difficulty sleeping, intrusive thoughts about patients, and irritability. Least common were avoidance of people, places, and things and disturbing dreams about patients. Current use of massage was significantly predictive of not having STS. Ethnicity of staff member was related to having STS. Further research is warranted evaluating STS prevalence in different groups of oncology staff along with the effect of STS on burnout and job retention.

  17. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  18. [1st National Meeting of Multidisciplinary Work in Oncogeriatrics: expert consensus document].

    PubMed

    Antonio, Maite; Saldaña, Juana; Formiga, Francesc; Lozano, Alicia; González-Barboteo, Jesús; Fernández, Paz; Arias, Fernando; Arribas, Lorena; Barbero, Elisabeth; Bescós, María del Mar; Boya, Maria Jesús; Bueso, Pilar; Casas, Ana; Dotor, Emma; Fort, Eduard; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Llonch, Mireia; Morlans, Germà; Murillo, Maria Teresa; Ossola, Gustavo; Peiró, Inma; Saiz, Fabiola; Sanz, Javier; Serra, José Antonio; Trelis, Jordi; Yuste, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    On 2nd of June 2011 the Institut Català d' Oncologia l'Hospitalet--Hospital Duran i Reynals hosted the first Meeting of Multidisciplinary Work in Oncogeriatrics. The reason for the meeting, which follows on from an initiative of the Medical Societies of Radiotherapy, Oncology, Geriatrics and Gerontology and Palliative Care and Medical Oncology, was to initiate a joint line of work among the different specialties that generally take part in the handling of the elderly patient suffering from oncologic pathologies. This document summarises the different subjects covered during the Meeting. Copyright © 2012 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  20. [Multidisciplinary consultation meetings: decision-making in palliative chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Le Divenah, Aude; David, Stéphane; Bertrand, Dominique; Chatel, Tanguy; Viallards, Marcel-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Multidisciplinary consultation meetings provide an opportunity for specialists from different disciplines to engage in formal discussions over diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in oncology. In complex clinical situations, specialists discuss medical decisions collectively, particularly in cases involving palliative chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors considered in multidisciplinary consultation meetings in deciding whether palliative chemotherapy is needed. A study was conducted over a three-month period in an adult hematology department in order to identify the criteria used in weekly multidisciplinary consultation meetings to determine whether palliative chemotherapy is required. The study only included patients who were confirmed to be in the palliative phase by all the doctors present at the multidisciplinary consultation meetings. The criteria cover 5 areas related to patient's characteristics, patients'environment, the disease, scientific data and the objectives of palliative chemotherapy. The criteria considered in 100% of cases were related to the disease, the expected benefits of chemotherapy with palliative intent and patients' characteristics. The least important criteria were related to the patients' environment. Scientific data were not discussed during the multidisciplinary consultation meetings. The results show that the criteria used to determine whether chemotherapy with palliative intent is required are essentially of a medical nature. However, in palliative situations, factors related to patients' environment must be taken into account. In order to meet this requirement, it may be necessary to increase the participation of paramedical professionals and palliative care teams in multidisciplinary consultation meetings and to promote dialogue and collaboration with doctors and coordinating nurses.

  1. Multidisciplinary care of craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Edward P; Xue, Yunfeng; Xue, Amy S; Olshinka, Asaf; Lam, Sandi

    2017-01-01

    The management of craniosynostosis, especially in the setting of craniofacial syndromes, is ideally done in a multidisciplinary clinic with a team focused toward comprehensive care. Craniosynostosis is a congenital disorder of the cranium, caused by the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. This fusion results in abnormal cranial growth due to the inability of the involved sutures to accommodate the growing brain. Skull growth occurs only at the patent sutures, resulting in an abnormal head shape. If cranial growth is severely restricted, as seen in multisuture craniosynostosis, elevation in intracranial pressure can occur. Whereas most patients treated in a multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic have non-syndromic or isolated craniosynostosis, the most challenging patients are those with syndromic craniosynostosis. The purpose of this article was to discuss the multidisciplinary team care required to treat both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:28740400

  2. The integration of BRCA testing into oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Percival, Natalie; George, Angela; Gyertson, Jennifer; Hamill, Monica; Fernandes, Andreia; Davies, Emily; Rahman, Nazneen; Banerjee, Susana

    2016-06-23

    The PARP inhibitor, Olaparib, is approved for women with BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Therefore there is an urgent need to test patients and obtain results in time to influence treatment. Models of BRCA testing, such as the mainstreaming oncogenetic pathway, involving oncology health professionals are being used. The authors report on the establishment of the extended role of the clinical nurse specialist in consenting women for BRCA testing in routine gynaecology-oncology clinics using the mainstreaming model. Nurses undertook generic consent training and specific counselling training for BRCA testing in the form of a series of online videos, written materials and checklists before obtaining approval to consent patients for germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Between July 2013 and December 2015, 108 women with ovarian cancer were counselled and consented by nurses in the medical oncology clinics at a single centre (The Royal Marsden, UK). This represented 36% of all ovarian cancer patients offered BRCA testing in the oncology clinics at the centre. Feedback from patients and nurses was encouraging with no significant issues raised in the counselling and consenting process. The mainstreaming model allows for greater access to BRCA testing for ovarian cancer patients, many of whom may benefit from personalised therapy (PARP inhibitors). This is the first report of oncology nurses in the BRCA testing pathway. Specialist oncology nurses trained in BRCA testing have an important role within a multidisciplinary team counselling and consenting patients to undergo BRCA testing.

  3. Unexpected Return for Follow-up During the First Year of Multidisciplinary Care May Be Predictive of Rapid Deterioration of Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Fang, Yu-Weil; Wang, Li Hui; You, Xiang Gin; Leu, Jyh-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multidisciplinary predialysis education and team care (MDC) may slow the decline in renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, associations between unexpected return during MDC and progression of renal dysfunction have not been characterized in patients with CKD. Our study aimed to determine the association between exacerbation of renal dysfunction and the frequency of unexpected return during follow-up. A total of 437 patients with CKD receiving multidisciplinary care between January 2009 and June 2013 at the Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital were included in this retrospective observational cohort study, and multiple imputations were performed for missing data. The predictor was the frequency of unexpected return for follow-up during the first year after entering MDC. Main outcome was monthly declines in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Moreover, the demographic data, comorbidities, history of medication, and routine laboratory data for patients with CKD were collected. Among all patients, 59.7% were male, the mean age at initiation of MDC was 69.4 ± 13.2 years, and the duration of follow-up was 21.4 ± 3.3 months. The subjects were divided into 2 groups according to frequencies of follow-up (≤4 and > 4 visits) during the 1st year of MDC. The patients with CKD were regularly followed up every 3 months as a part of MDC in our hospital, and patients who returned for more than 4 follow-up visits were included in the unexpected return group. In crude regression analyses, unexpected return was significantly associated with higher monthly declines of eGFR (β = 0.092, 95% confidence interval, 0.014–0.170). This association remained after adjustments for multiple variables, and subgroup analyses of unexpected return showed that male gender, older age, CKD stage 1 to 3, hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, and use of renin–angiotensin system blockade were significantly associated with

  4. Unexpected Return for Follow-up During the First Year of Multidisciplinary Care May Be Predictive of Rapid Deterioration of Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Fang, Yu-Weil; Wang, Li Hui; You, Xiang Gin; Leu, Jyh-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Multidisciplinary predialysis education and team care (MDC) may slow the decline in renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, associations between unexpected return during MDC and progression of renal dysfunction have not been characterized in patients with CKD. Our study aimed to determine the association between exacerbation of renal dysfunction and the frequency of unexpected return during follow-up.A total of 437 patients with CKD receiving multidisciplinary care between January 2009 and June 2013 at the Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital were included in this retrospective observational cohort study, and multiple imputations were performed for missing data. The predictor was the frequency of unexpected return for follow-up during the first year after entering MDC. Main outcome was monthly declines in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Moreover, the demographic data, comorbidities, history of medication, and routine laboratory data for patients with CKD were collected.Among all patients, 59.7% were male, the mean age at initiation of MDC was 69.4 ± 13.2 years, and the duration of follow-up was 21.4 ± 3.3 months. The subjects were divided into 2 groups according to frequencies of follow-up (≤4 and > 4 visits) during the 1st year of MDC. The patients with CKD were regularly followed up every 3 months as a part of MDC in our hospital, and patients who returned for more than 4 follow-up visits were included in the unexpected return group. In crude regression analyses, unexpected return was significantly associated with higher monthly declines of eGFR (β = 0.092, 95% confidence interval, 0.014-0.170). This association remained after adjustments for multiple variables, and subgroup analyses of unexpected return showed that male gender, older age, CKD stage 1 to 3, hypertension, history of coronary artery disease, and use of renin-angiotensin system blockade were significantly associated with declines in

  5. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  6. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Diwakar D; Faiz, Saadia A; Hernandez, Mike; Kowalski, Alicia M; Bashoura, Lara; Goravanchi, Farzin; Cherian, Sujith V; Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer S; French, Katy E

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m(2) (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients.

  7. Oncology Nursing Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Account Login Cart Search the ONS website Continuing Nursing Education Courses and Activities Access Devices: The Virtual ... Vomiting Chemotherapy for Non-Oncology Conditions Clinical Trials Nursing 101 Cognitive Impairment Fundamentals of Blood and Marrow ...

  8. Imaging in interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Stephen B; Silverman, Stuart G

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging in interventional oncology is used differently than in diagnostic radiology and prioritizes different imaging features. Whereas diagnostic imaging prioritizes the highest-quality imaging, interventional imaging prioritizes real-time imaging with lower radiation dose in addition to high-quality imaging. In general, medical imaging plays five key roles in image-guided therapy, and interventional oncology, in particular. These roles are (a) preprocedure planning, (b) intraprocedural targeting, (c) intraprocedural monitoring, (d) intraprocedural control, and (e) postprocedure assessment. Although many of these roles are still relatively basic in interventional oncology, as research and development in medical imaging focuses on interventional needs, it is likely that the role of medical imaging in intervention will become even more integral and more widely applied. In this review, the current status of medical imaging for intervention in oncology will be described and directions for future development will be examined.

  9. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  10. Integrating Multidisciplinary Engineering Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Karin; Luckett, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    In order to design two distinct engineering qualification levels for an existing University of Technology programme, empirical evidence based on the current diploma is necessary to illuminate the nature of and the relationship between the "contextual" and "conceptual" elements underpinning a multidisciplinary engineering…

  11. Possibly Impossible Patients: Management of Difficult Behavior in Oncology Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.; Meyer, Fremonta L.; Miovic, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Angry, threatening, or otherwise disruptive behavior by patients can interfere with necessary oncologic treatment, sometimes to the point of rendering continued care impossible. We offer oncology clinicians guidance in dealing with difficult outpatients by discussing the differential diagnosis and multidisciplinary management of treatment-disrupting behavior in the ambulatory oncology setting. We review the existing literature on dealing with difficult patients and present clinical experience at a comprehensive cancer center where a formalized, institutional process for responding to disruptive outpatients has been developed. A structured, multidisciplinary approach to deal with difficult behavior in oncology outpatients can improve care and staff morale. Staff using this approach can identify causes of treatment-disrupting behavior, develop and implement appropriate behavior plans, facilitate communication, address mental health issues, and ensure that decisions to terminate a relationship with a patient are ethical, clinically justified, and supported by due process. In the future, clinical recommendations and institutional guidelines for dealing with difficult patients should be evaluated with more structured, quantitative research. PMID:22043189

  12. Prospective roles for Canadian oncology nurses in breast cancer rapid diagnostic clinics.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, M S; Maheu, C; Baku, L; Wedderburn, P J S; Lemonde, M

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of rapid diagnostic clinics for breast cancer increases oncology nurses' (ONs) responsibility for patient education and coordination of multidisciplinary care. Developed as an outcome of the E-Mentorship Oncology Nursing Program, this paper proposes new roles for these nurses to respond effectively and competently to such diagnostic innovation. The Oslo Manual Conceptual Framework of Innovation inspired the idea of change in prospective ONs' roles, corroborated by the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology's Standards of Practice and Competencies. New roles for ONs that are informed by the domain of information dynamics and evidence-based care are proposed.

  13. Performance characteristics of prostate-specific antigen density and biopsy core details to predict oncological outcome in patients with intermediate to high-risk prostate cancer underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yashi, Masahiro; Nukui, Akinori; Tokura, Yuumi; Takei, Kohei; Suzuki, Issei; Sakamoto, Kazumasa; Yuki, Hideo; Kambara, Tsunehito; Betsunoh, Hironori; Abe, Hideyuki; Fukabori, Yoshitatsu; Nakazato, Yoshimasa; Kaji, Yasushi; Kamai, Takao

    2017-06-23

    Many urologic surgeons refer to biopsy core details for decision making in cases of localized prostate cancer (PCa) to determine whether an extended resection and/or lymph node dissection should be performed. Furthermore, recent reports emphasize the predictive value of prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) for further risk stratification, not only for low-risk PCa, but also for intermediate- and high-risk PCa. This study focused on these parameters and compared respective predictive impact on oncologic outcomes in Japanese PCa patients. Two-hundred and fifty patients with intermediate- and high-risk PCa according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) classification, that underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at a single institution, and with observation periods of longer than 6 months were enrolled. None of the patients received hormonal treatments including antiandrogens, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues, or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors preoperatively. PSAD and biopsy core details, including the percentage of positive cores and the maximum percentage of cancer extent in each positive core, were analyzed in association with unfavorable pathologic results of prostatectomy specimens, and further with biochemical recurrence. The cut-off values of potential predictive factors were set through receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses. In the entire cohort, a higher PSAD, the percentage of positive cores, and maximum percentage of cancer extent in each positive core were independently associated with advanced tumor stage ≥ pT3 and an increased index tumor volume > 0.718 ml. NCCN classification showed an association with a tumor stage ≥ pT3 and a Gleason score ≥8, and the attribution of biochemical recurrence was also sustained. In each NCCN risk group, these preoperative factors showed various associations with unfavorable pathological results. In the intermediate-risk group, the percentage of positive cores showed

  14. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  15. NASA multidisciplinary research grant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Research is discussed in the multidisciplinary areas of space and planetary science; materials and radiation; systems, instrumentation, and structures; and technology and man. Highlights are identified as an alpha-recoil track method of archeological dating; infrared astronomical telescope; reaction rates data, semiconductor radiation detectors, and analysis of time-dependent systems; Gunn effect devices for microwave generation and detection, mode-locked lasers, and radiation theory; and the application of a satellite communication system to educational development. Detectors to be flown on Apollo 16 to measure heavy particle flux in the solar wind and to be part of the HEAO-A experiment on extremely heavy nuclei in cosmic rays were developed. The impact of the multidisciplinary research on university activities is described, and individual departmental reports are included.

  16. Validation of the procedures. [integrated multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Validation strategies are described for procedures aimed at improving the rotor blade design process through a multidisciplinary optimization approach. Validation of the basic rotor environment prediction tools and the overall rotor design are discussed.

  17. Multidisciplinary Management of Hypodontia.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael; O'Connell, Brian

    2017-02-28

    Patients with hypodontia require a wide range of treatment, ranging from single tooth replacement to the restoration of multiple edentulous spaces in both arches. Treatment should involve an interdisciplinary team, as no dental speciality possesses the range of expertise required to optimally treat this patient population. This paper presents principles of treatment, key factors of assessment and multidisciplinary approaches to management of the hypodontia patient, including contributions from conservative dentistry.

  18. Positive predictive value of breast lesions of uncertain malignant potential (B3): Can we identify high risk patients? The value of a multidisciplinary team and implications in the surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    M, Taffurelli; A, Pellegrini; F, Ghignone; D, Santini; S, Zanotti; M, Serra

    2016-06-01

    The use of conventional needle core biopsy for palpable masses and vacuum-assisted needle core biopsy for microcalcifications has significantly increased the preoperative diagnosis rate, but the strategy for those patients with lesions of uncertain malignant potential (B3) still remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of the malignancy of B3 lesions in order to establish their correct management in the setting of a multidisciplinary care pathway. Data from all patients who had a Needle Core Biopsy (NCB) or a Vacuum-Assisted Needle Core Biopsy (VANCB) between 2005 and 2014 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The B3 patients were discussed by the Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) deciding for surgery or for follow-up, based on a score in which clinical-instrumental factors and environmental factors were considered. The PPV of malignancy of all surgically excised B3 lesions was calculated. One hundred and seventy-eight B3 NCBs were included in the study and Atypical Epithelial Proliferation of Ductal Type (AEDPT) was the most represented subcategory. The final histopathology report of the 128 patients operated on showed 94 benign and 34 malignant lesions. The PPV of B3 patients referred to surgery was 26.5%. B3 patients should be evaluated by a breast MDT in order to make the right therapeutic decision, in particular for patients with contrasting clinical/diagnostic findings. Larger prospective studies are required to assess the definitive PPV of each B3 subcategory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults in the Oncology Setting: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geriatric assessment is a multidisciplinary diagnostic process that evaluates the older adult’s medical, psychological, social, and functional capacity. No systematic review of the use of geriatric assessment in oncology has been conducted. The goals of this systematic review were: 1) to provide an overview of all geriatric assessment instruments used in the oncology setting; 2) to examine the feasibility and psychometric properties of those instruments; and 3) to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of geriatric assessment in predicting or modifying outcomes (including the impact on treatment decision making, toxicity of treatment, and mortality). Methods We searched Medline, Embase, Psychinfo, Cinahl, and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English, French, Dutch, or German between January 1, 1996, and November 16, 2010, reporting on cross-sectional, longitudinal, interventional, or observational studies that assessed the feasibility or effectiveness of geriatric assessment instruments. The quality of articles was evaluated using relevant quality assessment frameworks. Results We identified 83 articles that reported on 73 studies. The quality of most studies was poor to moderate. Eleven studies examined psychometric properties or diagnostic accuracy of the geriatric assessment instruments used. The assessment generally took 10–45min. Geriatric assessment was most often completed to describe a patient’s health and functional status. Specific domains of geriatric assessment were associated with treatment toxicity in 6 of 9 studies and with mortality in 8 of 16 studies. Of the four studies that examined the impact of geriatric assessment on the cancer treatment decision, two found that geriatric assessment impacted 40%–50% of treatment decisions. Conclusion Geriatric assessment in the oncology setting is feasible, and some domains are associated with adverse outcomes. However, there is limited evidence that geriatric assessment

  20. Comparative oncology today.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, Melissa C; Khanna, Chand

    2007-11-01

    The value of comparative oncology has been increasingly recognized in the field of cancer research, including the identification of cancer-associated genes; the study of environmental risk factors, tumor biology, and progression; and, perhaps most importantly, the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics. The fruits of this effort are expected to be the creation of better and more specific drugs to benefit veterinary and human patients who have cancer. The state of the comparative oncology field is outlined in this article, with an emphasis on cancer in dogs.

  1. Fat in the lumbar multifidus muscles - predictive value and change following disc prosthesis surgery and multidisciplinary rehabilitation in patients with chronic low back pain and degenerative disc: 2-year follow-up of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Storheim, Kjersti; Berg, Linda; Hellum, Christian; Gjertsen, Øivind; Neckelmann, Gesche; Espeland, Ansgar; Keller, Anne

    2017-04-04

    Evidence is lacking on whether fat infiltration in the multifidus muscles affects outcomes after total disc replacement (TDR) surgery and if it develops after surgery. The aims of this study were 1) to investigate whether pre-treatment multifidus muscle fat infiltration predicts outcome 2 years after treatment with TDR surgery or multidisciplinary rehabilitation, and 2) to compare changes in multifidus muscle fat infiltration from pre-treatment to 2-year follow-up between the two treatment groups. The study is secondary analysis of data from a trial with 2-year follow-up of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) and degenerative disc randomized to TDR surgery or multidisciplinary rehabilitation. We analyzed (aim 1) patients with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at pre-treatment and valid data on outcome measures at 2-year follow-up (predictor analysis), and (aim 2) patients with MRI at both pre-treatment and 2-year follow-up. Outcome measures were visual analogue scale (VAS) for LBP, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), work status and muscle fat infiltration on MRI. Patients with pre-treatment MRI and 2-year outcome data on VAS for LBP (n = 144), ODI (n = 147), and work status (n = 137) were analyzed for prediction purposes. At 2-year follow-up, 126 patients had another MRI scan, and change in muscle fat infiltration was compared between the two treatment groups. Three radiologists visually quantified multifidus muscle fat in the three lower lumbar levels on MRI as <20% (grade 0), 20-50% (grade 1), or >50% (grade 2) of the muscle cross-section containing fat. Regression analysis and a mid-P exact test were carried out. Grade 0 pre-treatment multifidus muscle fat predicted better clinical results at 2-year follow-up after TDR surgery (all outcomes) but not after rehabilitation. At 2-year follow-up, increased fat infiltration was more common in the surgery group (intention-to-treat p = 0.03, per protocol p = 0.08) where it was related to

  2. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Awad A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B; Chapman, Christina H; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Beta Predicts Oncologic Outcome of pT3 Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Better Than Aggressive Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao Lun; Sung, Ming Tse; Tsai, Eing Mei; Lin, Chang Shen; Lee, Nai Lun; Chung, Yueh-Hua; Chiang, Po Hui

    2016-01-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UT-UC) is rare and treatment options or prognostic markers are limited. There is increasing evidence indicating that urothelial carcinoma may be an endocrine-related cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic effect of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) on the outcome of UT-UC. From 2005 to 2012, this study included 105 patients with pT3 UT-UC. Perioperative factors, pathological features, and ERβ immunostaining were reviewed and prognostic effects were examined by multivariate analysis. This study divided patients into either the ERβ-high (n = 52) or ERβ-low (n = 53) group and analyzed their oncologic outcomes. All pathological features except infiltrating tumor architecture (significantly higher incidence in ERβ-low group, p = 0.004) are symmetric in both groups. Low ERβ expression was significantly correlated with local recurrence and distant metastasis in univariate analysis (p = 0.035 and 0.004, respectively) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.05 and 0.008, respectively). Cell line study also proved that knock down of ERβ cause less UTUC proliferation and migration. In addition, ERβ agonist also enhanced the cytotoxic and migration inhibition effect of cisplatin and ERβ antagonist cause the UTUC cell more resistant to cisplatin. This result may help identify patients in need of adjuvant therapy or develop potential targeted therapy. PMID:27052470

  4. Nonclinical Evaluations of Small-Molecule Oncology Drugs: Integration into Clinical Dose Optimization and Toxicity Management.

    PubMed

    Dambach, Donna M; Simpson, Natalie E; Jones, Thomas W; Brennan, Richard J; Pazdur, Richard; Palmby, Todd R

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches that incorporate nonclinical pharmacologic and toxicologic characterization of small-molecule oncology drugs into clinical development programs may facilitate improved benefit-risk profiles and clinical toxicity management in patients. The performance of the current nonclinical safety-testing scheme was discussed, highlighting current strengths and areas for improvement. While current nonclinical testing appears to predict the clinical outcome where the prevalence of specific adverse effects are high, nonclinical testing becomes less reliable for predicting clinical adverse effects that occur infrequently, as with some kinase inhibitors. Although adverse effects associated with kinase inhibitors can often be predicted on the basis of target biology, drugs can be promiscuous and inhibit targets with poorly defined function and associated risks. Improvements in adverse effect databases and better characterization of the biologic activities of drug targets may enable better use of computational modeling approaches in predicting adverse effects with kinase inhibitors. Assessing safety of a lead candidate in parallel with other drug properties enables incorporation of a molecule's best features during chemical design, eliminates the worst molecules early, and permits timely investigation/characterization of toxicity mechanisms for identified liabilities. A safety lead optimization and candidate identification strategy that reduces intrinsic toxicity and metabolic risk and enhances selectivity can deliver selective kinase inhibitors that demonstrate on-target adverse effects identified nonclinically. Integrating clinical and nonclinical data during drug development can facilitate better identification and management of oncology drugs. Follow-up nonclinical studies may be used to better understand the risks in a given patient population and minimize or manage these risks more appropriately. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2618-22. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL

  5. Big data in oncologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Regge, Daniele; Mazzetti, Simone; Giannini, Valentina; Bracco, Christian; Stasi, Michele

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and unfortunately understanding how the components of the cancer system work does not help understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the words of the Greek philosopher Aristotle "the whole is greater than the sum of parts." To date, thanks to improved information technology infrastructures, it is possible to store data from each single cancer patient, including clinical data, medical images, laboratory tests, and pathological and genomic information. Indeed, medical archive storage constitutes approximately one-third of total global storage demand and a large part of the data are in the form of medical images. The opportunity is now to draw insight on the whole to the benefit of each individual patient. In the oncologic patient, big data analysis is at the beginning but several useful applications can be envisaged including development of imaging biomarkers to predict disease outcome, assessing the risk of X-ray dose exposure or of renal damage following the administration of contrast agents, and tracking and optimizing patient workflow. The aim of this review is to present current evidence of how big data derived from medical images may impact on the diagnostic pathway of the oncologic patient.

  6. [Better multidisciplinary team meetings are linked to better care].

    PubMed

    van Drielen, Eveline; de Vries, Antoinette W; Ottevanger, P B Nelleke; Hermens, Rosella P M G

    2012-01-01

    Discussing a patient in an oncology multidisciplinary team meeting (MTM) increases the value of the quality of the treatment chosen. MTMs are increasingly mentioned in guidelines and indicator sets. Based on literature review and observations, the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Netherlands (CCCNL), in collaboration with IQ Healthcare and the Department of Medical Oncology of the UMC St Radboud Nijmegen in the Netherlands, has conducted research into the quality criteria for a good MTM. Two of our studies show that the organisation of MTMs can be significantly improved. Based on the results, we developed a checklist to accomplish this. The most significant areas of improvement for optimising the organisation of MTMs are: (a) the presence of specialists from all relevant disciplines; (b) a capable chairman who promotes the efficiency of the MTM; and (c) the reduction of intruding factors, such as mobile phones and participants who walk in and out.

  7. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Imaging in oncology.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Mukbil H; Nassar, Lara; Haydar, Mohamad; Hourany-Rizk, Roula G

    2009-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the management of cancer patients, and in screening of asymptomatic individuals for early detection of cancer. This paper will review the clinical applications of oncologic imaging in the diagnosis, staging and followup in cancer patients and screening for cancer.

  9. The optimal organization of gynecologic oncology services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M.; Kennedy, E.B.; Biagi, J.; Colgan, T.; D’Souza, D.; Elit, L.M.; Hunter, A.; Irish, J.; McLeod, R.; Rosen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background A system-level organizational guideline for gynecologic oncology was identified by a provincial cancer agency as a key priority based on input from stakeholders, data showing more limited availability of multidisciplinary or specialist care in lower-volume than in higher-volume hospitals in the relevant jurisdiction, and variable rates of staging for ovarian and endometrial cancer patients. Methods A systematic review assessed the relationship of the organization of gynecologic oncology services with patient survival and surgical outcomes. The electronic databases medline and embase (ovid: 1996 through 9 January 2015) were searched using terms related to gynecologic malignancies combined with organization of services, patterns of care, and various facility and physician characteristics. Outcomes of interest included overall or disease-specific survival, short-term survival, adequate staging, and degree of cytoreduction or optimal cytoreduction (or both) for ovarian cancer patients by hospital or physician type, and rate of discrepancy in initial diagnoses and intraoperative consultation between non-specialist pathologists and gyne-oncology–specialist pathologists. Results One systematic review and sixteen additional primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base as a whole was judged to be of lower quality; however, a trend toward improved outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology was found, particularly with respect to the gynecologic oncology care of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Conclusions Improvements in outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology services can be attributed to a number of factors, including access to specialist care and multidisciplinary team management. Findings of this systematic review should be used with caution because of the limitations of the evidence base; however, an expert consensus process made it possible to create recommendations for implementation. PMID:26300679

  10. Side effects of chemotherapy in musculoskeletal oncology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Romantini, Matteo; Angelini, Andrea; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in medical and orthopedic oncology, radiation therapy and single- or multiple-agent perioperative chemotherapy are currently applied as an essential part of the multidisciplinary treatment to improve disease-free and overall survival of patients with primary and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumors. However, these treatments have led to unwanted complications. A better understanding of the effects of various antineoplastic agents on bone, soft tissue, and organs may provide the basis for the more efficacious use of antiproliferative drugs when fracture healing or allograft incorporation is required. This knowledge may also provide a rationale for concurrent treatment with drugs that protect against or compensate for adverse effects in osseous repair resulting from chemotherapy.

  11. Multidisciplinary audit of digoxin.

    PubMed

    Keys, P W; DeSantis, D; Duffy, M G

    1978-08-01

    Use review of digoxin as part of a medical care evaluation study in a hospital is described. This drug audit within the hospital's quality assurance program used a multidisciplinary approach. The study was designed to measure the incidence of digoxin toxicity, evaluate monitoring practices for digoxin use and evaluate the adequacy of digoxin dosing patterns. Forty-eight patients were involved. Results indicated that some patients were not adequately assessed in regard to renal function and digoxin serum level. Further, there was a 17% incidence of digoxin toxicity. Studies such as this give pharmacists an opportunity to use their knowledge of proper drug use through a structured hospital program.

  12. Protein Kinase A RI-{alpha} Predicts for Prostate Cancer Outcome: Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 86-10

    SciTech Connect

    Khor, Li-Yan; Bae, Kyounghwa; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Grignon, David J.; Sause, William T.; Pilepich, Miljenko V.; Okunieff, Paul P.; Sandler, Howard M.; Pollack, Alan

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: The RI-{alpha} regulatory subunit of protein kinase A type 1 (PKA) is constitutively overexpressed in human cancer cell lines and is associated with active cell growth and neoplastic transformation. This report examined the association between PKA expression and the endpoints of biochemical failure (BF), local failure (LF), distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and overall mortality in men treated with radiotherapy, with or without short-term androgen deprivation in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 86-10. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment archival diagnostic tissue samples from 80 patients were stained for PKA by immunohistochemical methods from a parent cohort of 456 cases. PKA intensity was scored manually and by image analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model for overall mortality and Fine and Gray's regression models for CSM, DM, LF and BF were then applied to determine the relationship of PKA expression to the endpoints. Results: The pretreatment characteristics of the missing and determined PKA groups were not significantly different. On univariate analyses, a high PKA staining intensity was associated with BF (image analysis, continuous variable, p = 0.022), LF (image analysis, dichotomized variable, p = 0.011), CSM (manual analysis, p = 0.037; image analysis, continuous, p = 0.014), and DM (manual analysis, p = 0.029). On multivariate analyses, the relationships to BF (image analysis, continuous, p = 0.03), LF (image analysis, dichotomized, p = 0.002), and DM remained significant (manual analysis, p = 0.018). In terms of CSM, a trend toward an association was seen (manual analysis, p = 0.08; image analysis, continuous, p = 0.09). Conclusion: PKA overexpression was significantly related to patient outcome and is a potentially useful biomarker for identifying high-risk prostate cancer patients who might benefit from a PKA knockdown strategy.

  13. High-performance GPU-based rendering for real-time, rigid 2D/3D-image registration and motion prediction in radiation oncology

    PubMed Central

    Spoerk, Jakob; Gendrin, Christelle; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Furtado, Hugo; Fabri, Daniella; Bloch, Christoph; Bergmann, Helmar; Gröller, Eduard; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of lung cancer as well as other malignant diseases is the compensation of periodic and aperiodic motion during dose delivery. Modern systems for image-guided radiation oncology allow for the acquisition of cone-beam computed tomography data in the treatment room as well as the acquisition of planar radiographs during the treatment. A mid-term research goal is the compensation of tumor target volume motion by 2D/3D registration. In 2D/3D registration, spatial information on organ location is derived by an iterative comparison of perspective volume renderings, so-called digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) from computed tomography volume data, and planar reference x-rays. Currently, this rendering process is very time consuming, and real-time registration, which should at least provide data on organ position in less than a second, has not come into existence. We present two GPU-based rendering algorithms which generate a DRR of 512 × 512 pixels size from a CT dataset of 53 MB size at a pace of almost 100 Hz. This rendering rate is feasible by applying a number of algorithmic simplifications which range from alternative volume-driven rendering approaches – namely so-called wobbled splatting – to sub-sampling of the DRR-image by means of specialized raycasting techniques. Furthermore, general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming paradigms were consequently utilized. Rendering quality and performance as well as the influence on the quality and performance of the overall registration process were measured and analyzed in detail. The results show that both methods are competitive and pave the way for fast motion compensation by rigid and possibly even non-rigid 2D/3D registration and, beyond that, adaptive filtering of motion models in IGRT. PMID:21782399

  14. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  15. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    PubMed

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  16. Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

  17. Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Curd M L; Beikler, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover,halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear-nose-throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear-nose-throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo.Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins.

  18. Exercise therapy in oncology rehabilitation in Australia: A mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Dennett, Amy M; Peiris, Casey L; Shields, Nora; Morgan, Delwyn; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2016-12-22

    Oncology rehabilitation improves outcomes for cancer survivors but little is known about program availability in Australia. The aims of this study were: to describe oncology rehabilitation programs in Australia: determine whether the exercise component of programs is consistent with guidelines: and to explore barriers and facilitators to program implementation. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods study was completed in two phases: (1) a survey of Australian oncology rehabilitation programs; and (2) purposively sampled follow-up semistructured interviews with senior clinicians working in oncology rehabilitation who were involved with exercise prescription. Hospitals and/or cancer centers from 42 public hospital health networks (representing 163 hospitals) and 39 private hospitals were contacted to identify 31 oncology rehabilitation programs. All 31 surveys were returned (100% response rate). Programs were typically multidisciplinary, ran twice weekly, provided education and exercise and included self-management strategies. Exercise prescription and progression was patient centered and included a combination of resistance and aerobic training supplemented by balance, pelvic floor, and core stability exercises. Challenges to implementation included a lack of awareness of programs in the community and organizational barriers such as funding. Strong links with oncologists facilitated program referrals. Despite evidence to support oncology rehabilitation, there are few programs in Australia and there are challenges that limit it becoming part of standard practice. Programs that exist are multidisciplinary with a focus on exercise with the majority of programs following a cardiac rehabilitation model of care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. GRC RBCC Concept Multidisciplinary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the GRC RBCC Concept for Multidisciplinary Analysis. The multidisciplinary coupling procedure is presented, along with technique validations and axisymmetric multidisciplinary inlet and structural results. The NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) test bed developments and code parallelization are also presented. These include milestones and accomplishments, a discussion of running R4 fan application on the PII cluster as compared to other platforms, and the National Combustor Code speedup.

  20. Individualized Prediction of Overall Survival After Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Korean Radiation Oncology Group Study (KROG 13-03)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Han, Seungbong; Kim, Young Seok; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Jin Hee; Cha, Soon Do; Kim, Juree; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yoon, Mee Sun; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: A nomogram is a predictive statistical model that generates the continuous probability of a clinical event such as death or recurrence. The aim of the study was to construct a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after postoperative radiation therapy for stage IB to IIA cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The clinical data from 1702 patients with early-stage cervical cancer, treated at 10 participating hospitals from 1990 to 2011, were reviewed to develop a prediction nomogram based on the Cox proportional hazards model. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic variables were included and analyzed to formulate the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration power of the model was measured using a concordance index (c-index) and calibration curve. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 75.6 months, and the 5-year overall survival probability was 87.1%. The final model was constructed using the following variables: age, number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and the use of concurrent chemotherapy. The nomogram predicted the 5-year overall survival with a c-index of 0.69, which was superior to the predictive power of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system (c-index of 0.54). Conclusions: A survival-predicting nomogram that offers an accurate level of prediction and discrimination was developed based on a large multi-center study. The model may be more useful than the FIGO staging system for counseling individual patients regarding prognosis.

  1. The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership: helping to establish multidisciplinary cancer care in Blantyre, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Gorman, D; Knowles, G; Taylor, F; Jere, Y; Bates, J; Masamba, L

    2016-03-01

    In response to the growing incidence of cancer in Malawi, a new oncology unit was established at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre. The unit opened in 2010, the first in the country, and is led by a single consultant oncologist. In 2012, a healthcare partnership was formed between the oncology and palliative care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK. The principal objective of the partnership is to help develop high quality multidisciplinary cancer care in Malawi. Methods A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of cancer services: nurse-led treatment delivery; management of clinical data; and multidisciplinary working. The partnership received grant funding from the Scottish Government Malawi Development Programme in 2013 and a three year project plan was implemented. This has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Results Key achievements have been completion of a programme of oncology nursing education attended by 32 oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals, which has resulted in increased experience in cancer practice and standardisation of chemotherapy delivery procedures; development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with cancer and which links to the Malawi Cancer Registry; development of weekly multidisciplinary meetings involving oncology, gynaecology and surgery that has enabled a cross-specialty approach to patient care. Conclusion The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will focus on the further development of multidisciplinary breast cancer care and the development of a radiotherapy service for patients in Malawi.

  2. [Biosimilars in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sérgio; Coutinho, Jorge; Damasceno, Margarida; Dinis, José; Forjaz de Lacerda, João; Gervásio, Helena; Leal da Costa, Fernando; Marques Pereira, Ana; Parreira, António; Principe, Fernando; Rodrigues, Helena; Sá, Anabela; Teixeira, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    The development of biotechnology drugs represents one of the great advances in medical therapy and it was observed an exponential growth in its use. The resource to these drugs in Oncology and Hematology is no exception and it soon became an essential element of an integrated and directed therapy strategy. The expiry of the first biotechnology drugs patents has opened the door for the development and marketing of biosimilars, which entry in the Portuguese market was recently approved. This article was built on the analysis of the available state-of-the-art information on biotechnology drugs, biosimilars and current legislation and it expresses the opinion of Oncology and Hematology experts about the substituition of biological drugs by biosimilars in clinical practice.

  3. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  4. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm(2); stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm(2)) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P < .001). Minor amputations (stage 1, 18%; stage 4, 56%) and revascularizations (stage 1, 6%; stage 4, 55%) were more common with increasing WIfI stage (P < .001). On Kaplan-Meier analysis, WIfI classification was predictive of wound healing (P < .001) but not of major amputation (P = .99). For stage 4 wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among

  5. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  6. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  7. Liver tumors: Multidisciplinary management

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, W.J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on an aggressive, multidisciplinary approach toward patients with liver tumors. It was written in response to the recognition that a greater range of therapeutic management is being offered. Management of such tumors involve more than one individual - included is the primary physician first contacted by the patient, the diagnostician and finally the group of individuals that actually treats the disease. Either intermittent systemic chemotherapy is given, or a few highly selected cases have massive hepatic resections in a very few major medical centers. Further, the perception has been clouded by a combination of high surgical mortality and poor results obtainable with conventional systemic chemotherapy. For this reason, the authors have undertaken a study of liver tumors. Their major objective is to show that it is possible to obtain superior results by presenting a range of options.

  8. [Depression in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, M

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to make a brief review of the main problematics raised by depression in oncology in terms of prevalence, semiology, screening, risk, prognosis factors and treatment. This reflection was based on recent literature data obtained through a PubMed search. Depressive disorders have frequently been encountered in cancer patients. During routine oncology daily care, depression screening, assessment and treatment are of paramount importance regarding psychosocial management. Depressive elements have a tremendous impact on the quality of life, tolerance and compliance with anticancer treatment. Moreover, depression morbidity and its possible influence on prognosis represent an important challenge in terms of prevention. A specific semiology for depressive disorders in the oncologic field might be more relevant with practical clinical implications. Optimal care of these mood disorders have to be implemented as soon as possible and be supported by the association of pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2010 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  10. Hybrid Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Maseeh uz; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Zaman, Unaiza; Shahid, Wajeeha; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    In oncology various imaging modalities play a crucial role in diagnosis, staging, restaging, treatment monitoring and follow up of various cancers. Stand-alone morphological imaging like computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide a high magnitude of anatomical details about the tumor but are relatively dumb about tumor physiology. Stand-alone functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are rich in functional information but provide little insight into tumor morphology. Introduction of first hybrid modality PET/CT is the one of the most successful stories of current century which has revolutionized patient care in oncology due to its high diagnostic accuracy. Spurred on by this success, more hybrid imaging modalities like SPECT/CT and PET/MR were introduced. It is the time to explore the potential applications of the existing hybrid modalities, developing and implementing standardized imaging protocols and train users in nuclear medicine and radiology. In this review we discuss three existing hybrid modalities with emphasis on their technical aspects and clinical applications in oncology.

  11. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested.

  12. Commentary on 19th annual scientific meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) is the premier organization dedicated to the cause of central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Although it is primarily located in North America, it attracts considerable memberships from all over the world with truly multi-disciplinary representations from not only neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, radiation oncology, medical oncology and basic scientists, but also in recent years from imaging, psychology, epidemiology, public health and industry, etc. SNO annual meetings are very much looked forward to with presentations of the latest cutting edge data as well as several educational sessions for trainees and updates for senior members too. The meeting is unique in the way that almost the entire scientific agenda is based on submitted abstracts with very few invited lectures. PMID:25810579

  13. Challenges and opportunities to advance pediatric neuro-oncology care in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael H; Boop, Frederick; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    As the morbidity and mortality associated with communicable diseases continue to decrease in the developing world, the medical burden of childhood cancer continues to expand. Although international aid and relief groups such as the World Health Organization recognize the importance of childhood cancer, their main emphasis is on the more easily treated malignancies, such as leukemias and lymphomas, and not pediatric brain tumors, which are the second most common malignancy in children and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the pediatric population. Addressing the needs of these children is a growing concern of several professional neuro-oncology-related societies. Thus, the goal of this review is to describe the current state of pediatric neuro-oncology care in the developing world, address the current and future needs of the field, and help guide professional societies' efforts to contribute in a more holistic and multidisciplinary manner. We reviewed the literature to compare the availability of neuro-oncology care in various regions of the developing world with that in higher income nations, to describe examples of successful initiatives, and to present opportunities to improve care. The current challenges, previous successes, and future opportunities to improve neuro-oncology care are presented. The multidisciplinary nature of neuro-oncology depends on large teams of highly specialized individuals, including neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, neurologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, palliative care specialists, oncology nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, pediatric intensivists, and social workers, among others. Pediatric neuro-oncology is one of the most complex types of medical care to deliver, as it relies on numerous specialists, subspecialists, support staff, and physical resources and infrastructure. However, with increasing collaboration and advancing technologies, developed nations

  14. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes.

  15. Prognostic and predictive implications of Sokal, Euro and EUTOS scores in chronic myeloid leukaemia in the imatinib era-experience from a tertiary oncology centre in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Kuntegowdanahalli, Lakshmaiah Chinnagiriyappa; Kanakasetty, Govind Babu; Thanky, Aditi Harsh; Dasappa, Lokanatha; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Mallekavu, Suresh Babu; Lakkavalli, Rajeev Krishnappa; Kadabur, Lokesh N; Haleshappa, Rudresha Antapura

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder. Over the years many prognostic models have been developed to better risk stratify this disease at baseline. Sokal, Euro, and EUTOS scores were developed in varied populations initially receiving various therapies. Here we try to identify their predictive and prognostic implication in a larger population of Indian patients with CML-CP (chronic phase) in the imatinib era.

  16. Comparison of ¹²³I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and ¹³¹I-MIBG semi-quantitative scores in predicting survival in patients with stage 4 neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Arlene; Parisi, Marguerite T; Shulkin, Barry L; London, Wendy B; Matthay, Katherine K; Kreissman, Susan G; Yanik, Gregory A

    2011-07-01

    ¹²³I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scans are preferable to ¹³¹I-MIBG for neuroblastoma imaging as they deliver less patient radiation yet have greater sensitivity in disease detection. Both ¹²³I-MIBG and ¹³¹I-MIBG scans were used for disease assessments of neuroblastoma patients enrolled on Children's Oncology Group (COG) high-risk study A3973. The hypothesis was that ¹²³I-MIBG and ¹³¹I-MIBG scans were sufficiently similar for clinical purposes in terms of ability to predict survival. Patients enrolled on COG A3973 with stage 4 disease who completed ¹²³I-MIBG or ¹³¹I-MIBG scans at diagnosis, post-induction, post-transplant, or post-biotherapy were analyzed. The performance of the Curie score for each MIBG scan type in predicting survival was evaluated. At each time point, survival curves for ¹²³I-MIBG versus ¹³¹I-MIBG were compared using the log-rank test. Of the 413 patients on A3973 with at least one MIBG scan, 350 were stage 4. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 33.4 ± 3.6% and 45.6 ± 4.0% (N = 350). At post-induction, EFS (P = 0.3501) and OS (P = 0.5337) for ¹²³I-MIBG versus ¹³¹I-MIBG were not significantly different. Similarly, comparisons at the three other time points were non-significant. We found no evidence of a statistically significant difference in outcome by type of scan. For future survival analyses of MIBG Curie scores, ¹²³I-MIBG and ¹³¹I-MIBG results may be combined and analyzed overall, without adjustment for scan type. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Ascites predicts treatment benefit of bevacizumab in front-line therapy of advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancers: an NRG Oncology/GOG study.

    PubMed

    Ferriss, James S; Java, James J; Bookman, Michael A; Fleming, Gini F; Monk, Bradley J; Walker, Joan L; Homesley, Howard D; Fowler, Jeffrey; Greer, Benjamin E; Boente, Matthew P; Burger, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Predictive factors for efficacy of bevacizumab in advanced ovarian cancer have remained elusive. We investigated ascites both as a prognostic factor and as a predictor of efficacy for bevacizumab. Using data from GOG 0218, patients receiving cytotoxic therapy plus concurrent and maintenance bevacizumab were compared to those receiving cytotoxic therapy plus placebo. The presence of ascites was determined prospectively. Chi-square and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests compared baseline variables between subgroups. Survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate independent prognostic factors and estimate their covariate-adjusted effects on survival. Treatment arms were balanced with respect to ascites and other prognostic factors. Overall, 886 (80%) women had ascites, 221 (20%) did not. Those with ascites were more likely to have: poorer performance status (p<0.001); serous histology (p=0.012); higher baseline CA125 (p<0.001); and suboptimal cytoreduction (p=0.004). In multivariate survival analysis, ascites was prognostic of poor OS (Adjusted HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.48, p=0.045), but not PFS. In predictive analysis, patients without ascites treated with bevacizumab had no significant improvement in either PFS (AHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59-1.10, p=0.18) or OS (AHR 0.94, 95% CI 0.65-1.36, p=0.76). Patients with ascites treated with bevacizumab had significantly improved PFS (AHR 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.81, p<0.001) and OS (AHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.70-0.96, p=0.014). Ascites in women with advanced ovarian cancer is prognostic of poor overall survival. Ascites may predict the population of women more likely to derive long-term benefit from bevacizumab. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Music therapy: a valuable adjunct in the oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Emily M; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2011-08-01

    Music therapy is the supervised and therapeutic use of music by a credentialed therapist to promote positive clinical outcomes. It can be a valuable form of complementary medicine in the oncology setting to decrease patient stress and anxiety, relieve pain and nausea, provide distraction, alleviate depression, and promote the expression of feelings. The music therapist assesses the patient and consults other members of the multidisciplinary team to create a therapeutic treatment plan. Music therapists design music sessions based on patients' needs and their intended therapeutic goals. Patients can participate actively or passively in individual or group sessions. Only a credentialed music therapist can provide safe and beneficial music therapy interventions.

  19. Facilitating Teamwork in Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca H; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Smith, Ashley W; Block, Rebecca G; Keyton, Joann

    2016-11-01

    A case of a young adult patient in the days immediately after a cancer diagnosis illustrates the critical importance of three interrelated core coordinating mechanisms-closed-loop communication, shared mental models, and mutual trust-of teamwork in an adolescent and young adult multidisciplinary oncology team. The case illustrates both the opportunities to increase team member coordination and the problems that can occur when coordination breaks down. A model for teamwork is presented, which highlights the relationships among these coordinating mechanisms and demonstrates how balance among them works to optimize team function and patient care. Implications for clinical practice and research suggested by the case are presented.

  20. Facilitating Teamwork in Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Smith, Ashley W.; Block, Rebecca G.; Keyton, Joann

    2016-01-01

    A case of a young adult patient in the days immediately after a cancer diagnosis illustrates the critical importance of three interrelated core coordinating mechanisms—closed-loop communication, shared mental models, and mutual trust—of teamwork in an adolescent and young adult multidisciplinary oncology team. The case illustrates both the opportunities to increase team member coordination and the problems that can occur when coordination breaks down. A model for teamwork is presented, which highlights the relationships among these coordinating mechanisms and demonstrates how balance among them works to optimize team function and patient care. Implications for clinical practice and research suggested by the case are presented. PMID:27624944

  1. Imaging of complications of oncological therapy in the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Chitra; Bhosale, Priya; Ganeshan, Dhakshin Moorthy; Truong, Myelene T; Silverman, Paul; Balachandran, Aparna

    2012-05-07

    Treatment of cancer involves a multidisciplinary approach consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy and radiation therapy. These therapies work on the tumor cells to result in cell stasis or cell death. The same mechanism can result in toxicity to the normal gastrointestinal tract. Radiation therapy can cause acute and chronic injury. The chronic injury results from involvement of the vascular supply of the gastrointestinal tract and by causing fibrosis. The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging of complications resulting from oncologic treatment in the gastrointestinal system.

  2. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  3. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Affinita, Antonio; Catalani, Loredana; Cecchetto, Giovanna; De Lorenzo, Gianfranco; Dilillo, Dario; Donegani, Giorgio; Fransos, Lucia; Lucidi, Fabio; Mameli, Chiara; Manna, Elisa; Marconi, Paolo; Mele, Giuseppe; Minestroni, Laura; Montanari, Massimo; Morcellini, Mario; Rovera, Giuseppe; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Sachet, Marco; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2013-07-10

    The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being.

  4. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Discussion Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. Summary The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being. PMID:23842429

  5. Advances in viral oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 of Advances in Viral Oncology presents experimental approaches to multifactorial interactions in tumor development. Included are in-depth analyses of malignant phenotypes by oncogene complementation, as well as studies of complementary interactions among DNA viral oncogenes; multiple cell-derived sequences in single retroviral genomes; and sequences that influence the transforming activity and expression of the mos oncogene. The genetic regulation of tumorigenic expression in somatic cell hybrids, the inhibition of oncogenes by cellular genes, and the interaction of genes that favor and genes that suppress tumorigenesis are examined in detail. The book concludes with a study of the relationship of oncogenes to the evolution of the metastatic phenotype.

  6. Oncology disease management.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald E; Terry, Rachel

    2007-02-01

    Oncologic conditions are ubiquitous medical illnesses that present a particular challenge for medical management programs designed to address quality and cost issues in patient populations. Disease management strategies represent a reasonable and effective approach for employers and health plans in their arsenal of health management strategies. Multiple reasons exist for the development of specialized disease management programs that deal with cancer patients, some unique to this group of individuals. Health plans and/or employers have solid justification for addressing these issues directly through programs developed specifically to work with cancer patients. Whether developed within a health plan, or "carved out" to an external vendor, proper evaluation of outcomes is essential.

  7. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    PubMed

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  8. Positive surgical margins in radical prostatectomy patients do not predict long-term oncological outcomes: results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort.

    PubMed

    Mithal, Prabhakar; Howard, Lauren E; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher; Freedland, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    To assess the impact of positive surgical margins (PSMs) on long-term outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP), including metastasis, castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Retrospective study of 4,051 men in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) cohort treated by RP from 1988 to 2013. Proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of PSMs in predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR), CRPC, metastases, and PCSM. To determine if PSMs were more predictive in certain patients, analyses were stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, and preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. The median (interquartile range) follow-up was 6.6 (3.2-10.6) years and 1 127 patients had >10 years of follow-up. During this time, 302 (32%) men had BCR, 112 (3%) developed CRPC, 144 (4%) developed metastases, and 83 (2%) died from prostate cancer. There were 1,600 (40%) men with PSMs. In unadjusted models, PSMs were significantly associated with all adverse outcomes: BCR, CRPC, metastases and PCSM (all P ≤ 0.001). After adjusting for demographic and pathological characteristics, PSMs were associated with increased risk of only BCR (HR 1.98, P < 0.001), and not CRPC, metastases, or PCSM (HR ≤1.29, P > 0.18). Similar results were seen when stratified by pathological Gleason score, stage, or PSA level, and when patients who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy were excluded. PSMs after RP are not an independent risk factor for CRPC, metastasis, or PCSM overall or within any subset. In the absence of other high-risk features, PSMs alone may not be an indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology New York, New York, United ... The 10th Joint MSKCC/HSS/IOR Course in Musculoskeletal Tumor Pathology and Clinical Oncology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center ...

  10. Oncology in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  11. Lesson in psycho-oncology.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jimmie C

    2002-01-01

    As a new subspecialty of oncology, psycho-oncology's emergent role reflects the growing interest and concern over the past 25 years, on the part of both oncologists and the general public, in the psychological, behavioral, and social factors related to cancer prevention and treatment. Today, total care of cancer patients must include concern for psychosocial well-being and management of distress must be fully integrated with the other aspects of the patient's treatment plan. Prevention efforts are rooted in the willingness and ability of individuals to change lifestyle and risk behaviors, and this has to be elucidated by research in psycho-oncology. Further, psycho-oncology advances theory and practice related to the effects of cancer on psychological function and provides expertise in the prevention of cancer. Thus, psycho-oncology has a unique role to play in cancer treatment and prevention.

  12. Stress in pediatric oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Hecktman, Hillary Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Although the onset of physiological and emotional stress can greatly affect outcomes for a child with cancer, the focus of this review targets pediatric oncology nurses and their daily occupation-related stress. Literature currently exists that discusses the etiology of stress in the oncology work environment as well as coping strategies and their effects on pediatric oncology nurses' stress levels. To date, however, no literature review has been assembled to comprehensively address practice implications and provide recommendations for pediatric oncology staff nurses. This review of literature seeks to provide a general overview of stress experienced in the pediatric oncology work environment and supportive interventions to decrease negative outcomes such as compassion fatigue and burnout. Recommendations and conclusions are made based on existing interventions, thus creating a framework for future research to be conducted to compare the effectiveness of these measures and optimize patient experiences through caregiver well-being.

  13. Multidisciplinary approach to obesity.

    PubMed

    Donini, L M; Donini, M L; Savina, C; Castellaneta, E; Coletti, C; Paolini, M; Scavone, L; Civale, C; Ceccarelli, P; Zaninotto, S; Tineri, M; Grossi, G; De Felice, M R; Cannella, C

    2009-03-01

    Obesity, associated with morbidity and mortality, is a complex disorder, characterised by an increase in fat mass (FM). Most authors agree in considering essential an integrated treatment made up of nutritional intervention, physical reconditioning programme and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy. However, the feasibility is problematic and data in literature confirming the validity of this approach are poor. To verify the efficacy of a multidimensional approach (Nutritional Psycho-Physical Reconditioning - NPPR) in obesity treatment. All patients admitted from June 2002 to June 2004 (464 subjects) ranged from 18 to 65 years old, with a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 were included in the programme. After the nutritional status evaluation a standard dietetic treatment (group N) or an integrated and multidisciplinary obesity treatment (group NPPR) was proposed. In group NPPR treatment duration was significantly higher (142.6+/-26 vs 48.6+/-55 days - p=0.000), while the drop-out amount was definitely lower (5.5 vs 54.4%; p=0.000). Weight loss compared to the initial weight and the difference between initial and final FM resulted significantly higher in group NNPR. Subjects in NPPR obtained a higher increase in the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test (59.9+/-19 vs 40.5+/-17 m; p=0.04) and in muscular strength. State and trait anxiety, mood and quality of life scores improved in NPPR subjects while remained substantially stable in group N. An integrated approach to obesity is the way to be pursued in order to obtain important and at least short-term results.

  14. [Treatment planning visit in oncology: factors predictive of satisfaction with the meeting with the physician and benefits of a second interview with a nurse].

    PubMed

    Négrier, Sylvie; Gomez, Frédéric; Chauvin, Frank; Buclon, Murielle; Syp, Laurence; Gonnon, Giovanna; Dumortier, Arlette; Friedrich, Manon; Saltel, Pierre

    2007-05-01

    Effective patient-physician communication is essential in life-threatening diseases. This is why a specific process, the so-called "diagnosis disclosure visit", is included in the management protocol for cancer patients. The distress engendered by the news may, however, hinder the information process. We analyzed the emotional aspects of the consultation before informed consent to clinical trials in 140 patients with advanced cancer, to assess whether emotions interfered with information quality and to evaluate the potential benefit of a second interview with a nurse. Principal component analysis of responses to a self-completed questionnaire determined the satisfaction scores of interviews. Factors predictive of satisfaction were tested with a logistic regression model. Although most patients rated themselves as fully informed, 37% required additional information. Two variables were significantly correlated with success of the interview: a low depression score on the HADS scale (included in the questionnaire) and a feeling of inability to ask all questions. A second interview with the nurse increased patient satisfaction with the information from 63% to 95% on average. Cancer patients need information and do not always feel they have received it after speaking to the oncologist. They cannot always express their concerns, or may fear the answers to questions they therefore avoid asking. Depressed patients appear to find it more difficult to understand the information provided.

  15. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    SciTech Connect

    Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Link, Emma; Lehman, Margot; Campbell, Gillian; O'Brien, Peter; Chua, Boon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dose–volume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dose–volume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

  16. Can we predict plan quality for external beam partial breast irradiation: results of a multicenter feasibility study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02).

    PubMed

    Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Link, Emma; Lehman, Margot; Campbell, Gillian; O'Brien, Peter; Chua, Boon

    2013-11-15

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dose-volume parameters of organs at risk. Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dose-volume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The IR Evolution in Oncology: Tools, Treatments, and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    de Baere, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Early focus of interventional oncologists was developing tools and imaging guidance, performing "procedures" acting as a skillful technician without knowledge of clinical patient outcomes, beyond post-treatment image findings. Interventional oncologists must deliver "treatments" and not "procedures", and focus on clinically relevant outcomes, provide clinical continuity of care, which means stand at multidisciplinary tumor boards, see patients in consultation before treatment and for follow-up. Interventional oncologists have fought for the same "market" with surgery in a head to head, bloody competition called red ocean strategy in marketing terms, resulting in many aborted trials. Wide adoption of interventional oncology is facing the challenge to build evidence with overall survival as endpoint in randomized trials while the benefits of a treatment on overall survival are diluted by the effects of possible/inevitable subsequent therapies. Because interventional oncology is a disruptive force in medicine achieving same results as others (surgery) using different, less invasive approaches, patients where surgery is irrelevant can be target with a blue ocean strategy (to propose treatment where there is no competition). Recently interventional oncology has been included in the ESMO guidelines for colorectal cancer with oligometastatic disease with both surgical resection, and thermal ablation classified in the same category called "local ablative treatments". Interventional oncologists have to shape the future by publications in oncologic journal, by being active members of oncology scientific societies, and use modern public megaphone (blog, video sharing, …) to disseminate information and let society know that interventional is not a me-too product but a disruptive treatment.

  18. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Patrick Y; Chang, Susan M; Van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Macdonald, David R; Lee, Eudocia Q

    2017-07-20

    Development of novel therapies for CNS tumors requires reliable assessment of response and progression. This requirement has been particularly challenging in neuro-oncology for which contrast enhancement serves as an imperfect surrogate for tumor volume and is influenced by agents that affect vascular permeability, such as antiangiogenic therapies. In addition, most tumors have a nonenhancing component that can be difficult to accurately quantify. To improve the response assessment in neuro-oncology and to standardize the criteria that are used for different CNS tumors, the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group was established. This multidisciplinary international working group consists of neuro-oncologists, medical oncologists, neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neuropsychologists, and experts in clinical outcomes assessments, working in collaboration with government and industry to enhance the interpretation of clinical trials. The RANO working group was originally created to update response criteria for high- and low-grade gliomas and to address such issues as pseudoresponse and nonenhancing tumor progression from antiangiogenic therapies, and pseudoprogression from radiochemotherapy. RANO has expanded to include working groups that are focused on other tumors, including brain metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, spine tumors, pediatric brain tumors, and meningiomas, as well as other clinical trial end points, such as clinical outcomes assessments, seizures, corticosteroid use, and positron emission tomography imaging. In an effort to standardize the measurement of neurologic function for clinical assessment, the Neurologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology scale was drafted. Born out of a workshop conducted by the Jumpstarting Brain Tumor Drug Development Coalition and the US Food and Drug Administration, a standardized brain tumor imaging protocol now exists to reduce variability and improve reliability. Efforts by RANO

  19. Clinical trials of interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuaki

    2012-08-01

    Interventional oncology has great potential to be a good treatment modality in the field of oncology, because its procedures are minimally invasive and fairly quick. However, except for a few procedures such as percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and trans-catheter arterial chemo-embolization that have been recognized as standard treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, most procedures have not been established as the standard treatment modality due to the limited number of clinical trials with compelling evidence. There are several common problems when performing clinical trials of interventional oncology. The first is that the outcomes of clinical trials are greatly influenced by the level of technical skill of the physicians. The second is that equipment and devices vary widely in countries and regions, and they also influence the outcomes. The third is that the methodology of clinical trials for techniques such as interventional oncology has not yet been established. The fourth is the difficulty of setting appropriate endpoints; quality of life is suitable for evaluating interventional oncology in palliative care, but it is not easy to set as the endpoint. The fifth is the difficulty of employing a blinded design, because the procedure cannot be performed without the physician's awareness. Despite such difficult situations, many multi-institutional clinical trials of interventional oncology have been carried out in Japan, with some challenging results. Establishing evidence is critical to making interventional oncology the standard treatment. Interventional radiologists should know the importance of clinical trials, and should move ahead in this direction in a step-by-step manner.

  20. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  1. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital.

  2. Radiation oncology (Vol. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Radiation Oncology series features update reports on the current status of primary therapy for lung cancer and the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hepatomas. Other articles describe the use of stereotaxic interstitial implantation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and discuss the indications for and results of radiation as the primary or adjuvant treatment of large bowel cancer. Reports on new technological developments examine the biological basis and clinical potential of local-regional hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy. Included are reviews of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of cancer and of three-dimensional treatment planning for high energy external beam radiotherapy.

  3. [Dermato-oncological rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Buhles, N; Sander, C

    2005-07-01

    National insurance companies in Germany support health cures for patients with malignant tumors (malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell tumor, malignant cutaneous lymphoma). The clinical requirements are an invasively growing tumor, problems of self-assurance, and dis-integration of the patient regarding his social and/or professional environment. The decision for a health cure is made by the treating dermatologist in the hospital. In this context, the following sociomedical criteria should be applied: impairment, disability, and handicap. Usually, rehabilitation starts after the patient is discharged from the hospital. The inpatient rehabilitation program should be performed at an institution capable of providing dermatological and psychological treatment. The dermatologist acts as a manager for the members of the rehabilitation team (psychologists, physiotherapists, social workers, and ergo-therapists). In conclusion, dermato-oncologic rehabilitation plays an important role in re-integrating the patient into his professional life to avoid retirement.

  4. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  5. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning.

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology provisional clinical opinion: testing for KRAS gene mutations in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma to predict response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Carmen J; Jessup, J Milburn; Somerfield, Mark R; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hammond, Elizabeth H; Hayes, Daniel F; McAllister, Pamela K; Morton, Roscoe F; Schilsky, Richard L

    2009-04-20

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO), offers timely clinical direction to ASCO's oncologists following publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO addresses the utility of KRAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma to predict response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy with cetuximab or panitumumab (see Note). Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials demonstrate that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer benefit from therapy with monoclonal antibodies directed against the EGFR, when used either as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. Retrospective subset analyses of the data from these trials strongly suggest that patients who have KRAS mutations detected in codon 12 or 13 do not benefit from this therapy. Five randomized controlled trials of cetuximab or panitumumab have evaluated outcomes for patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma in relation to KRAS mutational status as no mutation detected (wild type) or abnormal (mutated). Another five single-arm studies have retrospectively evaluated tumor response according to KRAS status. Based on systematic reviews of the relevant literature, all patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested for KRAS mutations in a CLIA-accredited laboratory. If KRAS mutation in codon 12 or 13 is detected, then patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma should not receive anti-EGFR antibody therapy as part of their treatment. ASCO's provisional clinical opinions (PCOs) reflect expert consensus based on clinical evidence and literature available at the time they are written, and are intended to assist physicians in clinical decision-making and identify questions and settings for further research. Due to the rapid flow of scientific information in

  7. A multidisciplinary team care approach improves outcomes in high-risk pediatric neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Liu, Yen-Lin; Lu, Meng-Yao; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Yang, Yung-Li; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Lu, Ching-Chu; Liu, Chia-Ju; Peng, Steven Shinn-Forng; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Lee, Hsinyu; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Huang, Min-Chuan; Liao, Yung-Feng; Lee, Ya-Ling; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2017-01-17

    We assessed the impact of a multidisciplinary team care program on treatment outcomes in neuroblastoma patients. Newly diagnosed neuroblastoma patients received treatment under the Taiwan Pediatric Oncology Group (TPOG) N2002 protocol at the National Taiwan University Hospital beginning in 2002. A multidisciplinary team care approach that included nurse-led case management for patients treated under this protocol began in January 2010. Fifty-eight neuroblastoma patients, including 29 treated between 2002 and 2009 (Group 1) and 29 treated between 2010 and 2014 (Group 2), were enrolled in the study. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates for all 58 patients were 59% and 54.7%, respectively. Group 2 patients, who were treated after implementation of the multidisciplinary team care program, had better 3-year EFS (P = 0.046), but not OS (P = 0.16), rates than Group 1 patients. In a multivariate analysis, implementation of the multidisciplinary team approach was the only significant independent prognostic factor for neuroblastoma patients. In further subgroup analyses, the multidisciplinary team approach improved EFS, but not OS, in patients with stage 4 disease, those in the high-risk group, and those with non-MYCN amplified tumors. These data indicate a multidisciplinary team care approach improved survival outcomes in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. However, further investigation will be required to evaluate the long-term effects of this approach over longer follow-up periods.

  8. Review at a multidisciplinary tumor board impacts critical management decisions of pediatric patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Thenappan, Arun; Halaweish, Ihab; Mody, Rajen J; Smith, Ethan A; Geiger, James D; Ehrlich, Peter F; Jasty Rao, Rama; Hutchinson, Raymond; Yanik, Gregory; Rabah, Raja M; Heider, Amer; Stoll, Tammy; Newman, Erika A

    2017-02-01

    Optimal cancer care requires a multidisciplinary approach. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary tumor board on the treatment plans of children with solid tumors. The records of 158 consecutive patients discussed at a formal multidisciplinary pediatric tumor board between July 2012 and April 2014 were reviewed. Treatment plans were based on clinical practice guidelines and on current Children's Oncology Group protocols. Alterations in radiologic, pathologic, surgical, and medical interpretations were analyzed to determine the impact on changes in recommendations for clinical management. Overall, 55 of 158 children (35%) had alterations in radiologic, pathologic, medical, or surgical interpretation of clinical data following multidisciplinary discussion. Of these, 64% had changes to the initial recommendation for clinical management. Review of imaging studies resulted in interpretation changes in 30 of 158 patients studied (19%), with 12 clinical management changes. Six of 158 patients (3.9%) had changes in pathologic interpretation, with four patients (2.5%) requiring treatment changes. In eight patients (5%), a change in medical management was recommended, while in 11 patients (7%) there were changes in surgical management that were based solely on discussion and not on interpretation of imaging or pathology. Formal multidisciplinary review led to alterations in interpretation of clinical data in 35% of patients, and the majority led to changes in recommendations for treatment. Comprehensive multidisciplinary tumor board incorporated into the care of children with cancer provides additional perspectives for families and care providers when delineating optimal treatment plans. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: evolving role of the multidisciplinary team approach in management.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Peter; Morosi, Carlo; Wardelmann, Eva; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2012-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the GI tract arising from mesenchymal cells. Treatment options include surgical resection and medical therapy with imatinib. A summary of National Comprehensive Cancer Network and European Society of Medical Oncology clinical practice guidelines relating to GIST management are presented here. A multidisciplinary team of physicians is essential to the successful treatment of GIST. Evidence supports multidisciplinary team management with a gastroenterologist, surgeon, medical oncologist, pathologist and radiologist. Consultations between them are recommended to ensure optimal care of patients with GIST. The role for individual core team workers is highlighted. The benefits of multidisciplinary disease management of patients include reducing recurrent disease, optimizing timing of surgery and organ preservation, prolonging survival for the patient and enhancing response to targeted therapies.

  10. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  11. Endocrine oncology in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, A; Rees, D A

    2011-12-01

    Endocrine tumours occur rarely in pregnant women but present clinicians with unique challenges. A high index of suspicion is often required to make a diagnosis since the symptoms and signs associated with many of these tumours, including insulinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma, mimic those of normal pregnancy or its complications, such as pre-eclampsia. The evidence base which informs management is very limited hence decisions on investigation and therapy must be individualised and undertaken jointly by the multidisciplinary medical team and the patient. The optimal strategy will depend on the nature and stage of the endocrine tumour, gestational stage, treatments available and patient wishes. Thus, surgical intervention, appropriately timed, may be considered in pregnancy for resectable adrenocortical carcinoma or phaeochromocytoma, but delayed until the postpartum period for well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Medical therapy may be required to reduce the drive to tumour growth, control symptoms of hormone excess and to minimise the risks of surgery, anaesthesia or labour.

  12. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented.

  13. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  14. Multidisciplinary Management of Pituitary Apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Albani, Adriana; Ferraù, Francesco; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; Esposito, Felice; Granata, Francesca; Ferreri, Felicia; Cannavò, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare clinical syndrome due to ischemic or haemorrhagic necrosis of the pituitary gland which complicates 2-12% of pituitary tumours, especially nonfunctioning adenomas. In many cases, it results in severe neurological, ophthalmological, and endocrinological consequences and may require prompt surgical decompression. Pituitary apoplexy represents a rare medical emergency that necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. Modalities of treatment and times of intervention are still largely debated. Therefore, the management of patients with pituitary apoplexy is often empirically individualized and clinical outcome is inevitably related to the multidisciplinary team's skills and experience. This review aims to highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the management of pituitary apoplexy and to discuss modalities of presentation, treatment, and times of intervention.

  15. Multidisciplinary Management of Pituitary Apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Albani, Adriana; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; Esposito, Felice; Granata, Francesca; Ferreri, Felicia; Cannavò, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare clinical syndrome due to ischemic or haemorrhagic necrosis of the pituitary gland which complicates 2–12% of pituitary tumours, especially nonfunctioning adenomas. In many cases, it results in severe neurological, ophthalmological, and endocrinological consequences and may require prompt surgical decompression. Pituitary apoplexy represents a rare medical emergency that necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. Modalities of treatment and times of intervention are still largely debated. Therefore, the management of patients with pituitary apoplexy is often empirically individualized and clinical outcome is inevitably related to the multidisciplinary team's skills and experience. This review aims to highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the management of pituitary apoplexy and to discuss modalities of presentation, treatment, and times of intervention. PMID:28074095

  16. Central line maintenance bundles and CLABSIs in ambulatory oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Michael L; Bundy, David G; Chen, Allen R; Milstone, Aaron M; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations.

  17. Central Line Maintenance Bundles and CLABSIs in Ambulatory Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations. PMID:24101764

  18. Current oncologic concepts and emerging techniques for imaging of head and neck squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadick, Maliha; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Hoermann, Karl; Sadick, Haneen

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is increasing and currently they account for 5% of all malignancies worldwide. Inspite of ongoing developments in diagnostic imaging and new therapeutic options, HNSCC still represents a multidisciplinary challenge. One of the most important prognostic factors in HNSCC is the presence of lymph node metastases. Patients with confirmed nodal involvement have a considerable reduction of their 5-year overall survival rate. In the era of individually optimised surgery, chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy, the main role of pre- and posttherapeutic imaging remains cancer detection at an early stage and accurate follow-up. The combined effort of early diagnosis and close patient monitoring after surgery and/or radio-chemotherapy influences disease progression and outcome predicition in patients with HNSCC. This review article focuses on currrent oncologic concepts and emerging tools in imaging of head and neck squamous cell cancer. Besides the diagnostic spectrum of the individual imaging modalities, their limitations are also discussed. One main part of this article is dedicated to PET-CT which combines functional and morphological imaging. Furthermore latest developments in MRI are presented with regard to lymph node staging and response prediction. Last but not least, a clinical contribution in this review explains, which information the head and neck surgeon requires from the multimodality imaging and its impact on operation planning. PMID:23320060

  19. Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus H; Grosu, Anca L

    2014-09-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential indicators of scientific impact. Highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥15 citations, were identified via a systematic search of the citation database, Scopus. Up to 608 articles per year were published between 2006 and 2010, however, <10% of publications in each year accumulated ≥15 citations. This figure is notably low, when compared with other oncology studies. A large variety of preclinical and clinical topics, including toxicity prediction, the dose-volume relationship and radioprotectors, accumulated ≥15 citations. However, clinical prevention or mitigation studies were underrepresented. The following conclusion may be drawn from the present study; despite the improved technology that has resulted in superior dose distribution, clinical prevention or mitigation studies are critical and must receive higher priority, funding and attention.

  20. Biomarker, Molecular, and Technologic Advances in Urologic Pathology, Oncology, and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Carla L; Harik, Lara R; Cohen, Cynthia; Osunkoya, Adeboye O

    2017-04-01

    Urologic pathology is evolving rapidly. Emerging trends include the expanded diagnostic utility of biomarkers and molecular testing, as well as adapting to the plethora of technical advances occurring in genitourinary oncology, surgical practice, and imaging. We illustrate those trends by highlighting our approach to the diagnostic workup of a few selected disease entities that pathologists may encounter, including newly recognized subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, and prostate cancer, some of which harbor a distinctive chromosomal translocation, gene loss, or mutation. We illustrate applications of immunohistochemistry for differential diagnosis of needle core renal biopsies, intraductal carcinoma of the prostate, and amyloidosis and cite encouraging results from early studies using targeted gene expression panels to predict recurrence after prostate cancer surgery. At our institution, pathologists are working closely with urologic surgeons and interventional radiologists to explore the use of intraoperative frozen sections for margins and nerve sparing during robotic prostatectomy, to pioneer minimally invasive videoscopic inguinal lymphadenectomy, and to refine image-guided needle core biopsies and cryotherapy of prostate cancer as well as blue-light/fluorescence cystoscopy. This collaborative, multidisciplinary approach enhances clinical management and research, and optimizes the care of patients with urologic disorders.

  1. [Breast care nurse. A new specialist in the multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Tóth, László; Sávolt, Akos; Péley, Gábor; Tínusz, Anikó; Palla, Eva; Bartal, Alexandra; Horti, Ildikó; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The uniform European structure and professional standards for high quality breast cancer care were established in conjunction with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment, the European Society of Mastology and the European Breast Cancer Coalition with the support of the European Parliament. Well-prepared professional teams including a new member called the breast care nurse serve as ground for special breast cancer centers with international accreditation that provide modern, evidence based, patient centered multidisciplinary oncological care. The responsibilities of the new qualified professional staff member include the psycho-social support of the patient and carers from the moment of diagnosis throughout the whole oncological treatment, the fostering of delivering information and communication between patients and specialists. As a result of the curriculum founded by the European Oncology Nursing Society, breast care nurses have become key members of the practice of holistic breast cancer care in countries where the European recommendations have already been implemented. Considering the expected rearrangement of national oncological care, the new sub-specialty is outlined for the first time in the light of the experiences gained at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, a comprehensive cancer center.

  2. Oral Health Status of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; Winning, Lewis; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect data on the oral health status of patients undergoing treatment for head and neck oncology across Northern Ireland. Data were collected on all patients referred to the Northern Ireland Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Team for discussion and treatment planning. Each patient underwent pre-treatment dental assessment in the Centre for Dentistry, Queen's University Belfast, between June 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected from clinical oral examinations supplemented with intra-oral radiographs. During the course of the study 96 patients were assessed and the levels of dental disease observed in this cohort were high. On clinical examination 43% were diagnosed with caries and 46% with periodontal disease. Ten patients were completely edentate. The disease profile of this patient group presents significant challenges to dental services tasked with rendering patients dentally fit prior to undergoing oncology treatment.

  3. Rationale for Cardio-Oncology Units.

    PubMed

    Nhola, Lara F; Villarraga, Hector R

    2017-07-01

    With the rapidly rising number of patients surviving cancer, often in the setting of new or pre-existing cardiovascular disease and risk factors, a need has arisen for a specialty within the realm of cardiovascular care that can evaluate and manage these patients along with our colleagues in oncology and hematology. By the same token, all health care providers involved in the care of cancer patients with heart disease must be fully aware of the impact of adverse cardiovascular effects on the survival of these patients. Collaboration is required to mitigate the effect of cardiovascular toxicity associated with these necessary life-saving cancer therapies. The cardio-oncologist plays a pivotal role in bridging the 2 specialties, by creating a comprehensive plan to address the comorbidities as well as to provide guidance on the optimal choice of therapy. In this 3-part review, we will outline: a) the significant impact of cancer therapies on the cardiovascular health of patients with cancer and cancer survivors, b) the advantage of a multidisciplinary team in addressing these cardiovascular complications, and c) the delivery of clinical care to patients with cancer and heart disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Bölling, T; Hardes, J; Dirksen, U

    2013-01-01

    The management of bone tumours in paediatric oncology requires careful multidisciplinary planning due to the need for multimodal therapy approaches. The non-specific symptoms often lead to a delayed definitive diagnosis of a bone tumour. Imaging procedures are of major importance for an individualised and optimised treatment planning. They have to be carried out before any surgery, including biopsies. The introduction of multi-agent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival rates in patients suffering from Ewing's sarcomas and osteosarcomas. However, local therapy still remains indispensable in order to achieve long-term survival. For osteosarcoma, surgery remains the only adequate local therapy modality. Radiotherapy may be considered if surgery is not feasible. In these cases, high radiation doses need to be applied. The choice for local therapy modality is not as clear in patients with Ewing's sarcoma. Today, surgery is often preferred if a wide or at least marginal resection can be carried out. Additional radiotherapy is advised in patients with marginal/intralesional resection or poor histological response to induction chemotherapy. Definitive radiotherapy is recommended for inoperable lesions. In the future, new radiotherapy approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton therapy, may yield better results with minor risks of late effects.

  5. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  6. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F.; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  7. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-12

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

  8. [Unproven methods in oncology].

    PubMed

    Jallut, O; Guex, P; Barrelet, L

    1984-09-08

    As in some other chronic diseases (rheumatism, multiple sclerosis, etc.), unproven methods of diagnosis and treatment have long been current in cancer. Since 1960 the American Cancer Society has published an abundant literature on these "unproven methods", which serves as a basis for a historical review: some substances (Krebiozen, Laetrile) have enjoyed tremendous if shortlived success. The present trend is back to nature and "mild medicine". The proponents of this so-called natural medicine are often disciples of a pseudoscientific religion using irrational arguments. Direct attacks on these erroneous theories and their public refutation fail to convince the adepts, who trust in these methods and are not amenable to a scientific approach. Study of their psychological motivations reveals that in fact they seek something more reassuring than plain medical explanation which is aware of its limits. They feel reassured by theories which often bear some resemblance to the old popular medicine. To protect patients against these dangerous methods and all the disillusionment they entail, the Swiss Society of Oncology and the Swiss Cancer League have decided to gather information and draw up a descriptive list of the commonest unproven methods in Switzerland (our File No. 2, "Total anti-cancer cure", is given as an example). The files are published in French, German and English and are available to physicians, nursing teams, and also patients who wish to have more objective information on these methods.

  9. [Economic limits in oncology].

    PubMed

    Hellriegel, K P

    2000-12-01

    Economic aspects require consideration even in oncology. However, they have to be seen in context with open questions concerning especially the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness, of methodology, and particularly of ethics. Medical procedures and achievements should primarily be measured against objective results, against effectiveness and benefits. Consequently, the suitability of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies has to be evaluated. Overall objective of medical achievements should be their optimalization, not their maximization. For a physician being aware of his responsibility, the optimal care for his patients always has highest priority. Medical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up are the basis for effective and economic patient care. They have to undergo economic evaluation and permanent updating. For systematic collection, documentation and evaluation, the clinical register is the appropriate instrument. For the assessment of medical care, a continuous monitoring of its processes has to be established. The documentation of medical care processes should lead to sustainable cost reductions together with an optimalization of the quality of care.

  10. Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Sarkar, Chitra; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Chatterjee, Sandip; Shirsat, Neelam; Muzumdar, Dattatreya; Pungavkar, Sona; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Jalali, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The high success rate in the management medulloblastoma achieved in the western world is not exactly mirrored in developing countries including India. Socio-demographic differences, health-care disparity, and lack in uniformity of care with resultant widespread variations in the clinical practice are some of the reasons that may partly explain this difference in outcomes. Patients with medulloblastoma require a multi-disciplinary team approach involving but not limited to neuro-radiology, neurosurgery; neuropathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, pediatric medical oncology and rehabilitative services for optimizing outcomes. The Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology (ISNO) constituted an expert multi-disciplinary panel with adequate representation from all stakeholders to prepare national consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma. Minimum desirable, as well as preferable though optional recommendations (as appropriate), were developed and adopted for the pre-surgical work-up including neuroimaging; neurosurgical management including surgical principles, techniques, and complications; neuropathology reporting and molecular testing; contemporary risk-stratification in the molecular era; appropriate adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy and chemotherapy); and follow-up schedule in medulloblastoma. The current document represents a broad consensus reached amongst various stakeholders within the neuro-oncology community involved in the contemporary curative-intent management of children with medulloblastoma. It provides both general as well as specific guidelines and recommendations to be adopted by physicians and health care providers across India to achieve uniformity of care, improve disease-related outcomes, and compare results between institutions within the country.

  11. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  12. Designing Multidisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Marla; Hagan, Jill; Ho, Pier Sun; Hudis, Paula M.

    2010-01-01

    The term "integrated curriculum" has many different, sometimes conflicting, meanings to educators. In this manual, integrated curriculum refers to the materials and pedagogical strategies used by "multidisciplinary" teams of teachers to organize their instruction so that students are encouraged to make meaningful connections…

  13. Multidisciplinary disease management in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Susan

    2003-11-01

    With an increasingly ageing population, the number of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis is expected to rise. High-quality patient education and self-management are essential in these chronic debilitating conditions. A multidisciplinary team has produced a template to guide the assessment, treatment and holistic care of patients in primary care.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  15. Aesthetic design preservation in multidisciplinary therapy: philosophy and clinical execution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernesto A; Jun, Sang K

    2002-09-01

    Complex perio-prosthetic cases that require multidisciplinary therapy often result in compromised aesthetics. Traditional treatment planning philosophies, as well as existing interdisciplinary relational patterns, do not promote the achievement of predictable aesthetic results. Implementation of a restorative-driven approach requires the development of an aesthetic blueprint that will serve as a guide through treatment. This article illustrates the clinical techniques and sequence for an outcome-based protocol that enhances therapeutic cohesiveness and ensures the sequential transfer of design objectives for the preservation of aesthetics in multidisciplinary therapy.

  16. Translational value of mouse models in oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Gould, Stephen E; Junttila, Melissa R; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2015-05-01

    Much has been written about the advantages and disadvantages of various oncology model systems, with the overall finding that these models lack the predictive power required to translate preclinical efficacy into clinical activity. Despite assertions that some preclinical model systems are superior to others, no single model can suffice to inform preclinical target validation and molecule selection. This perspective provides a balanced albeit critical view of these claims of superiority and outlines a framework for the proper use of existing preclinical models for drug testing and discovery. We also highlight gaps in oncology mouse models and discuss general and pervasive model-independent shortcomings in preclinical oncology work, and we propose ways to address these issues.

  17. Multidisciplinary management of heart failure just beginning in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukihito

    2015-09-01

    The mortality associated with end-stage heart failure (HF) is high despite the development of new and increasingly effective drugs and non-pharmacological therapies. Repetitive hospitalizations predict fatal outcomes and each hospitalization should prompt individual conversations with the patient, the family, and the caregivers. A multidisciplinary disease management program promotes the education of patients and their families and modifies their behavior, with a view to ultimately improve the prognosis and quality of life. From the early to the late stages of HF, a multidisciplinary disease management program should be implemented. In Western societies this multidisciplinary management has long been debated and endorsed, in contrast to Japan, where it has just begun. In 2012, the Japanese Nursing Association launched a certification in chronic HF nursing. A Japanese version of HF disease management should soon be developed in its own social environment.

  18. Development of a Multidisciplinary, Multicampus Subspecialty Practice in Endocrine Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Keith C.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Morris, John C.; Molina, Julian R.; Suman, Vera J.; Copland, John A.; Rubin, Joseph; Menefee, Michael E.; Sideras, Kostandinos; Maples, William J.; McIver, Bryan; Fatourechi, Vahab; Hay, Ian; Foote, Robert L.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Kasperbauer, Jan L.; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Grant, Clive S.; Richards, Melanie L.; Sebo, Thomas; Lloyd, Ricardo; Eberhardt, Norman L.; Reddi, Honey V.; Casler, John D.; Karlin, Nina J.; Westphal, Sydney A.; Richardson, Ronald L.; Buckner, Jan C.; Erlichman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to more abundant neoplasms, endocrine cancers have been historically neglected, yet their incidence is increasing. We therefore sought to build interest in endocrine cancers, improve physician experience, and develop innovative approaches to treating patients with these neoplasms. Methods: Between 2005 and 2010, we developed a multidisciplinary Endocrine Malignancies Disease Oriented Group involving all three Mayo Clinic campuses (Rochester, MN; Jacksonville, FL; and Scottsdale, AZ). In response to higher demand at the Rochester campus, we sought to develop a Subspecialty Tumor Group and an Endocrine Malignancies Tumor Clinic within the Division of Medical Oncology. Results: The intended groups were successfully formed. We experienced difficulty in integration of the Mayo Scottsdale campus resulting from local uncertainty as to whether patient volumes would be sufficient to sustain the effort at that campus and difficulty in developing enthusiasm among clinicians otherwise engaged in a busy clinical practice. But these obstacles were ultimately overcome. In addition, with respect to the newly formed medical oncology subspecialty endocrine malignancies group, appointment volumes quadrupled within the first year and increased seven times within two years. The number of active therapeutic endocrine malignancies clinical trials also increased from one in 2005 to five in 2009, with all three Mayo campuses participating. Conclusion: The development of subspecialty tumor groups for uncommon malignancies represents an effective approach to building experience, increasing patient volumes and referrals, and fostering development of increased therapeutic options and clinical trials for patients afflicted with otherwise historically neglected cancers. PMID:22942830

  19. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  20. Can Patient Comorbidities Be Included in Clinical Performance Measures for Radiation Oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jean B.; Khalid, Najma; Ho, Alex; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Tao, May Lin; Currey, Adam; Wilson, J. Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patient comorbidities may affect the applicability of performance measures that are inherent in multidisciplinary cancer treatment guidelines. This article describes the distribution of common comorbid conditions by disease site and by patient and facility characteristics in patients who received radiation therapy as part of treatment for cancer of the breast, cervix, lung, prostate, and stomach, and investigates the association of comorbidities with treatment decisions. Materials and Methods: Stratified two-stage cluster sampling provided a random sample of radiation oncology facilities. Eligible patients were randomly sampled from each participating facility for each disease site, and data were abstracted from medical records. The Adult Comorbidity Evaluation Index (ACE-27) was used to measure comorbid conditions and their severity. National estimates were calculated using SUDAAN statistical software. Results: Multivariable logistic regression models predicted the dependent variable “treatment changed or contraindicated due to comorbidities.” The final model showed that ACE-27 was highly associated with change in treatment for patients with severe or moderate index values compared to those with none or mild (P < .001). Two other covariates, age and medical coverage, had no (age) or little (medical coverage) significant contribution to predicting treatment change in the multivariable model. Disease site was associated with treatment change after adjusting for other covariates in the model. Conclusions: ACE-27 is highly predictive of treatment modifications for patients treated for these cancers who receive radiation as part of their care. A standardized tool identifying patients who should be excluded from clinical performance measures allows more accurate use of these measures. PMID:24643573

  1. Oocyte cryopreservation in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Fabbri, Raffaella; Damiano, Giuseppe; Fratto, Rosita; Giunchi, Susanna; Venturoli, Stefano

    2004-04-05

    The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in oncological patients may reduce their reproductive potential. Sperm cryopreservation has been already used in men affected by neoplastic disease. Oocyte cryopreservation might be an important solution for these patients at risk of losing ovarian function. A program of oocyte cryopreservation for oncological patients is also present in our center. From June 1996 to January 2000, 18 patients awaiting chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoplastic disease were included in our oocyte cryopreservation program. Our experience documents that oocyte storage may be a concrete and pragmatic alternative for oncological patients. The duration of oocyte storage does not seem to interfere with oocyte survival as pregnancies occurred even after several years of gamete cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

  2. Integrative oncology imperative for nurses.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Wu, Susan; Decker, Georgia M

    2012-02-01

    To provide an overview of key issues and resources related to complementary and alternative medical (CAM) and integrative approaches in cancer care. Peer-reviewed publications and web sites of professional, federal, and academic institutions and organizations. The field of integrative oncology is growing and research evidence in this area is burgeoning. Many cancer patients are using and can benefit from CAM. There are many resources and educational opportunities available to oncology nurses to enhance their CAM knowledge and skills. Nurses must keep abreast of the growing evidence in integrative oncology that documents the safety and efficacy of different CAM approaches for cancer patients. It is critical that nurses be aware of reputable resources and legal implications related to use of CAM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethical issues in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Schiff, Elad; Golan, Ofra

    2008-08-01

    Integrative oncology relates to an emerging dialog between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) scholars, oncologists, family practitioners, and other health care providers who envision an extended and holistic patient-centered approach to oncology care. The multiple commitments of integrative oncology to a medical humanistic approach and to a strong evidence-based foundation may impose considerable ethical concerns and dilemmas. The authors use narrative ethics to present a case study that exemplifies the ethical challenges confronting physicians and health care providers who wish to provide an integrative approach for their patients. An ethical analysis of the narrative is provided to help clarify the ethical issues and conflicts within it. Finally, a framework that may transform ethical constraints to a communication tool is proposed.

  4. Emergencies in Hematology and Oncology.

    PubMed

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Hogan, William J; Madsen, Bo E

    2017-04-01

    The development of medical emergencies related to the underlying disease or as a result of complications of therapy are common in patients with hematologic or solid tumors. These oncological emergencies can occur as an initial presentation or in a patient with an established diagnosis and are encountered in all medical care settings, ranging from primary care to the emergency department and various subspecialty environments. Therefore, it is critically important that all physicians have a working knowledge of the potential oncological emergencies that may present in their practice and how to provide the most effective care without delay. This article reviews the most common oncological emergencies and provides practical guidance for initial management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  6. Multidisciplinary perspective of hepatocellular carcinoma: A Pacific Northwest experience.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Matthew M; Yeung, Raymond S; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Cuevas, Carlos; Harris, William P; Hon, Tony Lim Kiat; Padia, Siddharth A; Park, James O; Riggle, Kevin M; Daoud, Sayed S

    2015-06-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most rapidly increasing type of cancer in the United States. HCC is a highly malignant cancer, accounting for at least 14000 deaths in the United States annually, and it ranks third as a cause of cancer mortality in men. One major difficulty is that most patients with HCC are diagnosed when the disease is already at an advanced stage, and the cancer cannot be surgically removed. Furthermore, because almost all patients have cirrhosis, neither chemotherapy nor major resections are well tolerated. Clearly there is need of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of HCC. For example, there is a need for better understanding of the fundamental etiologic mechanisms that are involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, which could lead to the development of successful preventive and therapeutic modalities. It is also essential to define the cellular and molecular bases for malignant transformation of hepatocytes. Such knowledge would: (1) greatly facilitate the identification of patients at risk; (2) prompt efforts to decrease risk factors; and (3) improve surveillance and early diagnosis through diagnostic imaging modalities. Possible benefits extend also to the clinical management of this disease. Because there are many factors involved in pathogenesis of HCC, this paper reviews a multidisciplinary perspective of recent advances in basic and clinical understanding of HCC that include: molecular hepatocarcinogenesis, non-invasive diagnostics modalities, diagnostic pathology, surgical modality, transplantation, local therapy and oncological/target therapeutics.

  7. Multidisciplinary perspective of hepatocellular carcinoma: A Pacific Northwest experience

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Matthew M; Yeung, Raymond S; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Cuevas, Carlos; Harris, William P; Hon, Tony Lim Kiat; Padia, Siddharth A; Park, James O; Riggle, Kevin M; Daoud, Sayed S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most rapidly increasing type of cancer in the United States. HCC is a highly malignant cancer, accounting for at least 14000 deaths in the United States annually, and it ranks third as a cause of cancer mortality in men. One major difficulty is that most patients with HCC are diagnosed when the disease is already at an advanced stage, and the cancer cannot be surgically removed. Furthermore, because almost all patients have cirrhosis, neither chemotherapy nor major resections are well tolerated. Clearly there is need of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of HCC. For example, there is a need for better understanding of the fundamental etiologic mechanisms that are involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, which could lead to the development of successful preventive and therapeutic modalities. It is also essential to define the cellular and molecular bases for malignant transformation of hepatocytes. Such knowledge would: (1) greatly facilitate the identification of patients at risk; (2) prompt efforts to decrease risk factors; and (3) improve surveillance and early diagnosis through diagnostic imaging modalities. Possible benefits extend also to the clinical management of this disease. Because there are many factors involved in pathogenesis of HCC, this paper reviews a multidisciplinary perspective of recent advances in basic and clinical understanding of HCC that include: molecular hepatocarcinogenesis, non-invasive diagnostics modalities, diagnostic pathology, surgical modality, transplantation, local therapy and oncological/target therapeutics. PMID:26085907

  8. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Cancer.gov

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  9. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  10. Reconstruction of Peripelvic Oncologic Defects.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Katie E; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the anatomy of the peripelvic area. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of performing peripelvic reconstruction in patients undergoing oncologic resection. 3. Select the appropriate local, pedicled, or free-flap reconstruction based on the location of the defect and donor-site characteristics. Peripelvic reconstruction most commonly occurs in the setting of oncologic ablative surgery. The peripelvic area contains several distinct reconstructive regions, including vagina, vulva, penis, and scrotum. Each area provides unique reconstructive considerations. In addition, prior or future radiation therapy or chemotherapy along with cancer cachexia can increase the complexity of reconstruction.

  11. [Vitamins and Minerals in Oncology].

    PubMed

    Holch, Julian Walter; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Erickson, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    The use of vitamins and minerals to prevent cancer as well as their supportive use in oncological patients is widespread and often occurs without the knowledge of the treating physician. Beyond general recommendations with regard to a balanced and healthy diet, no evidence exists supporting the use of vitamins and minerals in the prevention of cancer. Furthermore, the diet of oncological patients should contain vitamins and minerals of the same quantity as for healthy individuals. In particular, there is currently no rationale for a high-dosage administration of antioxidants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Improving quality through multidisciplinary education.

    PubMed

    Kveraga, Rikante; Jones, Stephanie B

    2011-03-01

    Multidisciplinary education (MDE) is perceived as the next means of implementing major improvements in the quality and cost-effectiveness of patient care. In this article, the authors discuss various definitions of MDE, evaluate how MDE might be implemented in clinical arenas relevant to the anesthesiologist, and describe several implementations of MDE within their hospital and the anesthesiology department. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Design of oncology clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Revathi; Menon, Sandeep

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that occurs due to the uncontrolled multiplication of cells that invade nearby tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. An increased incidence of cancer in the world has led to an increase in oncology research and in the number of oncology trials. Well designed oncology clinical trials are a key part of developing effective anti-cancer drugs. This review focuses on statistical considerations in the design and analysis of oncology clinical trials.

  14. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishing a framework for building multidisciplinary programs

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Cheryl; Ryan, Carrie E; Edil, Barish H; Schulick, Richard D; Gajdos, Csaba; Boniface, Megan; Schefter, Tracey E; Purcell, W Thomas; McCarter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While most providers support the concept of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, challenges exist to the implementation of successful multidisciplinary clinical programs. As patients become more knowledgeable about their disease through research on the Internet, they seek hospital programs that offer multidisciplinary care. At the University of Colorado Hospital, we utilize a formal multidisciplinary approach across a variety of clinical settings, which has been beneficial to patients, providers, and the hospital. We present a reproducible framework to be used as a guide to develop a successful multidisciplinary program. PMID:26664132

  16. Oncologic Outcomes After Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, J. Scott; Smith, Richard V.; Moore, Eric; Lawson, Georges; Remacle, Marc; Ganly, Ian; Kraus, Dennis H.; Teng, Marita S.; Miles, Brett A.; White, Hilliary; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.; Mehta, Vikas; Kiyosaki, Krista; Damrose, Edward J.; Wang, Steven J.; Kupferman, Michael E.; Koh, Yoon Woo; Genden, Eric M.; Holsinger, F. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    all-cause mortality (P = .01). Although advanced age and tobacco use were associated with locoregional recurrence and disease-specific survival, they, as well as tumor stage and other adverse histopathologic features, did not remain significant on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE This large, multi-institutional study supports the role of TORS within the multidisciplinary treatment paradigm for the treatment of head and neck cancer, especially for patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Favorable oncologic outcomes have been found across institutions. Ongoing comparative clinical trials funded by the National Cancer Institute will further evaluate the role of robotic surgery for patients with head and neck cancers. PMID:26402479

  17. Advances in Statistical Approaches Oncology Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Rosner, Gary L.; Marchenko, Olga; Parke, Tom; Perevozskaya, Inna; Wang, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    We describe some recent developments in statistical methodology and practice in oncology drug development from an academic and an industry perspective. Many adaptive designs were pioneered in oncology, and oncology is still at the forefront of novel methods to enable better and faster Go/No-Go decision making while controlling the cost. PMID:25949927

  18. Technological challenges of theranostics in oncology.

    PubMed

    Warenius, Hilmar M

    2009-07-01

    Although the term theranostics has been coined only fairly recently, attempts to relate the level of biomarkers to therapeutic response in the oncology clinic go back several decades. After a long period in which a limited number of individual theranostic molecular biomarkers gained general clinical acceptance, extremely powerful genomic and proteomic technologies have now emerged. These technologies, reviewed here, promise a potential revolution in our ability to predict therapeutic response in cancer, and by so doing, guide new anticancer drugs more successfully into clinical oncology practice. A full understanding of the detailed molecular nature of clinical cancer is, however, still evolving. The need for appropriate models of the highly complex disease, against which we are attempting to direct effective therapy more accurately, is also addressed. These should include an understanding of genomic and proteomic heterogeneity, genetic instability and systems biology models of cancer that take into account recent demonstrations of the vastly increased mutational state of the average clinical cancer as compared with the normal cell(s) from which it arose. The way forward in theranostics is, arguably, less dependent on further improvements in the already powerful genomic and proteomic technologies themselves than on our improved understanding of how we should apply them to the complex reality of the average clinical cancer.

  19. Implementation and audit of 'Fast-Track Surgery' in gynaecological oncology surgery.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Verinder S; Lancaster, Letitia; Elliott, David; Brand, Alison H

    2012-08-01

    Fast-track surgery is a multidisciplinary approach to surgery that results in faster recovery from surgery and decreased length of stay (LOS). The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to report on the processes required for the introduction of fast-track surgery to a gynaecological oncology unit and (ii) to report the results of a clinical audit conducted after the protocol's implementation. A fast-track protocol, specific to our unit, was developed after a series of multidisciplinary meetings. The protocol, agreed upon by those involved in the care of women in our unit, was then introduced into clinical practice. An audit was conducted of all women undergoing laparotomy, with known or suspected malignancy. Information on LOS, complication and readmission rates was collected. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression were used for statistical analysis. The developed protocol involved a multidisciplinary approach to pre-, intra- and postoperative care. The audit included 104 consecutive women over a 6-month period, who were followed for 6 weeks postoperatively. The median LOS was 4 days. The readmission rate was 7% and the complication rate was 19% (1% intraoperative, 4% major and 14% minor). Multivariate analysis revealed that increased duration of surgery and increasing age were predictors of longer LOS. The development of a fast-track protocol is achievable in a gynaecological oncology unit, with input from a multidisciplinary team. Effective implementation of the protocol can result in a short LOS, with acceptable complication and readmission rates when applied non-selectively to gynaecological oncology patients. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    PubMed

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-02-15

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions.

  1. Supporting prostate cancer focal therapy: a multidisciplinary International Consensus of Experts ("ICE").

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo O; Billis, Athanase; Zequi, Stenio C; Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Viana, Publio; Cerqueira, Michael; Ward, John F

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy among men, and the current screening, imaging and sampling approaches aim to detect early-stage, organ-confined disease. In such scenario, focal prostate cancer therapy currently relies on the index lesion concept as the dominant lesion that drives the disease natural history. Focal therapy demands the essential imaging and sampling techniques to strategically locate and qualify the disease, but, despite advances in technology, prostate imaging and biopsy have several limitations that need to be overcome if focal therapy is to be developed further. The I Prostate Cancer Focal Treatment International Symposium was convened to foster discussion on this topic that sits at the crossroads of multiple disciplines (Urology, Pathology, Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology) all of which were represented for this comprehensive multidisciplinary review of the current literature.

  2. The 100 most-cited articles in spinal oncology.

    PubMed

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; Caro-Osorio, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    spinal oncology. The studies highlighted the multidisciplinary and multimodal nature of spinal tumor management. Recognition of historical articles may guide future spinal oncology research.

  3. How Multidisciplinary Are the Multidisciplinary Journals Science and Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Gregg E. A.; Carley, Stephen; Porter, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in cross-disciplinary research knowledge interchange runs high. Review processes at funding agencies, such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, consider plans to disseminate research across disciplinary bounds. Publication in the leading multidisciplinary journals, Nature and Science, may signify the epitome of successful interdisciplinary integration of research knowledge and cross-disciplinary dissemination of findings. But how interdisciplinary are they? The journals are multidisciplinary, but do the individual articles themselves draw upon multiple fields of knowledge and does their influence span disciplines? This research compares articles in three fields (Cell Biology, Physical Chemistry, and Cognitive Science) published in a leading disciplinary journal in each field to those published in Nature and Science. We find comparable degrees of interdisciplinary integration and only modest differences in cross-disciplinary diffusion. That said, though the rate of out-of-field diffusion might be comparable, the sheer reach of Nature and Science, indicated by their potent Journal Impact Factors, means that the diffusion of knowledge therein can far exceed that of leading disciplinary journals in some fields (such as Physical Chemistry and Cognitive Science in our samples). PMID:27043924

  4. How Multidisciplinary Are the Multidisciplinary Journals Science and Nature?

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gregg E A; Carley, Stephen; Porter, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Interest in cross-disciplinary research knowledge interchange runs high. Review processes at funding agencies, such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, consider plans to disseminate research across disciplinary bounds. Publication in the leading multidisciplinary journals, Nature and Science, may signify the epitome of successful interdisciplinary integration of research knowledge and cross-disciplinary dissemination of findings. But how interdisciplinary are they? The journals are multidisciplinary, but do the individual articles themselves draw upon multiple fields of knowledge and does their influence span disciplines? This research compares articles in three fields (Cell Biology, Physical Chemistry, and Cognitive Science) published in a leading disciplinary journal in each field to those published in Nature and Science. We find comparable degrees of interdisciplinary integration and only modest differences in cross-disciplinary diffusion. That said, though the rate of out-of-field diffusion might be comparable, the sheer reach of Nature and Science, indicated by their potent Journal Impact Factors, means that the diffusion of knowledge therein can far exceed that of leading disciplinary journals in some fields (such as Physical Chemistry and Cognitive Science in our samples).

  5. [Multidisciplinary health care needs of psychologically distressed cancer patients in a Comprehensive Cancer Center].

    PubMed

    Schiel, R O; Brechtel, A; Hartmann, M; Taubert, A; Walther, J; Wiskemann, J; Rötzer, I; Becker, N; Jäger, D; Herzog, W; Friederich, H-C

    2014-03-01

    Considering the prolonged life-expectancies and the resulting demands that are placed on cancer patients and their relatives, the importance of specific counseling and support services including psycho-oncology, social services, nutritional, and exercise counseling has profoundly increased. The main focus of the current study was to evaluate the multidisciplinary health care needs of emotionally distressed cancer patients whoe were treated in a Comprehensive Cancer Center. METHODS AND STUDYGROUP: 831 out-patients were evaluated with regard to their psychological distress level and their multidisciplinary health care needs for specialist services of psycho-oncology, social services, nutritional, and exercise counseling using a tablet-PC assisted screening questionnaire. Separate analyses were completed for patients with and without psychological distress. One third of the screened patients showed clinically relevant psychological distress. Health care needs for all specialist services were significantly greater among these patients compared to patients without psychological distress (all p-values < 0.005). The higher needs were foremost presented by the number of needed specialist services (p < 0.001): two thirds of the psychologically distressed patients demonstrated, besides the need for a psycho-oncological service, a need for two or three further specialist services, whereas among patients without psychological distress more than 70% showed a need for at most one specialist service. Multidisciplinary health care needs of psychologically distressed cancer patients should be systematically addressed in a Comprehensive Cancer Center, and patients should be offered a coordinated and integrated health care program. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Multidisciplinary management in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervás Morón, Asunción; García de Paredes, María Luisa; Lobo Martínez, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of rectal cancer has evolved over the last few decades from surgery alone to treatments with trimodal therapy for high-risk patients. The involvement of a multidisciplinary team of radiologists, pathologists, surgeons, radiotherapists and medical oncologists is now fundamental for decision-making and outcomes. The evolution of different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has optimised the therapeutic rate. Future studies will determine the optimal regimen for inducing complete responses in locally advanced disease and whether the intensification of local treatments could enable the use of more conservative treatments, as for other tumour locations. The study of biomarkers will be essential in this respect.

  7. [Multidisciplinary therapy of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balogh, A; Kahán, Z; Maráz, A; Mikó, T; Nagy, F; Palkó, A; Thurzó, L; Tiszlavicz, L

    2001-03-18

    A multidisciplinary program for the treatment of colorectal cancer is described. The main objective of the authors has been to define uniform up to date guidelines based on recent progress in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Preoperative diagnostic procedures are summarized which advance determination of clinical stage and prognosis. These information essentially determine care. Sequences of surgical methods, preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy and medical treatments are discussed according to tumor stages. Guidelines for surveillance following active treatment and recommendation for the screening of population at high risk for colorectal cancer are presented.

  8. [PET/CT tomography. Usefulness in oncology].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villaseñor, David; Gerson-Cwilich, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    In order to have optimum results in oncological patients, precise evaluation, diagnosis and staging of the patient is necessary. Positron emission tomography (PET) yields a high negative predictive value through exploration of the entire body. It diagnoses the benign or malignant state of a neoplasm that has been detected by other imaging methods and establishes an extensive diagnosis previous to therapeutic treatment of a known cancer. It identifies residual tumor and changes produced after surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy and locates suspicious residual tumor clinically or by elevation of the tumor markers. It allows for a new extension study or re-staging after diagnosis of recurrence and permits early evaluation of response to a therapeutic regime and permits the search for a primary tumor in patients with metastasis of unknown origin. PET leads to a molecular functional imaging of cancer in the entire body.

  9. Advances and trends in dermato-oncology.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Gogas, Helen; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2010-11-01

    The 6th Congress of the European Association of Dermato-Oncology, held in Athens, Greece (16-19 June 2010), focused on the most recent advances in the field of melanoma, epithelial skin cancers and other malignant skin tumors. Under the theme 'transforming care through personalized medicine', the scientific program reviewed and discussed the significant changes that are currently taking place in many aspects of skin cancer care, from risk prediction and prevention to the use of targeted treatments. This article highlights the key messages from selected presentations that feature the remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of skin malignancies and the rapid 'translation' of this knowledge into new effective treatments in clinical practice.

  10. Organization and implementation of a cardio-oncology program.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Manuela; Ribeiro, Leonor; Magalhães, Andreia; Sousa, Ana Rita; Nobre Menezes, Miguel; Jorge, Marília; Costa, Luís; Pinto, Fausto José

    2016-09-01

    Considerable advances in cancer therapies in recent decades have reshaped the prognosis of cancer patients. There are now estimated to be over 20 million cancer survivors in the USA and Europe, numbers unimaginable a few years ago. However, this increase in survival, along with the aging of the patient population, has been accompanied by a rise in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when there is a previous history of heart disease. The incidence of cardiotoxicity continues to grow, which can compromise the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Cardiotoxicity associated with conventional therapies, especially anthracyclines and radiation, is well known, and usually leads to left ventricular dysfunction. However, heart failure represents only a fraction of the cardiotoxicity associated with newer therapies, which have diverse cardiovascular effects. There are few guidelines for early detection, prevention and treatment of cardiotoxicity of cancer treatments, and no well-established tools for screening these patients. Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessment of patients before, during and after cancer treatment. It therefore makes sense to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to these patients, involving cardiologists, oncologists and radiotherapists, collaborating in the development of new training modules, and performing clinical and translational research in a cardio-oncology program. Cardio-oncology is a new frontier in medicine and has emerged as a new medical subspecialty that concentrates knowledge, understanding, training and treatment of cardiovascular comorbidities, risks and complications in patients with cancer in a comprehensive approach to the patient rather than to the disease.

  11. Integrative oncology research in the Middle East: weaving traditional and complementary medicine in supportive care.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed Saleem; Nejmi, Mati; Schiff, Elad; Hassan, Esmat; Mutafoglu, Kamer; Afifi, Fatma U; Jamous, Rana Majed; Lev, Efraim; Silbermman, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has an important role in supportive cancer care in the Middle East and is often used in association with traditional medicine. This article provides a comprehensive review of published data on CAM research in supportive cancer care in the Middle East. A multi-disciplinary Middle-Eastern Research Group in Integrative Oncology (MERGIO) was established in six countries. Authors independently searched Medline database for articles in Arabic, Hebrew, French, and Turkish using oncology and CAM-related keywords. Articles were recorded according to the first author's affiliation with an academic or clinical institution in the Middle East. We identified 143 articles on CAM and cancer care that had been published in 12 Middle-Eastern countries. Eighty-five articles were directly related to cancer supportive care. The latter included studies on the prevalence of CAM use by patients with cancer, aspects related to of doctor-patient communication, ethics and regulation, psychosocial aspects of CAM, CAM safety and quality assurance, studies of CAM education for health care providers, and ethno-botanical studies and reviews. Twenty-eight articles referred to clinical research on supportive care, and the use of specific CAM modalities that included acupuncture, anthroposophic medicine, dietary and nutritional therapies herbal medicine, homeopathy, mind-body medicine, shiatsu, therapeutic touch, and yoga. CAM-related supportive care research is prevalent in the Middle East, a fact that may serve as a basis for future multinational-multidisciplinary research work in supportive care in oncology.

  12. Responding to Challenging Interactions With Families: A Training Module for Inpatient Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Zaider, Talia I.; Banerjee, Smita C.; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Pehrson, Cassandra; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A.; Bylund, Carma L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sustaining the well-being of the caregiving family is a critical agenda in cancer care. In the multidisciplinary team, nurses often serve as a bridge between the family and oncology team. Evidence suggests that dealing with difficult family dynamics is a common source of stress for oncology nurses, yet nurses typically receive very little guidance on how to achieve an effective partnership with families under these circumstances. We report on the application and preliminary evaluation of a new training module for improving nurses’ skills in responding collaborative to challenging family situations. Method Training was delivered to 282 inpatient oncology nurses at a comprehensive cancer center over 2 years. Posttraining surveys measured perceived changes in confidence working with families, as well as the utility and relevance of this training. A 6-month follow-up survey measured continued use of skills. Results Of the nurses, 75%–90% reported that the skills learned were useful and relevant to their setting. Retrospective pre–post ratings suggested increased confidence in managing stressful encounters with families. Discussion Further investigation is needed to observe how nurses transport these skills into their practice settings and to understand the role of the nurse-as-family champion within the larger multidisciplinary team. PMID:27632541

  13. Immunotherapy Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (iRANO): A Report of the RANO Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F.; Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B.; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy represents a promising area of therapy among neuro-oncology patients. However, early phase studies reveal unique challenges associated with assessment of radiological changes reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumor regression, can still occur following initial apparent progression or appearance of new lesions. Refinement of response assessment criteria for neuro-oncology patients undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. A multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describes immunotherapy response assessment for neuro-oncology (iRANO) criteria that are based on guidance for determination of tumor progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria (irRC) and the response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease (PD) within six months of initiating immunotherapy including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for use of corticosteroids. The role of advanced imaging techniques and measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurologic and immunologic functions are reviewed. The iRANO guidelines put forth herein will evolve successively to improve their utility as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. PMID:26545842

  14. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  15. Oncoplastic multidisciplinary meetings: a necessity or luxury?

    PubMed

    Rusby, Jennifer E; Gough, Jenny; Harris, Paul A; MacNeill, Fiona A

    2011-05-01

    Although there is scant evidence to support multidisciplinary meetings in any cancer specialty, they are now regarded as best practice. We believe the oncoplastic multidisciplinary meeting plays a similarly important role, consolidating oncoplastic multidisciplinary working and allowing transparent decision making, standardisation of care and recording of results. This may drive oncoplastic surgery to an evidence-based position from which oncoplastic excellence can be achieved.

  16. A golden anniversary: highlights of the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McVie, Gordon; Nailor, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology showed a shift in the culture of cancer research, moving towards multidisciplinary, integrated, and patient-centric work. Hormone-sensitive cancers were particularly highlighted at this meeting, and impressive strides were made in the previously underserved areas of the lung and thyroid cancer. Interestingly, immunotherapy was one of the strongest themes to emerge. PMID:25075218

  17. Future of oncologic photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Ron R; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Sibata, Claudio H

    2010-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a tumor-ablative and function-sparing oncologic intervention. The relative simplicity of photosensitizer application followed by light activation resulting in the cytotoxic and vasculartoxic photodynamic reaction has allowed PDT to reach a worldwide audience. With several commercially available photosensitizing agents now on the market, numerous well designed clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of PDT on various cutaneous and deep tissue tumors. However, current photosensitizers and light sources still have a number of limitations. Future PDT will build on those findings to allow development and refinement of more optimal therapeutic agents and illumination devices. This article reviews the current state of the art and limitations of PDT, and highlight the progress being made towards the future of oncologic PDT.

  18. [Oncological data elements in histopathology].

    PubMed

    Haroske, G; Kramm, T; Mörz, M; Oberholzer, M

    2010-09-01

    In order to cope with increasing demands to supply information to a variety of documentation systems outside pathology, pathologists need to set standards both for the content and the use of the information they generate. Oncological datasets based on a set vocabulary are urgently required for use both in pathology and in further processing. Data elements were defined according to German pathology report guidelines for colorectal cancers in line with ISO 11179 requirements for the relations between data element concepts and value domains, as well as for further formal conditions, which can be exported in XML together with metadata information. Tests on 100 conventionally written diagnoses showed their principal usability and an increasing degree of guideline conformity in diagnoses commensurate with training time. This set of oncological data elements is a valuable checklist tool for pathologists, enabling formatted information export for further use and saving documentation effort.

  19. Oncology pain and complementary therapy.

    PubMed

    Running, Alice; Turnbeaugh, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Half of all patients with cancer experience some level of pain, so pain management is an important topic for oncology nurses. Pharmacologic measures traditionally are the primary intervention for bone, visceral, neuropathic, and procedural pain; however, many patients are turning to an integrative approach of Western and complementary therapies for pain and symptom management. The authors explored the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of complementary therapies in relation to cancer pain and symptom control.

  20. Mentoring future Kenyan oncology researchers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of the 1st Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Oncology Institute research grant writing workshop organized in collaboration with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and held in Kisumu, Kenya from January 16th to 18th, 2013. The goal of this meeting was to mentor future Kenyan scientists and prioritize research topics that would lead to improved cancer care and survival for the citizens of Kenya. PMID:24099090

  1. Integrative oncology in North America.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Integrative oncology is an evolving evidence-based specialty that uses complementary therapies in concert with medical treatment to enhance its efficacy, improve symptom control, alleviate patient distress and reduce suffering. In North America the evolution of research into complementary therapies was delayed by the narrow focus of the Flexner Report. A government-funded research agenda and incorporation of complementary therapies into medical school curricula have been driven by early evidence of efficacy and patient demand. Integrative oncology focuses on the role of natural health products (botanicals, vitamins, and minerals), nutrition, acupuncture, meditation and other mind-body approaches, music therapy, touch therapies, fitness therapies, and more. Some natural health products, such as herbs and their constituent phytochemicals, may be biologic response modifiers that could increase cancer control. Current research stretches from the laboratory to health services. Institutions are exploring the effectiveness gap in their clinical services and are determining efficacy of complementary therapies through randomized controlled trials. Eventually, the goal is to establish practice guidelines through determining relative effectiveness and value through cost-utility studies. The aim of integrative oncology should be one medicine, not alternative; it should be patient-focused; it should be evidence-based; and it should provide the best care for cancer cure, prevention, symptom control, and quality of life.

  2. Advancing performance measurement in oncology.

    PubMed

    Campion, Francis X; Larson, Leanne R; Kadlubek, Pamela J; Earle, Craig C; Neuss, Michael N

    2011-05-01

    The American healthcare system, including the cancer care system, is under pressure to improve patient outcomes and lower the cost of care. Government payers have articulated an interest in partnering with the private sector to create learning communities to measure quality and improve the value of healthcare. In 2006, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) unveiled the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI), which has become a key component of the measurement system to promote quality cancer care. QOPI is a physician-led, voluntary, practice-based, quality-improvement program, using performance measurement and benchmarking among oncology practices across the United States. Since its inception, ASCO's QOPI has grown steadily to include 973 practices as of November 2010. One key area that QOPI has addressed is end-of-life care. During the most recent data collection cycle in the fall of 2010, those practices completing multiple data collection cycles had better performance on care of pain compared with sites participating for the first time (62.61% vs 46.89%). Similarly, repeat QOPI participants demonstrated meaningfully better performance than their peers in the rate of documenting discussions of hospice and palliative care (62.42% vs 54.65%) and higher rates of hospice enrollment. QOPI demonstrates how a strong performance measurement program can lead to improved quality and value of care for patients.

  3. Oncological resource allocation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Michael; Kath, Roland; Gundermann, Christin

    2008-03-01

    Oncology is a resource-intensive medical discipline where, so far, effectiveness rather than efficiency of a treatment has stood in the foreground. The aim of our study was, therefore, to determine the resource allocation and to assess the efficiency of oncology in Germany for the period of 2002-2004. With the aid of the official German Health Report, the expenditures for health in 2004 and the gain in years of life according to ICD 10 disease categories were analyzed. Based on the incremental costs and years of life gained, the cost calculation per year of life gained was made. Malignant neoplasms appear in 5th place in health expenditures at a cost of 15 billion 1. With costs per year of life gained of 140,750 1, malignant neoplasms range ahead of respiratory diseases (52,500 1)digestive diseases (27,455 1), and injuries (14,538 1). Costs involving malignant neoplasm per year of life gained range between 39,000 1(malignancies of the lip, oral cavity, and the pharynx), and 126,000 1(digestive organ cancer). In Germany, oncology incurs higher costs per year of life gained as compared to several other diseases. Also, in malignant neoplasm considerable differences can be observed regarding resource allocation and efficiency. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Orthodontic treatment in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The progress in oncological treatment has led to the current increase of childhood cancer survival rate to 80%. That is why orthodontists more and more frequently consult patients who had completed a successful anti-cancer therapy in childhood. Oncological treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or supportive immunosuppressive therapy cause numerous side effects in growing patients, connected i.a. with growth, the development of teeth or the viscerocranium. This is a special group of patients that needs an optimised plan of orthodontic treatment and often has to accept a compromise result. The purpose of the current work is to discuss the results of orthodontic treatment in patients after an anti-cancer therapy. Time of treatment was 12,5 months. In 6 patients (from 40 undergoing orthodontic therapy) we haven't reached a normocclusion, in 9 patients we should have stopped the therapy because of the recurrence. In 11 patients we found mucosa inflammation and in 1 patient the therapy stopped before the end because of very low oral hygiene level. Bearing in mind the limited number of original works on the above topic in Polish medical literature, the study has been carried out in order to make Polish orthodontists more acquainted with the topic and the standards of dealing with an oncological patient.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma in immunocompetent patients: guidelines from the European Association for Neuro-Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Bessell, Eric; Bromberg, Jacoline; Hottinger, Andreas F; Preusser, Matthias; Rudà, Roberta; Schlegel, Uwe; Siegal, Tali; Soussain, Carole; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Cassoux, Nathalie; Deckert, Martina; Dirven, Clemens M F; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Graus, Francesc; Henriksson, Roger; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Taphoorn, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The management of primary CNS lymphoma is one of the most controversial topics in neuro-oncology because of the complexity of the disease and the very few controlled studies available. In 2013, the European Association of Neuro-Oncology created a multidisciplinary task force to establish evidence-based guidelines for immunocompetent adults with primary CNS lymphoma. In this Review, we present these guidelines, which provide consensus considerations and recommendations for diagnosis, assessment, staging, and treatment of primary CNS lymphoma. Specifically, we address aspects of care related to surgery, systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy, intensive chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation, radiotherapy, intraocular manifestations, and management of elderly patients. The guidelines should aid clinicians in their daily practice and decision making, and serve as a basis for future investigations in neuro-oncology.

  6. A systematic evaluation of a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer elder mistreatment intervention model.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Victoria M; Burnes, David; Chalfy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a conceptually based, systematic evaluation process employing multivariate techniques to evaluate a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer intervention model (JASA-LEAP). Logistic regression analyses were used with a random sample of case records (n = 250) from three intervention sites. Client retention, program fidelity, and exposure to multidisciplinary services were significantly related to reduction in mistreatment risk at case closure. Female gender, married status, and living with perpetrator significantly predicted unfavorable outcomes. This study extends the elder mistreatment program evaluation literature beyond descriptive/bivariate evaluation strategies. Findings suggest that a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer elder mistreatment intervention model is a successful approach.

  7. Highlights from the 36th European Society of Surgical Oncology Congress (ESSO 36), 14–16 September 2016, Kracow, Poland: optimising European cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lichosik, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    The ESSO Congress is the event for all surgeons with an interest in surgical oncology. The congress is a gathering for the surgical oncology community from all around the world to meet and gain an insight into state-of-the-art technology, latest healthcare services, and solutions within their field. The ESSO 36 congress gathered over 750 participants from 58 countries. With over 100 speakers, the scientific programme featured 18 scientific symposia including a joint symposium with the American Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), 6 multidisciplinary sessions including joint sessions with CIRSE (Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe) and JCOG (Japanese Clinical Oncology Group), 8 meet-the-expert sessions, 5 debates, 13 proffered paper sessions, and 2 video sessions. PMID:28386298

  8. Extended RAS Gene Mutation Testing in Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma to Predict Response to Anti-Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Carmen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mangu, Pamela B; Roach, Nancy; Hantel, Alexander; Schilsky, Richard L

    2016-01-10

    An American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) offers timely clinical direction after publication or presentation of potentially practice-changing data from major studies. This PCO update addresses the utility of extended RAS gene mutation testing in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to detect resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. Recent results from phase II and III clinical trials in mCRC demonstrate that patients whose tumors harbor RAS mutations in exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146) are unlikely to benefit from therapy with MoAbs directed against EGFR, when used as monotherapy or combined with chemotherapy. In addition to the evidence reviewed in the original PCO, 11 systematic reviews with meta-analyses, two retrospective analyses, and two health technology assessments based on a systematic review were obtained. These evaluated the outcomes for patients with mCRC with no mutation detected or presence of mutation in additional exons in KRAS and NRAS. PCO: All patients with mCRC who are candidates for anti-EGFR antibody therapy should have their tumor tested in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory for mutations in both KRAS and NRAS exons 2 (codons 12 and 13), 3 (codons 59 and 61), and 4 (codons 117 and 146). The weight of current evidence indicates that anti-EGFR MoAb therapy should only be considered for treatment of patients whose tumor is determined to not have mutations detected after such extended RAS testing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. [Definition and outline on geriatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Terret, C; Droz, J-P

    2009-11-01

    Geriatric oncology is the concept for management of elderly cancer patients. It is an equal approach of the health status problems and of cancer in a patient considered as a whole. Therefore it is not a subspecialty but a practice which can be translated in the elderly cancer patient's care. The treatment of cancer is based on the same principles than this of younger patients; recommendations used are those of the scientific oncological societies. Health problems of elderly patients are screened by specific tools. Patients without major health problems are managed by the oncological team in the routine; those for whom screening have demonstrated problems are first evaluated in the geriatrics setting and then oncological decisions are adapted to the patient situation. Decisions are made in specific geriatric oncology conferences. Specific clinical trials are required to build an Evidence Based Medicine background. Geriatric oncology teaching programs are warranted.

  10. [Multidisciplinary practice guideline 'Marfan syndrome'].

    PubMed

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multi-system disorder of dominant inheritance in which the cardiovasculature, in particular the aorta, the eyes and the skeleton are affected. Diagnostic assessment and treatment of patients who are suspected of or have Marfan syndrome should preferably be done by multidisciplinary teams such as those found in specialised Marfan syndrome centres. The practice guideline is intended for all care givers involved with the recognition, diagnosis, consultations and the medicinal and surgical treatment of Marfan patients; it includes referral criteria and information on the referral process. A diagnosis of Marfan syndrome is based on international criteria in which aortic root dilatation and dissection, ectopia lentis, an affected first-degree family member and a pathogenic FBN1 mutation are the cardinal features. Alternative diagnoses are also included in the practice guideline. Recommendations are given for the monitoring and treatment of Marfan patients during pregnancy and delivery. Advice on lifestyle is mainly focussed on sports activities.

  11. Integration of Multidisciplinary Sensory Data:

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Perry L.; Nadkarni, Prakash; Singer, Michael; Marenco, Luis; Hines, Michael; Shepherd, Gordon

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of neuroinformatics research at Yale University being performed as part of the national Human Brain Project. This research is exploring the integration of multidisciplinary sensory data, using the olfactory system as a model domain. The neuroinformatics activities fall into three main areas: 1) building databases and related tools that support experimental olfactory research at Yale and can also serve as resources for the field as a whole, 2) using computer models (molecular models and neuronal models) to help understand data being collected experimentally and to help guide further laboratory experiments, 3) performing basic neuroinformatics research to develop new informatics technologies, including a flexible data model (EAV/CR, entity-attribute-value with classes and relationships) designed to facilitate the integration of diverse heterogeneous data within a single unifying framework. PMID:11141511

  12. [Wilms' tumor. Its multidisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Rivera Luna, R; Martínez Guerra, G; Ruano Aguilar, J; Cárdenas Cardoz, R; Lanche Guevara, T

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 children with a histopathological diagnosis of Wilms' tumor were studied. The average age was three years. An abdominal tumor was the most frequent clinical manifestations, with a predominating clinicopathological stage II. The most important prognostic factors were the clinical stage and histological subvariety. A five year disease free period during the early stages was very favorable. On the other hand, advances stages and unfavorable histopathology established a poor prognosis. In our experience, stages I and II and favorable histology should not receive radiotherapy but instead brief chemotherapy. The global five year survival was 82%. All the patients with an unfavorable histology occupied stages II and IV. a comparison of disease free survival between stages I and II against III and IV showed statistical significance (p 0.01). Statistical significance also appeared upon comparison between unfavorable versus favorable (p 0.01) histology. Emphasis is placed upon multidisciplinary management of this type of malignant neoplasias.

  13. [Multidisciplinary treatment of orofacial pain].

    PubMed

    Geurts, J W; Haumann, J; van Kleef, M

    2016-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain can be complex. The differential diagnosis is very extensive. Therefore, multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment are often indicated. The diagnosis of chronic pain also entails the investigation of psychological factors. This is because psychological problems can play a role in the chronification of pain, but they can also be a consequence of chronic pain. Patients with persistent orofacial complaints should be seen by a medical team consisting of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, a neurologist, an anaesthesiologist/pain specialist, a dentist-gnathologist, an orofacial physical therapist, and a psychologist or psychiatrist specialising in orofacial pain. Treatment options should be discussed, taking into account literature concerning their effectiveness. The general conclusion is that much research remains to be done into the causes of, and treatments for, orofacial pain.

  14. NPSS Multidisciplinary Integration and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Rasche, Joseph; Simons, Todd A.; Hoyniak, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this task was to enhance the capability of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) by expanding its reach into the high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis area. This task investigated numerical techniques to convert between cold static to hot running geometry of compressor blades. Numerical calculations of blade deformations were iteratively done with high fidelity flow simulations together with high fidelity structural analysis of the compressor blade. The flow simulations were performed with the Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis (ADPAC) code, while structural analyses were performed with the ANSYS code. High fidelity analyses were used to evaluate the effects on performance of: variations in tip clearance, uncertainty in manufacturing tolerance, variable inlet guide vane scheduling, and the effects of rotational speed on the hot running geometry of the compressor blades.

  15. Multidisciplinary survey of erectile impotence.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, W. E.; McKendry, J. B.; Silverman, M.; Krul, L. E.; Collins, J. P.; Irvine, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    A study was done of 220 men referred principally by family physicians to a multidisciplinary erectile dysfunction study group to determine the factors causing or contributing to impotence that had persisted for more than 2 months and for which no cause was apparent. The men were aged 21 to 79 (mean 50.3) years, and the duration of impotence was a few months to 15 years (mean 2.65 years). The men were to be assessed from general medical, endocrinologic/metabolic, psychiatric and urogenital viewpoints. The significance of the causal or contributory factors detected was scored by application of defined criteria and a four-point scale. The degree of loss of potency and of libido as well as level of concern were also scored by each specialist. Impotence was complete in 60%, and an associated decline in libido was reported by 38%. The level of concern was high--that is, normal--in 81% and slightly reduced in 9%. Full investigation by all the specialists was precluded by the severity of other conditions in 16 patients, by the return of potency following relief of anxiety/depression or genitourinary tract infection in 16 and for logistic or other reasons in 34. Although the cause of the impotence could be attributed in 186 of the patients, only 154 were fully assessed. Among these patients general medical factors were contributory in 46%, endocrinologic/metabolic factors in 44%, psychogenic factors (primary or secondary) in 60% and urogenital factors in 49%. Multiple contributing factors were identified in 65%, which underscores the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to assessing many cases of impotence. PMID:6850465

  16. Career opportunities and benefits for young oncologists in the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Gilberto; Lambertini, Matteo; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Amaral, Teresa; Argiles, Guillem; Banerjee, Susana; Cardone, Claudia; Corral, Jesus; De Mattos-Arruda, Letticia; Öztürk, Akif; Petrova, Mila; Poulsen, Laurids; Strijbos, Michiel; Tyulyandina, Alexandra; Vidra, Radu; Califano, Raffaele; de Azambuja, Evandro; Garrido Lopez, Pilar; Guarneri, Valentina; Reck, Martin; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Martinelli, Erika; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Stahel, Rolf; Voest, Emile; Arnold, Dirk; Cardoso, Fatima; Casali, Paolo; Cervantes, Andrés; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Eniu, Alexandru; Jassem, Jacek; Pentheroudakis, George; Peters, Solange; McGregor, Keith; Rauh, Stefan; Zielinski, Christoph C; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tabernero, Josep; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is one of the leading societies of oncology professionals in the world. Approximately 30% of the 13 000 ESMO members are below the age of 40 and thus meet the society's definition of young oncologists (YOs). ESMO has identified the training and development of YOs as a priority and has therefore established a comprehensive career development programme. This includes a leadership development programme to help identify and develop the future leaders in oncology. Well-trained and highly motivated future generations of multidisciplinary oncologists are essential to ensure the optimal evolution of the field of oncology with the ultimate goal of providing the best possible care to patients with cancer. ESMO's career development portfolio is managed and continuously optimised by several dedicated committees composed of ESMO officers and is directly supervised by the ESMO Executive Board and the ESMO President. It offers unique resources for YOs at all stages of training and includes a broad variety of fellowship opportunities, educational courses, scientific meetings, publications and resources. In this article, we provide an overview of the activities and career development opportunities provided by ESMO to the next generation of oncologists. PMID:28255451

  17. Career opportunities and benefits for young oncologists in the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gilberto; Lambertini, Matteo; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Amaral, Teresa; Argiles, Guillem; Banerjee, Susana; Cardone, Claudia; Corral, Jesus; De Mattos-Arruda, Letticia; Öztürk, Akif; Petrova, Mila; Poulsen, Laurids; Strijbos, Michiel; Tyulyandina, Alexandra; Vidra, Radu; Califano, Raffaele; de Azambuja, Evandro; Garrido Lopez, Pilar; Guarneri, Valentina; Reck, Martin; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Martinelli, Erika; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Stahel, Rolf; Voest, Emile; Arnold, Dirk; Cardoso, Fatima; Casali, Paolo; Cervantes, Andrés; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Eniu, Alexandru; Jassem, Jacek; Pentheroudakis, George; Peters, Solange; McGregor, Keith; Rauh, Stefan; Zielinski, Christoph C; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tabernero, Josep; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is one of the leading societies of oncology professionals in the world. Approximately 30% of the 13 000 ESMO members are below the age of 40 and thus meet the society's definition of young oncologists (YOs). ESMO has identified the training and development of YOs as a priority and has therefore established a comprehensive career development programme. This includes a leadership development programme to help identify and develop the future leaders in oncology. Well-trained and highly motivated future generations of multidisciplinary oncologists are essential to ensure the optimal evolution of the field of oncology with the ultimate goal of providing the best possible care to patients with cancer. ESMO's career development portfolio is managed and continuously optimised by several dedicated committees composed of ESMO officers and is directly supervised by the ESMO Executive Board and the ESMO President. It offers unique resources for YOs at all stages of training and includes a broad variety of fellowship opportunities, educational courses, scientific meetings, publications and resources. In this article, we provide an overview of the activities and career development opportunities provided by ESMO to the next generation of oncologists.

  18. Development of a hematology/oncology ICD-10 documentation job aid.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel B; Silas, Sean; Covner, Audrey; Hendrie, Paul C; Stewart, F Marc

    2015-04-01

    Conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) was mandated for October 1, 2014, but was delayed by one year. ICD-10 accommodates newly developed diagnoses and procedures and is expected to help measure quality of care. When implemented, it will impact oncology practices because of conversion costs, loss of productivity, and billing problems. Clinical documentation must meet the specificity required by ICD-10 codes or risk denial of payments, which are projected to dramatically increase. In preparation for the now delayed conversion, the ICD-10 transition team at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) examined the ICD-10 codes for primary hematology/oncology diagnoses and comorbidities of cancer and therapy seen at our institution to identify the need for and feasibility of developing a printable job aid to guide clinical documentation. We found that the variable complexity of ICD-10 codes in hematology/oncology frequently requires nonintuitive specificity likely to be overlooked without prompting. We were able to develop a succinct and facile documentation aid usable in both electronic and printed forms that includes all hematology/oncology diagnoses and the comorbidities most frequently seen in our multidisciplinary institution. This document is organized in a notebook format for easy review and will be continuously improved with feedback from practitioners. It is available for free download from the SCCA Web site. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  19. The Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Geriatric Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brianna; Tarbi, Elise

    2016-02-01

    To describe how the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) is uniquely suited to meet the needs of older adults throughout the continuum of cancer, to explore the progress that APNs have made in gero-oncology care, and make suggestions for future directions. Google Scholar, PubMed, and CINAHL. Search terms included: "gero-oncology," "geriatric oncology," "Advanced Practice Nurse," "Nurse Practitioner," "older adult," "elderly," and "cancer." Over the last decade, APNs have made advances in caring for older adults with cancer by playing a role in prevention, screening, and diagnosis; through evidence-based gero-oncology care during cancer treatment; and in designing tailored survivorship care models. APNs must combat ageism in treatment choice for older adults, standardize comprehensive geriatric assessments, and focus on providing person-centered care, specifically during care transitions. APNs are well-positioned to help understand the complex relationship between risk factors, geriatric syndromes, and frailty and translate research into practice. Palliative care must expand beyond specialty providers and shift toward APNs with a focus on early advanced care planning. Finally, APNs should continue to establish multidisciplinary survivorship models across care settings, with a focus on primary care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug pain interventions in practice.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Bumpus, Molly; Wanta, Britt; Serlin, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Cancer pain management guidelines recommend nondrug interventions as adjuvants to analgesic medications. Although physicians typically are responsible for pharmacologic pain treatments, oncology staff nurses, who spend considerable time with patients, are largely responsible for identifying and implementing nondrug pain treatments. Oncology nurses' use of nondrug interventions, however, has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to describe oncology nurses' use of four nondrug interventions (music, guided imagery, relaxation, distraction) and to identify factors that influence their use in practice. A national sample of 724 oncology staff nurses completed a mailed survey regarding use of the nondrug interventions in practice, beliefs about the interventions, and demographic characteristics. The percentages of nurses who reported administering the strategies in practice at least sometimes were 54% for music, 40% for guided imagery, 82% for relaxation, and 80% for distraction. Use of each nondrug intervention was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about effectiveness of the intervention (e.g., perceived benefit; P<0.025) and a composite score on beliefs about support for carrying out the intervention (e.g., time; P<0.025). In addition, use of guided imagery was predicted by a composite score on beliefs about characteristics of patients who may benefit from the intervention (e.g., cognitive ability; P<0.05). Some nurse demographic, professional preparation, and practice environment characteristics also predicted use of individual nondrug interventions. Efforts to improve application of nondrug interventions should focus on innovative educational strategies, problem solving to secure support, and development and testing of new delivery methods that require less time from busy staff nurses.

  1. A Multidisciplinary Clerkship in Emergency Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Marshall, Carter L.

    1979-01-01

    At the New Jersey Medical School, an obligatory, multidisciplinary, fourth-year emergency medicine clerkship requires ambulance duty, emergency room rotation, medical specialty lectures, and a cardiac life support providers course. Particular problems associated with multidisciplinary courses are discussed. (Author/JMD)

  2. Multi-Disciplinary Consumer Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sie, Maureen A.; And Others

    Two activities are described in this report, both of which focus on the multi-disciplinary approach in the development of a consumer education curriculum for high school students. The first activity, which demonstrated the feasibility of a multi-disciplinary approach using local school personnel and resources and university faculty in curriculum…

  3. Pediatric pain management: the multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Odell, Shannon; Logan, Deirdre E

    2013-11-11

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents is a growing problem and one that is increasingly being addressed with multidisciplinary treatment teams. This review summarizes different multidisciplinary clinics, focusing specifically on intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation centers. This review offers a summary of the challenges faced by these programs and areas for future study.

  4. An Objective Examination of Multidisciplinary Patient Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Jane S.; Spiegel, Timothy M.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of multidisciplinary patient conferences was examined. The question of multidisciplinary conference productivity was addressed by examining the impact of these conferences on a team's formulation of patient therapy plans, problem lists, hospitalization goals, and discharge date. (Author/MLW)

  5. An overview of viral oncology in Italy - report from the Pavia meeting on solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Ricotti, Mattia; Buonaguro, Franco; Tirelli, Umberto; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2012-09-05

    This is a report on some of the research activities currently ongoing in Italy as outlined at the "Viruses and solid tumors" meeting jointly organized by the Oncology Sections of IRCCS Policlinico "San Matteo" (Pavia) and IRCCS National Cancer Institute (Aviano), held in Pavia, Italy, on October 2011. Experts from the various disciplines involved in the study of the complex relationships between solid tumors and viruses met to discuss recent developments in the field and to report their personal contributions to the specified topics. Secondary end point was to establish a multidisciplinary work group specifically devoted to solid tumors and infectious agents, aimed to identify areas of common interest, promoting and establishing collaborative projects and programs, and to coordinate clinical and research activities. The group, which will be named IVOG (Italian Viral Oncology Group), will operate under the patronage of the various scientific societies of interest.

  6. Applying Precision Medicine and Immunotherapy Advances from Oncology to Host-Directed Therapies for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Robert N.; Hafner, Richard

    2017-01-01

    To meet the challenges of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the infectious disease community needs innovative therapeutics. Precision medicine and immunotherapies are transforming cancer therapeutics by targeting the regulatory signaling pathways that are involved not only in malignancies but also in the metabolic and immunologic function of the tumor microenvironment. Infectious diseases target many of the same regulatory pathways as they modulate host metabolic functions for their own nutritional requirements and to impede host immunity. These similarities and the advances made in precision medicine and immuno-oncology that are relevant for the current development of host-directed therapies (HDTs) to treat infectious diseases are discussed. To harness this potential, improvements in drug screening methods and development of assays that utilize the research tools including high throughput multiplexes already developed by oncology are essential. A multidisciplinary approach that brings together immunologists, infectious disease specialists, and oncologists will be necessary to fully develop the potential of HDTs. PMID:28706516

  7. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... products (products to suppress clotting of blood) in children. Issues for discussion will...

  8. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... (Pub. L. 108-155) and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (Pub. L. 107-109) and their...

  9. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... will receive a presentation on pediatric provisions mandated by the Food and Drug Administration Safety...

  10. Report on the use of non-clinical studies in the regulatory evaluation of oncology drugs.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kawada, Manabu; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Yao, Ryoji; Hayashi, Masahiro; Kai, Chieko; Matsuda, Akira; Naoe, Tomoki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Okazaki, Taku; Saji, Hideo; Sata, Masataka; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Toi, Masakazu; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2016-02-01

    Non-clinical studies are necessary at each stage of the development of oncology drugs. Many experimental cancer models have been developed to investigate carcinogenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, and other aspects in cancer biology and these models turned out to be useful in the efficacy evaluation and the safety prediction of oncology drugs. While the diversity and the degree of engagement in genetic changes in the initiation of cancer cell growth and progression are widely accepted, it has become increasingly clear that the roles of host cells, tissue microenvironment, and the immune system also play important roles in cancer. Therefore, the methods used to develop oncology drugs should continuously be revised based on the advances in our understanding of cancer. In this review, we extensively summarize the effective use of those models, their advantages and disadvantages, ranges to be evaluated and limitations of the models currently used for the development and for the evaluation of oncology drugs.

  11. Technical aspects of quality assurance in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Saw, Cb; Ferenci, Ms; Wanger, H

    2008-07-01

    The technical aspects of quality assurance (QA) in radiation oncology as practice in the United States will be reviewed and updated in the spirit of offering the experience to the radiation oncology communities in the Asia-Pacific region. The word "technical" is used to express the organisational components or processes and not the materials within the QA program. A comprehensive QA program in radiation oncology will have an official statement declaring the quality plan for effective patient care services it provides in a document. The QA program will include all aspects of patient care: physical, clinical, and medical aspects of the services. The document will describe the organisational structure, responsibilities, checks and procedures, and resources allocated to ensure the successful implementation of the quality of patient management. Regulatory guidelines and guidelines from accreditation agencies should be incorporated in the QA program to ensure compliance. The organisational structure will have a multidisciplinary QA committee that has the authority to evaluate continuously the effectiveness of the QA program to provide prompt corrective recommendations and to request feedback as needed to monitor the response. The continuous monitoring aspects require meetings to be held at regular intervals with the minutes of the meetings officially recorded and documented. To ensure that a QA program is effective, the program itself should be audited for quality at regular intervals at least annually. It has been recognised that the current QA program has not kept abreast with the rapid implementation of new and advanced radiation therapy technologies with the most recent in image-based radiation therapy technology. The societal bodies (ASTRO and AAPM) and federal agency (NCI) acknowledge this inadequacy and have held workshops to address this issue. The challenges for the societal bodies and federal agency are numerous that include (a) the prescriptive methodology

  12. Technical aspects of quality assurance in radiation oncology

    PubMed Central

    Saw, CB; Ferenci, MS; Wanger, H

    2008-01-01

    The technical aspects of quality assurance (QA) in radiation oncology as practice in the United States will be reviewed and updated in the spirit of offering the experience to the radiation oncology communities in the Asia-Pacific region. The word “technical” is used to express the organisational components or processes and not the materials within the QA program. A comprehensive QA program in radiation oncology will have an official statement declaring the quality plan for effective patient care services it provides in a document. The QA program will include all aspects of patient care: physical, clinical, and medical aspects of the services. The document will describe the organisational structure, responsibilities, checks and procedures, and resources allocated to ensure the successful implementation of the quality of patient management. Regulatory guidelines and guidelines from accreditation agencies should be incorporated in the QA program to ensure compliance. The organisational structure will have a multidisciplinary QA committee that has the authority to evaluate continuously the effectiveness of the QA program to provide prompt corrective recommendations and to request feedback as needed to monitor the response. The continuous monitoring aspects require meetings to be held at regular intervals with the minutes of the meetings officially recorded and documented. To ensure that a QA program is effective, the program itself should be audited for quality at regular intervals at least annually. It has been recognised that the current QA program has not kept abreast with the rapid implementation of new and advanced radiation therapy technologies with the most recent in image-based radiation therapy technology. The societal bodies (ASTRO and AAPM) and federal agency (NCI) acknowledge this inadequacy and have held workshops to address this issue. The challenges for the societal bodies and federal agency are numerous that include (a) the prescriptive methodology

  13. Recommended guidelines for the conduct and evaluation of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Webster, J D; Dennis, M M; Dervisis, N; Heller, J; Bacon, N J; Bergman, P J; Bienzle, D; Cassali, G; Castagnaro, M; Cullen, J; Esplin, D G; Peña, L; Goldschmidt, M H; Hahn, K A; Henry, C J; Hellmén, E; Kamstock, D; Kirpensteijn, J; Kitchell, B E; Amorim, R L; Lenz, S D; Lipscomb, T P; McEntee, M; McGill, L D; McKnight, C A; McManus, P M; Moore, A S; Moore, P F; Moroff, S D; Nakayama, H; Northrup, N C; Sarli, G; Scase, T; Sorenmo, K; Schulman, F Y; Shoieb, A M; Smedley, R C; Spangler, W L; Teske, E; Thamm, D H; Valli, V E; Vernau, W; von Euler, H; Withrow, S J; Weisbrode, S E; Yager, J; Kiupel, M

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate prognostic and predictive markers in veterinary oncology because of an increasing number of treatment options, the increased financial costs associated with treatment, and the emotional stress experienced by owners in association with the disease and its treatment. Numerous studies have evaluated potential prognostic and predictive markers for veterinary neoplastic diseases, but there are no established guidelines or standards for the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary medicine. This lack of standardization has made the evaluation and comparison of studies difficult. Most important, translating these results to clinical applications is problematic. To address this issue, the American College of Veterinary Pathologists' Oncology Committee organized an initiative to establish guidelines for the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology. The goal of this initiative is to increase the quality and standardization of veterinary prognostic studies to facilitate independent evaluation, validation, comparison, and implementation of study results. This article represents a consensus statement on the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology from veterinary pathologists and oncologists from around the world. These guidelines should be considered a recommendation based on the current state of knowledge in the field, and they will need to be continually reevaluated and revised as the field of veterinary oncology continues to progress. As mentioned, these guidelines were developed through an initiative of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists' Oncology Committee, and they have been reviewed and endorsed by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. Symposium: "Oncology Leadership in Asia".

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeul Hong; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Baba, Hideo; Samson-Fernando, Marie Cherry Lynn; Misra, Sanjeev; Aziz, Zeba; Umbas, Rainy; P Singh, Yogendra; Shu Kam Mok, Tony; Yang, Han-Kwang; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2017-03-09

    The Symposium on "Oncology Leadership in Asia" was held as part of the official program of the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association. Given the increasing incidence of cancer in all countries and regions of Asia, regardless of developmental stage, and also in light of the recognized need for Asian countries to enhance collaboration in cancer prevention, research, treatment and follow-up, the symposium was held with the aim of bringing together oncology specialists from eight countries and regions in Asia to present the status in their own national context and discuss the key challenges and requirements in order to establish a greater Asian presence in the area of cancer control and research. The task of bringing together diverse countries and regions is made all the more urgent in that while Asia now accounts for more than half of all new cancer cases globally, clinical guidelines are based predominantly on practices adopted in western countries, which may not be optimized for unique ethnic, pharmacogenomic and cultural characteristics in Asia. Recognizing the need for Asia to better gather information and data for the compilation of Asia-specific clinical guidelines, the participants discussed the current status in Asia in the national and regional contexts and identified future steps towards integrated and collaborative initiatives in Asia. A key outcome of the symposium was a proposal to combine and integrate the activities of existing pan-Asian societies, including the Asia Pacific Federation of Organizations for Cancer Research and Control (APFOCC) and Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS). Further proposals included the expansion of pan-Asian society membership to include individuals and the essential need to encourage the participation of young researchers in order to ensure self-sustainability of cancer control efforts in the future.

  15. Multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Ing. Ulvi Arslan, Univ., ., Dr. _., Prof.; Heiko Huber, Dipl.-Ing.

    2010-05-01

    KEYWORDS Geothermal sciences, geothermics, research, theory and application, numerical calculation, geothermal modeling, Technical University Darmstadt, Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) INTRODUCTION In times of global warming renewable, green energies are getting more and more important. The development of application of geothermal energy as a part of renewable energies in Germany is a multidisciplinary process of fast growing research and improvements. Geothermal energy is the energy, which is stored below earth's surface. The word geothermal derives from the Greek words geo (earth) and thermos (heat), so geothermal is a synonym to earth heat. Geothermal energy is one of the auspicious renewable energies. In average the temperature increases 3°C every 100 m of depth, which is termed as geothermal gradient. Therefore 99 percent of our planet is hotter than 1.000°C, while 99 percent of that last percent is even hotter than 100°C. Already in a depth of about 1 kilometer temperatures of 35 - 40°C can be achieved. While other renewable energies arise less or more from the sun, geothermal energy sources its heat from the earth's interior, which is caused mostly by radioactive decay of persistent isotopes. This means a possibility of a base-loadable form of energy supply. Especially efficient is the use of deep geothermal energy of high-enthalpie reservoirs, which means a high energy potential in low depths. In Germany no high-enthalpie reservoirs are given. To use the given low-enthalpie potential and to generate geothermal power efficiently inventions and improvements need to be performed. An important part of geothermal progresses is performed by universities with multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling. Especially in deep geothermal systems numerical calculations are essential for a correct dimensioning of the geothermal system. Therefore German universities and state aided organizations are developing numerical programs for a detailed use of

  16. [Should cases of hepatocellular carcinoma be discussed by non-specialized multidisciplinary team meetings?].

    PubMed

    Barbare, Jean-Claude; Franco, Dominique; André, Thierry; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Merle, Philippe; Péron, Jean-Marie; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Seitz, Jean-François; Ychou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is difficult due to the underlying cirrhosis which has its own influence on therapeutic issues. An inquiry was performed in centres with specialized multidisciplinary team meetings dedicated to HCC (HCC-MTM) or in centres with non-specialized (digestive oncology or general oncology) multidisciplinary team meetings (NS-MTM). The number of cases of HCCs taken in charge yearly was significantly higher in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,0014). Interventional radiologists and transplant surgeons were more frequently implied in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (respectively p=0,009 and p=0,02). On site availability of every treatment of HCC was higher in RCP-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,015). There were no inclusion in clinical trials in 40.5 % of NS-MTM versus only 17.6 % of HCC-MTM (p=0,0086). In three clinical cases out of seven there were discrepancies between the therapeutic options of HCC-MTM and NS-MTM. In all three cases, the treatment offered to the patient by HCC-MTM was more consistent with clinical standards. These results prompt to perform more studies on the quality of management of patients with HCCs by MTMs.

  17. Economics of new oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, Joseph A; Grabowski, Henry G

    2007-01-10

    Review existing studies and provide new results on the development, regulatory, and market aspects of new oncology drug development. We utilized data from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), company surveys, and publicly available commercial business intelligence databases on new oncology drugs approved in the United States and on investigational oncology drugs to estimate average development and regulatory approval times, clinical approval success rates, first-in-class status, and global market diffusion. We found that approved new oncology drugs to have a disproportionately high share of FDA priority review ratings, of orphan drug designations at approval, and of drugs that were granted inclusion in at least one of the FDA's expedited access programs. US regulatory approval times were shorter, on average, for oncology drugs (0.5 years), but US clinical development times were longer on average (1.5 years). Clinical approval success rates were similar for oncology and other drugs, but proportionately more of the oncology failures reached expensive late-stage clinical testing before being abandoned. In relation to other drugs, new oncology drug approvals were more often first-in-class and diffused more widely across important international markets. The market success of oncology drugs has induced a substantial amount of investment in oncology drug development in the last decade or so. However, given the great need for further progress, the extent to which efforts to develop new oncology drugs will grow depends on future public-sector investment in basic research, developments in translational medicine, and regulatory reforms that advance drug-development science.

  18. Molecular profiles in foregut oncology.

    PubMed

    Sukharamwala, Prashant; Hennessey, Daniel; Wood, Thomas; Singh, Shelly; Ryan, Carrie; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Oncology is and will continue to evolve resulting from a better understanding of the biology and intrinsic genetic profile of each cancer. Tumor biomarkers and targeted therapies are the new face of precision medicine, so it is essential for all physicians caring for cancer patients to understand and assist patients in understanding the role and importance of such markers and strategies to target them. This review was initiated in an attempt to identify, characterize, and discuss literature supporting clinically relevant molecular markers and interventions. The efficacy of targeting specific markers will be examined with data from clinical trials focusing on treatments for esophageal, gastric, liver, gallbladder, biliary tract, and pancreatic cancers.

  19. [The second opinion in oncology].

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Luciano; Felicetti, Viviana; Cristina, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The medical second opinion (MSO) means the process through which it is possible to consult any available medical institution or a single physician, to compare, confirm and/or review a first diagnosis and/or a proposed treatment. The MSO is of the utmost importance when patients are suffering serious and disabling diseases or when risking their lives. Oncology is a really complex discipline in which, daily, doctors and patients have to deal with new clinical, managerial and sociological problems. Most patients are now better informed-often having gathered information from the Web, newspapers, magazines.This information is often very mixed and confusing and the number of MSO is increasing.

  20. Precision medicine in oncology drug development: a pharma perspective.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Simon J

    2015-12-01

    A rapid expansion in precision medicine founded on the potential for durable clinical benefit through matching a drug to a predictive marker used to select patients has driven the development of targeted drugs with accompanied companion diagnostics for patient selection. Oncology has been at the forefront, with the improvements in patient survival notable. Increasing numbers of molecular subgroups require an equally increasing number (and new generation) of highly selective agents targeting inevitably lower incidence molecular segments, posing significant challenges for drug development. Innovative trial designs (umbrella or basket studies) are emerging as patient-centric approaches and public-private partnerships, cross-industry, government and non-profit sector collaborations are enabling implementation. Success will require continued innovation, new paradigms in oncology drug development and market approval and continued collaboration.

  1. Design Environment for Multifidelity and Multidisciplinary Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges when developing propulsion systems is predicting the interacting effects between the fluid loads, thermal loads, and structural deflection. The interactions between technical disciplines often are not fully analyzed, and the analysis in one discipline often uses a simplified representation of other disciplines as an input or boundary condition. For example, the fluid forces in an engine generate static and dynamic rotor deflection, but the forces themselves are dependent on the rotor position and its orbit. It is important to consider the interaction between the physical phenomena where the outcome of each analysis is heavily dependent on the inputs (e.g., changes in flow due to deflection, changes in deflection due to fluid forces). A rigid design process also lacks the flexibility to employ multiple levels of fidelity in the analysis of each of the components. This project developed and validated an innovative design environment that has the flexibility to simultaneously analyze multiple disciplines and multiple components with multiple levels of model fidelity. Using NASA's open-source multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (OpenMDAO) framework, this multifaceted system will provide substantially superior capabilities to current design tools.

  2. Multidisciplinary approaches to solar hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bren, Kara L.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes three different approaches to engineering systems for the solar-driven evolution of hydrogen fuel from water: molecular, nanomaterials and biomolecular. Molecular systems have the advantage of being highly amenable to modification and detailed study and have provided great insight into photophysics, electron transfer and catalytic mechanism. However, they tend to display poor stability. Systems based on nanomaterials are more robust but also are more difficult to synthesize in a controlled manner and to modify and study in detail. Biomolecular systems share many properties with molecular systems and have the advantage of displaying inherently high efficiencies for light absorption, electron–hole separation and catalysis. However, biological systems must be engineered to couple modules that capture and convert solar photons to modules that produce hydrogen fuel. Furthermore, biological systems are prone to degradation when employed in vitro. Advances that use combinations of these three tactics also are described. Multidisciplinary approaches to this problem allow scientists to take advantage of the best features of biological, molecular and nanomaterials systems provided that the components can be coupled for efficient function. PMID:26052425

  3. Submarine Landslides: A Multidisciplinary Crossroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of submarine landslides has advanced considerably in the last decade. A multitude of geoscience disciplines, including marine, petroleum and planetary geology, as well as geohazard assessments, are concerned with the study of these units. Oftentimes, researchers working in these fields disseminate their findings within their own communities and a multidisciplinary approach seems to lack. This presentation showcases several case studies in which a broader approach has increased our understanding of submarine landslides in a variety of geologic settings. Three-dimensional seismic data from several continental margins (Trinidad, Brazil, Morocco, Canada, GOM), as well as data from outcrop localities are shown to explore geomorphological complexities associated with submarine landslides. Discussion associated with the characterization and classification of submarine landslides is also part of this work. Topics that will be cover include: 1) how data from conventional oil and gas exploration activities can be used to increase our understanding of the dynamic behavior of submarine landslides, 2) analogies between terrestrial submarine landslides and potential Martian counterparts, 3) impact of submarine landslides in margin construction, as well as their economic significance and 4) the importance of quantifying the morphology of submarine landslides in a systematic fashion.

  4. Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances.

  5. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  6. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes.

  7. Report from the OECI Oncology Days 2014

    PubMed Central

    van Harten, WH; Stanta, G; Bussolati, G; Riegman, P; Hoefler, G; Becker, KF; Folprecht, G; Truini, M; Haybaeck, J; Buiga, R; Dono, M; Bagg, A; López Guerrero, JA; Zupo, S; Lemare, F; de Lorenzo, F; Goedbloed, N; Razavi, D; Lövey, J; Cadariu, PA; Rollandi, GA; Paparo, F; Pierotti, M; Ciuleanu, T; De Paoli, P; Weiner, G; Saghatchian, M; Lombardo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 OECI Oncology Days was held at the ‘Prof. Dr. Ion Chiricuta’ Oncology Institute in Cluj, Romania, from 12 to 13 June. The focus of this year’s gathering was on developments in personalised medicine and other treatment advances which have made the cost of cancer care too high for many regions throughout Europe. PMID:25624877

  8. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  9. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  10. Perceptions of Oncology as a Medical Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and prestige associated with oncology and assessed shifts in medical students' perceptions as a result of participation in an oncology course are explored. Respondents were asked to rate the prestige of eight specialities and asked to select characteristics "that best describe each type of specialist." (MLW)

  11. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients.…

  12. Perceptions of Oncology as a Medical Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and prestige associated with oncology and assessed shifts in medical students' perceptions as a result of participation in an oncology course are explored. Respondents were asked to rate the prestige of eight specialities and asked to select characteristics "that best describe each type of specialist." (MLW)

  13. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  14. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  15. [Consultations in oncological supportive care mono-, multi-, ou interdisciplinary: What should we favour?].

    PubMed

    Garnier, Stéphanie Ranque; Pelletti, Caroline; Quenard, Christelle; Vallet, Fabienne; Lemoine, Patrick; Guastella, Virginie; Rhondali, Wadih

    2015-09-01

    According to the point 7.6 and 7.7 of the Cancer Plan 2014, all cancer patients should have access to supportive care. Indeed, the supportive care consultation in oncology is an important tool for the symptom management of cancer patients at all times of treatment. This consultation can be mono-disciplinary or multi-disciplinary (with different professions: physician, nurse, psychologist, social service assistant…) with or without integration (multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary). There are few studies focusing on the types of consultations (mono- or multidisciplinary) to promote based on their expected outcomes. After describing the different types of consultations (initial, follow-up, unscheduled, discharge) and having highlighted the main issues of these consultations, we will present the possible configurations. Our discussion will concern then the advantages and disadvantages of monodisciplinarity and different types of multidisciplinary highlighting the possible improvements. At the end of this work, after a brief synthesis of the different outcomes associated with each type of consultation, we would like to discuss the type of consultation to choose according to the outcomes.

  16. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  17. Role of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary management of Ewing's Sarcoma of bone in pediatric patients: An effective treatment for local control.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jose Luis; Cabrera, Patricia; Ordoñez, Rafael; Marquez, Catalina; Ramirez, Gema Lucia; Praena-Fernandez, Juan Manuel; Ortiz, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays an important role in the multidisciplinary management of Ewing's Sarcoma (ES), especially in unresectable cases. Assessment of efficacy of RT in terms of local control in pediatric patients with primary ES of bone. Thirty-six patients younger than 17 years old with ES treated with combined RT and chemotherapy with (N = 14) or without (N = 22) prior surgery from 1981 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Since 1995, they were all treated according to the Spanish Society of Pediatric Oncology protocol (55.5% cases). Those patients received vincristine, ifosfamide, doxorubicin and etoposide. The TNM classification was as follows: 17 T1, 18 T2 and 1 T3; 36 N0; 29 M0, 5 M1a and 2 M1b. Analysis was stratified by treatment: definitive RT or pre/postoperative RT. The 36 patients (21 male; 15 female) had a median age of 10 years (range 2-17 years). Median follow-up of living patients was 105 months. The 2-year local control (LC) rate for all patients was 88%. Five-year LC rates for patients treated with definitive and pre/postoperative RT were 91% and 86%, respectively. Two-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates for all patients were 68% and 66%, respectively. Low phosphatase alkaline levels and local and distant recurrences were significantly predictive of worse prognosis (P = 0.021, P = 0.011, P = 0.007, respectively). Radiotherapy with and without surgery is a highly effective local treatment option in the multidisciplinary management of ES in pediatric patients.

  18. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    PubMed

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  19. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  20. Vascular access in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Pittiruti, Mauro; Biffi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Adequate vascular access is of paramount importance in oncology patients. It is important in the initial phase of surgical treatment or chemotherapy, as well as in the chronic management of advanced cancer and in the palliative care setting. We present an overview of the available vascular access devices and of the most relevant issues regarding insertion and management of vascular access. Particular emphasis is given to the use of ultrasound guidance as the preferred technique of insertion, which has dramatically decreased insertion-related complications. Vascular access management has considerably improved after the publication of effective guidelines for the appropriate nursing of the vascular device, which has reduced the risk of late complications, such as catheter-related bloodstream infection. However, many areas of clinical practice are still lacking an evidence-based background, such as the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in each clinical situation, as well as prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device for the oncology patient, based on the literature available to date.

  1. Psychiatric oncology: Cancer in mind

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology is an upcoming area of interest, which deals with numerous psychiatric, psychological, and social aspects of malignancies. Psychiatric oncology relates to some of the common psychological and emotional problems encountered in persons with malignancy and their formal and informal caregivers. This oration will discuss the importance of this field of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, with a focus on the research and practice in the Indian setting. This presentation will also share the findings and researches of the presenter. All these range from studies on cancer pain and palliative care, screening for psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, communication skills for health professionals in breaking bad news and handling difficult questions, and counseling. The findings on researches on somatization and illness behavior in cancer patients would highlight newer challenges in this field. Caregivers of persons with cancer are as important as the patient, but usually ignored. The stress, strain, burden, positive emotions, and coping in the context of care giving for persons with cancer are being increasingly realized. Professional caregivers should be aware of caregiver difficulties and support them through their ordeal. Lastly, the importance of dealing with staff stress and burnout among health professionals looking after families with cancer patients and survivors will be emphasized. PMID:22988317

  2. Oncology and pharmacogenetics in 2007.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Justin Stebbing is a member of the Royal College of Physicians, American Board of Internal Medicine and the Royal College of Pathologists. Originally, Justin trained in medicine at Trinity College Oxford (Oxford, UK), obtaining a triple first class degree. After completion of junior doctor posts in Oxford, he undertook a residency (junior doctor) training at The Johns Hopkins Hospital (MD, USA), before returning to London to continue his training in oncology at The Royal Marsden. Justin then undertook a PhD, funded by the medical research council, investigating the interplay between the immune system and cancer. Specifically, the role of heat shock proteins in tumorigenesis was examined, leading to the development of a cancer vaccine that is currently in clinical trials. Justin has published over 200 papers and book chapters, in journals such as the Lancet, New England Journal, Blood, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Annals of Internal Medicine, the majority as first or last author. They mainly focus on early and late stage trials of new drugs, mechanisms of disease and prognostic indicators. He is on the editorial board of a number of journals and regularly serves as a referee. Justin's main focus is now in breast cancer, and helping patients with early and late stage disease get better.

  3. Optical imaging probes in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Cristina; Dico, Alessia Lo; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management. Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation. The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27145373

  4. [The first 25 years of oncopsychology at the National Institute of Oncology: antecedents and events (1988-2013)].

    PubMed

    Riskó, Ágnes

    2015-09-01

    The first oncopsychological department was established in National Institute of Oncology by Sándor Eckhardt in 1988. At an early stage the specialists who were interested in mental hygiene made a united effort with Katalin Muszbek's oncopsychologic group. Ágnes Riskó was the first specialist who seceded from this group, and she became a permanent member of the onco-hematology group in 1992. Due to the universalized approach, the psyhcologist would become a permanent member of onco-team. The overhand and increasing multidisciplinary cooperation enable to use this accepted method in the daily medical treatment. When necessary, patients' relatives may come in for treatment and this method can help for medical stuff to avoid burnout. As a result of oncopsychology techniques and cooperation of oncologic teamwork the integration of psychosocial intervention into a complex oncologic treatment has already begun. The attendance of supervised onco-psychological specialists is being increased. Our activity contributes to improve our patients' psychosocial standard of living, their cooperation with the medical staff and the atmosphere of oncologic departments. The integration of the approach and methods of psychosocial rehabilitation into the new oncologic professional guideline has also begun.

  5. Exploring an herbal "wonder cure" for cancer: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Mahajna, Jamal; Aly, Radi; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed Saleem; Bentur, Yedidia; Lev, Efraim; Deng, Gary; Samuels, Noah

    2016-07-01

    The unmonitored use of herbal medicinal remedies by patients with cancer presents a significant challenge to oncology healthcare professionals. We describe an increasingly popular herbal "wonder drug," Ephedra foeminea (Alanda in Arabic), whose use has spread from the Palestinian patient population throughout the Middle East. We conducted a multicentered and multidisciplinary collaborative research effort in order to understand the potential benefits and harms of this popular herbal remedy. We conducted an in-depth search of the medical literature, both traditional and modern, for any mention of the clinical use of Alanda for the treatment of cancer. We then tested the remedy, first for toxic ephedra alkaloid components and then for anticancer effects, as well as effects on the cytotoxic activity of chemotherapy agents (cisplatin and carboplatin) on breast cancer cell cultures. We found no mention in the literature, both conventional and traditional, on the use of Alanda for the treatment of cancer. Laboratory testing did not find any toxic components (i.e., ephedra alkaloids) in the preparation. However, in vitro exposure to Alanda led to a reduced cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy on breast cancer cell cultures. The use of an integrative ethnobotanical, laboratory and clinical research-based approach can be extremely helpful when providing nonjudgmental and evidence-based guidance to patients with cancer, especially on the use of traditional herbal medicine. The effectiveness and safety of these products need to be examined by integrative physicians who are dually trained in both complementary medicine and supportive cancer care.

  6. Multidisciplinary Meeting on Male Breast Cancer: Summary and Research Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Korde, Larissa A.; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Kamin, Leah; Giordano, Sharon; Domchek, Susan; Anderson, William F.; Bartlett, John M.S.; Gelmon, Karen; Nahleh, Zeina; Bergh, Jonas; Cutuli, Bruno; Pruneri, Giancarlo; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Gralow, Julie; Hortobagyi, Gabriel; Cardoso, Fatima

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Most data on male breast cancer comes from small single-institution studies, and because of the paucity of data, the optimal treatment for male breast cancer is not known. This article summarizes a multidisciplinary international meeting on male breast cancer, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases and the National Cancer Institute Divisions of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. The meeting included representatives from the fields of epidemiology, genetics, pathology and molecular biology, health services research, and clinical oncology and the advocacy community, with a comprehensive review of the data. Presentations focused on highlighting differences and similarities between breast cancer in males and females. To enhance our understanding of male breast cancer, international consortia are necessary. Therefore, the Breast International Group and North American Breast Cancer Group have joined efforts to develop an International Male Breast Cancer Program and to pool epidemiologic data, clinical information, and tumor specimens. This international collaboration will also facilitate the future planning of clinical trials that can address essential questions in the treatment of male breast cancer. PMID:20308661

  7. Surgical Oncology Nursing: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patrick C; Selanders, Louise

    2017-02-01

    To provide a historical perspective in the development of oncology nursing and surgical oncology as critical components of today's health care system. Review of the literature and Web sites of key organizations. The evolution of surgical oncology nursing has traversed a historical journey from that of a niche subspecialty of nursing that had very little scientific underpinning, to a highly sophisticated discipline within a very short time. Nursing continues to contribute its expertise to the encyclopedic knowledge base of surgical oncology and cancer care, which have helped improve the lives of countless patients and families who have had to face the difficulties of this diagnosis. An understanding of the historical context for which a nursing specialty such as surgical oncology nursing evolves is critical to gaining an appreciation for the contributions of nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  9. Multidisciplinary pain facility treatment outcome for pain-associated fatigue.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, David A; Lewis, John; Cole, Brandly; Cutler, Brian; Smets, Eve; Rosomoff, Hubert; Rosomoff, Rennee Steele

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue is frequently found in chronic pain patients (CPPs) and may be etiologically related to the presence of pain. Fishbain et al. have recently demonstrated that chronic low back pain (LBP) and chronic neck pain patients are more fatigued than controls. The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic LBP- and chronic neck pain-associated fatigue responded to multidisciplinary multimodal treatment not specifically targeted to the treatment of fatigue. A total of 85 chronic LBP and 33 chronic neck pain patients completed the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), and Beck Depression Inventory on admission. In addition, an information tool was completed on each CPP by the senior author. This tool listed demographic information, primary and secondary pain diagnoses, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) psychiatric diagnoses assigned, pain location, pain precipitating event, type of injury, years in pain, number of surgeries, type of surgery, type of pain pattern, opioids consumed per day in morphine equivalents, worker compensation status, and whether, according to the clinical examination, the CPP had a neuropathic pain component. At completion of the multidisciplinary multimodal treatment, each CPP again completed the MFI. Student's t-test was utilized to test for statistical changes on the MFI five scales from pre- to post-treatment. Pearson and point-biserial correlations were utilized to determine which variables significantly correlated with MFI change scores. Variables found significant at less than or equal to 0.01 were utilized in a stepwise aggression analysis to find variables predictive of change in MFI scores. Multidisciplinary pain facility. Chronic LBP and chronic neck pain patients. Multidisciplinary multimodal treatment significantly improved CPP fatigue as measured by the MFI. The available variables utilized to predict fatigue best explained only a small percentage

  10. Development of a Virtual Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Tumor Board in a Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Marvaretta M.; Irwin, Tonia; Lowry, Terry; Ahmed, Maleka Z.; Walden, Thomas L.; Watson, Melanie; Sutton, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Creating an effective platform for multidisciplinary tumor conferences can be challenging in the rural community setting. The Duke Cancer Network created an Internet-based platform for a multidisciplinary conference to enhance the care of patients with lung cancer. This conference incorporates providers from different physical locations within a rural community and affiliated providers from a university-based cancer center 2 hours away. An electronic Web conferencing tool connects providers aurally and visually. Methods: Conferences were set up using a commercially available Web conferencing platform. The video platform provides a secure Web site coupled with a secure teleconference platform to ensure patient confidentiality. Multiple disciplines are invited to participate, including radiology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, pathology, and medical oncology. Participants only need telephone access and Internet connection to participate. Results: Patient histories and physicals are presented, and the Web conferencing platform allows radiologic and histologic images to be reviewed. Treatment plans for patients are discussed, allowing providers to coordinate care among the different subspecialties. Patients who need referral to the affiliated university-based cancer center for specialized services are identified. Pertinent treatment guidelines and journal articles are reviewed. On average, there are 10 participants with one to two cases presented per session. Conclusion: The use of a Web conferencing platform allows subspecialty providers throughout the community and hours away to discuss lung cancer patient cases. This platform increases convenience for providers, eliminating travel to a central location. Coordination of care for patients requiring multidisciplinary care is facilitated, shortening evaluation time before definitive treatment plan. PMID:23942505

  11. Effect of off-label use of oncology drugs on pharmaceutical costs: the rituximab experience.

    PubMed

    Kocs, Darren; Fendrick, A Mark

    2003-05-01

    While the off-label use of oncology interventions is widespread, the factors influencing off-label use and the resultant influence on oncology drug expenditures are not well understood. To assess the indications for rituximab use, a retrospective review was undertaken at a single academic center between September 1998 and June 2001. Patient diagnoses were linked to pharmacy records, and each administration of rituximab was classified as either on-label or off-label as defined by FDA-approved indications. The resultant utilization patterns were the foundation for a conceptual model designed to identify factors that influence off-label use of oncology-related therapeutics and forecast the effect of off-label use on aggregate oncology drug expenditures. One hundred one patients received a total of 428 rituximab administrations during the study period. Most (320, 75%) of the administrations were for off-label indications. Although the extent of off-label and on-label use grew at a similar rate initially, off-label utilization increased nearly exponentially over time as on-label uses lessened. A conceptual model that describes factors that promote, inhibit, or have a mixed influence on off-label use may help predict future patterns of off-label utilization and allow better forecasting of oncology drug expenditures. The off-label use of rituximab is substantial. Projections of oncology-related patterns of care and drug expenditures must account for the potential for off-label use.

  12. Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

    1999-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

  13. [Medical students' reactions to their experience in oncology and its contribution to their training].

    PubMed

    Notzer, Netta; Tur-Kaspa, Ran

    2006-01-01

    The need to deepen the teaching of oncology was recognized by the Sackler Faculty of Medicine. In 2004, a weekly short clerkship was introduced into the 6th year curriculum, aiming to expose students to a variety of cancer diseases and treatments and to internalize the comprehensive approach to the patient and his family by the multi-professional team. To present students' reactions to their experiences in oncology in order to learn about the clerkship's contribution and to find ways to improve the training. A questionnaire was circulated to students at the end of their experiences. The response rate was 87% (out of 83), of which 55% were women. The answers were summarized by qualitative and quantitative methods. The students perceived the change in their attitude to cancer patients as a result of the acquisition of knowledge and their exposure to treatments of the diseases and patients (75%). They highly appreciated the implementation of the patient-doctor relationship and the multi-disciplinary teamwork (over 50%), transforming the oncologist into a different physician from his colleagues (70%), and more optimistic as to the prognosis. Twenty-five percent of the students expressed their interest in becoming involved with oncology in the future. While women noted the behavioral aspects of oncology significantly more than men, men indicated a greater appreciation of the knowledge and technologies they encountered. No relationship was found with the occurrence of cancer in the students' families. With the growing need to deepen physicians' empathy with patients and their families, especially with long-term diseases and health problems, oncology departments were found to serve as a unique site, suitable for training students. This was asserted by the students' reactions to the clerkship, as expressed in this study. The students furthermore expressed their preference for broader training exposure to palliative care and pain relief, and increased involvement in

  14. Discharge Planning: Screening Older Patients for Multidisciplinary Team Referral

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Carolyn; Buckley, Clare; Forrest, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine whether the Elders Risk Assessment Index can predict multi-disciplinary team referral of older patients (≥ 65 years) in Emergency Department same-day discharges. The study identified 1,376 qualifying individuals from a regional New Zealand hospital database. Of these, 12.7 % were referred to the multi-disciplinary team. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to explore associations between the Index, its components, and other demographic factors with referral. With every unit increase in the Index there was a 9% increase in the odds of being referred. When the components of the Index were analysed separately, an increased likelihood of being referred was associated with not being married, having had a previous hospital admission of more than five days, having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and being older. Conversely, a decreased likelihood was associated with having diabetes. When non-Index items were analysed it was found that females were more likely to be referred than males and that Māori were less likely to be referred than New Zealand Europeans. With adaptation, the Elders Risk Assessment Index may provide a simple, cost-effective, and timely tool to assist in determining the need for multi-disciplinary team referral for older people who present to the Emergency Department. PMID:28413367

  15. Sensitivity Analysis for Multidisciplinary Systems (SAMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TM-2017-0017 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) Richard D. Snyder Design & Analysis Branch Aerospace Vehicles...February 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY SYSTEMS (SAMS) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c...comprising an interim briefing for this work effort. PA Case Number 88ABW-2016-6159; Clearance Date: 30 Nov 2016. 14. ABSTRACT The Sensitivity Analysis

  16. Multidisciplinary teamwork--myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Rowe, H

    1996-03-01

    The provision and delivery of health care has become increasingly complex in recent years due to technological innovation in medicine and increasing client expectations. The challenge for health care workers is to meet the purchasers' demands, one option may be to shift working practices from a functionalist approach to one of multidisciplinary teamwork. This paper explores one example of multidisciplinary teamwork and examines the processes which enhance and those that limit collaboration.

  17. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research.

    PubMed

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Scott, Jessica; Jones, Lee W

    2015-06-01

    The field of exercise-oncology has increased dramatically over the past two decades, with close to 100 published studies investigating the efficacy of structured exercise training interventions in patients with cancer. Of interest, despite considerable differences in study population and primary study end point, the vast majority of studies have tested the efficacy of an exercise prescription that adhered to traditional guidelines consisting of either supervised or home-based endurance (aerobic) training or endurance training combined with resistance training, prescribed at a moderate intensity (50-75% of a predetermined physiological parameter, typically age-predicted heart rate maximum or reserve), for two to three sessions per week, for 10 to 60 min per exercise session, for 12 to 15 weeks. The use of generic exercise prescriptions may, however, be masking the full therapeutic potential of exercise treatment in the oncology setting. Against this background, this opinion paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of human exercise physiology known as the principles of training, with specific application of these principles in the design and conduct of clinical trials in exercise-oncology research. We contend that the application of these guidelines will ensure continued progress in the field while optimizing the safety and efficacy of exercise treatment following a cancer diagnosis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  18. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research†

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F; Koelwyn, Graeme J; Scott, Jessica; Jones, Lee W

    2015-01-01

    The field of exercise-oncology has increased dramatically over the past two decades, with close to 100 published studies investigating the efficacy of structured exercise training interventions in patients with cancer. Of interest, despite considerable differences in study population and primary study end point, the vast majority of studies have tested the efficacy of an exercise prescription that adhered to traditional guidelines consisting of either supervised or home-based endurance (aerobic) training or endurance training combined with resistance training, prescribed at a moderate intensity (50–75% of a predetermined physiological parameter, typically age-predicted heart rate maximum or reserve), for two to three sessions per week, for 10 to 60 min per exercise session, for 12 to 15 weeks. The use of generic exercise prescriptions may, however, be masking the full therapeutic potential of exercise treatment in the oncology setting. Against this background, this opinion paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of human exercise physiology known as the principles of training, with specific application of these principles in the design and conduct of clinical trials in exercise-oncology research. We contend that the application of these guidelines will ensure continued progress in the field while optimizing the safety and efficacy of exercise treatment following a cancer diagnosis. PMID:26136187

  19. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. Connor, Nadine P.; Hartig, Gregory K.; Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  20. Management of veno-occlusive disease: the multidisciplinary approach to care.

    PubMed

    Wallhult, Elisabeth; Kenyon, Michelle; Liptrott, Sarah; Mank, Arno; Ní Chonghaile, Mairéad; Babic, Aleksandra; Bijkerk, Jacobine; Bompoint, Caroline; Corbacioglu, Selim; de Weijer, Roel; Fink, Claudia; Marktel, Sarah; Soni, Vivek; Sprenger, Sarah; Arjona, Eugenia Trigoso; Mohty, Mohamad

    2017-04-01

    Although it is considered a relatively rare disorder, veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is one of the main causes of overall, non-relapse mortality associated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This article, based on the consensus opinion of haemato-oncology nurses, haemato-oncologists and pharmacists from both adult and paediatric services at the VOD International Multi-Disciplinary Advisory Board at the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) meeting, Istanbul, 2015, aims to explore the multidisciplinary approach to care for the management of VOD, with an emphasis on current challenges in this area. The careful monitoring of HSCT patients allows early detection of the symptoms associated with VOD and timely treatment, ultimately improving patient outcomes. As part of a multidisciplinary team, nurses have an essential role to play, from pretransplant assessment to medical management and overall care of the patient. Physicians and pharmacists have a responsibility to facilitate education and training so that nurses can work effectively within that team.

  1. WE-G-9A-01: Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C; Miller, R; Sloan, J; Wu, Q; Howell, R

    2014-06-15

    The construction of databases and support software to enable routine and systematic aggregation, analysis and reporting of patient outcomes data is emerging as an important area. “How have results for our patients been affected by the improvements we have made in our practice and in the technologies we use?” To answer this type of fundamental question about the overall pattern of efficacy observed, it is necessary to systematically gather and analyze data on all patients treated within a clinic. Clinical trials answer, in great depth and detail, questions about outcomes for the subsets of patients enrolled in a given trial. However, routine aggregation and analysis of key treatment parameter data and outcomes information for all patients is necessary to recognize emergent patterns that would be of interest from a public health or practice perspective and could better inform design of clinical trials or the evolution of best practice principals. To address these questions, Radiation Oncology outcomes databases need to be constructed to enable combination essential data from a broad group of data types including: diagnosis and staging, dose volume histogram metrics, patient reported outcomes, toxicity metrics, performance status, treatment plan parameters, demographics, DICOM data and demographics. Developing viable solutions to automate aggregation and analysis of this data requires multidisciplinary efforts to define nomenclatures, modify clinical processes and develop software and database tools requires detailed understanding of both clinical and technical issues. This session will cover the developing area of Radiation Oncology Outcomes Informatics. Learning Objectives: Audience will be able to speak to the technical requirements (software, database, web services) which must be considered in designing an outcomes database. Audience will be able to understand the content and the role of patient reported outcomes as compared to traditional toxicity measures

  2. Nutrition support in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2009-01-01

    This review article, the second in a series of articles to examine the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition support in surgical oncology patients. Cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may be indicated in malnourished cancer patients undergoing surgery, depending on individual patient characteristics. As with the first article in this series, this article provides background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients, as well as discusses the role of nutrition support in the care of surgical cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the clinical guidelines as they relate to recommendations made for surgical patients, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequently published studies.

  3. The radiation oncology workforce: A focus on medical dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Gregg F.; Mobile, Katherine; Yu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce survey was conducted to assess the current state of the entire workforce, predict its future needs and concerns, and evaluate quality improvement and safety within the field. This article describes the dosimetrist segment results. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Workforce Subcommittee, in conjunction with other specialty societies, conducted an online survey targeting all segments of the radiation oncology treatment team. The data from the dosimetrist respondents are presented in this article. Of the 2573 dosimetrists who were surveyed, 890 responded, which resulted in a 35% segment response rate. Most respondents were women (67%), whereas only a third were men (33%). More than half of the medical dosimetrists were older than 45 years (69.2%), whereas the 45 to 54 years age group represented the highest percentage of respondents (37%). Most medical dosimetrists stated that their workload was appropriate (52%), with respondents working a reported average of 41.7 ± 4 hours per week. Overall, 86% of medical dosimetrists indicated that they were satisfied with their career, and 69% were satisfied in their current position. Overall, 61% of respondents felt that there was an oversupply of medical dosimetrists in the field, 14% reported that supply and demand was balanced, and the remaining 25% felt that there was an undersupply. The medical dosimetrists' greatest concerns included documentation/paperwork (78%), uninsured patients (80%), and insufficient reimbursement rates (87%). This survey provided an insight into the dosimetrist perspective of the radiation oncology workforce. Though an overwhelming majority has conveyed satisfaction concerning their career, the study allowed a spotlight to be placed on the profession's current concerns, such as insufficient reimbursement rates and possible oversupply of dosimetrists within the field.

  4. Early phase Technology Assessment of nanotechnology in oncology.

    PubMed

    Retèl, Valesca P; Hummel, Marjan J M; van Harten, Willem H

    2008-01-01

    To perform early Technology Assessment (TA) of nanotechnology in oncology. The possibilities of nanotechnology for detection (imaging), diagnosis and treatment of cancer are subject of different research programs where major investments are concerned. As a range of bio- nanotechnologies is expected to enter the oncology field it is relevant to consider the various aspects involved in especially early TA. This article provides two cases of early assessment of (predecessors of) nanotechnologies: Microarray Analysis and Photodynamic Therapy implementation, which methodology can be extrapolated to other nanotechnologies in oncology. Constructive Technology Assessment (CTA) is used for the introduction of technologies that are still in a dynamic phase of development or in an early stage of diffusion. The selection of studied aspects in CTA is based on: clinical aspects (safety, efficacy, and effectiveness), economic (cost-effectiveness), patient related (QoL, ethical/juridical and psychosocial), organizational aspects (diffusion and adoption) and scenario drafting. The features of the technology and the phase of implementation are decisive for choices and timing of the specific aspects to be studied. A framework was drafted to decide on the relevant aspects. In the first case, early implementation of Microarray Analysis; clinical effectiveness, logistics, patient centeredness and scenario drafting were given priority. Related to the diffusion-phase of Photodynamic Therapy however other aspects were evaluated, such as early cost-effectiveness analysis for possible reimbursement. Often CTA will result in a mixed method design. Especially scenario drafting is a powerful instrument to predict possible developments that can be anticipated upon in the assessment. CTA is appropriate for the study of early implementation of new technologies in oncology. In early TA small series often necessitate a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. The features of nanotechnology

  5. Psychological factors affecting oncology conditions.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Biancosino, Bruno; Marmai, Luciana; Rossi, Elena; Sabato, Silvana

    2007-01-01

    The area of psychological factors affecting cancer has been the object of research starting from the early 1950s and consolidating from the 1970s with the development of psychooncology. A series of problems in the DSM and ICD nosological systems, such as the difficult application of the criteria for psychiatric diagnoses (i.e. major depression, adjustment disorders) and the scarce space dedicated to the rubric of psychosocial implications of medical illness (i.e. Psychological Factors Affecting a Medical Condition under 'Other Conditions That May Be a Focus of Clinical Attention' in the DSM-IV) represent a major challenge in psycho-oncology. The application of the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) has been shown to be useful in a more precise identification of several psychological domains in patients with cancer. The DCPR dimensions of health anxiety, demoralization and alexithymia have been shown to be quite frequent in cancer patient (37.7, 28.8 and 26%, respectively). The overlap between a formal DSM-IV diagnosis and the DCPR is low, with 58% of patients being categorized as non-cases on the DSM-IV having at least one DCPR syndrome. The specific quality of the DCPR in characterizing psychosocial aspects secondary to cancer is also confirmed by the fact that some dimensions of coping (e.g. Mini-Mental Adjustment to Cancer subscale hopelessness) correlate with the DCPR dimension of demoralization, while a quantitative approach on symptom assessment (e.g. stress symptoms on the Brief Symptom Inventory) is not useful in discriminating the patients with and without DCPR syndromes. More research is needed in order to understand the relationship between DCPR constructs (e.g. alexithymia) and psychosocial factors which have been shown to be significant in oncology (e.g. emotional repression and avoidance). The role of specific DCPR constructs in influencing the course of illness is also an area that should be investigated.

  6. Pharmacy Instruction in Medical Oncology: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cersosimo, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey concerning oncology instruction in pharmacy schools found it taught primarily as part of a course in medicinal chemistry/pharmacology or therapeutics. Twenty-one schools offer an oncology course, with others planning them. Oncology clerkships are currently available in 42 schools. Increased emphasis on oncology instruction is encouraged.…

  7. Pharmacy Instruction in Medical Oncology: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cersosimo, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey concerning oncology instruction in pharmacy schools found it taught primarily as part of a course in medicinal chemistry/pharmacology or therapeutics. Twenty-one schools offer an oncology course, with others planning them. Oncology clerkships are currently available in 42 schools. Increased emphasis on oncology instruction is encouraged.…

  8. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de

  9. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  10. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  11. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence.

  12. The impact of genomics on oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Laura Curr; Linder, Lauri; Wu, Bohua; Eggert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, genetics and genomics information has led to exciting new diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment options in oncology practice. Profiling of cancers offers providers insight into treatment and prognostic factors. Germline testing provides an individual with information for surveillance or therapy that may help them prevent cancer in their lifetime and options for family members as yet untouched by malignancy. This offers a challenge for oncology nurses and other oncology health care providers to become comfortable with incorporating education about genetics/genomics into their clinical practice and patient education.

  13. Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group: Development of the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Technology and Treatments (ANROTAT) Framework.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Gillian M; Grand, Mel; Kron, Tomas; Haworth, Annette; Corry, June; Jackson, Michael; Ng, Michael; Besuijen, Deidre; Carter, Hannah E; Martin, Andrew; Schofield, Deborah; Gebski, Val; Torony, Joan; Kovacev, Olga; Amin, Rowena; Burmeister, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    The study aim was to develop a generic framework to derive the parameters to populate health-economic models for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. A draft framework was developed through horizon scanning for relevant technologies, literature review to identify framework models, and a workshop program with radiation oncology professionals, biostatisticians, health economists and consumers to establish the Framework's structure. It was tested using four clinical protocols, comparing intensity modulated with 3D conformal therapy (post-prostatectomy, anal canal and nasopharynx) and image-guided radiation therapy techniques with off-line review of portal imaging (in the intact prostate). The draft generic research framework consisted of five sequential stages, each with a number of components, and was assessed as to its suitability for deriving the evidence needed to populate the decision-analytic models required for the health-economic evaluations. A final Framework was established from this experience for use by future researchers to provide evidence of clinical efficacy and cost-utility for other novel techniques. The four clinical treatment sites tested during the project were considered suitable to use in future evaluations. Development of a generic research framework to predict early and long-term clinical outcomes, combined with health-economic data, produced a generally applicable method for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. Its application to further health technology assessments in the radiation oncology sector will allow further refinement and support its generalisability. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  15. Advances in Multi-disciplinary Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Huerta, J.; Rubio-Iglesias, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    The challenge for addressing issues such as climate change, food security or ecosystem sustainability is that they require multi-disciplinary collaboration and the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. Multidisciplinary collaborations are difficult because each discipline has its own "language", protocols and formats for communicating within its community and handling data and information. EuroGEOSS demonstrates the added value to the scientific community and to society of making existing systems and applications interoperable and useful within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. In 2010, the project built an initial operating capacity of a multi-disciplinary Information System addressing three areas: drought, forestry and biodiversity. It is now furthering this development into an advanced operating capacity (http://www.eurogeoss.eu). The key to this capability is the creation of a broker that supports access to multiple resources through a common user interface and the automation of data search and access using state of the art information technology. EuroGEOSS hosted a conference on information systems and multi-disciplinary applications of science and technology. "EuroGEOSS: advancing the vision of GEOSS" provided a forum for developers, users and decision-makers working with advanced multi-disciplinary information systems to improve science and decisions for complex societal issues. In particular, the Conference addressed: Information systems for supporting multi-disciplinary research; Information systems and modeling for biodiversity, drought, forestry and related societal benefit areas; and Case studies of multi-disciplinary applications and outcomes. This paper will discuss the major finding of the conference and the directions for future development.

  16. The use of failure mode and effect analysis in a radiation oncology setting: the Cancer Treatment Centers of America experience.

    PubMed

    Denny, Diane S; Allen, Debra K; Worthington, Nicole; Gupta, Digant

    2014-01-01

    Delivering radiation therapy in an oncology setting is a high-risk process where system failures are more likely to occur because of increasing utilization, complexity, and sophistication of the equipment and related processes. Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a method used to proactively detect risks to the patient in a particular healthcare process and correct potential errors before adverse events occur. FMEA is a systematic, multidisciplinary team-based approach to error prevention and enhancing patient safety. We describe our experience of using FMEA as a prospective risk-management technique in radiation oncology at a national network of oncology hospitals in the United States, capitalizing not only on the use of a team-based tool but also creating momentum across a network of collaborative facilities seeking to learn from and share best practices with each other. The major steps of our analysis across 4 sites and collectively were: choosing the process and subprocesses to be studied, assembling a multidisciplinary team at each site responsible for conducting the hazard analysis, and developing and implementing actions related to our findings. We identified 5 areas of performance improvement for which risk-reducing actions were successfully implemented across our enterprise.

  17. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology-oncology fellows.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies' publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows' evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners' educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology–oncology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies’ publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows’ evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners’ educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  19. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies Advertising Sponsorship Support of CME Committee Policies, Responsibilities, and Resources Conflict of Interest and Disclosure for ... toward Equity Children's Oncology Group (COG) Outcomes Research Social Media: The Good, The Bad, and Beyond Sickle ...

  20. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    PubMed

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    The head and neck cancer in Michoacán, Mexico, ranks as the third most common cancer and accounts for 12% of deaths. The increase in malnutrition in a patient with this disease has been associated with increased mortality. We studied prospectively 30 patients of both sexes, aged 18 years with head and neck cancer in the Cancer Care Center of Michoacan. In the evaluation period since August 2010 to August 2011. Formats were used VGS-Oncology (Subjective Global Assessment), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) and Guss (Gugging Swallowing Screen), through which nutritional risk was determined, and established the swallowing capacity of the study population. In our study, 53.3% of the population had moderate malnutrition according to the VGS Oncology, 33% weight loss record. The NRS 2002 show that 43.3% is at risk of malnutrition. The degree of dysphagia is shown more often in older patients, cancer type and stage of illness. Nutritional risk scales relate directly proportional to tumor location and stage, as well, there are other different oncological factors involved in the patient's nutritional deterioration. Therefore it is of vital importance to have a nutritionist as part of the multidisciplinary team, to detect the nutritional risk and to be able to handle it in an opportune way. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Multiple authorship in two English-language journals in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Halperin, E C; Scott, J; George, S L

    1992-12-01

    Multiple authorship is the listing of more than one person as author of an article in the scholarly literature. Editors, researchers, and others in science publishing have raised concerns about the increasing number of authors being listed per article, the practice of "honorary authorship" (listing as an author someone who made little or no contribution to the work being reported), and the danger of the dilution of responsibility when many authors are involved. The authors studied multiauthorship in the two most popular English-language journals on radiation oncology, examining 1,908 papers and letters published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, and Physics (IJROBP) and Radiotherapy and Oncology (RO) from 1983 through 1987. There was no increase in the number of authors per article during this period, when the median number for IJROBP was four and that for RO was three. The number of authors varied by type of article, by country (France had the largest median number, six for IJROBP and five for RO), and by the authors' institution. The first author's gender was unrelated to the number of subsequent authors for an article. The proportion of men first authors varied widely between countries and institutions. Possible explanations for these variations include the multidisciplinary nature and complexity of some forms of research, institutional policies concerning the use of authorship as a commodity of exchange, and social-cultural factors.

  2. [Interests of applied anthropology to oncology].

    PubMed

    Soum-Pouyalet, Fanny; Hubert, Annie; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    From now on the introduction of social and human sciences studies in the field of oncology has not always been conclusive. This article aims to analyze the bounds that border the meeting and the understanding between physicians, patients and anthropologists. It also treats the problems due to the introduction of applied anthropology in the field of oncology and points up the interests and practical contributions that this disciplinary bring and could bring.

  3. [Information technology in gynecological oncology today].

    PubMed

    Kupka, M S; Richter, O; Tutschek, B

    2003-11-01

    Information technology has been integrated in gynecological oncology treatment. Therefore, new software has been established in hospitals and out-patient clinics. A German law concerning data collection in oncology has attempted to unify different strategies. All intentions to establish new documentation systems for tumor diseases need a standardized basic data set. Nevertheless, local governmental health organizations are not yet prepared to implement a global information system such as prenatal and perinatal care databases. Financial support and political work is therefore needed.

  4. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology

    DOE PAGES

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; ...

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapiesmore » is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. Furthermore, with a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time.« less

  5. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; Rericha, Erin C.

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. Furthermore, with a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time.

  6. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J; Rericha, Erin C

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Towards a Science of Tumor Forecasting for Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J.; Rericha, Erin C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community make a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is- only assessed post hoc by physical exam or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of atreatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology towards tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor specific datasets of varied types, and effectively defeat cancer one patient at a time. PMID:25592148

  8. Medicare coverage for oncology services.

    PubMed

    Bagley, G P; McVearry, K

    1998-05-15

    Medicare's mission is to assure health care security for our beneficiaries. Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) provides the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) with the authority to fulfill this mission. Although Medicare is considered a defined benefit program, the Act vested Medicare with the discretionary authority to make specific policy decisions when necessary. HCFA's discretionary authority, which is found at section 1862(a)(1)(A) of the Act, enables HCFA to provide coverage for services that are reasonable and necessary for the treatment and diagnosis of illness or injury or to improve the functioning of a malformed body member. To determine whether a service is reasonable and necessary, HCFA relies on authoritative evidence. This evidence includes, but is not limited to, approvals from appropriate federal agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration, and systematic evaluations of scientific literature via technology assessments. HCFA also may decide that a service warrants a unique type of coverage policy, which is referred to as coverage with conditions. This form of coverage is a middle ground between strict noncoverage and general coverage for a medical service that appears promising, but still is evolving. All these policy specifications effect Medicare coverage of oncology services. This means that reasonable and necessary diagnostic and therapeutic cancer-related services that are not otherwise prohibited by Medicare's statute, regulations, and manual instructions are covered and paid for by the program. Prior to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA '97), Medicare provided coverage for some beneficiaries to undergo mammography and Papanicolaou smear screening. As a result of BBA '97, Congress has mandated expanding coverage for these services as well as adding coverage for pelvic examinations, prostate cancer screening, colorectal screening, and antiemetic drugs used as part of an anticancer chemotherapy regimen. Other

  9. The art of pediatric oncology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric oncology nursing practice must incorporate both the science and the art of the discipline to foster positive physical and psychosocial treatment outcomes for pediatric oncology patients, especially those outcomes related to their health-related quality of life. In this article, the art of nursing care is described within the context of scientifically based care, and the art of nursing practice is evident in the implementation of the scientific principles and standards for pediatric oncology nursing practice. The author proposes that the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice ought to be evident in care activities that the nurse provides within a therapeutic relationship that is steeped in nursing presence. Although the art of nursing care and the nature of an effective therapeutic relationship is tacit, valued knowledge among pediatric oncology nurses, as well as children and adolescents with cancer and their families, it is difficult to describe and challenging to quantify its effect on patient care outcomes. This article discusses the art of pediatric oncology nursing practice and its influence on treatment outcomes.

  10. Exploring resilience in paediatric oncology nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Zander, Melissa; Hutton, Alison; King, Lindy

    2013-01-01

    Resilience has been suggested as an important coping strategy for nurses working in demanding settings, such as paediatric oncology. This qualitative study explored paediatric oncology nurses' perceptions of their development of resilience and how this resilience underpinned their ability to deal with work-related stressors. Five paediatric oncology nurses were interviewed about their understanding of the concept of resilience, their preferred coping mechanisms, and their day-today work in paediatric oncology. Using thematic analysis, the interviews were subsequently grouped together into seventeen initial themes. These themes were then grouped into seven major aspects that described how the participants perceived resilience underpinned their work. These "seven aspects of forming resilience" contributed to an initial understanding of how paediatric oncology nurses develop resilience in the face of their personal and professional challenges. Several key strategies derived from the findings, such as improved rostering, support to a nurse's friend and family, and a clinical support nursing role, could be implemented at an organizational level to support resilience development within the paediatric oncology setting.

  11. Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

  12. Multidisciplinary Approach to Aerospike Nozzle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional finite-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against separate aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single-discipline design strategy.

  13. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  14. Multidisciplinary Approach to Linear Aerospike Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional fink-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against sequential aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single- discipline design strategy.

  15. Benchmarking of surgical complications in gynaecological oncology: prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Burnell, M; Iyer, R; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Nordin, A; Liston, R; Manchanda, R; Das, N; Gornall, R; Beardmore-Gray, A; Hillaby, K; Leeson, S; Linder, A; Lopes, A; Meechan, D; Mould, T; Nevin, J; Olaitan, A; Rufford, B; Shanbhag, S; Thackeray, A; Wood, N; Reynolds, K; Ryan, A; Menon, U

    2016-12-01

    To explore the impact of risk-adjustment on surgical complication rates (CRs) for benchmarking gynaecological oncology centres. Prospective cohort study. Ten UK accredited gynaecological oncology centres. Women undergoing major surgery on a gynaecological oncology operating list. Patient co-morbidity, surgical procedures and intra-operative (IntraOp) complications were recorded contemporaneously by surgeons for 2948 major surgical procedures. Postoperative (PostOp) complications were collected from hospitals and patients. Risk-prediction models for IntraOp and PostOp complications were created using penalised (lasso) logistic regression using over 30 potential patient/surgical risk factors. Observed and risk-adjusted IntraOp and PostOp CRs for individual hospitals were calculated. Benchmarking using colour-coded funnel plots and observed-to-expected ratios was undertaken. Overall, IntraOp CR was 4.7% (95% CI 4.0-5.6) and PostOp CR was 25.7% (95% CI 23.7-28.2). The observed CRs for all hospitals were under the upper 95% control limit for both IntraOp and PostOp funnel plots. Risk-adjustment and use of observed-to-expected ratio resulted in one hospital moving to the >95-98% CI (red) band for IntraOp CRs. Use of only hospital-reported data for PostOp CRs would have resulted in one hospital being unfairly allocated to the red band. There was little concordance between IntraOp and PostOp CRs. The funnel plots and overall IntraOp (≈5%) and PostOp (≈26%) CRs could be used for benchmarking gynaecological oncology centres. Hospital benchmarking using risk-adjusted CRs allows fairer institutional comparison. IntraOp and PostOp CRs are best assessed separately. As hospital under-reporting is common for postoperative complications, use of patient-reported outcomes is important. Risk-adjusted benchmarking of surgical complications for ten UK gynaecological oncology centres allows fairer comparison. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. [Requests for active euthanasia: which reality in an oncology center.].

    PubMed

    Chvetzoff, G; Perret, M; Thevenet, G; Arbiol, E; Gobet, S; Saltel, P

    2009-09-01

    Euthanasia is a controversial issue in today's society. In countries where euthanasia is legal, it is mainly associated with people with cancer. We retrospectively studied the frequency and basis of patients' requests for active euthanasia in the oncology setting.MethodsRecurrent requests for euthanasia made by the patients of Leon-Berard cancer center (Lyon, France) between 2001 and 2003 were recorded by questioning the physicians and nurse supervisors in charge or by collecting information from the minutes of multidisciplinary palliative care meetings. We also collected information on the general health status of the patients, their motives and their evolution over time, as well as responses from caregivers.ResultsWe identified 16 requests for euthanasia. These involved 8 men, 7 women and 1 child (median age, 56 years), corresponding to 1% of the total deaths recorded during the period. In 2 cases, the request had come from the family only. The most frequent motives were psychological distress (38%), desire for self-autonomy (31%) and pain (31%). Half of the patients, particularly those striving for autonomy, persisted with their request until death, whereas 2 of 3 requests motivated by physical or psychological distress were not maintained. Sedation was administered to 3 patients in response to recurrent requests.ConclusionRequests for euthanasia in cancer patients are rare but may occur. Sometimes suffering is not relieved by palliative care and the request is maintained. Dealing with these patients puts caregivers in a difficult situation.

  17. Addressing Low Literacy and Health Literacy in Clinical Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sofia F.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Low functional literacy and low health literacy continue to be under-recognized and are associated with poorer patient health outcomes. Health literacy is a dynamic state influenced by how well a healthcare system delivers information and services that match patients’ abilities, needs and preferences. Oncology care poses considerable health literacy demands on patients who are expected to process high stakes information about complex multidisciplinary treatment over lengths of time. Much of the information provided to patients in clinical care and research is beyond their literacy levels. In this paper, we provide an overview of currently available guidelines and resources to improve how the needs of patients with diverse literacy skills are met by cancer care providers and clinics. We present recommendations for health literacy assessment in clinical practice and ways to enhance the usability of health information and services by improving written materials and verbal communication, incorporating multimedia and culturally appropriate approaches, and promoting health literacy in cancer care settings. The paper also includes a list of additional resources that can be used to develop and implement health literacy initiatives in cancer care clinics. PMID:20464884

  18. Clinical ethics consultation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Montas, Sacha M; Barnosky, Andrew R; Smith, Lauren B; Fins, Joseph J; McCabe, Mary S

    2013-09-01

    There is limited empirical research exploring the nature of clinical ethical consultations within the oncology population. Our objective was to review and describe clinical ethics consultations at two National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers to identify opportunities for systems improvement in clinical care and opportunities for staff education. This case series is derived from two institutional prospectively maintained clinical ethics consultation databases. All ethics consultations from 2007 through 2011 that related to adult patients with cancer were included. A total of 208 eligible patient cases were identified. The most common primary issues leading to ethics consultation were code status and advance directives (25%), surrogate decision making (17%), and medical futility (13%). Communication lapses were identified in 45% of patient cases, and interpersonal conflict arose in 51%. Before ethics consultation, 26% of patients had do-not-resuscitate orders, which increased to 60% after ethics consultation. Palliative care consultation occurred in 41% of patient cases. Ethics consultations among patients with cancer reflect the complexities inherent to their clinical management. Appropriately honoring patients' wishes within the context of overall goals of care is crucial. Thoughtful consideration of the role of and relationship with palliative care experts, communication barriers, sources of interpersonal conflict, symptom control, and end-of-life care is paramount to optimal management strategies in this patient population.

  19. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  20. Oncology information on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasushi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-05-01

    Owing to new developments in Internet technologies, the amount of available oncology information is growing. Both patients and caregivers are increasingly using the Internet to obtain medical information. However, while it is easy to provide information, ensuring its quality is always a concern. Thus, many instruments for evaluating the quality of health information have been created, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The increasing importance of online search engines such as Google warrants the examination of the correlation between their rankings and medical quality. The Internet also mediates the exchange of information from one individual to another. Mailing lists of advocate groups and social networking sites help spread information to patients and caregivers. While text messages are still the main medium of communication, audio and video messages are also increasing rapidly, accelerating the communication on the Internet. Future health information developments on the Internet include merging patients' personal information on the Internet with their traditional health records and facilitating the interaction among patients, caregivers and health-care providers. Through these developments, the Internet is expected to strengthen the mutually beneficial relationships among all stakeholders in the field of medicine.

  1. Oncologic imaging: kidney and ureter

    SciTech Connect

    McClennan, B.L.; Balfe, D.M.

    1983-11-01

    Malignant cancers of the kidney and ureter account for only 2 to 3% of all neoplasms in man. However, early diagnosis and treatment can have a profound effect on patient prognosis and survival. This article seeks to amalgamate a large body of information related to the pathology of primary renal tumors and metastatic disease with current imaging strategies to assist the clinician and enhance his understanding of the wide variety of modern imaging techniques available. Current tumor staging classifications are presented and the various imaging strategies are keyed to detection, definition and treatment options for tumors of the renal parenchyma and ureter. The strengths and limitations of all available imaging modalities are reviewed. An optimal approach to the imaging workup is developed with regard to availability, evolving technology and most importantly, cost efficacy. The controversies and conflicts in imaging and treatment options are explored while constructing a step by step approach that will be both flexible and utilitarian for the clinician faced with daily oncologic management choices.

  2. Nanotechnology Applications in Surgical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sunil; Nie, Shuming; Wang, May D.

    2010-01-01

    Surgery is currently the most effective and widely used procedure in treating human cancers, and the single most important predictor of patient survival is a complete surgical resection. Major opportunities exist to develop new and innovative technologies that could help the surgeon to delineate tumor margins, to identify residual tumor cells and micrometastases, and to determine if the tumor has been completely removed. Here we discuss recent advances in nanotechnology and optical instrumentation, and how these advances can be integrated for applications in surgical oncology. A fundamental rationale is that nanometer-sized particles such as quantum dots and colloidal gold have functional and structural properties that are not available from either discrete molecules or bulk materials. When conjugated with targeting ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, or small molecules, these nanoparticles can be used to target malignant tumor cells and tumor microenvironments with high specificity and affinity. In the “mesoscopic” size range of 10–100 nm, nanoparticles also have large surface areas for conjugating to multiple diagnostic and therapeutic agents, opening new possibilities in integrated cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:20059343

  3. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  4. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  5. Assessing multi-disciplinary Earth observation impacts on societal benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, J.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-disciplinary interactions are becoming more important as demands for science-driven information needed for decision-making are increasing. Further development of systems to improve the scientific understanding of Earth's system and its response to natural or human-induced changes are required to meet this need. These would facilitate modeling and analyses in many critical areas such as climate prediction, food security, water availability and ecosystem sustainability among others. It is intuitive that better information will have a positive impact on decision outcomes. Yet this is difficult to quantitate. The impacts of multi-disciplinary work are particularly difficult to assess, yet it is hard to predict climate change without considering oceans, land use and many other Earth system characteristics. There are several steps that are important to quantitate the benefits. Some of these have been discussed at IIASA, RFI and other centers of excellence in this area. The key is to establish a program with metrics, a community of practice to propagate the metrics and clear case studies that will demonstrate effectiveness. A workshop was held to set the foundations for this approach and recommendations from a team of global experts are evolving into a program. This presentation discusses the indicators and metrics, examines their efficacy and looks at a case study to assess and validate the development.

  6. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Big Data and machine learning in radiation oncology: State of the art and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Giraud, Philippe; Burgun, Anita

    2016-11-01

    Precision medicine relies on an increasing amount of heterogeneous data. Advances in radiation oncology, through the use of CT Scan, dosimetry and imaging performed before each fraction, have generated a considerable flow of data that needs to be integrated. In the same time, Electronic Health Records now provide phenotypic profiles of large cohorts of patients that could be correlated to this information. In this review, we describe methods that could be used to create integrative predictive models in radiation oncology. Potential uses of machine learning methods such as support vector machine, artificial neural networks, and deep learning are also discussed.

  8. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  9. A Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Clinic: The University of North Carolina Experience.

    PubMed

    McKee, Megan J; Keith, Kevin; Deal, Allison M; Garrett, Amy L; Wheless, Amy A; Green, Rebecca L; Benbow, Julie M; Dees, E Claire; Carey, Lisa A; Ewend, Matthew G; Anders, Carey K; Zagar, Timothy M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) confers a poor prognosis and is unusual in requiring multidisciplinary care in the metastatic setting. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) has created a BCBM clinic to provide medical and radiation oncology, neurosurgical, and supportive services to this complex patient population. We describe organization and design of the clinic as well as characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of the patients seen in its first 3 years. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients in a prospectively maintained database. Descriptive statistics are reported as percentages and means. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-event outcomes. Sixty-five patients were seen between January 2012 and January 2015. At the time of presentation to the BCBM clinic, most patients (74%) had multiple (≥2) brain metastases and had received prior systemic (77%) and whole-brain radiation therapy and/or central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery (65%) in the metastatic setting. Seventy-eight percent returned for a follow-up visit; 32% were enrolled in a clinical trial. Median time from diagnosis of brain metastasis to death was 2.11 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-2.47) for all patients, 1.15 years (95% CI 0.4-2.43) for triple-negative breast cancer, 1.31 years (95% CI 0.51-2.52) for hormone receptor-positive/HER2- breast cancer, and 3.03 years (95% CI lower limit 1.94, upper limit not estimable) for HER2+ breast cancer (p = .0037). Patients with BCBM have unique and complex needs that require input from several oncologic disciplines. The development of the UNC-CH multidisciplinary BCBM clinic is a model that can be adapted at other centers to provide coordinated care for patients with a challenging and complex disease. Patients with breast cancer brain metastases often require unique multidisciplinary care to meet the numerous and uncommon challenges associated with their conditions. Here, the

  10. A Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Clinic: The University of North Carolina Experience

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Megan J.; Keith, Kevin; Deal, Allison M.; Garrett, Amy L.; Wheless, Amy A.; Green, Rebecca L.; Benbow, Julie M.; Dees, E. Claire; Carey, Lisa A.; Ewend, Matthew G.; Zagar, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) confers a poor prognosis and is unusual in requiring multidisciplinary care in the metastatic setting. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) has created a BCBM clinic to provide medical and radiation oncology, neurosurgical, and supportive services to this complex patient population. We describe organization and design of the clinic as well as characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of the patients seen in its first 3 years. Methods. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients in a prospectively maintained database. Descriptive statistics are reported as percentages and means. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-event outcomes. Results. Sixty-five patients were seen between January 2012 and January 2015. At the time of presentation to the BCBM clinic, most patients (74%) had multiple (≥2) brain metastases and had received prior systemic (77%) and whole-brain radiation therapy and/or central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery (65%) in the metastatic setting. Seventy-eight percent returned for a follow-up visit; 32% were enrolled in a clinical trial. Median time from diagnosis of brain metastasis to death was 2.11 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.47) for all patients, 1.15 years (95% CI 0.4–2.43) for triple-negative breast cancer, 1.31 years (95% CI 0.51–2.52) for hormone receptor-positive/HER2− breast cancer, and 3.03 years (95% CI lower limit 1.94, upper limit not estimable) for HER2+ breast cancer (p = .0037). Conclusion. Patients with BCBM have unique and complex needs that require input from several oncologic disciplines. The development of the UNC-CH multidisciplinary BCBM clinic is a model that can be adapted at other centers to provide coordinated care for patients with a challenging and complex disease. Implications for Practice: Patients with breast cancer brain metastases often require unique multidisciplinary care to meet the

  11. Enhancing the role of case-oriented peer review to improve quality and safety in radiation oncology: Executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Adams, Robert D.; Pawlicki, Todd; Blumberg, Albert L.; Hoopes, David; Brundage, Michael D.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of a series of white papers commissioned for the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors as part of ASTRO's Target Safely Campaign, focusing on the role of peer review as an important component of a broad safety/quality assurance (QA) program. Peer review is one of the most effective means for assuring the quality of qualitative, and potentially controversial, patient-specific decisions in radiation oncology. This report summarizes many of the areas throughout radiation therapy that may benefit from the application of peer review. Each radiation oncology facility should evaluate the issues raised and develop improved ways to apply the concept of peer review to its individual process and workflow. This might consist of a daily multidisciplinary (eg, physicians, dosimetrists, physicists, therapists) meeting to review patients being considered for, or undergoing planning for, radiation therapy (eg, intention to treat and target delineation), as well as meetings to review patients already under treatment (eg, adequacy of image guidance). This report is intended to clarify and broaden the understanding of radiation oncology professionals regarding the meaning, roles, benefits, and targets for peer review as a routine quality assurance tool. It is hoped that this work will be a catalyst for further investigation, development, and study of the efficacy of peer review techniques and how these efforts can help improve the safety and quality of our treatments. PMID:24175002

  12. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein.

  14. The National Oncology Working Group (NOW) initiative: payer and provider collaborations in oncology benefits management.

    PubMed

    Soper, Aileen M; Reeder, C E; Brown, Loreen M; Stojanovska, Ana; Lennert, Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Payers recognize the need to expand benefits management for oncology but struggle to find effective solutions amid the complexity of available therapies and skepticism from oncologists, who are facing their own set of economic pressures. An effort called the National Oncology Working Group (NOW) Initiative is trying to change the sometimes adversarial relationship between payers and oncologists through a collaborative model. The group, which is supported by pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis, is developing patient-centered strategies for successful and sustainable oncology benefits management. The focus includes finding consensus between payers and providers and devising solutions for oncology management such as decreasing variability of cancer care and improving end-of-life care for patients with terminal illness. NOW is designing tools that will be tested in small-scale regional demonstration projects, which NOW participants anticipate will set an example for successful oncology benefits management that can be replicated and expanded.

  15. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases from solid tumors: guidelines from the European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO).

    PubMed

    Soffietti, Riccardo; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Baumert, Brigitta; Combs, Stephanie E; Kinhult, Sara; Kros, Johan M; Marosi, Christine; Metellus, Philippe; Radbruch, Alexander; Villa Freixa, Salvador S; Brada, Michael; Carapella, Carmine M; Preusser, Matthias; Le Rhun, Emilie; Rudà, Roberta; Tonn, Joerg C; Weber, Damien C; Weller, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The management of patients with brain metastases has become a major issue due to the increasing frequency and complexity of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In 2014, the European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) created a multidisciplinary Task Force to draw evidence-based guidelines for patients with brain metastases from solid tumors. Here, we present these guidelines, which provide a consensus review of evidence and recommendations for diagnosis by neuroimaging and neuropathology, staging, prognostic factors, and different treatment options. Specifically, we addressed options such as surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy, whole-brain radiotherapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy (with particular attention to brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma and breast and renal cancer), and supportive care. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Improving Care in Pediatric Neuro-oncology Patients: An Overview of the Unique Needs of Children With Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Cheryl; Petriccione, Mary; Donzelli, Maria; Pottenger, Elaine

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumors in childhood, accounting for almost 25% of all childhood cancer, second only to leukemia. Pediatric central nervous system tumors encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Any brain tumor can be associated with significant morbidity, even when low grade, and mortality from pediatric central nervous system tumors is disproportionately high compared to other childhood malignancies. Management of children with central nervous system tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population, beyond general oncology care. Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs during treatment, as cancer survivors, and at end of life. A multidisciplinary team approach, including advanced practice nurses with a specialty in neuro-oncology, allows for better supportive care. Knowledge of the unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors, and the appropriate interventions required, allows for improved quality of life.

  18. Management of childhood brain tumors: consensus report by the Pediatric Hematology Oncology (PHO) Chapter of Indian Academy of Pediatrics (IAP).

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sunil; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Suri, Vaishali; Patir, Rana; Kurkure, Purna; Kellie, Stewart; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2011-12-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common childhood tumors and remain the leading cause of cancer related deaths in children. Appropriate diagnosis and management of these tumors are essential to improve survival. There are no clinical practical guidelines available for the management of brain tumors in India. This document is a consensus report prepared after a National Consultation on Pediatric Brain Tumors held in Delhi on 06 Nov 2008. The meeting was attended by eminent experts from all over the country, in the fields of Neurosurgery, Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, Neuropathology, Diagnostic Imaging, Pediatric Endocrinology and Allied Health Professionals. This article highlights that physicians looking after children with brain tumors should work as part of a multidisciplinary team to improve the survival, quality of life, neuro-cognitive outcomes and standards of care for children with brain tumors. Recommendations for when to suspect, diagnostic workup, initial management, long-term follow up and specific management of individual tumors are outlined.

  19. Improving Care in Pediatric Neuro-oncology Patients:An Overview of the Unique Needs of Children with Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Cheryl; Petriccione, Mary; Donzelli, Maria; Pottenger, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumors in childhood, accounting for almost 25% of all childhood cancer, second only to leukemia. Childhood CNS tumors encompass a wide variety of diagnoses, from benign to malignant. Any brain tumor can be associated with significant morbidity, even when low grade, and mortality from childhood CNS tumors is disproportionately high compared to other childhood malignancies. Management of children with CNS tumors requires knowledge of the unique aspects of care associated with this particular patient population, beyond general oncology care. Pediatric brain tumor patients have unique needs during treatment, as cancer survivors, and at end of life. A multidisciplinary team approach, including advanced practice nurses with a specialty in neuro-oncology, allows for better supportive care. Knowledge of the unique aspects of care for children with brain tumors, and the appropriate interventions required, allows for improved quality of life. PMID:26245798

  20. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Sternick, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  1. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  2. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  3. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Zeng, Zhi; Stary, Creed M.; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Gu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS) technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1) precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2) isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3) descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research. PMID:27313981

  4. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Zeng, Zhi; Stary, Creed M; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Gu, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS) technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1) precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2) isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3) descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  5. The role of Internet resources in clinical oncology: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Greenberg, Alexandra J; Rutten, Lila J Finney

    2016-12-01

    The Internet is a valuable tool that continues to revolutionize many aspects of our lives; however, the ability to disseminate diverse data across populations and nations presents both opportunities and challenges. Online resources are increasingly used in health care, providing wider access to information for patients, researchers, and clinicians. At the turn of the millennium, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) predicted that Internet-based technologies would create a revolution in communication for oncology professionals and patients with cancer. Herein, findings from the NCI's Health Information National Trends Survey are reviewed to give insight into how Internet trends related to oncology patients are evolving. Future trends are discussed, including examples of 'connected health' in oncology; the spread of mobile and ubiquitous access points to Internet-hosted information; the diffusion of devices, sensors, and apps; the spread of personal data sharing; and an evolution in how networks can support person-centred and family-centred care.

  6. The psychiatrist's perspective on quality of life and quality of care in oncology: concepts, symptom management, communication issues.

    PubMed

    Razavi, D; Delvaux, N

    1995-01-01

    The important prevalence of psychosocial problems and psychiatric disturbances that have been reported in oncology, underlines the need for comprehensive psychosocial support for cancer patients and their families. Psychosocial support is designed to preserve, restore or enhance quality of life. Quality of life refers not only to psychosocial distress and adjustment-related problems but also to the management of cancer symptoms and treatment side-effects. Psychosocial interventions designed for this purpose should be divided into five categories: prevention, early detection, restoration, support and palliation. Firstly, preventive interventions are designed to avoid the development of predictable morbidity secondary to treatment and/or disease. Secondly, early detection of patients' needs or problems refers to the assumption that early interventions' could have therapeutic results superior to those of delayed support, both for quality of life and survival. Thirdly, restorative interventions refer to actions used when a cure is likely, the aim being the control or elimination of residual cancer disability. Fourthly, supportive rehabilitation is planned to lessen disability related to chronic disease, characterised by cancer illness remission and progression, and to active treatment. Fifthly, palliation is required when curative treatments are likely to no longer be effective, and when maintaining or improving comfort becomes the main goal. Psychological interventions are often multidisciplinary, with a variety of content. The type of psychological intervention ranges from information and education to more sophisticated support programmes including directive (behavioural or cognitive) therapies, or non-directive (dynamic or supportive) therapies. Social interventions usually include financial, household, equipment, and transport assistance depending on individual and family needs and resources. These interventions may be combined with the prescription of

  7. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  8. Thoughts about multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    This essay focuses on multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research. The definitions and objectives for these three types of multiple discipline research are given. Discussion centers on the gains and losses that may be experienced by individual nurses who engage in such research, as well as gains and losses for the discipline of nursing.

  9. Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.…

  10. Creating Collaborative Community in Multidisciplinary Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twale, Darla J.; Schaller, Molly A.; Hunley, Sawyer A.; Polanski, Patricia J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined part-time students' perceptions of collaborative community in a graduate, multidisciplinary education department with courses offered on multiple campuses. Found that perceptions of community are synonymous with friendship, involvement, cohesion, communication, and trust. These feelings were affected more by campus location, program area,…

  11. Directions in Environmental Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendig, Hal

    2003-01-01

    This article considers developments and directions for environmental gerontology drawing on the three papers in this Forum. The multidisciplinary field came of age during the 1960s with Powell Lawton's powerful environmental press paradigm and its applications to empirical research and building design. Recent theoretical developments in Europe and…

  12. Multidisciplinary approaches to climate change questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; LePage, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the complex environmental problems of our time. Solutions to climate change problems are good examples of situations requiring complex syntheses of ideas from a vast set of disciplines including science, engineering, social science, and the humanities. Unfortunately, most ecologists have narrow training, and are not equipped to bring their environmental skills to the table with interdisciplinary teams to help solve multidisciplinary problems. To address this problem, new graduate training programs and workshops sponsored by various organizations are providing opportunities for scientists and others to learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Two examples of training in multidisciplinary thinking include those organized by the Santa Fe Institute and Dahlem Workshops. In addition, many interdisciplinary programs have had successes in providing insight into climate change problems including the International Panel on Climate Change, the Joint North American Carbon Program, the National Academy of Science Research Grand Challenges Initiatives, and the National Academy of Science. These programs and initiatives have had some notable success in outlining some of the problems and solutions to climate change. Scientists who can offer their specialized expertise to interdisciplinary teams will be more successful in helping to solve the complex problems related to climate change.

  13. Improving Student Achievement in a Multidisciplinary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Amanda; Bloxham, Sue

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses interim findings of an ongoing action research project into the use of assessment criteria and grade descriptors in the assessment process. The project is multidisciplinary and covers areas as diverse as Sports Sociology, Economics, Youth and Community Studies, and Education. The idea is to equip first-year students with the…

  14. Stronger Disciplinary Identities in Multidisciplinary Research Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geschwind, Lars; Melin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two multidisciplinary Social Sciences and Humanities research schools in Sweden have been investigated regarding disciplinary identity-making. This study investigates the meetings between different disciplines around a common thematic area of study for Ph.D. students. The Ph.D. students navigate through a complex social and…

  15. Man and Environment, A Multidisciplinary Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, F. H.; And Others

    This multidisciplinary guide, developed for teachers in the secondary schools, stresses the use of Man and Environment in Arkansas. The guide illustrates how teachers in social studies, the arts, English, science, physical education and health, home economics, and mathematics can implement these materials into their present classroom situations. A…

  16. Evaluating Multidisciplinary Education in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Elsegood, John; Hall, John; Hamilton, Sheila; Harden, Ronald; Lee, Diana; Stead, Joan

    A 2-year study evaluated students' and course organizers' perceptions of the effectiveness of multidisciplinary education (ME) in health care and factors that facilitate or inhibit its development. The study had three phases: a survey of ME provision in the United Kingdom; 42 qualitative interviews and focus groups in 14 sites; and data feedback.…

  17. Structuring Decision-Making in Multidisciplinary Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabler, Michael L.; Genshaft, Judy L.

    1983-01-01

    Three areas related to decision making are discussed: (1) a research survey summary of multidisciplinary team decision making (MTD); (2) four approaches for structuring MTD decision making; and (3) styles of leadership as a factor that impacts on the decision-making teams. (Author/PN)

  18. Are Multidisciplinary Teams Worth the Investment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Roland K.

    1983-01-01

    Current research data provide only weak support for the continued use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). It is argued that MDTs have not had a fair chance to be implemented and that the complexity of organizational changes needed for MDTs to function effectively have been overlooked by team members and administrators. (Author/PN)

  19. International Multidisciplinary Artificial Gravity (IMAG) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts of the International Multidisciplinary Artificial Gravity Project. Specifically it reviews the NASA Exploration Planning Status, NASA Exploration Roadmap, Status of Planning for the Moon, Mars Planning, Reference health maintenance scenario, and The Human Research Program.

  20. Creating Collaborative Community in Multidisciplinary Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twale, Darla J.; Schaller, Molly A.; Hunley, Sawyer A.; Polanski, Patricia J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined part-time students' perceptions of collaborative community in a graduate, multidisciplinary education department with courses offered on multiple campuses. Found that perceptions of community are synonymous with friendship, involvement, cohesion, communication, and trust. These feelings were affected more by campus location, program area,…

  1. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, R S; Baaj, J; Khan, M U; Dammas, F A; Rashid, N

    2016-01-01

    Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta) is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  2. Acute mesenteric ischemia: current multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Savlania, Ajay; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the mechanisms of acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) and the rationale and conduct of currently available endovascular and open surgical techniques in its management. We also propose an algorithm to support the current multidisciplinary approach in decision-making for mesenteric revascularization to manage this high-risk entity.

  3. Directions in Environmental Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendig, Hal

    2003-01-01

    This article considers developments and directions for environmental gerontology drawing on the three papers in this Forum. The multidisciplinary field came of age during the 1960s with Powell Lawton's powerful environmental press paradigm and its applications to empirical research and building design. Recent theoretical developments in Europe and…

  4. Evaluating Multidisciplinary Education in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Elsegood, John; Hall, John; Hamilton, Sheila; Harden, Ronald; Lee, Diana; Stead, Joan

    A 2-year study evaluated students' and course organizers' perceptions of the effectiveness of multidisciplinary education (ME) in health care and factors that facilitate or inhibit its development. The study had three phases: a survey of ME provision in the United Kingdom; 42 qualitative interviews and focus groups in 14 sites; and data feedback.…

  5. Improving Student Achievement in a Multidisciplinary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Amanda; Bloxham, Sue

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses interim findings of an ongoing action research project into the use of assessment criteria and grade descriptors in the assessment process. The project is multidisciplinary and covers areas as diverse as Sports Sociology, Economics, Youth and Community Studies, and Education. The idea is to equip first-year students with the…

  6. Stronger Disciplinary Identities in Multidisciplinary Research Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geschwind, Lars; Melin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two multidisciplinary Social Sciences and Humanities research schools in Sweden have been investigated regarding disciplinary identity-making. This study investigates the meetings between different disciplines around a common thematic area of study for Ph.D. students. The Ph.D. students navigate through a complex social and…

  7. 34 CFR 303.17 - Multidisciplinary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Multidisciplinary. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  8. 34 CFR 303.17 - Multidisciplinary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Multidisciplinary. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  9. A multidisciplinary approach to improving revenue integrity.

    PubMed

    Craghead, Todd; Liston, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Intermountain Healthcare's journey toward a modern revenue integrity process began with five key steps: building a multidisciplinary team, developing department-specific charge-capture teams, providing ongoing education and training on best practices for revenue integrity, leveraging new technology and business support services, establishing a proactive approach to managing audits and compliance.

  10. Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization Using WAVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The current preliminary design tools lack the product performance, quality and cost prediction fidelity required to design Six Sigma products. They are also frequently incompatible with the tools used in detailed design, leading to a great deal of rework and lost or discarded data in the transition from preliminary to detailed design. Thus, enhanced preliminary design tools are needed in order to produce adequate financial returns to the business. To achieve this goal, GEAE has focused on building the preliminary design system around the same geometric 3D solid model that will be used in detailed design. With this approach, the preliminary designer will no longer convert a flowpath sketch into an engine cross section but rather, automatically create 3D solid geometry for structural integrity, life, weight, cost, complexity, producibility, and maintainability assessments. Likewise, both the preliminary design and the detailed design can benefit from the use of the same preliminary part sizing routines. The design analysis tools will also be integrated with the 3D solid model to eliminate manual transfer of data between programs. GEAE has aggressively pursued the computerized control of engineering knowledge for many years. Through its study and validation of 3D CAD programs and processes, GEAE concluded that total system control was not feasible at that time. Prior CAD tools focused exclusively on detail part geometry and Knowledge Based Engineering systems concentrated on rules input and data output. A system was needed to bridge the gap between the two to capture the total system. With the introduction of WAVE Engineering from UGS, the possibilities of an engineering system control device began to formulate. GEAE decided to investigate the new WAVE functionality to accomplish this task. NASA joined GEAE in funding this validation project through Task Order No. 1. With the validation project complete, the second phase under Task Order No. 2 was established to

  11. Impact of oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Masha Sh; Cheung, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Studies have identified non-adherence as one of the major contributing factors to treatment failure in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients receiving imatinib. Published literature has demonstrated a unique role of oncology pharmacists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, in contributing to overall positive outcomes for patients. To evaluate the impact of an oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program on oral medication adherence in CML patients versus usual care. Electronic refill history and medical records of patients diagnosed with CML treated with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) managed by oncology pharmacists during a 6-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. Imatinib adherence rate, as the primary endpoint, was compared with the rate for those in the usual care group within the same organization. The secondary endpoints were descriptive to characterize pharmacist interventions for all TKIs. A total of 56 patients including 45 who were treated with imatinib, were evaluated. The group managed by oncology pharmacists resulted in a higher percentage of imatinib adherence rate compared to usual care (88.6% vs 65.8%, p = 0.0046). A total of 3432 pharmacist encounters were reviewed, and 567 interventions of six categories including side effect monitoring/management (n = 95; 16.8%); drug interaction detection (n = 109; 19.2%); TKI dose adjustment (n = 82; 14.5%); laboratory monitoring (n = 200; 35.3%); non-CML related drug choice (n = 74; 13.1%); and copay assistance (n = 7; 1.2%), were documented. This resulted in a mean of 10.1 interventions per patient. Our oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program significantly improved TKI adherence rates in CML patients. We attribute the success of our program to consistent follow-up by utilizing routine phone, and secure email follow-ups, that allowed our oncology pharmacists to build a close and trustworthy relationship with patients and

  12. Pharmacists' roles in oncology pharmacy services: Results of a global survey.

    PubMed

    Holle, Lisa M; Harris, Christy S; Chan, Alexandre; Fahrenbruch, Rebecca J; Labdi, Bonnie A; Mohs, Jocelyn E; Norris, Leann B; Perkins, Janelle; Vela, Cory M

    2017-04-01

    Background Oncology pharmacists are capable of providing medication therapy management (MTM) because of their level of training, practice experiences, and responsibilities. Very little data exist about their current practice, including changing roles in the multidisciplinary team, overall impact, and effects in the education of patients and healthcare professionals. Methods A 70-item survey about oncology pharmacists' activities in oral chemotherapy programs, MTM, and collaborative practice agreements (CPAs) was deployed using a web survey tool (Qualtrics, Provo, UT, USA), targeting pharmacist members of American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Hematology/Oncology Practice and Research Network (PRN). The objective of this study was to determine oncology pharmacists' activities in areas of oral chemotherapy programs, MTM, and CPAs. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to the ACCP Hematology/Oncology PRN membership. Investigational Review Board approval was obtained. Results Of the 795 members who were sent the survey, 81 members (10%) responded; 33 respondents (47%) are involved with an oral chemotherapy program; with 42% measuring outcomes of programs. Only six pharmacists (19%) have published or presented their data. A total of 28 (35%) respondents provide MTM services, with almost half (43%) of these MTM services being dictated by CPAs. A small fraction of these pharmacists (21.4%) reported conducting quality assurance evaluations of their MTM services and three pharmacists (10.7%) reported publishing their results. Those pharmacists practicing under CPAs ( n = 28) were surveyed as to activities included in their CPA. The most common activities included adjusting medication, ordering, interpreting, and monitoring lab tests, developing therapeutic plans and educating patients. Reimbursement for providing these services was uncommon: MTM (4%), oral chemotherapy program (6%), and CPA services (11%). Reported obstacles to reimbursement included lack of

  13. Radiation Oncology Physician Practice in the Modern Era: A Statewide Analysis of Medicare Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Kao, Johnny; Zucker, Amanda; Mauer, Elizabeth A; Wong, Andrew T; Christos, Paul; Kang, Josephine

    2017-04-25

    In recent years, major changes in health care policy have affected oncology practice dramatically. In this context, we examined the effect of practice structure on volume and payments for radiation oncology services using the 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (POSPUF) for New York State radiation oncologists. The Medicare POSPUF data was queried, and individual physicians were classified into freestanding office-based and hospital-based practices. Freestanding practices were further subdivided into urology, hematology-oncology, and other ownership structures. Additional variables analyzed included gender, year of medical school graduation, and Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Statistical analyses were performed to assess the impact of the above-mentioned variables on reimbursements. There were 236 New York State radiation oncologists identified in the 2013 Medicare POSPUF dataset, with a total reimbursement of $91,525,855. Among freestanding centers, the mean global Medicare reimbursement was $832,974. Global Medicare reimbursement was $1,328,743 for urology practices, compared to $754,567 for hematology-oncology practices and $691,821 for other ownership structures (p < 0.05). The mean volume of on-treatment visits (OTVs) was 240.5 per year, varying by practice structure. The mean annual OTV volumes for urology practices, hematology-oncology practices, other freestanding practices, and hospital-based programs were 424.6, 311.5, 247.5, and 209.3, respectively. After correcting for gender, physician experience, and HHI, practice structure was predictive of freestanding reimbursement and on treatment visit volume. Higher Medicare payment was significantly predicted by the type of practice structure, with urology-based and hematology-oncology practices accounting for the highest total reimbursement and OTV volume.

  14. Radiation Oncology Physician Practice in the Modern Era: A Statewide Analysis of Medicare Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Johnny; Mauer, Elizabeth A; Wong, Andrew T; Christos, Paul; Kang, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, major changes in health care policy have affected oncology practice dramatically. In this context, we examined the effect of practice structure on volume and payments for radiation oncology services using the 2013 Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (POSPUF) for New York State radiation oncologists. Methods The Medicare POSPUF data was queried, and individual physicians were classified into freestanding office-based and hospital-based practices. Freestanding practices were further subdivided into urology, hematology-oncology, and other ownership structures. Additional variables analyzed included gender, year of medical school graduation, and Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). Statistical analyses were performed to assess the impact of the above-mentioned variables on reimbursements. Results There were 236 New York State radiation oncologists identified in the 2013 Medicare POSPUF dataset, with a total reimbursement of $91,525,855. Among freestanding centers, the mean global Medicare reimbursement was $832,974. Global Medicare reimbursement was $1,328,743 for urology practices, compared to $754,567 for hematology-oncology practices and $691,821 for other ownership structures (p < 0.05). The mean volume of on-treatment visits (OTVs) was 240.5 per year, varying by practice structure. The mean annual OTV volumes for urology practices, hematology-oncology practices, other freestanding practices, and hospital-based programs were 424.6, 311.5, 247.5, and 209.3, respectively. After correcting for gender, physician experience, and HHI, practice structure was predictive of freestanding reimbursement and on treatment visit volume. Conclusion Higher Medicare payment was significantly predicted by the type of practice structure, with urology-based and hematology-oncology practices accounting for the highest total reimbursement and OTV volume. PMID:28553570

  15. Precision oncology: origins, optimism, and potential.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Fojo, Tito; Brada, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result--an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets--set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

  16. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don . E-mail: donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.

  17. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  18. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  19. Integrating Environmental Optics into Multidisciplinary, Predictive Models of Ocean Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 New modeling system – The photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll a plays a pivotal role in...indicators of photosynthetic capabilities and biochemical composition, and to improve upon established procedures for retrieving estimates of...physiological properties (e.g., the irradiance to which phytoplankton are acclimated, a key measure of photosynthetic performance) depends on analysis

  20. The maximum standardized uptake value of metastatic site in 18 F-FDG PET/CT predicts molecular subtypes and survival in metastatic breast cancer: An Izmir Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Cokmert, Suna; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Karapolat, Inanc; Demir, Lutfiye; Bayoglu, Vedat; Can, Alper; Akyol, Murat; Yilmaz, Yasar; Oktay Tarhan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the association between the 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluorodeoxyglucose maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of metastatic sites and molecular subtypes and survival in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) was performed in 176 MBC patients before any therapeutic intervention. The FDG uptakes of metastatic sites were evaluated using the SUVmax. Histopathological prognostic parameters, such as the tumor size, grade, lymph node involvement, lymphovascular invasion, estrogen (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), HER2 status and Ki67 were determined from the primary breast tumor tissue. The SUVmax of the metastatic sites was assessed in relation to the molecular subtypes and survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations between SUVmax measurements and overall survival (OS). The mean SUVmax of 176 tumors was 8.0. Among the subtypes 49 (28.8%) were luminal A, 51 (28.9%) luminal B, 35 (19.8%) HER2-overexpressing, and 41 (23.2%) triple- negative, and the corresponding means of SUVmax were 5.6, 7.4, 11.4, 11.0, respectively. A cut-off value of ≤8.4 yielded 80% sensitivity and 57.1% specificity with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) of 0.731 for predicting that a tumor was of the luminal A subtype. A cut-off value of SUVmax ≥10.05 yielded 62.9% sensitivity and 67.4% specificity with an AUC of 0.648 for predicting a HER2 overexpressing subtype. A cut-off value of SUVmax ≥9.25 yielded 61% sensitivity and 64.4% specificity with an AUC of 0.660 for predicting a triple-negative subtype. The SUVmax could not effectively differentiate patients with luminal B subtype. Cox regression analysis showed that in patients with MBC, a SUVmax ≤7.55 acted as an independent negative prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio/HR = 1.552). The SUVmax of metastatic

  1. Predictors of outcome of multidisciplinary treatment in chronic widespread pain: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of multidisciplinary treatment in chronic widespread pain (CWP) is limited. The considerable heterogeneity among patients is a likely explanation. Knowledge on predictors of the outcome of multidisciplinary treatment can help to optimize treatment effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of multidisciplinary treatment outcome in patients with CWP. Methods Data were used from baseline and 6 months follow-up measurements of a prospective cohort study of 120 CWP. Regression models were used to assess whether baseline variables predicted treatment outcome. Outcome domains included: pain, pain interference, depression, and global perceived effect (GPE). Potential predictors included: psychological distress, illness and self-efficacy beliefs, fear-avoidance beliefs and behaviour, symptoms, disability, and socio-demographic factors. Results Greater improvement in pain was predicted by more pain at baseline and male gender. Greater improvement in interference of pain in daily life was predicted by more interference of pain in daily life at baseline, lower levels of anxiety, a stronger belief in personal control, less belief in consequences, male gender, and a higher level of education. Greater improvement in depression was predicted by higher baseline values of depression, stronger beliefs in personal control, and a higher level of education. Better outcome on GPE was predicted by less pain, less fatigue, and a higher level of education. Conclusion Less anxiety, stronger beliefs in personal control, less belief in consequences, less pain, less fatigue, higher level of education, and male gender are predictors of better outcome of multidisciplinary treatment in CWP. Tailoring treatment to these specific patient characteristics or selecting eligible patients for multidisciplinary treatment may further improve treatment outcome. PMID:23577981

  2. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sustainable Management of Watershed Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lack of integration in the study and management of water resource problems suggests the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As practiced in the Shepherd Creek stormwater management study (Cincinnati OH), we envision a multidisciplinary approach involving economic incentive...

  3. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sustainable Management of Watershed Resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lack of integration in the study and management of water resource problems suggests the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As practiced in the Shepherd Creek stormwater management study (Cincinnati OH), we envision a multidisciplinary approach involving economic incentive...

  4. Life's final journey: the oncology nurse's role.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Cheryl A; Paice, Judith A

    2005-10-01

    Despite advances in technology and science, many people diagnosed with cancer are likely to die from the disease. Because of the long-term relationships that oncology nurses develop with patients and their families during lengthy treatment periods, they are the most appropriate clinicians to provide care across the continuum and through the final journey. Care of patients in the final days of life requires a comprehensive knowledge of common syndromes, skillful assessment, and adept clinical management. Nurses cannot focus solely on the needs of patients; family members often are unaware of the dying process. Oncology nurses are uniquely qualified to provide education and support to families at the bedside witnessing the final days and hours of their loved ones. Finally, oncology nurses involved in the care of dying patients are at risk for burnout and need to provide care for their own needs to find balance between their professional and personal lives.

  5. The Servier oncology pipeline in 2017.

    PubMed

    Therasse, Patrick; Perron, Beatrice; Novack, Sarah A; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is a complex, multifactorial disease that for years has been the focus of intensive research efforts to explore both the molecular and biological mechanisms involved and the development of novel agents to target these pathways. Servier is an independent French pharmaceutical company with a focus on oncology. Currently, Servier's commercial portfolio includes agents used to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and metastatic colorectal cancer; Servier's oncology pipeline involves agents for the treatment of both solid and hematological tumors. The main areas of future research focus on the development of therapeutics targeting apoptosis or the active immune components involved in tumour development/maintenance. Servier intends to continue its focus on cutting-edge oncology innovation by collaborating with both industry and academia, and maintaining its strong patient-centered approach.

  6. [Acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Arias, F; Manterola, A; Domínguez, M A; Martínez, E; Villafranca, E; Romero, P; Vera, R

    2004-01-01

    Dysphagia is one of the most frequent syndromes in patients with tumours of the head and neck, and the oesophagus. This can be the initial symptom or, more frequently, related to the oncological treatment. We review the most important therapeutic and physio-pathological aspects of acute dysphagia of oncological origin. Deglutition is a complex process in which numerous muscular-skeletal structures intervene under the neurological control of different cranial nerves. The complex neuro-muscular coordination needed for a correct deglutition can be affected by numerous situations, both from the effect of the tumours and from their treatment, basically surgery or radiotherapy. In conclusion, it can be affirmed that for a suitable treatment of oncological dysphagia, a correct initial evaluation and an active treatment are required, since not only the patient's quality of life but, on numerous occasions, the possibility of continuing the treatment and thus maintaining the possibilities of a cure depend on control of the dysphagia.

  7. [Imaging in oncology: terms and definitions].

    PubMed

    Brader, P; Menu, Y; Kreuzer, S; Polanec, S; Mayerhoefer, M; Herold, C J

    2013-04-01

    Oncologic imaging includes the morphological description of the primary tumor region for an accurate classification of the tumor and lymph node stage and whether distant metastases have occurred according to the TNM staging system. Knowing the stage of the disease helps to plan the treatment and to estimate the prognosis. In clinical routine this is accomplished by conventional imaging techniques, such as ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, oncologic imaging is essential in treatment monitoring to visualize and quantify the effect of cancer therapy according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. The tremendous development in oncology and technical innovations in imaging represent a particular challenge for radiology.

  8. [Bipolar disorders in oncology: Characteristics and management].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Kotecki, Nuria

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar disorders belong to the spectrum of mood disorders and represent a serious psychiatric comorbidity. Behaviors adopted by bipolar patients can foster cancer occurrence but also impact its management, especially during acute depressive or manic episode. Oncologists must adapt their protocols in order to obtain the best compliance for treatment and avoid any possible mood destabilization, with the inherent risk of suicidal attempt. Potential interactions between mood-stabilizing agents (lithium, divalproate, atypical antipsychotics, and anticonvulsivants) and oncologic treatment (chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, corticotherapy) will be particularly watched. To do so, a closely collaboration with the oncopsychiatrist but also with the referent or liaison psychiatry team is necessary during the patient's oncologic care. Some clinical vignettes will illustrate the modalities of care of bipolar disorders in oncology. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  10. Multi-Disciplinary Research for High Energy Chemical Lasers, Closed-Cycle ElectricOIL Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    electrodynamic model predictions a laser system model was utilized to predict the scalability of the system; results indicate that theoretical electrical ...multidisciplinary research program for a high energy closed-cycle laser that is derived from the Electrically assisted Oxygen Iodine Laser (ElectricOlU (EOIL...flow iodine from one reservoir and trap it in another. The principal advantage of the hybrid EOIL system is trading a small fixed mass in electrical

  11. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals-most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These contemporary figures may be useful to medical students

  12. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    endoscopic diagnosis is likely to be impacted by a combination of biomarkers and technology, and 'endoscopic molecular imaging' should be defined as "visualization of molecular characteristics with endoscopy". These innovations will allow us not only to locate a tumor or dysplastic lesion but also to visualize its molecular characteristics (e.g., DNA mutations and polymorphisms, gene and/or protein expression), and the activity of specific molecules and biological processes that affect tumor behavior and/or its response to therapy. In the near future, these methods should be promising technologies that will play a central role in gastrointestinal oncology.

  13. Genetics in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Martuza, R L

    1983-01-01

    could be identified and studied in the meningioma, the findings could be important not only in the treatment of patients with this tumor but also in the treatment of tumors of other hormonally modulated tissues such as breast and uterus. Finally, neurofibromatosis was chosen as the most common of the phakomatoses and as one which can offer significant insights into many areas of neuro-oncology. The NF gene occurs in at least two forms (VRNF, BANF), and it can be associated with virtually all of the tumors known to neurosurgeons--gliomas, neurofibromas, schwannomas, and meningiomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  14. Oncological emergencies associated with gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Prenen, Klaas; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Oncological emergencies are defined as acute life-threatening conditions in cancer patients either as a result of the malignancy or as a result of its treatment. In this review, we focus on oncological emergencies associated with gastrointestinal tumors. They can be categorized by their system of origin as hematologic, neurologic or metabolic. Furthermore, we discuss mechanical emergencies such as intestinal obstruction and vena cava superior syndrome as well as acute gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary embolism. The patients’ performance status as well as prognosis are essential during decision making for optimal treatment. PMID:26424367

  15. [Role of laparoscopy in uro-oncology].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L; Novák, K; Dvorácek, J

    2005-01-01

    The article reviews problems of laparoscopic surgery in uro-oncology. Examples supporting and opposing the laparoscopic alternative are given. Original objections against the use of the method for the treatment of malignancies are discussed from the retrospective position. According to the predominant views it looks that laparoscopic treatment by a highly educated team with good technical background, respecting oncologic and functional aspects, does not have worse short-term and long-lasting results. The improving diagnostics and possibility to identify malignancies in early stage of development will enable wider use of the laparoscopic surgery.

  16. Fish Oncology: Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Nadeau, Marie-Eve; Groff, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    The scientific literature contains a wealth of information concerning spontaneous fish neoplasms, although ornamental fish oncology is still in its infancy. The occurrence of fish neoplasms has often been associated with oncogenic viruses and environmental insults, making them useful markers for environmental contaminants. The use of fish, including zebrafish, as models of human carcinogenesis has been developed and knowledge gained from these models may also be applied to ornamental fish, although more studies are required. This review summarizes information available about fish oncology pertaining to veterinary clinicians.

  17. Managing oncology agents: an HMO's perspective.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The only way to accomplish the goals discussed is for health plans to collaborate more constructively with the oncologist community. We have reached out to providers, but there is still plenty of room for improvement. It is critical for both our success and that of the oncology community, because no one benefits from an adversarial relationship. We have not really sat down as partners with care providers to talk about what both parties see as emerging issues and how to best address them. We are at a point in oncology where we have this opportunity.

  18. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  19. Immunotherapy Administration: Oncology Nursing Society Recommendations
.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Kathleen; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Wall, Lisa; Baldwin-Medsker, Abigail; Nguyen, Kim; Marsh, Lisa; Baniewicz, Diane

    2017-04-01

    As the use of immunotherapeutic agents increases in single-agent and multimodality treatment regimens, oncology nurses face the challenge of administering and caring for patients receiving new and unique agents. Oncology Nursing Society clinical staff and clinical nurses collaborated to produce a set of recommendations to educate nurses involved with the monitoring of patients receiving immunotherapy on administration procedures and safe handling of these agents to ensure patient and staff safety and to reduce risk of error. The recommendations are meant to provide clinical nurses with a framework on which to build policies and procedures for administering new treatment modalities.
.

  20. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented.