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Sample records for predicts mortality independent

  1. Could dysnatremias play a role as independent factors to predict mortality in surgical critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Nicolini, Edson A.; Nunes, Roosevelt S.; Santos, Gabriela V.; da Silva, Silvana Lia; Carreira, Mariana M.; Pellison, Fernanda G.; Menegueti, Mayra G.; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Feres, Marcus A.; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have demonstrated the impact of dysnatremias on mortality of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The objective of this study was to assess whether dysnatremia is an independent factor to predict mortality in surgical critically ill patients admitted to ICU in postoperative phase. One thousand five hundred and ninety-nine surgical patients (58.8% males; mean age of 60.6 ± 14.4 years) admitted to the ICU in the postoperative period were retrospectively studied. The patients were classified according to their serum sodium levels (mmol/L) at admission as normonatremia (135–145), hyponatremia (<135), and hypernatremia (>145). APACHE II, SAPS III, and SOFA were recorded. The capability of each index to predict mortality of ICU and hospital mortality of patients was analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Hyponatremia did not have an influence on mortality in the ICU with a relative risk (RR) = 0.95 (0.43–2.05) and hospital mortality of RR = 1.40 (0.75–2.59). However, this association was greater in patients with hypernatremia mortality in the ICU (RR = 3.33 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.58–7.0]) and also in hospital mortality (RR = 2.9 [ 95% CI = 1.51–5.55). The pairwise comparison of ROC curves among the different prognostic indexes (APACHE II, SAPS III, SOFA) did not show statistical significance. The comparison of these indexes with serum sodium levels for general population, hyponatremia, and normonatremia was statistically significant (P < .001). For hypernatremia, the AUC and 95% CI for APACHE II, SAPS III, SOFA, and serum sodium level were 0.815 (0.713–0.892), 0.805 (0.702–0.885), 0.885 (0.794–0.945), and 0.663 (0.549–0.764), respectively. The comparison among the prognostic indexes was not statistically significant. Only SOFA score had a statistic difference compared with hypernatremia (P < .02). The serum sodium levels at admission, especially hypernatremia, may be used as an

  2. CIBMTR Chronic GVHD Risk Score Predicts Mortality in an Independent Validation Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mukta; Hemmer, Michael T.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Klein, John P.; Cutler, Corey S.; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Couriel, Daniel R.; Alousi, Amin M.; Gale, Robert Peter; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Li, Peigang; Antin, Joseph H.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Boyiadzis, Michael; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Isola, Luis M.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Jagasia, Madan; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Santarone, Stella; Schouten, Harry C.; Wingard, John R.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Flowers, Mary E.D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported a risk score that predicted mortality in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (CGVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) between 1995–2004 and reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Registry (CIBMTR). We sought to validate this risk score in an independent CIBMTR cohort of 1128 patients with CGVHD transplanted between 2005–2007 using the same inclusion criteria and risk-score calculations. According to the sum of the overall risk score (range 1 to 12), patients were assigned to 4 risk-groups (RGs): RG1 (0–2), RG2 (3–6), RG3 (7–8) and RG4 (9–10). RG3 and 4 were combined as RG4 comprised only 1% of the total cohort. Cumulative incidences of non relapse mortality (NRM) and probability of overall survival (OS) were significantly different between each RG (all p<0.01). NRM and OS at five years after CGVHD for each RG were 17% and 72% in RG1, 26% and 53% in RG2, and 44% and 25% in RG 3, respectively (all p<0.01). Our study validates the prognostic value of the CIBMTR CGVHD RGs for OS and NRM in a contemporary transplant population. The CIBMTR CGVHD RGs can be used to predict major outcomes, tailor treatment planning, and enrollment in clinical trials. PMID:25528390

  3. Phase angle obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis independently predicts mortality in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Belarmino, Giliane; Gonzalez, Maria Cristina; Torrinhas, Raquel S; Sala, Priscila; Andraus, Wellington; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Pereira, Rosa Maria R; Caparbo, Valéria F; Ravacci, Graziela R; Damiani, Lucas; Heymsfield, Steven B; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prognostic value of the phase angle (PA) obtained from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for mortality prediction in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS In total, 134 male cirrhotic patients prospectively completed clinical evaluations and nutritional assessment by BIA to obtain PAs during a 36-mo follow-up period. Mortality risk was analyzed by applying the PA cutoff point recently proposed as a malnutrition marker (PA ≤ 4.9°) in Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression models. RESULTS The patients were divided into two groups according to the PA cutoff value (PA > 4.9°, n = 73; PA ≤ 4.9°, n = 61). Weight, height, and body mass index were similar in both groups, but patients with PAs > 4.9° were younger and had higher mid-arm muscle circumference, albumin, and handgrip-strength values and lower severe ascites and encephalopathy incidences, interleukin (IL)-6/IL-10 ratios and C-reactive protein levels than did patients with PAs ≤ 4.9° (P ≤ 0.05). Forty-eight (35.80%) patients died due to cirrhosis, with a median of 18 mo (interquartile range, 3.3-25.6 mo) follow-up until death. Thirty-one (64.60%) of these patients were from the PA ≤ 4.9° group. PA ≤ 4.9° significantly and independently affected the mortality model adjusted for Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and age (hazard ratio = 2.05, 95%CI: 1.11-3.77, P = 0.021). In addition, Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with PAs ≤ 4.9° were significantly more likely to die. CONCLUSION In male patients with cirrhosis, the PA ≤ 4.9° cutoff was associated independently with mortality and identified patients with worse metabolic, nutritional, and disease progression profiles. The PA may be a useful and reliable bedside tool to evaluate prognosis in cirrhosis. PMID:28321276

  4. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Independently Predicts Mortality in Diabetic Foot Ulcers Patients Undergoing Amputations

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hailing; Ye, Tingting; Ge, Shengjie; Zhuo, Ruyi

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Patients with diabetic foot ulcers undergoing amputations have poor prognosis. Malnutrition usually occurs in this population and is associated with increased risk of mortality. The geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) is a widely used, simple, and well-established tool to assess nutritional risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between GNRI and all-cause mortality in diabetic foot ulcers patients undergoing minor or major amputations. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study including 271 adult patients. Patients were divided into two groups according to a GNRI cutoff value of 92, and characteristics and mortality were compared between the two groups. Cox proportional hazard analysis was performed to explore the association between GNRI and mortality. Result. GNRI (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), and eGFR (p = 0.002) were independent predictors of mortality. Among a subgroup of 230 patients with minor amputation, increased age (p < 0.001), coronary artery disease (p = 0.030), and increased GNRI (p < 0.001) were major risk factors. Conclusion. GNRI on admission might be a novel clinical predictor for the incidence of death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers who were undergoing amputations. PMID:28164133

  5. A New Body Shape Index Predicts Mortality Hazard Independently of Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Krakauer, Jesse C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity, typically quantified in terms of Body Mass Index (BMI) exceeding threshold values, is considered a leading cause of premature death worldwide. For given body size (BMI), it is recognized that risk is also affected by body shape, particularly as a marker of abdominal fat deposits. Waist circumference (WC) is used as a risk indicator supplementary to BMI, but the high correlation of WC with BMI makes it hard to isolate the added value of WC. Methods and Findings We considered a USA population sample of 14,105 non-pregnant adults () from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004 with follow-up for mortality averaging 5 yr (828 deaths). We developed A Body Shape Index (ABSI) based on WC adjusted for height and weight: ABSI had little correlation with height, weight, or BMI. Death rates increased approximately exponentially with above average baseline ABSI (overall regression coefficient of per standard deviation of ABSI [95% confidence interval: –]), whereas elevated death rates were found for both high and low values of BMI and WC. (–) of the population mortality hazard was attributable to high ABSI, compared to (–) for BMI and (–) for WC. The association of death rate with ABSI held even when adjusted for other known risk factors including smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol. ABSI correlation with mortality hazard held across the range of age, sex, and BMI, and for both white and black ethnicities (but not for Mexican ethnicity), and was not weakened by excluding deaths from the first 3 yr of follow-up. Conclusions Body shape, as measured by ABSI, appears to be a substantial risk factor for premature mortality in the general population derivable from basic clinical measurements. ABSI expresses the excess risk from high WC in a convenient form that is complementary to BMI and to other known risk factors. PMID:22815707

  6. Red blood cell distribution width independently predicts medium-term mortality and major adverse cardiac events after an acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Turcato, Gianni; Serafini, Valentina; Dilda, Alice; Bovo, Chiara; Caruso, Beatrice; Ricci, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Background The value of red blood cell distribution width (RDW), a simple and inexpensive measure of anisocytosis, has been associated with the outcome of many human chronic disorders. Therefore, this retrospective study was aimed to investigate whether RDW may be associated with medium-term mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods A total number of 979 patients diagnosed with ACS were enrolled from June 2014 to November 2014, and followed-up until June 2015. Results The RDW value in patients with 3-month MACE and in those who died was significantly higher than that of patients without 3-month MACE (13.3% vs. 14.0%; P<0.001) and those who were still alive at the end of follow-up (13.4% vs. 14.4%; P<0.001). In univariate analysis, RDW was found to be associated with 3-month MACE [odds ratio (OR), 1.70; 95% CI, 1.44–2.00, P<0.001]. In multivariate analysis, RDW remained independently associated with 3-month MACE (adjusted OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19–1.55; P<0.001) and death (adjusted OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05–1.71; P=0.020). The accuracy of RDW for predicting 3-month MACE was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.66–0.72; P<0.001). The most efficient discriminatory RDW value was 14.8%, which was associated with 3.8 (95% CI, 2.6–5.7; P<0.001) higher risk of 3-month MACE. Patients with RDW >14.8% exhibited a significantly short survival than those with RDW ≤14.8% (331 vs. 465 days; P<0.001). Conclusions The results of this study confirm that RDW may be a valuable, easy and inexpensive parameter for stratifying the medium-term risk in patients with ACS. PMID:27500155

  7. HDAC1 and HDAC2 independently predict mortality in hepatocellular carcinoma by a competing risk regression model in a Southeast Asian population

    PubMed Central

    LER, SER YENG; LEUNG, CAROL HO WING; KHIN, LAY WAI; LU, GUO-DONG; SALTO-TELLEZ, MANUEL; HARTMAN, MIKAEL; IAU, PHILIP TSAU CHOONG; YAP, CELESTIAL T.; HOOI, SHING CHUAN

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in transcriptional repression. We aimed to examine the significance of HDAC1 and HDAC2 gene expression in the prediction of recurrence and survival in 156 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among a South East Asian population who underwent curative surgical resection in Singapore. We found that HDAC1 and HDAC2 were upregulated in the majority of HCC tissues. The presence of HDAC1 in tumor tissues was correlated with poor tumor differentiation. Notably, HDAC1 expression in adjacent non-tumor hepatic tissues was correlated with the presence of satellite nodules and multiple lesions, suggesting that HDAC1 upregulation within the field of HCC may contribute to tumor spread. Using competing risk regression analysis, we found that increased cancer-specific mortality was significantly associated with HDAC2 expression. Mortality was also increased with high HDAC1 expression. In the liver cancer cell lines, HEP3B, HEPG2, PLC5, and a colorectal cancer cell line, HCT116, the combined knockdown of HDAC1 and HDAC2 increased cell death and reduced cell proliferation as well as colony formation. In contrast, knockdown of either HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone had minimal effects on cell death and proliferation. Taken together, our study suggests that both HDAC1 and HDAC2 exert pro-survival effects in HCC cells, and the combination of isoform-specific HDAC inhibitors against both HDACs may be effective in targeting HCC to reduce mortality. PMID:26352599

  8. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  9. Consistent Predictions of Future Forest Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    We examined empirical and model based estimates of current and future forest mortality of conifers in the northern hemisphere. Consistent water potential thresholds were found that resulted in mortality of our case study species, pinon pine and one-seed juniper. Extending these results with IPCC climate scenarios suggests that most existing trees in this region (SW USA) will be dead by 2050. Further, independent estimates of future mortality for the entire coniferous biome suggest widespread mortality by 2100. The validity and assumptions and implications of these results are discussed.

  10. Tree mortality predicted from drought-induced vascular damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, William R. L.; Flint, Alan; Huang, Cho-Ying; Flint, Lorraine; Berry, Joseph A.; Davis, Frank W.; Sperry, John S.; Field, Christopher B.

    2015-05-01

    The projected responses of forest ecosystems to warming and drying associated with twenty-first-century climate change vary widely from resiliency to widespread tree mortality. Current vegetation models lack the ability to account for mortality of overstorey trees during extreme drought owing to uncertainties in mechanisms and thresholds causing mortality. Here we assess the causes of tree mortality, using field measurements of branch hydraulic conductivity during ongoing mortality in Populus tremuloides in the southwestern United States and a detailed plant hydraulics model. We identify a lethal plant water stress threshold that corresponds with a loss of vascular transport capacity from air entry into the xylem. We then use this hydraulic-based threshold to simulate forest dieback during historical drought, and compare predictions against three independent mortality data sets. The hydraulic threshold predicted with 75% accuracy regional patterns of tree mortality as found in field plots and mortality maps derived from Landsat imagery. In a high-emissions scenario, climate models project that drought stress will exceed the observed mortality threshold in the southwestern United States by the 2050s. Our approach provides a powerful and tractable way of incorporating tree mortality into vegetation models to resolve uncertainty over the fate of forest ecosystems in a changing climate.

  11. Tree mortality predicted from drought-induced vascular damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderegg, William R. L.; Flint, Alan L.; Huang, Cho-ying; Flint, Lorraine E.; Berry, Joseph A.; Davis, Frank W.; Sperry, John S.; Field, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    The projected responses of forest ecosystems to warming and drying associated with twenty-first-century climate change vary widely from resiliency to widespread tree mortality1, 2, 3. Current vegetation models lack the ability to account for mortality of overstorey trees during extreme drought owing to uncertainties in mechanisms and thresholds causing mortality4, 5. Here we assess the causes of tree mortality, using field measurements of branch hydraulic conductivity during ongoing mortality in Populus tremuloides in the southwestern United States and a detailed plant hydraulics model. We identify a lethal plant water stress threshold that corresponds with a loss of vascular transport capacity from air entry into the xylem. We then use this hydraulic-based threshold to simulate forest dieback during historical drought, and compare predictions against three independent mortality data sets. The hydraulic threshold predicted with 75% accuracy regional patterns of tree mortality as found in field plots and mortality maps derived from Landsat imagery. In a high-emissions scenario, climate models project that drought stress will exceed the observed mortality threshold in the southwestern United States by the 2050s. Our approach provides a powerful and tractable way of incorporating tree mortality into vegetation models to resolve uncertainty over the fate of forest ecosystems in a changing climate.

  12. Base Deficit and Alveolar-Arterial Gradient During Resuscitation Contribute Independently But Modestly to the Prediction of Mortality After Burn Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    et al 295 Herndon DN, editor. Total Burn Care. London: W.B. Saunders; 2002:16–30. 2. Cartotto R , Choi J, Gomez M, et al. A prospective study on the...determines therapy. J Trauma 1992; 33:417–23. 21. Weiskopf RB, Fairley HB. Anesthesia for major trauma. Surg Clin North Am 1982;62:31–45. 22. Moomey...trauma. Crit Care Med 1999;27:154–61. 23. Mikulaschek A, Henry SM, Donovan R , et al. Serum lactate is not predicted by anion gap or base excess after

  13. Brain natriuretic peptide predicts mortality in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Wallén, T.; Landahl, S.; Hedner, T.; Nakao, K.; Saito, Y.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether prospective measurements of circulating concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) could predict mortality in the general elderly population. DESIGN AND SETTING: Circulating BNP was measured in a cohort of 85 year olds from the general population who were followed up prospectively for five years as part of a longitudinal population study, "70 year old people in Gothenburg, Sweden". PATIENTS: 541 subjects from the 85 year old population in Gothenburg. All subjects were investigated for the presence or absence of cardiovascular disorder such as congestive heart failure, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, and atrial fibrillation. Venous plasma samples were obtained for BNP analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Overall mortality during the prospective follow up period. RESULTS: Circulating concentrations of BNP predicted five-year mortality in the total population (P < 0.001). In subjects with a known cardiovascular disorder, five-year mortality was correlated with increased BNP concentrations (P < 0.01). Increased BNP concentrations predicted five-year mortality in subjects without a defined cardiovascular disorder (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In an elderly population, measurements of BNP may add valuable prognostic information and may be used to predict mortality in the total population as well as in patients with known cardiovascular disorders. In subjects without any known cardiovascular disorder, BNP was a strong and independent predictor of total mortality. PMID:9093047

  14. Prediction of Mortality Based on Facial Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Arnaud; Pierce, Alan; Michel, Leena; Radin, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that characteristics of the face contain a wealth of information about health, age and chronic clinical conditions. Such studies involve objective measurement of facial features correlated with historical health information. But some individuals also claim to be adept at gauging mortality based on a glance at a person’s photograph. To test this claim, we invited 12 such individuals to see if they could determine if a person was alive or dead based solely on a brief examination of facial photographs. All photos used in the experiment were transformed into a uniform gray scale and then counterbalanced across eight categories: gender, age, gaze direction, glasses, head position, smile, hair color, and image resolution. Participants examined 404 photographs displayed on a computer monitor, one photo at a time, each shown for a maximum of 8 s. Half of the individuals in the photos were deceased, and half were alive at the time the experiment was conducted. Participants were asked to press a button if they thought the person in a photo was living or deceased. Overall mean accuracy on this task was 53.8%, where 50% was expected by chance (p < 0.004, two-tail). Statistically significant accuracy was independently obtained in 5 of the 12 participants. We also collected 32-channel electrophysiological recordings and observed a robust difference between images of deceased individuals correctly vs. incorrectly classified in the early event related potential (ERP) at 100 ms post-stimulus onset. Our results support claims of individuals who report that some as-yet unknown features of the face predict mortality. The results are also compatible with claims about clairvoyance warrants further investigation. PMID:27242466

  15. Skin autofluorescence predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kanno, Makoto; Watanabe, Kimio; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Suzuki, Hodaka; Sato, Keiji; Sakaue, Michiaki; Terawaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Masaaki; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) is thought to contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive measure of AGE accumulation using autofluorescence of the skin under ultraviolet light, has been reported to be an independent predictor of mortality associated with CVD in Caucasian patients on chronic hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of skin autofluorescence on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis. Baseline skin autofluorescence was measured with an autofluorescence reader in 128 non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during a period of 6 years. During the follow-up period, 42 of the 128 patients died; 19 of those patients died of CVD. Skin autofluorescence did not have a significant effect on all-cause mortality. However, age, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), serum albumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), skin autofluorescence and pre-existing CVD were significantly correlated with cardiovascular mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed skin autofluorescence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]1.67-9.43), serum albumin (adjusted HR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.32), and hsCRP (adjusted HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.18-2.05) to be independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. The present study suggests that skin autofluorescence is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in non-Caucasian (Japanese) patients on chronic hemodialysis.

  16. Overhydration Is a Strong Predictor of Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients – Independently of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jotterand Drepper, Valérie; Kihm, Lars P.; Kälble, Florian; Diekmann, Christian; Seckinger, Joerg; Sommerer, Claudia; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    Background Overhydration is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis patients and has been shown to be associated with mortality. However, it still remains unclear whether overhydration per se is predictive of mortality or whether it is mainly a reflection of underlying comorbidities. The purpose of our study was to assess overhydration in peritoneal dialysis patients using bioimpedance spectroscopy and to investigate whether overhydration is an independent predictor of mortality. Methods We analyzed and followed 54 peritoneal dialysis patients between June 2008 and December 2014. All patients underwent bioimpedance spectroscopy measurement once and were allocated to normohydrated and overhydrated groups. Overhydration was defined as an absolute overhydration/extracellular volume ratio > 15%. Simultaneously, clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory data were assessed. Heart failure was defined either on echocardiography, as a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, or clinically according to the New York Heart Association functional classification. Patient survival was documented up until December 31st 2014. Factors associated with mortality were identified and a multivariable Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results Apart from higher daily peritoneal ultrafiltration rate and cumulative diuretic dose in overhydrated patients, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups, in particular with respect to gender, body mass index, comorbidity and cardiac medication. Mortality was higher in overhydrated than in euvolemic patients. In the univariate analysis, increased age, overhydration, low diastolic blood pressure, raised troponin and NTproBNP, hypoalbuminemia, heart failure but not CRP were predictive of mortality. After adjustment, only overhydration, increased age and low diastolic blood pressure remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Overhydration remains an

  17. Olfactory Dysfunction Predicts 5-Year Mortality in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Kern, David W.; Schumm, L. Philip; McClintock, Martha K.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of mortality has focused on disease and frailty, although antecedent biomarkers may herald broad physiological decline. Olfaction, an ancestral chemical system, is a strong candidate biomarker because it is linked to diverse physiological processes. We sought to determine if olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of 5-year mortality in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project [NSHAP], a nationally representative sample of older U.S. adults. 3,005 community-dwelling adults aged 57–85 were studied in 2005–6 (Wave 1) and their mortality determined in 2010–11 (Wave 2). Olfactory dysfunction, determined objectively at Wave 1, was used to estimate the odds of 5-year, all cause mortality via logistic regression, controlling for demographics and health factors. Mortality for anosmic older adults was four times that of normosmic individuals while hyposmic individuals had intermediate mortality (p<0.001), a “dose-dependent” effect present across the age range. In a comprehensive model that included potential confounding factors, anosmic older adults had over three times the odds of death compared to normosmic individuals (OR, 3.37 [95%CI 2.04, 5.57]), higher than and independent of known leading causes of death, and did not result from the following mechanisms: nutrition, cognitive function, mental health, smoking and alcohol abuse or frailty. Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year mortality and may serve as a bellwether for slowed cellular regeneration or as a marker of cumulative toxic environmental exposures. This finding provides clues for pinpointing an underlying mechanism related to a fundamental component of the aging process. PMID:25271633

  18. Olfactory dysfunction predicts 5-year mortality in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jayant M; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Kern, David W; Schumm, L Philip; McClintock, Martha K

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of mortality has focused on disease and frailty, although antecedent biomarkers may herald broad physiological decline. Olfaction, an ancestral chemical system, is a strong candidate biomarker because it is linked to diverse physiological processes. We sought to determine if olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of 5-year mortality in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project [NSHAP], a nationally representative sample of older U.S. adults. 3,005 community-dwelling adults aged 57-85 were studied in 2005-6 (Wave 1) and their mortality determined in 2010-11 (Wave 2). Olfactory dysfunction, determined objectively at Wave 1, was used to estimate the odds of 5-year, all cause mortality via logistic regression, controlling for demographics and health factors. Mortality for anosmic older adults was four times that of normosmic individuals while hyposmic individuals had intermediate mortality (p<0.001), a "dose-dependent" effect present across the age range. In a comprehensive model that included potential confounding factors, anosmic older adults had over three times the odds of death compared to normosmic individuals (OR, 3.37 [95%CI 2.04, 5.57]), higher than and independent of known leading causes of death, and did not result from the following mechanisms: nutrition, cognitive function, mental health, smoking and alcohol abuse or frailty. Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year mortality and may serve as a bellwether for slowed cellular regeneration or as a marker of cumulative toxic environmental exposures. This finding provides clues for pinpointing an underlying mechanism related to a fundamental component of the aging process.

  19. Vitamin D Status Predicts 30 Day Mortality in Hospitalised Cats

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen; Kilpatrick, Scott; Sinclair, Jennifer; Boag, Alisdair; Bode, Elizabeth F.; Lalor, Stephanie M.; Gaylor, Donna; Berry, Jacqueline; Bommer, Nicholas X.; Gunn-Moore, Danielle; Reed, Nikki; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency, defined as low serum concentrations of the major circulating form of vitamin D, 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been associated with the development of numerous infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic disorders in humans. In addition, vitamin D insufficiency has been found to be predictive of mortality for many disorders. However, interpretation of human studies is difficult since vitamin D status is influenced by many factors, including diet, season, latitude, and exposure to UV radiation. In contrast, domesticated cats do not produce vitamin D cutaneously, and most cats are fed a commercial diet containing a relatively standard amount of vitamin D. Consequently, domesticated cats are an attractive model system in which to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and health outcomes. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would predict short term, all-cause mortality in domesticated cats. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, together with a wide range of other clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters, were measured in 99 consecutively hospitalised cats. Cats which died within 30 days of initial assessment had significantly lower serum 25(OH)D concentrations than cats which survived. In a linear regression model including 12 clinical variables, serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile was significantly predictive of mortality. The odds ratio of mortality within 30 days was 8.27 (95% confidence interval 2.54-31.52) for cats with a serum 25(OH)D concentration in the lower tertile. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that low serum 25(OH)D concentration status is an independent predictor of short term mortality in cats. PMID:25970442

  20. Predicting mortality based on body composition analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tellado, J M; Garcia-Sabrido, J L; Hanley, J A; Shizgal, H M; Christou, N V

    1989-01-01

    The role of the Nae/Ke ratio (the ratio of exchangeable sodium to exchangeable potassium) was examined as a nutritional marker in surgical patients in relation to anthropometrical and biochemical indexes by its ability to identify patients at risk for mortality after hospitalization. In 73 patients with sepsis and malnutrition (Training Group, Madrid) the following were determined: percentage of recent weight loss, triceps skin fold, midarm muscle circumference, serum albumin, serum transferrin, delayed hypersensitivity skin test response, total lymphocytes, and Nae/Ke ratio by multiple isotope dilution. The predictive power of Nae/Ke ratio was so strong (F = 105.1; p less than 0.00001) that it displaced anthropometric, biochemical, and immunologic variables from the linear equation derived from stepwise discriminant analysis using hospital mortality as the dependent variable. A theoretical curve of expected deaths was developed, based on an equation obtained by logistic regression analysis: Pr/death/ = 1/(1 + e[11.8-5.2 Nae/Ke]). Pre- and post-test probabilities on that curve allowed us to determine two cut-off values, Nae/Ke ratios of 1.5 and 2.5, which were markers for nonrisk and mortality, respectively. The model was tested in a heterogeneous data base of surgical patients (n = 417) in another hospital (Validation Group, Montreal). For patients exhibiting an abnormal Nae/Ke ratio (greater than 1.2) and a greater than 10% of probability of death, 54 deaths were expected and 53 observed (X2 = 1.8 NS). Two tests confirmed the basic agreement between the model and its performance, a G statistic of -0.704 and the area beneath the "receiver-operating-characteristic" (ROC) curve (Az = 0.904 + 0.0516 for the Madrid group vs. Az = 0.915 + 0.0349 for the Montreal group, NS). It was concluded from this analysis that, compared with the usual anthropometric measurements, the Nae/Ke ratio, if available, is the best method for identifying malnourished patients at risk of

  1. Hemoglobin Variability Does Not Predict Mortality in European Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph; Kronenberg, Florian; Aljama, Pedro; Anker, Stefan D.; Canaud, Bernard; Molemans, Bart; Stenvinkel, Peter; Schernthaner, Guntram; Ireland, Elizabeth; Fouqueray, Bruno; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with CKD exhibit significant within-patient hemoglobin (Hb) level variability, especially with the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) and iron. Analyses of dialysis cohorts in the United States produced conflicting results regarding the association of Hb variability with patient outcomes. Here, we determined Hb variability in 5037 European hemodialysis (HD) patients treated over 2 years to identify predictors of high variability and to evaluate its association with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. We assessed Hb variability with various methods using SD, residual SD, time-in-target (11.0 to 12.5 g/dl), fluctuation across thresholds, and area under the curve (AUC). Hb variability was significantly greater among incident patients than prevalent patients. Compared with previously described cohorts in the United States, residual SD was similar but fluctuations above target were less frequent. Using logistic regression, age, body mass index, CVD history, dialysis vintage, serum albumin, Hb, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) use, ESA use, dialysis access type, dialysis access change, and hospitalizations were significant predictors of high variability. Multivariable adjusted Cox regression showed that SD, residual SD, time-in-target, and AUC did not predict all-cause or CVD mortality during a median follow-up of 12.4 months (IQR: 7.7 to 17.4). However, patients with consistently low levels of Hb (<11 g/dl) and those who fluctuated between the target range and <11 g/dl had increased risks for death (RR 2.34; 95% CI: 1.24 to 4.41 and RR 1.74; 95% CI: 1.00 to 3.04, respectively). In conclusion, although Hb variability is common in European HD patients, it does not independently predict mortality. PMID:20798262

  2. Mortality of atomic bomb survivors predicted from laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Grahn, Douglas; Hoel, David

    2003-01-01

    Exposure, pathology and mortality data for mice, dogs and humans were examined to determine whether accurate interspecies predictions of radiation-induced mortality could be achieved. The analyses revealed that (1) days of life lost per unit dose can be estimated for a species even without information on radiation effects in that species, and (2) accurate predictions of age-specific radiation-induced mortality in beagles and the atomic bomb survivors can be obtained from a dose-response model for comparably exposed mice. These findings illustrate the value of comparative mortality analyses and the relevance of animal data to the study of human health effects.

  3. Prediction of mortality rates in the presence of missing values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chon Sern; Pooi, Ah Hin

    2015-12-01

    A time series model based on multivariate power-normal distribution has been applied in the past literature on the United States (US) mortality data from the years 1933 to 2000 to forecast the future age-specific mortality rates of the years 2001 to 2010. In this paper, we show that the method based on multivariate power-normal distribution can still be used for an incomplete US mortality dataset that contains some missing values. The prediction intervals based on this incomplete training data are found to still have good ability of covering the observed future mortality rates although the interval lengths may become wider for long-range prediction.

  4. Predicting drought-induced tree mortality in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, W.; Wolf, A.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Projected responses of forest ecosystems to warming and drying associated with 21st century climate change vary widely from resiliency to widespread dieback. A major shortcoming of current vegetation models is the inability to account for mortality of overstory trees during extreme drought due to uncertainties in mechanisms and thresholds. In this talk, I discuss two modeling efforts to predict drought-induced tree mortality in the western United States. In the first, we identify a lethal drought threshold in the loss of vascular transport capacity from xylem cavitation, which provides insight into what initiates mortality, in Populus tremuloides in the southwestern United States. We then use the hydraulic-based threshold to produce a hindcast of a drought-induced forest dieback and compare predictions against three independent regional mortality datasets. The hydraulic threshold predicted major regional patterns of tree mortality with high accuracy based on field plots and mortality maps derived from Landsat imagery. Climate model simulations project increasing drought stress in this region that exceeds the observed mortality threshold in the high emissions scenario by the 2050s, likely triggering further widespread diebacks. In the second approach, we build a dynamic plant hydraulic model into a land-surface model and compare predictions against observed mortality patterns across multiple species. These methods provide powerful and tractable approaches for incorporating tree mortality into vegetation models to resolve uncertainty over the fate of forest ecosystems in a changing climate.

  5. The epigenetic clock and telomere length are independently associated with chronological age and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Harris, Sarah E; Shah, Sonia; McRae, Allan F; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Wray, Naomi R; Visscher, Peter M; Deary, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Telomere length and DNA methylation have been proposed as biological clock measures that track chronological age. Whether they change in tandem, or contribute independently to the prediction of chronological age, is not known. Methods: We address these points using data from two Scottish cohorts: the Lothian Birth Cohorts of 1921 (LBC1921) and 1936 (LBC1936). Telomere length and epigenetic clock estimates from DNA methylation were measured in 920 LBC1936 participants (ages 70, 73 and 76 years) and in 414 LBC1921 participants (ages 79, 87 and 90 years). Results: The epigenetic clock changed over time at roughly the same rate as chronological age in both cohorts. Telomere length decreased at 48–67 base pairs per year on average. Weak, non-significant correlations were found between epigenetic clock estimates and telomere length. Telomere length explained 6.6% of the variance in age in LBC1921, the epigenetic clock explained 10.0%, and combined they explained 17.3% (all P < 1 × 10−7). Corresponding figures for the LBC1936 cohort were 14.3%, 11.7% and 19.5% (all P < 1 × 10−12). In a combined cohorts analysis, the respective estimates were 2.8%, 28.5% and 29.5%. Also in a combined cohorts analysis, a one standard deviation increase in baseline epigenetic age was linked to a 22% increased mortality risk (P = 2.6 × 10−4) whereas, in the same model, a one standard deviation increase in baseline telomere length was independently linked to an 11% decreased mortality risk (P = 0.06). Conclusions: These results suggest that telomere length and epigenetic clock estimates are independent predictors of chronological age and mortality risk. PMID:27075770

  6. Chemotherapy effectiveness and mortality prediction in surgically treated osteosarcoma dogs: A validation study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A F; Nielen, M; Withrow, S J; Selmic, L E; Burton, J H; Klungel, O H; Groenwold, R H H; Kirpensteijn, J

    2016-03-01

    Canine osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer, and an important cause of mortality and morbidity, in large purebred dogs. Previously we constructed two multivariable models to predict a dog's 5-month or 1-year mortality risk after surgical treatment for osteosarcoma. According to the 5-month model, dogs with a relatively low risk of 5-month mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy treatment. In the present study, we externally validated these results using an independent cohort study of 794 dogs. External performance of our prediction models showed some disagreement between observed and predicted risk, mean difference: -0.11 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]-0.29; 0.08) for 5-month risk and 0.25 (95%CI 0.10; 0.40) for 1-year mortality risk. After updating the intercept, agreement improved: -0.0004 (95%CI-0.16; 0.16) and -0.002 (95%CI-0.15; 0.15). The chemotherapy by predicted mortality risk interaction (P-value=0.01) showed that the chemotherapy compared to no chemotherapy effectiveness was modified by 5-month mortality risk: dogs with a relatively lower risk of mortality benefited most from additional chemotherapy. Chemotherapy effectiveness on 1-year mortality was not significantly modified by predicted risk (P-value=0.28). In conclusion, this external validation study confirmed that our multivariable risk prediction models can predict a patient's mortality risk and that dogs with a relatively lower risk of 5-month mortality seem to benefit most from chemotherapy.

  7. Interpretable Topic Features for Post-ICU Mortality Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yen-Fu; Rumshisky, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records provide valuable resources for understanding the correlation between various diseases and mortality. The analysis of post-discharge mortality is critical for healthcare professionals to follow up potential causes of death after a patient is discharged from the hospital and give prompt treatment. Moreover, it may reduce the cost derived from readmissions and improve the quality of healthcare. Our work focused on post-discharge ICU mortality prediction. In addition to features derived from physiological measurements, we incorporated ICD-9-CM hierarchy into Bayesian topic model learning and extracted topic features from medical notes. We achieved highest AUCs of 0.835 and 0.829 for 30-day and 6-month post-discharge mortality prediction using baseline and topic proportions derived from Labeled-LDA. Moreover, our work emphasized the interpretability of topic features derived from topic model which may facilitates the understanding and investigation of the complexity between mortality and diseases. PMID:28269879

  8. UNITED STATES BLACK:WHITE INFANT MORTALITY DISPARITIES ARE NOT INEVITABLE: IDENTIFICATION OF COMMUNITY RESILIENCE INDEPENDENT OF SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS

    PubMed Central

    Fry-Johnson, Yvonne W.; Levine, Robert; Rowley, Diane; Agboto, Vincent; Rust, George

    2010-01-01

    Introduction US disparities in Black:White infant mortality are persistent. National trends, however, may obscure local successes. Methods Zero-corrected, negative binomial multivariable modeling was used to predict Black infant mortality (1999–2003) in all US counties with reliable rates. Independent variables included county population size, racial composition, educational attainment, poverty, income and geographic origin. Resilient counties were defined as those whose Black infant mortality rate residual score was <2.0. Mortality data was accessed from the Compressed Mortality File compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics and found on the CDC WONDER website. Demographic information was obtained from the US Census. Results The final model included the percentage of Blacks, age 18 to 64 years, speaking little or no English (P<.008), a socioeconomic index comprising educational attainment, poverty, and per capita income (P<.001), and household income in 1990 (P<.001). After accounting for these factors, a stratum comprising Essex and Plymouth Counties, Mass.; Bronx, N.Y.; and Multnomah, Ore. was identified as unusually resilient. Percentage of Black poverty and educational attainment in Black women in the resilient stratum approximated the average for all 330 counties, In 1979, Black infant mortality in the resilient stratum (23.6 per 1,000 live births) exceeded Black US infant mortality (22.6). By 2001, Black infant mortality in the resilient stratum (5.6) was below the corresponding value for Whites (5.7). Resilient county neonatal mortality declined both early and late in the observation period, while post-neonatal declines were most marked after 1996. Conclusions Models for reduction/elimination of racial disparities in US infant mortality, independent from county-level contextual measures of socioeconomic status, may already exist. PMID:20521401

  9. Urinary Sodium Concentration Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in a Type 2 Diabetes Cohort Population

    PubMed Central

    Gand, Elise; Ragot, Stéphanie; Bankir, Lise; Piguel, Xavier; Fumeron, Frédéric; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Marechaud, Richard; Roussel, Ronan; Hadjadj, Samy; Study group, SURDIAGENE

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Sodium intake is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has specifically reported an association between cardiovascular mortality and urinary sodium concentration (UNa). We examined the association of UNa with mortality in a cohort of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Methods. Patients were followed for all-cause death and cardiovascular death. Baseline UNa was measured from second morning spot urinary sample. We used Cox proportional hazard models to identify independent predictors of mortality. Improvement in prediction of mortality by the addition of UNa to a model including known risk factors was assessed by the relative integrated discrimination improvement (rIDI) index. Results. Participants (n = 1,439) were followed for a median of 5.7 years, during which 254 cardiovascular deaths and 429 all-cause deaths were recorded. UNa independently predicted all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. An increase of one standard deviation of UNa was associated with a decrease of 21% of all-cause mortality and 22% of cardiovascular mortality. UNa improved all-cause and cardiovascular mortality prediction beyond identified risk factors (rIDI = 2.8%, P = 0.04 and rIDI = 4.6%, P = 0.02, resp.). Conclusions. In T2D, UNa was an independent predictor of mortality (low concentration is associated with increased risk) and improved modestly its prediction in addition to traditional risk factors. PMID:28255559

  10. Forearm bone mass predicts mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Orlic, Lidija; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Crncevic-Orlic, Zeljka; Jakopcic, Ivan; Josipovic, Josipa; Pavlovic, Drasko

    2016-07-27

    We aim to determine the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD), measured by T- and Z-score, and mortality risk in hemodialysis (HD) patients. We also investigate which are the most suitable skeletal sites for predicting mortality rate. We analyzed the survival of 102 patients who had been treated with chronic HD according to BMD. Patients with a T-score ≤2.5 at the middle, ultradistal and proximal part of the forearm had a higher mortality risk than those with a T-score of -2.5 or higher. Furthermore, no statistically significant association was found between loss of bone mass at other measuring points-lumbar spine (anteroposterior orientation from L1-L4) and hip (neck, trochanter, intertrochanter, total and Ward's triangle)-and mortality risk. We were also interested in exploring the relationship between Z-score at different skeletal regions and mortality risk. We found that patients with a Z-score of -1 or lower at all three parts of the forearm had a greater mortality risk. It is also worth noting that the Z-score at all three parts of the forearm was a more apparent predictor of mortality, compared to the T-score at the same skeletal regions. This empirical analysis showed that BMD assessments should be obtained at the forearm, due to the good predictability of this skeletal site regarding mortality of HD patients. Moreover, data concerning bone density should be reported as Z-scores.

  11. Towards more accurate vegetation mortality predictions

    DOE PAGES

    Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Xu, Chonggang

    2016-09-26

    Predicting the fate of vegetation under changing climate is one of the major challenges of the climate modeling community. Here, terrestrial vegetation dominates the carbon and water cycles over land areas, and dramatic changes in vegetation cover resulting from stressful environmental conditions such as drought feed directly back to local and regional climate, potentially leading to a vicious cycle where vegetation recovery after a disturbance is delayed or impossible.

  12. Lung function indices for predicting mortality in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boutou, Afroditi K.; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Smith, Cayley; Kelly, Julia L.; Ward, Simon P.; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by high morbidity and mortality. It remains unknown which aspect of lung function carries the most prognostic information and if simple spirometry is sufficient. Survival was assessed in COPD outpatients whose data had been added prospectively to a clinical audit database from the point of first full lung function testing including spirometry, lung volumes, gas transfer and arterial blood gases. Variables univariately associated with survival were entered into a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. 604 patients were included (mean±sd age 61.9±9.7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 s 37±18.1% predicted; 62.9% males); 229 (37.9%) died during a median follow-up of 83 months. Median survival was 91.9 (95% CI 80.8–103) months with survival rates at 3 and 5 years 0.83 and 0.66, respectively. Carbon monoxide transfer factor % pred quartiles (best quartile (>51%): HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.172–0.639; and second quartile (51–37.3%): HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.322–0.825; versus lowest quartile (<27.9%)), age (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06) and arterial oxygen partial pressure (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77–0.94) were the only parameters independently associated with mortality. Measurement of gas transfer provides additional prognostic information compared to spirometry in patients under hospital follow-up and could be considered routinely. PMID:23349449

  13. Prediction of mortality rates using a model with stochastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chon Sern; Pooi, Ah Hin

    2016-10-01

    Prediction of future mortality rates is crucial to insurance companies because they face longevity risks while providing retirement benefits to a population whose life expectancy is increasing. In the past literature, a time series model based on multivariate power-normal distribution has been applied on mortality data from the United States for the years 1933 till 2000 to forecast the future mortality rates for the years 2001 till 2010. In this paper, a more dynamic approach based on the multivariate time series will be proposed where the model uses stochastic parameters that vary with time. The resulting prediction intervals obtained using the model with stochastic parameters perform better because apart from having good ability in covering the observed future mortality rates, they also tend to have distinctly shorter interval lengths.

  14. Predicting 15 year chronic bronchitis mortality in the Whitehall Study.

    PubMed Central

    Ebi-Kryston, K L

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen year chronic bronchitis mortality was investigated among 17,717 male civil servants aged 40-64 years participating in the Whitehall Study. Associations were assessed between mortality and Medical Research Council standardised questions about chronic phlegm production and breathlessness, and a measure of lung function. Low FEV1 was the most powerful single predictor of mortality; controlling for age, smoking habits and employment grade, the relative hazards ratio (RHR) was 20. Using mortality rates standardised for age and smoking, the proportion of mortality in the total population statistically attributable to low FEV1 (population excess fraction) was 57%. Breathlessness while walking on the level was the best predictor among the questions and combinations of questions; the relative hazards ratio was 12 and the population excess fraction, 39%. A Medical Research Council definition of chronic bronchitis including chronic phlegm production and breathlessness was also strongly associated with chronic bronchitis mortality (RHR = 13); however, the population excess fraction was only 20%. This definition identified only 30% of the 64 deaths, and added almost nothing to prediction by FEV1 alone. The results suggest that although the combination of chronic phlegm production and chronic airflow limitation is strongly associated with mortality from chronic bronchitis, the presence of chronic phlegm production alone is not associated with mortality. PMID:2592906

  15. Multi-scale predictions of coniferous forest mortality in the northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our incomplete understanding of the fundamental physiological thresholds of vegetation mortality during drought limits our ability to accurately simulate future vegetation distributions and associated climate feedbacks. Here we integrate experimental evidence with models to show potential widespread loss of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET; ~ conifers) within the Southwest USA by 2100; with rising temperature being the primary cause of mortality. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ypd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, stomatal and hydraulic conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. Empirical and mechanistic models accurately predicted NET Ypd, and 91% of predictions (10/11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the 21st century due to temperature rise. Completely independent global models predicted >50% loss of northern hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the findings for Southwest USA. The global models disagreed with the ecosystem process models in regards to future mortality in Southwest USA, however, highlighting the potential underestimates of future NET mortality as simulated by the global models and signifying the importance of improving regional predictions. Taken together, these results from the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict global-scale conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  16. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.; Williams, A. P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.; Mackay, D. S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, J. C.; Allen, C. D.; Fisher, R. A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J. D.; Breshears, D. D.; Rauscher, S. A.; Koven, C.

    2016-03-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests and their associated climatic feedbacks. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April-August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted >=50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  17. Multi-scale predictions of massive conifer mortality due to chronic temperature rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nathan G.; Williams, A.P.; Xu, C.; Pockman, W. T.; Dickman, L. T.; Sevanto, S.; Pangle, R.; Limousin, J.; Plaut, J.J.; Mackay, D.S.; Ogee, J.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Allen, Craig D.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Jiang, X.; Muss, J.D.; Breshears, D.D.; Rauscher, Sara A.; Koven, C.

    2016-01-01

    Global temperature rise and extremes accompanying drought threaten forests1, 2and their associated climatic feedbacks3, 4. Our ability to accurately simulate drought-induced forest impacts remains highly uncertain5, 6 in part owing to our failure to integrate physiological measurements, regional-scale models, and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here we show consistent predictions of widespread mortality of needleleaf evergreen trees (NET) within Southwest USA by 2100 using state-of-the-art models evaluated against empirical data sets. Experimentally, dominant Southwest USA NET species died when they fell below predawn water potential (Ψpd) thresholds (April–August mean) beyond which photosynthesis, hydraulic and stomatal conductance, and carbohydrate availability approached zero. The evaluated regional models accurately predicted NET Ψpd, and 91% of predictions (10 out of 11) exceeded mortality thresholds within the twenty-first century due to temperature rise. The independent DGVMs predicted ≥50% loss of Northern Hemisphere NET by 2100, consistent with the NET findings for Southwest USA. Notably, the global models underestimated future mortality within Southwest USA, highlighting that predictions of future mortality within global models may be underestimates. Taken together, the validated regional predictions and the global simulations predict widespread conifer loss in coming decades under projected global warming.

  18. The independent contribution of diabetic foot ulcer on lower extremity amputation and mortality risk

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Mendes, D.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; Boyko, E. J.; Ribeiro, M.; Barata, P.; Lima, J.; Soares, R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To estimate 3-year risk for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), lower extremity amputation (LEA) and death; determine predictive variables and assess derived models accuracy. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study including all subjects with diabetes enrolled in our diabetic foot outpatient clinic from beginning 2002 until middle 2010. Data was collected from clinical records. Results 644 subjects with mean age of 65.1 (±11.2) and diabetes duration of 16.1 (±10.8) years. Cumulative incidence was 26.6% for DFU, 5.8% for LEA and 14.0% for death. In multivariate analysis, physical impairment, peripheral arterial disease complication history, complication count and previous DFU were associated with DFU; complication count, foot pulses and previous DFU with LEA and age, complication count and previous DFU with death. Predictive models’ areas under the ROC curves from 0.80 to 0.83. A simplified model including previous DFU and complication count presented high accuracy. Previous DFU was associated with all outcomes, even when adjusted for complication count, in addition to more complex models. Conclusions DFU seems more than a marker of complication status, having independent impact on LEA and mortality risk. Proposed models may be applicable in healthcare settings to identify patients at higher risk of DFU, LEA and death. PMID:24877985

  19. Pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure-variability is independently associated with all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Viknesh; Pasea, Laura; Ojha, Sanjay; Wilkinson, Ian B; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2014-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure variability is an independent risk factor for mortality and cardiovascular events. Standard measures of blood pressure predict outcome poorly in haemodialysis patients. We investigated whether systolic blood pressure variability was associated with mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. We performed a longitudinal observational study of patients commencing haemodialysis between 2005 and 2011 in East Anglia, UK, excluding patients with cardiovascular events within 6 months of starting haemodialysis. The main exposure was variability independent of the mean (VIM) of systolic blood pressure from short-gap, pre-dialysis blood pressure readings between 3 and 6 months after commencing haemodialysis, and the outcome was all-cause mortality. Of 203 patients, 37 (18.2%) patients died during a mean follow-up of 2.0 (SD 1.3) years. The age and sex-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.17) for a one-unit increase of VIM. This was not altered by adjustment for diabetes, prior cardiovascular disease and mean systolic blood pressure (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.16). Patients with VIM of systolic blood pressure above the median were 2.4 (95% CI 1.17-4.74) times more likely to die during follow-up than those below the median. Results were similar for all measures of blood pressure variability and further adjustment for type of dialysis access, use of antihypertensives and absolute or variability of fluid intake did not alter these findings. Diastolic blood pressure variability showed no association with all cause mortality. Our study shows that variability of systolic blood pressure is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. Further research is needed to understand the mechanism as this may form a therapeutic target or focus for management.

  20. Syndecan-4 Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause as Well as Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaroszyński, Andrzej J.; Jaroszyńska, Anna; Przywara, Stanisław; Zaborowski, Tomasz; Książek, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated withincreased mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients.Syndecan-4 plays a role in many processes that are involved in the heart fibrosis and hypertrophy.We designed this study to prospectively determine whether syndecan-4 was predictive of mortality in a group of HD patients. Methods In total, 191 HD patients were included. Clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic parameters were recorded. HD patients were followed-up for 23.18 ± 4.02 months. Results Syndecan-4 levels correlated strongly with geometrical echocardiographic parameters and ejection fraction. Relations with pressure-related parameters were weak and only marginally significant. Using the receiver operating characteristics the optimal cut-off points in predicting all-cause as well as cardiovascular (CV) mortality were evaluated and patients were divided into low and high syndecan-4 groups. A Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that the cumulative incidences of all-cause as well as CV mortality were higher in high serum syndecan-4 group compared with those with low serum syndecan-4 (p<0.001 in both cases).A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed syndecan-4 concentration to be an independent and significant predictor of all-cause (hazard ratio, 2.99; confidence interval, 2.34 to 3.113; p<0.001)as well as CV mortality (hazard ratio, 2.81;confidence interval, 2.28to3.02; p<0.001). Conclusions Serum syndecan-4 concentration reflects predominantly geometrical echocardiographic parameters. In HD patients serum syndecan-4 concentration is independently associated with all-cause as well as CV mortality. PMID:27685148

  1. The Prediction Predicament: Rethinking Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Samantha A.; Levy, Brandon H.; Prematilake, Chalani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Our study sought to identify independent risk factors predisposing patients with necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) to mortality from among laboratory values, demographic data, and microbiologic findings in a small population. To this end, a retrospective review was conducted of the medical records of all patients with NSTI who had been treated at our institution from 2003 to 2012 (n=134). Methods: Baseline demographics and comorbidities, clinical and laboratory values, hospital course, and the microbiologic characteristics of surgical incision cultures were recorded. Each variable was tested for association with survival status and all associated variables with p<0.15 were included in a logistic regression model to seek factors associated independently with mortality. Results: Surprisingly, no demographic or pre-existing condition proved to be a predictor of mortality. Two laboratory values had an inverse correlation to mortality: High C-reactive protein (CRP) and highest recorded CRP. Of surgical incisions that grew bacteria in culture, 33.6% were polymicrobial. Mortality rates were highest with Enterococcus-containing polymicrobial infections (50%), followed by those containing Pseudomonas (40%), and Streptococcus spp. (27%). Understanding why so many studies across the literature, now including our own, find such disparate results for correlation of NSTI mortality with patient data may lie in the fundamentally dynamic nature of the organisms involved. Conclusions: This study suggests that no single factor present on admission is a robust predictor of outcome; it is likely that survival in NSTI is predicated upon a complex interaction of multiple host and microbial factors that do not lend themselves to reduction into a simple formula. It is also abundantly clear that the well-established principles of NSTI surgery should continue to be followed in all cases, with an emphasis on early debridement, irrespective of apparent severity of

  2. Diagnosis trajectories of prior multi-morbidity predict sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Mette K.; Jensen, Anders Boeck; Nielsen, Annelaura Bach; Perner, Anders; Moseley, Pope L.; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis affects millions of people every year, many of whom will die. In contrast to current survival prediction models for sepsis patients that primarily are based on data from within-admission clinical measurements (e.g. vital parameters and blood values), we aim for using the full disease history to predict sepsis mortality. We benefit from data in electronic medical records covering all hospital encounters in Denmark from 1996 to 2014. This data set included 6.6 million patients of whom almost 120,000 were diagnosed with the ICD-10 code: A41 ‘Other sepsis’. Interestingly, patients following recurrent trajectories of time-ordered co-morbidities had significantly increased sepsis mortality compared to those who did not follow a trajectory. We identified trajectories which significantly altered sepsis mortality, and found three major starting points in a combined temporal sepsis network: Alcohol abuse, Diabetes and Cardio-vascular diagnoses. Many cancers also increased sepsis mortality. Using the trajectory based stratification model we explain contradictory reports in relation to diabetes that recently have appeared in the literature. Finally, we compared the predictive power using 18.5 years of disease history to scoring based on within-admission clinical measurements emphasizing the value of long term data in novel patient scores that combine the two types of data. PMID:27812043

  3. Predicting Discharge Mortality after Acute Ischemic Stroke Using Balanced Data

    PubMed Central

    Ho, King Chung; Speier, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S.; Saver, Jeffery L.; Bui, Alex A. T.; Arnold, Corey W.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict stroke outcomes (e.g., stroke mortality, patient dependence, etc.) in recent decades. However, there is little discussion regarding the problem of between-class imbalance in stroke datasets, which leads to prediction bias and decreased performance. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique to overcome such problems. We also compare state of the art machine learning methods and construct a six-variable support vector machine (SVM) model to predict stroke mortality at discharge. Finally, we discuss how the identification of a reduced feature set allowed us to identify additional cases in our research database for validation testing. Our classifier achieved a c-statistic of 0.865 on the cross-validated dataset, demonstrating good classification performance using a reduced set of variables. PMID:25954451

  4. Predicting Mortality in Low-Income Country ICUs: The Rwanda Mortality Probability Model (R-MPM)

    PubMed Central

    Kiviri, Willy; Fowler, Robert A.; Mueller, Ariel; Novack, Victor; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Weinkauf, Julia L.; Talmor, Daniel S.; Twagirumugabe, Theogene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intensive Care Unit (ICU) risk prediction models are used to compare outcomes for quality improvement initiatives, benchmarking, and research. While such models provide robust tools in high-income countries, an ICU risk prediction model has not been validated in a low-income country where ICU population characteristics are different from those in high-income countries, and where laboratory-based patient data are often unavailable. We sought to validate the Mortality Probability Admission Model, version III (MPM0-III) in two public ICUs in Rwanda and to develop a new Rwanda Mortality Probability Model (R-MPM) for use in low-income countries. Methods We prospectively collected data on all adult patients admitted to Rwanda’s two public ICUs between August 19, 2013 and October 6, 2014. We described demographic and presenting characteristics and outcomes. We assessed the discrimination and calibration of the MPM0-III model. Using stepwise selection, we developed a new logistic model for risk prediction, the R-MPM, and used bootstrapping techniques to test for optimism in the model. Results Among 427 consecutive adults, the median age was 34 (IQR 25–47) years and mortality was 48.7%. Mechanical ventilation was initiated for 85.3%, and 41.9% received vasopressors. The MPM0-III predicted mortality with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.72 and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic p = 0.024. We developed a new model using five variables: age, suspected or confirmed infection within 24 hours of ICU admission, hypotension or shock as a reason for ICU admission, Glasgow Coma Scale score at ICU admission, and heart rate at ICU admission. Using these five variables, the R-MPM predicted outcomes with area under the ROC curve of 0.81 with 95% confidence interval of (0.77, 0.86), and Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square statistic p = 0.154. Conclusions The MPM0-III has modest ability to predict mortality in a population of Rwandan ICU patients. The R

  5. Intensive Care Unit Admission Parameters Improve the Accuracy of Operative Mortality Predictive Models in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Ballotta, Andrea; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina; Brozzi, Simonetta; Boncilli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Background Operative mortality risk in cardiac surgery is usually assessed using preoperative risk models. However, intraoperative factors may change the risk profile of the patients, and parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit may be relevant in determining the operative mortality. This study investigates the association between a number of parameters at the admission in the intensive care unit and the operative mortality, and verifies the hypothesis that including these parameters into the preoperative risk models may increase the accuracy of prediction of the operative mortality. Methodology 929 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery were admitted to the study. The preoperative risk profile was assessed using the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score. A number of parameters recorded at the admission in the intensive care unit were explored for univariate and multivariable association with the operative mortality. Principal Findings A heart rate higher than 120 beats per minute and a blood lactate value higher than 4 mmol/L at the admission in the intensive care unit were independent predictors of operative mortality, with odds ratio of 6.7 and 13.4 respectively. Including these parameters into the logistic EuroSCORE and the ACEF score increased their accuracy (area under the curve 0.85 to 0.88 for the logistic EuroSCORE and 0.81 to 0.86 for the ACEF score). Conclusions A double-stage assessment of operative mortality risk provides a higher accuracy of the prediction. Elevated blood lactates and tachycardia reflect a condition of inadequate cardiac output. Their inclusion in the assessment of the severity of the clinical conditions after cardiac surgery may offer a useful tool to introduce more sophisticated hemodynamic monitoring techniques. Comparison between the predicted operative mortality risk before and after the operation may offer an assessment of the operative performance. PMID:21042411

  6. Predicting exposure-response associations of ambient particulate matter with mortality in 73 Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Madaniyazi, Lina; Guo, Yuming; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong; Tong, Shilu

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the burden of mortality associated with particulates requires knowledge of exposure-response associations. However, the evidence on exposure-response associations is limited in many cities, especially in developing countries. In this study, we predicted associations of particulates smaller than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) with mortality in 73 Chinese cities. The meta-regression model was used to test and quantify which city-specific characteristics contributed significantly to the heterogeneity of PM10-mortality associations for 16 Chinese cities. Then, those city-specific characteristics with statistically significant regression coefficients were treated as independent variables to build multivariate meta-regression models. The model with the best fitness was used to predict PM10-mortality associations in 73 Chinese cities in 2010. Mean temperature, PM10 concentration and green space per capita could best explain the heterogeneity in PM10-mortality associations. Based on city-specific characteristics, we were able to develop multivariate meta-regression models to predict associations between air pollutants and health outcomes reasonably well.

  7. Urinary cadmium levels predict mortality of patients with acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Kuan-Hsing; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Wen-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute heart failure (AHF) is a serious condition that is associated with increased mortality in critically ill patients. Previous studies indicated that environmental exposure to cadmium increases mortality of general populations. However, the relationship of cadmium exposure and mortality is unclear for AHF patients. Materials and methods A total of 153 patients with AHF in intensive care units (ICUs) met the inclusion criteria and were followed up for 6 months. Demographic data, AHF etiology, hematological and biochemical data, and hospital mortality were recorded. The scores of two predictive systems (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]) for mortality in critically ill patients were calculated, and urinary cadmium levels were recorded. Results At the end of the follow-up period, the mortality rate was 24.8%. The survivors (n=115) had higher urinary cadmium levels on day 1 (D1UCd) of ICU admission than non-survivors (n=38). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed a positive correlation between D1UCd and acute kidney injury, but a negative correlation between D1UCd and the level of serum albumin. A multivariate Cox analysis indicated that D1UCd was an independent predictor of mortality in AHF patients. For each increment of 1 μg of D1UCd, the hazard ratio for ICU mortality was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–1.32, P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for D1UCd was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.91), better than the values for the SOFA and APACHE II systems. Conclusion The D1UCd may serve as a single predictor of hospital mortality for AHF patients in the ICU. Because of the high mortality and smaller sample size, more investigations are required to confirm these observations and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:28392700

  8. Prediction of the mortality dose-response relationship in man

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Based upon an extensive data base including 100 separate animal studies, an estimate of the mortality dose-response relationship due to continuous photon radiation is predicted for 70 kg man. The model used in this prediction exercise includes fixed terms accounting for effects of body weight and dose rate, and random terms accounting for inter- and intra-species variation and experimental error. Point predictions and 95% prediction intervals are given for the LD/sub 05/, LD/sub 10/, LD/sub 25/, LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 75/, LD/sub 90/, and LD/sub 95/, for dose rates ranging from 1 to 50 R/min. 6 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Cystatin C at Admission in the Intensive Care Unit Predicts Mortality among Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Dalboni, Maria Aparecida; Beraldo, Daniel de Oliveira; Quinto, Beata Marie Redublo; Blaya, Rosângela; Narciso, Roberto; Oliveira, Moacir; Monte, Júlio César Martins; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Pavão, Oscar Fernando; Batista, Marcelo Costa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cystatin C has been used in the critical care setting to evaluate renal function. Nevertheless, it has also been found to correlate with mortality, but it is not clear whether this association is due to acute kidney injury (AKI) or to other mechanism. Objective. To evaluate whether serum cystatin C at intensive care unit (ICU) entry predicts AKI and mortality in elderly patients. Materials and Methods. It was a prospective study of ICU elderly patients without AKI at admission. We evaluated 400 patients based on normality for serum cystatin C at ICU entry, of whom 234 (58%) were selected and 45 (19%) developed AKI. Results. We observed that higher serum levels of cystatin C did not predict AKI (1.05 ± 0.48 versus 0.94 ± 0.36 mg/L; P = 0.1). However, it was an independent predictor of mortality, H.R. = 6.16 (95% CI 1.46-26.00; P = 0.01), in contrast with AKI, which was not associated with death. In the ROC curves, cystatin C also provided a moderate and significant area (0.67; P = 0.03) compared to AKI (0.47; P = 0.6) to detect death. Conclusion. We demonstrated that higher cystatin C levels are an independent predictor of mortality in ICU elderly patients and may be used as a marker of poor prognosis.

  10. Cystatin C at Admission in the Intensive Care Unit Predicts Mortality among Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dalboni, Maria Aparecida; Beraldo, Daniel de Oliveira; Quinto, Beata Marie Redublo; Blaya, Rosângela; Narciso, Roberto; Oliveira, Moacir; Monte, Júlio César Martins; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Pavão, Oscar Fernando; Batista, Marcelo Costa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cystatin C has been used in the critical care setting to evaluate renal function. Nevertheless, it has also been found to correlate with mortality, but it is not clear whether this association is due to acute kidney injury (AKI) or to other mechanism. Objective. To evaluate whether serum cystatin C at intensive care unit (ICU) entry predicts AKI and mortality in elderly patients. Materials and Methods. It was a prospective study of ICU elderly patients without AKI at admission. We evaluated 400 patients based on normality for serum cystatin C at ICU entry, of whom 234 (58%) were selected and 45 (19%) developed AKI. Results. We observed that higher serum levels of cystatin C did not predict AKI (1.05 ± 0.48 versus 0.94 ± 0.36 mg/L; P = 0.1). However, it was an independent predictor of mortality, H.R. = 6.16 (95% CI 1.46–26.00; P = 0.01), in contrast with AKI, which was not associated with death. In the ROC curves, cystatin C also provided a moderate and significant area (0.67; P = 0.03) compared to AKI (0.47; P = 0.6) to detect death. Conclusion. We demonstrated that higher cystatin C levels are an independent predictor of mortality in ICU elderly patients and may be used as a marker of poor prognosis. PMID:24967238

  11. Blood Epigenetic Age may Predict Cancer Incidence and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yinan; Joyce, Brian T; Colicino, Elena; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Dai, Qi; Shrubsole, Martha J; Kibbe, Warren A; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Zhou; Jafari, Nadereh; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Hou, Lifang

    2016-03-01

    Biological measures of aging are important for understanding the health of an aging population, with epigenetics particularly promising. Previous studies found that tumor tissue is epigenetically older than its donors are chronologically. We examined whether blood Δage (the discrepancy between epigenetic and chronological ages) can predict cancer incidence or mortality, thus assessing its potential as a cancer biomarker. In a prospective cohort, Δage and its rate of change over time were calculated in 834 blood leukocyte samples collected from 442 participants free of cancer at blood draw. About 3-5 years before cancer onset or death, Δage was associated with cancer risks in a dose-responsive manner (P = 0.02) and a one-year increase in Δage was associated with cancer incidence (HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10) and mortality (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07-1.28). Participants with smaller Δage and decelerated epigenetic aging over time had the lowest risks of cancer incidence (P = 0.003) and mortality (P = 0.02). Δage was associated with cancer incidence in a 'J-shaped' manner for subjects examined pre-2003, and with cancer mortality in a time-varying manner. We conclude that blood epigenetic age may mirror epigenetic abnormalities related to cancer development, potentially serving as a minimally invasive biomarker for cancer early detection.

  12. Developing a simple preinterventional score to predict hospital mortality in adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Meng-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Huang, Chung-Chi; Lin, Pyng-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite gaining popularity, venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) remains a controversial therapy for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in adult patients due to its equivocal survival benefits. The study was aimed at identifying the preinterventional prognostic predictors of hospital mortality in adult VV-ECMO patients and developing a practical mortality prediction score to facilitate clinical decision-making. This retrospective study included 116 adult patients who received VV-ECMO for severe ARF in a tertiary referral center, from 2007 to 2015. The definition of severe ARF was PaO2/ FiO2 ratio < 70 mm Hg under advanced mechanical ventilation (MV). Preinterventional variables including demographic characteristics, ventilatory parameters, and severity of organ dysfunction were collected for analysis. The prognostic predictors of hospital mortality were generated with multivariate logistic regression and transformed into a scoring system. The discriminative power on hospital mortality of the scoring system was presented as the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The overall hospital mortality rate was 47% (n = 54). Pre-ECMO MV day > 4 (OR: 4.71; 95% CI: 1.98–11.23; P < 0.001), pre-ECMO sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score >9 (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.36–7.36; P = 0.01), and immunocompromised status (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.07–7.89; P = 0.04) were independent predictors of hospital mortality of adult VV-ECMO. A mortality prediction score comprising of the 3 binary predictors was developed and named VV-ECMO mortality score. The total score was estimated as follows: VV-ECMO mortality score = 2 × (Pre-ECMO MV day > 4) + 1 × (Pre-ECMO SOFA score >9) + 1 × (immunocompromised status). The AUROC of VV-ECMO mortality score was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67–0.85; P < 0.001). The corresponding hospital mortality rates to VV-ECMO mortality scores were 18% (Score 0), 35% (Score 1), 56

  13. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  14. The Predictive Role of Red Cell Distribution Width in Mortality among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Yang, Yu; Wen, Yao-Ko; Chiu, Ping-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that RDW independently predicts clinically important outcomes in many populations. However, the role of RDW has not been elucidated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We conducted the present study with the aim to evaluate the predictive value of RDW in CKD patients. Methods A retrospective observational cohort study of 1075 stage 3–5 CKD patients was conducted in a medical center. The patients’ baseline information included demographic data, laboratory values, medications, and comorbid conditions. The upper limit of normal RDW value (14.9%) was used to divide the whole population. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of mortality. Results Of the 1075 participants, 158 patients (14.7%) died over a mean follow-up of approximately 2.35 years. The crude mortality rate was significantly higher in the high RDW group (high RDW group, 22.4%; low RDW group 11%, p <0.001). From the adjusted model, the high RDW group was correlated with a hazard ratio of 2.19 for overall mortality as compared with the low RDW group (95% CI = 1.53–3.09, p<0.001). In addition, the high RDW group was also associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (HR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.14–4.25, p = 0.019) and infection (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.15–3.14, p = 0.012)) related mortality in comparison with the low RDW group. Conclusions In stage 3–5 CKD patients, RDW was associated with patient mortality of all-cause, cardiovascular disease and infection. RDW should be considered as a clinical predictor for mortality when providing healthcare to CKD patients. PMID:27906969

  15. Predictive factors of septic shock and mortality in neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Ramzi, Jeddi; Mohamed, Zarrouk; Yosr, Benabdennebi; Karima, Kacem; Raihane, Benlakhal; Lamia, Aissaoui; Hela, Ben Abid; Zaher, Belhadjali; Balkis, Meddeb

    2007-12-01

    Neutropenia is a major risk factor for developing a serious infection. Bacteremia still causes significant mortality among neutropenic patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for septic shock and for mortality in neutropenic patients with leukemia and bacteremia. Consecutive samples from 20 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and bacteremia were studied during a 1 year period (January-December 2003). All patients received empirical antibiotic therapies for febrile episodes using ceftazidime plus amikacin. About 110 neutropenic febrile episodes were noted: clinically documented 14.54%, microbiologically documented 16.36% and fever of unknown origin 69.09%. Gram-negative organism caused eight febrile episodes: Pseudomonas (5), Klebsiella (3). Gram-positive organism caused 10 episodes: Staphylococcus (6), Streptococci (2), Enterococci (2). Pulmonary infection accounted for 25% of clinically documented infections. About 14 of the 110 febrile episodes were associated with septic shock causing mortality in 7 patients. In a univariate analysis variables associated with septic shock were: pulmonary infection (OR = 17, p = 0.001), serum bicarbonate < 17 mmol/l (OR = 68, p < 0.001) and serum lactate >3 mmol/l (OR = 62, p < 0.001). Variables associated with mortality were: pulmonary infection (OR = 83, p < 0.001) and serum bicarbonate < 17 mmol/l (OR = 61, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis two variables were associated with septic shock: pulmonary infection (OR = 5, p = 0.043) and serum lactate >3 mmol/l (OR = 10, p = 0.003). An elevated serum lactate (>3 mmol/l) and low serum bicarbonate ( < 17 mmol/l) at the onset of bacteremia are useful biomarkers in predicting septic shock and mortality in neutropenic patients.

  16. Increased dietary sodium is independently associated with greater mortality among prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mc Causland, Finnian R; Waikar, Sushrut S; Brunelli, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Dietary sodium is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, hypervolemia, and mortality in hemodialysis patients; hence, sodium restriction is almost universally recommended. Since the evidence upon which to base these assumptions is limited, we undertook a post-hoc analysis of 1770 patients in the Hemodialysis Study with available dietary, clinical, and laboratory information. Within this cohort, 772 were men, 1113 black, and 786 diabetic, with a mean age of 58 years and a median dietary sodium intake of 2080 mg/day. After case-mix adjustment, linear regression modeling found that higher dietary sodium was associated with a greater ultrafiltration requirement, caloric and protein intake; sodium to calorie intake ratio was associated with a greater ultrafiltration requirement; and sodium to potassium ratio was associated with higher serum sodium. No indices were associated with the pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure. Cox regression modeling found that higher baseline dietary sodium and the ratio of sodium to calorie or potassium were each independently associated with greater all-cause mortality. No association between a prescribed dietary sodium restriction and mortality were found. Thus, higher reported dietary sodium intake is independently associated with greater mortality among prevalent hemodialysis patients. Randomized trials will be necessary to determine whether dietary sodium restriction improves survival.

  17. Life span decrements in fluid intelligence and processing speed predict mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Aichele, Stephen; Rabbitt, Patrick; Ghisletta, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    We examined life span changes in 5 domains of cognitive performance as predictive of mortality risk. Data came from the Manchester Longitudinal Study of Cognition, a 20-plus-year investigation of 6,203 individuals ages 42-97 years. Cognitive domains were general crystallized intelligence, general fluid intelligence, verbal memory, visuospatial memory, and processing speed. Life span decrements were evident across these domains, controlling for baseline performance at age 70 and adjusting for retest effects. Survival analyses stratified by sex and conducted independently by cognitive domain showed that lower baseline performance levels in all domains-and larger life span decrements in general fluid intelligence and processing speed-were predictive of increased mortality risk for both women and men. Critically, analyses of the combined predictive power of cognitive performance variables showed that baseline levels of processing speed (in women) and general fluid intelligence (in men), and decrements in processing speed (in women and in men) and general fluid intelligence (in women), accounted for most of the explained variation in mortality risk. In light of recent evidence from brain-imaging studies, we speculate that cognitive abilities closely linked to cerebral white matter integrity (such as processing speed and general fluid intelligence) may represent particularly sensitive markers of mortality risk. In addition, we presume that greater complexity in cognition-survival associations observed in women (in analyses incorporating all cognitive predictors) may be a consequence of longer and more variable cognitive declines in women relative to men.

  18. Prediction using patient comparison vs. modeling: a case study for mortality prediction.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; El Hassouni, Ali; Mok, Kwongyen; Ghassemi, Marzyeh; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Information in Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) can be used to generate accurate predictions for the occurrence of a variety of health states, which can contribute to more pro-active interventions. The very nature of EMRs does make the application of off-the-shelf machine learning techniques difficult. In this paper, we study two approaches to making predictions that have hardly been compared in the past: (1) extracting high-level (temporal) features from EMRs and building a predictive model, and (2) defining a patient similarity metric and predicting based on the outcome observed for similar patients. We analyze and compare both approaches on the MIMIC-II ICU dataset to predict patient mortality and find that the patient similarity approach does not scale well and results in a less accurate model (AUC of 0.68) compared to the modeling approach (0.84). We also show that mortality can be predicted within a median of 72 hours.

  19. Quantifying the Value of Biomarkers for Predicting Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Noreen; Glei, Dana A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In light of widespread interest in the prognostic value of biomarkers, we apply three discrimination measures to evaluate the incremental value of biomarkers –beyond self-reported measures – for predicting all-cause mortality. We assess whether all three measures –AUC, NRI(>0), and IDI – lead to the same conclusions. Methods We use longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of older Taiwanese (n = 639, aged 54+ in 2000, examined in 2000 and 2006, with mortality follow-up through 2011). We estimate age-specific mortality using a Gompertz hazard model. Results The broad conclusions are consistent across the three discrimination measures and support the inclusion of biomarkers, particularly inflammatory markers, in household surveys. Although the rank ordering of individual biomarkers varies across discrimination measures, the following is true for all three: interleukin-6 is the strongest predictor, the other three inflammatory markers make the top 10, and homocysteine ranks second or third. Conclusions The consistency of most of our findings across metrics should provide comfort to researchers using discrimination measures to evaluate the prognostic value of biomarkers. However, because the degree of consistency varies with the level of detail inherent in the research question, we recommend that researchers confirm results with multiple discrimination measures. PMID:26419291

  20. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  1. Lower serum uric acid level predicts mortality in dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eunjin; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Shin, Nara; Kim, Sun Moon; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Hajeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the impact of serum uric acid (SUA) on mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. A total of 4132 adult patients on dialysis were enrolled prospectively between August 2008 and September 2014. Among them, we included 1738 patients who maintained dialysis for at least 3 months and had available SUA in the database. We categorized the time averaged-SUA (TA-SUA) into 5 groups: <5.5, 5.5–6.4, 6.5–7.4, 7.5–8.4, and ≥8.5 mg/dL. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality according to SUA group. The mean TA-SUA level was slightly higher in men than in women. Patients with lower TA-SUA level tended to have lower body mass index (BMI), phosphorus, serum albumin level, higher proportion of diabetes mellitus (DM), and higher proportion of malnourishment on the subjective global assessment (SGA). During a median follow-up of 43.9 months, 206 patients died. Patients with the highest SUA had a similar risk to the middle 3 TA-SUA groups, but the lowest TA-SUA group had a significantly elevated HR for mortality. The lowest TA-SUA group was significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 1.720; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–2.937; P = 0.047) even after adjusting for demographic, comorbid, nutritional covariables, and medication use that could affect SUA levels. This association was prominent in patients with well nourishment on the SGA, a preserved serum albumin level, a higher BMI, and concomitant DM although these parameters had no significant interaction in the TA-SUA-mortality relationship except DM. In conclusion, a lower TA-SUA level <5.5 mg/dL predicted all-cause mortality in patients with chronic dialysis. PMID:27310949

  2. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  3. Prediction of mortality after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjin; Lam, Kin-Man; Deng, Zhaohong; Choi, Kup-Sze

    2015-08-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer in genitourinary malignancy. For muscle invasive bladder cancer, surgical removal of the bladder, i.e. radical cystectomy, is in general the definitive treatment which, unfortunately, carries significant morbidities and mortalities. Accurate prediction of the mortality of radical cystectomy is therefore needed. Statistical methods have conventionally been used for this purpose, despite the complex interactions of high-dimensional medical data. Machine learning has emerged as a promising technique for handling high-dimensional data, with increasing application in clinical decision support, e.g. cancer prediction and prognosis. Its ability to reveal the hidden nonlinear interactions and interpretable rules between dependent and independent variables is favorable for constructing models of effective generalization performance. In this paper, seven machine learning methods are utilized to predict the 5-year mortality of radical cystectomy, including back-propagation neural network (BPN), radial basis function (RBFN), extreme learning machine (ELM), regularized ELM (RELM), support vector machine (SVM), naive Bayes (NB) classifier and k-nearest neighbour (KNN), on a clinicopathological dataset of 117 patients of the urology unit of a hospital in Hong Kong. The experimental results indicate that RELM achieved the highest average prediction accuracy of 0.8 at a fast learning speed. The research findings demonstrate the potential of applying machine learning techniques to support clinical decision making.

  4. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer K.; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  5. Birth Weight Independently Affects Morbidity and Mortality of Extremely Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Petousis, Stamatios; Tsimpanakos, John; Masouridou, Sophia; Kountourelli, Kelly; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Papouli, Maria; Rousso, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates born between 24 + 0 and 27 + 6 gestational weeks, widely known as extremely preterm neonates, present a category characterized by increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. Main objective of the present study is to analyze the effect of various epidemiological and pregnancy-related parameters on unfavorable neonatal mortality and morbidity outcomes. Methods A retrospective study was performed enrolling cases delivered during 2003 - 2008 in our department. Cases of neonatal death as well as pathological Apgar score (≤ 4 in the first and ≤ 7 in the fifth minute of life), need for emergency resuscitation, respiratory disease syndrome (RDS), neonatal asphyxia, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and neonatal death were recorded for neonates of our analysis. A multivariate regression model was used to correlate these outcomes with gestational week at delivery, maternal age, parity, kind of gestation (singleton or multiple), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), birth weight (BW), preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), mode of delivery (vaginal delivery or cesarean section) and antenatal use of corticosteroids. Results Out of 5,070 pregnancies delivered, 57 extremely preterm neonates were born (1.1%). Mean BW was 780.35 ± 176.0, RDS was observed in 93.0% (n = 53), resuscitation was needed in 54.4% (n = 31) while overall mortality rate was 52.6% (n = 30). BW was independently associated with neonatal death (P = 0.004), pathological Apgar score in the first (P = 0.05) and fifth minute of life (P = 0.04) as well as neonatal sepsis (P = 0.05). Conclusion BW at delivery is independently affecting neonatal mortality and morbidity parameters in extremely preterm neonates. PMID:26015815

  6. Changes in Albuminuria Predict Mortality and Morbidity in Patients with Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Johannes F. E.; Schumacher, Helmut; Gao, Peggy; Mancia, Giuseppe; Weber, Michael A.; McQueen, Matthew; Koon, Teo; Yusuf, Salim

    2011-01-01

    The degree of albuminuria predicts cardiovascular and renal outcomes, but it is not known whether changes in albuminuria also predict similar outcomes. In two multicenter, multinational, prospective observational studies, a central laboratory measured albuminuria in 23,480 patients with vascular disease or high-risk diabetes. We quantified the association between a greater than or equal to twofold change in albuminuria in spot urine from baseline to 2 years and the incidence of cardiovascular and renal outcomes and all-cause mortality during the subsequent 32 months. A greater than or equal to twofold increase in albuminuria from baseline to 2 years, observed in 28%, associated with nearly 50% higher mortality (HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.32 to 1.66), and a greater than or equal to twofold decrease in albuminuria, observed in 21%, associated with 15% lower mortality (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74 to 0.98) compared with those with lesser changes in albuminuria, after adjustment for baseline albuminuria, BP, and other potential confounders. Increases in albuminuria also significantly associated with cardiovascular death, composite cardiovascular outcomes (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and hospitalization for heart failure), and renal outcomes including dialysis or doubling of serum creatinine (adjusted HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.11 to 1.78). In conclusion, in patients with vascular disease, changes in albuminuria predict mortality and cardiovascular and renal outcomes, independent of baseline albuminuria. This suggests that monitoring albuminuria is a useful strategy to help predict cardiovascular risk. PMID:21719791

  7. Speckle tracking echocardiography detects uremic cardiomyopathy early and predicts cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Kramann, Rafael; Erpenbeck, Johanna; Schneider, Rebekka K; Röhl, Anna B; Hein, Marc; Brandenburg, Vincent M; van Diepen, Merel; Dekker, Friedo; Marx, Nicolaus; Floege, Jürgen; Becker, Michael; Schlieper, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is high in ESRD, partly driven by sudden cardiac death and recurrent heart failure due to uremic cardiomyopathy. We investigated whether speckle-tracking echocardiography is superior to routine echocardiography in early detection of uremic cardiomyopathy in animal models and whether it predicts cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing dialysis. Using speckle-tracking echocardiography in two rat models of uremic cardiomyopathy soon (4-6 weeks) after induction of kidney disease, we observed that global radial and circumferential strain parameters decreased significantly in both models compared with controls, whereas standard echocardiographic readouts, including fractional shortening and cardiac output, remained unchanged. Furthermore, strain parameters showed better correlations with histologic hallmarks of uremic cardiomyopathy. We then assessed echocardiographic and clinical characteristics in 171 dialysis patients. During the 2.5-year follow-up period, ejection fraction and various strain parameters were significant risk factors for cardiovascular mortality (primary end point) in a multivariate Cox model (ejection fraction hazard ratio [HR], 0.97 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.95 to 0.99; P=0.012]; peak global longitudinal strain HR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.07 to 1.28; P<0.001]; peak systolic and late diastolic longitudinal strain rates HRs, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.23 to 17.64; P=0.023] and 0.25 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.79; P=0.02], respectively). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed circumferential early diastolic strain rate, among others, as an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality (secondary end point; HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.74; P=0.002). Together, these data support speckle tracking as a postprocessing echocardiographic technique to detect uremic cardiomyopathy and predict cardiovascular mortality in ESRD.

  8. Viewpoint: paradoxical excess mortality in the PLATO trial should be independently verified.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, V L

    2011-05-01

    The PLATO trial revealed excess all-cause (4.5%) and vascular (4.0%) mortality after experimental pyrimidine, ticagrelor, and even higher death rates (5.9% and 5.1%, respectively) after clopidogrel, which have never been seen in any previous acute coronary syndrome (ACS) trial. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted, and recently released the ticagrelor review outlining some paradoxical mortality patterns in PLATO, including the existence of alive patient, who initially was reported dead. The drug was recently approved in Europe, but repeatedly delayed in the USA. The objective of this viewpoint article was to evaluate extremely high death rates in PLATO by scrutinising FDA-released evidence, and comparing mortality patterns in recent ACS trials. These data were first presented as the analytical report submitted to the FDA on October 26, 2010. The available evidence suggest that mortality rates in PLATO, so as death benefit of ticagrelor over clopidogrel are extreme, despite incomplete follow-up, short duration of the trial, frequent preloading with clopidogrel, and gross mismatch between conventional average myocardial infarction rates but disproportionally frequent vascular fatalities, and heavily imbalanced sepsis-related deaths. In contrast to the overall PLATO results, the deaths rates in the USA were much lower (3.2% vs. 3.8%) not only favouring clopidogrel, but more importanly matching very well with identical rates in TRITON (3.2%), and one-year ACUITY (3.6%-3.9%) fatalities. Since the «play of chance» cannot explain these discrepancies due to excess death rates in both PLATO arms, and considering that study sponsor self-monitored sites in most countries, but not in the USA, the mortality data are questionable, and should be independently virified. It was concluded that excess mortality rates and delayed timing of the benefit onset in PLATO do not match with any recent ACS trial, and do not look natural. Reevaluation of the survival, especially

  9. Predicting the stroke patient's ability to live independently.

    PubMed

    DeJong, G; Branch, L G

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify those variables that best predict a stroke patient's ability to live independently following his/her discharge from medical rehabilitation. The paper draws heavily on a formal research model grounded in independent living (IL) theory. Independent living is defined and operationalized as (1) the patient's ability to live in a nonrestrictive environment and (2) the patient's ability to live productively--not only in terms of gainful employment but also in terms of other contributions to community and family life. The main data source for the study is an extensive computer file of 84 stroke patients discharged from 8 medical rehabilitation centers. The multivariate statistical analysis indicates that 56 to 80 percent of the variance in a patient's ability to live independently can be explained or predicted mainly by the patient's marital status, age, Barthel score, communication impairments, and the ability to get into a motor vehicle. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of the findings for medical rehabilitation and public policy.

  10. The effects of deep network topology on mortality prediction.

    PubMed

    Hao Du; Ghassemi, Mohammad M; Mengling Feng

    2016-08-01

    Deep learning has achieved remarkable results in the areas of computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing and most recently, even playing Go. The application of deep-learning to problems in healthcare, however, has gained attention only in recent years, and it's ultimate place at the bedside remains a topic of skeptical discussion. While there is a growing academic interest in the application of Machine Learning (ML) techniques to clinical problems, many in the clinical community see little incentive to upgrade from simpler methods, such as logistic regression, to deep learning. Logistic regression, after all, provides odds ratios, p-values and confidence intervals that allow for ease of interpretation, while deep nets are often seen as `black-boxes' which are difficult to understand and, as of yet, have not demonstrated performance levels far exceeding their simpler counterparts. If deep learning is to ever take a place at the bedside, it will require studies which (1) showcase the performance of deep-learning methods relative to other approaches and (2) interpret the relationships between network structure, model performance, features and outcomes. We have chosen these two requirements as the goal of this study. In our investigation, we utilized a publicly available EMR dataset of over 32,000 intensive care unit patients and trained a Deep Belief Network (DBN) to predict patient mortality at discharge. Utilizing an evolutionary algorithm, we demonstrate automated topology selection for DBNs. We demonstrate that with the correct topology selection, DBNs can achieve better prediction performance compared to several bench-marking methods.

  11. The Change in Body Weight During Hospitalization Predicts Mortality in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Komaki, Tomo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Arimura, Tadaaki; Shiga, Yuhei; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Kitajima, Ken; Iwata, Atsushi; Morito, Natsumi; Yahiro, Eiji; Fujimi, Kanta; Matsunaga, Akira; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background In our experience, the change in body weight (BW) during hospitalization varies greatly in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF). Since the clinical significance of a change in BW is not clear, we investigated whether a change in BW could predict mortality. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 130 patients (72 males; aged 68 ± 10 years) who were hospitalized due to acute decompensated HF and followed for 2 years after discharge. The change in the BW index during hospitalization (ΔBWI) was calculated as (BW at hospital admission minus BW at hospital discharge)/body surface area at hospital discharge. Results The patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔBWI, and the 2-year mortality rates in the quartiles with the lowest, second, third and highest ΔBWI were 18.8%, 12.1%, 3.1% and 9.1%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis after adjusting for variables with a P value less than 0.05, ΔBWI was independently associated with 2-year mortality (P = 0.0002), and the quartile with the lowest ΔBWI had a higher relative risk (RR) for 2-year mortality than the quartile with the highest ΔBWI (RR: 7.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.03 - 53.99, P = 0.04). Conclusion In conclusion, ΔBWI was significantly associated with 2-year mortality after discharge, which indicates that ΔBWI might be a simple predictor of prognosis in acute decompensated HF. PMID:28179967

  12. Can photoperiod predict mortality in the 1918-1920 influenza pandemic?

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J

    2011-08-01

    Amplitude of the seasonal change in day length increases with distance from the equator, and changes in day length markedly alter immune function in diverse nonhuman animal models of infection. Historical records of mortality data, ambient temperature, population density, geography, and economic indicators from 42 countries during 1918-1920 were analyzed to determine relative contributions toward human mortality during the "Spanish" influenza pandemic of 1918-1920. The data identify a strong negative relation between distance from the equator and mortality during the 1918-1920 influenza pandemic, which, in a multiple regression model, manifested independent of major economic, demographic, and temperature variables. Enhanced survival was evident in populations that experienced a winter nadir day length ≤10 h light/day, relative to those that experienced lower amplitude changes in photoperiod. Numerous reports indicate that exposure to short day lengths, typical of those occurring outside the tropics during winter, yields robust and enduring reductions in the magnitude of cytokine, febrile, and behavioral responses to infection. The present results are preliminary but prompt the conjecture that, if similar mechanisms are operant in humans, then they would be predicted to mitigate symptoms of infection in proportion to an individual's distance from the equator. Although limitations and uncertainties accompany regression-based analyses of historical epidemiological data, latitude, per se, may be an underrecognized factor in mortality during the 1918-1920 influenza pandemic. The author proposes that some proportion of the global variance in morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases may be explained by effects of day length on the innate immune response to infection.

  13. Predictive Factors for Good Outcome and Mortality After Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy in Patients With Acute Anterior Circulation Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Seul Kee; Park, Man Seok; Baek, Byung Hyun; Lee, Yun Young

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Predictive factors associated with stent-retriever thrombectomy for patients with acute anterior circulation stroke remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate clinical and procedural factors predictive of good outcome and mortality after stent-retriever thrombectomy in a large cohort of patients with acute anterior circulation stroke. Methods We analyzed clinical and procedural data in 335 patients with acute anterior circulation stroke treated with stent-retriever thrombectomy. A good outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2 at 3 months. The associations between clinical, imaging, and procedural factors and good outcome and mortality, respectively, were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Using multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR], 0.965; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.944-0.986; P=0.001), successful revascularization (OR, 4.658; 95% CI, 2.240-9.689; P<0.001), parenchymal hemorrhage (OR, 0.150; 95% CI, 0.049-0.460; P=0.001), and baseline NIHSS score (OR, 0.908; 95% CI, 0.855-0.965; P=0.002) were independent predictors of good outcome. Independent predictors of mortality were age (OR, 1.043; 95% CI, 1.002-1.086; P=0.041), successful revascularization (OR, 0.171; 95% CI, 0.079-0.370; P<0.001), parenchymal hemorrhage (OR, 2.961; 95% CI, 1.059-8.276; P=0.038), and a history of previous stroke/TIA (OR, 3.124; 95% CI, 1.340-7.281; P=0.008). Conclusions Age, revascularization status, and parenchymal hemorrhage are independent predictors of both good outcome and mortality after stent retriever thrombectomy for acute anterior circulation stroke. In addition, NIHSS score on admission is independently associated with good outcome, whereas a history of previous stroke is independently associated with mortality. PMID:28178407

  14. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients treated in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Skok, P; Sinkovič, A

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, cohort study assessed the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at the University Clinical Centre Maribor, Slovenia. Using univariate, multivariate and logistic regression methods the predictors of mortality in 54 upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage patients (47 men, mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 14.2 years) were investigated. The mean ± SD duration of treatment in the MICU was 2.8 ± 2.9 days and the mortality rate was 31.5%. Significant differences between nonsurvivors and survivors were observed in haemorrhagic shock, heart failure, infection, diastolic blood pressure at admission, haemoglobin and red blood cell count at admission, and lowest haemoglobin and red blood cell count during treatment. Heart failure (odds ratio 59.13) was the most significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Haemorrhagic shock and the lowest red blood cell count during treatment were also important independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality.

  15. Predicting functional capacity during treadmill testing independent of exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Foster, C; Crowe, A J; Daines, E; Dumit, M; Green, M A; Lettau, S; Thompson, N N; Weymier, J

    1996-06-01

    Clinically useful estimates of VO2max from treadmill tests (GXT) may be made using protocol-specific equations. In many cases, GXT may proceed more effectively if the clinician is free to adjust speed and grade independent of a specific protocol. We sought to determine whether VO2max could be predicted from the estimated steady-state VO2 of the terminal exercise stage. Seventy clinically stable individuals performed GXT with direct measurement of VO2. Exercise was incremented each minute to optimize clinical examination. Measured VO2max was compared to the estimated steady-state VO2 of the terminal stage based on ACSM equations. Equations for walking or running were used based on the patient's observed method of ambulation. The measured VO2max was always less than the ACSM estimate, with a regular relationship between measured and estimated VO2max. No handrail support: VO2max = 0.869.ACSM -0.07; R2 = 0.955, SEE = 4.8 ml.min-1.kg-1 (N = 30). With handrail support: VO2max = 0.694.ACSM + 3.33; R2 = 0.833, SEE = 4.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 (N = 40). The equations were cross-validated with 20 patients. The correlation between predicted and observed values was r = 0.98 and 0.97 without and with handrail support, respectively. The mean absolute prediction error (3.1 and 4.1 ml.min-1.kg-1) were similar to protocol-specific equations. We conclude that VO2max can be predicted independent of treadmill protocol with approximately the same error as protocol-specific equations.

  16. Predicting mortality for paediatric inpatients where malaria is uncommon

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Dana C; Ramadhani, Habib O; Msuya, Levina J; Njau, Boniface N; Kinabo, Grace D; Buchanan, Ann M; Crump, John A

    2012-01-01

    Objective As the proportion of children living low malaria transmission areas in sub-Saharan Africa increases, approaches for identifying non-malarial severe illness need to be evaluated to improve child outcomes. Design As a prospective cohort study, we identified febrile paediatric inpatients, recorded data using Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) criteria, and collected diagnostic specimens. Setting Tertiary referral centre, northern Tanzania. Results Of 466 participants with known outcome, median age was 1.4 years (range 2 months–13.0 years), 200 (42.9%) were female, 11 (2.4%) had malaria and 34 (7.3%) died. Inpatient death was associated with: Capillary refill >3 s (OR 9.0, 95% CI 3.0 to 26.7), inability to breastfeed or drink (OR 8.9, 95% CI 4.0 to 19.6), stiff neck (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.8 to 17.6), lethargy (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.5 to 10.6), skin pinch >2 s (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 12.3), respiratory difficulty (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.9 to 8.2), generalised lymphadenopathy (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.3) and oral candidiasis (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.3). BCS <5 (OR 27.2, p<0.001) and severe wasting (OR 6.9, p<0.001) were independently associated with inpatient death. Conclusions In a low malaria transmission setting, IMCI criteria performed well for predicting inpatient death from non-malarial illness. Laboratory results were not as useful in predicting death, underscoring the importance of clinical examination in assessing prognosis. Healthcare workers should consider local malaria epidemiology as malaria over-diagnosis in children may delay potentially life-saving interventions in areas where malaria is uncommon. PMID:22872067

  17. Executive Function [Capacity for Behavioral Self-regulation]and Decline Predicted Mortality in a Longitudinal Study in Southern Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E.; Baxter, Judith; Grigsby, Jim; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Hokanson, John E; Bryant, Lucinda L

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between mortality and impairment and decline in a specific executive cognitive function, the capacity for behavioral self-regulation. Study Design & Setting This study examined the association between mortality and baseline and 22-month decline in the capacity for behavioral self-regulation, as measured by the Behavioral Dyscontrol Scale, among 1,293 participants of the San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study (SLVHAS), a population-based longitudinal study. The Behavioral Dyscontrol Scale and a measure of overall mental status, the Mini-Mental State Examination, were administered at baseline and follow-up interviews. Cox regression was used to examine baseline and decline in capacity for behavioral self-regulation as possible predictors of morality. Results Baseline Behavioral Dyscontrol Scale score was predictive of mortality, independent of demographics and comorbidity count (HR=1.07; 95% CI:1.04–1.09). It remained a significant predictor with further adjustment for Mini-Mental State Examination score. Decline in this specific executive cognitive function was associated with mortality after adjustment for covariates and baseline cognitive scores (HR=1.09; 95% CI:1.04–1.13). Conclusion Thus, both baseline capacity for behavioral self-regulation and its decline over time predicted mortality in the SLVHAS cohort. These associations may partly be due to maintaining the ability for self-care. Understanding how specific forms of impairment contribute to mortality may help identify patients who could benefit from early intervention. PMID:19716261

  18. Red blood cell distribution width is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam Su; Kim, Hye-Won; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Jeong, Su Jin; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chang Oh; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2012-08-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is known to be a predictor of severe morbidity and mortality in some chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure. However, to our knowledge, little is known about RDW as a predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia, a major nosocomial cause of intra-abdominal infections, urinary tract infections, and primary bacteremia. Therefore, we investigated whether RDW is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, and outcomes of 161 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia from November 2010 to March 2011 diagnosed at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, were retrospectively analyzed. The main outcome measure was 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality rate was significantly higher in the increased RDW group compared with the normal RDW group (P < 0.001). According to multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, RDW levels at the onset of bacteremia (per 1% increase, P = 0.036), the Charlson index (per 1-point increase, P < 0.001), and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (per 1-point increase, P = 0.001) were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality. Moreover, the nonsurvivor group had significantly higher RDW levels 72 h after the onset of bacteremia than did the survivor group (P = 0.001). In addition, the area under the curve of RDW at the onset of bacteremia, the 72-h RDW, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score for 28-day mortality were 0.764 (P = 0.001), 0.802 (P < 0.001), and 0.703 (P = 0.008), respectively. Red blood cell distribution width at the onset of bacteremia was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Also, 72-h RDW could be a predictor for all-cause mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  19. Trends and predictions for gastric cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Giusti, Angela Carolina Brandão; de Oliveira Salvador, Pétala Tuani Candido; dos Santos, Juliano; Meira, Karina Cardoso; Camacho, Amanda Rodrigues; Guimarães, Raphael Mendonça; Souza, Dyego L B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of age-period and birth cohort on gastric cancer mortality, in Brazil and across its five geographic regions, by sex, in the population over 20 years of age, as well as make projections for the period 2010-2029. METHODS: An ecological study is presented herein, which distributed gastric cancer-related deaths in Brazil and its geographic regions. The effects of age-period and birth cohort were calculated by the Poisson regression model and projections were made with the age-period-cohort model in the statistical program R. RESULTS: Progressive reduction of mortality rates was observed in the 1980’s, and then higher and lower mortality rates were verified in the 2000’s, for both sexes, in Brazil and for the South, Southeast and Midwest regions. A progressive decrease in mortality rates was observed for the Northeast (both sexes) and North (men only) regions within the period 1995-1999, followed by rising rates. CONCLUSION: Regional differences were demonstrated in the mortality rates for gastric cancer in Brazil, and the least developed regions of the country will present increases in projected mortality rates. PMID:27605887

  20. Metabonomics Analysis of Plasma Reveals the Lactate to Cholesterol Ratio as an Independent Prognostic Factor of Short-Term Mortality in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Franck; Galinier, Michel; Trouillet, Charlotte; Berry, Matthieu; Delmas, Clément; Turkieh, Annie; Massabuau, Pierre; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mortality in heart failure (AHF) remains high, especially during the first days of hospitalization. New prognostic biomarkers may help to optimize treatment. The aim of the study was to determine metabolites that have a high prognostic value. Methods We conducted a prospective study on a training cohort of AHF patients (n = 126) admitted in the cardiac intensive care unit and assessed survival at 30 days. Venous plasmas collected at admission were used for 1H NMR–based metabonomics analysis. Differences between plasma metabolite profiles allow determination of discriminating metabolites. A cohort of AHF patients was subsequently constituted (n = 74) to validate the findings. Results Lactate and cholesterol were the major discriminating metabolites predicting 30-day mortality. Mortality was increased in patients with high lactate and low total cholesterol concentrations at admission. Accuracies of lactate, cholesterol concentration and lactate to cholesterol (Lact/Chol) ratio to predict 30-day mortality were evaluated using ROC analysis. The Lact/Chol ratio provided the best accuracy with an AUC of 0.82 (P < 0.0001). The acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system provided an AUC of 0.76 for predicting 30-day mortality. APACHE II score, Cardiogenic shock (CS) state and Lact/Chol ratio ≥ 0.4 (cutoff value with 82% sensitivity and 64% specificity) were significant independent predictors of 30-day mortality with hazard ratios (HR) of 1.11, 4.77 and 3.59, respectively. In CS patients, the HR of 30-day mortality risk for plasma Lact/Chol ratio ≥ 0.4 was 3.26 compared to a Lact/Chol ratio of < 0.4 (P  =  0.018). The predictive power of the Lact/Chol ratio for 30-day mortality outcome was confirmed with the independent validation cohort. Conclusion This study identifies the plasma Lact/Chol ratio as a useful objective and simple parameter to evaluate short term prognostic and could be integrated into quantitative

  1. Central Venous Pressure After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Does it Predict Postoperative Mortality or Renal Failure?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Judson B.; Peterson, Eric D.; Wojdyla, Daniel; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Smith, Peter K.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Lopes, Renato D.

    2015-01-01

    Background While hemodynamic monitoring is often performed following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), the relationship between postoperative central venous pressure (CVP) measurement and clinical outcomes is unknown. Methods Detailed clinical data were analyzed from 2,390 randomly selected patients undergoing high risk CABG or CABG/valve at 55 hospitals participating in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' National Cardiac Surgery Database from 2004 to 2005. Eligible patients underwent elective/urgent isolated CABG with an ejection fraction < 40%, or elective/urgent CABG at age ≥65 years with diabetes or a glomerular filtration rate 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Correlation between post-operative CVP and in-hospital / 30-day mortality and renal failure was assessed as a continuous variable, both unadjusted and after adjusting for important clinical factors using logistic regression modeling. Results Mean age was 72 years, 54% of patients had diabetes mellitus, 49% were urgent procedures, and mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 105 minutes. Patients’ CVP 6 hours post-operation was strongly associated with in-hospital and 30 day mortality: odds ratio (OR) 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23, 1.87) for every 5 mmHg increase in CVP, p<0.0001. This association remained significant after risk-adjustment for cardiac index: adjusted OR 1.44 (95% CI 1.10, 1.89), p<0.01. A model adjusting for cardiac index also revealed increased incidence of mortality or renal failure: adjusted OR 1.5 (95% CI 1.28, 1.86) for every 5 mmHg increase in CVP, p<0.0001. Conclusion Patients’ central venous pressure at 6 hours following CABG surgery was highly predictive of operative mortality or renal failure, independent of cardiac index and other important clinical variables. Future studies will need to assess whether post-operative CVP can be used to guide intervention and improve outcomes. PMID:25035048

  2. Gender-related risk factors improve mortality predictive ability of VACS Index among HIV-infected women

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, Mardge H; HOTTON, Anna L; HERSHOW, Ronald C; LEVINE, Alexandra; BACCHETTI, Peter; GOLUB, Elizabeth T.; ANASTOS, Kathryn; YOUNG, Mary; GUSTAFSON, Deborah; WEBER, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adding gender-related modifiable characteristics or behaviors to the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) Index might improve the accuracy of predicting mortality among HIV-infected women on treatment. We evaluated the VACS Index in women with HIV, determined whether additional variables would improve mortality prediction, and quantified the potential for improved survival associated with reduction in these additional risk factors. Methods The VACS Index (based on age, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA, hemoglobin, AST, ALT, platelets, creatinine and Hepatitis C status) was validated in HIV-infected women in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) who initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) between January 1996 and December 2007. Models were constructed adding race, depression, abuse, smoking, substance use, transactional sex, and comorbidities to determine whether predictability improved. Population attributable fractions were calculated. Results The VACS Index accurately predicted 5-year mortality in 1057 WIHS women with 1 year on HAART with c-index 0.83 (95% CI 0.79–0.87). In multivariate analysis, the VACS Index score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for 5-point increment 1.30; 95% CI 1.25–1.35), depressive symptoms (aHR 1.73; 95% CI 1.17–2.56) and history of transactional sex (aHR 1.93; 95% CI 1.33–1.82) were independent statistically significant predictors of mortality. Conclusions Including depression and transactional sex significantly improved the performance of the VACS Index in predicting mortality among HIV-infected women. Providing treatment for depression and addressing economic and psychosocial instability in HIV infected women would improve health and perhaps point to a broader public health approach to reducing HIV mortality. PMID:26284531

  3. Change in Leukocyte Telomere Length Predicts Mortality in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Goglin, Sarah E.; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Short telomere length independently predicts mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. Whether 5-year change in telomere length predicts subsequent mortality in patients with coronary heart disease has not been evaluated. Methods In a prospective cohort study of 608 individuals with stable coronary artery disease, we measured leukocyte telomere length at baseline and after five years of follow-up. We divided the sample into tertiles of telomere change: shortened, maintained or lengthened. We used Cox survival models to evaluate 5-year change in telomere length as a predictor of mortality. Results During an average of 4.2 years follow-up, there were 149 deaths. Change in telomere length was inversely predictive of all-cause mortality. Using the continuous variable of telomere length change, each standard deviation (325 base pair) greater increase in telomere length was associated with a 24% reduction in mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61–0.94; p = 0.01), adjusted for age, sex, waist to hip ratio, exercise capacity, LV ejection fraction, serum creatinine, and year 5 telomere length. Mortality occurred in 39% (79/203) of patients who experienced telomere shortening, 22% (45/203) of patients whose telomere length was maintained, and 12% (25/202) of patients who experienced telomere lengthening (p<0.001). As compared with patients whose telomere length was maintained, those who experienced telomere lengthening were 56% less likely to die (HR 0.44, 95% CI, 0.23–0.87). Conclusions In patients with coronary heart disease, an increase in leukocyte telomere length over 5 years is associated with decreased mortality. PMID:27783614

  4. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  5. A biological approach to the interspecies prediction of radiation-induced mortality risk

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.; Olshansky, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    Evolutionary explanations for why sexually reproducing organisms grow old suggest that the forces of natural selection affect the ages when diseases occur that are subject to a genetic influence (referred to here as intrinsic diseases). When extended to the population level for a species, this logic leads to the general prediction that age-specific death rates from intrinsic causes should begin to rise as the force of selection wanes once the characteristic age of sexual maturity is attained. Results consistent with these predictions have been found for laboratory mice, beagles, and humans where, after adjusting for differences in life span, it was demonstrated that these species share a common age pattern of mortality for intrinsic causes of death. In quantitative models used to predict radiation-induced mortality, risks are often expressed as multiples of those observed in a control population. A control population, however, is an aging population. As such, mortality risks related to exposure must be interpreted relative to the age-specific risk of death associated with aging. Given the previous success in making interspecies predictions of age-related mortality, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced mortality observed in one species could also be predicted quantitatively from a model used to describe the mortality consequences of exposure to radiation in a different species. Mortality data for B6CF{sub 1} mice and beagles exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays for the duration of life were used for analysis.

  6. Abdominal aortic calcification is not superior over other vascular calcification in predicting mortality in hemodialysis patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines recommend that a lateral abdominal radiograph should be performed to assess vascular calcification (VC) in dialysis patients. However, abdominal aortic calcification is a prevalent finding, and it remains unclear whether other anatomical areas of VC can predict mortality more accurately. Methods A total of 217 maintenance hemodialysis patients were enrolled at the Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital between July 2010 and March 2011. Radiographs of the abdomen, pelvis and hands were evaluated by a radiologist to evaluate the presence of VC. The correlation between different areas of VC and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality was analyzed using univariate and multivariate models. Results The prevalence of VC was 70.0% (152 patients), and most had abdominal aortic calcification (90.1%). During 26 ± 7 months of follow-up, 37 patients died. The VC score was independently associated with patient mortality. VC observed on abdominal radiographs (abdominal aortic calcification) was associated with all-cause mortality in models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.69; 95%CI, 1.60-13.69) and dialysis factors (HR, 3.38; 95%CI, 1.18-9.69). VC in the pelvis or hands was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for dialysis factors. When three combinations of VC in different radiographs were included in models, the presence of abdominal VC was only significantly associated with all-cause mortality in the integrated model. VC in the abdomen and pelvis was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for cardiovascular factors and the integrated model, but neither was significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. VC in all radiographs was significantly associated with a more than 6-fold risk of all-cause mortality and a more than 5-fold risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to patients without VC. Conclusions VC in different arteries as shown on

  7. Risk prediction for perioperative mortality of endovascular versus open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms using the Medicare population

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kristina A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; O’Malley, A. James; Cotterill, Philip; Jhaveri, Ami; Pomposelli, Frank; Landon, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES The impact of risk factors upon perioperative mortality might differ for patients undergoing open versus endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In order to investigate this, we developed a differential predictive model of perioperative mortality after AAA repair. METHODS A total of 45,660 propensity score matched Medicare beneficiaries undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair from 2001–2004 were studied. Using half the dataset we developed a multiple logistic regression model for a matched cohort of open and EVAR patients and used this to derive an easily evaluable risk prediction score. The remainder of the dataset formed a validation cohort used to confirm results. RESULTS The derivation cohort included 11,415 open and 11,415 endovascular repairs. Perioperative mortality was 5.3% and 1.8% respectively. Independent predictors of mortality (RR, 95% CI) were open repair (3.2, 2.7–3.8), age (71–75 years 1.2, 0.9–1.6; 76–80 years 1.9, 1.4–2.5; >80 years 3.1, 2.4–4.2), female sex (1.5, 1.3–1.8), dialysis (2.6, 1.5–4.6), chronic renal insufficiency (2.0, 1.6–2.6), congestive heart failure (1.7, 1.5–2.1), and vascular disease (1.3, 1.2–1.6). There were no differential predictors of mortality across the two procedures. A simple scoring system was developed from a logistic regression model fit to both endovascular and open patients (area under the ROC curve of 72.6) from which low, medium, and high risk groups were developed. The absolute predicted mortality ranged from 0.7% for an EVAR patient ≤ 70 years of age with no comorbidities to 38% for an open patient > 80 with all the comorbidities considered. Although relative risk was similar among age groups, the absolute difference was greater for older patients (with higher baseline risk). CONCLUSIONS Mortality after AAA repair is predicted by comorbidities, sex, and age and these predictors have similar effects for both methods of AAA

  8. Amiodarone-Induced Cirrhosis of Liver: What Predicts Mortality?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Amiodarone has been used for more than 5 decades for the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias and previously for the treatment of refractory angina. There are multiple well-established side effects of amiodarone. However, amiodarone-induced cirrhosis (AIC) of liver is an underrecognized complication. Methods. A systematic search of Medline from January 1970 to November 2012 by using the following terms, amiodarone and cirrhosis, identified 37 reported cases of which 30 were used in this analysis. Patients were divided into 2 subsets, survivors versus nonsurvivors, at 5 months. Results. Aspartate aminotransferase was significantly lower (P = 0.03) in patients who survived at 5-months (mean 103.33 IU/L) compared to nonsurvivors (mean 216.88 IU/L). There was no statistical difference in the levels of prothrombin time, total bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, cumulative dose, and latency period between the two groups. The prevalence of DM, HTN, HLD, CAD, and CHF was similar in the two groups. None of the above-mentioned variables could be identified as a predictor of survival at 5 months. Conclusion. AIC carries a mortality risk of 60% at 5 months once the diagnosis is established. Further prospective studies are needed to identify predictors of AIC and of mortality or survival in cases of AIC. PMID:23577267

  9. Echocardiographic Assessment of Estimated Right Atrial Pressure and Size Predicts Mortality in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Christopher; Alassas, Khadija; Burger, Charles; Safford, Robert; Pagan, Ricardo; Duello, Katherine; Kumar, Preetham; Zeiger, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated mean right atrial pressure (RAP) measured by cardiac catheterization is an independent risk factor for mortality. Prior studies have demonstrated a modest correlation with invasive and noninvasive echocardiographic RAP, but the prognostic impact of estimated right atrial pressure (eRAP) has not been previously evaluated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 121 consecutive patients with PAH based on right-sided heart catheterization and echocardiography was performed. The eRAP was calculated by inferior vena cava diameter and collapse using 2005 and 2010 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) definitions. Accuracy and correlation of eRAP to RAP was assessed. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis by eRAP, right atrial area, and Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL Registry) risk criteria as well as univariate and multivariate analysis of echocardiographic findings was performed. RESULTS: Elevation of eRAP was associated with decreased survival time compared with lower eRAP (P < .001, relative risk = 7.94 for eRAP > 15 mm Hg vs eRAP ≤ 5 mm Hg). Univariate analysis of echocardiographic parameters including eRAP > 15 mm Hg, right atrial area > 18 cm2, presence of pericardial effusion, right ventricular fractional area change < 35%, and at least moderate tricuspid regurgitation was predictive of poor survival. However, multivariate analysis revealed that eRAP > 15 mm Hg was the only echocardiographic risk factor that was predictive of mortality (hazard ratio = 2.28, P = .037). CONCLUSIONS: Elevation of eRAP by echocardiography at baseline assessment was strongly associated with increased risk of death or transplant in patients with PAH. This measurement may represent an important prognostic component in the comprehensive echocardiographic evaluation of PAH. PMID:25211049

  10. Mortality of Inshore Marine Mammals in Eastern Australia Is Predicted by Freshwater Discharge and Air Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Meager, Justin J.; Limpus, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding environmental and climatic drivers of natural mortality of marine mammals is critical for managing populations effectively and for predicting responses to climate change. Here we use a 17-year dataset to demonstrate a clear relationship between environmental forcing and natural mortality of inshore marine mammals across a subtropical-tropical coastline spanning a latitudinal gradient of 13° (>2000 km of coastline). Peak mortality of inshore dolphins and dugongs followed sustained periods of elevated freshwater discharge (9 months) and low air temperature (3 months). At a regional scale, these results translated into a strong relationship between annual mortality and an index of El Niño-Southern Oscillation. The number of cyclones crossing the coastline had a comparatively weak effect on inshore marine mammal mortality, and only in the tropics. Natural mortality of offshore/migratory cetaceans was not predicted by freshwater discharge, but was related to lagged air temperature. These results represent the first quantitative link between environmental forcing and marine mammal mortality in the tropics, and form the basis of a predictive tool for managers to prepare responses to periods of elevated marine mammal mortality. PMID:24740149

  11. Mortality of inshore marine mammals in eastern Australia is predicted by freshwater discharge and air temperature.

    PubMed

    Meager, Justin J; Limpus, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding environmental and climatic drivers of natural mortality of marine mammals is critical for managing populations effectively and for predicting responses to climate change. Here we use a 17-year dataset to demonstrate a clear relationship between environmental forcing and natural mortality of inshore marine mammals across a subtropical-tropical coastline spanning a latitudinal gradient of 13° (>2000 km of coastline). Peak mortality of inshore dolphins and dugongs followed sustained periods of elevated freshwater discharge (9 months) and low air temperature (3 months). At a regional scale, these results translated into a strong relationship between annual mortality and an index of El Niño-Southern Oscillation. The number of cyclones crossing the coastline had a comparatively weak effect on inshore marine mammal mortality, and only in the tropics. Natural mortality of offshore/migratory cetaceans was not predicted by freshwater discharge, but was related to lagged air temperature. These results represent the first quantitative link between environmental forcing and marine mammal mortality in the tropics, and form the basis of a predictive tool for managers to prepare responses to periods of elevated marine mammal mortality.

  12. A 6-Point TACS Score Predicts In-Hospital Mortality Following Total Anterior Circulation Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Adrian D; Gollop, Nicholas D; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Clark, Allan B; Metcalf, Anthony K; Bowles, Kristian M; Flather, Marcus D; Potter, John F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Little is known about the factors associated with in-hospital mortality following total anterior circulation stroke (TACS). We examined the characteristics and comorbidity data for TACS patients in relation to in-hospital mortality with the aim of developing a simple clinical rule for predicting the acute mortality outcome in TACS. Methods A routine data registry of one regional hospital in the UK was analyzed. The subjects were 2,971 stroke patients with TACS (82% ischemic; median age=81 years, interquartile age range=74–86 years) admitted between 1996 and 2012. Uni- and multivariate regression models were used to estimate in-hospital mortality odds ratios for the study covariates. A 6-point TACS scoring system was developed from regression analyses to predict in-hospital mortality as the outcome. Results Factors associated with in-hospital mortality of TACS were male sex [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.19], age (AOR=4.96 for ≥85 years vs. <65 years), hemorrhagic subtype (AOR=1.70), nonlateralization (AOR=1.75), prestroke disability (AOR=1.73 for moderate disability vs. no symptoms), and congestive heart failure (CHF) (AOR=1.61). Risk stratification using the 6-point TACS Score [T=type (hemorrhage=1 point) and territory (nonlateralization=1 point), A=age (65–84 years=1 point, ≥85 years=2 points), C=CHF (if present=1 point), S=status before stroke (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score of 4 or 5=1 point)] reliably predicted a mortality outcome: score=0, 29.4% mortality; score=1, 46.2% mortality [negative predictive value (NPV)=70.6%, positive predictive value (PPV)=46.2%]; score=2, 64.1% mortality (NPV=70.6, PPV=64.1%); score=3, 73.7% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=73.7%); and score=4 or 5, 81.2% mortality (NPV=70.6%, PPV=81.2%). Conclusions We have identified the key determinants of in-hospital mortality following TACS and derived a 6-point TACS Score that can be used to predict the prognosis of particular patients. PMID:27819414

  13. Sarcopenia predicts readmission and mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Haozhong; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Birong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate the associations between sarcopenia and long‐term mortality and readmission in a population of elderly inpatients in acute care wards. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study in the acute care wards of a teaching hospital in western China. The muscle mass was estimated according to a previously validated anthropometric equation. Handgrip strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer, and physical performance was measured via a 4 m walking test. Sarcopenia was defined according to the recommended diagnostic algorithm of the Asia Working Group for Sarcopenia. The survival status and readmission information were obtained via telephone interviews at 12, 24, and 36 months during the 3 year follow‐up period following the baseline investigation. Results Two hundred and eighty‐eight participants (mean age: 81.1 ± 6.6 years) were included. Forty‐nine participants (17.0%) were identified as having sarcopenia. This condition was similar in men and women (16.9% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P = 0.915). During the 3 year follow‐up period, 49 men (22.7%) and 9 women (16.4%) died (P = 0.307). The mortality of sarcopenic participants was significantly increased compared with non‐sarcopenic participants (40.8% vs. 17.1%, respectively, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and other confounders, sarcopenia was an independent predictor of 3 year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.49; 95% confidential interval: 1.25–4.95) and readmission (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.81; 95% confidential interval: 1.17–2.80). Conclusions Sarcopenia, which is evaluated by a combination of anthropometric measures, gait speed, and handgrip strength, is valuable to predict hospital readmission and long‐term mortality in elderly patients in acute care wards. PMID:27896949

  14. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    PubMed

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  15. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5), admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8%) patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  16. TV viewing time is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Brazilian adults independent of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Turi, Bruna Camilo; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz; Ribeiro Lemes, Ítalo; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Lynch, Kyle Robinson; Asahi Mesquita, Camila Angélica; Fernandes, Rômulo Araújo

    2017-03-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between television (TV) viewing and all-cause mortality among Brazilian adults after six years of follow-up. This longitudinal study started in 2010 in the city of Bauru, SP, Brazil, and involved 970 adults aged ≥ 50 years. Mortality was reported by relatives and confirmed in medical records of the Brazilian National Health System. Physical activity (PA) and TV viewing were assessed by the Baecke questionnaire. Health status, sociodemographic and behavioural covariates were considered as potential confounders. After six years of follow-up, 89 deaths were registered (9.2% [95%CI= 7.4% to 11%]). Type 2 diabetes mellitus was associated with higher risk of mortality (p-value= 0.012). Deaths correlated significantly with age (rho= 0.188; p-value= 0.001), overall PA score (rho= -0.128; p-value= 0.001) and TV viewing (rho= 0.086; p-value= 0.007). Lower percentage of participants reported TV viewing time as often (16%) and very often (5.7%), but there was an association between higher TV viewing time ("often" and "very often" grouped together) and increased mortality after six years of follow-up (p-value= 0.006). The higher TV viewing time was associated with a 44.7% increase in all-cause mortality (HR= 1.447 [1.019 to 2.055]), independently of other potential confounders. In conclusion, the findings from this cohort study identified increased risk of mortality among adults with higher TV viewing time, independently of physical activity and other variables. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. A satellite mortality study to support space systems lifetime prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory F.

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  18. A Satellite Mortality Study to Support Space Systems Lifetime Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  19. Pleural cancer mortality in Spain: time-trends and updating of predictions up to 2020

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A total of 2,514,346 metric tons (Mt) of asbestos were imported into Spain from 1906 until the ban on asbestos in 2002. Our objective was to study pleural cancer mortality trends as an indicator of mesothelioma mortality and update mortality predictions for the periods 2011–2015 and 2016–2020 in Spain. Methods Log-linear Poisson models were fitted to study the effect of age, period of death and birth cohort (APC) on mortality trends. Change points in cohort- and period-effect curvatures were assessed using segmented regression. Fractional power-link APC models were used to predict mortality until 2020. In addition, an alternative model based on national asbestos consumption figures was also used to perform long-term predictions. Results Pleural cancer deaths increased across the study period, rising from 491 in 1976–1980 to 1,249 in 2006–2010. Predictions for the five-year period 2016–2020 indicated a total of 1,319 pleural cancer deaths (264 deaths/year). Forecasts up to 2020 indicated that this increase would continue, though the age-adjusted rates showed a levelling-off in male mortality from 2001 to 2005, corresponding to the lower risk in post-1960 generations. Among women, rates were lower and the mortality trend was also different, indicating that occupational exposure was possibly the single factor having most influence on pleural cancer mortality. Conclusion The cancer mortality-related consequences of human exposure to asbestos are set to persist and remain in evidence until the last surviving members of the exposed cohorts have disappeared. It can thus be assumed that occupationally-related deaths due to pleural mesothelioma will continue to occur in Spain until at least 2040. PMID:24195451

  20. Predicting mortality with biomarkers: a population-based prospective cohort study for elderly Costa Ricans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about adult health and mortality relationships outside high-income nations, partly because few datasets have contained biomarker data in representative populations. Our objective is to determine the prognostic value of biomarkers with respect to total and cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population of a middle-income country, as well as the extent to which they mediate the effects of age and sex on mortality. Methods This is a prospective population-based study in a nationally representative sample of elderly Costa Ricans. Baseline interviews occurred mostly in 2005 and mortality follow-up went through December 2010. Sample size after excluding observations with missing values: 2,313 individuals and 564 deaths. Main outcome: prospective death rate ratios for 22 baseline biomarkers, which were estimated with hazard regression models. Results Biomarkers significantly predict future death above and beyond demographic and self-reported health conditions. The studied biomarkers account for almost half of the effect of age on mortality. However, the sex gap in mortality became several times wider after controlling for biomarkers. The most powerful predictors were simple physical tests: handgrip strength, pulmonary peak flow, and walking speed. Three blood tests also predicted prospective mortality: C-reactive protein (CRP), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Strikingly, high blood pressure (BP) and high total cholesterol showed little or no predictive power. Anthropometric measures also failed to show significant mortality effects. Conclusions This study adds to the growing evidence that blood markers for CRP, HbA1c, and DHEAS, along with organ-specific functional reserve indicators (handgrip, walking speed, and pulmonary peak flow), are valuable tools for identifying vulnerable elderly. The results also highlight the need to better understand an anomaly noted previously in other settings: despite the

  1. Multivariate prediction of total and cardiovascular mortality in an obese Polynesian population.

    PubMed

    Crews, D E

    1989-08-01

    The effects of body weight and blood pressure on the risk of total mortality and mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) were examined in a prospective sample of 5,866 adult residents of American Samoa, a Polynesian population noted for exhibiting high levels of obesity. Data collected during 1975-76 were linked to mortality records from 1976 through 1981. In logistic regression models which did not include blood pressure, percent of desirable weight was an important risk factor for mortality from CVD, but it was not an important risk factor when diastolic blood pressure was included in the model. Percent of desirable weight was not related to mortality from all causes combined in either Samoan men or women. Age and diastolic blood pressure were predictors of total and CVD mortality in men and women. These results, in an obese population, suggest that body weight and obesity are not independently related to excess mortality in the very obese, although they may associate with high blood pressure. These results also suggest that relations between physiological characteristics and mortality may vary with cultural, genetic, or other factors not examined in this study.

  2. Early Standard Electroencephalogram Abnormalities Predict Mortality in Septic Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azabou, Eric; Magalhaes, Eric; Braconnier, Antoine; Yahiaoui, Lyria; Moneger, Guy; Heming, Nicholas; Annane, Djillali; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Durand, Marie-Christine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Porcher, Raphael; Sharshar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is associated with increased mortality, delirium and long-term cognitive impairment in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities occurring at the acute stage of sepsis may correlate with severity of brain dysfunction. Predictive value of early standard EEG abnormalities for mortality in ICU septic patients remains to be assessed. Methods In this prospective, single center, observational study, standard EEG was performed, analyzed and classified according to both Synek and Young EEG scales, in consecutive patients acutely admitted in ICU for sepsis. Delirium, coma and the level of sedation were assessed at the time of EEG recording; and duration of sedation, occurrence of in-ICU delirium or death were assessed during follow-up. Adjusted analyses were carried out using multiple logistic regression. Results One hundred ten patients were included, mean age 63.8 (±18.1) years, median SAPS-II score 38 (29–55). At the time of EEG recording, 46 patients (42%) were sedated and 22 (20%) suffered from delirium. Overall, 54 patients (49%) developed delirium, of which 32 (29%) in the days after EEG recording. 23 (21%) patients died in the ICU. Absence of EEG reactivity was observed in 27 patients (25%), periodic discharges (PDs) in 21 (19%) and electrographic seizures (ESZ) in 17 (15%). ICU mortality was independently associated with a delta-predominant background (OR: 3.36; 95% CI [1.08 to 10.4]), absence of EEG reactivity (OR: 4.44; 95% CI [1.37–14.3], PDs (OR: 3.24; 95% CI [1.03 to 10.2]), Synek grade ≥ 3 (OR: 5.35; 95% CI [1.66–17.2]) and Young grade > 1 (OR: 3.44; 95% CI [1.09–10.8]) after adjustment to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS-II) at admission and level of sedation. Delirium at the time of EEG was associated with ESZ in non-sedated patients (32% vs 10%, p = 0.037); with Synek grade ≥ 3 (36% vs 7%, p< 0.05) and Young grade > 1 (36% vs 17%, p< 0.001). Occurrence of delirium in the days after

  3. Predictive Factors of Hospital Mortality Due to Myocardial Infarction: A Multilevel Analysis of Iran's National Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh; Sajjadi, Homeira; Sadeghi, Mehraban

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding failure to establish the statistical presuppositions for analysis of the data by conventional approaches, hierarchical structure of the data as well as the effect of higher-level variables, this study was conducted to determine the factors independently associated with hospital mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in Iran using a multilevel analysis. Methods: This study was a national, hospital-based, and cross-sectional study. In this study, the data of 20750 new MI patients between April, 2012 and March, 2013 in Iran were used. The hospital mortality due to MI was considered as the dependent variable. The demographic data, clinical and behavioral risk factors at the individual level and environmental data were gathered. Multilevel logistic regression models with Stata software were used to analyze the data. Results: Within 1-year of study, the frequency (%) of hospital mortality within 30 days of admission was derived 2511 (12.1%) patients. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of mortality with (95% confidence interval [CI]) was derived 2.07 (95% CI: 1.5–2.8) for right bundle branch block, 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.7) for ST-segment elevation MI, 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1–1.4) for female gender, and 1.2 (95% CI: 1.1–1.3) for humidity, all of which were considered as risk factors of mortality. But, OR of mortality was 0.7 for precipitation (95% CI: 0.7–0.8) and 0.5 for angioplasty (95% CI: 0.4–0.6) were considered as protective factors of mortality. Conclusions: Individual risk factors had independent effects on the hospital mortality due to MI. Variables in the province level had no significant effect on the outcome of MI. Increasing access and quality to treatment could reduce the mortality due to MI. PMID:26730342

  4. The Independent Action Theory of Mortality as Tested at Fort Detrick

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-12-01

    The independent action theory is sometimes used as an approach to all-or none dosage-effect problems instead of the more usual dosage-effect methods...independent action theory in its simplest form the assumption is that any toxic unit reaching the site of action will be effective. Each unit is believed to

  5. THE INDEPENDENT ACTION THEORY OF MORTALITY AS TESTED AT FORT DETRICK

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The independent action theory is compared with the probit and similar approaches. The basic question is the variation of susceptibility among...survival against dose and failure of estimates of virus population to conform to the dilution ratio are viewed as evidence against the independent action theory .

  6. Disability Stage Is an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Medicare Beneficiaries 65 Years of Age and Older

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Pan, Qiang; Streim, Joel E.; Bogner, Hillary; Xie, Dawei; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stages of activity limitation based on activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) have been found to predict mortality in those age 70 years and above but have not been examined in Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years and older using routinely collected data. Objective To examine the association between functional stages based on activities of ADLs and IADLs with three-year mortality in Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years and older, accounting for baseline sociodemographics, heath status, smoking, subjective health, and psychological well-being. Design Cohort study using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) and associated health care utilization data. Setting Community administered survey. Participants We included 9698 Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age and older who entered the MCBS in 2005–07. Main outcome measures Death within three years of cohort entry. Results The overall mortality rate was 3.6 per 100 person years, and three-year cumulative mortality was 10.3%. Unadjusted three-year mortality was monotonically associated with both ADL stage and IADL stag. Adjusted three-year mortality was associated with ADL and IADL stages, except that in some models the hazard ratio for stage III (which includes persons with atypical activity limitation patterns) was numerically lower than that for stage II. Conclusion We found nearly monotonic relationships between ADL and IADL stage and adjusted three-year mortality. These findings could aid in the development of population health approaches and metrics for evaluating the success of alternative economic, social, or health policies on the longevity of older adults with activity limitations. PMID:26003869

  7. Right atrial volume by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts mortality in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander; Mohamed, Ambreen; Asfour, Ahmed; Ho, Jean; Khan, Saadat A.; Chen, Onn; Klem, Igor; Ramasubbu, Kumudha; Brener, Sorin J.; Heitner, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Right Atrial Volume Index (RAVI) measured by echocardiography is an independent predictor of morbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The aim of this study is to evaluate the predictive value of RAVI assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for all-cause mortality in patients with HFrEF and to assess its additive contribution to the validated Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic heart failure (MAGGIC) score. Methods and results We identified 243 patients (mean age 60 ± 15; 33% women) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35% measured by CMR. Right atrial volume was calculated based on area in two- and four -chamber views using validated equation, followed by indexing to body surface area. MAGGIC score was calculated using online calculator. During mean period of 2.4 years 33 patients (14%) died. The mean RAVI was 53 ± 26 ml/m2; significantly larger in patients with than without an event (78.7±29 ml/m2 vs. 48±22 ml/m2, p<0.001). RAVI (per ml/m2) was an independent predictor of mortality [HR = 1.03 (1.01–1.04), p = 0.001]. RAVI has a greater discriminatory ability than LVEF, left atrial volume index and right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) (C-statistic 0.8±0.08 vs 0.55±0.1, 0.62±0.11, 0.68±0.11, respectively, all p<0.02). The addition of RAVI to the MAGGIC score significantly improves risk stratification (integrated discrimination improvement 13%, and category-free net reclassification improvement 73%, both p<0.001). Conclusion RAVI by CMR is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with HFrEF. The addition of RAVI to MAGGIC score improves mortality risk stratification. PMID:28369148

  8. The MDS Mortality Risk Index: The evolution of a method for predicting 6-month mortality in nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate prognosis is vital to the initiation of advance care planning particularly in a vulnerable, at risk population such as care home residents. The aim of this paper is to report on the revision and simplification of the MDS Mortality Rating Index (MMRI) for use in clinical practice to predict the probability of death in six months for care home residents. Methods The design was a secondary analysis of a US Minimum Data Set (MDS) for long term care residents using regression analysis to identify predictors of mortality within six months. Results Using twelve easy to collect items, the probability of mortality within six months was accurately predicted within the MDS database. The items are: admission to the care home within three months; lost weight unintentionally in past three months; renal failure; chronic heart failure; poor appetite; male; dehydrated; short of breath; active cancer diagnosis; age; deteriorated cognitive skills in past three months; activities of daily living score. Conclusion A lack of recognition of the proximity of death is often blamed for inappropriate admission to hospital at the end of an older person's life. An accurate prognosis for older adults living in a residential or nursing home can facilitate end of life decision making and planning for preferred place of care at the end of life. The original MMRI was derived and validated from a large database of long term care residents in the USA. However, this simplification of the revised index (MMRI-R) may provide a means for facilitating prognostication and end of life discussions for application outside the USA where the MDS is not in use. Prospective testing is needed to further test the accuracy of the MMRI-R and its application in the UK and other non-MDS settings. PMID:20637076

  9. Cardiac natriuretic peptides are related to left ventricular mass and function and predict mortality in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, C; Mallamaci, F; Benedetto, F A; Tripepi, G; Parlongo, S; Cataliotti, A; Cutrupi, S; Giacone, G; Bellanuova, I; Cottini, E; Malatino, L S

    2001-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship among brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and left ventricular mass (LVM), ejection fraction, and LV geometry in a large cohort of dialysis patients without heart failure (n = 246) and to test the prediction power of these peptides for total and cardiovascular mortality. In separate multivariate models of LVM, BNP and ANP were the strongest independent correlates of the LVM index. In these models, the predictive power of BNP was slightly stronger than that of ANP. Both natriuretic peptides also were the strongest independent predictors of ejection fraction, and again BNP was a slightly better predictor of ejection fraction than ANP. In separate multivariate Cox models, the relative risk of death was significantly higher in patients of the third tertile of the distribution of BNP and ANP than in those of the first tertile (BNP, 7.14 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.83 to 18.01, P = 0.00001]; ANP, 4.22 [95% CI, 1.79 to 9.92, P = 0.001]), and a similar difference was found for cardiovascular death (BNP, 6.72 [95% CI, 2.44 to 18.54, P = 0.0002]; ANP, 3.80 [95% CI, 1.44 to 10.03, P = 0.007]). BNP but not ANP remained as an independent predictor of death in a Cox's model including LVM and ejection fraction. Cardiac natriuretic peptides are linked independently to LVM and function in dialysis patients and predict overall and cardiovascular mortality. The measurement of the plasma concentration of BNP and ANP may be useful for risk stratification in these patients.

  10. Preoperative risk score predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Su, Yu-Chieh; Wei, Chang-Kao; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Juang, Shiun-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2014-09-01

    The impact of important preexisting comorbidities, such as liver and renal disease, on the outcome of liver resection remains unclear. Identification of patients at risk of mortality will aid in improving preoperative preparations. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a population-based score based on available preoperative and predictable parameters predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection using data from a hepatitis endemic country.We identified 13,159 patients who underwent liver resection between 2002 and 2006 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In a randomly selected half of the total patients, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop a prediction score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by patient demographics, preoperative liver disease and comorbidities, indication for surgery, and procedure type. The score was validated with the remaining half of the patients.Overall 90-day mortality was 3.9%. Predictive characteristics included in the model were age, preexisting cirrhosis-related complications, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, renal disease, malignancy, and procedure type. Four risk groups were stratified by mortality scores of 1.1%, 2.2%, 7.7%, and 15%. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications were the strongest predictors. The score discriminated well in both the derivation and validation sets with c-statistics of 0.75 and 0.75, respectively.This population-based score could identify patients at risk of 90-day mortality before liver resection. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications had the strongest influence on mortality. This score enables preoperative risk stratification, decision-making, quality assessment, and counseling for individual patients.

  11. Low lean tissue mass is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with stages 4 and 5 non-dialysis chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Soraya; Macías, Nicolás; Aragoncillo, Inés; Santos, Alba; Galán, Isabel; Cedeño, Santiago; Manuel López-Gómez, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mortality in patients with stages 4 and 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) is higher than in the general population. Body composition predicts mortality. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of body composition on mortality in patients with stages 4 and 5 non-dialysis CKD. Methods: We performed a prospective study of 356 patients with stages 4 and 5 non-dialysis CKD. At baseline, we recorded general characteristics, history of cardiovascular events, body composition, serum inflammatory markers, nutrition and cardiac biomarkers. Body composition was analysed using bioimpedance spectroscopy. We recorded the lean tissue index (LTI), fat tissue index (FTI) and overhydration (OH). During a median (range) follow-up of 22 (3–49) months, we recorded mortality, cardiovascular events and progress to renal replacement therapy. Results: At baseline, mean (± standard deviation) age was 67 ± 13 years (men 64%; diabetes 36%). Mean body mass index was 28.2 ± 12.8 kg/m2, the FTI was 12.3 ± 5.6 kg/m2, the LTI was 15.7 ± 3.4 kg/m2 and median (interquartile range) OH was 0.6 (−0.4 to 1.5) L. Sixty-four (18%) patients died during follow-up. The univariate Cox analysis showed an association between mortality and age, low LTI, high Charlson comorbidity index, previous cardiovascular events, OH, low albumin and prealbumin levels, and high C-reactive protein levels. Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed higher survival in patients with a higher LTI (log-rank, 9.47; P = 0.002). The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed an association between mortality and low LTI (P = 0.031), previous cardiovascular events (P = 0.003) and high Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.01). We did not find any association between body composition and cardiovascular events or renal replacement therapy. Conclusions: A low LTI is an independent factor for mortality in patients with stages 4 and 5 CKD.

  12. Predicting all-cause mortality from basic physiology in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William B; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-02-01

    Using longitudinal data from a cohort of 1349 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, we show that as early as 28-38 years of age, almost 10% of variation in future lifespan can be predicted from simple clinical parameters. Specifically, we found diastolic and systolic blood pressure, blood glucose, weight, and body mass index (BMI) to be relevant to lifespan. These and similar parameters have been well-characterized as risk factors in the relatively narrow context of cardiovascular disease and mortality in middle to old age. In contrast, we demonstrate here that such measures can be used to predict all-cause mortality from mid-adulthood onward. Further, we find that different clinical measurements are predictive of lifespan in different age regimes. Specifically, blood pressure and BMI are predictive of all-cause mortality from ages 35 to 60, while blood glucose is predictive from ages 57 to 73. Moreover, we find that several of these parameters are best considered as measures of a rate of 'damage accrual', such that total historical exposure, rather than current measurement values, is the most relevant risk factor (as with pack-years of cigarette smoking). In short, we show that simple physiological measurements have broader lifespan-predictive value than indicated by previous work and that incorporating information from multiple time points can significantly increase that predictive capacity. In general, our results apply equally to both men and women, although some differences exist.

  13. Clostridium difficile Associated Risk of Death Score (CARDS): A novel severity score to predict mortality among hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Zain; Fabersunne, Camila Cribb; Smith, Mark B.; Alm, Eric J.; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is public health threat and associated with significant mortality. However, there is a paucity of objectively derived CDI severity scoring systems to predict mortality. Aims To develop a novel CDI risk score to predict mortality entitled: Clostridium difficile Associated Risk of Death Score (CARDS). Methods We obtained data from the United States 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. All CDI-associated hospitalizations were identified using discharge codes (ICD-9-CM, 008.45). Multivariate logistic regression was utilized to identify independent predictors of mortality. CARDS was calculated by assigning a numeric weight to each parameter based on their odds ratio in the final logistic model. Predictive properties of model discrimination were assessed using the c-statistic and validated in an independent sample using the 2010 NIS database. Results We identified 77,776 hospitalizations, yielding an estimate of 374,747 cases with an associated diagnosis of CDI in the United States, 8% of whom died in the hospital. The 8 severity score predictors were identified on multivariate analysis: age, cardiopulmonary disease, malignancy, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, acute renal failure, liver disease and ICU admission, with weights ranging from −1 (for diabetes) to 5 (for ICU admission). The overall risk score in the cohort ranged from 0 to 18. Mortality increased significantly as CARDS increased. CDI-associated mortality was 1.2% with a CARDS of 0 compared to 100% with CARDS of 18. The model performed equally well in our validation cohort. Conclusion CARDS is a promising simple severity score to predict mortality among those hospitalized with CDI. PMID:26849527

  14. Childhood-Onset Disease Predicts Mortality in an Adult Cohort of Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Aimee O.; Trupin, Laura; Yazdany, Jinoos; Panopalis, Peter; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Yelin, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood-onset disease as a predictor of mortality in a cohort of adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Data were derived from the University of California Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 957 adult subjects with SLE that includes 98 subjects with childhood-onset SLE. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained via telephone interviews conducted between 2002-2007. The number of deaths during 5 years of follow-up was determined and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the cohort, and across age groups, were calculated. Kaplan-Meier life table analysis was used to compare mortality rates between childhood (defined as SLE diagnosis <18 years) and adult-onset SLE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine predictors of mortality. Results During the median follow-up period of 48 months, 72 deaths (7.5% of subjects) occurred, including 9 (12.5%) among those with childhood-onset SLE. The overall SMR was 2.5 (CI 2.0-3.2). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, after adjusting for age, childhood-onset subjects were at increased risk for mortality throughout the follow-up period (p<0.0001). In a multivariate model adjusting for age, disease duration and other covariates, childhood-onset SLE was independently associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-7.3), as was low socioeconomic status measured by education (HR: 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2) and end stage renal disease (HR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.1-4.0). Conclusion Childhood-onset SLE was a strong predictor of mortality in this cohort. Interventions are needed to prevent early mortality in this population. PMID:20235215

  15. Delta-He: a novel marker of inflammation predicting mortality and ESA response in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Kristin; Beshara, Soheir; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimbürger, Olof; Lindholm, Bengt; Hansson, Magnus; Hylander, Britta; Germanis, Guna; Stenvinkel, Peter; Barany, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation impairs erythropoiesis, iron availability and is associated with a higher mortality risk in patients with end-stage renal disease. We studied the associations between Delta-He [the difference between the reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret-He) and erythrocyte haemoglobin content], a suggested marker of iron availability, and markers of inflammation, iron status, response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and mortality in prevalent peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods Eighty-two PD patients were followed weekly for 12 weeks with an additional follow-up of 36 months. Delta-He, Ret-He and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured weekly and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and iron markers every fourth week. Mortality risk was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for potential confounding factors. The relationships between ESA response, inflammatory markers, iron markers and Delta-He were evaluated in the PD patients. The relationship between Delta-He and iron markers was analysed in 87 healthy subjects. Results Delta-He correlated with IL-6 (rho = 0.48, P < 0.001), hs-CRP (rho = 0.36, P < 0.001) and ESA hyporesponsivess index (EHRI; rho = −0.44, P < 0.001) in the PD patients. Delta-He did not correlate with iron markers in PD patients nor in healthy subjects. The mean Delta-He levels were significantly different between the tertiles of EHRI (P < 0.01). Delta-He was associated with all-cause mortality risk in PD patients after adjusting for age, gender, hs-CRP, comorbidity and nutritional status [OR 0.70 (0.51–0.96), P < 0.05]. Conclusions Delta-He independently predicts all-cause mortality in PD patients after adjusting for potential confounders and is a predictor of ESA response in PD patients. PMID:25852889

  16. Height loss starting in middle age predicts increased mortality in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Masunari, Naomi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Takahashi, Ikuno; Yamada, Michiko; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory-disease mortality among the elderly, even after adjusting for potential risk factors.

  17. DNA methylation signatures in peripheral blood strongly predict all-cause mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wilson, Rory; Heiss, Jonathan; Breitling, Lutz P.; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Schöttker, Ben; Holleczek, Bernd; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation (DNAm) has been revealed to play a role in various diseases. Here we performed epigenome-wide screening and validation to identify mortality-related DNAm signatures in a general population-based cohort with up to 14 years follow-up. In the discovery panel in a case-cohort approach, 11,063 CpGs reach genome-wide significance (FDR<0.05). 58 CpGs, mapping to 38 well-known disease-related genes and 14 intergenic regions, are confirmed in a validation panel. A mortality risk score based on ten selected CpGs exhibits strong association with all-cause mortality, showing hazard ratios (95% CI) of 2.16 (1.10–4.24), 3.42 (1.81–6.46) and 7.36 (3.69–14.68), respectively, for participants with scores of 1, 2–5 and 5+ compared with a score of 0. These associations are confirmed in an independent cohort and are independent from the ‘epigenetic clock'. In conclusion, DNAm of multiple disease-related genes are strongly linked to mortality outcomes. The DNAm-based risk score might be informative for risk assessment and stratification. PMID:28303888

  18. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos têm demonstrado a acurácia diagnóstica e o valor prognóstico da ecocardiografia com estresse f

  19. Growth rate predicts mortality of Abies concolor in both burned and unburned stands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Mutch, Linda S.; Johnson, Veronica G.; Esperanza, Annie M.; Parsons, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Tree mortality is often the result of both long-term and short-term stress. Growth rate, an indicator of long-term stress, is often used to estimate probability of death in unburned stands. In contrast, probability of death in burned stands is modeled as a function of short-term disturbance severity. We sought to narrow this conceptual gap by determining (i) whether growth rate, in addition to crown scorch, is a predictor of mortality in burned stands and (ii) whether a single, simple model could predict tree death in both burned and unburned stands. Observations of 2622 unburned and 688 burned Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindl. (white fir) in the Sierra Nevada of California, U.S.A., indicated that growth rate was a significant predictor of mortality in the unburned stands, while both crown scorch and radial growth were significant predictors of mortality in the burned stands. Applying the burned stand model to unburned stands resulted in an overestimation of the unburned stand mortality rate. While failing to create a general model of tree death for A. concolor, our findings underscore the idea that similar processes may affect mortality in disturbed and undisturbed stands.

  20. Nutritional risk screening 2002 and ASA score predict mortality after elective liver resection for malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Nelio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate whether Nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS 2002) at hospital admission may predict postoperative mortality and complications within 90 days after elective liver resection for malignancy. Material and methods A retrospective cohort study of a prospective database was performed. Two-hundred and three patients with elective liver resection for malignancy between 9 November 2007 and 27 May 2014 were included. Clinical data, NRS 2002, surgical procedures and histology were recorded. The primary endpoint was 90-day mortality. Complications were registered within 90 days postoperatively according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results The 90-day mortality was 5.9% and the overall complication rate was 59.1%. Multivariate analysis identified NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 (odds ratio (OR) = 9.24; p = 0.005) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥ 3 (OR = 6.20; p = 0.009) as predictors of 90-day mortality. The 90-day mortality was 27.6% (8/29) for patients with both risk factors (NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 and ASA score ≥ 3) vs. 2.3% (4/174) for patients without or with only one risk factor (p < 0.001). Conclusions In the present study NRS 2002 score ≥ 4 and ASA score ≥ 3 were predictors of 90-day mortality after elective liver resection for malignancy. PMID:28261289

  1. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit

    PubMed Central

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hancı, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality. At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed. A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality. The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group. PMID

  2. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit.

    PubMed

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hanc, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality.At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed.A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality.The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group.

  3. High Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Cardiovascular Mortality in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a novel simple biomarker of inflammation. It has emerged as a predictor of poor prognosis in cancer and cardiovascular disease in general population. But little was known of its prognostic value in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Here we investigated the association between NLR and cardiovascular risk markers, including increased pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and intima-media thickness (IMT), and mortality in HD patients. Two hundred and sixty-eight HD patients were enrolled in this study and were followed for 36 months. The primary end point was all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate the adjusted hazard ratios for NLR on all-cause and cardiovascular survival. We pinpointed that higher NLR in HD patients was a predictor of increased PP, LVMI, and IMT; HD patients with higher NLR had a lower survival at the end of the study; furthermore, high NLR was an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality when adjusted for other risk factors. In conclusion, higher NLR in HD patients was associated with cardiovascular risk factors and mortality. PMID:28316378

  4. Accuracy and Calibration of Computational Approaches for Inpatient Mortality Predictive Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Nakas, Christos T.; Schütz, Narayan; Werners, Marcus; Leichtle, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) data can be a key resource for decision-making support in clinical practice in the “big data” era. The complete database from early 2012 to late 2015 involving hospital admissions to Inselspital Bern, the largest Swiss University Hospital, was used in this study, involving over 100,000 admissions. Age, sex, and initial laboratory test results were the features/variables of interest for each admission, the outcome being inpatient mortality. Computational decision support systems were utilized for the calculation of the risk of inpatient mortality. We assessed the recently proposed Acute Laboratory Risk of Mortality Score (ALaRMS) model, and further built generalized linear models, generalized estimating equations, artificial neural networks, and decision tree systems for the predictive modeling of the risk of inpatient mortality. The Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) for ALaRMS marginally corresponded to the anticipated accuracy (AUC = 0.858). Penalized logistic regression methodology provided a better result (AUC = 0.872). Decision tree and neural network-based methodology provided even higher predictive performance (up to AUC = 0.912 and 0.906, respectively). Additionally, decision tree-based methods can efficiently handle Electronic Health Record (EHR) data that have a significant amount of missing records (in up to >50% of the studied features) eliminating the need for imputation in order to have complete data. In conclusion, we show that statistical learning methodology can provide superior predictive performance in comparison to existing methods and can also be production ready. Statistical modeling procedures provided unbiased, well-calibrated models that can be efficient decision support tools for predicting inpatient mortality and assigning preventive measures. PMID:27414408

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension an Independent Risk Factor for Death in Intensive Care Unit: Correlation of Hemodynamic Factors with Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Saydain, Ghulam; Awan, Aamir; Manickam, Palaniappan; Kleinow, Paul; Badr, Safwan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Critically ill patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) pose additional challenges due to the existence of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of hemodynamic factors on the outcome. METHODS We reviewed the records of patients with a diagnosis of PH admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to evaluating traditional hemodynamic parameters, we defined severe PH as right atrial pressure >20 mmHg, mean pulmonary artery pressure >55 mmHg, or cardiac index (CI) <2 L/min/m2. We also defined the RV functional index (RFI) as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) adjusted for CI as PASP/CI; increasing values reflect RV dysfunction. RESULTS Fifty-three patients (mean age 60 years, 72% women, 79% Blacks), were included in the study. Severe PH was present in 68% of patients who had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (6.8 ± 3.3 vs 3.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.001) and overall in-hospital mortality (36% vs 6%; P = 0.02) compared to nonsevere patients, although Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores (19.9 ± 7.5 vs 18.5 ± 6.04; P = 0.52) were similar and sepsis was more frequent among nonsevere PH patients (31 vs 64%; P = 0.02). Severe PH (P = 0.04), lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.04), and CI (P = 0.01); need for invasive ventilation (P = 0.02) and vasopressors (P = 0.03); and higher SOFA (P = 0.001), APACHE II (P = 0.03), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) (P = 0.01), and RFI (P = 0.004) were associated with increased mortality. In a multivariate model, SOFA [OR = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (C.I.) = 1.09–1.93; P = 0.01], PVRI (OR = 1.12, 95% C.I. = 1.02–1.24; P = 0.02), and increasing RFI (OR = 1.06, 95% C.I. = 1.01–1.11; P = 0.01) were independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION PH is an independent risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients. Composite factors rather than individual hemodynamic parameters are better predictors of

  6. Multiple, but not traditional risk factors predict mortality in older people: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    PubMed

    Hirani, Vasant; Naganathan, Vasi; Blyth, Fiona; Le Couteur, David G; Gnjidic, Danijela; Stanaway, Fiona F; Seibel, Markus J; Waite, Louise M; Handelsman, David J; Cumming, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identify the common risk factors for mortality in community-dwelling older men. A prospective population-based study was conducted with a median of 6.7 years of follow-up. Participants included 1705 men aged ≥70 years at baseline (2005-2007) living in the community in Sydney, Australia. Demographic information, lifestyle factors, health status, self-reported history of diseases, physical performance measures, blood pressure, height and weight, disability (activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADLs, instrumental ADLs (IADLs)), cognitive status, depressive symptoms and blood analyte measures were considered. Cox regression analyses were conducted to model predictors delete time until of mortality. During follow-up, 461 men (27 %) died. Using Cox proportional hazards model, significant predictors of delete time to time to mortality included in the final model (p < 0.05) were older age, body mass index < 20 kg m(2), high white cell count, anaemia, low albumin, current smoking, history of cancer, history of myocardial infarction, history of congestive heart failure, depressive symptoms and ADL and IADL disability and impaired chair stands. We found that overweight and obesity and/or being a lifelong non-drinker of alcohol were protective against mortality. Compared to men with less than or equal to one risk factor, the hazard ratio in men with three risk factors was 2.5; with four risk factors, it was 4.0; with five risk factors, it was 4.9; and for six or more risk factors, it was 11.4, respectively. We have identified common risk factors that predict mortality that may be useful in making clinical decisions among older people living in the community. Our findings suggest that, in primary care, screening and management of multiple risk factors are important to consider for extending survival, rather than simply considering individual risk factors in isolation. Some of the "traditional" risk factors for mortality in a

  7. Psychological Language on Twitter Predicts County-Level Heart Disease Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Kern, Margaret L.; Park, Gregory; Labarthe, Darwin R.; Merchant, Raina M.; Jha, Sneha; Agrawal, Megha; Dziurzynski, Lukasz A.; Sap, Maarten; Weeg, Christopher; Larson, Emily E.; Ungar, Lyle H.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Hostility and chronic stress are known risk factors for heart disease, but they are costly to assess on a large scale. We used language expressed on Twitter to characterize community-level psychological correlates of age-adjusted mortality from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD). Language patterns reflecting negative social relationships, disengagement, and negative emotions—especially anger—emerged as risk factors; positive emotions and psychological engagement emerged as protective factors. Most correlations remained significant after controlling for income and education. A cross-sectional regression model based only on Twitter language predicted AHD mortality significantly better than did a model that combined 10 common demographic, socioeconomic, and health risk factors, including smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Capturing community psychological characteristics through social media is feasible, and these characteristics are strong markers of cardiovascular mortality at the community level. PMID:25605707

  8. Psychological language on Twitter predicts county-level heart disease mortality.

    PubMed

    Eichstaedt, Johannes C; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Kern, Margaret L; Park, Gregory; Labarthe, Darwin R; Merchant, Raina M; Jha, Sneha; Agrawal, Megha; Dziurzynski, Lukasz A; Sap, Maarten; Weeg, Christopher; Larson, Emily E; Ungar, Lyle H; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-02-01

    Hostility and chronic stress are known risk factors for heart disease, but they are costly to assess on a large scale. We used language expressed on Twitter to characterize community-level psychological correlates of age-adjusted mortality from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD). Language patterns reflecting negative social relationships, disengagement, and negative emotions-especially anger-emerged as risk factors; positive emotions and psychological engagement emerged as protective factors. Most correlations remained significant after controlling for income and education. A cross-sectional regression model based only on Twitter language predicted AHD mortality significantly better than did a model that combined 10 common demographic, socioeconomic, and health risk factors, including smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Capturing community psychological characteristics through social media is feasible, and these characteristics are strong markers of cardiovascular mortality at the community level.

  9. New consensus definition for acute kidney injury accurately predicts 30-day mortality in cirrhosis with infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Florence; O’Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Patton, Heather; Kamath, Patrick S; Fallon, Michael B; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Subramanian, Ram M.; Malik, Raza; Maliakkal, Benedict; Thacker, Leroy R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims A consensus conference proposed that cirrhosis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) be defined as an increase in serum creatinine by >50% from the stable baseline value in <6 months or by ≥0.3mg/dL in <48 hrs. We prospectively evaluated the ability of these criteria to predict mortality within 30 days among hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and infection. Methods 337 patients with cirrhosis admitted with or developed an infection in hospital (56% men; 56±10 y old; model for end-stage liver disease score, 20±8) were followed. We compared data on 30-day mortality, hospital length-of-stay, and organ failure between patients with and without AKI. Results 166 (49%) developed AKI during hospitalization, based on the consensus criteria. Patients who developed AKI had higher admission Child-Pugh (11.0±2.1 vs 9.6±2.1; P<.0001), and MELD scores (23±8 vs17±7; P<.0001), and lower mean arterial pressure (81±16mmHg vs 85±15mmHg; P<.01) than those who did not. Also higher amongst patients with AKI were mortality in ≤30 days (34% vs 7%), intensive care unit transfer (46% vs 20%), ventilation requirement (27% vs 6%), and shock (31% vs 8%); AKI patients also had longer hospital stays (17.8±19.8 days vs 13.3±31.8 days) (all P<.001). 56% of AKI episodes were transient, 28% persistent, and 16% resulted in dialysis. Mortality was 80% among those without renal recovery, higher compared to partial (40%) or complete recovery (15%), or AKI-free patients (7%; P<.0001). Conclusions 30-day mortality is 10-fold higher among infected hospitalized cirrhotic patients with irreversible AKI than those without AKI. The consensus definition of AKI accurately predicts 30-day mortality, length of hospital stay, and organ failure. PMID:23999172

  10. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis.

  11. Evaluating the predictive performance of empirical estimators of natural mortality rate using information on over 200 fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Then, Amy Y.; Hoenig, John M; Hall, Norman G.; Hewitt, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been developed in the last 70 years to predict the natural mortality rate, M, of a stock based on empirical evidence from comparative life history studies. These indirect or empirical methods are used in most stock assessments to (i) obtain estimates of M in the absence of direct information, (ii) check on the reasonableness of a direct estimate of M, (iii) examine the range of plausible M estimates for the stock under consideration, and (iv) define prior distributions for Bayesian analyses. The two most cited empirical methods have appeared in the literature over 2500 times to date. Despite the importance of these methods, there is no consensus in the literature on how well these methods work in terms of prediction error or how their performance may be ranked. We evaluate estimators based on various combinations of maximum age (tmax), growth parameters, and water temperature by seeing how well they reproduce >200 independent, direct estimates of M. We use tenfold cross-validation to estimate the prediction error of the estimators and to rank their performance. With updated and carefully reviewed data, we conclude that a tmax-based estimator performs the best among all estimators evaluated. The tmax-based estimators in turn perform better than the Alverson–Carney method based on tmax and the von Bertalanffy K coefficient, Pauly's method based on growth parameters and water temperature and methods based just on K. It is possible to combine two independent methods by computing a weighted mean but the improvement over the tmax-based methods is slight. Based on cross-validation prediction error, model residual patterns, model parsimony, and biological considerations, we recommend the use of a tmax-based estimator (M=4.899t−0.916max, prediction error = 0.32) when possible and a growth-based method (M=4.118K0.73L−0.33∞ , prediction error = 0.6) otherwise.

  12. Telomerase-independent paths to immortality in predictable cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Durant, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers commandeer the activity of telomerase - the remarkable enzyme responsible for prolonging cellular lifespan by maintaining the length of telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase is only normally active in embryonic and highly proliferative somatic cells. Thus, targeting telomerase is an attractive anti-cancer therapeutic rationale currently under investigation in various phases of clinical development. However, previous reports suggest that an average of 10-15% of all cancers lose the functional activity of telomerase and most of these turn to an Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway (ALT). ALT-positive tumours will therefore not respond to anti-telomerase therapies and there is a real possibility that such drugs would be toxic to normal telomerase-utilising cells and ultimately select for resistant cells that activate an ALT mechanism. ALT exploits certain DNA damage response (DDR) components to counteract telomere shortening and rapid trimming. ALT has been reported in many cancer subtypes including sarcoma, gastric carcinoma, central nervous system malignancies, subtypes of kidney (Wilm's Tumour) and bladder carcinoma, mesothelioma, malignant melanoma and germ cell testicular cancers to name but a few. A recent heroic study that analysed ALT in over six thousand tumour samples supports this historical spread, although only reporting an approximate 4% prevalence. This review highlights the various methods of ALT detection, unravels several molecular ALT models thought to promote telomere maintenance and elongation, spotlights the DDR components known to facilitate these and explores why certain tissues are more likely to subvert DDR away from its usually protective functions, resulting in a predictive pattern of prevalence in specific cancer subsets.

  13. Comparison of mental status scales for predicting mortality on the general wards

    PubMed Central

    Zadravecz, Frank J.; Tien, Linda; Robertson-Dick, Brian J.; Yuen, Trevor C.; Twu, Nicole M.; Churpek, Matthew M.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Altered mental status is a significant predictor of mortality in inpatients. Several scales exist to characterize mental status, including the AVPU (Alert, responds to Voice, responds to Pain, Unresponsive) scale, which is used in many early warning scores in the general ward setting. The use of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) is not well established in this population. Objective To compare the accuracies of AVPU, GCS, and RASS for predicting inpatient mortality Design Retrospective cohort study Setting Single urban academic medical center Participants Adult inpatients on the general wards Measurements Nurses recorded GCS and RASS on consecutive adult hospitalizations. AVPU was extracted from the eye subscale of the GCS. We compared the accuracies of each scale for predicting in-hospital mortality within 24 hours of a mental status observation using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results 295,974 paired observations of GCS and RASS were obtained from 26,873 admissions; 417 (1.6%) resulted in in-hospital death. GCS and RASS more accurately predicted mortality than AVPU (AUC 0.80 and 0.82, respectively vs. 0.73; p<0.001 for both comparisons). Simultaneous use of GCS and RASS produced an AUC of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.82-0.87; p<0.001 when compared to all three scales). Conclusions In ward patients, both GCS and RASS were significantly more accurate predictors of mortality than AVPU. In addition, combining GCS and RASS was more accurate than any scale alone. Routine tracking of GCS and/or RASS on general wards may improve accuracy of detecting clinical deterioration. PMID:26374471

  14. Cholesterol-independent effects of atorvastatin prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a mouse model of atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lynn; Rombouts, Miche; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2016-05-01

    Because cholesterol-independent effects of statins are difficult to determine in patients, we studied these pleiotropic effects in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (Fbn1(C1039G+/-)). These mice develop exacerbated atherosclerosis and spontaneous plaque ruptures, accompanied by myocardial infarctions (MI) and sudden death. ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice were fed a Western diet (WD). At week 10 of WD, mice were divided in a control (WD), atorvastatin (10mg/kg/day + WD) and cholesterol withdrawal group (cholW, normal chow). The latter was included to compare the effects of atorvastatin with dietary lipid lowering. Fifteen weeks later, the mice were sacrificed. CholW, but not atorvastatin, reduced plasma cholesterol. Survival increased from 50% to 90% both in cholW and atorvastatin treated mice. CholW as well as atorvastatin treatment increased plaque collagen and fibrous cap thickness, but they did not affect the amount of plaque macrophages and T cells. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity was significantly lower and the expression of MMP-12, TNF-α and IL-1β was strongly reduced in both treatment groups. Blood monocytes and neutrophils returned to baseline levels (ApoE(-/-) mice before the onset of atherosclerosis). Importantly, atorvastatin but not cholW significantly reduced coronary stenosis (from 50 to 28%) and the occurrence of MI (from 43 to 10%). In conclusion, independent of cholesterol lowering, atorvastatin significantly reduced mortality, plaque vulnerability and inflammation to the same extent as cholW. In addition, atorvastatin but not cholW reduced coronary stenosis and the occurrence of MI. These data unequivocally illustrate the significance of the pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin in the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  15. TI-59 programmable calculator program for calculating predicted operative mortality in general surgery.

    PubMed

    Haddad, M; Reiss, R; Lilos, P; Fuchs, C

    1986-01-01

    A program for the TI-59 programmable calculator for calculating predicted postoperative mortality is presented. Input data are based on handy, clinical, non-invasive pre-operative and operative parameters retrieved mostly significant in this respect by former multivariate logistic regression analysis of a broad data-base; their relative weights are incorporated into the program data base as basic coefficients. Considerations employed in its usage are discussed, as well as possible future technical and/or environmental modifications.

  16. Using Wind Tunnels to Predict Bird Mortality in Wind Farms: The Case of Griffon Vultures

    PubMed Central

    de Lucas, Manuela; Ferrer, Miguel; Janss, Guyonne F. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Wind farms have shown a spectacular growth during the last 15 years. Avian mortality through collision with moving rotor blades is well-known as one of the main adverse impacts of wind farms. In Spain, the griffon vulture incurs the highest mortality rates in wind farms. Methodology/Principal Findings As far as we know, this study is the first attempt to predict flight trajectories of birds in order to foresee potentially dangerous areas for wind farm development. We analyse topography and wind flows in relation to flight paths of griffon vultures, using a scaled model of the wind farm area in an aerodynamic wind tunnel, and test the difference between the observed flight paths of griffon vultures and the predominant wind flows. Different wind currents for each wind direction in the aerodynamic model were observed. Simulations of wind flows in a wind tunnel were compared with observed flight paths of griffon vultures. No statistical differences were detected between the observed flight trajectories of griffon vultures and the wind passages observed in our wind tunnel model. A significant correlation was found between dead vultures predicted proportion of vultures crossing those cells according to the aerodynamic model. Conclusions Griffon vulture flight routes matched the predominant wind flows in the area (i.e. they followed the routes where less flight effort was needed). We suggest using these kinds of simulations to predict flight paths over complex terrains can inform the location of wind turbines and thereby reduce soaring bird mortality. PMID:23152764

  17. Temperature multiscale entropy analysis: a promising marker for early prediction of mortality in septic patients.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, V E; Chouvarda, I G; Maglaveras, N K; Baltopoulos, G I; Pneumatikos, I A

    2013-11-01

    A few studies estimating temperature complexity have found decreased Shannon entropy, during severe stress. In this study, we measured both Shannon and Tsallis entropy of temperature signals in a cohort of critically ill patients and compared these measures with the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, in terms of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. Skin temperature was recorded in 21 mechanically ventilated patients, who developed sepsis and septic shock during the first 24 h of an ICU-acquired infection. Shannon and Tsallis entropies were calculated in wavelet-based decompositions of the temperature signal. Statistically significant differences of entropy features were tested between survivors and non-survivors and classification models were built, for predicting final outcome. Significantly reduced Tsallis and Shannon entropies were found in non-survivors (seven patients, 33%) as compared to survivors. Wavelet measurements of both entropy metrics were found to predict ICU mortality better than SOFA, according to a combination of area under the curve, sensitivity and specificity values. Both entropies exhibited similar prognostic accuracy. Combination of SOFA and entropy presented improved the outcome of univariate models. We suggest that reduced wavelet Shannon and Tsallis entropies of temperature signals may complement SOFA in mortality prediction, during the first 24 h of an ICU-acquired infection.

  18. Predictive Value of Cumulative Blood Pressure for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Xiu; Song, Lu; Xing, Ai Jun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Hai Yan; Li, Chun Hui; Zhao, Hua Ling; Chen, Shuo Hua; Lu, Cheng Zhi; Wu, Shou Ling

    2017-02-07

    The predictive value of cumulative blood pressure (BP) on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (CCE) has hardly been studied. In this prospective cohort study including 52,385 participants from the Kailuan Group who attended three medical examinations and without CCE, the impact of cumulative systolic BP (cumSBP) and cumulative diastolic BP (cumDBP) on all-cause mortality and CCEs was investigated. For the study population, the mean (standard deviation) age was 48.82 (11.77) years of which 40,141 (76.6%) were male. The follow-up for all-cause mortality and CCEs was 3.96 (0.48) and 2.98 (0.41) years, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that for every 10 mm Hg·year increase in cumSBP and 5 mm Hg·year increase in cumDBP, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality were 1.013 (1.006, 1.021) and 1.012 (1.006, 1.018); for CCEs, 1.018 (1.010, 1.027) and 1.017 (1.010, 1.024); for stroke, 1.021 (1.011, 1.031) and 1.018 (1.010, 1.026); and for MI, 1.013 (0.996, 1.030) and 1.015 (1.000, 1.029). Using natural spline function analysis, cumSBP and cumDBP showed a J-curve relationship with CCEs; and a U-curve relationship with stroke (ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke). Therefore, increases in cumSBP and cumDBP were predictive for all-cause mortality, CCEs, and stroke.

  19. Predictive Value of Cumulative Blood Pressure for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Xiu; Song, Lu; Xing, Ai Jun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Hai Yan; Li, Chun Hui; Zhao, Hua Ling; Chen, Shuo Hua; Lu, Cheng Zhi; Wu, Shou Ling

    2017-02-01

    The predictive value of cumulative blood pressure (BP) on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (CCE) has hardly been studied. In this prospective cohort study including 52,385 participants from the Kailuan Group who attended three medical examinations and without CCE, the impact of cumulative systolic BP (cumSBP) and cumulative diastolic BP (cumDBP) on all-cause mortality and CCEs was investigated. For the study population, the mean (standard deviation) age was 48.82 (11.77) years of which 40,141 (76.6%) were male. The follow-up for all-cause mortality and CCEs was 3.96 (0.48) and 2.98 (0.41) years, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that for every 10 mm Hg·year increase in cumSBP and 5 mm Hg·year increase in cumDBP, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality were 1.013 (1.006, 1.021) and 1.012 (1.006, 1.018); for CCEs, 1.018 (1.010, 1.027) and 1.017 (1.010, 1.024); for stroke, 1.021 (1.011, 1.031) and 1.018 (1.010, 1.026); and for MI, 1.013 (0.996, 1.030) and 1.015 (1.000, 1.029). Using natural spline function analysis, cumSBP and cumDBP showed a J-curve relationship with CCEs; and a U-curve relationship with stroke (ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke). Therefore, increases in cumSBP and cumDBP were predictive for all-cause mortality, CCEs, and stroke.

  20. Predictive Value of Cumulative Blood Pressure for All-Cause Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan Xiu; Song, Lu; Xing, Ai Jun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Hai Yan; Li, Chun Hui; Zhao, Hua Ling; Chen, Shuo Hua; Lu, Cheng Zhi; Wu, Shou Ling

    2017-01-01

    The predictive value of cumulative blood pressure (BP) on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (CCE) has hardly been studied. In this prospective cohort study including 52,385 participants from the Kailuan Group who attended three medical examinations and without CCE, the impact of cumulative systolic BP (cumSBP) and cumulative diastolic BP (cumDBP) on all-cause mortality and CCEs was investigated. For the study population, the mean (standard deviation) age was 48.82 (11.77) years of which 40,141 (76.6%) were male. The follow-up for all-cause mortality and CCEs was 3.96 (0.48) and 2.98 (0.41) years, respectively. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that for every 10 mm Hg·year increase in cumSBP and 5 mm Hg·year increase in cumDBP, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality were 1.013 (1.006, 1.021) and 1.012 (1.006, 1.018); for CCEs, 1.018 (1.010, 1.027) and 1.017 (1.010, 1.024); for stroke, 1.021 (1.011, 1.031) and 1.018 (1.010, 1.026); and for MI, 1.013 (0.996, 1.030) and 1.015 (1.000, 1.029). Using natural spline function analysis, cumSBP and cumDBP showed a J-curve relationship with CCEs; and a U-curve relationship with stroke (ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke). Therefore, increases in cumSBP and cumDBP were predictive for all-cause mortality, CCEs, and stroke. PMID:28167816

  1. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) –based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as “serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl,” “age above 79 years,” “without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker,” “without taking beta-blocker,” “without taking loop diuretics,” “with mechanical ventilator support,” “with non-invasive ventilator support,” “with vasopressors use,” and “experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation” were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  2. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  3. Simplified Mortality Score for the Intensive Care Unit (SMS-ICU): protocol for the development and validation of a bedside clinical prediction rule

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Anders; Krag, Mette; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Haase, Nicolai; Holst, Lars Broksø; Marker, Søren; Collet, Marie Oxenbøll; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mortality prediction scores are widely used in intensive care units (ICUs) and in research, but their predictive value deteriorates as scores age. Existing mortality prediction scores are imprecise and complex, which increases the risk of missing data and decreases the applicability bedside in daily clinical practice. We propose the development and validation of a new, simple and updated clinical prediction rule: the Simplified Mortality Score for use in the Intensive Care Unit (SMS-ICU). Methods and analysis During the first phase of the study, we will develop and internally validate a clinical prediction rule that predicts 90-day mortality on ICU admission. The development sample will comprise 4247 adult critically ill patients acutely admitted to the ICU, enrolled in 5 contemporary high-quality ICU studies/trials. The score will be developed using binary logistic regression analysis with backward stepwise elimination of candidate variables, and subsequently be converted into a point-based clinical prediction rule. The general performance, discrimination and calibration of the score will be evaluated, and the score will be internally validated using bootstrapping. During the second phase of the study, the score will be externally validated in a fully independent sample consisting of 3350 patients included in the ongoing Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in the Intensive Care Unit trial. We will compare the performance of the SMS-ICU to that of existing scores. Ethics and dissemination We will use data from patients enrolled in studies/trials already approved by the relevant ethical committees and this study requires no further permissions. The results will be reported in accordance with the Transparent Reporting of multivariate prediction models for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) statement, and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal. PMID:28279999

  4. Clinical and Genetic Factors Predictive of Mortality in Early Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Assassi, Shervin; del Junco, Deborah; Sutter, Kari; McNearney, Terry A.; Reveille, John D.; Karnavas, Andrew; Gourh, Pravitt; Estrada-Y-Martin, Rosa M.; Fischbach, Michael; Arnett, Frank C.; Mayes, Maureen D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and genetic variables at initial presentation that predict survival in the Genetics versus Environment in Scleroderma Outcome Study (GENISOS) cohort. Methods GENISOS is a prospective, observational study of a multiethnic early systemic sclerosis (SSc) cohort. To date, a total of 250 patients have been enrolled. In addition to clinical and laboratory data, electrocardiograms (EKGs), chest radiographs, and pulmonary function tests have been obtained from each patient. A modified Rodnan skin thickness score, HLA class II genotyping, and a Medsger Damage Index also have been collected. We performed multivariable analyses utilizing the Cox regression following a purposeful model building strategy. Results The study analyzed 122 white, 47 African American, and 71 Hispanic SSc patients with an average disease duration of 2.6 years at enrollment. At the time of analysis, 52 (20.8%) of the 250 patients had died. In the final multivariable model excluding HLA genes, 7 variables emerged as significant predictors of mortality: age ≥65 years at enrollment, forced vital capacity <50% predicted, clinically significant arrhythmia on EKG, absence of anticentromere antibodies, hypertension, chest radiograph suggestive of pulmonary fibrosis, and low body mass index (BMI). In separate modeling that included HLA genes, HLA alleles DRB1*0802 and DQA1*0501 were significant predictors of mortality in addition to the predictors mentioned above. Conclusion A limited number of variables collected at presentation, including BMI, are able to predict mortality in patients with early SSc. In addition, some of the HLA genes associated with SSc susceptibility are useful for predicting SSc outcome. PMID:19790132

  5. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  6. Self‐Reported Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Prediction and Classification of Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and Longevity—A Prospective Investigation in the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Holtermann, Andreas; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn; Søgaard, Karen; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Prescott, Eva; Schnohr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background The predictive value and improved risk classification of self‐reported cardiorespiratory fitness (SRCF), when added to traditional risk factors on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and longevity, are unknown. Methods and Results A total of 3843 males and 5093 females from the Copenhagen City Heart Study without CVD in 1991–1994 were analyzed using multivariate Cox hazards regression to assess the predictive value and survival benefit for CVD and all‐cause mortality from SRCF. The category‐free net reclassification improvement from SRCF was calculated at 15‐year follow‐up on CVD and all‐cause mortality. Overall, 1693 individuals died from CVD. In the fully adjusted Cox model, those reporting the same (hazard ratio [HR], 1.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 1.32) and lower (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.62 to 2.24) SRCF than peers had an increased risk of CVD mortality, compared with individuals with higher SRCF. Compared with individuals with higher SRCF, those with the same and lower SRCF had 1.8 (95% CI, 1.0 to 2.5) and 5.1 (95% CI, 4.1 to 6.2) years lower life expectancy, respectively. Individuals with lower SRCF had a significantly increased risk of CVD mortality, compared with individuals with higher SRCF, within each strata of leisure time physical activity and self‐rated health, and SRCF significantly predicted CVD mortality independently of self‐rated health and walking pace. A net reclassification improvement of 30.5% (95% CI, 22.1% to 38.9%) for CVD mortality was found when adding SRCF to traditional risk factors. Comparable findings were found for all‐cause mortality. Conclusions SRCF has independent predictive value, is related to a considerable survival benefit, and improves risk classification when added to traditional risk factors of CVD and all‐cause mortality. SRCF might prove useful in improved risk stratification in primary prevention. PMID:25628408

  7. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Helder Novais; Osório, Nuno S; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8-7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity-HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease-(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3-5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment.

  8. Predicting later life health status and mortality using state-level socioeconomic characteristics in early life.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Rita; Rehkopf, David H; Kuan, Kai Y; Cullen, Mark R

    2016-12-01

    Studies extending across multiple life stages promote an understanding of factors influencing health across the life span. Existing work has largely focused on individual-level rather than area-level early life determinants of health. In this study, we linked multiple data sets to examine whether early life state-level characteristics were predictive of health and mortality decades later. The sample included 143,755 U.S. employees, for whom work life claims and administrative data were linked with early life state-of-residence and mortality. We first created a "state health risk score" (SHRS) and "state mortality risk score" (SMRS) by modeling state-level contextual characteristics with health status and mortality in a randomly selected 30% of the sample (the "training set"). We then examined the association of these scores with objective health status and mortality in later life in the remaining 70% of the sample (the "test set") using multivariate linear and Cox regressions, respectively. The association between the SHRS and adult health status was β=0.14 (95%CI: 0.084, 0.20), while the hazard ratio for the SMRS was 0.96 (95%CI: 0.93, 1.00). The association between the SHRS and health was not statistically significant in older age groups at a p-level of 0.05, and there was a statistically significantly different association for health status among movers compared to stayers. This study uses a life course perspective and supports the idea of "sensitive periods" in early life that have enduring impacts on health. It adds to the literature examining populations in the U.S. where large linked data sets are infrequently available.

  9. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Nuno S.; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8–7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7–4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity—HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease–(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3–5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  10. Oxidative Stress Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Fernández, Marta; Rodríguez, Carmen; Moreno, Ana; Oteo, Jose A.; Antela, Antonio; Moreno, Santiago; del Amo, Julia; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess whether oxidative stress is a predictor of mortality in HIV-infected patients. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in CoRIS, a contemporary, multicentre cohort of HIV-infected patients, antiretroviral-naïve at entry, launched in 2004. Cases were patients who died with available stored plasma samples collected. Two age and sex-matched controls for each case were selected. We measured F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and malondialdehyde (MDA) plasma levels in the first blood sample obtained after cohort engagement. Results 54 cases and 93 controls were included. Median F2-IsoPs and MDA levels were significantly higher in cases than in controls. When adjustment was performed for age, HIV-transmission category, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load at cohort entry, and subclinical inflammation measured with highly-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), the association of F2-IsoPs with mortality remained significant (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase, 2.34 [1.23–4.47], P = 0.009). The association of MDA with mortality was attenuated after adjustment: adjusted OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 2.05 [0.91–4.59], P = 0.080. Median hsCRP was also higher in cases, and it also proved to be an independent predictor of mortality in the adjusted analysis: OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.39 (1.01–1.91), P = 0.043; and OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.46 (1.07–1.99), P = 0.014, respectively, when adjustment included F2-IsoPs and MDA. Conclusion Oxidative stress is a predictor of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients. For plasma F2-IsoPs, this association is independent of HIV-related factors and subclinical inflammation. PMID:27111769

  11. Ratio of Systolic Blood Pressure to Right Atrial Pressure, a Novel Marker to Predict Morbidity and Mortality in Acute Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hesham R; Charnigo, Richard; Guglin, Maya

    2017-04-01

    Congestion is the main contributor to heart failure (HF) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the combined role of congestion and decreased forward flow in predicting morbidity and mortality in acute systolic HF. The Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness trial data set was used to determine if the ratio of simultaneously measured systolic blood pressure (SBP)/right atrial pressure (RAP) on admission predicted HF rehospitalization and 6-month mortality. One hundred ninety-five patients (mean age 56.5 years, 75% men) who received pulmonary artery catheterization were studied. The RAP, SBP, and SBP/RAP had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.593 (p = 0.0205), 0.585 (p = 0.0359), and 0.621 (p = 0.0026), respectively, in predicting HF rehospitalization. The SBP/RAP was a superior marker of HF rehospitalization compared with RAP alone (difference in AUC 0.0289, p = 0.0385). The optimal criterion of SBP/RAP <11 provided the highest combined sensitivity (77.1%) and specificity (50.9%) in predicting HF rehospitalization. The SBP/RAP had an AUC 0.622, p = 0.0108, and a cut-off value of SBP/RAP <8 had a sensitivity of 61.9% and specificity 64.1% in predicting mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that an SBP/RAP <11 independently predicted rehospitalization for HF (estimated odds ratio 3.318, 95% confidence interval 1.692 to 6.506, p = 0.0005) and an SBP/RAP <8 independently predicted mortality (estimated hazard ratio 2.025, 95% confidence interval 1.069 to 3.833, p = 0.030). In conclusion, SBP/RAP ratio is a marker that identifies a spectrum of complications after hospitalization of patients with decompensated systolic HF, starting with increased incidence of HF rehospitalization at SBP/RAP <11 to increased mortality with SBP/RAP <8.

  12. In Nonagenarians, Acute Kidney Injury Predicts In-Hospital Mortality, while Heart Failure Predicts Hospital Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lin, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Ko, Wen-Je

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The elderly constitute an increasing proportion of admitted patients worldwide. We investigate the determinants of hospital length of stay and outcomes in patients aged 90 years and older. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all admitted patients aged >90 years from the general medical wards in a tertiary referral medical center between August 31, 2009 and August 31, 2012. Patients’ clinical characteristics, admission diagnosis, concomitant illnesses at admission, and discharge diagnosis were collected. Each patient was followed until discharge or death. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to study factors associated with longer hospital length of stay (>7 days) and in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 283 nonagenarian in-patients were recruited, with 118 (41.7%) hospitalized longer than one week. Nonagenarians admitted with pneumonia (p = 0.04) and those with lower Barthel Index (p = 0.012) were more likely to be hospitalized longer than one week. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that patients with lower Barthel Index (odds ratio [OR] 0.98; p = 0.021) and those with heart failure (OR 3.05; p = 0.046) had hospital stays >7 days, while patients with lower Barthel Index (OR 0.93; p = 0.005), main admission nephrologic diagnosis (OR 4.83; p = 0.016) or acute kidney injury (OR 30.7; p = 0.007) had higher in-hospital mortality. Conclusion In nonagenarians, presence of heart failure at admission was associated with longer hospital length of stay, while acute kidney injury at admission predicted higher hospitalization mortality. Poorer functional status was associated with both prolonged admission and higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:24223127

  13. The Homeostatic Chemokine CCL21 Predicts Mortality and May Play a Pathogenic Role in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yndestad, Arne; Finsen, Alexandra Vanessa; Ueland, Thor; Husberg, Cathrine; Dahl, Christen P.; Øie, Erik; Vinge, Leif Erik; Sjaastad, Ivar; Sandanger, Øystein; Ranheim, Trine; Dickstein, Kenneth; Kjekshus, John; Damås, Jan Kristian; Fiane, Arnt E.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Lipp, Martin; Gullestad, Lars; Christensen, Geir; Aukrust, Pål

    2012-01-01

    Background CCL19 and CCL21, acting through CCR7, are termed homeostatic chemokines. Based on their role in concerting immunological responses and their proposed involvement in tissue remodeling, we hypothesized that these chemokines could play a pathogenic role in heart failure (HF). Methodology/Principal Findings Our main findings were: (i) Serum levels of CCL19 and particularly CCL21 were markedly raised in patients with chronic HF (n = 150) as compared with healthy controls (n = 20). A CCL21 level above median was independently associated with all-cause mortality. (ii) In patients with HF following acute myocardial infarction (MI; n = 232), high versus low CCL21 levels 1 month post-MI were associated with cardiovascular mortality, even after adjustment for established risk factors. (iii). Explanted failing human LV tissue (n = 29) had markedly increased expression of CCL21 as compared with non-failing myocardium (n = 5). (iv) Our studies in CCR7−/− mice showed improved survival and attenuated increase in markers of myocardial dysfunction and wall stress in post-MI HF after 1 week, accompanied by increased myocardial expression of markers of regulatory T cells. (v) Six weeks post-MI, there was an increase in markers of myocardial dysfunction and wall stress in CCR7 deficient mice. Conclusions/Significance High serum levels of CCL21 are independently associated with mortality in chronic and acute post-MI HF. Our findings in CCR7 deficient mice may suggest that CCL21 is not only a marker, but also a mediator of myocardial failure. However, while short term inhibition of CCR7 may be beneficial following MI, a total lack of CCR7 during long-term follow-up could be harmful. PMID:22427939

  14. Nurse-led risk assessment/management clinics reduce predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality in claudicants.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Josephine; Gulati, Sumit; Abdul Rahman, Morhisham N A; Coughlin, Patrick A; Chetter, Ian C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse-led assessment/management of risk factors is effective in many chronic medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate whether this finding was true for patients with intermittent claudication and to analyze its impact on patient-reported quality of life and predicted mortality due to coronary heart disease. We prospectively studied a series of 78 patients (51 men; median age, 65 years [IQR: 56-74 years]), diagnosed with intermittent claudication and referred to a nurse-led risk assessment/management clinic (NLC) from a consultant-led vascular surgical clinic. The NLC used clinical care pathways to manage antiplatelet medication, smoking cessation, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes and to provide exercise advice. All patients were reassessed at a 3 months. Medication compliance, smoking status, fasting lipid profiles, blood pressure, and HbA1c were recorded. Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using King's College VascuQoL and predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality were calculated using the PROCAM and Framingham risk scores. We found that NLC enrollment produced an antiplatelet and a statin compliance of 100%, a smoking cessation rate of 17% (9 patients) and significant improvements in total cholesterol (median, 5.2-4.5 mmol/l), LDL (median, 3.1-2.5 mmol/l) and triglyceride (median, 1.7-1.4 mmol/l) levels. Significant disease-specific quality of life improvements and significant reduction in both the PROCAM (14% to 10%) and Framingham (14% to 11%) coronary risk scores were observed. Providing care at NLCs for claudicants is effective in assessing and managing risk factors, improves disease-specific quality of life and reduces predicted morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  15. Using Data-Driven Rules to Predict Mortality in Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Rosenfeld, Roni; Clermont, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available. PMID:24699007

  16. Usefulness of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein to Predict Mortality in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities [ARIC] Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, José; Lopez, Faye L.; Montes, Ramón; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Astor, Brad C.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a marker for risk of cardiovascular and overall mortality, but information about the association between hs-CRP and mortality in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is scarce. A total of 293 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study with a history of AF and available hs-CRP levels were studied. During a median time follow-up of 9.4 years, 134 participants died (46%). The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality associated with the highest vs. the lowest tertile of hs-CRP was 2.52; 95% CI 1.49–4.25 after adjusting for age, sex, history of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors. A similar trend was observed for cardiovascular mortality (57 events) (HR=1.90; 95% CI 0.81–4.45). CHADS2 score was also associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality: the adjusted HR were, respectively, 3.39 (95% CI 1.91–6.01) and 8.71, (95% CI 2.98–25.47) comparing those with CHADS2>2 versus CHADS2=0. Adding hs-CRP to a predictive model including CHADS2 score was associated with an improvement of the C-statistic for total mortality (from 0.627 to 0.677) and for cardiovascular mortality (from 0.700 to 0.718). In conclusion, high levels of hs-CRP constitute an independent marker for risk of mortality in AF patients. PMID:21962993

  17. Prediction of risk of diabetic retinopathy for all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yong-Peng; Bai, Lu; Zhang, Xue-Lian; Zhou, Jian-Bo; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To examine and quantify the potential relation between diabetic retinopathy (DR) and risk of all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure (HF). The resources of meta-analysis of epidemiological observational studies were from Pub-med, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, conference, and proceedings. Random/fixed effects models were used to calculate pooled subgroup analysis stratified by different grades of DR was performed to explore the potential source of heterogeneity. Statistical manipulations were undertaken using program STATA. Of the included 25 studies, comprising 142,625 participants, 19 studies were concluded to find the relation of DR to all-cause mortality, 5 for stroke, and 3 for HF. Risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality with the presence of DR was 2.33 (95% CI 1.92–2.81) compared with diabetic individuals without DR. Evidences showed a higher risk of all-cause mortality associated with DR in patients with T2D or T1D (RR 2.25, 95% CI 1.91–2.65. RR 2.68, 95% CI 1.34–5.36). According to different grades of DR in patients with T2D, RR for all-cause mortality varied, the risk of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) was 1.38 (1.11–1.70), while the risk of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was 2.32 (1.75–3.06). There was no evidence of significant heterogeneity (Cochran Q test P = 0.29 vs 0.26, I2 = 19.6% vs 22.6%, respectively). Data from 5 studies in relation to DR and the risk of stroke showed that DR was significantly associated with increased risk of stroke (RR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.35–2.24), compared with patients without DR. Furthermore, DR (as compared with individuals without DR) was associated with a marginal increased risk of HF in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n = 3 studies; RR 2.24, 95% CI 0.98–5.14, P = 0.056). Our results showed that DR increased the risk of all-cause mortality, regardless of the different stages, compared with the diabetic individuals without DR. DR predicted

  18. What weather variables are important in predicting heat-related mortality? A new application of statistical learning methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Schwartz, Joel D.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Hot weather increases risk of mortality. Previous studies used different sets of weather variables to characterize heat stress, resulting in variation in heat-mortality- associations depending on the metric used. We employed a statistical learning method – random forests – to examine which of various weather variables had the greatest impact on heat-related mortality. We compiled a summertime daily weather and mortality counts dataset from four U.S. cities (Chicago, IL; Detroit, MI; Philadelphia, PA; and Phoenix, AZ) from 1998 to 2006. A variety of weather variables were ranked in predicting deviation from typical daily all-cause and cause-specific death counts. Ranks of weather variables varied with city and health outcome. Apparent temperature appeared to be the most important predictor of heat-related mortality for all-cause mortality. Absolute humidity was, on average, most frequently selected one of the top variables for all-cause mortality and seven cause-specific mortality categories. Our analysis affirms that apparent temperature is a reasonable variable for activating heat alerts and warnings, which are commonly based on predictions of total mortality in next few days. Additionally, absolute humidity should be included in future heat-health studies. Finally, random forests can be used to guide choice of weather variables in heat epidemiology studies. PMID:24834832

  19. What weather variables are important in predicting heat-related mortality? A new application of statistical learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Schwartz, Joel D; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-07-01

    Hot weather increases risk of mortality. Previous studies used different sets of weather variables to characterize heat stress, resulting in variation in heat-mortality associations depending on the metric used. We employed a statistical learning method - random forests - to examine which of the various weather variables had the greatest impact on heat-related mortality. We compiled a summertime daily weather and mortality counts dataset from four U.S. cities (Chicago, IL; Detroit, MI; Philadelphia, PA; and Phoenix, AZ) from 1998 to 2006. A variety of weather variables were ranked in predicting deviation from typical daily all-cause and cause-specific death counts. Ranks of weather variables varied with city and health outcome. Apparent temperature appeared to be the most important predictor of heat-related mortality for all-cause mortality. Absolute humidity was, on average, most frequently selected as one of the top variables for all-cause mortality and seven cause-specific mortality categories. Our analysis affirms that apparent temperature is a reasonable variable for activating heat alerts and warnings, which are commonly based on predictions of total mortality in next few days. Additionally, absolute humidity should be included in future heat-health studies. Finally, random forests can be used to guide the choice of weather variables in heat epidemiology studies.

  20. Mini Nutritional Assessment predicts gait status and mortality 6 months after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Gumieiro, David N; Rafacho, Bruna P M; Gonçalves, Andrea F; Tanni, Suzana E; Azevedo, Paula S; Sakane, Daniel T; Carneiro, Carlos A S; Gaspardo, David; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Pereira, Gilberto J C; Paiva, Sergio A R; Minicucci, Marcos F

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), the Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Score (ASA) as predictors of gait status and mortality 6 months after hip fracture. A total of eighty-eight consecutive patients over the age of 65 years with hip fracture admitted to an orthopaedic unit were prospectively evaluated. Within the first 72 h of admission, each patient's characteristics were recorded, and the MNA, the NRS 2002 and the ASA were performed. Gait status and mortality were evaluated 6 months after hip fracture. Of the total patients, two were excluded because of pathological fractures. The remaining eighty-six patients (aged 80·2 (sd 7·3) years) were studied. Among these patients 76·7 % were female, 69·8 % walked with or without support and 12·8 % died 6 months after the fracture. In a multivariate analysis, only the MNA was associated with gait status 6 months after hip fracture (OR 0·773, 95 % CI 0·663, 0·901; P= 0·001). In the Cox regression model, only the MNA was associated with mortality 6 months after hip fracture (hazard ratio 0·869, 95 % CI 0·757, 0·998; P= 0·04). In conclusion, the MNA best predicts gait status and mortality 6 months after hip fracture. These results suggest that the MNA should be included in the clinical stratification of patients with hip fracture to identify and treat malnutrition in order to improve the outcomes.

  1. Lipoprotein(a) level and MIF gene variant predict incident metabolic syndrome and mortality.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Çoban, Neslihan; Dönmez, İbrahim; Çakır, Hakan; Ademoğlu, Evin; Erginel-Ünaltuna, Nihan; Yüksel, Hüsniye

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the scarcity of available information, we aimed to assess the association of migration inhibitory factor (MIF)-173 G/C genotypes and serum lipoprotein(Lp)(a) with incident metabolic syndrome (MetS) and all-cause mortality, respectively. In population based, middle-aged adults (n=1297), stratified by gender and presence of MetS, we used Lp(a) quintiles to identify non-linear associations with outcomes using Cox regression models, adjusted for MIF genotype, age, smoking status, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure. After 5.2 years of follow-up, 151 cases of incident MetS and 123 deaths were recorded. For incident MetS, adjusted HRs increased in each gender across four declining quintiles, starting from the highest quintile in men and from quintile 4 in women. The MIF CC-GC genotype appeared to contribute to the risk estimates in men. Similarly adjusted models in the whole sample disclosed that all-cause mortality tended to be inversely associated with Lp(a) quintiles and yielded an HR (2.42 (95% CI 1.03 to 5.81)) in men in quintile 2, whereas the MIF genotype additively predicted mortality (HR 1.79 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.18)) only in men. Excess risk of death was additively conferred on Turkish men by the MIF CC-GC genotype and by apparently reduced circulating Lp(a) assays, supporting the notion that 'low' serum Lp(a), mediating autoimmune activation, is a major determinant of metabolic disease risk and death. Damaged MIF protein and more complex autoimmune activation in women may be responsible from lack of relationship to MetS/mortality.

  2. Predicting mortality from change-over-time in the Charlson Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Fraccaro, Paolo; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Sperrin, Matthew; Peek, Niels; Mallen, Christian; Urban, Philip; Buchan, Iain E.; Mamas, Mamas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multimorbidity is common among older people and presents a major challenge to health systems worldwide. Metrics of multimorbidity are, however, crude: focusing on measuring comorbid conditions at single time-points rather than reflecting the longitudinal and additive nature of chronic conditions. In this paper, we explore longitudinal comorbidity metrics and their value in predicting mortality. Using linked primary and secondary care data, we conducted a retrospective cohort study on adults in Salford, UK from 2005 to 2014 (n = 287,459). We measured multimorbidity with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and quantified its changes in various time windows. We used survival models to assess the relationship between CCI changes and mortality, controlling for gender, age, baseline CCI, and time-dependent CCI. Goodness-of-fit was assessed with the Akaike Information Criterion and discrimination with the c-statistic. Overall, 15.9% patients experienced a change in CCI after 10 years, with a mortality rate of 19.8%. The model that included gender and time-dependent age, CCI, and CCI change across consecutive time windows had the best fit to the data but equivalent discrimination to the other time-dependent models. The absolute CCI score gave a constant hazard ratio (HR) of around 1.3 per unit increase, while CCI change afforded greater prognostic impact, particularly when it occurred in shorter time windows (maximum HR value for the 3-month time window, with 1.63 and 95% confidence interval 1.59–1.66). Change over time in comorbidity is an important but overlooked predictor of mortality, which should be considered in research and care quality management. PMID:27787358

  3. Incidence, Mortality and Positive Predictive Value of Type 1 Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pimienta González, Raquel; Couto Comba, Patricia; Rodríguez Esteban, Marcos; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Hernández Afonso, Julio; Rodríguez Pérez, María del Cristo; Marcelino Rodríguez, Itahisa; Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Elosua, Roberto; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the risk of cardiovascular mortality associated with cardiorenal syndrome subtype 1 (CRS1) in patients who were hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was greater than the expected risk based on the sum of its components, to estimate the predictive value of CRS1, and to determine whether the severity of CRS1 worsens the prognosis. Methods Follow-up study of 1912 incident cases of ACS for 1 year after discharge. Cox regression models were estimated with time to event (in-hospital death, and readmission or death during the first year after discharge) as the dependent variable. Results The incidence of CRS1 was 9.2/1000 person-days of hospitalization (95% CI = 8.1–10.5), but these patients accounted for 56.6% (95% CI = 47.4–65.) of all mortality. The positive predictive value of CRS1 was 29.6% (95% CI = 23.9–36.0) for in-hospital death, and 51.4% (95% CI = 44.8–58.0) for readmission or death after discharge. The risk of in-hospital death from CRS1 (RR = 18.3; 95% CI = 6.3–53.2) was greater than the sum of risks associated with either acute heart failure (RR = 7.6; 95% CI = 1.8–31.8) or acute kidney injury (RR = 2.8; 95% CI = 0.9–8.8). The risk of events associated with CRS1 also increased with syndrome severity, reaching a RR of 10.6 (95% CI = 6.2–18.1) for in-hospital death at the highest severity level. Conclusions The effect of CRS1 on in-hospital mortality is greater than the sum of the effects associated with each of its components, and it increases with the severity of the syndrome. CRS1 accounted for more than half of all mortality, and its positive predictive value approached 30% in-hospital and 50% after discharge. PMID:27907067

  4. Bayesian multilevel discrete interval hazard analysis to predict dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene mortality in Hyalella azteca based on body residues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Stow, Craig A; Landrum, Peter F

    2009-11-01

    We exposed Hyalella azteca to p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene for intervals of 1 to 4 d and followed mortality out to 10 d. Mortality was determined as the cessation of heartbeat; dead organism body residue was determined daily. To model mortality probability, body residues of the living organisms were estimated using published kinetic data with concentration-dependent rate constants. The estimated residues compared favorably with measured residues in the dead organisms (predicted body residue = 1.302 ± 0.142 measured body residue + 10.351 ± 15.766, r² = 0.64, n = 50). The response data were collected at discrete intervals; thus, it was not possible to determine the exact time of death for organisms. Consequently, we analyzed the mortality data using discrete interval analysis, in a Bayesian hierarchical framework, with body residue as the dose metric. The predicted body residues to produce mortality were similar across the duration of exposure when postexposure mortality was considered. The concentration for 50% mortality was 0.47 μmol/g (148.6 tg/g, range 0.32-0.66 μmol/g), and predictions of response indicted 95% (range 73-99.9%) mortality at 0.79 μmol/g (250 μg/g) and 4% (range 1.2-9.6%) mortality at 0.16 μmol/g (50 μg/g). The lethal residue for 50% mortality based on interval analysis for short-term exposures with postexposure mortality resulted in values similar to long-term continuous exposures for exposure durations of more than 600 h.

  5. Quantitative and Morphological Measures May Predict Growth and Mortality During Prenatal Growth in Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kashmiri L.; Vatsalya, Vatsalya

    2014-01-01

    Growth pattern and mortality rate during the embryonic phase of avian species are difficult to recognize and predict. Determination of such measures and associated events may enhance our understanding of characteristics involved in the growth and hatching process. Furthermore, some quantitative measures could validate morphological determinants during the embryonic phase and predict the course of normal growth and alterations. Our aim was to characterize quantitative growth of embryos and to establish baseline embryonic standards for use in comparative and pathological research during the prenatal life of Japanese quail. Day 10 was a landmark timeline for initiation of extensive anatomical changes in growth and transformation. Wet and dry weights were positively correlated with each other and inversely correlated with water content (p = 0.05). Following d10, the water content decreased progressively, whereas, dry and wet weights increased with increasing age. Velocity of growth in wet and dry weights was evident starting d6, spiked at d11 and d15 and then declined before hatching on d16. Organic and inorganic contents of embryos were positively associated with age. Progressive increase in the organic to inorganic ratio with age was evident after d5, spiked on d9, d13 and d16. Accurate determinations of prenatal growth processes could serve as valuable tools in identifying morphological developments and characterization of prenatal growth and mortality, thus enhancing the reproductive efficiency of the breeding colony and the postnatal robustness of the offspring. PMID:25285101

  6. A lower baseline glomerular filtration rate predicts high mortality and newly cerebrovascular accidents in acute ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kai; Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Zhipeng; Ding, Jianping; Song, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is gradually recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and cardio-/cerebrovascular disease. This study aimed to examine the association of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and clinical outcomes at 3 months after the onset of ischemic stroke in a hospitalized Chinese population. Totally, 972 patients with acute ischemic stroke were enrolled into this study. Modified of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations were used to calculate eGFR and define CKD. The site and degree of the stenosis were examined. Patients were followed-up for 3 months. Endpoint events included all-cause death and newly ischemic events. The multivariate logistic model was used to determine the association between renal dysfunction and patients’ outcomes. Of all patients, 130 patients (13.4%) had reduced eGFR (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2), and 556 patients had a normal eGFR (≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2). A total of 694 patients suffered from cerebral artery stenosis, in which 293 patients only had intracranial artery stenosis (ICAS), 110 only with extracranial carotid atherosclerotic stenosis (ECAS), and 301 with both ICAS and ECAS. The patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2 had a higher proportion of death and newly ischemic events compared with those with a relatively normal eGFR. Multivariate analysis revealed that a baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 increased the risk of mortality by 3.089-fold and newly ischemic events by 4.067-fold. In further analysis, a reduced eGFR was associated with increased rates of mortality and newly events both in ICAS patients and ECAS patients. However, only an increased risk of newly events was found as the degree of renal function deteriorated in ICAS patients (odds ratio = 8.169, 95% confidence interval = 2.445–14.127). A low baseline eGFR predicted a high mortality and newly ischemic events at 3 months in ischemic stroke patients. A low baseline eGFR was also a strong independent

  7. Does social isolation predict hospitalization and mortality among HIV+ and uninfected older Veterans?

    PubMed Central

    Greysen, S. Ryan; Horwitz, Leora I.; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Gordon, Kirsha; Ohl, Michael E.; Justice, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Aging, HIV, and social isolation may affect acute care utilization and outcomes. Our objectives were to compare levels of social isolation in aging Veterans with and without HIV and determine associations with hospital admission and mortality. Study Design, Participants, and Setting The Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) is a longitudinal study of HIV+ and uninfected Veterans at eight VA Medical Centers nationally. We analyzed data for 1,836 Veterans age ≥55 enrolled in VACS from 2002–2008. Measurements We created a Social Isolation Score (SIS) using baseline survey responses about: relationship status, number of friends/family and frequency of visits, and involvement in volunteer work, religious or self-help groups, or other community activities. We compared scores by age and HIV status and used multivariable regression to assess effects of social isolation scores on hospital admission and all-cause mortality. Results Mean SIS was higher for HIV+ patients with increasing difference by age (p=.01 for trend). Social isolation was also more prevalent for HIV+ (59%) compared to uninfected patients (51%; p<.001). In multivariable regression analysis of HIV+ and uninfected groups combined, adjusted for demographic and clinical features, isolation was independently associated with increased risk of incident hospitalization (HR=1.25, 95% CI=1.09–1.42) as well as risk of all-cause mortality (HR=1.28, 95% CI=1.06–1.54). Risk estimates calculated for HIV+ and uninfected groups separately were not significantly different. Conclusions Social isolation is associated with increased risk of hospitalization and death among both HIV+ and uninfected older Veterans. Despite similar effects in both groups, the population level impact of social isolation may be greater in those who are HIV+ because of the higher prevalence of social isolation, particularly among the oldest patients. PMID:23927911

  8. Posterior Predictive Checks for Conditional Independence between Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Conditional independence (CI) between response time and response accuracy is a fundamental assumption of many joint models for time and accuracy used in educational measurement. In this study, posterior predictive checks (PPCs) are proposed for testing this assumption. These PPCs are based on three discrepancy measures reflecting different…

  9. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoven, Bret; Yan, Yan; Ritter, Mark; Khor, Li-Yan; Hammond, Elizabeth; Jones, Christopher; Amin, Mahul; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Pollack, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (≥Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (≥Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  10. HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Psichogiou, Mina; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2016-03-01

    The coinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with increased death rates. However, the relevant research has mostly relied on serologic HBV testing [HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)]. The aim of this work was to explore the relationship of HBV viraemia with overall mortality among HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. The analysis included 1,609 HIV seropositives of a previously described cohort (1984-2003) with limited exposure to tenofovir (12%) and a median follow-up of approximately 5 years. Those with persistent expression of HBsAg were further tested for HBV-DNA. The data were analyzed using Poisson regression models. Totally, 101 participants were chronic carriers of HBsAg (6.28%). Of these, 81 were tested for HBV-DNA. The median HBV-DNA levels were 3.81 log (base-10) International Units (IU)/ml. A third (31%) of those tested for HBV-DNA had received tenofovir. Before developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for all-cause mortality of coinfected patients with HBV viraemia above the median value versus the HIV monoinfected group was 3.44 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-11.27]. Multivariable regressions in the coinfected group only (n = 81) showed that one log-10 increase in HBV-DNA levels was associated with an elevated risk for death (IRR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.03-1.49). HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in the setting of HIV/HBV coinfection, especially during the period before developing AIDS, and could thus help prioritize needs and determine the frequency of medical monitoring.

  11. New algorithm of mortality risk prediction for cardiovascular patients admitted in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Moridani, Mohammad Karimi; Setarehdan, Seyed Kamaledin; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie; Hajinasrollah, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recognizing and managing of admitted patients in intensive care unit (ICU) with high risk of mortality is important for maximizing the patient’s outcomes and minimizing the costs. This study is based on linear and nonlinear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) to design a classifier for mortality prediction of cardio vascular patients admitted to ICU. Methods: In this study we evaluated 90 cardiovascular ICU patients (45 males and 45 females). Linear and nonlinear features of HRV include SDNN, NN50, low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), correlation dimension, approximate entropy; detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Poincaré plot were analyzed. Paired sample t-test was used for statistical comparison. Finally, we fed these features to the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to find a robust classification method to classify the patients with low risk and high risk of death. Results: Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the episode of half-hour before death. The results generated based on SVM and MLP classifiers show that SVM classifier is enable to distinguish high and low risk episodes with the total classification sensitivity, specificity, positive productivity and accuracy rate of 97.3%, 98.1%, 92.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear features of the HRV signals could be show nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26309114

  12. The effectiveness of BMI, calf circumference and mid-arm circumference in predicting subsequent mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alan C; Chang, Tsui-Lan

    2011-01-01

    BMI, mid-arm circumference (MAC) and calf circumference (CC) are anthropometric indicators often included in geriatric health measurement scales. However, their relative effectiveness in predicting long-term mortality risk has not been extensively examined. The present study aimed to evaluate the relative effectiveness of these anthropometrics in predicting long-term mortality risk in older adults. The study prospectively analysed the ability of these indicators in predicting 4-year follow-up mortality risk of a population-representative sample of 4191 men and women, 53 years of age or older in the 'Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan'. Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of follow-up mortality risk with low ( < 21 kg/m2) or high ( ≥ 27 kg/m2) BMI, low MAC ( < 23·5/22 cm for men/women) and low CC ( < 30/27 cm) respectively, according to Taiwanese-specific cut-off points. Results showed that low CC and low MAC were more effective than low BMI in predicting follow-up mortality risk in 65-74-year-old elderly. But low CC and low BMI were more effective than low MAC in ≥ 75-year-old elderly, and low BMI was more effective than low MAC or low CC in 53-64-year-old persons. High BMI was not effective in predicting mortality risk in any of these age ranges. These results suggest that in elderly adults, CC is more effective than BMI in predicting long-term mortality risk. Thus, more consideration to CC and MAC in designing geriatric health or nutritional measurement scales is recommended.

  13. A Comparison of Intensive Care Unit Mortality Prediction Models through the Use of Data Mining Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojae; Park, Rae Woong

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The intensive care environment generates a wealth of critical care data suited to developing a well-calibrated prediction tool. This study was done to develop an intensive care unit (ICU) mortality prediction model built on University of Kentucky Hospital (UKH)'s data and to assess whether the performance of various data mining techniques, such as the artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM) and decision trees (DT), outperform the conventional logistic regression (LR) statistical model. Methods The models were built on ICU data collected regarding 38,474 admissions to the UKH between January 1998 and September 2007. The first 24 hours of the ICU admission data were used, including patient demographics, admission information, physiology data, chronic health items, and outcome information. Results Only 15 study variables were identified as significant for inclusion in the model development. The DT algorithm slightly outperformed (AUC, 0.892) the other data mining techniques, followed by the ANN (AUC, 0.874), and SVM (AUC, 0.876), compared to that of the APACHE III performance (AUC, 0.871). Conclusions With fewer variables needed, the machine learning algorithms that we developed were proven to be as good as the conventional APACHE III prediction. PMID:22259725

  14. Usefulness of the heart-rate variability complex for predicting cardiac mortality after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that decreased heart-rate variability (HRV) is related to the risk of death in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the conventional indices of HRV have poor predictive value for mortality. Our aim was to develop novel predictive models based on support vector machine (SVM) to study the integrated features of HRV for improving risk stratification after AMI. Methods A series of heart-rate dynamic parameters from 208 patients were analyzed after a mean follow-up time of 28 months. Patient electrocardiographic data were classified as either survivals or cardiac deaths. SVM models were established based on different combinations of heart-rate dynamic variables and compared to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate. We tested the accuracy of predictors by assessing the area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve (AUC). Results We evaluated a SVM algorithm that integrated various electrocardiographic features based on three models: (A) HRV complex; (B) 6 dimension vector; and (C) 8 dimension vector. Mean AUC of HRV complex was 0.8902, 0.8880 for 6 dimension vector and 0.8579 for 8 dimension vector, compared with 0.7424 for LVEF, 0.7932 for SDNN and 0.7399 for DC. Conclusions HRV complex yielded the largest AUC and is the best classifier for predicting cardiac death after AMI. PMID:24886422

  15. The clinical outcomes and predictive factors for in-hospital mortality in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tsai-Yu; Hung, Chia-Yen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chou, Pai-Chien; Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Lin, Shu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent epidemiologic studies have showed that candidemia is an important nosocomial infection in hospitalized patients. The majority of candidemia patients were non-neutropenic rather than neutropenic status. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of non-neutropenic patients with candidemia and to measure the contributing factors for mortality. A total of 163 non-neutropenic patients with candidemia during January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. The patients’ risk factors for mortality, clinical outcomes, treatment regimens, and Candida species were analyzed. The overall mortality was 54.6%. Candida albicans was the most frequent Candida species (n = 83; 50.9% of patients). Under multivariate analyses, hemodialysis (OR, 4.554; 95% CI, 1.464–14.164) and the use of amphotericin B deoxycholate (OR, 8.709; 95% CI, 1.587–47.805) were independent factors associated with mortality. In contrast, abdominal surgery (OR, 0.360; 95% CI, 0.158–0.816) was associated with a better outcome. The overall mortality is still high in non-neutropenic patients with candidemia. Hemodialysis and use of amphotericin B deoxycholate were independent factors associated with mortality, whereas prior abdominal surgery was associated with a better outcome. PMID:27281087

  16. Darcy’s law predicts widespread forest mortality under climate warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDowell, Nate G.; Allen, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Drought and heat-induced tree mortality is accelerating in many forest biomes as a consequence of a warming climate, resulting in a threat to global forests unlike any in recorded history1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. Forests store the majority of terrestrial carbon, thus their loss may have significant and sustained impacts on the global carbon cycle11,12. We use a hydraulic corollary to Darcy’s law, a core principle of vascular plant physiology13, to predict characteristics of plants that will survive and die during drought under warmer future climates. Plants that are tall with isohydric stomatal regulation, low hydraulic conductance, and high leaf area are most likely to die from future drought stress. Thus, tall trees of old-growth forests are at the greatest risk of loss, which has ominous implications for terrestrial carbon storage. This application of Darcy’s law indicates today’s forests generally should be replaced by shorter and more xeric plants, owing to future warmer droughts and associated wildfires and pest attacks. The Darcy’s corollary also provides a simple, robust framework for informing forest management interventions needed to promote the survival of current forests. Given the robustness of Darcy’s law for predictions of vascular plant function, we conclude with high certainty that today’s forests are going to be subject to continued increases in mortality rates that will result in substantial reorganization of their structure and carbon storage.

  17. Development and Validation of Predictive Models of Cardiac Mortality and Transplantation in Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo Arrais; Pereira, Francisca Tatiana Moreira; Abreu, José Sebastião; Lima, José Wellington O.; Monteiro, Marcelo de Paula Martins; Rocha Neto, Almino Cavalcante; Goés, Camilla Viana Arrais; Farias, Ana Gardênia P.; Rodrigues Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Scanavacca, Maurício Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background 30-40% of cardiac resynchronization therapy cases do not achieve favorable outcomes. Objective This study aimed to develop predictive models for the combined endpoint of cardiac death and transplantation (Tx) at different stages of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods Prospective observational study of 116 patients aged 64.8 ± 11.1 years, 68.1% of whom had functional class (FC) III and 31.9% had ambulatory class IV. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables were assessed by using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier curves. Results The cardiac mortality/Tx rate was 16.3% during the follow-up period of 34.0 ± 17.9 months. Prior to implantation, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), ejection fraction < 25% and use of high doses of diuretics (HDD) increased the risk of cardiac death and Tx by 3.9-, 4.8-, and 5.9-fold, respectively. In the first year after CRT, RVD, HDD and hospitalization due to congestive heart failure increased the risk of death at hazard ratios of 3.5, 5.3, and 12.5, respectively. In the second year after CRT, RVD and FC III/IV were significant risk factors of mortality in the multivariate Cox model. The accuracy rates of the models were 84.6% at preimplantation, 93% in the first year after CRT, and 90.5% in the second year after CRT. The models were validated by bootstrapping. Conclusion We developed predictive models of cardiac death and Tx at different stages of CRT based on the analysis of simple and easily obtainable clinical and echocardiographic variables. The models showed good accuracy and adjustment, were validated internally, and are useful in the selection, monitoring and counseling of patients indicated for CRT. PMID:26559987

  18. Low sphingosine-1-phosphate plasma levels are predictive for increased mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Michael; Scholz, Markus; Seehofer, Daniel; Berg, Thomas; Engelmann, Cornelius; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Background & aim The association of circulating sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid involved in various cellular processes, and related metabolites such as sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) and sphingosine (SPH) with mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease is investigated in the presented study. S1P as a bioactive lipid mediator, is involved in several cellular processes, however, in end-stage liver disease its role is not understood. Methods The study cohort consisted of 95 patients with end-stage liver disease and available information on one-year outcome. The median MELD (Model for end-stage liver disease) score was 12.41 (Range 6.43–39.63). The quantification of sphingolipids in citrated plasma specimen was performed after methanolic protein precipitation followed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric detection. Results S1P and SA1P displayed significant correlations with the MELD score. Patients with circulating S1P levels below the lowest tertile (110.68 ng/ml) showed the poorest one-year survival rate of only 57.1%, whereas one-year survival rate in patients with S1P plasma levels above 165.67 ng/ml was 93.8%. In a multivariate cox regression analysis including platelet counts, concentrations of hemoglobin and MELD score, S1P remained a significant predictor for three-month and one-year mortality. Conclusions Low plasma S1P concentrations are highly significantly associated with prognosis in end-stage liver disease. This association is independent of the stage of liver disease. Further studies should be performed to investigate S1P, its role in the pathophysiology of liver diseases and its potential for therapeutic interventions. PMID:28334008

  19. Physical activity assessed in routine care predicts mortality after a COPD hospitalisation

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Marilyn L.; Gould, Michael K.; Liu, In-Lu Amy; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    The independent relationship between physical inactivity and risk of death after an index chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) hospitalisation is unknown. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a large integrated healthcare system. Patients were included if they were hospitalised for COPD between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011. All-cause mortality in the 12 months after discharge was the primary outcome. Physical activity, expressed as self-reported minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), was routinely assessed at outpatient visits prior to hospitalisation. 1727 (73%) patients were inactive (0 min of MVPA per week), 412 (17%) were insufficiently active (1–149 min of MVPA per week) and 231 (10%) were active (≥150 min of MVPA per week). Adjusted Cox regression models assessed risk of death across the MVPA categories. Among 2370 patients (55% females and mean age 73±11 years), there were 464 (20%) deaths. Patients who were insufficiently active or active had a 28% (adjusted HR 0.72 (95% CI 0.54–0.97), p=0.03) and 47% (adjusted HR 0.53 (95% CI 0.34–0.84), p<0.01) lower risk of death, respectively, in the 12 months following an index COPD hospitalisation compared to inactive patients. Any level of MVPA is associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality after a COPD hospitalisation. Routine assessment of physical activity in clinical care would identify persons at high risk for dying after COPD hospitalisation. PMID:27730174

  20. Skin autofluorescence, a measure of cumulative metabolic stress and advanced glycation end products, predicts mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hartog, Jasper W L; Graaff, Reindert; Huisman, Roel J; Links, Thera P; den Hollander, Nynke C; Thorpe, Susan R; Baynes, John W; Navis, Gerjan; Gans, Rijk O B; Smit, Andries J

    2005-12-01

    Tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE) are a measure of cumulative metabolic stress and trigger cytokines driven inflammatory reactions. AGE are thought to contribute to the chronic complications of diabetes and ESRD. Tissue autofluorescence is related to the accumulation of AGE. Therefore, skin autofluorescence (AF) may provide prognostic information on mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Skin AF was measured noninvasively with an AF reader at baseline in 109 HD patients. Overall and cardiovascular mortality was monitored prospectively during a period of 3 yr. The AF reader was validated against AGE contents in skin biopsies from 29 dialysis patients. Forty-two of the 109 (38.5%) HD patients died. Cox regression analysis showed that AF was an independent predictor of overall and cardiovascular mortality (for overall mortality odds ratio [OR] 3.9), as were pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD; OR 3.1), C-reactive protein (OR 1.1), and serum albumin (OR 0.3). Multivariate analysis revealed that 65% of the variance in AF could be attributed to the independent effects of age, dialysis and renal failure duration, presence of diabetes, triglycerides levels, and C-reactive protein. AF was also independently linked to the presence of CVD at baseline (OR 8.8; P < 0.001). AF correlated with collagen-linked fluorescence (r = 0.71, P < 0.001), pentosidine (r = 0.75, P < 0.001), and carboxy(m)ethyllysine (both r = 0.45, P < 0.01). Skin AF is a strong and independent predictor of mortality in ESRD. This supports a role for AGE as a contributor to mortality and CVD and warrants interventions specifically aimed at AGE accumulation.

  1. Is type D personality an independent risk factor for recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients?

    PubMed

    Condén, Emelie; Rosenblad, Andreas; Wagner, Philippe; Leppert, Jerzy; Ekselius, Lisa; Åslund, Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    Background Type D personality refers to a combination of simultaneously high levels of negative affectivity and social inhibition. The present study aimed to examine whether type D personality was independently associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients, using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Methods Utilising data from the Västmanland Myocardial Infarction Study, 946 post-acute myocardial infarction patients having data on the DS14 instrument used to measure type D personality were followed-up for recurrent myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality until 9 December 2015. Data were analysed using Cox regression, adjusted for established risk factors. Results In total, 133 (14.1%) patients suffered from type D personality. During a mean follow-up time for recurrent myocardial infarction of 5.7 (3.2) years, 166 (17.5%) patients were affected by recurrent myocardial infarction, of which 26 (15.7%) had type D personality, while during a mean follow-up time for all-cause mortality of 6.3 (2.9) years, 321 (33.9%) patients died, of which 42 (13.1%) had type D personality. After adjusting for established risk factors, type D personality was not significantly associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality. A weak association was found between the social inhibition part of type D personality and a decreased risk of all-cause mortality, but this association was not significant after taking missing data into account in a multiple imputation analysis. Conclusions No support was found for type D personality being independently associated with recurrent myocardial infarction or all-cause mortality in post-acute myocardial infarction patients, using any of the previously proposed methods for measuring type D personality.

  2. Independence and Interdependence Predict Health and Wellbeing: Divergent Patterns in the United States and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Karasawa, Mayumi; Curhan, Katherine B.; Ryff, Carol D.; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2010-01-01

    A cross-cultural survey was used to examine two hypotheses designed to link culture to wellbeing and health. The first hypothesis states that people are motivated toward prevalent cultural mandates of either independence (personal control) in the United States or interdependence (relational harmony) in Japan. As predicted, Americans with compromised personal control and Japanese with strained relationships reported high perceived constraint. The second hypothesis holds that people achieve wellbeing and health through actualizing the respective cultural mandates in their modes of being. As predicted, the strongest predictor of wellbeing and health was personal control in the United States, but the absence of relational strain in Japan. All analyses controlled for age, gender, educational attainment, and personality traits. The overall pattern of findings underscores culturally distinct pathways (independent versus interdependent) in achieving the positive life outcomes. PMID:21833228

  3. Complement Factor 3 Could Be an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality in Patients with HBV Related Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng-lin; Zhang, Ting; Ye, Yi-nong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Xie, Chan; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-liang

    2016-01-01

    The complement is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple liver disorders. However, its role in patients with HBV related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) remains unclear. Serum levels of the third and fourth complement components (C3, C4) and complement function (CH50) were examined in this prospective, observational study. Associations between their expression and disease activity were analyzed. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves. Predictors of clinical outcome were determined by Cox regression analysis. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients compared to controls. C3, C4, and CH50 levels were negatively correlated with Tbil levels but positively associated with PTA levels. C3 levels were negatively associated with MELD-Na. C3 levels were significantly lower in HBV-ACLF patients who died compared to patients who survived. In a median hospital stay of 39 days, mortality occurred in 41 patients with a progressive increase based on C3 grade (P = 0.008). The actuarial probability of developing mortality was significantly higher in patients with low C3 grade compared to those with high C3 grade (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that C3 levels were an independent predictor of mortality. Complement played a pathogenic role in HBV-ACLF patients and C3 was an independent predictor of mortality. PMID:27144164

  4. Factors influencing the predictive power of models for predicting mortality and/or heart failure hospitalization in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Wouter; Voors, Adriaan A; Zwinderman, Aeilko H

    2014-10-01

    The present paper systematically reviews and compares existing prediction models in order to establish the strongest variables, models, and model characteristics in patients with heart failure predicting outcome. To improve decision making accurately predicting mortality and heart-failure hospitalization in patients with heart failure can be important for selecting patients with a poorer prognosis or nonresponders to current therapy, to improve decision making. MEDLINE/PubMed was searched for papers dealing with heart failure prediction models. To identify similar models on the basis of their variables hierarchical cluster analysis was performed. Meta-analysis was used to estimate the mean predictive value of the variables and models; meta-regression was used to find characteristics that explain variation in discriminating values between models. We identified 117 models in 55 papers. These models used 249 different variables. The strongest predictors were blood urea nitrogen and sodium. Four subgroups of models were identified. Mortality was most accurately predicted by prospective registry-type studies using a large number of clinical predictor variables. Mean C-statistic of all models was 0.66 ± 0.0005, with 0.71 ± 0.001, 0.68 ± 0.001 and 0.63 ± 0.001 for models predicting mortality, heart failure hospitalization, or both, respectively. There was no significant difference in discriminating value of models between patients with chronic and acute heart failure. Prediction of mortality and in particular heart failure hospitalization in patients with heart failure remains only moderately successful. The strongest predictors were blood urea nitrogen and sodium. The highest C-statistic values were achieved in a clinical setting, predicting short-term mortality with the use of models derived from prospective cohort/registry studies with a large number of predictor variables.

  5. Infant Maltreatment-Related Mortality in Alaska: Correcting the Count and Using Birth Certificates to Predict Mortality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Jared W.; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To accurately count the number of infant maltreatment-related fatalities and to use information from the birth certificates to predict infant maltreatment-related deaths. Methods: A population-based retrospective cohort study of infants born in Alaska for the years 1992 through 2005 was conducted. Risk factor variables were ascertained…

  6. Post-Exercise Heart Rate Recovery Independently Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye Sun; Choi, Suk-Won; Han, Seong-Woo; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Kang, Seok-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) is an index of parasympathetic function associated with clinical outcome in patients with chronic heart failure. However, its relationship with the pro-inflammatory response and prognostic value in consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has not been investigated. Methods We measured HRR and pro-inflammatory markers in 107 prospectively and consecutively enrolled, recovered ADHF patients (71 male, 59 ± 15 years, mean ejection fraction 28.9 ± 14.2%) during the pre-discharge period. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular (CV) events defined as CV mortality, cardiac transplantation, or rehospitalization due to HF aggravation. Results The CV events occurred in 30 (28.0%) patients (5 cardiovascular deaths and 7 cardiac transplantations) during the follow-up period (median 214 days, 11–812 days). When the patients with ADHF were grouped by HRR according to the Contal and O’Quigley’s method, low HRR was shown to be associated with significantly higher levels of serum monokine-induced by gamma interferon (MIG) and poor clinical outcome. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that low HRR was an independent predictor of CV events in both enter method and stepwise method. The addition of HRR to a model significantly increased predictability for CV events across the entire follow-up period. Conclusion Impaired post-exercise HRR is associated with a pro-inflammatory response and independently predicts clinical outcome in patients with ADHF. These findings may explain the relationship between autonomic dysfunction and clinical outcome in terms of the inflammatory response in these patients. PMID:27135610

  7. 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' predicts mortality and length of hospital stay in acutely ill elderly.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Rebecca J; King, Claire L; Stroud, Mike A; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-02-01

    Malnutrition and its impact on clinical outcome may be underestimated in hospitalised elderly as many screening procedures require measurements of weight and height that cannot often be undertaken in sick elderly patients. The 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST') has been developed to screen all adults, even if weight and/or height cannot be measured, enabling more complete information on malnutrition prevalence and its impact on clinical outcome to be obtained. In the present study, 150 consecutively admitted elderly patients (age 85 (sd 5.5) years) were recruited prospectively, screened with 'MUST' and clinical outcome recorded. Although only 56 % of patients could be weighed, all (n 150) could be screened with 'MUST'; 58 % were at malnutrition risk and these individuals had greater mortality (in-hospital and post-discharge, P<0.01) and longer hospital stays (P=0.02) than those at low risk. Both 'MUST' categorisation and component scores (BMI, weight loss, acute disease) were significantly related to mortality (P<0.03). Those patients with no measured or recalled weight ('MUST' subjective criteria used) had a greater risk of malnutrition (P=0.01) and a poorer clinical outcome (P<0.002) than those who could be weighed and, within both groups, clinical outcome was worse in those at risk of malnutrition. The present study suggests that 'MUST' predicts clinical outcome in hospitalised elderly, in whom malnutrition is common (58 %). In those who cannot be weighed, a higher prevalence of malnutrition and associated poorer clinical outcome supports the importance of routine screening with a tool, like 'MUST', that can be used to screen all patients.

  8. Increased total serum random cortisol levels predict mortality in critically ill trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Urmil; Polite, Nathan; Wood, Teresa; Lieber, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis is thought to exist; however, there continues to be controversy about what level of serum cortisol corresponds to adrenal insufficiency. Few studies have focused on the significance of serum random cortisol in the critically ill trauma patient. Trauma patients with total serum random cortisol levels drawn in the intensive care unit within the first seven days of hospitalization were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome measured was in-hospital mortality. Two hundred forty-two patients were analyzed. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher mean cortisol levels than survivors (28.7 ± 15.80 μg/dL vs 22.9 ± 12.35 μg/dL, P = 0.01). Patients with cortisol 30 μg/dL or greater were more likely to die with odds ratio of 2.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 5). The odds ratio increased to 4.0 and 3.8 (95% CI, 1.4 to 11.4 and 1.3 to 10.9) when cortisol was drawn on hospital Day 2 and Days 3 through 7, respectively. Among nonsurvivors, patients with an injury severity score less than 25 had significantly higher cortisol levels than patients with an Injury Severity Score 25 or higher (35.3 ± 19.21 μg/dL vs 25.7 ± 13.21 μg/dL, P = 0.009). Patients with massive transfusion, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, or solid organ injury did not have significantly different cortisol levels. The covariate-adjusted area under the receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that cortisol level has a 77 per cent accuracy in differentiating survivors from nonsurvivors. Higher cortisol levels were predictive of mortality in critically ill trauma patients. Whether serum cortisol level is a marker that can be modified remains an area of interest for future study.

  9. The Homeostatic Chemokine CCL21 Predicts Mortality in Aortic Stenosis Patients and Modulates Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Finsen, Alexandra Vanessa; Ueland, Thor; Sjaastad, Ivar; Ranheim, Trine; Ahmed, Mohammed S.; Dahl, Christen P.; Askevold, Erik T.; Aakhus, Svend; Husberg, Cathrine; Fiane, Arnt E.; Lipp, Martin; Gullestad, Lars; Christensen, Geir; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Background CCL21 acting through CCR7, is termed a homeostatic chemokine. Based on its role in concerting immunological responses and its proposed involvement in tissue remodeling, we hypothesized that this chemokine could play a role in myocardial remodeling during left ventricular (LV) pressure overload. Methods and Results Our main findings were: (i) Serum levels of CCL21 were markedly raised in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS, n = 136) as compared with healthy controls (n = 20). (ii) A CCL21 level in the highest tertile was independently associated with all-cause mortality in these patients. (iii) Immunostaining suggested the presence of CCR7 on macrophages, endothelial cells and fibroblasts within calcified human aortic valves. (iv). Mice exposed to LV pressure overload showed enhanced myocardial expression of CCL21 and CCR7 mRNA, and increased CCL21 protein levels. (v) CCR7−/− mice subjected to three weeks of LV pressure overload had similar heart weights compared to wild type mice, but increased LV dilatation and reduced wall thickness. Conclusions Our studies, combining experiments in clinical and experimental LV pressure overload, suggest that CCL21/CCR7 interactions might be involved in the response to pressure overload secondary to AS. PMID:25398010

  10. Circulating TNF Receptors 1 and 2 Predict Mortality in Patients with End-stage Renal Disease Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Gohda, Tomohito; Maruyama, Shuntaro; Kamei, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Saori; Shibata, Terumi; Murakoshi, Maki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Ohsawa, Isao; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Nojiri, Shuko; Suzuki, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    Relatively high circulating levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors (TNFRs: TNFR1, TNFR2) have been associated with not only progression to end-stage renal disease but also mortality in patients with diabetes. It remains unknown whether elevated TNFR levels in haemodialysis patients are associated with mortality. We studied 319 patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis who were followed for a median of 53 months. Circulating markers of TNF pathway (TNFα and TNFRs) were measured with immunoassay. Strong positive correlations between TNFR1 and TNFR2 were observed (r = 0.81, P < 0.0001). During follow-up, 88 (27.6%) patients died of any cause (40 [45.5%] died of cardiovascular disease). In the Cox multivariate model, either TNFR but not TNFα remained a significant independent predictor of all-cause mortality (TNFR1: hazard ratio [HR] 2.34, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50–3.64; TNFR2: HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.38–3.29) after adjustment for age, prior cardiovascular disease, predialysis systolic blood pressure, and large systolic blood pressure decline during dialysis session. For cardiovascular mortality, significance was only observed in TNFR1 (TNFR1: HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.13–4.10). Elevated TNFRs levels were associated with the risk of cardiovascular and/or all-cause mortality independent of all relevant covariates in patients undergoing haemodialysis. PMID:28256549

  11. Pulmonary Infection Is an Independent Risk Factor for Long-Term Mortality and Quality of Life for Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Li; Liao, Xue-Lian; Xie, Zhi-Chao; Han, Li; Yang, Xiao-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long-term outcomes (mortality and health-related quality of life) of sepsis have risen as important indicators for health care. Pulmonary infection and abdominal infection are the leading causes of sepsis. However, few researches about long-term outcomes focused on the origin of sepsis. Here we aim to study the clinical differences between pulmonary-sepsis and abdominal-sepsis and to investigate whether different infection foci were associated with long-term outcomes. Methods. Patients who survived after hospital discharge were followed up by telephone interview. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ5D) questionnaire. Results. Four hundred and eighty-three sepsis patients were included, 272 (56.3%) had pulmonary-sepsis, and 180 (37.3%) had abdominal-sepsis. The overall ICU and one-year mortality rates of the cohort were 17.8% and 36.1%, respectively. Compared with abdominal-sepsis, pulmonary-sepsis patients had older age, higher APACHE II, higher ICU mortality (31.7% versus 12.6%), and one-year mortality (45.4% versus 24.4%), together with worse QoL. Age, septic shock, acute renal failure, fungus infection, anion gap, and pulmonary infection were predictors for one-year mortality and pulmonary infection was a risk factor for poor QoL. Conclusions. Pulmonary-sepsis showed worse outcome than abdominal-sepsis. Pulmonary infection is a risk factor for one-year mortality and QoL after sepsis. PMID:28050557

  12. Long Pentraxin 3 as a Predictive Marker of Mortality in Severe Septic Patients Who Received Successful Early Goal-Directed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Bean; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Lee, Ji Un; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Ku, Nam Su; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) has been suggested to be a prognostic marker of mortality in severe sepsis. Currently, there are limited data on biomarkers including PTX3 that can be used to predict mortality in severe sepsis patients who have undergone successful initial resuscitation through early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). Materials and Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted among 83 severe sepsis patients with fulfillment of all EGDT components and the achievement of final goal. Plasma PTX3 levels were measured by sandwich ELISA on hospital day (HD) 0, 3, and 7. The data for procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and delta neutrophil index were collected by electric medical record. The primary outcome was 28-day all-cause mortality. Results 28-day all-cause mortality was 19.3% and the median (interquartile range) APHCH II score of total patients was 16 (13–19). The non-survivors (n=16) had significantly higher PTX3 level at HD 0 [201.4 (56.9–268.6) ng/mL vs. 36.5 (13.7–145.3) ng/mL, p=0.008]. PTX3 had largest AUCROC value for the prediction of mortality among PTX3, procalcitonin, delta neutrophil index, CRP and APACHE II/SOFA sore at HD 0 [0.819, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.677–0.961, p=0.008]. The most valid cut-off level of PTX3 at HD 0 was 140.28 ng/mL (sensitivity 66.7%, specificity 73.8%). The PTX3 and procalcitonin at HD 0 showed strong correlation (r=0.675, p<0.001). However, PTX3 at HD 0 was the only independent predictive marker in Cox's proportional hazards model (≥140 ng/mL; hazard rate 7.16, 95% CI 2.46–15.85, p=0.001). Conclusion PTX3 at HD 0 could be a powerful predictive biomarker of 28-day all-cause mortality in severe septic patients who have undergone successful EGDT. PMID:28120568

  13. PREDICTING FIFTEEN-YEAR CANCER-SPECIFIC MORTALITY BASED ON THE PATHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Eggener, Scott E.; Scardino, Peter T.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Han, Misop; Partin, Alan W.; Trock, Bruce J.; Feng, Zhaoyong; Wood, David P.; Eastham, James A.; Yossepowitch, Ofer; Rabah, Danny M.; Kattan, Michael W.; Yu, Changhong; Klein, Eric A.; Stephenson, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after radical prostatectomy is poorly defined in the era of widespread screening. An understanding of the treated natural history of screen-detected cancers and the pathological risk factors for PCSM are needed for treatment decision-making. Methods Using Fine and Gray competing risk regression analysis, the clinical and pathological data and follow-up information of 11,521 patients treated by radical prostatectomy at four academic centers from 1987 to 2005 were modeled to predict PCSM. The model was validated on 12,389 patients treated at a separate institution during the same period. Results The overall 15-year PCSM was 7%. Primary and secondary pathological Gleason grade 4–5 (P < 0.001 for both), seminal vesicle invasion (P < 0.001), and year of surgery (P = 0.002) were significant predictors of PCSM. A nomogram predicting 15-year PCSM based on standard pathological parameters was accurate and discriminating with an externally-validated concordance index of 0.92. Stratified by patient age, 15-year PCSM for Gleason score ≤ 6, 3+4, 4+3, and 8–10 ranged from 0.2–1.2%, 4.2–6.5%, 6.6–11%, and 26–37%, respectively. The 15-year PCSM risks ranged from 0.8–1.5%, 2.9–10%, 15–27%, and 22–30% for organ-confined cancer, extraprostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node metastasis, respectively. Only 3 of 9557 patients with organ-confined, Gleason score ≤ 6 cancers have died from prostate cancer. Conclusions The presence of poorly differentiated cancer and seminal vesicle invasion are the prime determinants of PCSM after radical prostatectomy. The risk of PCSM can be predicted with unprecedented accuracy once the pathological features of prostate cancer are known. PMID:21239008

  14. Physical activity is independently associated with reduced mortality: 15-years follow-up of the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK)

    PubMed Central

    Kopperstad, Øyvind; Skogen, Jens Christoffer; Sivertsen, Børge; Tell, Grethe S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is associated with lower risk for non-communicable diseases and mortality. We aimed to investigate the prospective association between PA and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, and the impact of other potentially contributing factors. Method Data from the community-based Hordaland Health Study (HUSK, 1997–99) were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. The study included 20,506 individuals born 1950–1957 and 2,225 born in 1925–1927 (baseline age 40–49 and 70–74). Based on self-report, individuals were grouped as habitually performing low intensity, short duration, low intensity, longer duration or high intensity PA. The hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality during follow-up were calculated. Measures of socioeconomic status, physical health, mental health, smoking and alcohol consumption were added separately and cumulatively to the model. Results PA was associated with lower all-cause mortality in both older (HR 0.75 (95% CI 0.67–0.84)) and younger individuals (HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.72–0.92)) (crude models, HR: risk associated with moving from low intensity, short duration to low intensity, longer duration PA, and from low intensity, longer duration to high intensity). Smoking, education, somatic diagnoses and mental health accounted for some of the association between physical activity and mortality, but a separate protective effect of PA remained in fully adjusted models for cardiovascular (HR 0.78 (95% CI 0.66–0.92)) and respiratory (HR 0.45 (95% CI 0.32–0.63) mortality (both age-groups together), as well as all-cause mortality in the older age group (HR 0.74, 95%CI 0.66–0.83). Conclusion Low intensity, longer duration and high intensity physical activity was associated with reduced all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality, indicating that physical activity is beneficial also among older individuals, and that a moderate increase in PA can be beneficial. PMID

  15. Predicting Functional Independence Measure Scores During Rehabilitation with Wearable Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sprint, Gina; Cook, Diane J.; Weeks, Douglas L.; Borisov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating patient progress and making discharge decisions regarding inpatient medical rehabilitation rely upon standard clinical assessments administered by trained clinicians. Wearable inertial sensors can offer more objective measures of patient movement and progress. We undertook a study to investigate the contribution of wearable sensor data to predict discharge functional independence measure (FIM) scores for 20 patients at an inpatient rehabilitation facility. The FIM utilizes a 7-point ordinal scale to measure patient independence while performing several activities of daily living, such as walking, grooming, and bathing. Wearable inertial sensor data were collected from ecological ambulatory tasks at two time points mid-stay during inpatient rehabilitation. Machine learning algorithms were trained with sensor-derived features and clinical information obtained from medical records at admission to the inpatient facility. While models trained only with clinical features predicted discharge scores well, we were able to achieve an even higher level of prediction accuracy when also including the wearable sensor-derived features. Correlations as high as 0.97 for leave-one-out cross validation predicting discharge FIM motor scores are reported. PMID:27054054

  16. Sympathetic activity–associated periodic repolarization dynamics predict mortality following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rizas, Konstantinos D.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Barthel, Petra; Zürn, Christine S.; Kähönen, Mika; Viik, Jari; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nikus, Kjell; Eick, Christian; Greiner, Tim O.; Wendel, Hans P.; Seizer, Peter; Schreieck, Jürgen; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schmidt, Georg; Bauer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Background. Enhanced sympathetic activity at the ventricular myocardium can destabilize repolarization, increasing the risk of death. Sympathetic activity is known to cluster in low-frequency bursts; therefore, we hypothesized that sympathetic activity induces periodic low-frequency changes of repolarization. We developed a technique to assess the sympathetic effect on repolarization and identified periodic components in the low-frequency spectral range (≤0.1 Hz), which we termed periodic repolarization dynamics (PRD). Methods. We investigated the physiological properties of PRD in multiple experimental studies, including a swine model of steady-state ventilation (n = 7) and human studies involving fixed atrial pacing (n = 10), passive head-up tilt testing (n = 11), low-intensity exercise testing (n = 11), and beta blockade (n = 10). We tested the prognostic power of PRD in 908 survivors of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Finally, we tested the predictive values of PRD and T-wave alternans (TWA) in 2,965 patients undergoing clinically indicated exercise testing. Results. PRD was not related to underlying respiratory activity (P < 0.001) or heart-rate variability (P = 0.002). Furthermore, PRD was enhanced by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and pharmacological blockade of sympathetic nervous system activity suppressed PRD (P ≤ 0.005 for both). Increased PRD was the strongest single risk predictor of 5-year total mortality (hazard ratio 4.75, 95% CI 2.94–7.66; P < 0.001) after acute MI. In patients undergoing exercise testing, the predictive value of PRD was strong and complementary to that of TWA. Conclusion. We have described and identified low-frequency rhythmic modulations of repolarization that are associated with sympathetic activity. Increased PRD can be used as a predictor of mortality in survivors of acute MI and patients undergoing exercise testing. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00196274. Funding. This study was funded by

  17. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  18. Hyperlipidemia is associated with lower risk of poststroke mortality independent of statin use: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Flaherty, Matthew L; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; de los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Mackey, Jason; Khatri, Pooja; Kissela, Brett M; Khoury, Jane C

    2017-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is associated with reduced stroke and mortality risk, some studies report that higher lipid levels are associated with improved outcomes following ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the association of hyperlipidemia (HLD) combined with statin therapy on all-cause mortality in stroke patients. Methods All stroke patients in the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky region of ~1.3 million were identified using ICD-9 discharge codes in 2005 and 2010. Stroke patients with and without HLD were categorized based on their reported statin use at baseline or discharge into three groups: no-HLD/no-statins, HLD/no-statins, and HLD/on-statins. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years poststroke. Results Overall, 77% (2953) of the 3813 ischemic stroke patients were diagnosed with HLD and 72% (n = 2123) of those patients were on statin medications. The mean age was 70.0 ± 14.6 years, 56% were women, and 21% were black. In adjusted analyses, the HLD/no-statins group showed 35% (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92), 27% (aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59–0.90), and 17% (aHR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70–0.97) reduced risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively, poststroke, compared with no-HLD/no-statins group. The HLD/on-statins group showed an additional 17% significant survival benefit at 3 years poststroke compared with HLD/no-statins group. Conclusions A diagnosis of HLD in ischemic stroke patients is associated with reduced short- and long-term mortality, irrespective of statin use. Statin therapy is associated with significant, additional long-term survival benefit. PMID:27649737

  19. Customised and Noncustomised Birth Weight Centiles and Prediction of Stillbirth and Infant Mortality and Morbidity: A Cohort Study of 979,912 Term Singleton Pregnancies in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Iliodromiti, Stamatina; Mackay, Daniel F.; Pell, Jill P.; Sattar, Naveed; Nelson, Scott M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence to support the use of customised centile charts to identify those at risk of stillbirth and infant death at term. We sought to determine birth weight thresholds at which mortality and morbidity increased and the predictive ability of noncustomised (accounting for gestational age and sex) and partially customised centiles (additionally accounting for maternal height and parity) to identify fetuses at risk. Methods This is a population-based linkage study of 979,912 term singleton pregnancies in Scotland, United Kingdom, between 1992 and 2010. The main exposures were noncustomised and partially customised birth weight centiles. The primary outcomes were infant death, stillbirth, overall mortality (infant and stillbirth), Apgar score <7 at 5 min, and admission to the neonatal unit. Optimal thresholds that predicted outcomes for both non- and partially customised birth weight centiles were calculated. Prediction of mortality between non- and partially customised birth weight centiles was compared using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC) and net reclassification index (NRI). Findings Birth weight ≤25th centile was associated with higher risk for all mortality and morbidity outcomes. For stillbirth, low Apgar score, and neonatal unit admission, risk also increased from the 85th centile. Similar patterns and magnitude of associations were observed for both non- and partially customised birth weight centiles. Partially customised birth weight centiles did not improve the discrimination of mortality (AUROC 0.61 [95%CI 0.60, 0.62]) compared with noncustomised birth weight centiles (AUROC 0.62 [95%CI 0.60, 0.63]) and slightly underperformed in reclassifying pregnancies to different risk categories for both fatal and non-fatal adverse outcomes (NRI -0.027 [95% CI -0.039, -0.016], p < 0.001). We were unable to fully customise centile charts because we lacked data on maternal weight and ethnicity. Additional

  20. Metabolic syndrome predicts long-term mortality in subjects without established diabetes mellitus in asymptomatic Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Won, Ki-Bum; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Han, Donghee; Sung, Jidong; Choi, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the different features of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Asian populations compared with Western populations, the impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on long-term mortality according to DM status has not yet been elucidated in the Asian population. After performing 1:1 propensity score matching (PSM) using clinical variables including age, gender, smoking, and individual MetS components between DM and non-DM subjects from the data of the Korea Initiatives on Coronary Artery Calcification registry, mortality was evaluated according to DM and MetS in 14,956 asymptomatic Korean subjects. The mean follow-up duration was 53.1 months (interquartile range: 33–80). The overall prevalence of MetS was 60%. DM subjects had higher mortality compared with non-DM subjects (1.2% vs 0.7%, respectively; P = 0.001); the cumulative mortality by Kaplan–Meier analysis was higher in DM subjects than in non-DM subjects (log-rank P = 0.001). DM increased the risk of mortality in PSM participants (hazard ratio [HR] 1.74; P = 0.001). In non-DM subjects, MetS (HR 2.32) and one of its components, central obesity (HR 1.97), were associated with an increased risk of mortality (both P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the risk of mortality according to MetS or its components in DM subjects. After adjusting for confounding risk factors, it was shown that MetS independently increased the risk of mortality in non-DM subjects. Compared with non-DM subjects, DM subjects have an increased risk of long-term mortality among PSM participants. MetS appears to have an independent impact on mortality in subjects without established DM among the asymptomatic Korean population. Our results may not be applicable to the whole subjects with MetS because the PSM using MetS components was performed between subjects with and without DM which was very high risk for adverse clinical events. PMID:27930521

  1. Usefulness of the platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in predicting long-term cardiovascular mortality in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Erturk, Mehmet; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Yalcin, Ahmet Arif; Uygur, Begum; Bulut, Umit; Oz, Kursat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inflammation and increased platelet activation play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has recently been reported as a new independent predictor for major adverse cardiovascular events in cardiovascular diseases. Aim To investigate the relation between PLR and cardiovascular mortality in patients with intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia (CLI) or both. Material and methods In our retrospective study, 602 consecutive patients who were admitted to a large tertiary hospital with the diagnosis of symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) were included. Patients were divided into two groups according to their PLR as follows: high PLR (PLR > 142) and low PLR (PLR ≤ 142) groups. Results During the follow-up period (median: 33.8 months (interquartile range: 21–45)), 131 deaths occurred out of 602 (21.8%) patients. Cardiovascular mortality was found to be significantly higher in the high PLR group compared to the low PLR group (31.6% vs. 17.2 %; p < 0.001). Even after adjustment for various risk factors, PLR > 142 and age were found to be independent predictors of long-term cardiovascular mortality in Cox regression analysis (hazard ratios (95% confidence interval): 1.03 (1.01–1.04) and 1.04 (1.02–1.06), p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio, which is one of the parameters of routine complete blood count, reflects increased inflammatory status, platelet activation and aggregation. PLR is a cheap and readily available marker that has the ability to improve risk stratification provided by conventional risk scores in predicting long-term cardiovascular mortality in PAOD. PMID:28344615

  2. Careers and mortality in France: evidence on how far occupational mobility predicts differentiated risks.

    PubMed

    Cambois, Emmanuelle

    2004-06-01

    This new study goes beyond the well-established correlation between mortality differentials and occupational status, to focus on the impact of professional careers on mortality risk. It shows heterogeneity in the mortality risks within occupational classes, strongly related to the type of occupational moves experienced. The occupational data are taken from the French longitudinal census sample-using 1968 and 1975 census records-and mortality risks are estimated over the 1975-1980 period, for both occupational classes and pathways between classes. Results show a close relationship between occupational mobility and mortality. For men, favorable occupational moves-e.g. from clerks to upper class-put them less at risk of mortality than their counterparts who remained in their class. An inverse relationship is found for unfavorable moves. In most cases, the mortality risks of the movers are in between the risks in the class left and in the class joined. Similar patterns apply to specific groups of women only (upper classes, manual workers, clerks) for which occupational moves are probably driven, as for most men, by mortality related determinants (level of education, qualifications, health, etc.). The findings strongly support the use of a dynamic approach, based on individuals' experiences, to improve our understanding of mortality differentials.

  3. Urine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Is an Independent Predictive Factor of Hospital Readmission and Survival in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Graupera, Isabel; Solà, Elsa; Fabrellas, Núria; Moreira, Rebeca; Solé, Cristina; Huelin, Patricia; de la Prada, Gloria; Pose, Elisa; Ariza, Xavier; Risso, Alessandro; Albertos, Sonia; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in chemotaxis of monocytes. In several diseases, such as acute coronary syndromes and heart failure, elevated MCP-1 levels have been associated with poor outcomes. Little is known about MCP-1 in cirrhosis. AIM: To investigate the relationship between MCP-1 and outcome in decompensated cirrhosis. METHODS: Prospective study of 218 patients discharged from hospital after an admission for complications of cirrhosis. Urine and plasma levels of MCP-1 and other urine proinflammatroy biomarkers: osteopontin(OPN), trefoil-factor3 and liver-fatty-acid-binding protein were measured at admission. Urine non-inflammatory mediators cystatin-C, β2microglobulin and albumin were measured as control biomarkers. The relationship between these biomarkers and the 3-month hospital readmission, complications of cirrhosis, and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: 69 patients(32%) had at least one readmission during the 3-month period of follow-up and 30 patients died(14%). Urine MCP-1 and OPN levels, were associated with 3-month probability of readmission (0.85 (0.27–2.1) and 2003 (705–4586) ug/g creat vs 0.47 (0.2–1.1) and 1188 (512–2958) ug/g creat, in patients with and without readmission, respectively; p<0.05; median (IQR)). Furthermore, urine levels of MCP-1 were significantly associated with mortality (1.01 (1–3.6) vs 0.5 (0.2–1.1) μg/g creat, in dead and alive patients at 3 months; p<0.05). Patients with higher levels of urine MCP-1 (above percentile 75th) had higher probability of development of hepatic encephalopathy, bacterial infections or AKI. Urine MCP-1 was an independent predictive factor of hospital readmission and combined end-point of readmission or dead at 3 months. Plasma levels of MCP-1 did not correlated with outcomes. CONCLUSION: Urine, but not plasma, MCP-1 levels are associated with hospital readmission, development of complications of cirrhosis, and mortality. These

  4. Prediction of Mortality and Postoperative Complications using the Hip-Multidimensional Frailty Score in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Kwan-Jae; Kim, Sun-wook; Yoon, Sol-Ji; Kang, Min-gu; Kim, Kwang-il; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    High mortality and dependent living after hip fracture pose a significant public health concern. Retrospective study was conducted with 481 hip fracture patients (≥65 years of age) undergoing surgery from March 2009 to May 2014. The Hip-MFS was calculated by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). The primary outcome was the 6-month all-cause mortality rate. The secondary outcomes were 1-year all-cause mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay, and institutionalization. Thirty-five patients (7.3%) died within 6 months after surgery (median [interquartile range], 2.9 [1.4–3.9] months). The fully adjusted hazard ratio per 1 point increase in Hip-MFS was 1.458 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.210–1.758) for 6-months mortality and odds ratio were 1.239 (95% CI: 1.115–1.377), 1.156 (95% CI: 1.031–1.296) for postoperative complications and prolonged total hospital stay, respectively. High-risk patients (Hip-MFS > 8) showed higher risk of 6-month mortality (hazard ratio: 3.545, 95% CI: 1.466–8.572) than low-risk patients after adjustment. Hip-MFS successfully predict 6-month mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay in elderly hip fracture patients after surgery. Hip-MFS more precisely predict 6-month mortality than age or existing tools (P values of comparison of ROC curve: 0.002, 0.004, and 0.044 for the ASA classification, age and NHFS, respectively). PMID:28233870

  5. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  6. Serum Gamma-Glutamyl-Transferase Independently Predicts Outcome After Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: External Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Guiu, Boris Deschamps, Frederic; Boulin, Mathieu; Boige, Valerie; Malka, David; Ducreux, Michel; Hillon, Patrick; Baere, Thierry de

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: An Asian study showed that gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) can predict survival after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study was designed to validate in a European population this biomarker as an independent predictor of outcome after TACE of HCC and to determine a threshold value for clinical use. Methods: In 88 consecutive patients treated by TACE for HCC, the optimal threshold for GGT serum level was determined by a ROC analysis. Endpoints were time-to-treatment failure (TTTF) and overall survival (OS). All multivariate models were internally validated using bootstrapping (90 replications). Results: Median follow-up lasted 373 days, and median overall survival was 748 days. The optimal threshold for GGT was 165 U/L (sensitivity: 89.3%; specificity: 56.7%; area under the ROC curve: 0.7515). Median TTTF was shorter when GGT was {>=}165 U/L (281 days vs. 850 days; P < 0.001). GGT {>=}165 U/L (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.06; P = 0.02), WHO PS of 2 (HR = 5.4; P = 0.002), and tumor size (HR = 1.12; P = 0.014) were independently associated with shorter TTTF. Median OS was shorter when GGT was {>=}165 U/L (508 days vs. not reached; P < 0.001). GGT {>=} 165 U/L (HR = 3.05; P = 0.029), WHO PS of 2 (HR = 12.95; P < 0.001), alfa-fetoprotein (HR = 2.9; P = 0.01), and tumor size (HR = 1.096; P = 0.013) were independently associated with shorter OS. The results were confirmed by bootstrapping. Conclusions: Our results provide in a European population the external validation of GGT as an independent predictor of outcome after TACE of HCC. A serum level of GGT {>=} 165 U/L is independently associated with both shorter TTTF and OS.

  7. Factors Predicting Mortality in Midlife Adults with and without Down Syndrome Living with Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, A. J.; Seltzer, M. M.; Greenberg, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mortality of individuals with Down syndrome who have lived at home with their families throughout their lives. The current study evaluates the predictors, causes and patterns of mortality among co-residing individuals in midlife with Down syndrome as compared with co-residing individuals with ID owing to other…

  8. Renal insufficiency predicts mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergent general surgery.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubian, Arezou; Ge, Phillip; Tolan, Amy; Saltmarsh, Guy; Kaji, Amy H; Neville, Angela L; Bricker, Scott; De Virgilio, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Clinical predictors of perioperative mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergent general surgery have not been well described. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative morbidity and mortality in geriatric patients and factors associated with mortality. A retrospective review of patients 65 years of age or older undergoing emergent general surgery at a public teaching hospital was performed over a 7-year period. Data collected included demographics, comorbidities, laboratory studies, perioperative morbidities, and mortality. Descriptive statistics and predictors of morbidity and mortality are described. The mean age was 74 years. Indications for surgery included small bowel obstruction (24%), diverticulitis (20%), perforated viscous (16%), and large bowel obstruction (9%). The overall complication rate was 41 per cent with six cardiac complications (14%) and seven perioperative (16%) deaths. Mean admission serum creatinine was significantly higher in patients who died (3.6 vs 1.5 mg/dL, P = 0.004). Mortality for patients with an admission serum creatinine greater than 2.0 mg/dL was 42 per cent (5 of 12) compared with 3 per cent (2 of 32) for those 2.0 mg/dL or less (OR, 10.7; CI, 1.7 to 67; P = 0.01). Morbidity and mortality in geriatric patients undergoing emergency surgery remains high with the most significant predictor of mortality being the presence of renal insufficiency on admission.

  9. Important factors in predicting mortality outcome from stroke: findings from the Anglia Stroke Clinical Network Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    O. Bachmann, Max; Loke, Yoon Kong; D. Musgrave, Stanley; Price, Gill M.; Hale, Rachel; Metcalf, Anthony Kneale; Turner, David A.; Day, Diana J.; A. Warburton, Elizabeth; Potter, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background although variation in stroke service provision and outcomes have been previously investigated, it is less well known what service characteristics are associated with reduced short- and medium-term mortality. Methods data from a prospective multicentre study (2009–12) in eight acute regional NHS trusts with a catchment population of about 2.6 million were used to examine the prognostic value of patient-related factors and service characteristics on stroke mortality outcome at 7, 30 and 365 days post stroke, and time to death within 1 year. Results a total of 2,388 acute stroke patients (mean (standard deviation) 76.9 (12.7) years; 47.3% men, 87% ischaemic stroke) were included in the study. Among patients characteristics examined increasing age, haemorrhagic stroke, total anterior circulation stroke type, higher prestroke frailty, history of hypertension and ischaemic heart disease and admission hyperglycaemia predicted 1-year mortality. Additional inclusion of stroke service characteristics controlling for patient and service level characteristics showed varying prognostic impact of service characteristics on stroke mortality over the disease course during first year after stroke at different time points. The most consistent finding was the benefit of higher nursing levels; an increase in one trained nurses per 10 beds was associated with reductions in 30-day mortality of 11–28% (P < 0.0001) and in 1-year mortality of 8–12% (P < 0.001). Conclusions there appears to be consistent and robust evidence of direct clinical benefit on mortality up to 1 year after acute stroke of higher numbers of trained nursing staff over and above that of other recognised mortality risk factors. PMID:28181626

  10. Is the adiposity-associated FTO gene variant related to all-cause mortality independent of adiposity? Meta-analysis of data from 169,551 Caucasian adults

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, S. S.; Zhao, J. H.; Chasman, D. I.; Fischer, K.; Qi, Q.; Smith, A. V.; Thinggaard, M.; Jarczok, M. N.; Nalls, M. A.; Trompet, S.; Timpson, N. J.; Schmidt, B.; Jackson, A. U.; Lyytikäinen, L. P.; Verweij, N.; Mueller-Nurasyid, M.; Vikström, M.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Wong, A.; Meidtner, K.; Middelberg, R. P.; Strawbridge, R. J.; Christiansen, L.; Kyvik, K. O.; Hamsten, A.; Jääskeläinen, T.; Tjønneland, A.; Eriksson, J. G.; Whitfield, J. B.; Boeing, H.; Hardy, R.; Vollenweider, P.; Leander, K.; Peters, A.; van der Harst, P.; Kumari, M.; Lehtimäki, T.; Meirhaeghe, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Jöckel, K.-H.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Sattar, N.; Baumeister, S. E.; Smith, G. Davey; Casas, J. P.; Houston, D. K.; März, W.; Christensen, K.; Gudnason, V.; Hu, F. B.; Metspalu, A.; Ridker, P. M.; Wareham, N. J.; Loos, R. J. F.; Tiemeier, H.; Sonestedt, E.; Sørensen, T. I. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Previously, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, in the FTO gene showed a much stronger association with all-cause mortality than expected from its association with body mass index (BMI), body fat mass index (FMI) and waist circumference (WC). This finding implies that the SNP has strong pleiotropic effects on adiposity and adiposity-independent pathological pathways that leads to increased mortality. To investigate this further, we conducted a meta-analysis of similar data from 34 longitudinal studies including 169,551 adult Caucasians among whom 27,100 died during follow-up. Linear regression showed that the minor allele of the FTO SNP was associated with greater BMI (n = 169,551; 0.32 kg m−2; 95% CI 0.28–0.32, P < 1 × 10−32), WC (n = 152,631; 0.76 cm; 0.68–0.84, P < 1 × 10−32) and FMI (n = 48,192; 0.17 kg m−2; 0.13–0.22, P = 1.0 × 10−13). Cox proportional hazard regression analyses for mortality showed that the hazards ratio (HR) for the minor allele of the FTO SNPs was 1.02 (1.00–1.04, P = 0.097), but the apparent excess risk was eliminated after adjustment for BMI and WC (HR: 1.00; 0.98–1.03, P = 0.662) and for FMI (HR: 1.00; 0.96–1.04, P = 0.932). In conclusion, this study does not support that the FTO SNP is associated with all-cause mortality independently of the adiposity phenotypes. PMID:25752329

  11. Is the adiposity-associated FTO gene variant related to all-cause mortality independent of adiposity? Meta-analysis of data from 169,551 Caucasian adults.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, E; Ängquist, L H; Mirza, S S; Zhao, J H; Chasman, D I; Fischer, K; Qi, Q; Smith, A V; Thinggaard, M; Jarczok, M N; Nalls, M A; Trompet, S; Timpson, N J; Schmidt, B; Jackson, A U; Lyytikäinen, L P; Verweij, N; Mueller-Nurasyid, M; Vikström, M; Marques-Vidal, P; Wong, A; Meidtner, K; Middelberg, R P; Strawbridge, R J; Christiansen, L; Kyvik, K O; Hamsten, A; Jääskeläinen, T; Tjønneland, A; Eriksson, J G; Whitfield, J B; Boeing, H; Hardy, R; Vollenweider, P; Leander, K; Peters, A; van der Harst, P; Kumari, M; Lehtimäki, T; Meirhaeghe, A; Tuomilehto, J; Jöckel, K-H; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sattar, N; Baumeister, S E; Davey Smith, G; Casas, J P; Houston, D K; März, W; Christensen, K; Gudnason, V; Hu, F B; Metspalu, A; Ridker, P M; Wareham, N J; Loos, R J F; Tiemeier, H; Sonestedt, E; Sørensen, T I A

    2015-04-01

    Previously, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, in the FTO gene showed a much stronger association with all-cause mortality than expected from its association with body mass index (BMI), body fat mass index (FMI) and waist circumference (WC). This finding implies that the SNP has strong pleiotropic effects on adiposity and adiposity-independent pathological pathways that leads to increased mortality. To investigate this further, we conducted a meta-analysis of similar data from 34 longitudinal studies including 169,551 adult Caucasians among whom 27,100 died during follow-up. Linear regression showed that the minor allele of the FTO SNP was associated with greater BMI (n = 169,551; 0.32 kg m(-2) ; 95% CI 0.28-0.32, P < 1 × 10(-32) ), WC (n = 152,631; 0.76 cm; 0.68-0.84, P < 1 × 10(-32) ) and FMI (n = 48,192; 0.17 kg m(-2) ; 0.13-0.22, P = 1.0 × 10(-13) ). Cox proportional hazard regression analyses for mortality showed that the hazards ratio (HR) for the minor allele of the FTO SNPs was 1.02 (1.00-1.04, P = 0.097), but the apparent excess risk was eliminated after adjustment for BMI and WC (HR: 1.00; 0.98-1.03, P = 0.662) and for FMI (HR: 1.00; 0.96-1.04, P = 0.932). In conclusion, this study does not support that the FTO SNP is associated with all-cause mortality independently of the adiposity phenotypes.

  12. Evaluation of diagnostic relevance of mRNA levels in peripheral blood: predictive value for mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Füth, Reiner; Herder, Christian; Förster, Stefan; Müller-Scholze, Sylvia; Kruse, Niels; Rieckmann, Peter; Heinig, Antonia; Koenig, Wolfgang; Scherbaum, Werner A; Kolb, Hubert; Martin, Stephan

    2004-09-21

    In clinical practice, diagnosis and risk prediction are usually based on the analysis of serum or plasma proteins whereas gene expression analysis is not used on a routine basis. In order to compare the diagnostic and predictive relevance of serum protein and peripheral blood mRNA levels, we determined cytokine levels of end-stage renal failure patients undergoing hemodialysis. These patients face a high mortality mainly due to acceleration of atherosclerosis and subsequent severe vascular events. mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF alpha was significantly elevated in hemodialysis patients and further increased after 2 h of dialysis treatment. In contrast, gene expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF beta was significantly decreased. Patients who died during the observation period of 36 months had significantly increased mRNA levels of TNF alpha and decreased TGF beta mRNA expression at baseline. Survival analysis indicated that increased TNF alpha mRNA levels (P < 0.02) and TNF alpha/TGF beta mRNA ratios (P < 0.001) predict mortality. The corresponding cytokines in serum showed some association with disease, but serum concentrations neither changed during hemodialysis nor predicted mortality. This study shows that gene expression patterns of circulating leukocytes may present an important new diagnostic tool to predict clinical outcome in patients with inflammatory vascular diseases.

  13. The AFC Score: Validation of a 4-Item Predicting Score of Postoperative Mortality After Colorectal Resection for Cancer or Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Arnaud; Panis, Yves; Mantion, Georges; Slim, Karem; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Vicaut, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present prospective study was to validate externally a 4-item predictive score of mortality after colorectal surgery (the AFC score) by testing its generalizability on a new population. Summary Background Data: We have recently reported, in a French prospective multicenter study, that age older than 70 years, neurologic comorbidity, underweight (body weight loss >10% in <6 months), and emergency surgery significantly increased postoperative mortality after resection for cancer or diverticulitis. Patients and Methods: From June to September 2004, 1049 consecutive patients (548 men and 499 women) with a mean age of 67 ± 14 years, undergoing open or laparoscopic colorectal resection, were prospectively included. The AFC score was validated in this population. We assessed also the predictive value of other scores, such as the “Glasgow” score and the ASA score. To express and compare the predictive value of the different scores, a receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated. Results: Postoperative mortality rate was 4.6%. Variables already identified as predictors of mortality and used in the AFC score were also found to be associated with a high odds ratio in this study: emergency surgery, body weight loss >10%, neurologic comorbidity, and age older than 70 years in a multivariate logistic model. The validity of the AFC score in this population was found very high based both on the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test (P = 0.37) and on the area under the ROC curve (0.89). We also found that discriminatory capacity was higher than other currently used risk scoring systems such as the Glasgow or ASA score. Conclusion: The present prospective study validated the AFC score as a pertinent predictive score of postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery. Because it is based on only 4 risk factors, the AFC score can be used in daily practice. PMID:17592296

  14. Gut Microbiota Alterations can predict Hospitalizations in Cirrhosis Independent of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S.; Betrapally, Naga S.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Daita, Kalyani; Kang, Dae Joong; White, Melanie B.; Unser, Ariel B.; Fagan, Andrew; Gavis, Edith A.; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Dalmet, Swati; Heuman, Douglas M.; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes (DM) is prevalent in cirrhosis and may modulate the risk of hospitalization through gut dysbiosis. We aimed to define the role of gut microbiota on 90-day hospitalizations and of concomitant DM on microbiota. Cirrhotic outpatients with/without DM underwent stool and sigmoid mucosal microbial analysis and were followed for 90 days. Microbial composition was compared between those with/without DM, and those who were hospitalized/not. Regression/ROC analyses for hospitalizations were performed using clinical and microbial features. 278 cirrhotics [39% hepatic encephalopathy (HE), 31%DM] underwent stool while 72 underwent mucosal analyses. Ultimately, 94 were hospitalized and they had higher MELD, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and HE without difference in DM. Stool/mucosal microbiota were significantly altered in those who were hospitalized (UNIFRAC p< = 1.0e-02). Specifically, lower stool Bacteroidaceae, Clostridiales XIV, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcacae and higher Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae were seen in hospitalized patients. Concomitant DM impacted microbiota UNIFRAC (stool, p = 0.003, mucosa,p = 0.04) with higher stool Bacteroidaceae and lower Ruminococcaeae. Stool Bacteroidaceaeae and Clostridiales XIV predicted 90-day hospitalizations independent of clinical predictors (MELD, HE, PPI). Stool and colonic mucosal microbiome are altered in cirrhotics who get hospitalized with independent prediction using stool Bacteroidaceae and Clostridiales XIV. Concomitant DM distinctly impacts gut microbiota without affecting hospitalizations. PMID:26692421

  15. Independent Factors for Prediction of Poor Outcomes in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Günalp, Müge; Koyunoğlu, Merve; Gürler, Serdar; Koca, Ayça; Yeşilkaya, İlker; Öner, Emre; Akkaş, Meltem; Aksu, Nalan Metin; Demirkan, Arda; Polat, Onur; Elhan, Atilla Halil

    2014-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent management in the emergency department (ED). Recent progress in the treatment of neutropenic fever has underscored the importance of risk stratification. In this study, we aimed to determine independent factors for prediction of poor outcomes in patients with FN. Material/Methods We retrospectively evaluated 200 chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenic patients who visited the ED. Upon arrival at the ED, clinical data, including sex, age, vital signs, underlying systemic diseases, laboratory test results, estimated GFR, blood cultures, CRP, radiologic examinations, and Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) score of all febrile neutropenic patients were obtained. Outcomes were categorized as “poor” if serious complications during hospitalization, including death, occurred. Results The platelet count <50 000 cells/mm3 (OR 3.90, 95% CI 1.62–9.43), pulmonary infiltration (OR 3.45, 95% CI 1.48–8.07), hypoproteinemia <6 g/dl (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.27–8.56), respiratory rate >24/min (OR 8.75, 95% CI 2.18–35.13), and MASCC score <21 (OR 9.20, 95% CI 3.98–21.26) were determined as independent risk factors for the prediction of death. The platelet count <50 000 cells/mm3 (OR 3.93, 95% CI 1.42–10.92), serum CRP >50 mg/dl (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.68–8.61), hypoproteinemia (OR 7.81, 95% CI 3.43–17.78), eGFR ≤90 ML/min/1.73 m2 (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.13–8.26), and MASCC score <21 (OR 3.45, 95% CI 1.53–7.79) were determined as independent risk factors for the prediction of poor clinical outcomes of FN patients. Platelet count, protein level, respiratory rate, pulmonary infiltration, CRP, MASCC score, and eGFR were shown to have a significant association with outcome. Conclusions The results of our study may help emergency medicine physicians to prevent serious complications with proper use of simple independent risk factors besides MASCC score. PMID

  16. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population: A Prospective Study With 2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction.This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality.Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201-2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors.Our study showed that risk factors for anemia varied at

  17. Are Performance Measures Necessary to Predict Loss of Independence in Elderly People?

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, Claudio; Cesari, Matteo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Background. The frailty phenotype (FP) proposed by Fried and colleagues (Fried LP, Tangen CM, Walston J, et al.; Cardiovascular Health Study Collaborative Research Group. Frailty in older adults: evidence for a phenotype. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2001;56:M146–M156.) requires the administration of performance tests (gait speed, handgrip strength) not always feasible in routine clinical practice. Furthermore, the discriminative capacity of the instrument has been rarely investigated. Aim of this study was to evaluate the discriminative capacity of the FP and compare it with a modified version including only anamnestic information. Methods. Data are from 890 participants of the InCHIANTI study without impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) at baseline (mean age 74 years, women 55%). Frailty was defined by (a) the presence of ≥3 criteria of the FP, and (b) having ≥2 criteria of an anamnestic FP (AFP), not including gait speed and handgrip strength. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were used to evaluate the discriminative capacity of both definitions for incident disability (ie, loss of at least one ADL), incidence of “accelerated” disability (loss of >2 ADL) over a 6-year follow-up, and 5-years mortality. Results. FP and AFP yielded a frailty prevalence of 6.4% and 6.5%, respectively; only 32 patients were considered frail by both indices (kappa: .53). For incident disability, FP showed sensitivity = .194, specificity = .963, PPV = .400, and NPV = .903. Similarly, AFP had sensitivity = .129, specificity = .949, PPV = .245, and NPV = .894. Consistent results were found for accelerated disability and mortality. Conclusions. In our sample, both FP and AFP showed low sensitivity in identifying older people who would die or develop disability, but they could well discriminate people who would not experience adverse outcomes. PMID:26273019

  18. Prediction Models and Their External Validation Studies for Mortality of Patients with Acute Kidney Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Uchino, Shigehiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review AKI outcome prediction models and their external validation studies, to describe the discrepancy of reported accuracy between the results of internal and external validations, and to identify variables frequently included in the prediction models. Methods We searched the MEDLINE and Web of Science electronic databases (until January 2016). Studies were eligible if they derived a model to predict mortality of AKI patients or externally validated at least one of the prediction models, and presented area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (AUROC) to assess model discrimination. Studies were excluded if they described only results of logistic regression without reporting a scoring system, or if a prediction model was generated from a specific cohort. Results A total of 2204 potentially relevant articles were found and screened, of which 12 articles reporting original prediction models for hospital mortality in AKI patients and nine articles assessing external validation were selected. Among the 21 studies for AKI prediction models and their external validation, 12 were single-center (57%), and only three included more than 1,000 patients (14%). The definition of AKI was not uniform and none used recently published consensus criteria for AKI. Although good performance was reported in their internal validation, most of the prediction models had poor discrimination with an AUROC below 0.7 in the external validation studies. There were 10 common non-renal variables that were reported in more than three prediction models: mechanical ventilation, age, gender, hypotension, liver failure, oliguria, sepsis/septic shock, low albumin, consciousness and low platelet count. Conclusions Information in this systematic review should be useful for future prediction model derivation by providing potential candidate predictors, and for future external validation by listing up the published prediction models. PMID:28056039

  19. Blood Lactate Levels Cutoff and Mortality Prediction in Sepsis—Time for a Reappraisal? a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Roberto Rabello; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Colombo, Giancarlo; Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to identify the initial value of blood lactate that best correlates with 28-day mortality in resuscitated septic shock patients. This was a retrospective cohort study including 443 patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with severe sepsis or septic shock from the emergency department. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to obtain the best cutoff value for initial blood lactate associated with 28-day mortality. Patients were then dichotomized according to the chosen lactate cutoff, and sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Baseline blood lactate level more than 2.5 mmol/L showed the largest area under the ROC curve to predict 28-day mortality (ROC area, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62–0.79), with sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of 67.4%, 61.7%, and 94.2%, respectively. Mortality at 28 days was 16.9% (31/183) in patients with initial lactate more than 2.5 mmol/L and 5.8% (15/260) in patients with initial lactate at most 2.5 mmol/L (relative risk, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.63–5.28; P < 0.001). Initial blood lactate levels more than 2.5 mmol/L (hazard ratio [HR], 2.86; 95% CI, 1.53–5.33; P = 0.001) and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score at ICU admission (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09–1.27; P < 0.001) were associated with increased 28-day mortality in the adjusted Cox regression. In this retrospective cohort study, a lactate level more than 2.5 mmol/L was the best threshold to predict 28-day mortality among severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Further prospective studies should address the impact on morbidity and mortality of this threshold as a trigger to resuscitation in this population of critically ill patients. PMID:27380535

  20. Usefulness of a single-item measure of depression to predict mortality: the GAZEL prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Thomas; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Stringhini, Silvia; Dugravot, Aline; Lemogne, Cédric; Consoli, Silla M.; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: It remains unknown whether short measures of depression perform as well as long measures in predicting adverse outcomes such as mortality. The present study aims to examine the predictive value of a single-item measure of depression for mortality. Methods: A total of 14 185 participants of the GAZEL cohort completed the 20-item Center-for-Epidemiologic-Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale in 1996. One of these items (I felt depressed) was used as a single-item measure of depression. All-cause mortality data were available until 30 September 2009, a mean follow-up period of 12.7 years with a total of 650 deaths. Results: In Cox regression model adjusted for baseline socio-demographic characteristics, a one-unit increase in the single-item score (range 0–3) was associated with a 25% higher risk of all-cause mortality (95% CI: 13–37%, P < 0.001). Further adjustment for health-related behaviours and physical chronic diseases reduced this risk by 36% and 8%, respectively. After adjustment for all these variables, every one-unit increase in the single-item score predicted a 15% increased risk of death (95% CI: 5–27%, P < 0.01). There is also an evidence of a dose–reponse relationship between reponse scores on the single-item measure of depression and mortality. Conclusion: This study shows that a single-item measure of depression is associated with an increased risk of death. Given its simplicity and ease of administration, a very simple single-item measure of depression might be useful for identifying middle-aged adults at risk for elevated depressive symptoms in large epidemiological studies and clinical settings. PMID:21840893

  1. Kidney damage biomarkers detect acute kidney injury but only functional markers predict mortality after paraquat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Fahim; Buckley, Nicholas A; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Pickering, John W; Peake, Philip; Palangasinghe, Chathura; Wijerathna, Thilini; Ratnayake, Indira; Shihana, Fathima; Endre, Zoltan H

    2015-09-02

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following paraquat ingestion. The diagnostic performance of injury biomarkers was investigated in serial blood and urine samples from patients from 5 Sri Lankan hospitals. Functional AKI was diagnosed using serum creatinine (sCr) or serum cystatin C (sCysC). The 95th centile in healthy subjects defined the urinary biomarker cutoffs for diagnosing structural AKI. 50 poisoned patients provided 2 or more specimens, 76% developed functional AKI [AKIN stage 1 (n=12), 2 (n=7) or 3 (n=19)]; 19/26 patients with AKIN stage 2/3 also had functional AKI by sCysC criteria (≥50% increase). Urinary cystatin C (uCysC), clusterin (uClu) and NGAL (uNGAL) increased within 24h of ingestion compared with NoAKI patients and healthy controls. Each biomarker demonstrated moderate diagnostic utility [AUC-ROC: uCysC 0.79, uNGAL 0.79, uClu 0.68] for diagnosis of functional AKI at 16h. Death occurred only in subjects with functional AKI. Structural biomarker-based definitions detected more AKI than did sCr or sCysC, but did not independently predict death. Renal injury biomarkers did not add clinical value to patients who died rapidly due to multi-organ failure. Use of injury biomarkers within 16-24h may guide early intervention for reno-protection in less severe paraquat poisoning.

  2. Use of Life Course Work–Family Profiles to Predict Mortality Risk Among US Women

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Ivan Mejía; Glymour, M. Maria; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined relationships between US women’s exposure to midlife work–family demands and subsequent mortality risk. Methods. We used data from women born 1935 to 1956 in the Health and Retirement Study to calculate employment, marital, and parenthood statuses for each age between 16 and 50 years. We used sequence analysis to identify 7 prototypical work–family trajectories. We calculated age-standardized mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality associated with work–family sequences, with adjustment for covariates and potentially explanatory later-life factors. Results. Married women staying home with children briefly before reentering the workforce had the lowest mortality rates. In comparison, after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and education, HRs for mortality were 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58, 2.90) among single nonworking mothers, 1.48 (95% CI = 1.06, 1.98) among single working mothers, and 1.36 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.80) among married nonworking mothers. Adjustment for later-life behavioral and economic factors partially attenuated risks. Conclusions. Sequence analysis is a promising exposure assessment tool for life course research. This method permitted identification of certain lifetime work–family profiles associated with mortality risk before age 75 years. PMID:25713976

  3. Mortality prediction in patients with severe septic shock: a pilot study using a target metabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Manuela; Cambiaghi, Alice; Brunelli, Laura; Giordano, Silvia; Caironi, Pietro; Guatteri, Luca; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Gattinoni, Luciano; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock remains a major problem in Intensive Care Unit, with high lethality and high-risk second lines treatments. In this preliminary retrospective investigation we examined plasma metabolome and clinical features in a subset of 20 patients with severe septic shock (SOFA score >8), enrolled in the multicenter Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis study (ALBIOS, NCT00707122). Our purpose was to evaluate the changes of circulating metabolites in relation to mortality as a pilot study to be extended in a larger cohort. Patients were analyzed according to their 28-days and 90-days mortality. Metabolites were measured using a targeted mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomic approach that included acylcarnitines, aminoacids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and sugars. Data-mining techniques were applied to evaluate the association of metabolites with mortality. Low unsaturated long-chain phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines species were associated with long-term survival (90-days) together with circulating kynurenine. Moreover, a decrease of these glycerophospholipids was associated to the event at 28-days and 90-days in combination with clinical variables such as cardiovascular SOFA score (28-day mortality model) or renal replacement therapy (90-day mortality model). Early changes in the plasma levels of both lipid species and kynurenine associated with mortality have potential implications for early intervention and discovering new target therapy. PMID:26847922

  4. Length of stay of stroke rehabilitation inpatients: prediction through the functional independence measure.

    PubMed

    Franchignoni, F; Tesio, L; Martino, M T; Benevolo, E; Castagna, M

    1998-01-01

    A model for prediction of length of stay (LOS, in days) of stroke rehabilitation inpatients was developed, based on patients' age (years) and function at admission (scored on the Functional Independence Measure, FIMSM). One hundred and twenty-nine cases, consecutively admitted to three free-standing rehabilitation centres in Italy, were analyzed. A multiple linear regression using forward stepwise selection procedure was adopted. Median admission and discharge scores were: 57 and 75 for the total FIM score, 29 and 48 for the 13-item motor FIM subscore, 29 and 30 for the 5-item cognitive FIM subscore (potential range: 18-126, 13-91, 5-35, respectively). Median LOS was 44 days (interquartile range 30-62). The logLOS predictive model included three FIM items ("toilet transfer", TTr; "social interaction"; "expression") and patient's age (R2 = 0.48). TTr alone explained 31.3% of the variance of logLOS. These results are consistent with previous American studies, showing that FIM scores at admission are strong predictors of patients' LOS, with the transfer items having the greatest predictive power.

  5. Assessment of biochemical markers in the early post-burn period for predicting acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with major burn injury: comparison of serum creatinine, serum cystatin-C, plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The reported mortality rates range from 28% to 100% in burn patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) and from 50% to 100% among such patients treated with renal replacement therapy. Recently, the serum cystatin C and plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) levels have been introduced as early biomarkers for AKI; the levels of these biomarkers are known to increase 24 to 48 hours before the serum creatinine levels increase. In this study, we aimed to estimate the diagnostic utility of the cystatin C and plasma and urine NGAL levels in the early post-burn period as biomarkers for predicting AKI and mortality in patients with major burn injuries. Methods From May 2011 to July 2012, 90 consecutive patients with a burn wound area comprising ≥ 20% of the total body surface area (TBSA) were enrolled in this study. Whole blood and urine samples were obtained for measuring the serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and urine and plasma NGAL levels at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after admission. Receiver operating characteristic curve, area under the curve, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the predictive values of these biomarkers for AKI and mortality. Results In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, all variables, including age, percentage TBSA burned, sex, inhalation injury, and serum creatinine levels, serum cystatin C levels, and plasma and urine NGAL levels were independently associated with AKI development. Moreover, age, sex, percentage TBSA burned, and plasma and urine NGAL levels were independently associated with mortality. However, inhalation injury and the serum creatinine and cystatin C levels were not independently associated with mortality. Conclusions Massively burned patients who maintained high plasma and urine NGAL levels until 12 hours after admission were at the risk of developing early AKI and early mortality with burn shock. However, the plasma and urine

  6. Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Momin, Mohetaboer; Huo, Yong; Wang, Chun-yan; Zhang, Yan; Gong, Yan-jun; Liu, Zhao-ping; Wang, Xin-gang; Zheng, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between renal function and clinical outcomes among patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (ASTEMI), who were treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: 420 patients hospitalized in Peking University First Hospital, diagnosed with ASTEMI treated with emergency (PCI) from January 2001 to June 2011 were enrolled in this study. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used as a measure of renal function. We compared the clinical parameters and outcomes between ASTEMI patients combined renal insufficiency and the patients with normal renal function. Results: There was a significant increase in the concentrations of fibrinogen and D-Dimer (P<0.05) and a much higher morbidity of diabetes mellitus in the group of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) (P<0.01). CKD (eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI receiving PCI therapy rapidly (P=0.032, odds ratio (OR) 4.159, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.127–15.346). Conclusions: Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI treated with primary PCI. PMID:22843184

  7. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  8. Diet Quality Scores and Prediction of All-Cause, Cardiovascular and Cancer Mortality in a Pan-European Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lassale, Camille; Gunter, Marc J; Romaguera, Dora; Peelen, Linda M; Van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Beulens, Joline W J; Freisling, Heinz; Muller, David C; Ferrari, Pietro; Huybrechts, Inge; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Affret, Aurélie; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C; Olsen, Anja; Roswall, Nina; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Katzke, Verena A; Kühn, Tilman; Buijsse, Brian; Quirós, José-Ramón; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Etxezarreta, Nerea; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bonet, Catalina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy J; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Fasanelli, Francesca; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Boer, Jolanda M A; Sonestedt, Emily; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Renström, Frida; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Moons, Karel G M; Riboli, Elio; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Scores of overall diet quality have received increasing attention in relation to disease aetiology; however, their value in risk prediction has been little examined. The objective was to assess and compare the association and predictive performance of 10 diet quality scores on 10-year risk of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 451,256 healthy participants to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, followed-up for a median of 12.8y. All dietary scores studied showed significant inverse associations with all outcomes. The range of HRs (95% CI) in the top vs. lowest quartile of dietary scores in a composite model including non-invasive factors (age, sex, smoking, body mass index, education, physical activity and study centre) was 0.75 (0.72-0.79) to 0.88 (0.84-0.92) for all-cause, 0.76 (0.69-0.83) to 0.84 (0.76-0.92) for CVD and 0.78 (0.73-0.83) to 0.91 (0.85-0.97) for cancer mortality. Models with dietary scores alone showed low discrimination, but composite models also including age, sex and other non-invasive factors showed good discrimination and calibration, which varied little between different diet scores examined. Mean C-statistic of full models was 0.73, 0.80 and 0.71 for all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality. Dietary scores have poor predictive performance for 10-year mortality risk when used in isolation but display good predictive ability in combination with other non-invasive common risk factors.

  9. Predicting Mechanical Ventilation and Mortality: Early and Late Indicators in Steven-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Anna; Cooney, Ryan; Gamelli, Richard L; Mosier, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Steven-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are characterized by loss of the epidermis, often accompanied by sloughing of the oral mucosa and airway, which may be associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. We retrospectively examined our SJS and TEN population for factors predictive of the need for mechanical ventilation and mortality. Over more than a 7-year period, 74 subjects of ≥18 years old with biopsy-confirmed SJS-TEN were identified. Variables within the first 3 days of admission and throughout the entire hospital stay were analyzed for their value in predicting the need for mechanical ventilation and mortality. Predictive variables were examined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Of our 74 subjects, 28 (37.8%) required mechanical ventilation and 11 (13.9%) died, all of whom were intubated. Patients requiring ventilation had a significantly higher %TBSA loss of epidermis on admission and progressive epidermal loss after admission. On multivariate analysis, acute kidney injury within the first 3 days of admission and fewer days from symptom onset to admission were statistically significant in predicting need for mechanical ventilation. In addition, the early need for mechanical ventilation, early serum bicarbonate <20 mm/L, and older age were all associated with higher mortality on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, the need for mechanical ventilation in adult TEN subjects is associated with higher mortality. This is the first time that mechanical ventilation has been specifically examined in the recent U.S. SJS and TEN population. The early recognition of patients at risk for ventilation may help guide management, especially in those patients admitted early after symptom development with acute kidney injury and extensive, progressing epidermal loss.

  10. Estimation of feeding threshold for Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and its application to prediction of overwintering mortality.

    PubMed

    Son, Youngsoo; Groves, Russell L; Daane, Kent M; Morgan, David J W; Krugner, Rodrigo; Johnson, Marshall W

    2010-08-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), vectors the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa that induces Pierce's disease of grape. This study determined the effect of temperature on the feeding activity of H. vitripennis adults and the resulting production of excreta. The Logan type I model described a nonlinear pattern that showed excreta production increased up to an optimal temperature (33.1°C), followed by an abrupt decline near an estimated upper threshold (36.4°C). A temperature threshold for feeding, at or below which adults cease feeding, was estimated to be 10°C using a linear regression model based on the percentage of adults producing excreta over a range of constant temperatures. A simulated winter-temperature experiment using fluctuating thermal cycles confirmed that a time period above the temperature threshold for feeding was a critical factor in determining adult survival. Using data from the simulated temperature study, a predictive model was constructed by quantifying the relationship between cumulative mortality and cooling degree-hours. In field validation experiments, the model accurately predicted the temporal pattern of overwintering mortality of H. vitripennis adults held under winter temperatures simulating conditions in Bakersfield and Riverside, California, in 2006-2007. Model prediction using winter temperature data from a Riverside weather station indicated that H. vitripennis adults would experience an average of 92% overwintering mortality before reproduction in the spring, but levels of mortality varied depending on winter temperatures. The potential for temperature-based indices to predict temporal and spatial dynamics of H. vitripennis overwintering is discussed.

  11. Diet Quality Scores and Prediction of All-Cause, Cardiovascular and Cancer Mortality in a Pan-European Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lassale, Camille; Gunter, Marc J.; Romaguera, Dora; Peelen, Linda M.; Van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; Freisling, Heinz; Muller, David C.; Ferrari, Pietro; Huybrechts, Inge; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Affret, Aurélie; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C.; Olsen, Anja; Roswall, Nina; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Katzke, Verena A.; Kühn, Tilman; Buijsse, Brian; Quirós, José-Ramón; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Etxezarreta, Nerea; Huerta, José María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Bonet, Catalina; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy J.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Fasanelli, Francesca; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Sonestedt, Emily; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Renström, Frida; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv; Moons, Karel G. M.; Riboli, Elio; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Scores of overall diet quality have received increasing attention in relation to disease aetiology; however, their value in risk prediction has been little examined. The objective was to assess and compare the association and predictive performance of 10 diet quality scores on 10-year risk of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 451,256 healthy participants to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, followed-up for a median of 12.8y. All dietary scores studied showed significant inverse associations with all outcomes. The range of HRs (95% CI) in the top vs. lowest quartile of dietary scores in a composite model including non-invasive factors (age, sex, smoking, body mass index, education, physical activity and study centre) was 0.75 (0.72–0.79) to 0.88 (0.84–0.92) for all-cause, 0.76 (0.69–0.83) to 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for CVD and 0.78 (0.73–0.83) to 0.91 (0.85–0.97) for cancer mortality. Models with dietary scores alone showed low discrimination, but composite models also including age, sex and other non-invasive factors showed good discrimination and calibration, which varied little between different diet scores examined. Mean C-statistic of full models was 0.73, 0.80 and 0.71 for all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality. Dietary scores have poor predictive performance for 10-year mortality risk when used in isolation but display good predictive ability in combination with other non-invasive common risk factors. PMID:27409582

  12. Preparatory α-band oscillations reflect spatial gating independently of predictions regarding target identity.

    PubMed

    Wildegger, T; van Ede, F; Woolrich, M; Gillebert, C R; Nobre, A C

    2017-03-01

    Preparatory modulations of cortical α-band oscillations are a reliable index of the voluntary allocation of covert spatial attention. It is currently unclear whether attentional cues containing information about a target's identity (such as its visual orientation), in addition to its location, might additionally shape preparatory α modulations. Here, we explore this question by directly comparing spatial and feature-based attention in the same visual detection task while recording brain activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG). At the behavioral level, preparatory feature-based and spatial attention cues both improved performance and did so independently of each other. Using MEG, we replicated robust α lateralization following spatial cues: in preparation for a visual target, α power decreased contralaterally and increased ipsilaterally to the attended location. Critically, however, preparatory α lateralization was not significantly modulated by predictions regarding target identity, as carried via the behaviorally effective feature-based attention cues. Furthermore, nonlateralized α power during the cue-target interval did not differentiate between uninformative cues and cues carrying feature-based predictions either. Based on these results we propose that preparatory α modulations play a role in the gating of information between spatially segregated cortical regions and are therefore particularly well suited for spatial gating of information.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present work clarifies if and how human brain oscillations in the α-band support multiple types of anticipatory attention. Using magnetoencephalography, we show that posterior α-band oscillations are modulated by predictions regarding the spatial location of an upcoming visual target, but not by feature-based predictions regarding its identity, despite robust behavioral benefits. This provides novel insights into the functional role of preparatory α mechanisms and suggests a limited

  13. Sociosexual attitudes and dyadic sexual desire independently predict women's preferences for male vocal masculinity.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jillian J M; Jones, Benedict C; Fraccaro, Paul J; Tigue, Cara C; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Feinberg, David R

    2014-10-01

    Research suggests that the desire to behave sexually with a partner (dyadic sexual desire) may reflect desire for intimacy whereas solitary sexual desire may reflect pleasure seeking motivations more generally. Because direct reproductive success can only be increased with a sexual partner, we tested whether dyadic sexual desire was a better predictor of women's preferences for lower pitched men's voices (a marker of relatively high reproductive success) than was solitary sexual desire. In Study 1, women (N = 95) with higher dyadic sexual desire scores on the Sexual Desire Inventory-2 preferred masculinized male voices more than did women with lower dyadic sexual desire scores. We did not find a significant relationship between women's vocal masculinity preferences and their solitary sexual desire scores. In Study 2, we tested whether the relationship between voice preferences and dyadic sexual desire scores was related to differences in sociosexual orientation. Women (N = 80) with more positive attitudes towards uncommitted sex had stronger vocal masculinity preferences regardless of whether men's attractiveness was judged for short-term or long-term relationships. Independent of the effect of sociosexual attitudes, dyadic sexual desire positively predicted women's masculinity preferences when assessing men's attractiveness for short-term but not long-term relationships. These effects were independent of women's own relationship status and hormonal contraceptive use. Our results provide further evidence that women's mate preferences may independently reflect individual differences in both sexual desire and openness to short-term relationships, potentially with the ultimate function of maximizing the fitness benefits of women's mate choices.

  14. Restructuring the navigational field: individual predisposition towards field independence predicts preferred navigational strategy.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; D'Alessandro, Adele; Nori, Raffaella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2017-03-10

    To successfully navigate within an environment, individuals have to organize the spatial information in terms of salient landmarks, paths and general layout of the navigational environment. They may differ in the strategy they adopt to orientate themselves, with some individuals preferring to use salient landmarks (landmark spatial style, L-SS), others preferring to plan routes or paths through an egocentric strategy in which landmarks are connected with each other (route spatial style, R-SS) and others still create a global map-like configuration of the environment regardless of their own position in the environment (survey spatial style, S-SS). Here, we assessed whether Field independence (FI), that is the extent to which the individual perceives part of a field as discrete from the surrounding field rather than embedded in the field, predicted the individual's spatial style. We assessed the individual's spatial style using the spatial cognitive style test (SCST) and measured FI using the group embedded figure test (GEFT). We found that FI predicted general spatial ability, with a higher level of FI being associated with better performances on the SCST. Also, Field-independent individuals showed a marked preference for an S-SS. These results suggest that a higher level of FI is associated with better performance on higher level spatial tasks (i.e. R-SS and S-SS) that is tasks requiring individuals to restructure the "navigational field" according to the navigational goal. The results also suggest that a higher level of FI makes individuals more prone to use a global and complex map-like representation of the environment.

  15. Usefulness of biomarkers for predicting long-term mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus and non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (a GUSTO IV substudy).

    PubMed

    James, Stefan K; Lindahl, Bertil; Timmer, Jorik R; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Siegbahn, Agneta; Stridsberg, Mats; Armstrong, Paul; Califf, Robert; Wallentin, Lars; Simoons, Maarten L

    2006-01-15

    The present study evaluated whether biomarkers of ischemia, inflammation, myocardial damage, and dysfunction are equally useful in patients who have diabetes mellitus (DM) for prediction of cardiac events in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (ACS). DM was present in 1,677 of 7,800 patients (21.5%) who had non-ST-elevation ACS and were included in the Fourth Global Utilization of Strategies To Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO IV) trial. Creatinine, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), troponin T, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 were analyzed in serum samples that were obtained at a median of 9.5 hours from symptom onset. One-year mortality rates were 13.5% among patients who had DM (n = 227) and 6.9% among those who did not (n = 418, p < 0.001). The median level of NT-pro-BNP was 2 times as high in patients who had DM, whereas troponin T levels did not differ by DM status. Mortality increased with ascending quartiles of NT-pro-BNP, with 1-year mortality rates of 3.9% (n = 11) in the bottom quartile and 29% (n = 103) in the top quartile. In multivariable analyses, factors that were predictive of 1-year mortality in patients who did not have DM were also significant for those who did. Presence of ST depression > 0.5 mm had the highest odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.6). NT-pro-BNP levels > 669 ng/L (odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 3.6) and interleukin-6 levels > 10 ng/L (odds ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.0) were significant biomarker predictors. In conclusion, DM confers a high long-term mortality in non-ST-elevation ACS. Despite a larger proportion of ST depression and increased levels of NT-pro-BNP and interleukin-6 at admission, these factors provide independent prognostic information that may improve risk stratification and guidance of treatment.

  16. The Value of BISAP Score for Predicting Mortality and Severity in Acute Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng-En

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Bedside Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score has been developed to identify patients at high risk for mortality or severe disease early during the course of acute pancreatitis. We aimed to undertake a meta-analysis to quantify the accuracy of BISAP score for predicting mortality and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Materials and Methods We searched the databases of Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify studies using the BISAP score to predict mortality or SAP. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated from each study and were compared with the traditional scoring systems. Results Twelve cohorts from 10 studies were included. The overall sensitivity of a BISAP score of ≥3 for mortality was 56% (95% CI, 53%-60%), with a specificity of 91% (95% CI, 90%-91%). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.65 (95% CI, 4.23-7.55) and 0.48 (95% CI, 0.41-0.56), respectively. Regarding the outcome of SAP, the pooled sensitivity was 51% (43%-60%), and the specificity was 91% (89%-92%). The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.23 (4.21-12.42) and 0.56 (0.44-0.71), respectively. Compared with BISAP score, the Ranson criteria and APACHEⅡscore showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity for both outcomes. Conclusions The BISAP score was a reliable tool to identify AP patients at high risk for unfavorable outcomes. Compared with the Ranson criteria and APACHEⅡscore, BISAP score outperformed in specificity, but having a suboptimal sensitivity for mortality as well as SAP. PMID:26091293

  17. A predictive risk model for electroshock-induced mortality of the endangered Cape Fear shiner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holliman, F.M.; Reynolds, J.B.; Kwak, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a single electroshock on injury and mortality of hatchery-reared Cape Fear shiners Notropis mekistocholas (N = 517), an endangered cyprinid. Groups of 18-22 Cape Fear shiners were exposed to DC, 120-Hz pulsed DC (PDC), or 60-Hz PDC at voltage gradients of 1.1, 1.9, or 2.7 V/cm for 3 s. Mortality occurred only among fish exposed to 120-Hz PDC (25%) and DC (38%) applied at 2.7 V/cm. Because no mortality occurred in Cape Fear shiners exposed to 60-Hz PDC, this waveform was selected for further study of electroshock duration (3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 s) and voltage gradient (0.9, 1.6, or 2.3 V/cm). Most fish electroshocked in the experiments were immobilized (ceased swimming motion). No physical injury was detected by necropsy or radiography in any fish. Electroshock-induced mortality of Cape Fear shiners showed a strong multivariable relationship to voltage gradient, electroshock duration, and fish length. Fish subjected to 60-Hz PDC at 0.9 or 1.6 V/cm for 6 s experienced low mortality (<10%). Our results demonstrate that Cape Fear shiners can be immobilized by 60-Hz PDC electroshock without injury or significant risk of mortality. We propose that electrofishing may be safely used to sample similar small cyprinids, imperiled or otherwise, when electrofishers select an appropriate waveform (DC pulsed at 60-Hz or less) and use it judiciously (minimal exposure at, or below, the immobilization threshold).

  18. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  19. Predicting occupancy for pygmy rabbits in Wyoming: an independent evaluation of two species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Ignizio, Drew; Keinath, Doug; Copeland, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models are an important component of natural-resource conservation planning efforts. Independent, external evaluation of their accuracy is important before they are used in management contexts. We evaluated the classification accuracy of two species distribution models designed to predict the distribution of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis habitat in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The Nature Conservancy model was deductive and based on published information and expert opinion, whereas the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model was statistically derived using historical observation data. We randomly selected 187 evaluation survey points throughout southwestern Wyoming in areas predicted to be habitat and areas predicted to be nonhabitat for each model. The Nature Conservancy model correctly classified 39 of 77 (50.6%) unoccupied evaluation plots and 65 of 88 (73.9%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 63.3%. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model correctly classified 53 of 95 (55.8%) unoccupied plots and 59 of 88 (67.0%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 61.2%. Based on 95% asymptotic confidence intervals, classification success of the two models did not differ. The models jointly classified 10.8% of the area as habitat and 47.4% of the area as nonhabitat, but were discordant in classifying the remaining 41.9% of the area. To evaluate how anthropogenic development affected model predictive success, we surveyed 120 additional plots among three density levels of gas-field road networks. Classification success declined sharply for both models as road-density level increased beyond 5 km of roads per km-squared area. Both models were more effective at predicting habitat than nonhabitat in relatively undeveloped areas, and neither was effective at accounting for the effects of gas-energy-development road networks. Resource managers who wish to know the amount of pygmy rabbit habitat present in an

  20. Predictive Value of POSSUM and ACPGBI Scoring in Mortality and Morbidity of Colorectal Resection: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bremers, A. J. A.; Groenewoud, J. M. M.; van Laarhoven, C. J. H. M.; Bleichrodt, R. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preoperative risk prediction to assess mortality and morbidity may be helpful to surgical decision making. The aim of this study was to compare mortality and morbidity of colorectal resections performed in a tertiary referral center with mortality and morbidity as predicted with physiological and operative score for enumeration of mortality and morbidity (POSSUM), Portsmouth POSSUM (P-POSSUM), and colorectal POSSUM (CR-POSSUM). The second aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of different POSSUM scores in surgery performed for malignancy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diverticulitis. POSSUM scoring was also evaluated in colorectal resection in acute vs. elective setting. In procedures performed for malignancy, the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland (ACPGBI) score was assessed in the same way for comparison. Methods POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM predictor equations for mortality were applied in a retrospective case–control study to 734 patients who had undergone colorectal resection. The total group was assessed first. Second, the predictive value of outcome after surgery was assessed for malignancy (n = 386), inflammatory bowel diseases (n = 113), diverticulitis (n = 91), and other indications, e.g., trauma, endometriosis, volvulus, or ischemia (n = 144). Third, all subgroups were assessed in relation to the setting in which surgery was performed: acute or elective. In patients with malignancy, the ACPGBI score was calculated as well. In all groups, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. Results POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM have a significant predictive value for outcome after colorectal surgery. Within the total population as well as in all four subgroups, there is no difference in the area under the curve between the POSSUM, P-POSSUM, and CR-POSSUM scores. In the subgroup analysis, smallest areas under the ROC curve are seen in operations performed for malignancy, which

  1. Physical Activity Related to Depression and Predicted Mortality Risk: Results from the Americans' Changing Lives Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Lee, Charles C.-L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between three types of physical activities (PA) and depression, and the relationship between PA and later mortality. Previous studies rarely assessed these associations in one single study in randomly selected population samples. Few studies have assessed these relations by adjusting the covariate of…

  2. A frailty index to predict the mortality risk in a population of senior mexican adults

    PubMed Central

    García-González, José Juan; García-Peña, Carmen; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Background Frailty in the elderly can be regarded as nonspecific vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, caused by multiple factors. The aim was to analyze the relationships between the frailty index, age and mortality in a two year follow up study of Mexican elderly. Methods A frailty index was developed using 34 variables. To obtain the index, the mean of the total score for each individual was obtained. Survival analyses techniques were used to examine the risk ratios for the different levels of the frailty index. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained, adjusted for age and gender. Cox proportional hazards models were also built to obtain hazard ratio estimates. Results A total of 4082 participants was analyzed. Participants had an average age of 73 years and 52.5% were women. On average, participants were followed-up for 710 days (standard deviation = 111 days) and 279 of them died. Mortality increased with the frailty index level, especially in those with levels between .21 to .65, reaching approximately 17% and 21%, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models showed that participants with frailty index levels associated to increased mortality (.21 and higher) represent 24.0% of those aged 65-69 years and 47.6% of those 85 and older. Conclusion The frailty index shows the properties found in the other studies, it allows stratifying older Mexican into several groups different by the degree of the risk of mortality, and therefore the frailty index can be used in assessing health of elderly. PMID:19887005

  3. Increased EMR2 expression on neutrophils correlates with disease severity and predicts overall mortality in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Ho, Yu-Pin; Teng, Wei-; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chen, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis are susceptible to infections with high short-term mortalities. One CD97-related EGF-TM7 molecule, EMR2 (EGF-like molecule containing mucin-like hormone receptor 2), had been shown to regulate human neutrophil function, potentiate systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, EMR2 could also suppress neutrophil survival. Studying the role of EMR2 on neutrophil would be intriguing. 48 healthy volunteers and 100 cirrhotic patients were enrolled. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral blood and cell surface markers were measured by flow cytometry.EMR2 expression levels correlated with CTP scores and increased further in patients with infections. These EMR2-expressed neutrophils were with activated phenotype, but with deranged functions like increased resting oxidative burst and impaired phagocytosis ability. Ligation of EMR2 could increase the phagoburst capacity but not the phagocytosis ability. Furthermore, neutrophils with higher EMR2 expression were more apoptotic and lost the LPS-induced neutrophil survival. Finally, EMR2 expressions on neutrophils correlated with infections and their levels greater than 25 had an AUC = 0.708 for predicting mortality. In conclusion, EMR2 expression levels correlated with CTP scores and increased further in cirrhotic patients with infections. These high EMR2-expressed neutrophils had activated phenotype but with deranged functions. Higher levels of these EMR2-expressed neutrophils correlated with infectious complications and predict mortality. PMID:27905560

  4. Mortality prediction in Indian cardiac surgery patients: Validation of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Prachi; Geeta, Kanithi; Gopinath, Ramachandran; Durga, Padmaja

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Risk Stratification has an important place in cardiac surgery to identify high-risk cases and optimally allocate resources. Hence various risk scoring systems have been tried to predict mortality. The aim of the present study was to validate the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II (EuroSCORE II) in Indian cardiac surgical patients. Methods: After obtaining ethics committee clearance, data on EuroSCORE II variables were collected for all patients >18 years undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valve surgery and mixed (CABG + valve) procedures between January 2011 and December 2012. Mortality prediction was done using the online calculator from the site www.euroscore.org. The calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was analysed using the Hosmer–Lemeshow test and discrimination was analysed by plotting receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) and calculating area under the curve (AUC). The analysis was done in the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and in mixed procedures. Results: The overall observed mortality was 5.7% in the total sample, 6.6% in CABG, 4.2% in valve surgeries and 10.2% in mixed procedures whereas the predicted mortality was 2.9%, 3.1%, 2.4%, 5.1% in total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. The significance (P value) of Hosmer–Lemeshow test was 0.292, 0.45, 0.56 and 1 for the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively, indicating good calibration. The AUC of ROC was 0.76, 0.70, 0.83 and 0.78 for total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. Conclusion: Mortality of the sample was under-predicted by EuroSCORE II. Calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was good for total sample as well as for all surgical subcategories. Discrimination was good in the total sample and in the mixed procedure population, acceptable in CABG patients and excellent in valve surgeries. PMID:28250485

  5. Drug release from extruded solid lipid matrices: theoretical predictions and independent experiments.

    PubMed

    Güres, Sinan; Siepmann, Florence; Siepmann, Juergen; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a mechanistically realistic mathematical model based on Fick's second law to quantitatively predict the release profiles from solid lipid extrudates consisting of a ternary matrix. Diprophylline was studied as a freely water-soluble model drug, glycerol tristearate as a matrix former and polyethylene glycol or crospovidone as a pore former (blend ratio: 50:45:5%w/w/w). The choice of these ratios is based on former studies. Strains with a diameter of 0.6, 1, 1.5, 2.7 and 3.5mm were prepared using a twin-screw extruder at 65 °C and cut into cylinders of varying lengths. Drug release in demineralised water was measured using the USP 32 basket apparatus. Based on SEM pictures of extrudates before and after exposure to the release medium as well as on DSC measurements and visual observations, an analytical solution of Fick's second law of diffusion was identified in order to quantify the resulting diprophylline release kinetics from the systems. Fitting the model to one set of experimentally determined diprophylline release kinetics from PEG containing extrudates allowed determining the apparent diffusion coefficient of this drug (or water) in this lipid matrix. Knowing this value, the impact of the dimensions of the cylinders on drug release could be quantitatively predicted. Importantly, these theoretical predictions could be confirmed by independent experimental results. Thus, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism controlling drug release in this type of advanced drug delivery systems. In contrast, theoretical predictions of the impact of the device dimensions in the case of crospovidone containing extrudates significantly underestimated the real diprophylline release rates. This could be attributed to the disintegration of this type of dosage forms when exceeding a specific minimal device diameter. Thus, mathematical modelling can potentially significantly speed up the development of solid lipid extrudates, but care has

  6. Baseline CSF p-tau levels independently predict progression of hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, W J.P.; Vrenken, H; Barnes, J; Sluimer, I C.; Verwey, N A.; Blankenstein, M A.; Klein, M; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Barkhof, F; van der Flier, W M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether baseline CSF biomarkers are associated with hippocampal atrophy rate as a measure of disease progression in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls, controlling for baseline neuropsychological and MRI findings. Methods: We assessed data from 31 patients with AD, 25 patients with MCI, and 19 controls (mean age 68 ± 8 years; 39 [52%] female) who visited our memory clinic and had received serial MRI scanning (scan interval 1.7 ± 0.7 years). At baseline, CSF biomarkers (amyloid β 1-42, tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau]) were obtained, as well as neuropsychological data. Baseline MRI scans were assessed using visual rating scales for medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities. Hippocampal atrophy rates were estimated using regional nonlinear “fluid” registration of follow-up scan to baseline scan. Results: Stepwise multiple linear regression, adjusted for age and sex, showed that increased CSF p-tau levels (β [standard error]: −0.79 [0.35]) at baseline was independently associated with higher subsequent hippocampal atrophy rates (p < 0.05), together with poorer memory performance (0.09 [0.04]) and more severe MTA (−0.60 [0.21]). The association of memory function with hippocampal atrophy rate was explained by the link with diagnosis, because it disappeared from the model after we additionally corrected for diagnosis. Conclusions: Baseline CSF levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 are independently associated with subsequent disease progression, as reflected by hippocampal atrophy rate. This effect is independent of baseline neuropsychological and MRI predictors. Our results imply that predicting disease progression can best be achieved by combining information from different modalities. GLOSSARY Aβ1-42 = amyloid β 1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; FOV = field of view; GCA = global cortical

  7. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi). This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models. The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality. Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi. PMID:28121954

  8. Serum C-reactive protein predicts early mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, ShaoMing; Waili, Yulituzi; Qi, XiaoTing; Chen, YueMei; Lou, YuFeng; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether CRP could serve as a potential surrogate marker for 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-related decompensated cirrhosis (HBV-DeCi).This was a retrospective cohort study that included 140 patients with HBV-DeCi. All patients were followed up for 1-month. A panel of clinical and biochemical variables were analyzed for potential associations with outcomes using multiple regression models.The serum CRP was significantly higher in nonsurviving patients than in surviving patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CRP levels (odds ratio: 1.047, P = 0.002) and the model for end-stage liver disease score (odds ratio: 1.370, P = 0.001) were independent predictors for mortality.Serum CRP is a simple marker that may serve as an additional predictor of 1-month mortality in hospitalized patients with HBV-DeCi.

  9. Predicting dissolved inorganic nitrogen leaching in European forests using two independent databases.

    PubMed

    Dise, N B; Rothwell, J J; Gauci, V; van der Salm, C; de Vries, W

    2009-02-15

    Regional-scale databases can be particularly useful for identifying relationships between dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) leaching in forests and environmental drivers, which in turn allow an assessment of the risk of ecosystem damage, such as forest acidification and eutrophication of downstream water bodies. However, detecting the 'signal' of a significant correlate to N leaching against a background of wide variability in other factors requires a large number of sites, and the validation of models developed requires a similarly large number of independent sites. Here we use two large and fully independent databases of forest ecosystems across Europe to develop and validate indicators of N saturation and leaching. One database was used for model development and the other for validating these models. Among 35 variables considered, the most significant indicators of N leaching in the model development database were: the flux of dissolved inorganic N in deposition, mean annual temperature, mean altitude, the site drainage (plot vs catchment), needle- and litter-N concentration, organic horizon C:N ratio, and subsoil pH. Altitude was not a consistent predictor (it was significant in the development database but not in the validation database), and needle and litter N concentration, plot vs catchment, and subsoil pH all showed high intercorrelation with N deposition and so were not significant in models already including N deposition. The most consistent and useful indicators of N leaching were throughfall N deposition, organic horizon C:N ratio and mean annual temperature. Sites receiving low levels of N deposition (<8 kg N ha(-1) y(-1)) showed very low output fluxes of N and were simulated separately from more polluted forests. In general, the models successfully predicted N leaching (mean of +/-5 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) between observed and predicted) from forests at early to intermediate stages of nitrogen saturation but not from nitrogen-saturated sites. Thus, simple

  10. Hemodynamic indexes derived from computed tomography angiography to predict pulmonary embolism related mortality.

    PubMed

    John, Gregor; Marti, Christophe; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Perrier, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) induces an acute increase in the right ventricle afterload that can lead to right-ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and eventually to circulatory collapse. Hemodynamic status and presence of RVD are important determinants of adverse outcomes in acute PE. Technologic progress allows computed tomography angiography (CTA) to give more information than accurate diagnosis of PE. It may also provide an insight into hemodynamics and right-ventricular function. Proximal localization of emboli, reflux of contrast medium to the hepatic veins, and right-to-left short-axis ventricular diameter ratio seem to be the most relevant CTA predictors of 30-day mortality. These elements require little postprocessing time, an advantage in the emergency room. We herein review the prognostic value of RVD and other CTA mortality predictors for patients with acute PE.

  11. Frailty Index Predicts All-Cause Mortality for Middle-Aged and Older Taiwanese: Implications for Active-Aging Programs

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Yu; Lee, Wei-Ju; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Peng, Li-Ning; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty Index, defined as an individual’s accumulated proportion of listed health-related deficits, is a well-established metric used to assess the health status of old adults; however, it has not yet been developed in Taiwan, and its local related structure factors remain unclear. The objectives were to construct a Taiwan Frailty Index to predict mortality risk, and to explore the structure of its factors. Methods Analytic data on 1,284 participants aged 53 and older were excerpted from the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (2006), in Taiwan. A consensus workgroup of geriatricians selected 159 items according to the standard procedure for creating a Frailty Index. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to explore the association between the Taiwan Frailty Index and mortality. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify structure factors and produce a shorter version–the Taiwan Frailty Index Short-Form. Results During an average follow-up of 4.3 ± 0.8 years, 140 (11%) subjects died. Compared to those in the lowest Taiwan Frailty Index tertile (< 0.18), those in the uppermost tertile (> 0.23) had significantly higher risk of death (Hazard ratio: 3.2; 95% CI 1.9–5.4). Thirty-five items of five structure factors identified by exploratory factor analysis, included: physical activities, life satisfaction and financial status, health status, cognitive function, and stresses. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (C-statistics) of the Taiwan Frailty Index and its Short-Form were 0.80 and 0.78, respectively, with no statistically significant difference between them. Conclusion Although both the Taiwan Frailty Index and Short-Form were associated with mortality, the Short-Form, which had similar accuracy in predicting mortality as the full Taiwan Frailty Index, would be more expedient in clinical practice and community settings to target frailty screening and intervention. PMID:27537684

  12. Preoperative Metabolic Syndrome Is Predictive of Significant Gastric Cancer Mortality after Gastrectomy: The Fujian Prospective Investigation of Cancer (FIESTA) Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Peng, Feng; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Hejun; Liang, Binying; Ji, Kaida; Lin, Jinxiu; Chen, Lin-Feng; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. However, the impact of MetS on gastric cancer mortality remains largely unknown. Here, we prospectively examined the prediction of preoperative MetS for gastric cancer mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. This study was conducted among 3012 patients with gastric cancer who received radical gastrectomy between 2000 and 2010. The latest follow-up was completed in 2015. Blood/tissue specimens, demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics were collected at baseline. During 15-year follow-up, 1331 of 3012 patients died of gastric cancer. The median survival time (MST) of patients with MetS was 31.3months, which was significantly shorter than that of MetS-free patients (157.1months). The coexistence of MetS before surgery was associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk for gastric cancer mortality (P<0.001). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were increased with invasion depth T1/T2 (HR=2.78, P<0.001), regional lymph node metastasis N0 (HR=2.65, P<0.001), positive distant metastasis (HR=2.53, P<0.001), TNM stage I/II (HR=3.00, P<0.001), intestinal type (HR=2.96, P<0.001), negative tumor embolus (HR=2.34, P<0.001), and tumor size ≤4.5cm (HR=2.49, P<0.001). Further survival tree analysis confirmed the top splitting role of TNM stage, followed by MetS or hyperglycemia with remarkable discrimination ability. In this large cohort study, preoperative MetS, especially hyperglycemia, was predictive of significant gastric cancer mortality in patients with radical gastrectomy, especially for early stage of gastric cancer.

  13. Revision of MELD to Include Serum Albumin Improves Prediction of Mortality on the Liver Transplant Waiting List

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Robert P.; Shaheen, Abdel Aziz M.; Faris, Peter; Aspinall, Alexander I.; Burak, Kelly W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Allocation of donor livers for transplantation in most regions is based on the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) or MELD-sodium (MELDNa). Our objective was to assess revisions to MELD and MELDNa that include serum albumin for predicting waiting list mortality. Methods Adults registered for liver transplantation in the United States (2002–2007) were identified from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database. Cox regression was used to determine the association between serum albumin and 3-month mortality, and to derive revised MELD and MELDNa scores incorporating albumin (‘MELD-albumin’ and ‘5-variable MELD [5vMELD]’). Results Among 40,393 patients, 9% died and 24% underwent transplantation within 3 months of listing. For serum albumin concentrations between 1.0 and 4.0 g/dL, a linear, inverse relationship was observed between albumin and 3-month mortality (adjusted hazard ratio per 1 g/dL reduction in albumin: 1.44; 95% CI 1.35–1.54). The c-statistics for 3-month mortality of MELD-albumin and MELD were 0.913 and 0.896, respectively (P<0.001); 5vMELD was superior to MELDNa (c-statistics 0.922 vs. 0.912, P<0.001). The potential benefit of 5vMELD was greatest in patients with low MELD (<15). Among low MELD patients who died, 27% would have gained ≥10 points with 5vMELD over MELD versus only 4–7% among low MELD survivors and high MELD (≥15) candidates (P<0.0005). Conclusion Modification of MELD and MELDNa to include serum albumin is associated with improved prediction of waiting list mortality. If validated and shown to be associated with reduced mortality, adoption of 5vMELD as the basis for liver allograft allocation may improve outcomes on the liver transplant waiting list. PMID:23349678

  14. Intraspecific variation in sapling mortality and growth predicts geographic variation in forest composition

    SciTech Connect

    Kobe, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    With a view toward understanding variation in species composition among different forest communities, I examined species-specific growth and mortality of juvenile tree (2.3-78 mm diameter at 10cm above the ground) at three contrasting sites. Two sites differing in soil mineralogy and elevation (schists/gneiss uplands vs. calcareous bedrock valley) were situated in northwestern Connecticut, USA. To examine variation over a more extensive geographic scale, I located the third site in central-western Michigan, USA. Among the three sites, the deciduous species (American beech, white ash, and sugar maple) showed little intraspecific variation in models of relative radial growth at the Michigan site could be explained by sapling growth models originally calibrated for the Connecticut sites. in contrast to the deciduous species, the evergreen species (white pine and eastern hemlock) exhibited between the two Connecticut sites. Intraspecific species, mortality processes exhibited more variation among the sites than did growth. I found significant site differences in mortality as a function of recent growth for both sugar maple and white ash on the calcareous soils in comparison to the schist/gneiss soils in Connecticut site were similar, and both differed from the Connecticut calcareous site. 65 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Baseline serum interleukin-34 levels independently predict radiographic progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung Hae; Choi, Byoong Yong; Choi, Jungbum; Yoo, Jong Jin; Ha, You-Jung; Cho, Hyon Joung; Kang, Eun Ha; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Yun Jong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our observational study was to investigate the clinical significance of interleukin (IL)-34, a novel osteoclastogenic cytokine, for predicting structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Serum IL-34 levels were measured in 100 RA patients, 36 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and 59 gender- and age-matched healthy individuals using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also measured IL-34 concentrations in synovial fluid (SF) samples from 18 RA patients and 19 osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Progression of structural damage was assessed in 81 patients with RA by plain radiographs using the modified Sharp/van der Heijde score (SHS) at baseline and after an average 1.6-year follow-up period. Serum IL-34 levels were significantly higher in patients with RA (p < 0.001) or AS (p < 0.001) than in healthy controls. SF IL-34 levels were also significantly higher in RA patients than in OA patients (p < 0.001). In RA, serum IL-34 levels were associated with rheumatoid factor positivity (p = 0.01), current smoking (p < 0.01), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.01), and C-reactive protein levels (p < 0.01), but not with disease activity score 28. ΔSHS/year was positively correlated with serum IL-34 levels (r = 0.443, p < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, serum IL-34 level was an independent risk factor for radiographic progression. These results suggest that IL-34, a novel osteoclastogenic cytokine, plays a role in RA-associated joint damage and is a potential biomarker for predicting subsequent radiographic progression in patients with RA.

  16. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  17. Usefulness of serum interleukin-18 in predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease--systems and clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Formanowicz, Dorota; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to check if serum interleukin-18 (IL-18) predicts 2-year cardiovascular mortality in patients at various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within the previous year. Diabetes mellitus was one of the key factors of exclusion. It was found that an increase in serum concentration of IL-18 above the cut-off point (1584.5 pg/mL) was characterized by 20.63-fold higher risk of cardiovascular deaths among studied patients. IL-18 serum concentration was found to be superior to the well-known cardiovascular risk parameters, like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), glomerular filtration rate, albumins, ferritin, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in prognosis of cardiovascular mortality. The best predictive for IL-18 were 4 variables, such as CIMT, NT-proBNP, albumins and hsCRP, as they predicted its concentration at 89.5%. Concluding, IL-18 seems to be important indicator and predictor of cardiovascular death in two-year follow-up among non-diabetic patients suffering from CKD, with history of AMI in the previous year. The importance of IL-18 in the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation has been confirmed by systems analysis based on a formal model expressed in the language of Petri nets theory.

  18. Usefulness of serum interleukin-18 in predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease – systems and clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Formanowicz, Dorota; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Radom, Marcin; Formanowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to check if serum interleukin-18 (IL-18) predicts 2-year cardiovascular mortality in patients at various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within the previous year. Diabetes mellitus was one of the key factors of exclusion. It was found that an increase in serum concentration of IL-18 above the cut-off point (1584.5 pg/mL) was characterized by 20.63-fold higher risk of cardiovascular deaths among studied patients. IL-18 serum concentration was found to be superior to the well-known cardiovascular risk parameters, like high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), glomerular filtration rate, albumins, ferritin, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in prognosis of cardiovascular mortality. The best predictive for IL-18 were 4 variables, such as CIMT, NT-proBNP, albumins and hsCRP, as they predicted its concentration at 89.5%. Concluding, IL-18 seems to be important indicator and predictor of cardiovascular death in two-year follow-up among non-diabetic patients suffering from CKD, with history of AMI in the previous year. The importance of IL-18 in the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation has been confirmed by systems analysis based on a formal model expressed in the language of Petri nets theory. PMID:26669254

  19. The Value of Geriatric Assessments in Predicting Treatment Tolerance and All-Cause Mortality in Older Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Alinda G.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Awareness of the use of geriatric assessments for older patients with cancer is increasing. The aim of this review is to summarize all available evidence on the association between geriatric assessments and relevant oncologic outcomes. Method. A systematic search was conducted in Medline and Embase of studies on geriatric assessment in oncology, focusing on the association between baseline assessment and outcome. Results. The literature search identified 2008 reports; 51 publications from 37 studies were selected for inclusion in the review. The quality of studies was heterogeneous and generally poor. A median of five geriatric conditions were assessed per study (interquartile range: 4–8). Little consistency was found in the results of the studies. Furthermore, different tools appear to be predictive depending on the outcome measure: frailty, nutritional status, and comorbidity assessed by the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics were predictive for all-cause mortality; frailty was predictive for toxicity of chemotherapy; cognitive impairment and activities of daily living impairment were predictive for chemotherapy completion; and instrumental activities of daily living impairment was predictive for perioperative complications. Conclusion. Although various geriatric conditions appear to be of some value in predicting outcome in elderly patients with cancer, the results are too inconsistent to guide treatment decisions. Further research is needed to elucidate the role of geriatric assessments in the oncologic decision-making process for these patients. PMID:22941970

  20. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D.; McLaughlin, Milena M.; Esterly, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the

  1. The independent predictive value of peritraumatic dissociation for PTSD symptomatology after type I trauma: a systematic review of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Peter G; Wittmann, Lutz

    2008-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review of prospective studies examining the independent predictive value of peritraumatic dissociation (PD) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology following single traumatic events. Insight into the independent predictive value may help to identify victims at risk for PTSD symptomatology. For this purpose a literature search was carried out using the online databases PsycINFO, Medline/Pubmed, and PILOTS. Studies were included if they were published in peer-reviewed journals (before 2007), focused on more or less single traumatic events (Type I trauma), assessed PD within 1 month, had follow-ups 3 months or later, and which controlled for mental health problems at the time PD was assessed. The majority of the 17 identified studies showed no or only weak indications of an independent predictive value of PD for PTSD symptomatology following type I traumas. Only 3 of the 6 studies with positive results reported a strong independent predictive value of PD. Although bivariately associated with PTSD symptomatology, there is no general consensus across prospective Type I trauma studies that PD qualifies as an important independent predictor of PTSD symptomatology. Results indicate that initial mental health problems, among other factors, are better predictors of PTSD symptomatology than PD.

  2. Improving the Prediction of Mortality and the Need for Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients Using Standard Vital Signs With Heart-Rate Variability and Complexity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    IMPROVING THE PREDICTION OF MORTALITY AND THE NEED FOR LIFE-SAVING INTERVENTIONS IN TRAUMA PATIENTS USING STANDARD VITAL SIGNS WITH HEART -RATE...effectiveness of using traditional and new vital signs ( heart rate variability and complexity [HRV, HRC]) for predicting mortality and the need for life...from the point of injury via helicopter. Heart rate variability and HRC were calculated using criterion standard R-R interval sequences manually

  3. Comparison of the Ability to Predict Mortality between the Injury Severity Score and the New Injury Severity Score: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiangyu; Tang, Bihan; Xue, Chen; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Description of the anatomical severity of injuries in trauma patients is important. While the Injury Severity Score has been regarded as the “gold standard” since its creation, several studies have indicated that the New Injury Severity Score is better. Therefore, we aimed to systematically evaluate and compare the accuracy of the Injury Severity Score and the New Injury Severity Score in predicting mortality. Methods: Two researchers independently searched the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and included studies from which the exact number of true-positive, false-positive, false-negative, and true-negative results could be extracted. Quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist criteria. The meta-analysis was performed using Meta-DiSc. Meta-regression, subgroup analyses, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the source(s) of heterogeneity and factor(s) affecting the accuracy of the New Injury Severity Score and the Injury Severity Score in predicting mortality. Results: The heterogeneity of the 11 relevant studies (total n = 11,866) was high (I2 > 80%). The meta-analysis using a random-effects model resulted in sensitivity of 0.64, specificity of 0.93, positive likelihood ratio of 5.11, negative likelihood ratio of 0.27, diagnostic odds ratio of 27.75, and area under the summary receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.9009 for the Injury Severity Score; and sensitivity of 0.71, specificity of 0.87, positive likelihood ratio of 5.22, negative likelihood ratio of 0.20, diagnostic odds ratio of 24.74, and area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9095 for the New Injury Severity Score. Conclusion: The New Injury Severity Score and the Injury Severity Score have similar abilities in predicting mortality. Further research is required to determine the appropriate use of the Injury Severity Score or the New Injury Severity Score based on specific

  4. Establishment and Validation of ALPH-Q Score to Predict Mortality Risk in Patients With Acute-on-Chronic Hepatitis B Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Jie; Yan, Hua-Dong; Zheng, Zai-Xing; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wu, Fa-Ling; Xie, Yao-Yao; Fan, Yu-Chen; Ye, Bo-Zhi; Huang, Wei-Jian; Chen, Yong-Ping; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there are no robust models for predicting the outcome of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF). We aimed to establish and validate a new prognostic scoring system, named ALPH-Q, that integrates electrocardiography parameters that may be used to predict short-term mortality of patients with ACHBLF. Two hundred fourteen patients were included in this study. The APLH-Q score was constructed by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis and was validated in an independent patient cohort. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to compare the performance of different models, including APLH-Q, Child–Pugh score (CPS), model of end-stage liver disease (MELD), and a previously reported logistic regression model (LRM). The APLH-Q score was constructed with 5 independent risk factors, including age (HR = 1.034, 95% CI: 1.007–1.061), liver cirrhosis (HR = 2.753, 95% CI: 1.366–5.548), prothrombin time (HR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.002–1.062), hepatic encephalopathy (HR = 2.703, 95% CI: 1.630–4.480), and QTc (HR = 1.008, 95% CI: 1.001–1.016). The performance of the ALPH-Q score was significantly better than that of MELD and CPS in both the training (0.896 vs 0.712, 0.896 vs 0.738, respectively, both P < 0.05) and validation cohorts (0.837 vs 0.689, 0.837 vs 0.585, respectively, both P < 0.05). Compared with LRM, APLH-Q also showed a better performance (0.896 vs 0.825, 0.837 vs 0.818, respectively). We have developed a novel APLH-Q score with greater performance than CPS, MELD, and LRM for predicting short-term mortality of patients with ACHBLF. PMID:25590846

  5. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF LIGHT-INDUCED MORTALITY OF ENTEROCOCCI FAECALIS IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One approach to predictive modeling of biological contamination of recreational waters involves the application of process-based approaches that consider microbial sources, hydrodynamic transport, and microbial fate. This presentation focuses on one important fate process, light-...

  6. Predictive value of the fragmented QRS complex in 6-month mortality and morbidity following acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Fariborz; Pourafkari, Leili; Ghaffari, Samad; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2013-01-01

    Background Fragmented QRS encompasses different RSR’ patterns showing various morphologies of the QRS complexes with or without the Q wave on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram. It has been shown possibly to cause adverse cardiac outcomes in patients with some heart diseases, including coronary artery disease. In view of the need for risk stratification of patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome in the most efficacious and cost-effective way, we conducted this study to clarify the value of developing fragmented QRS in a cohort of patients presenting with their first acute coronary syndrome in predicting 6-month mortality and morbidity. Methods One hundred consecutive patients admitted to the coronary care unit at Shahid Madani Heart Center in Tabriz from December 2008 to March 2009 with their first acute coronary syndrome were enrolled in this prospective study. Demographic and electrocardiographic data on admission, inhospital mortality, and need for revascularization were recorded. Electrocardiography performed 2 months after the index event was examined for development of fragmented QRS. Mortality and morbidity was evaluated at 6-month follow-up in all patients. Results The patients were of mean age 57.7 ± 12.8 years, and 84% were men. The primary diagnosis was unstable angina in 17 (17%) patients, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) in 11 (11%), anterior or inferior ST elevation MI in 66 (66%), and postero-inferior MI in six (6%). Fragmented QRS was present in 30 (30%) patients during the first admission, which increased to 44% at the 2-month follow-up and to 53% at the 6-month follow-up. The presence of various coronary risk factors and drug therapy given, including fibrinolytic agents, had no effect on development of fragmented QRS. Mortality was significantly higher (P = 0.032) and left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower (P = 0.001) in the fragmented QRS group at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion This study strongly

  7. Temporary Transvenous Cardiac Pacing in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Predicts Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Yasir; Perez-Verdia, Alejandro; Jenkins, Leigh A.; Sehli, Shermila; Paige, Robert L.; Nugent, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporary pacemakers (TP) are used in emergency situations for severe bradyarrhythmias secondary to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to non-AMI related cardiac disorders. TP have been studied previously in AMI patients treated with thrombolytic therapy; limited information is available on current outcomes in AMI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods We reviewed the indications, complications, and mortality associated with TP insertion over a four year period (2003 - 2007) at a university hospital. Results Seventy-three temporary pacemakers were inserted (47 men, 26 women) during this period. The mean age was 65.2 years. TP were used in 29 AMI patients (39.7 % of total) and 44 non-AMI patients (60.3% of total). The duration of TP use was 2.6 ± 0.4 days in the whole cohort, 2.46 % of all AMI patients (29/1180) admitted during this period required a TP. Six of these patients requiring a TP required a permanent pacemaker. Eight patients with AMI and a TP died (27.6%). In contrast 8.9 % of AMI patients not requiring a TP died (P < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the AMI and non-AMI groups in the duration of temporary pacing (2.4 ± 0.6 days vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 days), in complications (27.6% vs. 29.5%), or in mortality (27.6% vs. 15.9%). The need for a permanent pacemaker (PPM) differed significantly between the AMI and non-AMI patients (20.7% vs. 54.5%; P < 0.05). Conclusion Our results indicate that AMI patients infrequently require a TP and that approximately 20% of these patients require a PPM. These results suggest that early revascularization of the conduction system with current interventional techniques has decreased the need for TP in AMI patients. However, this group requires more intensive monitoring as the mortality rate in this group of patients is significantly higher than the other AMI patients not requiring TP.

  8. Development and evaluation of three mortality prediction indices for cold-stunned Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, N. I.; Innis, C. J.; Hernandez, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Kemp's ridley sea turtle is an endangered species found in the Gulf of Mexico and along the east coast of the USA. Cold-stunned Kemp's ridley turtles are often found stranded on beaches of Massachusetts and New York in November and December each year. When found alive, turtles are transported to rehabilitation centres for evaluation and treatment. Blood gas and chemistry analytes of major clinical relevance in sea turtles were selected to develop mortality prediction indices (MPI)s. Testing the diagnostic performance of various combinations of blood gas and chemistry analytes by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis resulted in the development of three mortality prediction indices. The sensitivity and specificity of the best performing MPI (based on three blood analytes: pH, pO2, and potassium) was 88 and 80%, respectively. Using ROC analysis, the area under the curve = 0.896 (95% confidence interval = 0.83–0.94). The use of validated MPIs based on four blood analytes (pH, pCO2, pO2, and potassium) could be useful for better diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of cold-stunned sea turtles when admitted to rehabilitation facilities. PMID:27293587

  9. Ambulatory heart rate range predicts mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Ruff, Naomi; Groves, David; Eleuteri, Antonio; Denby, Christine; Kearney, Lorraine; Ali, Noman; Walker, Andrew M N; Jamil, Haqeel; Gierula, John; Gale, Chris P; Batin, Phillip D; Nolan, James; Shah, Ajay M; Fox, Keith A A; Sapsford, Robert J; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the prognostic value of the heart rate range during a 24 h period in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of 791 patients with CHF associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation were linked with ambulatory heart rate range (AHRR; calculated as maximum minus minimum heart rate using 24 h Holter monitor data, including paced and non-sinus complexes) in univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings were then corroborated in a validation cohort of 408 patients with CHF with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Results After a mean 4.1 years of follow-up, increasing AHRR was associated with reduced risk of all-cause, sudden, non-cardiovascular and progressive heart failure death in univariate analyses. After accounting for characteristics that differed between groups above and below median AHRR using multivariate analysis, AHRR remained strongly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.991/bpm increase in AHRR (95% CI 0.999 to 0.982); p=0.046). AHRR was not associated with the risk of any non-elective hospitalisation, but was associated with heart-failure-related hospitalisation. AHRR was modestly associated with the SD of normal-to-normal beats (R2=0.2; p<0.001) and with peak exercise-test heart rate (R2=0.33; p<0.001). Analysis of the validation cohort revealed AHRR to be associated with all-cause and mode-specific death as described in the derivation cohort. Conclusions AHRR is a novel and readily available prognosticator in patients with CHF, which may reflect autonomic tone and exercise capacity. PMID:26674986

  10. Mortality risk score prediction in an elderly population using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sherri

    2013-03-01

    Standard practice for prediction often relies on parametric regression methods. Interesting new methods from the machine learning literature have been introduced in epidemiologic studies, such as random forest and neural networks. However, a priori, an investigator will not know which algorithm to select and may wish to try several. Here I apply the super learner, an ensembling machine learning approach that combines multiple algorithms into a single algorithm and returns a prediction function with the best cross-validated mean squared error. Super learning is a generalization of stacking methods. I used super learning in the Study of Physical Performance and Age-Related Changes in Sonomans (SPPARCS) to predict death among 2,066 residents of Sonoma, California, aged 54 years or more during the period 1993-1999. The super learner for predicting death (risk score) improved upon all single algorithms in the collection of algorithms, although its performance was similar to that of several algorithms. Super learner outperformed the worst algorithm (neural networks) by 44% with respect to estimated cross-validated mean squared error and had an R2 value of 0.201. The improvement of super learner over random forest with respect to R2 was approximately 2-fold. Alternatives for risk score prediction include the super learner, which can provide improved performance.

  11. Complementarity of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment and Activities of Daily Living for predicting follow-up mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alan C; Lee, Li-Chin; Wang, Jiun-Yi

    2013-02-28

    Physical functional ability and nutritional status are two major indicators for predicting the risk of mortality in older adults. The present study examined the complementarity of the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) for predicting follow-up 4-year all-cause mortality risk in elderly Taiwanese. We analysed data of the 'Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan', a population-based longitudinal cohort study which involved 2872 men and women of ≥ 65 years old at baseline (1999). We rated their functional dependency with the ADL scale and nutritional status with the MNA (both the long form, LF and the short form, SF) at baseline, and analysed the complementarity of the two scales in predicting follow-up 4-year all-cause mortality with Cox regression analysis and the net reclassification improvement (NRI) to quantify the improvement. The results showed that both ADL and MNA offered improvement in predicting follow-up mortality risk beyond that predicted by either one alone according to the Akaike information criterion and the NRI. The MNA-SF was nearly as effective as the MNA-LF in improving the predictive ability of the ADL. The present study suggests that the MNA (especially the SF because of its simplicity and time-saving feature) together with the ADL scale might be of value for predicting the mortality risk of frail elderly living in various settings.

  12. Electronic Nose Based on Independent Component Analysis Combined with Partial Least Squares and Artificial Neural Networks for Wine Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Teodoro; Lozano, Jesús; Paredes, José A.; Álvarez, Fernando J.; Suárez, José I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an alternative way for wine classification and prediction based on an electronic nose (e-nose) combined with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) as a dimensionality reduction technique, Partial Least Squares (PLS) to predict sensorial descriptors and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for classification purpose. A total of 26 wines from different regions, varieties and elaboration processes have been analyzed with an e-nose and tasted by a sensory panel. Successful results have been obtained in most cases for prediction and classification. PMID:22969387

  13. Decreased HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain (CD74) mRNA expression predicts mortality after septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Septic syndromes remain the leading cause of mortality in intensive care units (ICU). Septic patients rapidly develop immune dysfunctions, the intensity and duration of which have been linked with deleterious outcomes. Decreased mRNA expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-related genes have been reported after sepsis. We investigated whether their mRNA levels in whole blood could predict mortality in septic shock patients. Methods A total of 93 septic shock patients were included. On the third day after shock, the mRNA expressions of five MHC class II-related genes (CD74, HLA-DRA, HLA-DMB, HLA-DMA, CIITA) were measured by qRT-PCR and monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) by flow cytometry. Results A significant correlation was found among MHC class II related gene expressions. Among mRNA markers, the best prognostic value was obtained for CD74 (HLA-DR antigen-associated invariant chain). For this parameter, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated (AUC = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55 to 0.79; P = 0.01) as well as the optimal cut-off value. After stratification based on this threshold, survival curves showed that a decreased CD74 mRNA level was associated with increased mortality after septic shock (Log rank test, P = 0.0043, Hazard Ratio = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.4 to 6.5). Importantly, this association remained significant after multivariate logistic regression analysis including usual clinical confounders (that is, severity scores, P = 0.026, Odds Ratio = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.2 to 9.8). Conclusion Decreased CD74 mRNA expression significantly predicts 28-day mortality after septic shock. After validation in a larger multicentric study, this biomarker could become a robust predictor of death in septic patients. PMID:24321376

  14. Comparison Between Soluble ST2 and High-Sensitivity Troponin I in Predicting Short-Term Mortality for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Rossella; Magrini, Laura; Orsini, Francesca; Russo, Veronica; Cardelli, Patrizia; Salerno, Gerardo; Hur, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Background High-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) and the soluble isoform of suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) are useful prognostic biomarkers in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study was to test the short term prognostic value of sST2 compared with hs-cTnI in patients with chest pain. Methods Assays for hs-cTnI and sST2 were performed in 157 patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) for chest pain at arrival. In-hospital and 30-day follow-up mortalities were assessed. Results The incidence of ACS was 37%; 33 patients were diagnosed with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and 25 were diagnosed with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Compared with the no acute coronary syndrome (NO ACS) group, the median level of hs-cTnI was higher in ACS patients: 7.22 (5.24-14) pg/mL vs 68 (15.33-163.50) pg/mL (P<0.0001). In all patients, the sST2 level at arrival showed higher independent predictive power than hs-cTnI (odds ratio [OR] 20.13, P<0.0001 and OR 2.61, P<0.0008, respectively). sST2 at ED arrival showed a greater prognostic value for cardiovascular events in STEMI (area under the curve [AUC] 0.80, P<0.001) than NSTEMI patients (AUC 0.72, P<0.05). Overall, 51% of the STEMI patients with an sST2 value>35 ng/mL at ED arrival died during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusions sST2 has a greater prognostic value for 30-day cardiac mortality after discharge in patients presenting to the ED for chest pain compared with hs-cTnI. In STEMI patients, an sST2 value >35 ng/mL at ED arrival showed the highest predictive power for short-term mortality. PMID:28029000

  15. Migration-inducing gene 7 promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and independently predicts poor prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bihui; Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Cao, Guosheng; Qi, Jin; Lou, Ge; Sheng, Shijie; Kou, Junping; Chen, Kang; Yu, Boyang

    2016-05-10

    Epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC) cause more mortality than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. New therapeutic approaches to reduce EOC mortality have been largely unsuccessful due to the poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying EOC proliferation and metastasis. Progress in EOC treatment is further hampered by a lack of reliable prognostic biomarkers for early risk assessment. In this study, we identify that Migration-Inducting Gene 7 (MIG-7) is specifically induced in human EOC tissues but not normal ovaries or ovarian cyst. Ovarian MIG-7 expression strongly correlated with EOC progression. Elevated MIG-7 level at the time of primary cytoreductive surgery was a strong and independent predictor of poor survival of EOC patients. Cell and murine xenograft models showed that MIG-7 was required for EOC proliferation and invasion, and MIG-7 enhanced EOC-associated angiogenesis by promoting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Inhibiting MIG-7 by RNA interference in grafted EOC cells retarded tumor growth, angiogenesis and improved host survival, and suppressing MIG-7 expression with a small molecule inhibitor D-39 identified from the medicinal plant Liriope muscari mitigated EOC growth and invasion and specifically abrogated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Our data not only reveal a critical function of MIG-7 in EOC growth and metastasis and support MIG-7 as an independent prognostic biomarker for EOC, but also demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of MIG-7 is likely beneficial in the treatment of EOC.

  16. Low Lean Mass Predicts Incident Fractures Independently From FRAX: a Prospective Cohort Study of Recent Retirees.

    PubMed

    Hars, Mélany; Biver, Emmanuel; Chevalley, Thierry; Herrmann, François; Rizzoli, René; Ferrari, Serge; Trombetti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Whether low muscle mass predisposes to fracture is still poorly understood. In the diagnosis of sarcopenia, different thresholds for low lean mass have been proposed but comparative data for these criteria against hard outcomes such as fractures are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of low lean mass according to different thresholds used in operational definitions of sarcopenia and their association with 3-year fracture incidence in a cohort of healthy 63- to 67-year-old community dwellers. In a longitudinal analysis of 913 participants (mean age 65.0 ± 1.4 years) enrolled in the Geneva Retirees Cohort (GERICO) study, lean mass was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and low trauma clinical fracture incidence was recorded over a 3-year period. Prevalence of low lean mass ranged from 3.5% to 20.2% according to the threshold applied. During a follow-up of 3.4 ± 0.9 years, 40 (4.4%) participants sustained at least one low trauma fracture. After multivariate adjustment including Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) probability with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), low lean mass, as defined by Baumgartner thresholds, was associated with higher fracture risk (odds ratio [OR], 2.32; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.18; p = 0.040). It also added significant predictive value beyond FRAX (likelihood ratio test for nested models, 4.28; p < 0.039). No significant association was found for other definition thresholds. The coexistence of sarcopenia and a T-score <-2.5 at spine or hip was associated with a 3.39-fold (95% CI, 1.54 to 7.46; p = 0.002) increase in low trauma fracture risk. In conclusion, low lean mass, as defined by the Baumgartner thresholds, is a predictor of incident fractures in a large cohort of healthy 65-year-old community dwellers, independently of FRAX probability. The increased risk is related to the threshold for low lean mass selected. These findings suggest that identification of sarcopenia should be

  17. Functional Capacity, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Oxygen Consumption Predict Mortality in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Telles da Rosa, Luis Henrique; Garcia, Eduardo; Marroni, Cláudio Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Liver diseases influence musculoskeletal functions and may negatively affect the exercise capacity of patients with cirrhosis. Aim. To test the relationship between the six-minute walk test (6MWT), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and exercise capacity (VO2peak) measures and the survival rate of patients with cirrhosis. Methods. This prospective cohort study consisted of 86 patients diagnosed with cirrhosis with the following aetiology: hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and/or alcoholic cirrhosis (AC). All patients were followed up for three years and submitted to the 6MWT, pressure measurements with a compound gauge, and an exercise test (VO2peak). Results. The survival analysis showed that the individuals who covered a distance shorter than 410 m during the 6MWT had a survival rate of 55% compared with a rate of 97% for the individuals who walked more than 410 m (p = 0.0001). Individuals with MIPs below −70 cmH2O had a survival rate of 62% compared with a rate of 93% for those with MIPs above −70 cmH2O (p = 0.0001). The patients with values below 17 mL/kg had a survival rate of 55% compared with a rate of 94% for those with values above 17 mL/kg (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. The 6MWT distance, MIP, and oxygen consumption are predictors of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:27559536

  18. Automated Prediction of Early Blood Transfusion and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    life-threatening injury or illness without available prehospital VSs. To avoid potential confusion with neurogenic shock, cervical spine injury patients...3 PPG features included the 25th percentile and 75th percentile of the PPG amplitude and the PPG amplitude interquartile range (25thY75th percentile...specificity of prediction are shown in Tables 1 to 3. Group 1 (prehospital HR only) AUROC for all post- admission time intervals ranged from 0.56 to

  19. Does Cognitive Ability Predict Mortality in the Ninth Decade? The Lothian Birth Cohort 1921

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Catherine; Pattie, Alison; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    To test whether cognitive ability predicts survival from age 79 to 89 years data were collected from 543 (230 male) participants who entered the study at a mean age of 79.1 years. Most had taken the Moray House Test of general intelligence (MHT) when aged 11 and 79 years from which, in addition to intelligence measures at these two time points,…

  20. NHANES III equations enhance early detection and mortality prediction of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Williams, K M; Hnatiuk, O; Mitchell, S A; Baird, K; Gadalla, S M; Steinberg, S M; Shelhamer, J; Carpenter, A; Avila, D; Taylor, T; Grkovic, L; Pulanic, D; Comis, L E; Blacklock-Schuver, B; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2014-04-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a serious complication of chronic GVHD (cGVHD) following HSCT (hematopoietic SCT). The clinical diagnosis of BOS is based on pulmonary function test (PFT) abnormalities including: FEV1<75% predicted and obstructive FEV1/VC ratio, calculated using reference equations. We sought to determine if the frequency of clinical diagnoses and severity of BOS would be altered by using the recommended NHANES III vs older equations (Morris/Goldman/Bates, MGB) in 166 cGVHD patients, median age 48 (range: 12-67). We found that NHANES III equations significantly increased the prevalence of BOS, with an additional 11% (18/166) meeting diagnostic criteria by revealing low FEV1 (<75%) (P<0.0001), and six additional patients by obstructive ratio (vs MBG). Collectively, this led to an increase of BOS incidence from 17 (29/166) to 29% (41/166). For patients with severe BOS, (FEV1<35%), NHANES III equations correctly predicted death 71.4% vs 50% using MGB. In conclusion, the use of NHANES III equations markedly increases the proportion of cases meeting diagnostic criteria for BOS and improves prediction of survival.

  1. A contemporary risk model for predicting 30-day mortality following percutaneous coronary intervention in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine S.L.; Ludman, Peter F.; Hulme, William; de Belder, Mark A.; Stables, Rodney; Chowdhary, Saqib; Mamas, Mamas A.; Sperrin, Matthew; Buchan, Iain E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The current risk model for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the UK is based on outcomes of patients treated in a different era of interventional cardiology. This study aimed to create a new model, based on a contemporary cohort of PCI treated patients, which would: predict 30 day mortality; provide good discrimination; and be well calibrated across a broad risk-spectrum. Methods and results The model was derived from a training dataset of 336,433 PCI cases carried out between 2007 and 2011 in England and Wales, with 30 day mortality provided by record linkage. Candidate variables were selected on the basis of clinical consensus and data quality. Procedures in 2012 were used to perform temporal validation of the model. The strongest predictors of 30-day mortality were: cardiogenic shock; dialysis; and the indication for PCI and the degree of urgency with which it was performed. The model had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.85 on the training data and 0.86 on validation. Calibration plots indicated a good model fit on development which was maintained on validation. Conclusion We have created a contemporary model for PCI that encompasses a range of clinical risk, from stable elective PCI to emergency primary PCI and cardiogenic shock. The model is easy to apply and based on data reported in national registries. It has a high degree of discrimination and is well calibrated across the risk spectrum. The examination of key outcomes in PCI audit can be improved with this risk-adjusted model. PMID:26942330

  2. Poor Self-Reported Sleep Quality Predicts Mortality within One Year of Inpatient Post-Acute Rehabilitation among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the association between self-reported sleep quality among older adults during inpatient post-acute rehabilitation and one-year survival. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two inpatient post-acute rehabilitation sites (one community and one Veterans Administration). Participants: Older patients (aged ≥ 65 years, n = 245) admitted for inpatient post-acute rehabilitation. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Within one year of post-acute rehabilitation, 57 participants (23%) were deceased. Cox proportional hazards models showed that worse Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) total scores during the post-acute care stay were associated with increased mortality risk when controlling for amount of rehabilitation therapy received, comorbidities, and cognitive functioning (Hazard ratio [95% CI] = 1.11 [1.02-1.20]). Actigraphically estimated sleep was unrelated to mortality risk. Conclusions: Poorer self-reported sleep quality, but not objectively estimated sleep parameters, during post-acute rehabilitation was associated with shorter survival among older adults. This suggests self-reported poor sleep may be an important and potentially modifiable risk factor for negative outcomes in these vulnerable older adults. Studies of interventions to improve sleep quality during inpatient rehabilitation should therefore be undertaken, and the long-term health benefits of improved sleep should be explored. Citation: Martin JL; Fiorentino L; Jouldjian S; Mitchell M; Josephson KR; Alessi CA. Poor self-reported sleep quality predicts mortality within one year of inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. SLEEP 2011;34(12):1715-1721. PMID:22131610

  3. CT findings for intracerebral hemorrhage have little incremental impact on post-stroke mortality prediction model performance

    PubMed Central

    Zahuranec, Darin B.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Brown, Devin L.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Meurer, William J.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke outcome studies often combine cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and ischemic stroke (IS). These studies of mixed stroke typically ignore computed tomography (CT) findings for ICH cases, though the impact of omitting these traditional predictors of ICH mortality is unknown. We investigated the incremental impact of ICH CT findings on mortality prediction model performance. Methods Cases of ICH and IS (2000–2003) were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. Base models predicting 30-day mortality included demographics, stroke type, and clinical findings (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) +/− Glasgow coma scale (GCS)). The impact of adding CT data (volume, intraventricular hemorrhage, infratentorial location) was assessed with the area under the curve (AUC), unweighted sum of squared residuals (Ŝ), and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). The model assessment was performed first for the mixed case of IS and ICH, and then repeated for ICH cases alone to determine whether any lack of improvement in model performance with CT data for mixed stroke type was due to IS cases naturally forming a larger proportion of the total sample than ICH. Results A total of 1,256 cases were included (86% IS, 14% ICH). Thirty-day mortality was 16% overall (11% for IS; 43% for ICH). When both clinical scales (NIHSS and GCS) were included, none of the model performance measures showed improvement with the addition of CT findings whether considering IS and ICH together (ΔAUC: 0.002, 95% CI −0.01, 0.02; ΔŜ: −3.0, 95% CI −9.1, 2.6; IDI: 0.017, 95% CI −0.004, 0.05) or considering ICH cases alone (ΔAUC: 0.02, 95% CI −0.02, 0.08; Δ Ŝ: −2.0, 95% CI −9.7, 3.4); IDI 0.065, 95% CI −0.03, 0.21). If NIHSS was the only clinical scale included, there was still no improvement in AUC or Ŝ when CT findings were added for the sample with IS/ICH combined (ΔAUC: 0.005, 95%CI −0.01, 0.02;

  4. A simple and practical score model for predicting the mortality of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shue; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Mingyue; Xiong, Yan; Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Hua; Yang, Dongliang; Peng, Cheng; Zheng, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease with a high fatality rate. The risk factors for death are not clearly identified, and there is no clinical score model to predict the prognosis. We retrospectively collected the clinical information of clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters of SFTS patients on admission. After analyzing the clinical characteristics of 179 SFTS patients, we found that an elevated level of neurologic symptoms, respiratory symptoms, viral load, and a lower level of monocyte percentage were the critical risk factors for mortality. We used the 4 variables to assemble a score formula named the SFTS index [SFTSI = 5 × Neurologic symptoms-level + 4 × Respiratory symptoms-level + 3 × LG10 Viral load – 2 × LN Monocyte% – 7]. The AURC of this model was 0.964, which was higher than the AURC 0.913 of the viral load especially among the patients with higher viral loads (0.936 vs 0.821). We identified that the neurologic symptoms, respiratory symptoms, viral load, and monocyte percentage were the critical risk factors for SFTS mortality. The clinical score model of SFTSI provides a practical method for clinicians to stratify patients with SFTS and to adopt prompt effective treatment strategies. PMID:28033271

  5. Host, Pathogen, and Environmental Characteristics Predict White-Nose Syndrome Mortality in Captive Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph S.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; McMichael, James W.; Meierhofer, Melissa B.; Stern, Daniel W. F.; Lumadue, Shayne S.; Sigler, Lauren E.; Winters, Harrison D.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Kurta, Allen; Kath, Joseph A.; Field, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 5.7 million or more bats died in North America between 2006 and 2012 due to infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) during hibernation. The behavioral and physiological changes associated with hibernation leave bats vulnerable to WNS, but the persistence of bats within the contaminated regions of North America suggests that survival might vary predictably among individuals or in relation to environmental conditions. To investigate variables influencing WNS mortality, we conducted a captive study of 147 little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) inoculated with 0, 500, 5 000, 50 000, or 500 000 Pd conidia and hibernated for five months at either 4 or 10°C. We found that female bats were significantly more likely to survive hibernation, as were bats hibernated at 4°C, and bats with greater body condition at the start of hibernation. Although all bats inoculated with Pd exhibited shorter torpor bouts compared to controls, a characteristic of WNS, only bats inoculated with 500 conidia had significantly lower survival odds compared to controls. These data show that host and environmental characteristics are significant predictors of WNS mortality, and that exposure to up to 500 conidia is sufficient to cause a fatal infection. These results also illustrate a need to quantify dynamics of Pd exposure in free-ranging bats, as dynamics of WNS produced in captive studies inoculating bats with several hundred thousand conidia may differ from those in the wild. PMID:25409028

  6. Activin A Predicts Left Ventricular Remodeling and Mortality in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jeng-Feng; Hsu, Shun-Yi; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Semon; Hsieh, Chien-An; Jang, Shih-Jung; Liu, Chih-Jen; Huang, Hsuan-Li; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Activin A levels increase in a variety of heart diseases including ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the level of activin A can be beneficial in predicting left ventricular remodeling, heart failure, and death in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods We enrolled 278 patients with STEMI who had their activin A levels measured on day 2 of hospitalization. Echocardiographic studies were performed at baseline and were repeated 6 months later. Thereafter, the clinical events of these patients were followed for a maximum of 3 years, including all-cause death and readmission for heart failure. Results During hospitalization, higher activin A level was associated with higher triglyceride level, lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and lower left ventricular end diastolic ventricular volume index (LVEDVI) in multivariable linear regression model. During follow-up, patients with activin A levels > 129 pg/ml had significantly lower LVEF, and higher LVEDVI at 6 months. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that activin A level > 129 pg/ml was a predictor of all-cause death (p = 0.022), but not a predictor of heart failure (p = 0.767). Conclusions Activin A level > 129 pg/ml predicts worse left ventricular remodeling and all-cause death in STEMI. PMID:27471355

  7. Simultaneous Prediction of New Morbidity, Mortality, and Survival without New Morbidity from Pediatric Intensive Care: A New Paradigm for Outcomes Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Funai, Tomohiko; Berger, John T.; Clark, Amy E.; Meert, Kathleen; Berg, Robert A.; Carcillo, Joseph; Wessel, David L.; Moler, Frank; Dalton, Heidi; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Shanley, Thomas; Harrison, Rick E.; Doctor, Allan; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Tamburro, Robert; Dean, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Assessments of care including quality assessments adjusted for physiological status should include the development of new morbidities as well as mortalities. We hypothesized that morbidity, like mortality, is associated with physiological dysfunction and could be predicted simultaneously with mortality. Design Prospective cohort study from December 4, 2011 to April 7, 2013. Setting and Patients General and cardiac/cardiovascular pediatric intensive care units at 7 sites. Measurements and Main Results Among 10,078 admissions, the unadjusted morbidity rates (measured with the Functional Status Scale (FSS), and defined as an increase of ≥ 3 from pre-illness to hospital discharge) were 4.6% (site range 2.6% to 7.7%) and unadjusted mortality rates were 2.7% (site range 1.3% – 5.0%). Morbidity and mortality were significantly (p<0.001) associated with physiological instability (measured with the PRISM III score) in dichotomous (survival, death) and trichotomous (survival without new morbidity, survival with new morbidity, death) models without covariate adjustments. Morbidity risk increased with increasing PRISM III scores and then decreased at the highest PRISM III values as potential morbidities became mortalities. The trichotomous model with covariate adjustments included age, admission source, diagnostic factors, baseline FSS and the PRISM III score. The three-level goodness of fit test indicated satisfactory performance for the derivation and validation sets (p>0.20). Predictive ability assessed with the volume under the surface (VUS) was 0.50 ± 0.019 (derivation) and 0.50 ± 0.034 (validation) (versus chance performance = 0.17). Site-level standardized morbidity ratios were more variable than standardized mortality ratios. Conclusions New morbidities were associated with physiological status and can be modeled simultaneously with mortality. Trichotomous outcome models including both morbidity and mortality based on physiological status are suitable

  8. Comparison of validation and application on various cardiovascular disease mortality risk prediction models in Chinese rural population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Changqing; Xu, Fei; Liu, Xiaotian; Fang, Mingwang; Zhou, Hao; Lian, Yixiao; Xie, Chen; Sun, Nan; Wang, Chongjian

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to assess application of different cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk prediction models in Chinese rural population. Data was collected from a 6-year follow-up survey in rural area of Henan Province, China. 10338 participants aged 40 to 65 years were included. Baseline study was conducted between 2007 and 2008, and followed up from 2013 to 2014. Seven models: general Framingham risk score (general-FRS), simplified-FRS, Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation for high (SCORE-high), SCORE-low, Chinese ischemic CVD (CN-ICVD), Pooled Cohort Risk Equation for white (PCE-white) and for African-American (PCE-AA) were assessed and recalibrated. The model performance was evaluated by C-statistics and modified Nam-D’Agostino test. 168 CVD deaths occurred during follow-up. All seven models showed moderate C-statics ranging from 0.727 to 0.744. Following recalibration, general-FRS, simplified-FRS, CN-ICVD, PCE-white and PCE-AA had improved C-statistics of 0.776, 0.795, 0.793, 0.779, and 0.776 for men and 0.756, 0.753, 0.755, 0.758 and 0.760 for women, respectively. Calibrations χ2 of general-FRS, simplified-FRS, SCORE-high, CN-ICVD and PCE-AA model for men, and general-FRS, CN-ICVD and PCE-white model for women were statistically acceptable, indicating these models predicts CVD mortality risk more accurately than others and could be recommended in Chinese rural population. PMID:28337999

  9. Pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for mortality and progression in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vavallo, Antonio; Simone, Simona; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Rutigliano, Monica; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto; Campagna, Marcello; Cariello, Marica; Ranieri, Elena; Pertosa, Giovanni; Lastilla, Gaetano; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Malignancies are one of the main causes of mortality in diabetic patients; however, to date, very limited data have been reported on the specific influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present long-term retrospective study, we investigated whether T2DM may influence the overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with surgically treated RCC. Medical records of 924 patients treated by radical or partial nephrectomy for sporadic, unilateral RCC were reviewed. Patients with type-1 DM and with T2 DM receiving insulin treatment were excluded. Survival estimates were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox regression model.Of the 924 RCC patients, 152 (16.5%) had T2DM. Mean follow-up was 68.5 months. Mean OS was 41.3 and 96.3 months in T2DM and non-T2DM patients, respectively (P < 0.0001).The estimated CSS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in T2DM versus non-T2DM patients were 63.4% versus 76.7%, 30.4% versus 56.6%, and 16.3% versus 48.6%, respectively (P = 0.001). Mean PFS was significantly lower (31.5 vs 96.3 months; P < 0.0001) in the T2DM group. At multivariate analysis, T2DM was an independent adverse prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR]  = 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.40-4.92), CSS (HR = 6.39; 95% CI: 3.78-10.79), and PFS (HR = 4.71; 95% CI: 3.11-7.15). In conclusion, our findings suggest that patients with RCC and pre-existing T2DM have a shorter OS, increased risk of recurrence, and higher risk for kidney cancer mortality than those without diabetes.

  10. Validation of CRASH Model in Prediction of 14-day Mortality and 6-month Unfavorable Outcome of Head Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Behrooz; Amanat, Mahnaz; Baratloo, Alireza; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahmati, Farhad; Motamedi, Maryam; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To date, many prognostic models have been proposed to predict the outcome of patients with traumatic brain injuries. External validation of these models in different populations is of great importance for their generalization. The present study was designed, aiming to determine the value of CRASH prognostic model in prediction of 14-day mortality (14-DM) and 6-month unfavorable outcome (6-MUO) of patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: In the present prospective diagnostic test study, calibration and discrimination of CRASH model were evaluated in head trauma patients referred to the emergency department. Variables required for calculating CRASH expected risks (ER), and observed 14-DM and 6-MUO were gathered. Then ER of 14-DM and 6-MUO were calculated. The patients were followed for 6 months and their 14-DM and 6-MUO were recorded. Finally, the correlation of CRASH ER and the observed outcome of the patients was evaluated. The data were analyzed using STATA version 11.0. Results: In this study, 323 patients with the mean age of 34.0 ± 19.4 years were evaluated (87.3% male). Calibration of the basic and CT models in prediction of 14-day and 6-month outcome were in the desirable range (P < 0.05). Area under the curve in the basic model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89-0.96) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.95), respectively. In addition, area under the curve in the CT model for prediction of 14-DM and 6-MUO were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91-0.97) and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91-0.96), respectively. There was no significant difference between the discriminations of the two models in prediction of 14-DM (p = 0.11) and 6-MUO (p = 0.1). Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that CRASH prediction model has proper discrimination and calibration in predicting 14-DM and 6-MUO of head trauma patients. Since there was no difference between the values of the basic and CT models, using the basic model is recommended to simplify the risk

  11. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury...pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384...pressure; Glasgow Coma Scale; heart rate; prehospital; traumatic brain injury Introduction The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was developed to stan-dardize the

  12. Evaluation of a microwave resonator for predicting grain moisture independent of bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work evaluated the ability of a planar whispering mode resonator to predict moisture considering moisture and densities expected in an on-harvester application. A calibration model was developed to accurately predict moisture over the moisture, density and temperature ranges evaluated. This mod...

  13. Fear on the move: predator hunting mode predicts variation in prey mortality and plasticity in prey spatial response.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer R B; Ament, Judith M; Schmitz, Oswald J

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists have long searched for a framework of a priori species traits to help predict predator-prey interactions in food webs. Empirical evidence has shown that predator hunting mode and predator and prey habitat domain are useful traits for explaining predator-prey interactions. Yet, individual experiments have yet to replicate predator hunting mode, calling into question whether predator impacts can be attributed to hunting mode or merely species identity. We tested the effects of spider predators with sit-and-wait, sit-and-pursue and active hunting modes on grasshopper habitat domain, activity and mortality in a grassland system. We replicated hunting mode by testing two spider predator species of each hunting mode on the same grasshopper prey species. We observed grasshoppers with and without each spider species in behavioural cages and measured their mortality rates, movements and habitat domains. We likewise measured the movements and habitat domains of spiders to characterize hunting modes. We found that predator hunting mode explained grasshopper mortality and spider and grasshopper movement activity and habitat domain size. Sit-and-wait spider predators covered small distances over a narrow domain space and killed fewer grasshoppers than sit-and-pursue and active predators, which ranged farther distances across broader domains and killed more grasshoppers, respectively. Prey adjusted their activity levels and horizontal habitat domains in response to predator presence and hunting mode: sedentary sit-and-wait predators with narrow domains caused grasshoppers to reduce activity in the same-sized domain space; more mobile sit-and-pursue predators with broader domains caused prey to reduce their activity within a contracted horizontal (but not vertical) domain space; and highly mobile active spiders led grasshoppers to increase their activity across the same domain area. All predators impacted prey activity, and sit-and-pursue predators generated strong

  14. Microbiological Characteristics and Predictive Factors for Mortality in Pleural Infection: A Single-Center Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Cheol-Kyu; Oh, Hyoung-Joo; Choi, Ha-Young; Shin, Hong-Joon; Lim, Jung Hwan; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Kim, Young-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification and understanding of the pathogens responsible for pleural infection is critical for appropriate antibiotic treatment. This study sought to determine the microbiological characteristics of pleural infection and to identify potential predictive factors associated with mortality. Methods In this retrospective study, we analyzed patient data from 421 cases of parapneumonic effusion. A total of 184 microorganisms were isolated from 164 patients, using two culture systems: a standard method and a method using pairs of aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles. Results The most frequently isolated microorganisms were streptococci (31.5%), followed by staphylococci (23.4%), gram-negative bacteria (18.5%) and anaerobes (10.3%). Streptococci were the main microorganisms found in standard culture (41.9%) and community-acquired infections (52.2%), and were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents in drug sensitivity testing. Staphylococci were the most frequently isolated pathogens in blood cultures (30.8%) and hospital-acquired infections (38.3%), and were primarily multidrug-resistant (61.8%). In multivariate analysis, the following were significant predictive factors for 30-day mortality among the total population: CURB-65 ≥ 2 (aOR 5.549, 95% CI 2.296–13.407, p<0.001), structural lung disease (aOR 2.708, 95% CI 1.346–5.379, p = 0.004), PSI risk class IV-V (aOR 4.714, 95% CI 1.530–14.524, p = 0.007), no use of intrapleural fibrinolytics (aOR 3.062, 95% CI 1.102–8.511, p = 0.014), hospital-acquired infection (aOR 2.205, 95% CI 1.165–4.172, p = 0.015), age (aOR 0.964, 95% CI 0.935–0.994, p = 0.018), and SOFA score ≥2 (aOR 2.361, 95% CI 1.134–4.916, p = 0.022). Conclusion In this study, common pathogens causing pleural infection were comparable to previous studies, and consisted of streptococci, staphylococci, and anaerobes. CURB-65 ≥2, structural lung disease, PSI risk class IV-V, no use of intrapleural fibrinolytics, hospital

  15. Value of echocardiography for stroke and mortality prediction following coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kluck, Orit; Berman, Marius; Stamler, Alon; Sahar, Gideon; Kogan, Alexander; Porat, Eyal; Sagie, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    There are known clinical and laboratory predictors for stroke and death following CABG. The aim of this study was to determine if transthoracic echocardiographic findings prior to CABG have additional predictive value for occurrence of perioperative cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and death. The files of patients who underwent CABG between January 2002 and November 2004, with perioperative echocardiographic assessment were reviewed. Echocardiographic variables examined included LV size, function and hypertrophy, mitral annulus calcification (MAC) and aortic valve calcification (AVC). Patients in whom post-CABG stroke or death was documented were compared with those without these endpoints. Of the 572 patients who met the study criteria, 33 (5.8%) had a neurological event and 26 (4.5%) died, four after a major stroke. One hundred and sixty-seven patients had MAC and 228 AVC. On multivariate analysis, risk factors for stroke were previous stroke (OR=2.91 CI 1.179-7.24; P<0.005), renal failure (OR=2.48 CI 1.039-5.95; P<0.001) and older age (OR=1.60 CI 0.971-2.63; P<0.001); risk factors for death were perioperative insertion of intra-aortic balloon pump (OR=33.7 CI 11.38-100; P<0.001) and peripheral vascular disease (OR=3.89 CI 1.32-11.45; P<0.001). Medically treated dyslipidemia was protective factor. LV hypertrophy significantly predicts stroke post-CABG by univariate analysis (P=0.02). There was no significant correlation between AVC and MAC with stroke, although death was slightly increased in patients with MAC (44% vs. 29.2%, P=0.114).

  16. Prognostic Abilities and Quality Assessment of Models for the Prediction of 90-Day Mortality in Liver Transplant Waiting List Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, Marc; Kaltenborn, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background Model of end-stage liver disease (MELD)-score and diverse variants are widely used for prognosis on liver transplant waiting-lists. Methods 818 consecutive patients on the liver transplant waiting-list included to calculate the MELD, MESO Index, MELD-Na, UKELD, iMELD, refitMELD, refitMELD-Na, upMELD and PELD-scores. Prognostic abilities for 90-day mortality were investigated applying Receiver-operating-characteristic-curve analysis. Independent risk factors for 90-day mortality were identified with multivariable binary logistic regression modelling. Methodological quality of the underlying development studies was assessed with a systematic assessment tool. Results 74 patients (9%) died on the liver transplant waiting list within 90 days after listing. All but one scores, refitMELD-Na, had acceptable prognostic performance with areas under the ROC-curves (AUROCs)>0.700. The iMELD performed best (AUROC = 0.798). In pediatric cases, the PELD-score just failed to reach the acceptable threshold with an AUROC = 0.699. All scores reached a mean quality score of 72.3%. Highest quality scores could be achieved by the UKELD and PELD-scores. Studies specifically lack statistical validity and model evaluation. Conclusions Inferior quality assessment of prognostic models does not necessarily imply inferior prognostic abilities. The iMELD might be a more reliable tool representing urgency of transplantation than the MELD-score. PELD-score is assumedly not accurate enough to allow graft allocation decision in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:28129338

  17. Predicting the mortality from asbestos-related diseases based on the amount of asbestos used and the effects of slate buildings in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Young; Kim, Young-Chan; Kim, Yongku; Hong, Won-Hwa

    2016-01-15

    Asbestos has been used since ancient times, owing to its heat-resistant, rot-proof, and insulating qualities, and its usage rapidly increased after the industrial revolution. In Korea, all slates were previously manufactured in a mixture of about 90% cement and 10% chrysotile (white asbestos). This study used a Generalized Poisson regression (GPR) model after creating databases of the mortality from asbestos-related diseases and of the amount of asbestos used in Korea as a means to predict the future mortality of asbestos-related diseases and mesothelioma in Korea. Moreover, to predict the future mortality according to the effects of slate buildings, a comparative analysis based on the result of the GPR model was conducted after creating databases of the amount of asbestos used in Korea and of the amount of asbestos used in making slates. We predicted the mortality from asbestos-related diseases by year, from 2014 to 2036, according to the amount of asbestos used. As a result, it was predicted that a total of 1942 people (maximum, 3476) will die by 2036. Moreover, based on the comparative analysis according to the influence index, it was predicted that a maximum of 555 people will die from asbestos-related diseases by 2031 as a result of the effects of asbestos-containing slate buildings, and the mortality was predicted to peak in 2021, with 53 cases. Although mesothelioma and pulmonary asbestosis were considered as asbestos-related diseases, these are not the only two diseases caused by asbestos. However the results of this study are highly important and relevant, as, for the first time in Korea, the future mortality from asbestos-related diseases was predicted. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the Korean government's policies related to the compensation for asbestos victims.

  18. Predicting pneumonia mortality using CURB-65, PSI, and patient characteristics in patients presenting to the emergency department of a comprehensive cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carmen; Johnson, Tami; Rolston, Kenneth; Merriman, Kelly; Warneke, Carla; Evans, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic accuracy of the CURB-65 criteria and pneumonia severity index (PSI) in immunocompromised cancer patients with pneumonia is unknown. We sought to determine whether CURB-65 and PSI predict 28-day mortality in cancer patients with pneumonia, and identify other factors that predispose cancer patients with pneumonia to a high mortality risk. We assessed sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, and areas under the receiver operating curve area under the curve (AUC) of the CURB-65 and PSI in predicting the 28-day mortality of cancer patients presenting to our institution's emergency department with pneumonia. We used the DeLong and Clarke–Pearson approach to determine whether the addition of other risk factors improved the scales' performances. The overall and pneumonia-related 28-day mortality rates were 20.2% (n = 44) and 17.4% (n = 38), respectively. In predicting 28-day mortality, the CURB-65 score had sensitivity of 45% and specificity of 81%, and the PSI score had sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 34%. The CURB-65 and PSI discriminated poorly between fatal and nonfatal pneumonia cases (AUCs, 0.664 and 0.658, respectively; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57–0.75 for each). The addition of radiation therapy (RT) within 4 weeks and stem cell transplant (SCT) significantly improved the AUCs of the CURB-65 (0.75; 95% CI, 0.67–0.83) and PSI (0.73; 95% CI, 0.65-0.82). Inadequate performances of CURB-65 and PSI demonstrate that a tool for predicting pneumonia-related mortality in cancer patients and other immunocompromised populations is needed. Pneumonia patients who have undergone recent RT or (SCT) are at a high risk of dying from pneumonia and require special consideration when assessing pneumonia-related mortality risk. PMID:24802800

  19. High day 28 ST2 levels predict for acute graft-versus-host disease and transplant-related mortality after cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Doris M; Hilden, Patrick; Mumaw, Christen; Devlin, Sean M; Lubin, Marissa; Giralt, Sergio; Goldberg, Jenna D; Hanash, Alan; Hsu, Katharine; Jenq, Robert; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Sauter, Craig; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Young, James W; Brentjens, Renier; Kernan, Nancy A; Prockop, Susan E; O'Reilly, Richard J; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Paczesny, Sophie; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-01-01

    While cord blood transplantation (CBT) is an effective therapy for hematologic malignancies, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a leading cause of transplant-related mortality (TRM). We investigated if biomarkers could predict aGVHD and TRM after day 28 in CBT recipients. Day 28 samples from 113 CBT patients were analyzed. Suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) was the only biomarker associated with grades II-IV and III-IV aGVHD and TRM. Day 180 grade III-IV aGVHD in patients with high ST2 levels was 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18-43) vs 13% (95% CI, 5-23) in patients with low levels (P = .024). The adverse effect of elevated ST2 was independent of HLA match. Moreover, high day 28 ST2 levels were associated with increased TRM with day 180 estimates of 23% (95% CI, 13-35) vs 5% (95% CI, 1-13) if levels were low (P = .001). GVHD was the most common cause of death in high ST2 patients. High concentrations of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, interleukin-8, and regenerating islet-derived protein 3-α were also associated with TRM. Our results are consistent with those of adult donor allografts and warrant further prospective evaluation to facilitate future therapeutic intervention to ameliorate severe aGVHD and further improve survival after CBT.

  20. Independent prediction of naphthalene transport and biodegradation in soil with a mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, I.S.; Ghiorse, W.C.; Lion, L.W.; Shuler, M.L.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments were performed to test the ability of a mathematical model to predict naphthalene transport and biodegradation. Pseudomonas putida G7, a model bacterial strain capable of degrading naphthalene, was added to a column packed with the soil that had been pre-equilibrated with naphthalene. Model prediction for transport and degradation were based on predetermined parameters that described naphthalene desorption kinetics and the utilization of naphthalene by the test bacterium. However, initial prediction for naphthalene biodegradation was high, and the formation of cell aggregates is advances as a plausible explanation. Access of substrate to cells in the interior of an aggregate would be restricted. When the numerical simulation was conducted with a factor to account for cell aggregation, it successfully described the experimental data. Thus, with a single adjustable parameter (an average effectiveness factor), the model predicted macroscopic responses of naphthalene in soil-columns where naphthalene was subject to transport and biodegradation.

  1. Preoperative Serum MicroRNA-155 Expression Independently Predicts Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction After Laparoscopic Surgery for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chaoshuang; Wang, Ruichun; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the association between serum expression of miRNA-155 and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer. Material/Methods We enrolled 110 patients scheduled to undergo colon tumor resection via laparotomy in Ningbo No. 2 Hospital from July 2013 to November 2015. The blood samples were collected from the participants 1 day before surgery. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used for the analysis of independent predictive biomarkers for POCD. Results On the 7th postoperative day, 29 of the 110 participants developed POCD, yielding a POCD incidence of 26.4%. Age, MMSE score, duration of surgery and anesthesia, serum levels of CRP, TNF-α, urea, creatinine, and miRNA-155 were highly associated with the occurrence of POCD. Serum expression of miRNA-155 was shown by multiple logistic regression analysis to be an independent predictive indicator for POCD after surgery (OR: 2.732; 95%CI 1.415–5.233; P=0.002). Conclusions The serum expression of miRNA-155 is an independent predictive factor for POCD after laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer. PMID:27872469

  2. Predicting morbidity and mortality in acute pancreatitis in an Indian population: a comparative study of the BISAP score, Ranson’s score and CT severity index

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Jitin; Yadav, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Baxla, Ranjan George; Sinha, Dipendra Kumar; Bodra, Pankaj; Besra, Ram Chandra; Baski, Babu Mani; Prakash, Om; Anand, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of the bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP) score in predicting mortality, as well as intermediate markers of severity, in a tertiary care centre in east central India, which caters mostly for an economically underprivileged population. Methods: A total of 119 consecutive cases with acute pancreatitis were admitted to our institution between November 2012 and October 2014. BISAP scores were calculated for all cases, within 24 hours of presentation. Ranson’s score and computed tomography severity index (CTSI) were also established. The respective abilities of the three scoring systems to predict mortality was evaluated using trend and discrimination analysis. The optimal cut-off score for mortality from the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to evaluate the development of persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis (PNec). Results: Of the 119 cases, 42 (35.2%) developed organ failure and were classified as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), 47 (39.5%) developed PNec, and 12 (10.1%) died. The area under the curve (AUC) results for BISAP score in predicting SAP, PNec, and mortality were 0.962, 0.934 and 0.846, respectively. Ranson’s score showed a slightly lower accuracy for predicting SAP (AUC 0.956) and mortality (AUC 0.841). CTSI was the most accurate in predicting PNec, with an AUC of 0.958. The sensitivity and specificity of BISAP score, with a cut-off of ≥3 in predicting mortality, were 100% and 69.2%, respectively. Conclusions: The BISAP score represents a simple way of identifying, within 24 hours of presentation, patients at greater risk of dying and the development of intermediate markers of severity. This risk stratification method can be utilized to improve clinical care and facilitate enrolment in clinical trials. PMID:25733696

  3. Pretransplant pulmonary function tests predict risk of mortality following fractionated total body irradiation and allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anurag K. . E-mail: singan@mail.nih.gov; Karimpour, Shervin E.; Savani, Bipin N.; Guion, Peter M.S.; Hope, Andrew J.; Mansueti, John R.; Ning, Holly; Altemus, Rosemary M. Ph.D.; Wu, Colin O.; Barrett, A. John

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) done before peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in predicting mortality after total body irradiation (TBI) performed with or without dose reduction to the lung. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2004, 146 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies received fractionated TBI before PBSCT. With regimen A (n = 85), patients were treated without lung dose reduction to 13.6 gray (Gy). In regimen B (n = 35), total body dose was decreased to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice per day for 4 days) and lung dose was limited to 9 Gy by use of lung shielding. In regimen C (n = 26), lung dose was reduced to 6 Gy. All patients received PFTs before treatment, 90 days after treatment, and annually. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (range, 12-90 months). Sixty-one patients had combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits defined as both a forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV{sub 1}) and a diffusion capacity of carbon dioxide (DLCO) <100% predicted. In this group, there was a 20% improvement in one-year overall survival with lung dose reduction (70 vs. 50%, log-rank test p = 0.042). Conclusion: Among those with combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits, lung dose reduction during TBI significantly improved survival.

  4. Maternal phenotype, independent of family economic capital, predicts educational attainment in lowland nepalese children

    PubMed Central

    Devakumar, Delan; Wells, Jonathan C.K.; Saville, Naomi; Reid, Alice; Costello, Anthony; Manandhar, Dharma S; Osrin, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Factors acting before children are born or reach school‐going age may explain why some do not complete primary education. Many relevant factors relate to maternal phenotype, but few studies have tested for independent associations of maternal factors relative to those characterizing the family in general. Methods Using data from a longitudinal study of 838 children in Dhanusha, Nepal, we used logistic regression models to test whether indices of maternal somatic and educational capital, or family economic capital, were independently associated with children having had ≤2 versus 3+ years of schooling at a mean age of 8.5 years. We also tested whether maternal age, children's early growth, and urban/rural location mediated such associations. Results Children had a higher risk of completing less schooling if their mothers were short, thin, anemic, and uneducated. Independently, lower family material assets and land acreage also increased children's odds of less schooling. There was an indication of gender differences, with the risk of poor educational attainment in girls associated with low maternal somatic and educational capital, whereas in boys the relevant factors were low maternal education and family land ownership. Conclusions Our analysis demonstrates that, independent of broader indices of family capital such as land or material assets, children's educational attainment is associated with factors embodied in maternal phenotype. Both somatic and educational maternal capital appeared important. A composite index of maternal capital could provide a new measurable proxy, prior to school entry, for identifying children at risk of completing fewer years of schooling. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:687–698, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27135632

  5. Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio can predict mortality in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurshawn; Nassri, Ammar; Kim, David; Zhu, Hong; Ramzan, Zeeshan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) could be helpful in predicting survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the VA North Texas Healthcare System from January 2005 to December 2010. The LMR was calculated from peripheral blood cell counts obtained at the time of diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by dividing the absolute lymphocyte count by the absolute monocyte count. A Univariable Cox regression analysis was performed using these data, and hazard ratios (HR) and 95%CI were calculated. The median LMR (2.05) was used to dichotomize patients into high-LMR and low-LMR groups and the log rank test was used to compare survival between the two groups. RESULTS We identified 97 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (all men, 66% white, 30% African-American). The mean age and weight at diagnosis were 66.0 ± 0.9 (SEM) years and 80.4 ± 1.7 kg respectively. Mean absolute lymphocyte and monocyte values were 1.50 ± 0.07 K/μL and 0.74 ± 0.03 K/μL respectively. Mean, median and range of LMR was 2.36, 2.05 and 0.4-12 respectively. In the univariable Cox regression analysis, we found that an increased LMR was a significant indicator of improved overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.70-0.98; P = 0.027). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed an overall median survival of 128 d (95%CI: 80-162 d). The median survival of patients in the high-LMR (> 2.05) group was significantly greater than the low-LMR group (≤ 2.05) (194 d vs 93 d; P = 0.03), validating a significant survival advantage in patients with a high LMR. CONCLUSION The LMR at diagnosis is a significant predictor for survival and can provide useful prognostic information in the management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28217375

  6. Do different measures of early life socioeconomic circumstances predict adult mortality? Evidence from the British Whitehall II and French GAZEL studies

    PubMed Central

    Stringhini, Silvia; Dugravot, Aline; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2011-01-01

    Background Father’s occupational position, education and height have all been used to examine the effects of adverse early life socioeconomic circumstances on health, but it remains unknown whether they predict mortality equally well. Methods We used pooled data on 18393 men and 7060 women from the Whitehall-II and GAZEL cohorts to examine associations between early life socioeconomic circumstances and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Results During the 20-year follow-up period, 1487 participants died. Education had a monotonic association with all mortality outcomes, the age, sex and cohort adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) for the lowest versus the highest educational group was 1.45 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.24,1.69) for all-cause mortality. There was evidence of a U-shaped association between height and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular mortality, robust to adjustment for the other indicators (HR=1.41; 95% CI: 1.03,1.93 for those shorter-than-average and HR=1.36; 95% CI: 0.98,1.88 for those taller-than-average for cardiovascular (CVD) mortality). Greater all-cause and cancer mortality was observed in participants whose father’s occupational position was manual rather than non-manual (HR=1.11; 95% CI: 1.00,1.23 for all-cause mortality), but the risks were attenuated after adjusting for education and height. Conclusions The association between early life socioeconomic circumstances and mortality depends on the socioeconomic indicator used and the cause of death examined. Height is not a straightforward measure of early life socioeconomic circumstances as taller people do not have a health advantage for all mortality outcomes. PMID:20675701

  7. Integrated fuzzy concentration addition-independent action (IFCA-IA) model outperforms two-stage prediction (TSP) for predicting mixture toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuang; Chen, Jingwen; Huang, Liping; Wang, Ying; Cai, Xiyun; Qiao, Xianliang; Dong, Yuying

    2009-02-01

    Mixture toxicities were determined for 12 industrial organic chemicals bearing four different modes of toxic action (MOAs) to Vibrio fischeri, to compare the predictability of the integrated fuzzy concentration addition-independent action (IFCA-IA) model and the two-stage prediction (TSP) model. Three mixtures were designed: The first and second mixtures were based on the ratios of each component at the 1% and 50% effect concentrations (EC(1) and EC(50)), respectively; and the third mixture contained an equimolar ratio of individual components. For the EC(1), EC(50) and equimolar ratio, prediction errors from the IFCA-IA model at the 50% experimental mixture effects were 0.3%, 6% and 0.6%, respectively; while for the TSP model, the corresponding errors were 2.8%, 19% and 24%, respectively. Thus, the IFCA-IA model performed better than the TSP model. The IFCA-IA model calculated two weight coefficients from the molecular structural descriptors, which weigh the relation between concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) through the fuzzy membership functions. Thus, MOAs are not pre-requisites for mixture toxicity prediction by the IFCA-IA approach, implying the practicability of this method in toxicity assessment of mixtures.

  8. Risk factors and prediction of very short term versus short/intermediate term post-stroke mortality: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Easton, Jonathan F; Stephens, Christopher R; Angelova, Maia

    2014-11-01

    Data mining and knowledge discovery as an approach to examining medical data can limit some of the inherent bias in the hypothesis assumptions that can be found in traditional clinical data analysis. In this paper we illustrate the benefits of a data mining inspired approach to statistically analysing a bespoke data set, the academic multicentre randomised control trial, U.K Glucose Insulin in Stroke Trial (GIST-UK), with a view to discovering new insights distinct from the original hypotheses of the trial. We consider post-stroke mortality prediction as a function of days since stroke onset, showing that the time scales that best characterise changes in mortality risk are most naturally defined by examination of the mortality curve. We show that certain risk factors differentiate between very short term and intermediate term mortality. In particular, we show that age is highly relevant for intermediate term risk but not for very short or short term mortality. We suggest that this is due to the concept of frailty. Other risk factors are highlighted across a range of variable types including socio-demographics, past medical histories and admission medication. Using the most statistically significant risk factors we build predictive classification models for very short term and short/intermediate term mortality.

  9. Rapid brain responses independently predict gain maximization and loss minimization during economic decision making.

    PubMed

    San Martín, René; Appelbaum, Lawrence G; Pearson, John M; Huettel, Scott A; Woldorff, Marty G

    2013-04-17

    Success in many decision-making scenarios depends on the ability to maximize gains and minimize losses. Even if an agent knows which cues lead to gains and which lead to losses, that agent could still make choices yielding suboptimal rewards. Here, by analyzing event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded in humans during a probabilistic gambling task, we show that individuals' behavioral tendencies to maximize gains and to minimize losses are associated with their ERP responses to the receipt of those gains and losses, respectively. We focused our analyses on ERP signals that predict behavioral adjustment: the frontocentral feedback-related negativity (FRN) and two P300 (P3) subcomponents, the frontocentral P3a and the parietal P3b. We found that, across participants, gain maximization was predicted by differences in amplitude of the P3b for suboptimal versus optimal gains (i.e., P3b amplitude difference between the least good and the best gains). Conversely, loss minimization was predicted by differences in the P3b amplitude to suboptimal versus optimal losses (i.e., difference between the worst and the least bad losses). Finally, we observed that the P3a and P3b, but not the FRN, predicted behavioral adjustment on subsequent trials, suggesting a specific adaptive mechanism by which prior experience may alter ensuing behavior. These findings indicate that individual differences in gain maximization and loss minimization are linked to individual differences in rapid neural responses to monetary outcomes.

  10. A Hierarchical Model Predictive Tracking Control for Independent Four-Wheel Driving/Steering Vehicles with Coaxial Steering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Masato; Hagimori, Yuki; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we apply a hierarchical model predictive control to omni-directional mobile vehicle, and improve the tracking performance. We deal with an independent four-wheel driving/steering vehicle (IFWDS) equipped with four coaxial steering mechanisms (CSM). The coaxial steering mechanism is a special one composed of two steering joints on the same axis. In our previous study with respect to IFWDS with ideal steering, we proposed a model predictive tracking control. However, this method did not consider constraints of the coaxial steering mechanism which causes delay of steering. We also proposed a model predictive steering control considering constraints of this mechanism. In this study, we propose a hierarchical system combining above two control methods for IFWDS. An upper controller, which deals with vehicle kinematics, runs a model predictive tracking control, and a lower controller, which considers constraints of coaxial steering mechanism, runs a model predictive steering control which tracks the predicted steering angle optimized an upper controller. We verify the superiority of this method by comparing this method with the previous method.

  11. Comparing modelled predictions of neonatal mortality impacts using LiST with observed results of community-based intervention trials in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Ingrid K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bang, Abhay; Cousens, Simon; Baqui, Abdullah H; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Walker, Neff; Lawn, Joy E

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an increasing body of evidence from trials suggesting that major reductions in neonatal mortality are possible through community-based interventions. Since these trials involve packages of varying content, determining how much of the observed mortality reduction is due to specific interventions is problematic. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) is designed to facilitate programmatic prioritization by modelling mortality reductions related to increasing coverage of specific interventions which may be combined into packages. Methods To assess the validity of LiST outputs, we compared predictions generated by LiST with observed neonatal mortality reductions in trials of packages which met inclusion criteria but were not used as evidence inputs for LiST. Results Four trials, all from South Asia, met the inclusion criteria. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) predicted by LiST matched the observed rate very closely in two effectiveness-type trials. LiST predicted NMR reduction was close (absolute difference <5/1000 live births) in a third study. The NMR at the end of the fourth study (Shivgarh, India) was overestimated by 39% or 16/1000 live births. Conclusions These results suggest that LiST is a reasonably reliable tool for use by policymakers to prioritize interventions to reduce neonatal deaths, at least in South Asia and where empirical data are unavailable. Reasons for the underestimated reduction in one trial likely include the inability of LiST to model all effective interventions. PMID:20348113

  12. Predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm incidence and mortality due to secondary neutrons in a girl and boy receiving proton craniospinal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Phillip J; Mahajan, Anita; Mirkovic, Dragan; Zhang, Rui; Giebeler, Annelise; Kornguth, David; Harvey, Mark; Woo, Shiao; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-12-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) incidence and mortality from secondary neutrons for a 9-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy who received proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI). SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons were predicted from equivalent doses to radiosensitive organs for cranial, spinal and intracranial boost fields. Therapeutic proton absorbed dose and equivalent dose from neutrons were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Risks of SMN incidence and mortality in most organs and tissues were predicted by applying risks models from the National Research Council of the National Academies to the equivalent dose from neutrons; for non-melanoma skin cancer, risk models from the International Commission on Radiological Protection were applied. The lifetime absolute risks of SMN incidence due to neutrons were 14.8% and 8.5%, for the girl and boy, respectively. The risks of a fatal SMN were 5.3% and 3.4% for the girl and boy, respectively. The girl had a greater risk for any SMN except colon and liver cancers, indicating that the girl's higher risks were not attributable solely to greater susceptibility to breast cancer. Lung cancer predominated the risk of SMN mortality for both patients. This study suggests that the risks of SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons may be greater for girls than for boys treated with proton CSI.

  13. Music therapy-induced changes in salivary cortisol level are predictive of cardiovascular mortality in patients under maintenance hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi-Chou; Lin, Yen-Ju; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Chiang, Han-Sun; Chang, Chia-Chi; Yang, Li-King

    2017-01-01

    Background Music therapy has been applied in hemodialysis (HD) patients for relieving mental stress. Whether the stress-relieving effect by music therapy is predictive of clinical outcome in HD patients is still unclear. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of 99 patients on maintenance HD and randomly assigned them to the experimental (n=49) or control (n=50) group. The experimental group received relaxing music therapy for 1 week, whereas the control group received no music therapy. In the experimental group, we compared cardiovascular mortality in the patients with and without cortisol changes. Results The salivary cortisol level was lowered after 1 week of music therapy in the experimental group (−2.41±3.08 vs 1.66±2.11 pg/mL, P<0.05), as well as the frequency of the adverse reaction score (−3.35±5.76 vs −0.81±4.59, P<0.05), the severity of adverse reactions score (−1.93±2.73 vs 0.33±2.71, P<0.05), and hemodialysis stressor scale (HSS) score (−6.00±4.68 vs −0.877±7.08, P<0.05). The difference in salivary cortisol correlated positively with HD stress score scales (r=0.231, P<0.05), systolic blood pressure (r=0.264, P<0.05), and respiratory rates (r=0.369, P<0.05) and negatively with finger temperature (r=−0.235, P<0.05) in the total study population. The 5-year cardiovascular survival in the experimental group was higher in patients whose salivary cortisol lowered by <0.6 pg/mL than that in patients whose salivary cortisol lowered by >0.6 pg/mL (83.8% vs 63.6%, P<0.05). Conclusion Providing music during HD is an effective complementary therapy to relieve the frequency and severity of adverse reactions, as well as to lower salivary cortisol levels. Differences in salivary cortisol after music therapy may predict cardiovascular mortality in patients under maintenance HD. PMID:28260913

  14. Hepatic venous pressure gradient predicts development of hepatocellular carcinoma independently of severity of cirrhosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Cristina; Groszmann, Roberto J.; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Bosch, Jaime; Grace, Norman; Burroughs, Andrew; Planas, Ramon; Escorsell, Angels; Garcia-Pagan, Juan Carlos; Makuch, Robert; Patch, David; Matloff, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims A total of 213 patients with compensated cirrhosis, portal hypertension and no varices were included in a trial evaluating beta-blockers in preventing varices. Predictors of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), including hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were analyzed. Methods Baseline laboratory tests, ultrasound and HVPG measurements were performed. Patients were followed prospectively every three months until development of varices or variceal bleeding or end of the study in 09/02. The endpoint was HCC development according to standard diagnostic criteria. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were developed to identify predictors of HCC. Results In a median follow-up of 58 months 26/213 (12.2%) patients developed HCC. Eight patients were transplanted and 28 patients died without HCC. Twenty-one (84%) HCC developed in patients with HCV. On multivariate analysis HVPG (HR 1.18; 95%CI 1.08–1.29), albumin (HR 0.34; 95%CI 0.14–0.83) and viral etiology (HR 4.59; 95%CI 1.51–13.92) were independent predictors of HCC development. ROC curves identified 10 mmHg of HVPG as the best cutoff; those who had an HVPG above this value had a 6-fold increase in the HCC incidence. Conclusions Portal hypertension is an independent predictor of HCC development. An HVPG >10 mmHg is associated with a 6-fold increase of HCC risk. PMID:19303163

  15. Evidence for conjugated linoleic acid-induced embryonic mortality that is independent of egg storage conditions and changes in egg relative fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Leone, V A; Stransky, D L; Aydin, R; Cook, M E

    2009-09-01

    Three experiments were performed to determine the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on embryonic development in the absence of vitelline membrane disruption. In experiment 1, when eggs from control and CLA (0.5%)-fed hens were stored at 21 or 15 degrees C for 48 h, mineral movement between the yolk and albumen was not observed (with the exception of Mg and Na). Also, it was found that CLA-induced changes in yolk fatty acid content (e.g., increased saturated fatty acids and CLA) had begun to change after 5 d of feeding hens CLA, and no differences were detected in fatty acid composition after 14 d. In experiment 2, the hatchability of eggs incubated directly after oviposition or stored 24 h at 21 or 15 degrees C was determined from hens fed control or 0.5% CLA diets. Regardless of storage conditions, CLA reduced hatchability. These data showed that CLA elicits negative effects on hatchability independent of vitelline membrane disruption or egg storage condition. In experiment 3, eggs were collected from hens fed 0 or 1% CLA daily for 3 wk, stored at 21 degrees C for 24 h, and incubated. Not only did CLA decrease hatchability, the data showed as the days of CLA feeding increased, the days of survival during incubation decreased. Average days of embryonic survival during incubation for the CLA group diminished to 18.0, 13.4, and 6.3 d for wk 1, 2, and 3 of CLA feeding, respectively, and control remained at 20.6, 20.8, and 19.8 for the 3 wk. These studies suggested that without the disruption of the vitelline membrane, hatchability and embryonic days of survival were significantly reduced by maternal CLA feeding in comparison to control-fed hens. Evidence that embryos die earlier the longer the hens are fed CLA, even though no additional changes in the fatty acid content of eggs were found, suggested that factors other than storage and egg yolk fatty acid composition played a role in CLA-induced embryonic mortality.

  16. Target-Independent Prediction of Drug Synergies Using Only Drug Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of compounds have been instrumental in selecting lead compounds with increased drug-likeness. However, the relationship between physicochemical properties of constituent drugs and the tendency to exhibit drug interaction has not been systematically studied. We assembled physicochemical descriptors for a set of antifungal compounds (“drugs”) previously examined for interaction. Analyzing the relationship between molecular weight, lipophilicity, H-bond donor, and H-bond acceptor values for drugs and their propensity to show pairwise antifungal drug synergy, we found that combinations of two lipophilic drugs had a greater tendency to show drug synergy. We developed a more refined decision tree model that successfully predicted drug synergy in stringent cross-validation tests based on only lipophilicity of drugs. Our predictions achieved a precision of 63% and allowed successful prediction for 58% of synergistic drug pairs, suggesting that this phenomenon can extend our understanding for a substantial fraction of synergistic drug interactions. We also generated and analyzed a large-scale synergistic human toxicity network, in which we observed that combinations of lipophilic compounds show a tendency for increased toxicity. Thus, lipophilicity, a simple and easily determined molecular descriptor, is a powerful predictor of drug synergy. It is well established that lipophilic compounds (i) are promiscuous, having many targets in the cell, and (ii) often penetrate into the cell via the cellular membrane by passive diffusion. We discuss the positive relationship between drug lipophilicity and drug synergy in the context of potential drug synergy mechanisms. PMID:25026390

  17. Response to anticipated reward in the nucleus accumbens predicts behavior in an independent test of honesty.

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Greene, Joshua D

    2014-08-06

    This study examines the cognitive and neural determinants of honesty and dishonesty. Human subjects undergoing fMRI completed a monetary incentive delay task eliciting responses to anticipated reward in the nucleus accumbens. Subjects next performed an incentivized prediction task, giving them real and repeated opportunities for dishonest gain. Subjects attempted to predict the outcomes of random computerized coin-flips and were financially rewarded for accuracy. In some trials, subjects were rewarded based on self-reported accuracy, allowing them to gain money dishonestly by lying. Dishonest behavior was indexed by improbably high levels of self-reported accuracy. Nucleus accumbens response in the first task, involving only honest rewards, accounted for ∼25% of the variance in dishonest behavior in the prediction task. Individuals showing relatively strong nucleus accumbens responses to anticipated reward also exhibited increased dorsolateral prefrontal activity (bilateral) in response to opportunities for dishonest gain. These results address two hypotheses concerning (dis)honesty. According to the "Will" hypothesis, honesty results from the active deployment of self-control. According to the "Grace" hypothesis, honesty flows more automatically. The present results suggest a reconciliation between these two hypotheses while explaining (dis)honesty in terms of more basic neural mechanisms: relatively weak responses to anticipated rewards make people morally "Graceful," but individuals who respond more strongly may resist temptation by force of Will.

  18. Does Feedback-Related Brain Response during Reinforcement Learning Predict Socio-motivational (In-)dependence in Adolescence?

    PubMed

    Raufelder, Diana; Boehme, Rebecca; Romund, Lydia; Golde, Sabrina; Lorenz, Robert C; Gleich, Tobias; Beck, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This multi-methodological study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural activation in a group of adolescent students (N = 88) during a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. We related patterns of emerging brain activity and individual learning rates to socio-motivational (in-)dependence manifested in four different motivation types (MTs): (1) peer-dependent MT, (2) teacher-dependent MT, (3) peer-and-teacher-dependent MT, (4) peer-and-teacher-independent MT. A multinomial regression analysis revealed that the individual learning rate predicts students' membership to the independent MT, or the peer-and-teacher-dependent MT. Additionally, the striatum, a brain region associated with behavioral adaptation and flexibility, showed increased learning-related activation in students with motivational independence. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex, which is involved in behavioral control, was more active in students of the peer-and-teacher-dependent MT. Overall, this study offers new insights into the interplay of motivation and learning with (1) a focus on inter-individual differences in the role of peers and teachers as source of students' individual motivation and (2) its potential neurobiological basis.

  19. Does Feedback-Related Brain Response during Reinforcement Learning Predict Socio-motivational (In-)dependence in Adolescence?

    PubMed Central

    Raufelder, Diana; Boehme, Rebecca; Romund, Lydia; Golde, Sabrina; Lorenz, Robert C.; Gleich, Tobias; Beck, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This multi-methodological study applied functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural activation in a group of adolescent students (N = 88) during a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. We related patterns of emerging brain activity and individual learning rates to socio-motivational (in-)dependence manifested in four different motivation types (MTs): (1) peer-dependent MT, (2) teacher-dependent MT, (3) peer-and-teacher-dependent MT, (4) peer-and-teacher-independent MT. A multinomial regression analysis revealed that the individual learning rate predicts students’ membership to the independent MT, or the peer-and-teacher-dependent MT. Additionally, the striatum, a brain region associated with behavioral adaptation and flexibility, showed increased learning-related activation in students with motivational independence. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex, which is involved in behavioral control, was more active in students of the peer-and-teacher-dependent MT. Overall, this study offers new insights into the interplay of motivation and learning with (1) a focus on inter-individual differences in the role of peers and teachers as source of students’ individual motivation and (2) its potential neurobiological basis. PMID:27199873

  20. Early Childhood Diarrhea Predicts Cognitive Delays in Later Childhood Independently of Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Relana; Oriá, Reinaldo B; Lima, Aldo A M; Rogawski, Elizabeth T; Oriá, Mônica O B; Patrick, Peter D; Moore, Sean R; Wiseman, Benjamin L; Niehaus, Mark D; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-11-02

    Understanding the complex relationship between early childhood infectious diseases, nutritional status, poverty, and cognitive development is significantly hindered by the lack of studies that adequately address confounding between these variables. This study assesses the independent contributions of early childhood diarrhea (ECD) and malnutrition on cognitive impairment in later childhood. A cohort of 131 children from a shantytown community in northeast Brazil was monitored from birth to 24 months for diarrhea and anthropometric status. Cognitive assessments including Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI), coding tasks (WISC-III), and verbal fluency (NEPSY) were completed when children were an average of 8.4 years of age (range = 5.6-12.7 years). Multivariate analysis of variance models were used to assess the individual as well as combined effects of ECD and stunting on later childhood cognitive performance. ECD, height for age (HAZ) at 24 months, and weight for age (WAZ) at 24 months were significant univariate predictors of the studies three cognitive outcomes: TONI, coding, and verbal performance (P < 0.05). Multivariate models showed that ECD remained a significant predictor, after adjusting for the effect of 24 months HAZ and WAZ, for both TONI (HAZ, P = 0.029 and WAZ, P = 0.006) and coding (HAZ, P = 0.025 and WAZ, P = 0.036) scores. WAZ and HAZ were also significant predictors after adjusting for ECD. ECD remained a significant predictor of coding (WISC III) after number of household income was considered (P = 0.006). This study provides evidence that ECD and stunting may have independent effects on children's intellectual function well into later childhood.

  1. Trop-2 protein overexpression is an independent marker for predicting disease recurrence in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. Trop-2 is a glycoprotein involved in cellular signal transduction and is differentially overexpressed relative to normal tissue in a variety of human adenocarcinomas, including endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EEC). Trop-2 overexpression has been proposed as a marker for biologically aggressive tumor phenotypes. Methods Trop-2 protein expression was quantified using tissue microarrays consisting of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from 118 patients who underwent surgical staging from 2001–9 by laparotomy for EEC. Clinicopathologic characteristics including age, stage, grade, lymphovascular space invasion, and medical comorbidities were correlated with immunostaining score. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed for overall survival, disease-free survival, and progression-free survival in relation to clinical parameters and Trop-2 protein expression. Results Clinical outcome data were available for 103 patients. Strong Trop-2 immunostaining was significantly associated with higher tumor grade (p=0.02) and cervical involvement (p<0.01). Univariate analyses showed a significant association with reduced disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.01), and a trend towards significance for overall and progression-free survival (p=0.06 and p=0.05, respectively). Multivariate analyses revealed Trop-2 overexpression and advanced FIGO stage to be independent prognostic factors for poor DFS (p=0.04 and p <0.001, respectively). Conclusions Trop-2 protein overexpression is significantly associated with higher tumor grade and serves as an independent prognostic factor for DFS in endometrioid endometrial cancer. PMID:23151048

  2. Characteristics of Fibromyalgia Independently Predict Poorer Long‐Term Analgesic Outcomes Following Total Knee and Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, Andrew G.; Hassett, Afton L.; Tsodikov, Alex; Hallstrom, Brian R.; Wood, Nathan I.; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While psychosocial factors have been associated with poorer outcomes after knee and hip arthroplasty, we hypothesized that augmented pain perception, as occurs in conditions such as fibromyalgia, may account for decreased responsiveness to primary knee and hip arthroplasty. Methods A prospective, observational cohort study was conducted. Preoperative phenotyping was conducted using validated questionnaires to assess pain, function, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. Participants also completed the 2011 fibromyalgia survey questionnaire, which addresses the widespread body pain and comorbid symptoms associated with characteristics of fibromyalgia. Results Of the 665 participants, 464 were retained 6 months after surgery. Since individuals who met criteria for being classified as having fibromyalgia were expected to respond less favorably, all primary analyses excluded these individuals (6% of the cohort). In the multivariate linear regression model predicting change in knee/hip pain (primary outcome), a higher fibromyalgia survey score was independently predictive of less improvement in pain (estimate −0.25, SE 0.044; P < 0.00001). Lower baseline joint pain scores and knee (versus hip) arthroplasty were also predictive of less improvement (R2 = 0.58). The same covariates were predictive in the multivariate logistic regression model for change in knee/hip pain, with a 17.8% increase in the odds of failure to meet the threshold of 50% improvement for every 1‐point increase in fibromyalgia survey score (P = 0.00032). The fibromyalgia survey score was also independently predictive of change in overall pain and patient global impression of change. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the fibromyalgia survey score is a robust predictor of poorer arthroplasty outcomes, even among individuals whose score falls well below the threshold for the categorical diagnosis of fibromyalgia. PMID:25772388

  3. Predicting Mortality in Patients With “Malignant” Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction Using Susceptibility-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shu-Ping; Chen, Chia-Yuen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chan, Wing P.; Chen, Chin-I

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction (defined as space-occupying edema in more than 50% to 75% of the MCA territory) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence and assess the usefulness of SWI findings, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as predictors of clinical outcome. Data from 16 patients with large MCA infarction previously admitted to our institution between December 2009 and October 2012 were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Within 7 days after stroke onset, 1 neurologist and 1 neuroradiologist estimated the area of infarction on DWI/ADC and extent of prominent vessel sign (PVS) on SWI images using the Stroke Program Early MR Score (SPEMRS). The PVS on SWI was defined as a local prominence of hypointense vessels with either increased vessel number or diameter in the target area, when compared with the number or diameter of the contralateral MCA territory vessels. Six patients died and 10 survived. Although the DWI/ADC-SPEMRS and clinical profiles were similar between the nonsurvivor and survivor groups, SWI-SPEMRS was significantly lower in the nonsurvivor group (P < 0.001). The area of deoxygenation on SWI in patients with malignant MCA infarction can predict mortality. Lower SWI-SPEMRS is a potentially better predictor of poor outcome than lower DWI-SPEMRS. A larger prospective study is needed to clarify the role of SWI as a therapeutic guide in malignant MCA. PMID:26937906

  4. Predicting the Mortality Benefit of CT Screening for Second Lung Cancer in a High-Risk Population

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, C. Matthew; Hamlington, Katharine L.; O’Toole, Jacqueline; Stapleton, Renee; Bates, Jason H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Patients who survive an index lung cancer (ILC) after surgical resection continue to be at significant risk for a metachronous lung cancer (MLC). Indeed, this risk is much higher than the risk of developing an ILC in heavy smokers. There is currently little evidence upon which to base guidelines for screening at-risk patients for MLC, and the risk-reward tradeoffs for screening this patient population are unknown. The goal of this investigation was to estimate the maximum mortality benefit of CT screening for MLC. We developed a computational model to estimate the maximum rates of CT detection of MLC and surgical resection to be expected in a given population as a function of time after resection of an ILC. Applying the model to a hypothetical high-risk population suggests that screening for MLC within 5 years after resection of an ILC may identify only a very small number of treatable cancers. The risk of death from a potentially resectable MLC increases dramatically past this point, however, suggesting that screening after 5 years is imperative. The model also predicts a substantial detection gap for MLC that demonstrates the benefit to be gained as more sensitive screening methods are developed. PMID:27806080

  5. Correlation of Amine Swingbed On-Orbit CO2 Performance with a Hardware Independent Predictive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papale, William; Sweterlitsch, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    The Amine Swingbed Payload is an experimental system deployed on the International Space Station (ISS) that includes a two-bed, vacuum regenerated, amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) removal subsystem as the principal item under investigation. The aminebased subsystem, also described previously in various publications as CAMRAS 3, was originally designed, fabricated and tested by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc. (HSSSI) and delivered to NASA in November 2008. The CAMRAS 3 unit was subsequently designed into a flight payload experiment in 2010 and 2011, with flight test integration activities accomplished on-orbit between January 2012 and March 2013. Payload activation was accomplished in May 2013 followed by a 1000 hour experimental period. The experimental nature of the Payload and the interaction with the dynamic ISS environment present unique scientific and engineering challenges, in particular to the verification and validation of the expected Payload CO2 removal performance. A modeling and simulation approach that incorporates principles of chemical reaction engineering has been developed for the amine-based system to predict the dynamic cabin CO2 partial pressure with given inputs of sorbent bed size, process air flow, operating temperature, half-cycle time, CO2 generation rate, cabin volume and the magnitude of vacuum available. Simulation runs using the model to predict ambient CO2 concentrations show good correlation to on-orbit performance measurements and ISS dynamic concentrations for the assumed operating conditions. The dynamic predictive modelling could benefit operational planning to help ensure ISS CO2 concentrations are maintained below prescribed limits and for the Orion vehicle to simulate various operating conditions, scenarios and transients.

  6. Autonomic dysfunction independently predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes in the DIAD study

    PubMed Central

    Wackers, Frans JTh; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Jose, Powell; Weiss, Curtis; Davey, Janice A; Heller, Gary V; Iskandrian, Ami E; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this secondary analysis was to determine whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes. Additional aims include the determination of the correlation of standard autonomic testing measures and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the association of diabetes-related and cardiac risk factors with cardiac autonomic neuropathy measures. Methods: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed at the study entry into the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study, using autonomic heart rate and blood pressure testing, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. All participants were prospectively followed for the composite clinical outcome of cardiac death, acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, or coronary revascularization. Results: Over 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 1119 (8.4%) subjects developed symptomatic cardiac disease. In unadjusted bivariate analyses, abnormalities in several cardiac autonomic neuropathy tests, including lower Valsalva and Standing Heart Rate Ratios, higher resting Heart Rate, greater systolic blood pressure decrease on standing, and lower low-frequency power, were predictive of symptomatic disease. Independent predictors of poor cardiac outcome were a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio, non-Black ethnicity, longer diabetes duration, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin use, reported numbness in the extremities, higher pulse pressure, family history of coronary artery disease, and higher waist-to-hip ratio. Clinical factors independently associated with a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio were insulin use, clinical proteinuria, higher pulse pressure, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and non-Black ethnicity. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes without known cardiac disease. Clinical variables may help to

  7. Combined prediction model of death toll for road traffic accidents based on independent and dependent variables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhong-xiang; Lu, Shi-sheng; Zhang, Wei-hua; Zhang, Nan-nan

    2014-01-01

    In order to build a combined model which can meet the variation rule of death toll data for road traffic accidents and can reflect the influence of multiple factors on traffic accidents and improve prediction accuracy for accidents, the Verhulst model was built based on the number of death tolls for road traffic accidents in China from 2002 to 2011; and car ownership, population, GDP, highway freight volume, highway passenger transportation volume, and highway mileage were chosen as the factors to build the death toll multivariate linear regression model. Then the two models were combined to be a combined prediction model which has weight coefficient. Shapley value method was applied to calculate the weight coefficient by assessing contributions. Finally, the combined model was used to recalculate the number of death tolls from 2002 to 2011, and the combined model was compared with the Verhulst and multivariate linear regression models. The results showed that the new model could not only characterize the death toll data characteristics but also quantify the degree of influence to the death toll by each influencing factor and had high accuracy as well as strong practicability.

  8. Financial Strain and Stressful Events Predict Newlyweds’ Negative Communication Independent of Relationship Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Hannah C.; Karney, Benjamin R.; Bradbury, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Social-learning perspectives explicitly recognize the role of partners’ personal histories and contexts as possible causes of couple communication behavior, but these assumptions are rarely tested directly, and operationalizations of context in behavioral research on couples rarely extend beyond the interacting dyad. To broaden our understanding of why couples differ in communication, the current study examined whether observed behaviors in marital interactions covary with individual experiences and contextual factors. Behaviors coded from in-home conversations of 414 ethnically-diverse newlywed couples were examined simultaneously in relation to childhood and family-of-origin experiences, financial strain and stressful life events, depressive symptoms, and relationship satisfaction. A latent factor representing financial strain and stressful life events was the strongest correlate of negative communication, with higher levels of stress predicting more negativity. Relationship satisfaction was the strongest correlate of observed positivity, with higher levels of satisfaction predicting more positivity. Childhood and family experiences were unrelated to behaviors, whereas results for depressive symptoms were complex and counterintuitive. Because the negative behaviors highlighted in social-learning models of relationship functioning, and often targeted in educational interventions, covary reliably with the stresses and financial strains that couples experience, contextual factors merit greater emphasis in models designed to explain and prevent marital deterioration. PMID:23421833

  9. Financial strain and stressful events predict newlyweds' negative communication independent of relationship satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Hannah C; Karney, Benjamin R; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2013-02-01

    Social-learning perspectives explicitly recognize the role of partners' personal histories and contexts as possible causes of couple communication behavior, but these assumptions are rarely tested directly, and operationalizations of context in behavioral research on couples rarely extend beyond the interacting dyad. To broaden our understanding of why couples differ in communication, the current study examined whether observed behaviors in marital interactions covary with individual experiences and contextual factors. Behaviors coded from in-home conversations of 414 ethnically diverse newlywed couples were examined simultaneously in relation to childhood and family-of-origin experiences, financial strain and stressful life events, depressive symptoms, and relationship satisfaction. A latent factor representing financial strain and stressful life events was the strongest correlate of negative communication, with higher levels of stress predicting more negativity. Relationship satisfaction was the strongest correlate of observed positivity, with higher levels of satisfaction predicting more positivity. Childhood and family experiences were unrelated to behaviors, whereas results for depressive symptoms were complex and counterintuitive. Because the negative behaviors highlighted in social-learning models of relationship functioning, and often targeted in educational interventions, covary reliably with the stresses and financial strains that couples experience, contextual factors merit greater emphasis in models designed to explain and prevent marital deterioration.

  10. Metabolic syndrome independently predicts future diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam H; Ahn, Chang Ho; Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Metzger, Boyd E; Jang, Hak C

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an established predisposing condition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is not thoroughly evaluated whether MetS increases the risk of T2DM in women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who already at high risk of T2DM compared with the general population. We investigated the impact of MetS on the development of postpartum diabetes in women with a history of GDM.This was a multicenter, prospective cohort study of women diagnosed with GDM. The follow-up evaluations, including the oral glucose tolerance test, were completed at 6 weeks postpartum and annually thereafter. MetS was diagnosed at the initial postpartum evaluation according to the revised criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the follow-up period was analyzed based on the presence of MetS, and the adjusted risk was calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model.A total of 412 women without diabetes at the initial postpartum evaluation participated in the annual follow-up for median 3.8 years. MetS was prevalent in 66 (19.2%) women at the initial postpartum evaluation. The incidences of diabetes in women with and without MetS were 825 and 227 per 10,000 person-years, respectively (P < 0.001). The presence of MetS was an independent risk factor for T2DM, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04-5.08) in multivariate analysis after adjustment for clinical and metabolic parameters. When we considered MetS and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) separately, women with MetS, IFG, or both had an increased risk of T2DM, with HRs of 4.17, 4.36, and 6.98, respectively.The presence of MetS during the early postpartum period is an independent risk factor for the development of T2DM in women with a previous history of GDM.

  11. Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio predicts 5-fluorouracil sensitivity independently of p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Mirjolet, J-F; Barberi-Heyob, M; Didelot, C; Peyrat, J-P; Abecassis, J; Millon, R; Merlin, J-L

    2000-01-01

    p53 tumour-suppressor gene is involved in cell growth control, arrest and apoptosis. Nevertheless cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction can be observed in p53-defective cells after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suggesting the importance of alternative pathways via p53-independent mechanisms. In order to establish relationship between p53 status, cell cycle arrest, Bcl-2/Bax regulation and 5-FU sensitivity, we examined p53 mRNA and protein expression and p53 protein functionality in wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) p53 cell lines. p53 mRNA and p53 protein expression were determined before and after exposure to equitoxic 5-FU concentration in six human carcinoma cell lines differing in p53 status and displaying marked differences in 5-FU sensitivity, with IC 50 values ranging from 0.2–22.6 mM. 5-FU induced a rise in p53 mRNA expression in mt p53 cell lines and in human papilloma virus positive wt p53 cell line, whereas significant decrease in p53 mRNA expression was found in wt p53 cell line. Whatever p53 status, 5-FU altered p53 transcriptional and translational regulation leading to up-regulation of p53 protein. In relation with p53 functionality, but independently of p53 mutational status, after exposure to 5-FU equitoxic concentration, all cell lines were able to arrest in G1. No relationship was evidenced between G1 accumulation ability and 5-FU sensitivity. Moreover, after 5-FU exposure, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins regulation was under p53 protein control and a statistically significant relationship (r= 0.880,P= 0.0097) was observed between Bcl-2/Bax ratio and 5-FU sensitivity. In conclusion, whatever p53 status, Bcl-2 or Bax induction and Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio were correlated to 5-FU sensitivity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044365

  12. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  13. Prediction of cardiovascular disease mortality by proteinuria and reduced kidney function: pooled analysis of 39,000 individuals from 7 cohort studies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masaharu; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Irie, Fujiko; Sairenchi, Toshimi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2013-07-01

    There are limited studies addressing whether proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are independently associated with cardiovascular disease in Asia. Using data from 7 prospective cohorts recruited between 1980 and 1994 in Japan, we assessed the influence of proteinuria (≥1+ on dipstick) and reduced eGFR on the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality in 39,405 participants (40-89 years) without kidney failure. During a 10.1-year follow-up, 1,927 subjects died from cardiovascular disease. Proteinuria was associated with a 1.75-fold (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.44, 2.11) increased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Additionally, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of cardiovascular disease mortality increased linearly with lower eGFR levels (P(trend) < 0.001): Subjects with eGFR of <45 mL/minute/1.73 m² had a 2.22-fold (95% CI: 1.60, 3.07) greater risk of cardiovascular disease mortality than those with eGFR of ≥90 mL/minute/1.73 m². Subjects with both proteinuria and eGFR of <45 mL/minute/1.73 m² had a 4.05-fold (95% CI: 2.55, 6.43) higher risk of cardiovascular disease mortality compared with those with neither of these risk factors. There was no evidence of interaction in the relationship between proteinuria and lower eGFR (P(interaction) = 0.77). The present results suggest that proteinuria and lower eGFR are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality in the Japanese population.

  14. Curiosity Predicts Smoking Experimentation Independent of Susceptibility in a US National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Nodora, Jesse; Hartman, Sheri J.; Strong, David R.; Messer, Karen; Vera, Lisa E.; White, Martha M.; Portnoy, David B.; Choiniere, Conrad J.; Vullo, Genevieve C.; Pierce, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To improve smoking prevention efforts, better methods for identifying at-risk youth are needed. The widely used measure of susceptibility to smoking identifies at-risk adolescents; however, it correctly identifies only about one third of future smokers. Adding curiosity about smoking to this susceptibility index may allow us to identify a greater proportion of future smokers while they are still pre-teens. Methods We use longitudinal data from a recent national study on parenting to prevent problem behaviors. Only oldest children between 10-13 years of age were eligible. Participants were identified by RDD survey and followed for 6 years. All baseline never smokers with at least one follow-up assessment were included (n=878). The association of curiosity about smoking with future smoking behavior was assessed. Then, curiosity was added to form an enhanced susceptibility index and sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were calculated. Results Among committed never smokers at baseline, those who were ‘definitely not curious’ were less likely to progress towards smoking than both those who were ‘probably not curious’ (ORadj =1.89; 95% CI=1.03-3.47) or ‘probably/definitely curious’ (ORadj=2.88; 95% CI=1.11-7.45). Incorporating curiosity into the susceptibility index increased the proportion identified as at-risk to smoke from 25.1% to 46.9%., The sensitivity (true positives) for this enhanced susceptibility index for both experimentation and established smoking increased from 37-40% to over 50%., although the positive predictive value did not improve. Conclusion The addition of curiosity significantly improves the identification and classification of which adolescents will experiment with smoking or become established smokers. PMID:25117844

  15. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  16. Can We Understand Why Cognitive Function Predicts Mortality? Results from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallacher, John; Bayer, Anthony; Dunstan, Frank; Yarnell, John; Elwood, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2009-01-01

    The association between cognitive function and mortality is of increasing interest. We followed 1870 men aged 55-69 years at cognitive assessment for 16 years to establish associations with all case and cause specific mortality. Cognitive assessment included AH4, 4 choice reaction time (used as estimates of mid-life cognition) and the National…

  17. Incident Subjective Cognitive Decline Does Not Predict Mortality in the Elderly – Results from the Longitudinal German Study on Ageing, Cognition, and Dementia (AgeCoDe)

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Susanne; Luck, Tobias; Heser, Kathrin; Fuchs, Angela; Ernst, Annette; Wiese, Birgitt; Werle, Jochen; Bickel, Horst; Brettschneider, Christian; Koppara, Alexander; Pentzek, Michael; Lange, Carolin; Prokein, Jana; Weyerer, Siegfried; Mösch, Edelgard; König, Hans-Helmut; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) might represent the first symptomatic representation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which is associated with increased mortality. Only few studies, however, have analyzed the association of SCD and mortality, and if so, based on prevalent cases. Thus, we investigated incident SCD in memory and mortality. Methods Data were derived from the German AgeCoDe study, a prospective longitudinal study on the epidemiology of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in primary care patients over 75 years covering an observation period of 7.5 years. We used univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses to examine the relationship of SCD and mortality. Further, we estimated survival times by the Kaplan Meier method and case-fatality rates with regard to SCD. Results Among 971 individuals without objective cognitive impairment, 233 (24.0%) incidentally expressed SCD at follow-up I. Incident SCD was not significantly associated with increased mortality in the univariate (HR = 1.0, 95% confidence interval = 0.8–1.3, p = .90) as well as in the multivariate analysis (HR = 0.9, 95% confidence interval = 0.7–1.2, p = .40). The same applied for SCD in relation to concerns. Mean survival time with SCD was 8.0 years (SD = 0.1) after onset. Conclusion Incident SCD in memory in individuals with unimpaired cognitive performance does not predict mortality. The main reason might be that SCD does not ultimately lead into future cognitive decline in any case. However, as prevalence studies suggest, subjectively perceived decline in non-memory cognitive domains might be associated with increased mortality. Future studies may address mortality in such other cognitive domains of SCD in incident cases. PMID:26766555

  18. 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)D vitamin D fails to predict sepsis and mortality in a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, Franz; Haslacher, Helmuth; Stadlberger, Markus; Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Obermüller, Markus; Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Perkmann, Thomas; Makristathis, Athanasios; Marculescu, Rodrig; Burgmann, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The clinical role of vitamin D in sepsis and mortality prediction is controversially discussed. Therefore, we conducted a prospective cohort study on standard care wards, including 461 patients with suspected sepsis fulfilling two or more SIRS criteria. On the first and third day after onset of SIRS symptoms levels of 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)D and sepsis biomarkers were analysed for their predictive capacity for identifying infection, bacteraemia and an elevated mortality risk. Additionally, several SNPs associated with vitamin D metabolism were evaluated. Bacteraemic patients (28.5%) presented with significantly lower 1,25(OH)D levels than SIRS patients without bacteraemia on the first and third day, while 25(OH)D did not show a predictive capacity. No significant differences of either 1,25(OH)D or 25(OH)D levels were found between SIRS patients with and without infections or between survivors and non-survivors. Sepsis biomarkers, including procalcitonin and CRP, showed a significantly higher discriminatory capacity for these classification tasks. The vitamin D metabolism-related SNPs analysed did not indicate any association with our outcome measures. In conclusion, 1,25(OH)D but not 25(OH)D showed a minor discriminatory value for the prediction of bacteraemia that was inferior to CRP and PCT but both failed to predict sepsis and mortality in a prospective cohort of SIRS patients. PMID:28079172

  19. Validation of a severity grading score (SGS) system for predicting the course of disease and mortality in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF).

    PubMed

    Bakır, M; Gözel, M G; Köksal, I; Aşık, Z; Günal, Ö; Yılmaz, H; But, A; Yılmaz, G; Engin, A

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to validate a severity grading score (SGS) system for predicting the course of disease and fatality in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). This SGS was established using several variables that were assumed to be associated with mortality and had clinical importance. We included patients diagnosed with CCHF from different centers. Patients who had symptoms of CCHF for <5 days were included. The patients were grouped into three categories according to mortality risk. An SGS ≤4 showed no association with mortality [n = 323 (79.9 % of the total study population), and all survived]. An SGS between 5 and 8 points was classified into the intermediate risk group (20 %), and 14 of 70 patients in this group died. An SGS ≥9 was classified as the high risk of mortality group and 11 of 11 patients in this group died (p = 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for an SGS >9 points at admission were 96, 100, 97, 100, and 44 %, respectively. This SGS system may help appropriate the triage of patients, decrease the cost of treatment, and improve the functionality of healthcare staff. The present study is the first investigation about the validation of an SGS system in patients with CCHF.

  20. Prediction of cancer and coronary heart disease mortality by means of a personality inventory: results of a 15-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Eysenck, H J

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports on the 1982-1986 follow-up of two samples of healthy persons first studied in 1972 and followed up in 1982 when mortality and cause of death were established (N = 2,146). Both were related to stress and personality type according to clearly elaborated theories, and results were very much in accordance with theory. The second follow-up was instigated to answer criticisms of the first study and to test whether results would still support the theories involved. The data support the previous results strongly and show that psychosocial data can predict with considerable accuracy mortality and cause of death over 14 years ahead.

  1. Subjective well-being in older adults: folate and vitamin B12 independently predict positive affect.

    PubMed

    Edney, Laura C; Burns, Nicholas R; Danthiir, Vanessa

    2015-10-28

    Vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine have long been implicated in mental illness, and growing evidence suggests that they may play a role in positive mental health. Elucidation of these relationships is confounded due to the dependence of homocysteine on available levels of vitamin B12 and folate. Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine and subjective well-being were assessed in a sample of 391 older, community-living adults without clinically diagnosed depression. Levels of vitamin B12, but not folate, influenced homocysteine levels 18 months later. Vitamin B12, folate and their interaction significantly predicted levels of positive affect (PA) 18 months later, but had no impact on the levels of negative affect or life satisfaction. Cross-sectional relationships between homocysteine and PA were completely attenuated in the longitudinal analyses, suggesting that the cross-sectional relationship is driven by the dependence of homocysteine on vitamin B12 and folate. This is the first study to offer some evidence of a causal link between levels of folate and vitamin B12 on PA in a large, non-clinical population.

  2. Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-6 expression independently predicts poor overall survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Wu, Ying; Wang, Ke-Yong; Liu, Yun-Peng; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) are important glycosyltransferases in cancer, but the clinical role of its individual isoforms is unclear. We investigated the clinical significance and survival relevance of one isoform, GalNAc-T6 in lung adenocarcinoma after curative resection. Results GalNAc-T6 was identified in 27.8% (55/198) of patients, and statistically indicated advanced TNM stage (P = 0.069). Multivariate analysis showed GalNAc-T6 to be an independent predictor for reduced overall survival of patients (P = 0.027), and the result was confirmed with bootstraping techniques, and on line “Kaplan-Meier Plotter” and “SurvExpress” database analysis, respectively. Moreover, ROC curve demonstrated that GalNAc-T6 expression significantly improved the accuracy of survival prediction. Methods With 198 paraffin-embedded tumor samples from lung adenocarcinoma patients, GalNAc-T6 expression was immunohistochemically assessed for the association with clinicopathological parameters. The prognostic significance was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with 1000 bootstraping. “Kaplan-Meier Plotter”, “SurvExpress” database analysis, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve were performed to provide further validation. Conclusions GalNAc-T6 expression correlated significantly with advanced TNM stage, and independently predicted worse OS for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27276675

  3. Integration of a model-independent interface for RBE predictions in a treatment planning system for active particle beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Steinsträter, O; Scholz, U; Friedrich, T; Krämer, M; Grün, R; Durante, M; Scholz, M

    2015-09-07

    Especially for heavier ions such as carbon ions, treatment planning systems (TPSs) for ion radiotherapy depend on models predicting the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the particles involved. Such models are subject to intensive research and the choice of the optimal RBE model is a matter of debate. On the other hand TPSs are often strongly coupled to particular RBE models and transition even to extended models of the same family can be difficult. We present here a model-independent interface which allows the unbiased use of any RBE model capable of providing dose-effect curves (even sampled curves) for a TPS. The full decoupling between the RBE model and TPS is based on the beam-mixing model proposed by Lam which is, in contrast to the often-used Zaider-Rossi model, independent of the explicit form of the underlying dose-effect curves. This approach not only supports the refinement of RBE models without adaptations of the TPS--which we demonstrate by means of the local effect model (LEM)--but also allows the comparison of very different model approaches on a common basis. We exemplify this by a comparison between the LEM and a model from the literature for proton RBE prediction.

  4. Evaluation of artificial neural network algorithms for predicting METs and activity type from accelerometer data: validation on an independent sample

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory provided a “proof of concept” for use of artificial neural networks (nnets) to estimate metabolic equivalents (METs) and identify activity type from accelerometer data (Staudenmayer J, Pober D, Crouter S, Bassett D, Freedson P, J Appl Physiol 107: 1330–1307, 2009). The purpose of this study was to develop new nnets based on a larger, more diverse, training data set and apply these nnet prediction models to an independent sample to evaluate the robustness and flexibility of this machine-learning modeling technique. The nnet training data set (University of Massachusetts) included 277 participants who each completed 11 activities. The independent validation sample (n = 65) (University of Tennessee) completed one of three activity routines. Criterion measures were 1) measured METs assessed using open-circuit indirect calorimetry; and 2) observed activity to identify activity type. The nnet input variables included five accelerometer count distribution features and the lag-1 autocorrelation. The bias and root mean square errors for the nnet MET trained on University of Massachusetts and applied to University of Tennessee were +0.32 and 1.90 METs, respectively. Seventy-seven percent of the activities were correctly classified as sedentary/light, moderate, or vigorous intensity. For activity type, household and locomotion activities were correctly classified by the nnet activity type 98.1 and 89.5% of the time, respectively, and sport was correctly classified 23.7% of the time. Use of this machine-learning technique operates reasonably well when applied to an independent sample. We propose the creation of an open-access activity dictionary, including accelerometer data from a broad array of activities, leading to further improvements in prediction accuracy for METs, activity intensity, and activity type. PMID:21885802

  5. Use of the interRAI CHESS Scale to Predict Mortality among Persons with Neurological Conditions in Three Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hirdes, John P.; Poss, Jeffrey W.; Mitchell, Lori; Korngut, Lawrence; Heckman, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Persons with certain neurological conditions have higher mortality rates than the population without neurological conditions, but the risk factors for increased mortality within diagnostic groups are less well understood. The interRAI CHESS scale has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality in the overall population of persons receiving health care in community and institutional settings. This study examines the performance of CHESS as a predictor of mortality among persons with 11 different neurological conditions. Methods Survival analyses were done with interRAI assessments linked to mortality data among persons in home care (n = 359,940), complex continuing care hospitals/units (n = 88,721), and nursing homes (n = 185,309) in seven Canadian provinces/territories. Results CHESS was a significant predictor of mortality in all 3 care settings for the 11 neurological diagnostic groups considered after adjusting for age and sex. The distribution of CHESS scores varied between diagnostic groups and within diagnostic groups in different care settings. Conclusions CHESS is a valid predictor of mortality in neurological populations in community and institutional care. It may prove useful for several clinical, administrative, policy-development, evaluation and research purposes. Because it is routinely gathered as part of normal clinical practice in jurisdictions (like Canada) that have implemented interRAI assessment instruments, CHESS can be derived without additional need for data collection. PMID:24914546

  6. Fluid Intelligence Is Independently Associated with All-Cause Mortality over 17 Years in an Elderly Community Sample: An Investigation of Potential Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batterham, Philip J.; Christensen, Helen; Mackinnon, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term relationship between lower intelligence and mortality risk in later life is well established, even when controlling for a range of health and sociodemographic measures. However, there is some evidence for differential effects in various domains of cognitive performance. Specifically, tests of fluid intelligence may have a stronger…

  7. The aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio predicts all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zoppini, Giacomo; Cacciatori, Vittorio; Negri, Carlo; Stoico, Vincenzo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Targher, Giovanni; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An increased aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR) has been widely used as a marker of advanced hepatic fibrosis. Increased AAR was also shown to be significantly associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the AAR and mortality risk in a well-characterized cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. A cohort of 2529 type 2 diabetic outpatients was followed-up for 6 years to collect cause-specific mortality. Cox regression analyses were modeled to estimate the independent association between AAR and the risk of all-cause and CV mortality. Over the 6-year follow-up period, 12.1% of patients died, 47.5% of whom from CV causes. An increased AAR, but not its individual components, was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause (adjusted-hazard risk 1.83, confidence interval [CI] 95% 1.14–2.93, P = 0.012) and CV (adjusted-hazard risk 2.60, CI 95% 1.38–4.90, P < 0.003) mortality after adjustment for multiple clinical risk factors and potential confounding variables. The AAR was independently associated with an increased risk of both all-cause and CV mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest that an increased AAR may reflect more systemic derangements that are not simply limited to liver damage. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological implications of an increased AAR. PMID:27787357

  8. Increase in skin autofluorescence and release of heart-type fatty acid binding protein in plasma predicts mortality of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Stefan; Trajceska, Lada; van Oeveren, Wim; Smit, Andries J; Dzekova, Pavlina; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Graaff, Reindert

    2013-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are uremic toxins that accumulate progressively in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year increase in skin autofluorescence (ΔAF), a measure of AGEs accumulation and plasma markers, as predictors of mortality in HD patients. One hundred sixty-nine HD patients were enrolled in this study. Skin autofluorescence was measured twice, 1 year apart using an AGE Reader (DiagnOptics Technologies BV, Groningen, The Netherlands). Besides routine blood chemistry, additional plasma markers including superoxide dismutase, myeloperoxydase, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), and von Willebrand factor were measured at baseline. The mortality of HD patients was followed for 36 months. Skin autofluorescence values of the HD patients at the two time points were significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those of healthy subjects of the same age. Mean 1-year ΔAF of HD patients was 0.16 ± 0.06, which was around seven- to ninefold higher than 1-year ΔAF in healthy subjects. Multivariate Cox regression showed that age, hypertension, 1-year ΔAF, hs-CRP, ICAM-1, and H-FABP were independent predictors of overall mortality. Hypertension, 1-year ΔAF, hs-CRP, and H-FABP were also independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. One-year ΔAF and plasma H-FABP, used separately and in combination, are strong predictors of overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients.

  9. Physical Health Indicators Improve Prediction of Cardiovascular and All-cause Mortality among Middle-Aged and Older People: a National Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Peng, Li-Ning; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of established methods for stratifying cardiovascular risk, for example, the Framingham risk score (FRS), may be improved by adding extra variables. This study evaluated the potential benefits of adding physical health indicators (handgrip strength, walking speed, and peak expiratory flow) to the FRS in predicting cardiovascular and all-cause mortality by using a nationwide population-based cohort study data. During median follow-up of 4.1 years, 67 of 911 study subjects had died. In Cox regression analysis, all additional physical health indicators, except walking speed, significantly predicted cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P < 0.05). Compared with the conventional FRS, c statistics were significantly increased when dominant handgrip strength or relative handgrip strength (handgrip strength adjusted for body mass index), or combination with walking speed or peak expiratory flow were incorporated into the FRS prediction model, both in the whole cohort and also in participants who did not have prevalent cardiovascular diseases at baseline. In conclusion, dominant or relative handgrip strength are simple and inexpensive physical health indicators that substantially improve the accuracy of the FRS in predicting cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older people. PMID:28079182

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids predict recurrent venous thromboembolism or total mortality in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Reiner, M F; Stivala, S; Limacher, A; Bonetti, N R; Méan, M; Egloff, M; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D; von Schacky, C; Lüscher, T F; Camici, G G; Beer, J H

    2017-01-01

    Essentials The role of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) in recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. Association of n-3 FAs with recurrent VTE or total mortality was investigated in 826 patients. Whole blood n-3 FAs were inversely correlated with recurrent VTE or total mortality. Major and non-major bleeding was not increased in patients with higher levels of n-3 FAs.

  11. The VACS Index Accurately Predicts Mortality and Treatment Response among Multi-Drug Resistant HIV Infected Patients Participating in the Options in Management with Antiretrovirals (OPTIMA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sheldon T.; Tate, Janet P.; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Kirkwood, Katherine A.; Holodniy, Mark; Goulet, Joseph L.; Angus, Brian J.; Cameron, D. William; Justice, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The VACS Index is highly predictive of all-cause mortality among HIV infected individuals within the first few years of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, its accuracy among highly treatment experienced individuals and its responsiveness to treatment interventions have yet to be evaluated. We compared the accuracy and responsiveness of the VACS Index with a Restricted Index of age and traditional HIV biomarkers among patients enrolled in the OPTIMA study. Methods Using data from 324/339 (96%) patients in OPTIMA, we evaluated associations between indices and mortality using Kaplan-Meier estimates, proportional hazards models, Harrel’s C-statistic and net reclassification improvement (NRI). We also determined the association between study interventions and risk scores over time, and change in score and mortality. Results Both the Restricted Index (c = 0.70) and VACS Index (c = 0.74) predicted mortality from baseline, but discrimination was improved with the VACS Index (NRI = 23%). Change in score from baseline to 48 weeks was more strongly associated with survival for the VACS Index than the Restricted Index with respective hazard ratios of 0.26 (95% CI 0.14–0.49) and 0.39(95% CI 0.22–0.70) among the 25% most improved scores, and 2.08 (95% CI 1.27–3.38) and 1.51 (95%CI 0.90–2.53) for the 25% least improved scores. Conclusions The VACS Index predicts all-cause mortality more accurately among multi-drug resistant, treatment experienced individuals and is more responsive to changes in risk associated with treatment intervention than an index restricted to age and HIV biomarkers. The VACS Index holds promise as an intermediate outcome for intervention research. PMID:24667813

  12. Predictive Values of the New Sarcopenia Index by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project for Mortality among Older Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Ki Woong; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project’s recommended criteria for sarcopenia’s association with mortality among older Korean adults. Methods We conducted a community-based prospective cohort study which included 560 (285 men and 275 women) older Korean adults aged ≥65 years. Muscle mass (appendicular skeletal muscle mass-to-body mass index ratio (ASM/BMI)), handgrip strength, and walking velocity were evaluated in association with all-cause mortality during 6-year follow-up. Both the lowest quintile for each parameter (ethnic-specific cutoff) and FNIH-recommended values were used as cutoffs. Results Forty men (14.0%) and 21 women (7.6%) died during 6-year follow-up. The deceased subjects were older and had lower ASM, handgrip strength, and walking velocity. Sarcopenia defined by both low lean mass and weakness had a 4.13 (95% CI, 1.69–10.11) times higher risk of death, and sarcopenia defined by a combination of low lean mass, weakness, and slowness had a 9.56 (3.16–28.90) times higher risk of death after adjusting for covariates in men. However, these significant associations were not observed in women. In terms of cutoffs of each parameter, using the lowest quintile showed better predictive values in mortality than using the FNIH-recommended values. Moreover, new muscle mass index, ASM/BMI, provided better prognostic values than ASM/height2 in all associations. Conclusions New sarcopenia definition by FNIH was better able to predict 6-year mortality among Korean men. Moreover, ethnic-specific cutoffs, the lowest quintile for each parameter, predicted the higher risk of mortality than the FNIH-recommended values. PMID:27832145

  13. Prediction models for risk of developing type 2 diabetes: systematic literature search and independent external validation study

    PubMed Central

    Peelen, Linda M; Corpeleijn, Eva; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Stolk, Ronald P; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; van der A, Daphne L; Moons, Karel G M; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beulens, Joline W J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify existing prediction models for the risk of development of type 2 diabetes and to externally validate them in a large independent cohort. Data sources Systematic search of English, German, and Dutch literature in PubMed until February 2011 to identify prediction models for diabetes. Design Performance of the models was assessed in terms of discrimination (C statistic) and calibration (calibration plots and Hosmer-Lemeshow test).The validation study was a prospective cohort study, with a case cohort study in a random subcohort. Setting Models were applied to the Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort study (EPIC-NL). Participants 38 379 people aged 20-70 with no diabetes at baseline, 2506 of whom made up the random subcohort. Outcome measure Incident type 2 diabetes. Results The review identified 16 studies containing 25 prediction models. We considered 12 models as basic because they were based on variables that can be assessed non-invasively and 13 models as extended because they additionally included conventional biomarkers such as glucose concentration. During a median follow-up of 10.2 years there were 924 cases in the full EPIC-NL cohort and 79 in the random subcohort. The C statistic for the basic models ranged from 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.73 to 0.75) to 0.84 (0.82 to 0.85) for risk at 7.5 years. For prediction models including biomarkers the C statistic ranged from 0.81 (0.80 to 0.83) to 0.93 (0.92 to 0.94). Most prediction models overestimated the observed risk of diabetes, particularly at higher observed risks. After adjustment for differences in incidence of diabetes, calibration improved considerably. Conclusions Most basic prediction models can identify people at high risk of developing diabetes in a time frame of five to 10 years. Models including biomarkers classified cases slightly better than basic ones. Most models overestimated the actual risk of diabetes. Existing

  14. Systemic inflammation (Interleukin 6) predicts all-cause mortality in men: results from a 9-year follow-up of the MEMO Study.

    PubMed

    Baune, Bernhard T; Rothermundt, Matthias; Ladwig, Karl H; Meisinger, Christine; Berger, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of biomarkers among circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines with all-cause mortality in elderly community dwellings of the MEMO study, Germany. All-cause mortality (cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and other causes of death) was assessed in a general population sample (N = 385) of the elderly (age 65-83 years) 9 years after baseline assessment in 1998. As markers of inflammation, a variety of cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-4sR, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha) were assessed in serum. Cox proportional Hazard model was used to estimate the association of cytokines with all-cause mortality over 9 years. In total, 110 deaths had occurred during follow-up (cancer N = 36; CVD N = 56; other = 18). Deaths were more frequent in male (N  = 76, 37.4%) as compared to females (N = 40, 21.9%; p  = 0.001). Among individual cytokines, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha were associated with all-cause mortality, of which IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 remained significant after adjusting for confounders. When the upper tertiles of these cytokines were compared to the lower tertiles, only IL-6 was consistently related to all-cause mortality independently of the level of adjustment and showing a dose-response relationship between IL-6 tertiles and risk of death. This effect originated in the male population. The study shows that IL-6 is a powerful predictor of all-cause mortality in male elderly community dwellings. Higher levels of IL-6 may reflect a chronic low-level systemic inflammation prospectively increasing the risk of death in the elderly.

  15. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, WD; Berlind, CG; Gee, JC; Simone, CB

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  16. Identification of pure component spectra by independent component analysis in glucose prediction based on mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sangjoon; Yoon, Gilwon

    2006-11-10

    We present a method for glucose prediction from mid-IR spectra by independent component analysis (ICA). This method is able to identify pure, or individual, absorption spectra of constituent components from the mixture spectra without a priori knowledge of the mixture. This method was tested with a two-component system consisting of an aqueous solution of both glucose and sucrose, which exhibit distinct but closely overlapped spectra. ICA combined with principal component analysis was able to identify a spectrum for each component, the correct number of components, and the concentrations of the components in the mixture. This method does not need a calibration process and is advantageous in noninvasive glucose monitoring since expensive and time-consuming clinical tests for data calibration are not required.

  17. Independent walking as a major skill for the development of anticipatory postural control: evidence from adjustments to predictable perturbations.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants' ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants.

  18. Independent Walking as a Major Skill for the Development of Anticipatory Postural Control: Evidence from Adjustments to Predictable Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Cignetti, Fabien; Zedka, Milan; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Although there is suggestive evidence that a link exists between independent walking and the ability to establish anticipatory strategy to stabilize posture, the extent to which this skill facilitates the development of anticipatory postural control remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of independent walking on the infants’ ability to anticipate predictable external perturbations. Non-walking infants, walking infants and adults were sitting on a platform that produced continuous rotation in the frontal plane. Surface electromyography (EMG) of neck and lower back muscles and the positions of markers located on the platform, the upper body and the head were recorded. Results from cross-correlation analysis between rectified and filtered EMGs and platform movement indicated that although muscle activation already occurred before platform movement in non-walking infants, only walking infants demonstrated an adult-like ability for anticipation. Moreover, results from further cross-correlation analysis between segmental angular displacement and platform movement together with measures of balance control at the end-points of rotation of the platform evidenced two sorts of behaviour. The adults behaved as a non-rigid non-inverted pendulum, rather stabilizing head in space, while both the walking and non-walking infants followed the platform, behaving as a rigid inverted pendulum. These results suggest that the acquisition of independent walking plays a role in the development of anticipatory postural control, likely improving the internal model for the sensorimotor control of posture. However, despite such improvement, integrating the dynamics of an external object, here the platform, within the model to maintain balance still remains challenging in infants. PMID:23409171

  19. Usefulness of heart rate to predict one-year mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation and acute myocardial infarction (from the OMEGA trial).

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Becker, Ruediger; Rauch, Bernhard; Schiele, Rudolf; Schneider, Steffen; Riemer, Thomas; Diller, Frank; Gohlke, Helmut; Gottwik, Martin; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Sabin, Georg; Katus, Hugo A; Senges, Jochen

    2013-03-15

    In the setting of acute myocardial infarction and sinus rhythm, the heart rate (HR) has been demonstrated to correlate closely with mortality. In patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation (AF) on admission, however, the prognostic relevance of the HR has not yet been systematically addressed. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the data from the OMEGA trial was conducted to analyze whether the admission HR determines the 1-year mortality in patients presenting with AF in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Of 3,851 patients enrolled in the OMEGA study, 211 (6%) presented with AF on admission. This subgroup was dichotomized according to the admission HR (cutoff 95 beats/min). Multiple regression analysis revealed that an admission HR of ≥95 beats/min independently determined the 1-year mortality in patients with AF (odds ratio 4.69, 95% confidence interval 1.47 to 15.01; p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study demonstrating that a high HR (≥95 beats/min) on admission in patients with AF and acute myocardial infarction is associated with an almost fivefold mortality risk.

  20. Attentional Selection Can Be Predicted by Reinforcement Learning of Task-relevant Stimulus Features Weighted by Value-independent Stickiness.

    PubMed

    Balcarras, Matthew; Ardid, Salva; Kaping, Daniel; Everling, Stefan; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2016-02-01

    Attention includes processes that evaluate stimuli relevance, select the most relevant stimulus against less relevant stimuli, and bias choice behavior toward the selected information. It is not clear how these processes interact. Here, we captured these processes in a reinforcement learning framework applied to a feature-based attention task that required macaques to learn and update the value of stimulus features while ignoring nonrelevant sensory features, locations, and action plans. We found that value-based reinforcement learning mechanisms could account for feature-based attentional selection and choice behavior but required a value-independent stickiness selection process to explain selection errors while at asymptotic behavior. By comparing different reinforcement learning schemes, we found that trial-by-trial selections were best predicted by a model that only represents expected values for the task-relevant feature dimension, with nonrelevant stimulus features and action plans having only a marginal influence on covert selections. These findings show that attentional control subprocesses can be described by (1) the reinforcement learning of feature values within a restricted feature space that excludes irrelevant feature dimensions, (2) a stochastic selection process on feature-specific value representations, and (3) value-independent stickiness toward previous feature selections akin to perseveration in the motor domain. We speculate that these three mechanisms are implemented by distinct but interacting brain circuits and that the proposed formal account of feature-based stimulus selection will be important to understand how attentional subprocesses are implemented in primate brain networks.

  1. Don't worry, be (moderately) happy: Mothers' anxiety and positivity during pregnancy independently predict lower mother-infant synchrony.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginger A; Quigley, Kelsey M; Voegtline, Kristin M; DiPietro, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    Maternal positivity and mother-infant synchrony have been linked, independently, to beneficial infant outcomes; however, research that has examined relations between the two has found that higher positivity is associated with lower synchrony. Methodological issues may inform this counter-intuitive association and clinical theory supports its validity. This study examined the theory that heightened positivity associated with anxiety is a way of avoiding negative emotion and contributes to lower synchrony because it interferes with appropriate responding to infant cues. We examined mothers' (N=75) self-reported anxiety and verbal expression of positivity during pregnancy in relation to mother-infant synchrony at 6 months post-partum. Verbal positivity was assessed using linguistic analysis of interviews about pregnancy experiences. Mother and infant affect and gaze were coded during interaction and synchrony was computed as the correlation between mother and infant behaviors. Higher verbal positivity and anxiety during pregnancy independently predicted lower mother-infant synchrony, suggesting distinct pathways to the same degree of synchrony with potentially different consequences for infant development.

  2. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 Concentrations Predict AKI and Long-Term Mortality in Adults after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, William R.; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steven G.; Devereaux, Philip J.; Eikelboom, John; Kavsak, Peter; McArthur, Eric; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Shortt, Colleen; Shlipak, Michael; Whitlock, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has an integral role in the pathophysiology of AKI. We investigated the associations of two biomarkers of inflammation, plasma IL-6 and IL-10, with AKI and mortality in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were enrolled at six academic centers (n=960). AKI was defined as a ≥50% or ≥0.3-mg/dl increase in serum creatinine from baseline. Pre- and postoperative IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were categorized into tertiles and evaluated for associations with outcomes of in-hospital AKI or postdischarge all-cause mortality at a median of 3 years after surgery. Preoperative concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were not significantly associated with AKI or mortality. Elevated first postoperative IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI, and the risk increased in a dose-dependent manner (second tertile adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.61 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.10 to 2.36]; third tertile adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 1.45 to 3.13]). First postoperative IL-6 concentration was not associated with risk of mortality; however, the second tertile of peak IL-6 concentration was significantly associated with lower risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.57 to 0.99]). Elevated first postoperative IL-10 concentration was significantly associated with higher risk of AKI (adjusted OR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.04 to 2.38]) and lower risk of mortality (adjusted HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.56 to 0.93]). There was a significant interaction between the concentration of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, an established AKI biomarker, and the association of IL-10 concentration with mortality (P=0.01). These findings suggest plasma IL-6 and IL-10 may serve as biomarkers for perioperative outcomes. PMID:25855775

  3. Gender differences in the predictive role of self-rated health on short-term risk of mortality among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the well-established association between self-rated health and mortality, research findings have been inconsistent regarding how men and women differ on this link. Using a national sample in the United States, this study compared American male and female older adults for the predictive role of baseline self-rated health on the short-term risk of mortality. Methods: This longitudinal study followed 1500 older adults (573 men (38.2%) and 927 women (61.8%)) aged 66 years or older for 3 years from 2001 to 2004. The main predictor of interest was self-rated health, which was measured using a single item in 2001. The outcome was the risk of all-cause mortality during the 3-year follow-up period. Demographic factors (race and age), socio-economic factors (education and marital status), and health behaviors (smoking and drinking) were covariates. Gender was the focal moderator. We ran logistic regression models in the pooled sample and also stratified by gender, with self-rated health treated as either nominal variables, poor compared to other levels (i.e. fair, good, or excellent) or excellent compared to other levels (i.e. good, fair, or poor), or an ordinal variable. Results: In the pooled sample, baseline self-rated health predicted mortality risk, regardless of how the variable was treated. We found a significant interaction between gender and poor self-rated health, indicating a stronger effect of poor self-rated health on mortality risk for men compared to women. Gender did not interact with excellent self-rated health on mortality. Conclusion: Perceived poor self-rated health better reflects risk of mortality over a short period of time for older men compared to older women. Clinicians may need to take poor self-rated health of older men very seriously. Future research should test whether the differential predictive validity of self-rated health based on gender is due to a different meaning of poor self-rated health for older men and women

  4. Predictive value of NT-proBNP for 30-day mortality in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a comparison with the GRACE and TIMI risk scores

    PubMed Central

    Schellings, Dirk AAM; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Dambrink, Jan-Henk E; Gosselink, AT Marcel; Kedhi, Elvin; Roolvink, Vincent; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; van’t Hof, Arnoud WJ

    2016-01-01

    Background The biomarker N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) predicts outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). Whether NT-proBNP has incremental prognostic value beyond established risk strategies is still questionable. Purpose To evaluate the predictive value of NT-proBNP for 30-day mortality over and beyond the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk scores in patients with NSTE-ACS. Methods Patients included in our ACS registry were candidates. NT-proBNP levels on admission were measured and the GRACE and TIMI risk scores were assessed. We compared the predictive value of NT-proBNP to both risk scores and evaluated whether NT-proBNP improves prognostication by using receiver operator curves and measures of discrimination improvement. Results A total of 1324 patients were included and 50 patients died during follow-up. On logistic regression analysis NT-proBNP and the GRACE risk score (but not the TIMI risk score) both independently predicted mortality at 30 days. The predictive value of NT-proBNP did not differ significantly compared to the GRACE risk score (area under the curve [AUC]) 0.85 vs 0.87 p=0.67) but was considerably higher in comparison to the TIMI risk score (AUC 0.60 p<0.001). Adjustment of the GRACE risk score by adding NT-proBNP did not improve prognostication: AUC 0.86 (p=0.57), integrated discrimination improvement 0.04 (p=0.003), net reclassification improvement 0.12 (p=0.21). Conclusion In patients with NSTE-ACS, NT-proBNP and the GRACE risk score (but not the TIMI risk score) both have good and comparable predictive value for 30-day mortality. However, incremental prognostic value of NT-proBNP beyond the GRACE risk score could not be demonstrated. PMID:27920547

  5. Low Recent Protein Intake Predicts Cancer-Related Fatigue and Increased Mortality in Patients with Advanced Tumor Disease Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stobäus, Nicole; Müller, Manfred J; Küpferling, Susanne; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Norman, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients, in general, suffer from anorexia hence diminished nutritional intake. In a prospective observational study, we investigated the impact of recent energy and protein intake on cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Recent protein and energy intake was assessed by 24-h recall in 285 patients. Cancer-related fatigue was determined by Brief Fatigue Inventory, and fat free mass index (FFMI) was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Symptoms with the validated German version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (30 questions) and 6-month mortality was documented. Risk factors of cancer-related fatigue and predictors of mortality were investigated with logistic regression analysis and stepwise Cox regression analysis, respectively. Low protein intake (<1 g/kg body weight) was found in 66% of patients, who were characterized by higher age, weight, and body mass index. Recent protein intake emerged as the strongest contributor to cancer-related fatigue followed by nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and age. Reduced protein intake, male sex, number of comorbidities, and FFMI were identified as significant predictors for increased 6-month mortality. In conclusion, a low recent protein intake assessed by 24-h recall is associated with a more than twofold higher risk of cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality. Every effort should be taken to assess and guarantee proper nutritional intake in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  6. Soluble CD40 ligand is elevated in type 1 diabetic nephropathy but not predictive of mortality, cardiovascular events or kidney function.

    PubMed

    Lajer, Maria; Tarnow, Inge; Michelson, Alan D; Jorsal, Anders; Frelinger, Andrew L; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise

    2010-01-01

    Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) derived from platelets mediates atherothrombosis, leading to proinflammatory and proatherosclerotic responses. We investigated the predictive value of plasma sCD40L for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, progression towards end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and nephropathy. The study was a prospective, observational follow-up study of 443 T1DM patients with diabetic nephropathy (274 men; age 42.1 ± 10.5 years [mean ± SD], duration of diabetes 28.3 ± 8.9 years, GFR 76 ± 33 ml/min/1.73 m2) and a control group of 421 patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes and persistent normoalbuminuria (232 men; age 45.4 ± 11.5 years, duration of diabetes 27.7 ± 10.1 years) at baseline. sCD40L was measured by ELISA. Plasma sCD40L levels were higher in patients with diabetic nephropathy compared to normoalbuminuric patients (median (range) 1.54 (0.02-13.38) vs. 1.30 (0.04-20.65) µg/L, respectively p = 0.004). The patients were followed for 8.1 (0.0-12.9) years (median (range)). Among normoalbuminuric patients, sCD40L levels did not predict all-cause mortality (p = 0.33) or combined fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) (p = 0.27). Similarly, among patients with diabetic nephropathy, the covariate adjusted sCD40L levels did not predict all-cause mortality (p = 0.86) or risk of fatal and non-fatal CVD (p = 0.08). Furthermore, high levels of sCD40L did not predict development of ESRD (p = 0.85) nor rate of decline in GFR (p = 0.69). Plasma sCD40L is elevated in T1DM nephropathy but is not a predictor of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and morbidity or deterioration of kidney function

  7. Predictive Validity of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Pooled Cohort Equations in Predicting All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease-Specific Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study of Adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-06-01

    The predictive validity of the Pooled Cohort risk (PCR) equations for cardiovascular disease (CVD)-specific and all-cause mortality among a national sample of US adults has yet to be evaluated, which was this study's purpose. Data from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, with participants followed up through December 31, 2011, to ascertain mortality status via the National Death Index probabilistic algorithm. The analyzed sample included 11,171 CVD-free adults (40-79 years of age). The 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event was determined from the PCR equations. For the entire sample encompassing 849,202 person-months, we found an incidence rate of 1.00 (95% CI, 0.93-1.07) all-cause deaths per 1000 person-months and an incidence rate of 0.15 (95% CI, 0.12-0.17) CVD-specific deaths per 1000 person-months. The unweighted median follow-up duration was 72 months. For nearly all analyses (unadjusted and adjusted models with ASCVD expressed as a continuous variable as well as dichotomized at 7.5% and 20%), the ASCVD risk score was significantly associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality (P<.05). In the adjusted model, the increased all-cause mortality risk ranged from 47% to 77% based on an ASCVD risk of 20% or higher and 7.5% or higher, respectively. Those with an ASCVD score of 7.5% or higher had a 3-fold increased risk of CVD-specific mortality. The 10-year predicted risk of a first ASCVD event via the PCR equations was associated with all-cause and CVD-specific mortality among those free of CVD at baseline. In this American adult sample, the PCR equations provide evidence of predictive validity.

  8. Vitamin D Predicts All-Cause and Cardiac Mortality in Females with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Comparison with Brain Natriuretic Peptide and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A.; León de la Fuente, Ricardo A.; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjoern; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may not only reflect disease but may also serve as a prognostic indicator. Our aim was to assess the gender-specific utility of vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] to predict all-cause and cardiac death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to compare its prognostic utility to brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Blood samples were harvested on admission in 982 patients. Forty percent were women (65.9 ± 12.6 years). Mortality was evaluated in quartiles of 25(OH)D, BNP, and hsCRP, respectively, during a 5-year follow-up, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and seventy-three patients died; 78 were women. In 92 patients (37 women), death was defined as cardiac. In women, the univariate hazard ratio (HR) for total death of 25(OH)D in Quartile (Q) 2 versus Q1, Q3 versus Q1, and Q4 versus Q1 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.33–0.93), 0.29 (95% CI 0.15–0.55), and 0.13 (95% CI 0.06–0.32), respectively. In females, it was an independent predictor of total and cardiac death, whereas BNP and hsCRP were less gender-specific. No gender differences in 25(OH)D were noted in a reference material. Accordingly, vitamin D independently predicts mortality in females with suspected ACS. PMID:24349821

  9. A low bioimpedance phase angle predicts a higher mortality and lower nutritional status in chronic dialysis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumler Md, Francis

    2010-04-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis is an established technique for body composition analysis. The phase angle parameter, an index of body cell mass, tissue hydration, and membrane integrity, makes it suitable for assessing nutritional status and survivability. We evaluated the significance of a low phase angle value on nutritional status and mortality in 285 chronic dialysis patients during a longitudinal prospective observational study. Patients in the lower phase angle tertile had decreased body weight, body mass index, fat free mass, body cell mass, and lower serum albumin concentrations than those in the higher tertile (P<001). In addition, mortality rates were significantly lower (P=0.05) in the highest tertile patients. In conclusion, the phase angle is a useful method for identifying dialysis patients at high risk for malnutrition and increased mortality.

  10. Does sickness absence due to psychiatric disorder predict cause-specific mortality? A 16-year follow-up of the GAZEL occupational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Maria; Ferrie, Jane E; Alexanderson, Kristina; Goldberg, Marcel; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Head, Jenny

    2010-09-15

    Mental disorders are a frequent cause of morbidity and sickness absence in working populations; however, the status of psychiatric sickness absence as a predictor of mortality is not established. The authors tested the hypothesis that psychiatric sickness absence predicts mortality from leading medical causes. Data were derived from the French GAZEL cohort study (n = 19,962). Physician-certified sickness absence records were extracted from administrative files (1990-1992) and were linked to mortality data from France's national registry of mortality (1993-2008, mean follow-up: 15.5 years). Analyses were conducted by using Cox regression models. Compared with workers with no sickness absence, those absent due to psychiatric disorder were at increased risk of cause-specific mortality (hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for age, gender, occupational grade, other sickness absence-suicide: 6.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.07, 11.75; cardiovascular disease: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.08; and smoking-related cancer: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.07, 2.53). After full adjustment, the excess risk of suicide remained significant (HR = 5.13, 95% CI: 2.60, 10.13) but failed to reach statistical significance for fatal cardiovascular disease (HR = 1.59, 95% CI: 0.95, 2.66) and smoking-related cancer (HR = 1.31, 95% CI: 0.85, 2.03). Psychiatric sickness absence records could help identify individuals at risk of premature mortality and serve to monitor workers' health.

  11. Development of a daily mortality probability prediction model from Intensive Care Unit patients using a discrete-time event history analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying Che; Chang, Kuang Yi; Lin, Shih Pin; Chen, Kung; Chan, Kwok Hon; Chang, Polun

    2013-08-01

    As studies have pointed out, severity scores are imperfect at predicting individual clinical chance of survival. The clinical condition and pathophysiological status of these patients in the Intensive Care Unit might differ from or be more complicated than most predictive models account for. In addition, as the pathophysiological status changes over time, the likelihood of survival day by day will vary. Actually, it would decrease over time and a single prediction value cannot address this truth. Clearly, alternative models and refinements are warranted. In this study, we used discrete-time-event models with the changes of clinical variables, including blood cell counts, to predict daily probability of mortality in individual patients from day 3 to day 28 post Intensive Care Unit admission. Both models we built exhibited good discrimination in the training (overall area under ROC curve: 0.80 and 0.79, respectively) and validation cohorts (overall area under ROC curve: 0.78 and 0.76, respectively) to predict daily ICU mortality. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the models, and discusses the possibility of them to serve as the foundation of a new bedside advisory or alarm system.

  12. Predictive value of plasma copeptin level for the risk and mortality of heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian-Jun; Lu, Ying; Kuai, Zheng-Ping; Yong, Yong-Hong

    2017-02-28

    Epidemiologic studies are inconsistent regarding the association between plasma copeptin level and heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to determine whether high level of copeptin is correlated with incidence of HF and mortality in patients with HF. We searched PUBMED and EMBASE databases for studies conducted from 1966 through May 2016 to identify studies reporting hazard ratio (HR) estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between plasma copeptin level and HF. A random-effects model was used to combine study-specific risk estimates. A total of 13 studies were included in the meta-analysis, with five studies on the incidence of HF and eight studies on the mortality of patients with HF. For incidence of HF, the summary HR indicated a borderline positive association of high plasma copeptin level with HF risk (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 0.90-2.85). Furthermore, an increase of 1 standard deviation in log copeptin level was associated with a 17% increase in the risk of incident HF (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02-1.33). For all-cause mortality of patients with HF, we also found a significant association between elevated plasma copeptin level and increased mortality of HF (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.33-2.33). Our dose-response analysis indicated that an increment in copeptin level of 1 pmol/l was associated with a 3% increase in all-cause mortality (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that elevated plasma copeptin level is associated with an increased risk of HF and all-cause mortality in patients with HF.

  13. Chronotype and Improved Sleep Efficiency Independently Predict Depressive Symptom Reduction after Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Bei; Ong, Jason C.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M.W.; Manber, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness-eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Methods: Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age mean ± standard deviation = 48.14 ± 14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended at least 4 sessions of a 6-session group CBT-I. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Results: Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. Conclusions: In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. Citation: Bei B, Ong JC, Rajaratnam SM, Manber R. Chronotype and improved sleep efficiency independently predict depressive symptom reduction after group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):1021–1027. PMID

  14. Survey Criteria for Fibromyalgia Independently Predict Increased Postoperative Opioid Consumption after Lower Extremity Joint Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Chad M.; Janda, Allison M.; Schueller, Christa M.; Tsodikov, Alex; Morris, Michelle; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variance in pain following total knee and hip arthroplasty may be due to a number of procedural and peripheral factors but also, in some individuals, to aberrant central pain processing as is described in conditions like fibromyalgia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of patients undergoing lower extremity joint arthroplasty. Methods 519 patients were preoperatively phenotyped using validated self-reported pain questionnaires, psychological measures, and health information. In addition to assessing factors previously found to be associated with poor outcomes in arthroplasty, participants also completed the American College of Rheumatology survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Previous studies have suggested that rather than being “present” or “absent,” features of fibromyalgia as measured by this instrument, occur over a wide continuum. Postoperative pain control was assessed by total postoperative opioid consumption. Results Preoperatively, patients with higher fibromyalgia survey scores were younger, more likely to be female, taking more opioids, reported higher pain severity, and had a more negative psychological profile. In the multivariate analysis, the fibromyalgia survey score, younger age, preoperative opioid use, knee (vs. hip), pain severity at baseline, and the anesthetic technique were all predictive of increased postoperative opioid consumption. Conclusions Using the survey criteria for fibromyalgia distinct phenotypic differences were found, and the measure was independently predictive of opioid consumption. This self-report measure may provide an additional simple means of predicting postoperative pain outcomes and analgesic requirements. Future studies are needed to determine whether tailored therapies can improve postoperative pain control in this population. PMID:24343289

  15. Circulating miR-21 as an independent predictive biomarker for chemoresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Miyamae, Mahito; Okajima, Wataru; Ohashi, Takuma; Imamura, Taisuke; Kiuchi, Jun; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies indentified the significance of circulating microRNAs in blood as a predictive biomarker for chemoresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In this study, we tested whether oncogenic miR-21 promoted chemoresistance in ESCC and served as a biomarker for predicting chemoresistance in plasma of patients with ESCC. All consecutive patients underwent the preoperative chemotherapy regimen (JCOG9907 trial) with cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil. As a result, pretreatment plasma concentrations of miR-21 were significantly higher in ESCC patients with a low histopathological response than in those with a high histopathological response (P = 0.0416). Multivariate analysis revealed that a high pretreatment plasma concentration of miR-21 was an independent risk factor of chemoresistance (p = 0.0150; Odds Ratio 9.95 (range: 1.56-63.4)). The expression of miR-21 was also significantly higher in pretreatment ESCC tissues with a low histopathological response than in those with a high histopathological response (P = 0.0409). In vitro, although the growth of KYSE 170 ESCC cells transfected with the control mimics was markedly inhibited by the 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin treatment, the inhibitory effects of 5-FU (P < 0.05) or cisplatin (P < 0.05) were significantly reduced in KYSE170 cells that overexpressed miR-21. Taken together, the overexpression of miR-21 contributed to chemoresistance and circulating miR-21 in plasma of patients with ESCC could be a useful biomarker for predicting chemoresistance. PMID:27508093

  16. Development and Application of a Genetic Algorithm for Variable Optimization and Predictive Modeling of Five-Year Mortality Using Questionnaire Data.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lucas J; Bello, Ghalib; Dumancas, Gerard G

    2015-01-01

    The problem of selecting important variables for predictive modeling of a specific outcome of interest using questionnaire data has rarely been addressed in clinical settings. In this study, we implemented a genetic algorithm (GA) technique to select optimal variables from questionnaire data for predicting a five-year mortality. We examined 123 questions (variables) answered by 5,444 individuals in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The GA iterations selected the top 24 variables, including questions related to stroke, emphysema, and general health problems requiring the use of special equipment, for use in predictive modeling by various parametric and nonparametric machine learning techniques. Using these top 24 variables, gradient boosting yielded the nominally highest performance (area under curve [AUC] = 0.7654), although there were other techniques with lower but not significantly different AUC. This study shows how GA in conjunction with various machine learning techniques could be used to examine questionnaire data to predict a binary outcome.

  17. Comparing the predictive accuracy of frailty, comorbidity, and disability for mortality: a 1-year follow-up in patients hospitalized in geriatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Martin; Ritt, Julia Isabel; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating and comparing the power of frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments, together and in parallel, for predicting mortality are limited. Objective This study aimed to evaluate and compare the measures of frailty, comorbidity, and disability in predicting 1-year mortality in geriatric inpatients. Design Prospective cohort study. Patients and setting A total of 307 inpatients aged ≥65 years in geriatric wards of a general hospital participated in the study. Measurements The patients were evaluated in relation to different frailty, comorbidity, and disability instruments during their hospital stays. These included three frailty (the seven-category Clinical Frailty Scale [CFS-7], a 41-item frailty index [FI], and the FRAIL scale), two comorbidity (the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics [CIRS-G] and the comorbidity domain of the FI [Comorbidity-D-FI]), and two disability instruments (disability in basic activities of daily living [ADL-Katz] and the instrumental and basic activities of daily living domains of the FI [IADL/ADL-D-FI]). The patients were followed-up over 1 year. Results Using FI, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and ADL-Katz, this study identified a patient group with a high (≥50%) 1-year mortality rate in all of the patients and the two patient subgroups (ie, patients aged 65–82 years and ≥83 years). The CFS-7, FI, FRAIL scale, CIRS-G, Comorbidity-D-FI, and IADL/ADL-D-FI (analyzed as full scales) revealed useful discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality (ie, an area under the curve >0.7) in all the patients and the two patient subgroups (all P<0.001). Thereby, CFS-7 (in all patients and the two patient subgroups) and FI (in the subgroup of patients aged ≥83 years) showed greater discriminative accuracy for 1-year mortality compared to other instruments (all P<0.05). Conclusion All the different instruments emerged as suitable tools for risk stratification in geriatric inpatients. Among them, CFS-7, and in

  18. A simple novel measure of passive transfer of maternal immunoglobulin is predictive of preweaning mortality in piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preweaning mortality of piglets represents a significant loss to swine producers. Two factors that contribute to this loss are the timely initiation of lactation by the sow, and the ability of individual piglets to nurse successfully within hours of birth. However, the contribution of these factors ...

  19. Value of Chromosome 9p21 Polymorphism for Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality in Han Chinese Without Coronary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Te; Liang, Kae-Woei; Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chen, Yii-der Ida; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lee, Wen-Lieng; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variants at chromosome 9p21 are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the longitudinal effects of 9p21 variants on cardiovascular mortality remain controversial and may depend on whether the patient has CAD. We tested the hypothesis that the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4977574 is associated longitudinally with cardiovascular death in patients without detectable coronary lesions. We enrolled patients who underwent coronary angiography for angina pectoris but had normal angiographic findings. Laboratory analyses and rs4977574 TaqMan genotyping were performed using fasting blood samples collected during hospitalization. Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality rates were acquired from a national database. Among the 679 enrolled subjects with neither myocardial infarction nor an angiographic coronary lesion, 28 (19.0%) of the 147 homozygous GG carriers suffered a cardiovascular death, compared with 63 (11.8%) of the 532 subjects with the AG or AA genotype during the median 12.3 years (interquartile range 8.6–12.7 years) of follow-up. In a recessive model, cardiovascular mortality was significantly higher in subjects with the GG genotype than in those with the other genotypes (hazard ratio, 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.08 to 2.64; P = 0.021). In this follow-up study, rs4977574, a tag SNP at chromosome 9p21, was shown to be associated with cardiovascular mortality in Taiwanese patients with angina pectoris but no coronary lesions. PMID:26426617

  20. Average County-Level IQ Predicts County-Level Disadvantage and Several County-Level Mortality Risk Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, J. C.; Beaver, Kevin M.; Boutwell, Brian B.

    2013-01-01

    Research utilizing individual-level data has reported a link between intelligence (IQ) scores and health problems, including early mortality risk. A growing body of evidence has found similar associations at higher levels of aggregation such as the state- and national-level. At the same time, individual-level research has suggested the…

  1. In Italy, North-South Differences in IQ Predict Differences in Income, Education, Infant Mortality, Stature, and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Regional differences in IQ are presented for 12 regions of Italy showing that IQs are highest in the north and lowest in the south. Regional IQs obtained in 2006 are highly correlated with average incomes at r = 0.937, and with stature, infant mortality, literacy and education. The lower IQ in southern Italy may be attributable to genetic…

  2. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Is Predictive of Interstitial Lung Disease and Mortality in Dermatomyositis: a Korean Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Go, Dong Jin; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Konig, Maximilian Ferdinand; Park, Jin Kyun

    2016-03-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of death in patients with dermatomyositis (DM). This study was aimed to examine the utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as a predictor of ILD and prognostic marker of mortality in patients with DM. One hundred-and-fourteen patients with DM were examined, including 28 with clinically amyopathic DM (CADM). A diagnosis of ILD was made based on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. The association between elevated ESR and pulmonary impairment and mortality was then examined. ILD was diagnosed in 53 (46.5%) of 114 DM patients. Cancer was diagnosed in 2 (3.8%) of 53 DM patients with ILD and in 24 (92.3%) of those without ILD (P < 0.001). The median ESR (50.0 mm/hour) in patients with ILD was significantly higher than that in patients without ILD (29.0 mm/hour; P < 0.001). ESR was inversely correlated with forced vital capacity (Spearman ρ = - 0.303; P = 0.007) and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (ρ = - 0.319; P = 0.006). DM patients with baseline ESR ≥ 30 mm/hour had significantly higher mortality than those with ESR < 30 mm/hour (P = 0.002, log-rank test). Patients with a persistently high ESR despite immunosuppressive therapy was associated with higher mortality than those with a normalized ESR (P = 0.039, log-rank test). Elevated ESR is associated with increased mortality in patients with DM due to respiratory failure. Thus, monitoring ESR should be an integral part of the clinical care of DM patients.

  3. Predictive Factors of One-Year Mortality in a Cohort of Patients Undergoing Urgent-Start Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luciene P.; dos Reis, Luciene M.; Graciolli, Fabiana G.; Pereira, Benedito J.; de Oliveira, Rodrigo B.; de Souza, Altay A. L.; Moyses, Rosa M.; Elias, Rosilene M.; Jorgetti, Vanda

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 10–15% of adult population worldwide. Incident patients on hemodialysis, mainly those on urgent-start dialysis at the emergency room, have a high mortality risk, which may reflect the absence of nephrology care. A lack of data exists regarding the influence of baseline factors on the mortality of these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of this population and identify risk factors that contribute to their mortality. Patients and methods We studied 424 patients who were admitted to our service between 01/2006 and 12/2012 and were followed for 1 year. We analyzed vascular access, risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mineral and bone disease associated with CKD (CKD-MBD), and clinical events that occurred during the follow-up period. Factors that influenced patient survival were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Results The patient mean age was 50 ± 18 years, and 58.7% of them were male. Hypertension was the main cause of primary CKD (31.8%). Major risk factors were smoking (19.6%), dyslipidemia (48.8%), and CVD (41%). Upon admission, most patients had no vascular access for hemodialysis (89.4%). Biochemical results showed that most patients were anemic with high C-reactive protein levels, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, elevated parathyroid hormone and decreased 25-hydroxy vitamin D. At the end of one year, 60 patients died (14.1%). These patients were significantly older, had a lower percentage of arteriovenous fistula in one year, and low levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Conclusions The combined evaluation of clinical and biochemical parameters and risk factors revealed that the mortality in urgent-start dialysis is associated with older age and low levels of vitamin D deficiency. A lack of a permanent hemodialysis access after one year was also a risk factor for mortality in this population. PMID:28045952

  4. PCSK9 Plasma Concentrations Are Independent of GFR and Do Not Predict Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Decreased GFR

    PubMed Central

    Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Heine, Gunnar H.; Silbernagel, Günther; Kleber, Marcus E.; Seiler, Sarah; Emrich, Insa; Lennartz, Simone; Werner, Christian; Zawada, Adam M.; Fliser, Danilo; Böhm, Michael; März, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired renal function causes dyslipidemia that contributes to elevated cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a regulator of the LDL receptor and plasma cholesterol concentrations. Its relationship to kidney function and cardiovascular events in patients with reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) has not been explored. Methods Lipid parameters including PCSK9 were measured in two independent cohorts. CARE FOR HOMe (Cardiovascular and Renal Outcome in CKD 2–4 Patients—The Forth Homburg evaluation) enrolled 443 patients with reduced GFR (between 90 and 15 ml/min/1.73 m2) referred for nephrological care that were prospectively followed for the occurrence of a composite cardiovascular endpoint. As a replication cohort, PCSK9 was quantitated in 1450 patients with GFR between 90 and 15 ml/min/1.73 m2 enrolled in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study (LURIC) that were prospectively followed for cardiovascular deaths. Results PCSK9 concentrations did not correlate with baseline GFR (CARE FOR HOMe: r = -0.034; p = 0.479; LURIC: r = -0.017; p = 0.512). 91 patients in CARE FOR HOMe and 335 patients in LURIC reached an endpoint during a median follow-up of 3.0 [1.8–4.1] years and 10.0 [7.3–10.6] years, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that PCSK9 concentrations did not predict cardiovascular events in either cohort [CARE FOR HOMe (p = 0.622); LURIC (p = 0.729)]. Sensitivity analyses according to statin intake yielded similar results. Conclusion In two well characterized independent cohort studies, PCSK9 plasma levels did not correlate with kidney function. Furthermore, PCSK9 plasma concentrations were not associated with cardiovascular events in patients with reduced renal function. PMID:26799206

  5. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  6. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  7. 14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity - An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Giske, Christian G.; Fredrikson, Mats; Östholm Balkhed, Åse; Claesson, Carina; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Hoffmann, Mikael; Hanberger, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000–2013) in a Swedish county. Methods retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI). Results of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04). Conclusion this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics. PMID:27835663

  8. The ability of three different models of frailty to predict all-cause mortality: results from the European Male Aging Study (EMAS).

    PubMed

    Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Lee, David M; Pye, Stephen R; Gielen, Evelien; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Pendleton, Neil; Finn, Joseph D; Tajar, Abdelouahid; O'Connell, Matthew D L; Rockwood, Kenneth; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E J; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C W; O'Neill, Terence W

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared the ability of the most commonly used models of frailty to predict mortality among community-dwelling individuals. Here, we used a frailty index (FI), frailty phenotype (FP), and FRAIL scale (FS) to predict mortality in the EMAS. Participants were aged 40-79 years (n=2929) at baseline and 6.6% (n=193) died over a median 4.3 years of follow-up. The FI was generated from 39 deficits, including self-reported health, morbidities, functional performance and psychological assessments. The FP and FS consisted of five phenotypic criteria and both categorized individuals as robust when they had 0 criteria, prefrail as 1-2 criteria and frail as 3+ criteria. The mean FI increased linearly with age (r(2)=0.21) and in Cox regression models adjusted for age, center, smoking and partner status the hazard ratio (HR) for death for each unit increase of the FI was 1.49. Men who were prefrail or frail by either the FP or FS definitions, had a significantly increased risk of death compared to their robust counterparts. Compared to robust men, those who were FP frail at baseline had a HR for death of 3.84, while those who were FS frail had a HR of 3.87. All three frailty models significantly predicted future mortality among community-dwelling, middle-aged and older European men after adjusting for potential confounders. Our data suggest that the choice of frailty model may not be of paramount importance when predicting future risk of death, enabling flexibility in the approach used.

  9. Validation of the Shock Index, Modified Shock Index, and Age Shock Index for Predicting Mortality of Geriatric Trauma Patients in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The shock index (SI), modified shock index (MSI), and age multiplied by SI (Age SI) are used to assess the severity and predict the mortality of trauma patients, but their validity for geriatric patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to assess predictive value of the SI, MSI, and Age SI for geriatric trauma patients. We used the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance (EDIIS), which has data from 20 EDs across Korea. Patients older than 65 years who had traumatic injuries from January 2008 to December 2013 were enrolled. We compared in-hospital and ED mortality of groups categorized as stable and unstable according to indexes. We also assessed their predictive power of each index by calculating the area under the each receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. A total of 45,880 cases were included. The percentage of cases classified as unstable was greater among non-survivors than survivors for the SI (36.6% vs. 1.8%, P < 0.001), the MSI (38.6% vs. 2.2%, P < 0.001), and the Age SI (69.4% vs. 21.3%, P < 0.001). Non-survivors had higher median values than survivors on the SI (0.84 vs. 0.57, P < 0.001), MSI (0.79 vs. 1.14, P < 0.001), and Age SI (64.0 vs. 41.5, P < 0.001). The predictive power of the Age SI for in-hospital mortality was higher than SI (AUROC: 0.740 vs. 0.674, P < 0.001) or MSI (0.682, P < 0.001) in geriatric trauma patients. PMID:27822945

  10. Validation of the Shock Index, Modified Shock Index, and Age Shock Index for Predicting Mortality of Geriatric Trauma Patients in Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Yong; Hong, Ki Jeong; Shin, Sang Do; Ro, Young Sun; Ahn, Ki Ok; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Eui Jung

    2016-12-01

    The shock index (SI), modified shock index (MSI), and age multiplied by SI (Age SI) are used to assess the severity and predict the mortality of trauma patients, but their validity for geriatric patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to assess predictive value of the SI, MSI, and Age SI for geriatric trauma patients. We used the Emergency Department-based Injury In-depth Surveillance (EDIIS), which has data from 20 EDs across Korea. Patients older than 65 years who had traumatic injuries from January 2008 to December 2013 were enrolled. We compared in-hospital and ED mortality of groups categorized as stable and unstable according to indexes. We also assessed their predictive power of each index by calculating the area under the each receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. A total of 45,880 cases were included. The percentage of cases classified as unstable was greater among non-survivors than survivors for the SI (36.6% vs. 1.8%, P < 0.001), the MSI (38.6% vs. 2.2%, P < 0.001), and the Age SI (69.4% vs. 21.3%, P < 0.001). Non-survivors had higher median values than survivors on the SI (0.84 vs. 0.57, P < 0.001), MSI (0.79 vs. 1.14, P < 0.001), and Age SI (64.0 vs. 41.5, P < 0.001). The predictive power of the Age SI for in-hospital mortality was higher than SI (AUROC: 0.740 vs. 0.674, P < 0.001) or MSI (0.682, P < 0.001) in geriatric trauma patients.

  11. Country, Sex, EDSS Change and Therapy Choice Independently Predict Treatment Discontinuation in Multiple Sclerosis and Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G.; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand’Maison, François; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fiol, Marcela; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Giuliani, Giorgio; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Cristiano, Edgardo; Herbert, Joseph; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Bergamaschi, Roberto; van Pesch, Vincent; Moore, Fraser; Vella, Norbert; Slee, Mark; Santiago, Vetere; Barnett, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Young, Carolyn; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Tanner, Mary; Rutherford, Michelle; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a prospective study, MSBASIS, to assess factors leading to first treatment discontinuation in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods The MSBASIS Study, conducted by MSBase Study Group members, enrols patients seen from CIS onset, reporting baseline demographics, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Follow-up visits report relapses, EDSS scores, and the start and end dates of MS-specific therapies. We performed a multivariable survival analysis to determine factors within this dataset that predict first treatment discontinuation. Results A total of 2314 CIS patients from 44 centres were followed for a median of 2.7 years, during which time 1247 commenced immunomodulatory drug (IMD) treatment. Ninety percent initiated IMD after a diagnosis of MS was confirmed, and 10% while still in CIS status. Over 40% of these patients stopped their first IMD during the observation period. Females were more likely to cease medication than males (HR 1.36, p = 0.003). Patients treated in Australia were twice as likely to cease their first IMD than patients treated in Spain (HR 1.98, p = 0.001). Increasing EDSS was associated with higher rate of IMD cessation (HR 1.21 per EDSS unit, p<0.001), and intramuscular interferon-β-1a (HR 1.38, p = 0.028) and subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (HR 1.45, p = 0.012) had higher rates of discontinuation than glatiramer acetate, although this varied widely in different countries. Onset cerebral MRI features, age, time to treatment initiation or relapse on treatment were not associated with IMD cessation. Conclusion In this multivariable survival analysis, female sex, country of residence, EDSS change and IMD choice independently predicted time to first IMD cessation. PMID:22768046

  12. Genetic, Physiological, and Lifestyle Predictors of Mortality in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Mackenbach, Johan; Vokó, Zoltán; Lhachimi, Stefan; Ikram, M. Arfan; Uitterlinden, André G.; Newman, Anne B.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Franceschini, Nora; Schipper, Maarten; Hofman, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the quality of 162 variables, focusing on the contribution of genetic markers, used solely or in combination with other characteristics, when predicting mortality. Methods. In 5974 participants from the Rotterdam Study, followed for a median of 15.1 years, 7 groups of factors including age and gender, genetics, socioeconomics, lifestyle, physiological characteristics, prevalent diseases, and indicators of general health were related to all-cause mortality. Genetic variables were identified from 8 genome-wide association scans (n = 19 033) and literature review. Results. We observed 3174 deaths during follow-up. The fully adjusted model (C-statistic for 15-year follow-up [C15y] = 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75, 0.77) predicted mortality well. Most of the additional information apart from age and sex stemmed from physiological markers, prevalent diseases, and general health. Socioeconomic factors and lifestyle contributed meaningfully to mortality risk prediction with longer prediction horizon. Although specific genetic factors were independently associated with mortality, jointly they contributed little to mortality prediction (C15y = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.55, 0.57). Conclusions. Mortality can be predicted reasonably well over a long period. Genetic factors independently predict mortality, but only modestly more than other risk indicators. PMID:22397355

  13. Questionnaire, walking time and button test measures of functional capacity as predictive markers for mortality in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Callahan, L F; Vaughn, W K

    1987-04-01

    Mortality over 9 years in rheumatoid arthritis was studied according to baseline demographic, disease, therapy and comorbidity variables, and measures of functional capacity variables. Significant differences between patients who survived and died over the next 9 years were seen for 8 variables: age, joint count, oral corticosteroid use, presence of concurrent heart disease, formal educational level, and 3 quantitative measures of functional capacity, questionnaire responses regarding activities of daily living, modified walking time and the button test. Five-year survivals of 50% or less were seen in patients with severely dysfunctional values for the 3 quantitative measures of functional capacity. Increased relative risk of mortality according to functional capacity measures was not explained by age, sex, duration of disease, smoking history, joint count, hand radiograph score, grip strength, morning stiffness, formal educational level, oral corticosteroid or parenteral gold use, or various comorbidities, and was not expected by a majority of physicians.

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) fibrosis score predicts 6.6-year overall mortality of Chinese patients with NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Xun, Yun-Hao; Guo, Jian-Chun; Lou, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Yan-Ming; Zhuang, Zhen-Jie; Zhu, Meng-Fei; Luo, Yan; Ma, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Jing; Bian, Dong-Xue; Shi, Jun-Ping

    2014-09-01

    The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) fibrosis score (NFS) has emerged as a useful predictor of long-term outcome in NAFLD patients. We evaluated the predictive performance of the NFS for overall mortality in a Chinese population with NAFLD. All NAFLD patients diagnosed ultrasonographically at Xixi Hospital of Hangzhou between 1996 and 2011 were retrospectively recruited to the study. Outcome was determined by interview and causes of death were confirmed by medical records. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCROC ) was used to determine the predictive accuracy of the NFS, BARD (body mass index, aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio, diabetes) score, FIB-4 index and the AST/platelet ratio index (APRI) for mortality. Data from a total of 180 eligible patients (median age 39 years; 96 men) were analysed, with 12 deaths over a median follow-up period of 6.6 years (range 0.5-14.8 years). Using Cox model analysis, the NFS as a continuous variable was identified as the only predictor for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.743, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.670-4.504). The NFS yielded the highest AUCROC of 0.828 (95% CI 0.728-0.928, P < 0.05), followed by the FIB-4 index, APRI and BARD score (AUCROC 0.806 (P < 0.05), 0.732 (P < 0.05) and 0.632, respectively). The data indicated that the NFS is a useful predictor of 6.6-year all-cause mortality for Chinese patients with NAFLD.

  15. Prediction of Mild Cognitive Impairment Conversion Using a Combination of Independent Component Analysis and the Cox Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2017-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) represents a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and corresponds to a higher risk of developing AD. Thus, it is necessary to explore and predict the onset of AD in MCI stage. In this study, we propose a combination of independent component analysis (ICA) and the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model to investigate promising risk factors associated with MCI conversion among 126 MCI converters and 108 MCI non-converters from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data, we extracted brain networks from AD and normal control groups via ICA and then constructed Cox models that included network-based neuroimaging factors for the MCI group. We carried out five separate Cox analyses and the two-modality neuroimaging Cox model identified three significant network-based risk factors with higher prediction performance (accuracy = 73.50%) than those in either single-modality model (accuracy = 68.80%). Additionally, the results of the comprehensive Cox model, including significant neuroimaging factors and clinical variables, demonstrated that MCI individuals with reduced gray matter volume in a temporal lobe-related network of structural MRI [hazard ratio (HR) = 8.29E-05 (95% confidence interval (CI), 5.10E- 07 ~ 0.013)], low glucose metabolism in the posterior default mode network based on FDG-PET [HR = 0.066 (95% CI, 4.63E-03 ~ 0.928)], positive apolipoprotein E ε4-status [HR = 1. 988 (95% CI, 1.531 ~ 2.581)], increased Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale scores [HR = 1.100 (95% CI, 1.059 ~ 1.144)] and Sum of Boxes of Clinical Dementia Rating scores [HR = 1.622 (95% CI, 1.364 ~ 1.930)] were more likely to convert to AD within 36 months after baselines. These significant risk factors in such comprehensive Cox model had the best prediction

  16. Increased Pre-operative Pulse Pressure Predicts Procedural Complications and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Tibial Interventions for Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Jeremy D.; Lee, Vanessa; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Guzman, Raul J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pulse pressure is a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Elevated pulse pressure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and death. The effects of pulse pressure on outcomes after endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia (CLI), however, are unknown. We thus evaluated whether increased pre-operative pulse pressure was associated with adverse outcomes and mortality in patients undergoing endovascular tibial artery intervention. Methods All patients undergoing endovascular tibial intervention for CLI at a single institution from 2004 to 2014 were included in this study. Pre-operative pulse pressure was derived from measurements obtained in the holding area prior to the procedure. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on pulse pressure, < 80 or ≥ 80. Patient demographics and co-morbidities were documented, and outcomes including procedural complications, repeat intervention, amputation, and mortality were recorded. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to account for patient demographics and comorbidities. Results Of 371 patients, 186 patients had a pre-operative pulse pressure <80 and 185 had a pre-operative pulse pressure ≥80. No significant differences in patient demographics or comorbidities were identified; however there was a trend toward older age in patients with elevated pulse pressure (70 vs. 72, P = 0.07). On univariate analysis, procedural complications (21% vs. 13%, P = 0.02), reinterventions (26% vs. 17%, P < 0.01), and restenosis (32% vs. 23%, P = 0.03) were more common among patients with pulse pressure ≥ 80. Procedural complications remained significant on multivariate analysis (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.1, P = 0.04). There was no difference in 30-day mortality; however increased mortality was seen at 5 years of follow-up (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0-2.5, P = 0.04) following multivariable analysis. Conclusions Increased pre-operative pulse pressure is associated with procedural complications

  17. Comparison of Proposed Modified and Original Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Scores in Predicting ICU Mortality: A Prospective, Observational, Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Daneshiyan, Maryam; Aarabi, Mohsen; Talebiyan Kiakolaye, Yaser; Nouraei, Seyed Mahmood; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Sadeghi, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Background. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score has been recommended to triage critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study aimed to compare the performance of our proposed MSOFA and original SOFA scores in predicting ICU mortality. Methods. This prospective observational study was conducted on 250 patients admitted to the ICU. Both tools scores were calculated at the beginning, 24 hours of ICU admission, and 48 hours of ICU admission. Diagnostic odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to compare the two scores. Results. MSOFA and SOFA predicted mortality similarly with an area under the ROC curve of 0.837, 0.992, and 0.977 for MSOFA 1, MSOFA 2, and MSOFA 3, respectively, and 0.857, 0.988, and 0.988 for SOFA 1, SOFA 2, and SOFA 3, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of MSOFA 1 in cut-off point 8 were 82.9% and 68.4%, respectively, MSOFA 2 in cut-off point 9.5 were 94.7% and 97.1%, respectively, and MSOFA 3 in cut-off point of 9.3 were 97.4% and 93.1%, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the MSOFA 1 and the SOFA 1 (r: 0.942), 24 hours (r: 0.972), and 48 hours (r: 0.960). Conclusion. The proposed MSOFA and the SOFA scores had high diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for predicting mortality. PMID:28116220

  18. Comparing three clinical prediction rules for primarily predicting the 30-day mortality of patients with pulmonary embolism: The “Simplified Revised Geneva Score,” the “Original PESI,” and the “Simplified PESI”

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Fereyduni, Farid; Esfahani, Morteza Abdar; Kheyri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) should be evaluated for the clinical probability of PE using an applicable risk score. The Geneva prognostic score, the PE Severity Index (PESI), and its simplified version (sPESI) are well-known clinical prognostic scores for PE. The purpose of this study was to analyze these clinical scores as prognostic tools. Materials and Methods: A historical cohort study was conducted on patients with acute PE in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, from June 2013 to August 2014. To compare survival in the 1-month follow-up and factor-analyze mortality from the survival graph, Kaplan–Meier, and log-rank logistic regression were applied. Results: Two hundred and twenty four patients were assigned to two “low risk” and “high risk” groups using the three versions of “Simplified PESI, Original PESI, and Simplified Geneva.” They were followed for a period of 1 month after admission. The overall mortality rate within 1 month from diagnosis was about 24% (95% confidence interval, 21.4–27.2). The mortality rate of low risk PE patients was about 4% in the PESI, 17% in the Geneva, and <1% in the simplified PESI scales (P < 0.005). The mortality rate among high risk patients was 33%, 33.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Among patients with acute PE, the simplified PESI model was able to accurately predict mortality rate for low risk patients. Among high risk patients, however, the difference between the three models in predicting prognosis was not significant. PMID:27656606

  19. Cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Isabelle R.; de Souza, Dyego L.B.; Bernal, María M.; Costa, Íris do C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cancer is currently in the spotlight due to their heavy responsibility as main cause of death in both developed and developing countries. Analysis of the epidemiological situation is required as a support tool for the planning of public health measures for the most vulnerable groups. We analyzed cancer mortality trends in Brazil and geographic regions in the period 1996 to 2010 and calculate mortality predictions for the period 2011 to 2030. This is an epidemiological, demographic-based study that utilized information from the Mortality Information System on all deaths due to cancer in Brazil. Mortality trends were analyzed by the Joinpoint regression, and Nordpred was utilized for the calculation of predictions. Stability was verified for the female (annual percentage change [APC] = 0.4%) and male (APC = 0.5%) sexes. The North and Northeast regions present significant increasing trends for mortality in both sexes. Until 2030, female mortality trends will not present considerable variations, but there will be a decrease in mortality trends for the male sex. There will be increases in mortality rates until 2030 for the North and Northeast regions, whereas reductions will be verified for the remaining geographic regions. This variation will be explained by the demographic structure of regions until 2030. There are pronounced regional and sex differences in cancer mortality in Brazil, and these discrepancies will continue to increase until the year 2030, when the Northeast region will present the highest cancer mortality rates in Brazil. PMID:25906105

  20. Erythrocyte selenium concentration predicts intensive care unit and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Selenoenzymes can modulate the extent of oxidative stress, which is recognized as a key feature of septic shock. The pathophysiologic role of erythrocyte selenium concentration in patients with septic shock remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association of erythrocyte selenium concentration with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) activity, GPx1 polymorphisms and with ICU and hospital mortality in septic shock patients. Methods This prospective study included all patients older than 18 years with septic shock on admission or during their ICU stay, admitted to one of the three ICUs of our institution, from January to August 2012. At the time of the patients’ enrollment, demographic information was recorded. Blood samples were taken within the first 72 hours of the patients’ admission or within 72 hours of the septic shock diagnosis for determination of selenium status, protein carbonyl concentration, GPx1 activity and GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism (rs 1050450) genotyping. Results A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated. The mean age was 57.6 ± 15.9 years, 63.6% were male. Regarding selenium status, only erythrocyte selenium concentration was lower in patients who died in the ICU. The frequencies for GPx1 Pro198Leu polymorphism were 55%, 38% and 7% for Pro/Pro, Pro/Leu and Leu/Leu, respectively. In the logistic regression models, erythrocyte selenium concentration was associated with ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock even after adjustment for protein carbonyl concentration and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II) or sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA). Conclusions Erythrocyte selenium concentration was a predictor of ICU and hospital mortality in patients with septic shock. However, this effect was not due to GPx1 activity or Pro198Leu polymorphism. PMID:24887198

  1. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. Methods and finding We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755–0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691–0.783) and 0.742 (0.698–0.785), p < 0.0001). Decision Curve Analysis showed that the machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. Conclusions According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction. PMID:28060903

  2. Validation of the 6-Month GRACE Score in Predicting 1-Year Mortality of Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Admitted to the Arabian Gulf Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Thalib, Lukman; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; AlHabib, Khalid F; Alfaleh, Hussam F; AlShamiri, Mostafa Q; Amin, Haitham; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Almahmeed, Wael; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Doi, Suhail A R

    2017-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are the most common cardiovascular diseases and are associated with a significant risk of mortality and morbidity. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score postdischarge is a widely used ACS prediction model for risk of mortality (low, intermediate, and high); however, it has not yet been validated in patients from the Arabian Gulf. This prospective multicenter study (second Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events) provides detailed information of the GRACE risk score postdischarge in patients from the Arabian Gulf. Its prognostic utility was validated at 1-year follow-up in over 5000 patients with ACS from 65 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries (Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen). Overall, the goodness of fit (Hosmer and Lemeshow statistic P value = .826), calibration, and discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.695; 95% confidence interval: 0.668-0.722) were good. The GRACE risk score postdischarge can be used to stratify 1 year mortality risk in the Arabian Gulf population; it does not require further calibration and has a good discriminatory ability.

  3. Independent analysis of the radiation risk for leukaemia in children and adults with mortality data (1950-2003) of Japanese A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jan Christian; Walsh, Linda

    2013-03-01

    A recent analysis of leukaemia mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors has applied descriptive models, collected together from previous studies, to derive a joint excess relative risk estimate (ERR) by multi-model inference (MMI) (Walsh and Kaiser in Radiat Environ Biophys 50:21-35, 2011). The models use a linear-quadratic dose response with differing dose effect modifiers. In the present study, a set of more than 40 models has been submitted to a rigorous statistical selection procedure which fosters the parsimonious deployment of model parameters based on pairwise likelihood ratio tests. Nested models were consequently excluded from risk assessment. The set comprises models of the excess absolute risk (EAR) and two types of non-standard ERR models with sigmoidal responses or two line spline functions with a changing slope at a break point. Due to clearly higher values of the Akaike Information Criterion, none of the EAR models has been selected, but two non-standard ERR models qualified for MMI. The preferred ERR model applies a purely quadratic dose response which is slightly damped by an exponential factor at high doses and modified by a power function for attained age. Compared to the previous analysis, the present study reports similar point estimates and confidence intervals (CI) of the ERR from MMI for doses between 0.5 and 2.5 Sv. However, at lower doses, the point estimates are markedly reduced by factors between two and five, although the reduction was not statistically significant. The 2.5 % percentiles of the ERR from the preferred quadratic-exponential model did not fall below zero risk in exposure scenarios for children, adolescents and adults at very low doses down to 10 mSv. Yet, MMI produced risk estimates with a positive 2.5 % percentile only above doses of some 300 mSv. Compared to CI from a single model of choice, CI from MMI are broadened in cohort strata with low statistical power by a combination of risk extrapolations from several

  4. Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score Is Superior to the Obstetric-Specific Sepsis in Obstetrics Score in Predicting Mortality in Septic Obstetric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Helen M.; Magee, Laura A.; von Dadelszen, Peter; Fjell, Chris; Walley, Keith R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Mortality prediction scores have been used for a long time in ICUs; however, numerous studies have shown that they over-predict mortality in the obstetric population. With sepsis remaining a major cause of obstetric mortality, we aimed to look at five mortality prediction scores (one obstetric-based and four general) in the septic obstetric population and compare them to a nonobstetric septic control group. Subject and Design: Women in the age group of 16–50 years with an admission diagnosis or suspicion of sepsis were included. In a multicenter obstetric population (n = 797), these included all pregnant and postpartum patients up to 6 weeks postpartum. An age- and gender-matched control nonobstetric population was drawn from a single-center general critical care population (n = 2,461). Sepsis in Obstetric Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scores were all applied to patients meeting inclusion criteria in both cohorts, and their area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves was calculated to find the most accurate predictor. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 146 septic patients were found for the obstetric cohort and 299 patients for the nonobstetric control cohort. The Sepsis in Obstetric Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scores gave area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves of 0.67, 0.68, 0.72, 0.79, and 0.84 in the obstetric cohort, respectively, and 0.64, 0.72, 0.61, 0.78, and 0.74 in the nonobstetric cohort, respectively. The Sepsis in Obstetric Score performed similarly to all the other scores with the exception of the Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score, which was significantly better (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The Sepsis in Obstetric Score, designed specifically for

  5. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer risk prediction models are used to plan clinical trials and counsel women; however, relationships of predicted risks of breast cancer incidence and prognosis after breast cancer diagnosis are unknown. Methods Using largely pre-diagnostic information from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) for 37,939 invasive breast cancers (1996–2007), we estimated 5-year breast cancer risk (<1%; 1–1.66%; ≥1.67%) with three models: BCSC 1-year risk model (BCSC-1; adapted to 5-year predictions); Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT); and BCSC 5-year risk model (BCSC-5). Breast cancer-specific mortality post-diagnosis (range: 1–13 years; median: 5.4–5.6 years) was related to predicted risk of developing breast cancer using unadjusted Cox proportional hazards models, and in age-stratified (35–44; 45–54; 55–69; 70–89 years) models adjusted for continuous age, BCSC registry, calendar period, income, mode of presentation, stage and treatment. Mean age at diagnosis was 60 years. Results Of 6,021 deaths, 2,993 (49.7%) were ascribed to breast cancer. In unadjusted case-only analyses, predicted breast cancer risk ≥1.67% versus <1.0% was associated with lower risk of breast cancer death; BCSC-1: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.82 (95% CI = 0.75–0.90); BCRAT: HR = 0.72 (95% CI = 0.65–0.81) and BCSC-5: HR = 0.84 (95% CI = 0.75–0.94). Age-stratified, adjusted models showed similar, although mostly non-significant HRs. Among women ages 55–69 years, HRs approximated 1.0. Generally, higher predicted risk was inversely related to percentages of cancers with unfavorable prognostic characteristics, especially among women 35–44 years. Conclusions Among cases assessed with three models, higher predicted risk of developing breast cancer was not associated with greater risk of breast cancer death; thus, these models would have limited utility in planning studies to evaluate breast cancer mortality reduction strategies. Further, when offering

  6. Predicting cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease in Spain. The rationale and design of NEFRONA: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular risk assessment in this population is hampered by the failure of traditional risk factors to fully account for the elevated CVD risk (reverse epidemiology effect) and the presence of emerging risk factors specifically related to kidney failure. Therefore, diagnostic tools capable of improving cardiovascular risk assessment beyond traditional risk factors are currently warranted. We present the protocol of a 4-year prospective study aimed to assess the predictive value of non-invasive imaging techniques and biomarkers for CVD events and mortality in patients with CKD. Methods From November 2009 to October 2010, 4137 asymptomatic adult patients with stages 2 to 5 CKD will be recruited from nephrology services and dialysis units throughout Spain. During the same period, 843 participants without CKD (control group) will be recruited from lists of primary care physicians, only at baseline. During the follow-up, CVD events and mortality will be recorded from all CKD patients. Clinical and laboratory characteristics will be collected in a medical documentation sheet. Three trained itinerant teams will carry out a carotid ultrasound to assess intima-media thickness and presence of plaques. A composite atherosclerosis score will be constructed based on carotid ultrasound data and measurement of ankle-brachial index. In CKD patients, presence and type of calcifications will be assessed in the wall of carotid, femoral and brachial arteries, and in cardiac valves, by ultrasound. From all participants, blood samples will be collected and stored in a biobank to study novel biomarkers. Conclusions The NEFRONA study is the first large, prospective study to examine the predictive value of several non-invasive imaging techniques and novel biomarkers in CKD patients throughout Spain. Hereby, we present the protocol of this study aimed

  7. Predictions of mortality from pleural mesothelioma in Italy: a model based on asbestos consumption figures supports results from age-period-cohort models.

    PubMed

    Marinaccio, Alessandro; Montanaro, Fabio; Mastrantonio, Marina; Uccelli, Raffaella; Altavista, Pierluigi; Nesti, Massimo; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2005-05-20

    Italy was the second main asbestos producer in Europe, after the Soviet Union, until the end of the 1980s, and raw asbestos was imported on a large scale until 1992. The Italian pattern of asbestos consumption lags on average about 10 years behind the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom and the Nordic countries. Measures to reduce exposure were introduced in the mid-1970s in some workplaces. In 1986, limitations were imposed on the use of crocidolite and in 1992 asbestos was definitively banned. We have used primary pleural cancer mortality figures (1970-1999) to predict mortality from mesothelioma among Italian men in the next 30 years by age-cohort-period models and by a model based on asbestos consumption figures. The pleural cancer/mesothelioma ratio and mesothelioma misdiagnosis in the past were taken into account in the analysis. Estimated risks of birth cohorts born after 1945 decrease less quickly in Italy than in other Western countries. The findings predict a peak with about 800 mesothelioma annual deaths in the period 2012-2024. Results estimated using age-period-cohort models were similar to those obtained from the asbestos consumption model.

  8. Increased PD-1 Expression and Altered T Cell Repertoire Diversity Predict Mortality in Patients with Septic Shock: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomino, Atsutoshi; Tsuda, Masanobu; Aoki, Ruri; Kajita, Yuka; Hashiba, Masamitsu; Terajima, Tsuguaki; Kano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis causes impairment of innate and adaptive immunity by multiple mechanisms, including depletion of immune effector cells and T cell exhaustion. Although lymphocyte dysfunction is associated with increased mortality and potential reactivation of latent viral infection in patients with septic shock, the relation between viral reactivation and lymphocyte dysfunction is obscure. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine the relation of lymphocyte dysfunction to viral reactivation and mortality, and 2) to evaluate recovery of lymphocyte function during septic shock, including T cell receptor (TCR) diversity and the expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1). In 18 patients with septic shock and latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, serial blood samples were obtained on days 1, 3, and 7 after the onset of shock, and immune cell subsets and receptor expression were characterized by flow cytometry. TCR diversity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed by Multi-N-plex PCR, and CMV DNA was quantified using a real-time PCR kit. A decrease of TCR diversity and monocyte HLA-DR expression were observed in the early stage of septic shock, while CD4+ T cells displayed an increase of PD-1 expression. Significant lymphopenia persisted for at least 7 days following the onset of septic shock. Normalization of TCR diversity and PD-1 expression was observed by day 7, except in patients who died. CMV reactivation was detected in 3 of the 18 patients during the first week of their ICU stay and all 3 patients died. These changes are consistent with the early stage of immune cell exhaustion and indicate the importance of normal lymphocyte function for recovery from septic shock. Ongoing lymphocyte dysfunction is associated with CMV reactivation and dissemination, as well as with unfavorable outcomes. PMID:28072859

  9. Predicting Hospitalised Paediatric Pneumonia Mortality Risk: An External Validation of RISC and mRISC, and Local Tool Development (RISC-Malawi) from Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Colbourn, Tim; Lufesi, Norman; Costello, Anthony; Nambiar, Bejoy; Thammasitboon, Satid; Makwenda, Charles; Mwansambo, Charles; McCollum, Eric D.; King, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of under-5 mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical prediction tools may aide case classification, triage, and allocation of hospital resources. We performed an external validation of two published prediction tools and compared this to a locally developed tool to identify children admitted with pneumonia at increased risk for in-hospital mortality in Malawi. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the performance of the Respiratory Index of Severity in Children (RISC) and modified RISC (mRISC) scores in a child pneumonia dataset prospectively collected during routine care at seven hospitals in Malawi between 2011–2014. RISC has both an HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected tool. A local score (RISC-Malawi) was developed using multivariable logistic regression with missing data multiply imputed using chained equations. Score performances were assessed using c-statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood statistics. Results 16,475 in-patient pneumonia episodes were recorded (case-fatality rate (CFR): 3.2%), 9,533 with complete data (CFR: 2.0%). The c-statistic for the RISC (HIV-uninfected) score, used to assess its ability to differentiate between children who survived to discharge and those that died, was 0.72. The RISC-Malawi score, using mid-upper arm circumference as an indicator of malnutrition severity, had a c-statistic of 0.79. We were unable to perform a comprehensive external validation of RISC (HIV-infected) and mRISC as both scores include parameters that were not routinely documented variables in our dataset. Conclusion In our population of Malawian children with WHO-defined pneumonia, the RISC (HIV-uninfected) score identified those at high risk for in-hospital mortality. However the refinement of parameters and resultant creation of RISC-Malawi improved performance. Next steps include prospectively studying both scores to determine if

  10. Which Is More Useful in Predicting Hospital Mortality -Dichotomised Blood Test Results or Actual Test Values? A Retrospective Study in Two Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary; Nangalia, Vishal; Prytherch, David; Holder, Roger; Briggs, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Backgrou