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Sample records for predisposed subjects effects

  1. Prevalence of Radiographic Parameters Predisposing to Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Asymptomatic Chinese and White Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Van Houcke, Jan; Yau, Wan Pan; Yan, Chun Hoi; Huysse, Wouter; Dechamps, Hannes; Lau, Wing Hang; Wong, Chun Sing; Pattyn, Christophe; Audenaert, Emmanuel Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the hip is five to ten times more common in white people than in Chinese people. Little is known about the true prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement or its role in the development of osteoarthritis in the Chinese population. A cross-sectional study of both white and Chinese asymptomatic individuals was conducted to compare the prevalences of radiographic features posing a risk for femoroacetabular impingement in the two groups. It was hypothesized that that there would be proportional differences in hip anatomy between the white and Asian populations. Methods: Pelvic computed tomography scans of 201 subjects (ninety-nine white Belgians and 102 Chinese; 105 men and ninety-six women) without hip pain who were eighteen to forty years of age were assessed. The original axial images were reformatted to three-dimensional pelvic models simulating standardized radiographic views. Ten radiographic parameters predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement were measured: alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and caput-collum-diaphyseal angle on the femoral side and crossover sign, ischial spine projection, acetabular anteversion angle, center-edge angle, acetabular angle of Sharp, Tönnis angle, and anterior acetabular head index on the acetabular side. Results: The white subjects had a less spherical femoral head than the Chinese subjects (average alpha angle, 56° compared with 50°; p < 0.001). The Chinese subjects had less lateral acetabular coverage than the white subjects, with average center-edge angles of 35° and 39° (p < 0.001) and acetabular angles of Sharp of 38° and 36° (p < 0.001), respectively. A shallower acetabular configuration was predominantly present in Chinese women. Conclusions: Significant differences in hip anatomy were demonstrated between young asymptomatic Chinese and white subjects. However, the absolute size of the observed differences appears to contrast with the reported low prevalence of femoroacetabular

  2. Celiac Disease in a Predisposed Subject (HLA-DQ2.5) with Coexisting Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Kyoung; Kim, Seon Hye; Lee, Unjoo; Chin, Sang Ouk; Rhee, Sang Youl; Oh, Seungjoon; Woo, Jeong Taek; Kim, Sung Woon; Kim, Young Seol; Chon, Suk

    2015-03-27

    Celiac disease is an intestinal autoimmune disorder, triggered by ingestion of a gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic predisposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2-positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease has been estimated to be ~1% in Europe and the USA, but it is rarer and/or underdiagnosed in Asia. We report a case of celiac disease in a predisposed patient, with a HLA-DQ2 heterodimer, and Graves' disease that was treated successfully with a gluten-free diet. A 47-year-old woman complained of persistent chronic diarrhea and weight loss over a 9 month period. Results of all serological tests and stool exams were negative. However, the patient was found to carry the HLA DQ2 heterodimer. Symptoms improved after a gluten-free diet was initiated. The patient has been followed and has suffered no recurrence of symptoms while on the gluten-free diet. An overall diagnosis of celiac disease was made in a genetically predisposed patient (HLA-DQ2 heterodimer) with Graves' disease.

  3. Synergistic effect of multiple predisposing risk factors on the development of bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Kement, Metin; Ozlem, Nuraydin; Colak, Elif; Kesmer, Sadik; Gezen, Cem; Vural, Selahattin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinical characteristics of patients with gastric or intestinal bezoars recently treated in our hospital. METHODS: In this study, a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients with gastrointestinal bezoars, who were treated at the Samsun Education and Research Hospital between January 2006 and March 2011, was conducted. Data on demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, history of risk factors, diagnostic procedures, localization of bezoars, treatment interventions, and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were collected and evaluated. RESULTS: Forty-two patients [26 (61.9%) males and 16 (31.1%) females] with a mean ± SD (range) age of 55.8 ± 10.5 (37-74) years were enrolled in this study. Thirty-six patients (85.7%) had one or more predisposing risk factors for gastrointestinal bezoars. The most common predisposing risk factor was a history of previous gastric surgery which was identified in 18 patients (42.8%). Twenty three patients (54.8%) had multiple predisposing risk factors. Phytobezoars were identified in all patients except one who had a trichobezoar in the stomach. Non-operative endoscopic fragmentation was performed either initially or after unsuccessful medical treatment in 14 patients with gastric bezoars and was completely successful in 10 patients (71.5%). Surgery was the most frequent treatment method in our study, which was required in 28 patients (66.7%). Intestinal obstruction secondary to bezoars was the most common complication (n = 18, 42.8%) in our study. CONCLUSION: The presence of multiple predisposing factors may create a synergistic effect in the development of bezoars. PMID:22408356

  4. Predisposing effects of cigarette advertising on children's intentions to smoke when older.

    PubMed

    Aitken, P P; Eadie, D R; Hastings, G B; Haywood, A J

    1991-04-01

    Six hundred and forty Glasgow children, initially aged between 11 and 14 years, were interviewed twice, with approximately one year between interviews. Children whose intentions to smoke when older became more positive between the two interviews tended to be more aware of cigarette advertising at the time of the first interview (compared with children whose intentions to smoke were negative at both interviews). Children whose intentions to smoke became more negative between the interviews tended to be less appreciative of cigarette advertisements at the time of the first interview (compared with children whose intentions to smoke were positive at both interviews). Since both groups differed from their respective contrast groups before their declared intentions changed, these findings support the view that cigarette advertising has predisposing as well as reinforcing effects on children's attitudes and behaviour with respect to smoking.

  5. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Disease Predisposes to More Severe Infection with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Protective Effects of Andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Tan, W S Daniel; Peh, Hong Yong; Liao, Wupeng; Pang, Chu Hui; Chan, Tze Khee; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Wong, W S Fred

    2016-05-27

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with many maladies, one of which is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the disease progresses, patients are more prone to develop COPD exacerbation episodes by bacterial infection, particularly to nontypeable Haemophilus influenza (NTHi) infection. The present study aimed to develop a CS-exposed mouse model that increases inflammation induced by NTHi challenge and investigate the protective effects of andrographolide, a bioactive molecule with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties isolated from the plant Andrographis paniculata. Female BALB/c mice exposed to 2 weeks of CS followed by a single intratracheal instillation of NTHi developed increased macrophage and neutrophil pulmonary infiltration, augmented cytokine levels, and heightened oxidative damage. Andrographolide effectively reduced lung cellular infiltrates and decreased lung levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, 8-OHdG, matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), and MMP-9. The protective actions of andrographolide on CS-predisposed NTHi inflammation might be attributable to increased nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation and decreased Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) repressor function, resulting in enhanced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Taken together, these findings strongly support a therapeutic potential for andrographolide in preventing lung inflammation caused by NTHi in cigarette smokers.

  6. The effects of joint legal custody on mothers, fathers, and children controlling for factors that predispose a sole maternal versus joint legal award.

    PubMed

    Gunnoe, M L; Braver, S L

    2001-02-01

    Findings from comparisons of joint and sole custody families that do not control for predivorce differences in demographic and family process variables (factors that may predispose families to choose or be awarded joint custody) are of limited generalizability, since obtained group differences may be attributable to predisposing (self-selection) factors, custody, or both. This study compared a random sample of 254 recently separated, not-yet-divorced families on 71 predivorce variables that might plausibly differentiate between families awarded joint legal versus sole maternal custody. Twenty such factors were identified and controlled for in subsequent comparisons of 52 sole maternal and 26 joint legal custody families 2 years postdivorce. Families with joint custody had more frequent father-child visitation, lower maternal satisfaction with custody arrangements, more rapid maternal repartnering, and fewer child adjustment problems (net of predivorce selection factors). Moreover, these effects did not appear to be moderated by level of predecree parental conflict. No association between custody and fathers' compliance with child support orders was obtained.

  7. Depressive behavior induced by social isolation of predisposed female rats.

    PubMed

    Zanier-Gomes, Patrícia Helena; de Abreu Silva, Tomaz Eugênio; Zanetti, Guilherme Cia; Benati, Évelyn Raquel; Pinheiro, Nanci Mendes; Murta, Beatriz Martins Tavares; Crema, Virgínia Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Depression is a mood disorder that is more prevalent in women and has been closely associated with chronic stress. Many models of depression have been suggested that consider different forms of stress. In fact, stress is present in the life of every human being, but only a few develop depression. Accordingly, it seems wrong to consider all stressed animals to be depressed, emphasizing the importance of predisposition for this mood disorder. Based on this finding, we evaluated a predisposition to depressive behavior of female rats on the forced swim test (FST), and the more immobile the animal was during the FST, the more predisposed to depression it was considered to be. Then, animals were subjected to the stress of social isolation for 21 days and were re-evaluated by the FST. The Predisposed/Isolated rats presented higher immobility times. Once all the rats had prior experience in the FST, we calculated an Index of Increase by Isolation, confirming the previous results. Based on this result, we considered the Predisposed/Isolated group as presenting depressive behavior ('Depressed') and the Nonpredisposed/Nonisolated group as the control group ('Nondepressed'). The animals were distributed into 4 new groups: Nondepressed/Vehicle, Nondepressed/Amitriptyline, Depressed/Vehicle, Depressed/Amitriptyline. After 21 days of treatment, only the Depressed/Vehicle group differed from the other 3 groups, demonstrating the efficacy of amitriptyline in treating the depressive behavior of the Depressed animals, validating the model. This study shows that conducting an FST prior to any manipulation can predict predisposition to depressive behavior in female rats and that the social isolation of predisposed animals for 21 days is effective in inducing depressive behavior. This behavior can be considered real depressive behavior because it takes into account predisposition, chronic mild stress, and the prevalent gender.

  8. Why to Treat Subjects as Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Estes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R2 targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an…

  9. Why to treat subjects as fixed effects.

    PubMed

    Adelman, James S; Estes, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R² targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an interaction involving subjects, they broke down the interaction into individual subject data. Courrieu and Rey's (2015) commentary argues that (a) single-subject data need not be more reliable than subject-average data, and (b) anyway, treating groups of subjects as random samples leads to valid conclusions about general mechanisms of reading. Point (a) was not part of Adelman et al.'s claim. In this reply, we examine the consequences of using the fixed-effect assumption. It (a) produces the correct target to check if by-items regression models contain all necessary variables, (b) more accurately constrains cognitive models, (c) more accurately reveals general mechanisms, and (d) can offer more powerful tests of effects. Even when individual differences are not the primary focus of a study, the fixed-effect analysis is often preferable to the random-effects analysis. PMID:26348203

  10. Recruiting phobic research subjects: effectiveness and cost.

    PubMed Central

    Kaakko, T.; Murtomaa, H.; Milgrom, P.; Getz, T.; Ramsay, D. S.; Coldwell, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Efficiently enrolling subjects is one of the most important and difficult aspects of a clinical trial. This prospective study evaluated strategies used in the recruitment of 144 dental injection phobics for a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of combining alprazolam with exposure therapy. Three types of recruitment strategies were evaluated: paid advertising, free publicity, and professional referral. Sixty-three percent of subjects were enrolled using paid advertising (the majority of them from bus advertisements [27.0%], posters on the University of Washington campus [20.1%], and newspaper advertisements [13.2%]). Free publicity (eg, television coverage, word of mouth) yielded 18.8% of enrolled subjects and professionaL referrals 14.6% of subjects. The average cost (1996 dollars) of enrolling 1 subject was $79. Bus and poster advertising attracted more initial contacts and yielded the greatest enrollment. PMID:11495403

  11. Recruiting phobic research subjects: effectiveness and cost.

    PubMed

    Kaakko, T; Murtomaa, H; Milgrom, P; Getz, T; Ramsay, D S; Coldwell, S E

    2001-01-01

    Efficiently enrolling subjects is one of the most important and difficult aspects of a clinical trial. This prospective study evaluated strategies used in the recruitment of 144 dental injection phobics for a clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of combining alprazolam with exposure therapy. Three types of recruitment strategies were evaluated: paid advertising, free publicity, and professional referral. Sixty-three percent of subjects were enrolled using paid advertising (the majority of them from bus advertisements [27.0%], posters on the University of Washington campus [20.1%], and newspaper advertisements [13.2%]). Free publicity (eg, television coverage, word of mouth) yielded 18.8% of enrolled subjects and professionaL referrals 14.6% of subjects. The average cost (1996 dollars) of enrolling 1 subject was $79. Bus and poster advertising attracted more initial contacts and yielded the greatest enrollment.

  12. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects.

  13. Subjective effects of transdermal nicotine among nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Ashare, Rebecca L; Baschnagel, Joseph S; Hawk, Larry W

    2010-04-01

    The subjective experience of nicotine, which may be influenced by personality traits as well as environmental factors, may be important for understanding the factors associated with the initiation and maintenance of nicotine dependence. The present study examined the effects of 7 mg transdermal nicotine among a relatively large sample (n = 91; 44 women) of college-aged nonsmokers. Using a placebo controlled, double-blind, within-subjects design, nicotine's effects were examined at rest and again after participants completed a sustained attention task. Sex and personality factors (Behavioral Inhibition and Behavioral Approach; BIS/BAS Scales; Carver & White, 1994) were examined as potential moderators. Overall, the effects of nicotine were generally modest and unpleasant. In the context of the cognitive task, nicotine increased nausea and negative affect but reduced fatigue, relative to placebo. In contrast, effects of nicotine during the initial 4 hr of patch administration, in which participants were in their natural environments, were moderated by individual differences in behavioral approach. Neither behavioral inhibition nor gender reliably moderated any subjective effects of nicotine. The present work suggests transdermal nicotine exerts only modest, mostly negative effects among nonsmokers. Future work should examine both contextual and personality moderators in large samples of participants who are exposed to nicotine through multiple routes of administration. PMID:20384428

  14. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF.

  15. The effect of varying task difficulty on subjective workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y.-Y.; Wickens, C. D.; Hart, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of different difficulty distribution patterns on subjective workload, and the presence of a primacy/recency effect in subjective ratings are examined. Eight subjects performed the perceptual central processing required for response selection and manual target acquisition for response execution. The reaction time, movement time, and the percent of correct pattern matching and arithmetic equations are analyzed. The data reveal that subjective rating is unaffected by different task difficulty and no primacy/recency effects are observed in subjective ratings. It is concluded that subjective workload reflects the experience of an ongoing integration process.

  16. Necrotic enteritis predisposing factors in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors. Predisposing factors include elements that directly change the physical properties of the gut, either damaging the epithelial surface, inducing mucus production, or changing gut transit times; factors that disrupt the gut microbiota; and factors that alter the immune status of birds. In the past research into necrotic enteritis predisposing factors was directed by the simple hypothesis that low-level colonization of C. perfringens commonly occurred within the gut of healthy chickens and the predisposing factors lead to a proliferation of those bacteria to produce disease. More recently, with an increasing understanding of the major virulence factors of C. perfringens and the application of molecular techniques to define different clades of C. perfringens strains, it has become clear that the C. perfringens isolates commonly found in healthy chickens are generally not strains that have the potential to cause disease. Therefore, we need to re-evaluate hypotheses regarding the development of disease, the origin of disease causing isolates of C. perfringens, and the importance of interactions with other C. perfringens strains and with predisposing factors. Many predisposing factors that affect the physical and immunological characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract may also change the resident microbiota. Research directed towards defining the relative importance of each of these different actions of predisposing factors will improve the understanding of disease pathogenesis and may allow refinement of experiment disease models. PMID:26926926

  17. Necrotic enteritis predisposing factors in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis in chickens develops as a result of infection with pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens and the presence of predisposing factors. Predisposing factors include elements that directly change the physical properties of the gut, either damaging the epithelial surface, inducing mucus production, or changing gut transit times; factors that disrupt the gut microbiota; and factors that alter the immune status of birds. In the past research into necrotic enteritis predisposing factors was directed by the simple hypothesis that low-level colonization of C. perfringens commonly occurred within the gut of healthy chickens and the predisposing factors lead to a proliferation of those bacteria to produce disease. More recently, with an increasing understanding of the major virulence factors of C. perfringens and the application of molecular techniques to define different clades of C. perfringens strains, it has become clear that the C. perfringens isolates commonly found in healthy chickens are generally not strains that have the potential to cause disease. Therefore, we need to re-evaluate hypotheses regarding the development of disease, the origin of disease causing isolates of C. perfringens, and the importance of interactions with other C. perfringens strains and with predisposing factors. Many predisposing factors that affect the physical and immunological characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract may also change the resident microbiota. Research directed towards defining the relative importance of each of these different actions of predisposing factors will improve the understanding of disease pathogenesis and may allow refinement of experiment disease models.

  18. Learning Styles, Subject Matter, and Effectiveness in Undergraduate Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Darren C.

    2014-01-01

    Are potential relationships among students' learning styles and effectiveness in online education moderated by subject matter for undergraduate students at a private higher education institution? This causal relationship correlational study evaluated the effects of subject matter as a moderating variable between students learning styles and…

  19. Reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine in normal human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stern, K N; Chait, L D; Johanson, C E

    1989-01-01

    The reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine (100 and 300 mg, PO) were determined in a group of 18 normal, healthy adults. Subjects (eight females, ten males) were light to moderate users of caffeine, and had no history of drug abuse. A discrete-trial choice procedure was used in which subjects were allowed to choose between the self-administration of color-coded capsules containing either placebo or caffeine. The number of times caffeine was chosen over placebo was used as the primary index of reinforcing efficacy. Subjective effects were measured before and several times after capsule ingestion. The low dose of caffeine was chosen on 42.6% of occasions, not significantly different from chance (50%). The high dose of caffeine was chosen on 38.9% of occasions, significantly less than expected by chance, indicating that this dose served as a punisher. Both doses of caffeine produced stimulant-like subjective effects, with aversive effects such as increased anxiety predominating after the high dose. When subjects were divided into groups of caffeine-sensitive choosers and nonchoosers, a consistent relationship emerged between caffeine choice and subjective effects; nonchoosers reported primarily aversive effects after caffeine (increased anxiety and dysphoria), whereas choosers reported stimulant and "positive" mood effects. When compared with previous findings, these results demonstrate that caffeine is less reinforcing than amphetamine and related psychomotor stimulants. PMID:2498963

  20. Effects of subject-area degree and classroom experience on new chemistry teachers' subject matter knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Campbell, Benjamin K.; Luft, Julie A.

    2016-07-01

    Science teachers need to understand the subject matter they teach. While subject matter knowledge (SMK) can improve with classroom teaching experience, it is problematic that many secondary science teachers leave the profession before garnering extensive classroom experience. Furthermore, many new science teachers are assigned to teach science subjects for which they do not hold a degree. This study investigates the SMK of new secondary science teachers assigned to teach chemistry in their first three years of teaching. These new teachers do not have the advantage of years of experience to develop their SMK and half hold a degree in biology rather than chemistry. This qualitative study explores the effects of holding a degree in the subject area one teaches as well as classroom teaching experience on teachers' SMK for two chemistry topics, conservation of mass and chemical equilibrium. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews indicated that the SMK of teachers who had a chemistry degree and more extensive classroom experience was more coherent, chemistry-focused, and sophisticated than that of teachers who lacked this preparation and experience. This study provides evidence that new science teachers' SMK is influenced by both holding a degree in the subject area and having classroom experience.

  1. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Jenny E.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Evidence Acquisition: Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. Evidence Synthesis: SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Conclusions: Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients. PMID:26086329

  2. Effect of Daytime Exercise on Sleep Eeg and Subjective Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Y.; Kawada, T.; Kiryu, Y.

    1997-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of daytime physical exercise on the quality of objective and subjective sleep by examining all-night sleep EEGs. The subjects were five male students, aged 19 to 20 years, who were in the habit of performing regular daytime exercise. The sleep polygraphic parameters in this study were sleep stage time as a percentage of total sleep time (%S1, %S2, %S(3+4), %SREM, %MT), time in bed (TIB), sleep time (ST), total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), waking from sleep, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, number of stage shifts, number of spindles, and percentages of α and δ waves, all of which were determined by an automatic computer analysis system. The OSA questionnaire was used to investigate subjective sleep. The five scales of the OSA used were sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling, and sleep initiation. Each sleep parameter was compared in the exercise and the non-exercise groups. Two-way analysis of variance was applied using subject factor and exercise factor. The main effect of the subject was significant in all parameters and the main effect of exercise in %S(3+4), SOL and sleep efficiency, among the objective sleep parameters. The main effects of the subject, except sleepiness, were significant, as was the main effect of exercise on sleep initiation, among the subjective sleep parameters. These findings suggest that daytime exercise shortened sleep latency and prolonged slow-wave sleep, and that the subjects fell asleep more easily on exercise days. There were also significant individual differences in both the objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  3. Physiologic and subjective effects of respirator mask type.

    PubMed

    Harber, P; Beck, J; Brown, C; Luo, J

    1991-09-01

    The effect of alternate airflow path designs on full-face mask air-purifying respirators was assessed in 14 healthy volunteers during submaximal exercise. Respirator designs included no respirator (N), full-face mask, dual-cartridge with no nasal deflector (FN), full-face mask respirator with nasal deflector (FD), and a powered air-purifying respirator (PA). Physiologic effects were measured by using respiratory inductive plethysmography and subjective responses by two visual analog scales. There were significant effects of airflow path design upon the physiologic parameters of ventilation, tidal volume, and mean flow rate. There were no significant physiologic or subjective differences between the full-face mask respirators with and without the nasal deflector in place. The PA had less physiologic impact than the nonpowered models but did not show significant subjective benefit. The study suggests that both subjective and objective physiologic responses must be utilized in assessing respirator design. PMID:1781441

  4. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Tsybko, A S; Tikhonova, M A; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2012-07-12

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depressive-like behavior and serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain of antidepressant sensitive cataleptics (ASC)/Icg mouse strain, characterized by depressive-like behavior, in comparison with the parental nondepressive CBA/Lac mouse strain was examined. Significant decrease of catalepsy and tail suspension test (TST) immobility was shown 17days after acute central BDNF administration (300ng i.c.v.) in ASC mice. In CBA mouse strain, BDNF moderately decreased catalepsy without any effect on TST immobility time. Significant difference between ASC and CBA mice in the effect of BDNF on 5-HT system was revealed. It was shown that central administration of BDNF led to increase of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression but not 5-HT(1A) functional activity in ASC mice. Increased tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes expression accompanied by 5-HT(2A) receptor sensitization was shown in BDNF-treated ASC but not in CBA mouse strain, suggesting BDNF-induced increase of the brain 5-HT system functional activity and activation of neurogenesis in "depressive" ASC mice. There were no changes found in the 5-HT transporter mRNA level in BDNF-treated ASC and CBA mice. In conclusion, central administration of BDNF produced prolonged ameliorative effect on depressive-like behavior accompanied by increase of the Tph-2, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) genes expression and 5-HT(2A) receptor functional activity in animal model of hereditary behavior disorders.

  5. Predisposing factors and prevention of frostbite.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, H

    2000-04-01

    This review focuses on the physiological, behavioural and environmental factors which predispose to frostbite. Also prevention of frostbite is summarised. Predisposing factors may increase heat loss, decrease heat production, decrease the insulation of the clothing, make people especially susceptible to cold or make them to behave inadequately. Marked increase in convective or conductive heat loss is often the immediate reason for frostbite. Wind (as described by wind chill index) increases convective heat loss and touching of metal objects increases conductive cooling. Poor insulation of the clothing is also a common reason of frostbite. The insulation can be insufficient when clothing is wet, tight, permeable to wind or does not cover the cold sensitive body parts. Individual factors predisposing to frostbite are inadequate behaviour, low physical fitness, fatigue, dehydration, earlier cold injuries, sickness or poor circulation in peripheral parts of the body. Frostbite is often associated with the use of alcohol. To prevent frostbite, it is necessary to recognise cold risks, practise tasks in the cold, eat and drink well, have physical exercise, have sufficient clothing (also spare clothing), change into dry clothing if necessary and take care of companions. In the cold it is not advisable to get fatigued until exhaustion, sweat excessively, use tight and/or wet clothing, drink alcohol, smoke and expose oneself unnecessarily to wind, metals or fluids. PMID:10998828

  6. Predisposing factors and prevention of frostbite.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, H

    2000-04-01

    This review focuses on the physiological, behavioural and environmental factors which predispose to frostbite. Also prevention of frostbite is summarised. Predisposing factors may increase heat loss, decrease heat production, decrease the insulation of the clothing, make people especially susceptible to cold or make them to behave inadequately. Marked increase in convective or conductive heat loss is often the immediate reason for frostbite. Wind (as described by wind chill index) increases convective heat loss and touching of metal objects increases conductive cooling. Poor insulation of the clothing is also a common reason of frostbite. The insulation can be insufficient when clothing is wet, tight, permeable to wind or does not cover the cold sensitive body parts. Individual factors predisposing to frostbite are inadequate behaviour, low physical fitness, fatigue, dehydration, earlier cold injuries, sickness or poor circulation in peripheral parts of the body. Frostbite is often associated with the use of alcohol. To prevent frostbite, it is necessary to recognise cold risks, practise tasks in the cold, eat and drink well, have physical exercise, have sufficient clothing (also spare clothing), change into dry clothing if necessary and take care of companions. In the cold it is not advisable to get fatigued until exhaustion, sweat excessively, use tight and/or wet clothing, drink alcohol, smoke and expose oneself unnecessarily to wind, metals or fluids.

  7. Effect of hydration on nitrogen washout in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.; Conkin, J.

    1983-01-01

    Five subjects were tested to assess the influence of drinking hypotonic water (distilled water) on whole body tissue nitrogen washout. During the test, the subjects breathed aviators' oxygen for three hours. Each subject performed two baseline nitrogen washouts in a two-week period. The third washout, in the third week, was done under a transient hydrated condition. This was accomplished by having the subjects drink 1.5 liters of hypotonic water 30 minutes before the washout. Five-minute plots of tissue nitrogen removal from the three separate washouts were analyzed to ascertain if the hydration technique had any effect. Our results clearly indicate that the hydration technique did not alter the tissue nitrogen washout characteristics to any degree over three hours. An increase in tissue nitrogen washout under a transient hydrated condition using hypotonic fluid was not demonstrated to be the mechanism responsible for the reported benefit of this technique in preventing Type I altitude decompression pain in man.

  8. Effects of Prism Eyeglasses on Objective and Subjective Fixation Disparity.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Volkhard; Joos, Roland; Jaschinski, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In optometry of binocular vision, the question may arise whether prisms should be included in eyeglasses to compensate an oculomotor and/or sensory imbalance between the two eyes. The corresponding measures of objective and subjective fixation disparity may be reduced by the prisms, or the adaptability of the binocular vergence system may diminish effects of the prisms over time. This study investigates effects of wearing prisms constantly for about 5 weeks in daily life. Two groups of 12 participants received eyeglasses with prisms having either a base-in direction or a base-out direction with an amount up to 8 prism diopters. Prisms were prescribed based on clinical fixation disparity test plates at 6 m. Two dependent variables were used: (1) subjective fixation disparity was indicated by a perceived offset of dichoptic nonius lines that were superimposed on the fusion stimuli and (2) objective fixation disparity was measured with a video based eye tracker relative to monocular calibration. Stimuli were presented at 6 m and included either central or more peripheral fusion stimuli. Repeated measurements were made without the prisms and with the prisms after about 5 weeks of wearing these prisms. Objective and subjective fixation disparity were correlated, but the type of fusion stimulus and the direction of the required prism may play a role. The prisms did not reduce the fixation disparity to zero, but induced significant changes in fixation disparity with large effect sizes. Participants receiving base-out prisms showed hypothesized effects, which were concurrent in both types of fixation disparity. In participants receiving base-in prisms, the individual effects of subjective and objective effects were negatively correlated: the larger the subjective (sensory) effect, the smaller the objective (motor) effect. This response pattern was related to the vergence adaptability, i.e. the individual fusional vergence reserves.

  9. Effects of Prism Eyeglasses on Objective and Subjective Fixation Disparity.

    PubMed

    Schroth, Volkhard; Joos, Roland; Jaschinski, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In optometry of binocular vision, the question may arise whether prisms should be included in eyeglasses to compensate an oculomotor and/or sensory imbalance between the two eyes. The corresponding measures of objective and subjective fixation disparity may be reduced by the prisms, or the adaptability of the binocular vergence system may diminish effects of the prisms over time. This study investigates effects of wearing prisms constantly for about 5 weeks in daily life. Two groups of 12 participants received eyeglasses with prisms having either a base-in direction or a base-out direction with an amount up to 8 prism diopters. Prisms were prescribed based on clinical fixation disparity test plates at 6 m. Two dependent variables were used: (1) subjective fixation disparity was indicated by a perceived offset of dichoptic nonius lines that were superimposed on the fusion stimuli and (2) objective fixation disparity was measured with a video based eye tracker relative to monocular calibration. Stimuli were presented at 6 m and included either central or more peripheral fusion stimuli. Repeated measurements were made without the prisms and with the prisms after about 5 weeks of wearing these prisms. Objective and subjective fixation disparity were correlated, but the type of fusion stimulus and the direction of the required prism may play a role. The prisms did not reduce the fixation disparity to zero, but induced significant changes in fixation disparity with large effect sizes. Participants receiving base-out prisms showed hypothesized effects, which were concurrent in both types of fixation disparity. In participants receiving base-in prisms, the individual effects of subjective and objective effects were negatively correlated: the larger the subjective (sensory) effect, the smaller the objective (motor) effect. This response pattern was related to the vergence adaptability, i.e. the individual fusional vergence reserves. PMID:26431525

  10. Subjective and objective effects of coffee consumption - caffeine or expectations?

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Zs; Szemerszky, R; Köteles, F

    2015-03-01

    Impact of 5 mg/kg caffeine, chance of receiving caffeine (stimulus expectancies), and expectations of effects of caffeine (response expectancies) on objective (heart rate (HR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), measures of heart rate variability (HRV), and reaction time (RT)) and subjective variables were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment with a no-treatment group. Participants were 107 undergraduate university students (mean age 22.3 ± 3.96 years). Consumption of 5 mg/kg caffeine had an impact on participants' SBP, standard deviation of normal heartbeat intervals, HR (decrease), and subjective experience 40 minutes later even after controlling for respective baseline values, stimulus and response expectancies, and habitual caffeine consumption. No effects on DBP, high frequency component of HRV, the ratio of low- and high-frequency, and RT were found. Beyond actual caffeine intake, response expectancy score was also a determinant of subjective experience which refers to a placebo component in the total effect. Actual autonomic (SBP, HR) changes and somatosensory amplification tendency, however, had no significant impact on subjective experience. Placebo reaction plays a role in the subjective changes caused by caffeine consumption but it has no impact on objective variables. Conditional vs deceptive administration of caffeine (i.e. stimulus expectancies) had no impact on any assessed variable. PMID:25481367

  11. Subjective and objective effects of coffee consumption - caffeine or expectations?

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Zs; Szemerszky, R; Köteles, F

    2015-03-01

    Impact of 5 mg/kg caffeine, chance of receiving caffeine (stimulus expectancies), and expectations of effects of caffeine (response expectancies) on objective (heart rate (HR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), measures of heart rate variability (HRV), and reaction time (RT)) and subjective variables were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment with a no-treatment group. Participants were 107 undergraduate university students (mean age 22.3 ± 3.96 years). Consumption of 5 mg/kg caffeine had an impact on participants' SBP, standard deviation of normal heartbeat intervals, HR (decrease), and subjective experience 40 minutes later even after controlling for respective baseline values, stimulus and response expectancies, and habitual caffeine consumption. No effects on DBP, high frequency component of HRV, the ratio of low- and high-frequency, and RT were found. Beyond actual caffeine intake, response expectancy score was also a determinant of subjective experience which refers to a placebo component in the total effect. Actual autonomic (SBP, HR) changes and somatosensory amplification tendency, however, had no significant impact on subjective experience. Placebo reaction plays a role in the subjective changes caused by caffeine consumption but it has no impact on objective variables. Conditional vs deceptive administration of caffeine (i.e. stimulus expectancies) had no impact on any assessed variable.

  12. Effects of methadone on human cigarette smoking and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Chait, L D; Griffiths, R R

    1984-06-01

    In order to study possible interactions between opioids and cigarette smoking, we examined the effects of oral methadone administration on the smoking behavior of five male methadone-maintenance patients. Isolated subjects smoked their regular brand of cigarettes ad libitum in a naturalistic laboratory environment while reading or watching television. Ninety minutes before each daily 2-hr smoking session subjects received either placebo, dextromethorphan (a taste blind) or one of three doses of methadone, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 times their regular maintenance dose (40-60 mg). Each subject received each treatment five times, in a mixed order across days. Methadone pretreatment resulted in a dose-related increase in the number of cigarettes smoked per session (from a mean of 2.8 after placebo to 5.6 after the high dose of methadone). The total time spent puffing during the session increased from a mean of 27 sec after placebo to 74 sec after the high dose of methadone. CO levels in expired air (a measure of actual smoke inhalation) showed corresponding dose-related increases. Methadone administration also resulted in dose-related decreases in pupil diameter and increases in subjective ratings of smoking satisfaction and dose-strength. Dextromethorphan had no significant effects on any measure of smoking behavior or subjective response. The results demonstrate that methadone can produce substantial increases in cigarette smoking and may have implications regarding the proposed role of endogenous opioids in the smoking process.

  13. Confidentiality and Professional Affiliation Effects on Subject Ratings of Interviewers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, David W.; And Others

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of different statements regarding confidentiality (absolute; limited; nondirective) on subject impressions of interviewers. In addition, the professional affiliation of the interviewer was manipulated (psychologist, minister/pastoral counselor, social worker) to assess potential influence of…

  14. Influence of "Halo" and "Demon" Effects in Subjective Grading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Gerald D.

    1983-01-01

    The phenomenon of "halo" effects in subjective grading was investigated. Two groups of three raters evaluated 20 term papers in introductory psychology. Term paper grades correlated significantly with course grades when information about previous academic performance was made available. When this information was not available, the correlation was…

  15. Effect Size Measure and Analysis of Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaminathan, Hariharan; Horner, Robert H.; Rogers, H. Jane; Sugai, George

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at addressing the criticisms that have been leveled at the currently available statistical procedures for analyzing single subject designs (SSD). One of the vexing problems in the analysis of SSD is in the assessment of the effect of intervention. Serial dependence notwithstanding, the linear model approach that has been…

  16. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single­-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-­specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method: Data…

  17. Electronic cigarettes: abuse liability, topography and subjective effects

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sarah E; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the abuse liability, topography, subjective effects, craving and withdrawal suppression associated with e-cigarette use in order to identify information gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Methods Literature searches were conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 using five electronic databases. Studies were included in this review if they were peer-reviewed scientific journal articles evaluating clinical laboratory studies, national surveys or content analyses. Results A total of 15 peer-reviewed articles regarding behavioural use and effects of e-cigarettes published between 2010 and 2014 were included in this review. Abuse liability studies are limited in their generalisability. Topography (consumption behaviour) studies found that, compared with traditional cigarettes, e-cigarette average puff duration was significantly longer, and e-cigarette use required stronger suction. Data on e-cigarette subjective effects (such as anxiety, restlessness, concentration, alertness and satisfaction) and withdrawal suppression are limited and inconsistent. In general, study data should be interpreted with caution, given limitations associated with comparisons of novel and usual products, as well as the possible effects associated with subjects’ previous experience/inexperience with e-cigarettes. Conclusions Currently, very limited information is available on abuse liability, topography and subjective effects of e-cigarettes. Opportunities to examine extended e-cigarette use in a variety of settings with experienced e-cigarette users would help to more fully assess topography as well as behavioural and subjective outcomes. In addition, assessment of ‘real-world’ use, including amount and timing of use and responses to use, would clarify behavioural profiles and potential adverse health effects. PMID:24732159

  18. What aspects of autism predispose to talent?

    PubMed Central

    Happé, Francesca; Vital, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the question, why are striking special skills so much more common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC) than in other groups? Current cognitive accounts of ASC are briefly reviewed in relation to special skills. Difficulties in ‘theory of mind’ may contribute to originality in ASC, since individuals who do not automatically ‘read other minds’ may be better able to think outside prevailing fashions and popular theories. However, originality alone does not confer talent. Executive dysfunction has been suggested as the ‘releasing’ mechanism for special skills in ASC, but other groups with executive difficulties do not show raised incidence of talents. Detail-focused processing bias (‘weak coherence’, ‘enhanced perceptual functioning’) appears to be the most promising predisposing characteristic, or ‘starting engine’, for talent development. In support of this notion, we summarize data from a population-based twin study in which parents reported on their 8-year-olds' talents and their ASC-like traits. Across the whole sample, ASC-like traits, and specifically ‘restricted and repetitive behaviours and interests’ related to detail focus, were more pronounced in children reported to have talents outstripping older children. We suggest that detail-focused cognitive style predisposes to talent in savant domains in, and beyond, autism spectrum disorders. PMID:19528019

  19. Effect Size for Single-Subject Design in Phonological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, Michele L.; Dickinson, Stephanie L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document, validate, and corroborate effect size (ES) for single-subject design in treatment of children with functional phonological disorders; to evaluate potential child-specific contributing variables relative to ES; and to establish benchmarks for interpretation of ES for the population. Method Data were extracted from the Developmental Phonologies Archive for 135 preschool children with phonological disorders who previously participated in single-subject experimental treatment studies. Standard mean differenceall with correction for continuity was computed to gauge the magnitude of generalization gain that accrued longitudinally from treatment for each child with the data aggregated for purposes of statistical analyses. Results ES ranged from 0.09 to 27.83 for the study population. ES was positively correlated with conventional measures of phonological learning and visual inspection of learning data on the basis of procedures standard to single-subject design. ES was linked to children's performance on diagnostic assessments of phonology but not other demographic characteristics or related linguistic skills and nonlinguistic skills. Benchmarks for interpretation of ES were estimated as 1.4, 3.6, and 10.1 for small, medium, and large learning effects, respectively. Conclusion Findings have utility for single-subject research and translation of research to evidence-based practice for children with phonological disorders. PMID:26184118

  20. Decreasing Nicotine Content Reduces Subjective and Physiological Effects of Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Penetar, David M.; Lindsey, Kimberly P.; Peters, Erica N.; Juliano, Trisha M.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Assessment of the subjective and physiological effects of smoking cigarettes with different machine-smoked nicotine yields. Methods Eight volunteers rated the characteristics of cigarettes with varying levels of nicotine (Quest®). At 30 minute intervals, participants smoked one of three different Quest® brand cigarettes in a counterbalanced order (reported machine-smoked nicotine yield: 0.6 mg, 0.3 mg, or 0.05 mg). Smoking satisfaction and sensations were measured on a cigarette evaluation questionnaire. A mood questionnaire measured self-reported subjective changes in ‘happy’, ‘stimulated’, ‘anxious’, ‘desire to smoke’, and ‘desire not to smoke’. Heart rate and skin temperature were recorded continuously. Results As nicotine yield decreased, cigarettes produced smaller changes in subjective ratings on the evaluation questionnaire with the placebo nicotine cigarette always rated lower or less potent than the other two cigarettes evaluated. Heart rate was significantly increased by the reduced nicotine cigarettes, but was not affected by the nicotine-free cigarette. Conclusion These results indicate that machine-smoked yield is an important determinant of both the subjective and physiological effects of smoking. The use of reduced and nicotine free cigarettes in smoking cessation programs remains to be evaluated. PMID:25253991

  1. Effects of inulin on faecal bifidobacteria in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Kruse, H P; Kleessen, B; Blaut, M

    1999-11-01

    A controlled study with eight healthy free-living subjects was carried out, in which energy intake was adjusted to the individual energy requirements. On administration of inulin, blood lipids, the faecal microflora, short-chain fatty acids and accompanying gastrointestinal symptoms were characterized in order to investigate the long-term effect of inulin. During the run-in phase (8 d), subjects received a typical Western diet providing 45% energy as fat and 40% energy as carbohydrate. Subsequently, the subjects consumed a fat-reduced diet which provided 30% energy as fat and 55% energy as carbohydrate for a period of 64 d using inulin as a fat replacer. The amounts of inulin consumed by the subjects (up to 34 g/d) were based on individual energy requirements with the aim to keep the diet isoenergetic with that used in the run-in period. To assess the effects of inulin administration, a control study (run-in and intervention) was carried out in which subjects consumed the same diet but devoid of inulin during the whole course of the study. To investigate the effect of inulin on faecal flora composition total bacteria and bifidobacteria in the faeces were enumerated by in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes. Inulin significantly increased bifidobacteria from 9.8 to 11.0 log10/g dry faeces and caused a moderate increase in gastrointestinal symptoms such as flatulence and bloatedness, whereas blood lipids and short-chain fatty acids remained essentially unaffected. PMID:10673910

  2. Effect of cigarettes on memory search and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    West, R; Hack, S

    1991-02-01

    The effects of smoking a nicotine versus a nonnicotine cigarette on performance on Sternberg's memory search task and subjective ratings were examined. Testing sessions were undertaken both before and after a period of 24 hours' abstinence in occasional and regular smokers. Memory search rate was significantly faster after the nicotine cigarette than the nonnicotine cigarette. No significant difference in search rate was found between the results from occasional and regular smokers, and between the effect of a cigarette before and after the period of abstinence. The regular smokers inhaled more smoke from the nicotine and nonnicotine cigarettes than did the occasional smokers, but the amount of smoke inhaled from the test cigarettes did not change significantly from pre- to postabstinence. The nicotine cigarette produced stronger dizziness, tremor and palpitations than the nonnicotine cigarette, the more so after abstinence than before in the regular smokers. The results indicate that smoking a cigarette can produce subjective effects and performance improvements in regular and occasional smokers during the course of normal smoking, and that some subjective effects can be greater after abstinence.

  3. Effect of ozone on respiratory responses in subjects with asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.

    1995-03-01

    In the process of understanding the respiratory effects of individual air pollutants, it is useful to consider which populations seem to be most susceptible to the exposures. Ozone is the most ubiquitous air pollutant in the United States, and there is great interest in the extent of susceptibility to this air pollutant. This review presents evidence that individuals with asthma are more susceptible to adverse respiratory effects from ozone exposure than are nonasthmatic individuals under similar circumstances. In studies comparing patients with asthma to nonasthmatic subjects, research has shown increased pulmonary-function decrements, an increased frequency of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in ozone responders, increased signs of upper airway inflammation after ozone exposure, and an increased response to inhaled sulfur dioxide or allergen in the subjects with asthma. Subjects with asthma are indeed a population susceptible to the inhaled effects of ozone. These data need to be considered by regulators who are charged with setting air quality standards to protect even the most susceptible members of the population. They also underline the importance of strategies to reduce human exposure to ambient ozone. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Effect of atmospheric pressure on hearing in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Ozawa, H; Kodama, A; Izukura, H; Inoue, S; Uchida, K

    1994-01-01

    Hearing is assumed to be altered during or immediately after a change in atmospheric pressure, although this has not been tested experimentally. We used a soundproof pressure chamber to examine the effect of alterations in atmospheric pressure on hearing in 26 normal healthy subjects. The subjects were placed in the soundproof pressure chamber in a supine position and instructed to actively equilibrate middle ear pressure or to abstain from doing so. When the pressure was changed to +/- 500 mmH2O at 33 mmH2O/s the results were as follows: When subjects did not equilibrate middle ear pressure, air conduction at low frequency tones increased more than bone conduction. The degree of deterioration in hearing was greater when the chamber pressure was increased (descent) than where pressure was decreased (ascent). When the subjects equilibrated middle ear pressure, little change in the levels of air or bone conduction was observed. Most of the deterioration in bone conduction was considered to reflect functional loss due to increased stiffness and damping of the sound transmission mechanism.

  5. Effect of sonic boom asymmetry on subjective loudness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's sonic boom apparatus was used in an experimental study to quantify subjective loudness response to a wide range of asymmetrical N-wave sonic boom signatures. Results were used to assess the relative performance of several metrics as loudness estimators for asymmetrical signatures and to quantify in detail the effects on subjective loudness of varying both the degree and direction of signature loudness asymmetry. Findings of the study indicated that Perceived Level (Steven's Mark 7) and A-weighted sound exposure level were the best metrics for quantifying asymmetrical boom loudness. Asymmetrical signatures were generally rated as being less loud than symmetrical signatures of equivalent Perceived Level. The magnitude of the loudness reductions increased as the degree of boom asymmetry increased, and depended upon the direction of asymmetry. These loudness reductions were not accounted for by any of the metrics. Corrections were determined for use in adjusting calculated Perceived Level values to account for these reductions. It was also demonstrated that the subjects generally incorporated the loudness components of the complete signatures when making their subjective judgments.

  6. Effects of Subject-Area Degree and Classroom Experience on New Chemistry Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Campbell, Benjamin K.; Luft, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers need to understand the subject matter they teach. While subject matter knowledge (SMK) can improve with classroom teaching experience, it is problematic that many secondary science teachers leave the profession before garnering extensive classroom experience. Furthermore, many new science teachers are assigned to teach science…

  7. ["Debris" public policies and exclusion. Their effects on subjective constitution].

    PubMed

    Perugino, Aída

    2013-01-01

    The following paper formulates a critical and conceptual analysis based on a territorial experience. It is enshrined in the field of mental health, understood as the collection of practices and problems aiming at addressing subjectivity, that is, they are inseparable from social and health practices. Some of the causes and effects of exclusion in subjective constitution become problems when institutional, group, community and individual interventions -always of a singular nature- take place. The existing relationship between public policies and population appears in the very core of an intervention or consultation; we, as professionals, are a part of it. People living in conditions of poverty often feel alien to traditional healthcare settings and they end up excluding such facilities from their resources. We will work on childhood and adolescence, as they are constituent stages in history, and the ways in which such history develops in situations with social exclusion. Some of such ways are paco (cocaine paste), violence, conflict with the law or ignorance of it. These are singular ways, but they involve a common and recurring mark related to rejection, neglect and subjective de-structuring. This is what I will refer to as debris hereafter. Lastly, the reconstruction of a Social Other and an approach based on the bond will be emphasized. This will also allow for a social bond, and the building of a care mechanism, which through transference may accommodate an individual who could make certain requests.

  8. Effects of lithium on oxidative stress parameters in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Khairova, Rushaniya; Pawar, Rohit; Salvadore, Giacomo; Juruena, Mario F; de Sousa, Rafael T; Soeiro-de-Souza, Márcio G; Salvador, Mirian; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2012-03-01

    Increased neuronal oxidative stress (OxS) induces deleterious effects on signal transduction, structural plasticity and cellular resilience, mainly by inducing lipid peroxidation in membranes, proteins and genes. Major markers of OxS levels include the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase. Lithium has been shown to prevent and/or reverse DNA damage, free-radical formation and lipid peroxidation in diverse models. This study evaluates OxS parameters in healthy volunteers prior to and following lithium treatment. Healthy volunteers were treated with lithium in therapeutic doses for 2-4 weeks. Treatment with lithium in healthy volunteers selectively altered SOD levels in all subjects. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the SOD/CAT ratio was observed following lithium treatment, which was associated with decreased OxS by lowering hydrogen peroxide levels. This reduction in the SOD/CAT ratio may lead to lower OxS, indicated primarily by a decrease in the concentration of cell hydrogen peroxide. Overall, the present findings indicate a potential role for the antioxidant effects of lithium in healthy subjects, supporting its neuroprotective profile in bipolar disorder (BD) and, possibly, in neurodegenerative processes.

  9. Subjective effects of Salvia divinorum: LSD- or marijuana-like?

    PubMed

    Albertson, Dawn N; Grubbs, Laura E

    2009-09-01

    Salvia divinorum is a naturally occurring psychedelic considered to be one of the most potent hallucinogens found to date. The few behavioral studies conducted conclude that Salvia's effects may be similar to traditional psychedelics, which is noteworthy because Salvia acts via a unique molecular mechanism as a kappa opioid receptor agonist. One hundred and ninety-three participants, including 34 Salvia users, were asked to fill out a series of questionnaires related to general drug use, personality characteristics, demographics and their experiences with Salvia. Salvia users were found to differ from nonusers on personality characteristics and reported consuming significantly more alcohol than nonusers. In addition, although Salvia users rated their hallucinogenic experiences as similar to those seen in previously published reports, the majority likened their experiences as most similar to marijuana instead of more traditional psychedelics. Low scores on the ARCI LSD subscale confirmed this finding and call into question the reigning theory of LSD-like subjective effects elicited by Salvia.

  10. Genomic scan for genes predisposing to schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen. S.; Holik, J.

    1994-03-15

    We initiated a genome-wide search for genes predisposing to schizophrenia by ascertaining 9 families, each containing three to five cases of schizophrenia. The 9 pedigrees were initially genotyped with 329 polymorphic DNA loci distributed throughout the genome. Assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, 254 DNA loci yielded lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.0, 101 DNA markers gave lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.05, while 5 DNA loci produced maximum lod scores greater than 1: D4S35, D14S17, D15S1, D22S84, and D22S55. Of the DNA markers yielding lod scores greater than 1, D4S35 and D22S55 also were suggestive of linkage when the Affected-Pedigree-Member method was used. The families were then genotyped with four highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers; possible linkage diminished with DNA markers mapping nearby D4S35, while suggestive evidence of linkage remained with loci in the region of D22S55. Although follow-up investigation of these chromosomal regions may be warranted, our linkage results should be viewed as preliminary observations, as 35 unaffected persons are not past the age of risk. 90 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. The Influence of Predisposing, Enabling and Need Factors on Condom Use in Ivory Coast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngamini Ngui, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify key determinants of condom use in Ivory Coast. Data stem from Ivory Coast Demographic Health Survey (DHS) conducted by ORC Macro in 2005 among a representative sample of 9,686 persons aged 15 - 49. Following the behavioral model, we use logistic regression to assess the effect of predisposing,…

  12. Subject Expression in Brazilian Portuguese: Construction and Frequency Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira Neto, Agripino De Souza

    2012-01-01

    Brazilian Portuguese (henceforth BP) has for long been considered as a Null-subject language due to its variability in regards to subject expression (e.g. "Era bom porque eu diminuia de peso...era muito gordinha" "That was good because then I could lose some weight...(I) was a bit chubby." C33:179). Such variability has been…

  13. Mixed-Effects Modeling with Crossed Random Effects for Subjects and Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baayen, R. H.; Davidson, D. J.; Bates, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to mixed-effects models for the analysis of repeated measurement data with subjects and items as crossed random effects. A worked-out example of how to use recent software for mixed-effects modeling is provided. Simulation studies illustrate the advantages offered by mixed-effects analyses compared to…

  14. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury.

  15. Evaluating for suspected child abuse: conditions that predispose to bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon L; Abshire, Thomas C; Anderst, James D

    2013-04-01

    Child abuse might be suspected when children present with cutaneous bruising, intracranial hemorrhage, or other manifestations of bleeding. In these cases, it is necessary to consider medical conditions that predispose to easy bleeding/bruising. When evaluating for the possibility of bleeding disorders and other conditions that predispose to hemorrhage, the pediatrician must consider the child's presenting history, medical history, and physical examination findings before initiating a laboratory investigation. Many medical conditions can predispose to easy bleeding. Before ordering laboratory tests for a disease, it is useful to understand the biochemical basis and clinical presentation of the disorder, condition prevalence, and test characteristics. This technical report reviews the major medical conditions that predispose to bruising/bleeding and should be considered when evaluating for abusive injury. PMID:23530171

  16. McGurk effects in cochlear-implanted deaf subjects.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Julien; Fraysse, Bernard; Deguine, Olivier; Barone, Pascal

    2008-01-10

    Cochlear implants are neuroprostheses designed to restore speech perception in case of profound bilateral hearing loss. As speech is fundamentally an audiovisual percept, a deficit in processing auditory information might lead to changes in audiovisual integration of speech comprehension. Using vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli under unimodal, audiovisual congruent and audiovisual incongruent (McGurk) conditions, we tested postlingually deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) users and normally hearing (NH) subjects in order to investigate their audiovisual perceptive strategies. Mode/Place-of-articulation perceptive analysis and information transmission analysis of congruent and incongruent percepts indicated a similar sensory specialization for CI users when compared to NH subjects, with voicing and nasality cues transmitted via audition and place cues principally transmitted via vision. NH as well as CI subjects underwent typical McGurk illusory percepts. However, while normally hearing subjects show a well-balanced bimodal integration of incongruent speech, we demonstrated that cochlear implantees present a bias toward a visual-predominant bimodal integration. Our results are complementary to previous studies showing that CI users maintain a high level of speechreading, even after several years of recovery of auditory speech comprehension. Altogether, our results suggest a cross-modal reorganization of speech comprehension in cochlear-implanted patients that might recruit more strongly than in NH the visual and visuo-auditory brain areas involved in speechreading. PMID:18062941

  17. Inverse Association between Obesity Predisposing FTO Genotype and Completed Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Fudalej, Sylwia; Walczak, Anna; Wasilewska, Krystyna; Fudalej, Marcin; Stawiński, Piotr; Strawa, Katarzyna; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Paweł; Płoski, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The A allele of rs9939609 in the FTO gene predisposes to increased body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Recently we showed an inverse association between the obesity related A allele of rs9939609 and alcohol dependence which was replicated by others. Since this finding raises a possibility that FTO may be associated with other psychiatric phenotypes, we aimed to examine association of rs9939609 with completed suicide. We genotyped rs9939609 in 912 suicide victims and 733 controls using TaqMan approach. We observed an inverse association between suicide and the rs9939609 A allele (OR = 0.80, P = 0.002, Pcor = 0.006) with genotype distribution suggesting a co-dominant effect. Given the link between alcoholism and suicide under influence of alcohol reported in Polish population, confounding by alcohol addiction was unlikely due to apparently similar effect size among cases who were under influence of ethanol at the time of death (OR = 0.76, P = 0.003, N = 361) and those who were not (OR = 0.80, P = 0.007, N = 469). The search for genotype-phenotype correlations did not show significant results. In conclusion, our study proves that there is an inverse association between rs9939609 polymorphism in FTO gene and completed suicide which is independent from association between FTO and alcohol addiction. PMID:25265168

  18. Inverse association between obesity predisposing FTO genotype and completed suicide.

    PubMed

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Fudalej, Sylwia; Walczak, Anna; Wasilewska, Krystyna; Fudalej, Marcin; Stawiński, Piotr; Strawa, Katarzyna; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Paweł; Płoski, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    The A allele of rs9939609 in the FTO gene predisposes to increased body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Recently we showed an inverse association between the obesity related A allele of rs9939609 and alcohol dependence which was replicated by others. Since this finding raises a possibility that FTO may be associated with other psychiatric phenotypes, we aimed to examine association of rs9939609 with completed suicide. We genotyped rs9939609 in 912 suicide victims and 733 controls using TaqMan approach. We observed an inverse association between suicide and the rs9939609 A allele (OR = 0.80, P = 0.002, Pcor = 0.006) with genotype distribution suggesting a co-dominant effect. Given the link between alcoholism and suicide under influence of alcohol reported in Polish population, confounding by alcohol addiction was unlikely due to apparently similar effect size among cases who were under influence of ethanol at the time of death (OR = 0.76, P = 0.003, N = 361) and those who were not (OR = 0.80, P = 0.007, N = 469). The search for genotype-phenotype correlations did not show significant results. In conclusion, our study proves that there is an inverse association between rs9939609 polymorphism in FTO gene and completed suicide which is independent from association between FTO and alcohol addiction.

  19. Effects of pyrethroid insecticides on subjects engaged in packaging pyrethroids.

    PubMed Central

    He, F; Sun, J; Han, K; Wu, Y; Yao, P; Wang, S; Liu, L

    1988-01-01

    A health survey was conducted on 199 workers engaged in dividing and packaging pyrethroids. The subjects were exposed to fenvalerate at 0.012-0.055 mg/m3 and deltamethrin at 0.005-0.012 mg/m3 in the air with simultaneous skin contact for 0.5-4.5 months. Burning sensations and tightness or numbness on the face appeared in two thirds of the subjects and one third had sniffs and sneezes. Abnormal facial sensations, dizziness, fatigue, and miliary red papules on the skin were more evident in summer than in winter. Neither abnormalities in other organs or systems nor symptoms or signs of acute pyrethroid poisoning were found by interviews, examinations, and laboratory tests. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of NA, cAMP, and cGMP between the examined subjects and the control group. The urine concentration of fenvalerate in the study group ranged from 1.02 to 18.6 micrograms/l; deltamethrin in the urine was present in trace amounts. PMID:3415921

  20. Predisposing factors in delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Hohjoh, H; Matsuura, K

    2000-06-01

    We classified 64 patients with chronic delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) into the primary (n = 53) and secondary (n = 11) group according to presence or absence of such signs as difficulty in waking up which appeared much earlier than the onset of DSPS. The age at the onset of the early signs concentrated in adolescence. The familial occurrence of DSPS was noted in 11 patients of the primary group. In human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, the incidence of DR1 positivity alone was significantly higher in DSPS patients than in healthy subjects. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory revealed high scores on depression, psychoasthenia and hypochondriasis. We suggest that a predisposition to DSPS includes biological, genetic, social and psychological factors, various combinations of which may lead to DSPS. PMID:11186112

  1. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G.

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Ocular hemodynamic effects of nitrovasodilators in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Schmidl, D; Polska, E; Kiss, B; Sacu, S; Garhofer, G; Schmetterer, L

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the regulation of ocular blood flow and may be an interesting therapeutic target in ocular ischemic disease. In the present study, we hypothesized that NO-releasing drugs may increase blood flow to the head of the optic nerve and also in the choroid. The study employed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, four-way crossover design. On separate study days, 12 healthy subjects received infusions of nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, sodium nitroprusside, or placebo. All three study drugs reduced the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) (P < 0.001). None of the administered drugs increased the ocular hemodynamic variables. By contrast, vascular resistance decreased dose dependently during administration of the study drugs (P < 0.001). These results indicate that systemic administration of NO-donor drugs is associated with a decrease in vascular resistance in the ocular vasculature. However, because these drugs also reduce blood pressure, they do not improve perfusion to the posterior eye pole.

  3. Subjective visual vertical in erect/supine subjects and under microgravity: effects of lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Lucertini, Marco; De Angelis, Claudio; Martelli, Marialuisa; Zolesi, Valfredo; Tomao, Enrico

    2011-07-01

    Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) is mainly based on the contributions from the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems, and participates to the process of spatial orientation in relation to the surrounding environment and to the gravito-inertial force. The SVV can be significantly influenced by the presence of a displaced visual field, as in the case of the rod and frame test (RFT). A series of studies showed the effects of haematic mass shifts to and from the lower limbs on SVV, due to visceral mechanoreceptors (VM) located at the level of the kidneys and of the thorax. These sensors may be artificially activated with a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device. In this study, the role of visual and VM cues to orientation perception have been evaluated using the RFT and the LBNP devices under a microgravity environment. A preliminary investigation was conducted in a sample of military pilots to develop a RFT protocol to be used in microgravity environments. This protocol was adopted to evaluate the contribution of VM to the SVV in a cosmonaut before, during and after a 10 day space flight, with and without concurrent activation of LBNP. The same test sequence, including LBNP exposure, was repeated a few months later on Earth on the same subject. As expected, the influence of the frame on rod positioning was statistically significant in all test conditions. During the in-flight experimental step, a substantial lack of significant changes compared to the pre-flight condition was observed. Moreover, substantially no effects due to LBNP were observed. A mild rod displacement from the body axis was detected under microgravity compared to the pre-flight recording. Such a finding was in part reduced during LBNP. The same findings were observed during the post-flight repetition of the experiment. Our results showed an absence in this subject of significant effects on the RFT due to microgravity. In conclusion, no effects from his VM on the RFT

  4. Subjective visual vertical in erect/supine subjects and under microgravity: effects of lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Lucertini, Marco; De Angelis, Claudio; Martelli, Marialuisa; Zolesi, Valfredo; Tomao, Enrico

    2011-07-01

    Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) is mainly based on the contributions from the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems, and participates to the process of spatial orientation in relation to the surrounding environment and to the gravito-inertial force. The SVV can be significantly influenced by the presence of a displaced visual field, as in the case of the rod and frame test (RFT). A series of studies showed the effects of haematic mass shifts to and from the lower limbs on SVV, due to visceral mechanoreceptors (VM) located at the level of the kidneys and of the thorax. These sensors may be artificially activated with a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device. In this study, the role of visual and VM cues to orientation perception have been evaluated using the RFT and the LBNP devices under a microgravity environment. A preliminary investigation was conducted in a sample of military pilots to develop a RFT protocol to be used in microgravity environments. This protocol was adopted to evaluate the contribution of VM to the SVV in a cosmonaut before, during and after a 10 day space flight, with and without concurrent activation of LBNP. The same test sequence, including LBNP exposure, was repeated a few months later on Earth on the same subject. As expected, the influence of the frame on rod positioning was statistically significant in all test conditions. During the in-flight experimental step, a substantial lack of significant changes compared to the pre-flight condition was observed. Moreover, substantially no effects due to LBNP were observed. A mild rod displacement from the body axis was detected under microgravity compared to the pre-flight recording. Such a finding was in part reduced during LBNP. The same findings were observed during the post-flight repetition of the experiment. Our results showed an absence in this subject of significant effects on the RFT due to microgravity. In conclusion, no effects from his VM on the RFT

  5. Effect Size Measure and Analysis of Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness, 2013

    2013-01-01

    One of the vexing problems in the analysis of SSD is in the assessment of the effect of intervention. Serial dependence notwithstanding, the linear model approach that has been advanced involves, in general, the fitting of regression lines (or curves) to the set of observations within each phase of the design and comparing the parameters of these…

  6. Effects of bupropion on simulated demand for cigarettes and the subjective effects of smoking

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The biobehavioral mechanism(s) mediating bupropion’s efficacy are not well understood. Behavioral economic measures such as demand curves have proven useful in investigations of the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Behavioral economic measures may also be used to measure the effect of pharmacotherapies on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse. Methods: The effects of bupropion on simulated demand for cigarettes were investigated in a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. Participants reported the number of cigarettes they would purchase and consume in a single day at a range of prices. The effects of medication on the subjective effects of smoking were also explored. Results: Demand for cigarettes was well described by an exponential demand equation. Bupropion did not significantly decrease the maximum number of cigarettes that participants said they would smoke in a single day nor did it significantly alter the relation between price per cigarette and demand. Baseline demand elasticity did not predict smoking cessation, but changes in elasticity following 1 week of treatment did. Medication group had no effect on any subjective effects of smoking. Discussion: Bupropion had no significant effects on demand for cigarettes. The exponential demand equation, recently introduced in behavioral economics, proved amenable to human simulated demand and might be usefully employed in other pharmacotherapy studies as it provides a potentially useful measure of changes in the essential value of the drug as a reinforcer. Such changes may be useful in predicting the efficacy of medications designed to reduce drug consumption. PMID:20194522

  7. Cutting effectiveness of diamond instruments subjected to cyclic sterilization methods.

    PubMed

    Gureckis, K M; Burgess, J O; Schwartz, R S

    1991-12-01

    The effect of repeated sterilization on the cutting effectiveness of one brand of rotary dental diamond cutting instruments was measured. Four groups of five diamond burs were sterilized by four methods: (1) sterilization with a chemical agent (Sporicidin); (2) steam under pressure (autoclave); (3) dry heat (Dri-Clave); or (4) chemical vapor (Chemiclave). Each group of diamond instruments made a timed cut in a ceramic block. This cut and all subsequent cuts were measured and were used to determine a baseline cutting effectiveness. Each group of diamond burs was then ultrasonically cleaned, sterilized, and another cut was made. At the end of 10 cycles there was no difference in cutting efficiency of the dental diamond instruments. However, there are differences in the cutting efficiency of individual diamond instruments. The SEM evaluation made prior to cutting and at the end of the 10 cycles of sterilization demonstrated that diamond wear was similar in all groups and that little diamond particle loss occurred in any group. PMID:1666657

  8. Multiplicative correction of subject effect as preprocessing for analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Iku; Abe, Masaya; Kotani, Makoto

    2008-03-01

    The procedure of repeated-measures ANOVA assumes the linear model in which effects of both subjects and experimental conditions are additive. However, in electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography, there may be situations where subject effects should be considered to be multiplicative in amplitude. We propose a simple method to normalize such data by multiplying each subject's response by a subject-specific constant. This paper derives ANOVA tables for such normalized data. Present simulations show that this method performs ANOVA effectively including multiple comparisons provided that the data follows the multiplicative model.

  9. Subjective qualities of memories associated with the picture superiority effect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Huron, Caroline; Danion, Jean-Marie; Rizzo, Lydia; Killofer, Valérie; Damiens, Annabelle

    2003-02-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (n = 24) matched with 24 normal subjects were presented with both words and pictures. On a recognition memory task, they were asked to give remember, know, or guess responses to items that were recognized on the basis of conscious recollection, familiarity, or guessing, respectively. Compared with normal subjects, patients exhibited a lower picture superiority effect selectively related to remember responses. Unlike normal subjects, they did not exhibit any word superiority effect in relation to guess responses; this explains why the overall picture superiority effect appeared to be intact. These results emphasize the need to take into account the subjective states of awareness when analyzing memory impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:12653423

  10. End effects on elbows subjected to moment loadings. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    So-called end effects for moment loadings on short-radius and long-radius butt welding elbows of various arc lengths are investigated with a view toward providing more accurate design formulas for critical piping systems. Data developed in this study, along with published information, were used to develop relatively simple design equations for elbows attached at both ends to long sections of straight pipe. These formulas are the basis for an alternate ASME Code procedure for evaluating the bending moment stresses in Class 1 nuclear piping (ASME Code Case N-319). The more complicated problems of elbows with other end conditions, e.g., flanges at one or both ends, are also considered. Comparisons of recently published experimental and theoretical studies with current industrial code design rules for these situations indicate that these rules also need to be improved.

  11. [Effects of nifuroxazide on fecal flora in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Buisson, Y; Larribaud, J

    1989-01-01

    Effect of nifuroxazide on fecal flora was studied in 12 healthy volunteers receiving, in hazardous order and double-blind procedure, three six-days courses of treatment separated by eight-days spaces of time: the conventional dosage of 400 mg twice a day, a dosage of 1200 mg once a day, and placebo. Among six settled bacteriological index (wealth of the fecal flora, percentage of gram-negative bacteria, numbers of E. coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium and Bacteroides), no significant variation was found by means of statistical study between D0, D2 and D7, nor between the three courses of treatment. Therefore nifuroxazide, even in high dosage, does not injure integrity of microbial intestinal ecosystem under so defined experimental conditions, similar with clinical conditions. PMID:2756516

  12. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Saeed; Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples-the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)-to investigate the question of the "amplification" of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results-that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus-for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context-namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the amplification of

  13. Nonlocal Intuition: Replication and Paired-subjects Enhancement Effects

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of repeat entrepreneurs in Tehran, Iran, in which nonlocal intuition was investigated in a replication and extension of experiment using measures of heart rate variability (HRV). Nonlocal intuition is the perception of information about a distant or future event by the body's psychophysiological systems, which is not based on reason or memories of prior experience. This study follows up on the McCraty, Radin, and Bradley studies, which found evidence of nonlocal intuition. We used Radin's experimental protocol, with the addition of HRV measures as in the McCraty studies involving computer administration of a random sequence of calm and emotional pictures as the stimulus, and conducted two experiments on mutually exclusive samples—the first on a group of single participants (N=15) and the second on a group of co-participant pairs (N=30)—to investigate the question of the “amplification” of intuition effects by social connection. Each experiment was conducted over 45 trials while heart rate rhythm activity was recorded continuously. Results, using random permutation analysis, a statistically conservative procedure, show significant pre-stimulus results—that is, for the period before the computer had randomly selected the picture stimulus—for both experiments. Moreover, while significant separation between the emotional and calm HRV curves was observed in the single-participant experiment, an even larger separation was apparent for the experiment on co-participant pairs; the difference between the two groups was also significant. Overall, the results of the single-participant experiment confirm previous finding: that electrophysiological measures, especially changes in the heart rhythm, can detect intuitive foreknowledge. This result is notable because it constitutes cross-cultural corroboration in a non-Western context—namely, Iran. In addition, the results for co-participant pairs offer new evidence on the

  14. NOD2 prevents emergence of disease-predisposing microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Secher, Thomas; Normand, Sylvain; Chamaillard, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The gut flora is composed of a huge number of diverse, well-adapted symbionts that interact with epithelial lining throughout the host's entire life. Not all commensals have the same ability to maintain quiescent, protective inflammation. Importantly, instability in the composition of gut microbial communities (referred to as dysbiosis) has been linked to loss of gut barrier in the context of common human illnesses with increasing socio-economic impacts, such as Crohn disease and colorectal cancer. Our recent findings suggest that disease-predisposing dysbiosis can now be intentionally manipulated by targeting the major Crohn disease-predisposing NOD2 gene. That knowledge will not only add a new dimension to the often overlooked microbiology of Crohn disease and colorectal cancer, but will also have a broad impact on biomedical sciences worldwide. PMID:23778641

  15. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    PubMed

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  16. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  17. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26251183

  18. Strength and duration of priming effects in normal subjects and amnesic patients.

    PubMed

    Squire, L R; Shimamura, A P; Graf, P

    1987-01-01

    In three separate experiments, we assessed the strength and duration of word completion effects in amnesic patients and two control groups. In Experiment 1 subjects studied words under a semantic orienting condition and were given tests of word completion and recognition memory after an immediate, 2-hr or 4-day delay. In the word completion test for Experiment 1, we presented three-letter word stems that could be completed to form several common words, one of which had been presented previously (e.g. MOT for MOTEL), and subjects completed each stem with the first word that came to mind. Priming effects were equivalent in amnesic patients and control subjects and they reached baseline levels within 2 hr. In Experiments 2 and 3, subjects studied words under either a semantic or a nonsemantic orienting condition, and word completion was tested at the same three delays using cues that uniquely specified the study words (e.g. JUI for JUICE; or A--A--In for ASSASSIN). In these experiments, amnesic patients exhibited both smaller and shorter lasting word completion effects than control subjects. Specifically, amnesic patients exhibited word completion effects that seldom lasted as long as 2 hr, whereas control subjects usually exhibited completion effects lasting 4 days. An important additional finding was that control subjects exhibited larger and longer-lasting word completion effects when tested under the semantic orienting condition than when tested under the nonsemantic orienting condition. Amnesic patients were not affected by this manipulation. Moreover, under the nonsemantic orienting condition, control subjects and amnesic patients performed similarly. The results show that word completion performance is not always fully intact in amnesic patients. Long-lasting word completion effects found in normal subjects may be mediated by declarative or elaborative retrieval processes, which are impaired in amnesic patients. If so, priming as measured by word completion

  19. Native language influence on the distributive effect in producing second language subject-verb agreement.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoyan; Chen, Baoguo; Liang, Lijuan; Dunlap, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to investigate the distributive effect when producing subject-verb agreement in English as a second language (L2) when the participant's first language either does or does not require subject-verb agreement. Both Chinese-English and Uygur-English bilinguals were included in Experiment 1. Chinese has no required subject-verb agreement, whereas Uygur does. Results showed that the distributive effect was observed in Uygur-English bilinguals but not in Chinese-English bilinguals, indicating that this particular first language (L1) syntactic feature is one significant factor affecting the distributive effect in the production of subject-verb agreement in L2. Experiment 2 further investigated the matter by choosing Chinese-English participants with higher L2 proficiency. Still, no distributive effect was observed, suggesting that the absence of distributive effect in Chinese-English bilinguals in Experiment 1 was not due to low proficiency in the target language. Experiment 3 changed the way the stimuli were presented, highlighting the singular or distributive nature of the subject noun phrases, and the distributive effect was observed in Chinese-English bilinguals. Altogether, the results show that the L1 syntactic feature of subject-verb agreement is one significant factor affecting the distributive effect in the production of subject-verb agreement in L2. More specifically, distributive effects rarely occur in L2 when L1 has no requirement on subject-verb agreement, whereas distributive effects are more likely to occur in L2 when the L1 also has required subject-verb agreement.

  20. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  1. Effects of Local and Global Context on Processing Sentences with Subject and Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause…

  2. The Effectiveness of Oral Presentation Assessment in a Finance Subject: An Empirical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhati, Shyam S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effectiveness of oral presentation as an assessment tool in a Finance subject. Assessment data collected from a postgraduate Finance subject in an Australian university over a period of five years from 2005 to 2009 was analysed statistically to determine the relation between students' performance in oral…

  3. Familiarity, but not Recollection, Supports the Between-Subject Production Effect in Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Five experiments explored the basis of the between-subjects production effect in recognition memory as represented by differences in the recollection and familiarity of produced (read aloud) and nonproduced (read silently) words. Using remember-know judgments (Experiment 1b) and a dual-process signal-detection approach applied to confidence ratings (Experiments 2b and 3), we observed that production influences familiarity but not recollection when manipulated between-subjects. This is in contrast to within-subject designs, which reveal a clear effect of production on both recollection and familiarity (Experiments 1a and 2a). Our findings resolve contention concerning apparent design effects: Whereas the within-subject production effect is subserved by separable recollective- and familiarity-based components, the between-subjects production effect is subserved by the familiarity-based component alone. Our findings support a role for the relative distinctiveness of production as a means of guiding recognition judgments (at least when manipulated within-subjects), but we also propose that production influences the strength of produced items, explaining the persistence of the effect in between-subjects designs. PMID:27244352

  4. Familiarity, but not recollection, supports the between-subject production effect in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Jonathan M; Ozubko, Jason D

    2016-06-01

    Five experiments explored the basis of the between-subjects production effect in recognition memory as represented by differences in the recollection and familiarity of produced (read aloud) and nonproduced (read silently) words. Using remember-know judgments (Experiment 1b) and a dual-process signal-detection approach applied to confidence ratings (Experiments 2b and 3), we observed that production influences familiarity but not recollection when manipulated between-subjects. This is in contrast to within-subject designs, which reveal a clear effect of production on both recollection and familiarity (Experiments 1a and 2a). Our findings resolve contention concerning apparent design effects: Whereas the within-subject production effect is subserved by separable recollective- and familiarity-based components, the between-subjects production effect is subserved by the familiarity-based component alone. Our findings support a role for the relative distinctiveness of production as a means of guiding recognition judgments (at least when manipulated within-subjects), but we also propose that production influences the strength of produced items, explaining the persistence of the effect in between-subjects designs. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27244352

  5. Effect of aspartame and sucrose loading in glutamate-susceptible subjects.

    PubMed

    Stegink, L D; Filer, L J; Baker, G L

    1981-09-01

    It has been postulated that individuals reporting an idiosyncratic symptom response after glutamate ingestion might also experience such symptoms after aspartame ingestion. Such sensitive subjects might have been missed in earlier studies of aspartame. In the present study, six subjects reporting various symptoms after glutamate ingestion, but not after placebo, were administered aspartame (34 mg/kg body weight) or sucrose (1 g/kg body weight) dissolved in orange juice in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind study. No subject reported symptoms typical of a glutamate response after either sucrose or aspartame loading. One subject reported slight nausea approximately 1.5 h after aspartame ingestion, but indicated that the symptoms were not those of a glutamate response. Plasma phenylalanine and aspartate levels were similar to those noted in normal subjects administered identical doses of aspartame. The data indicate no effect of aspartame loading in glutamate-susceptible subjects.

  6. Effects of the number of subjects on the dark/light preference of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Mansur, Bruno de Matos; Dos Santos, Bruno Rodrigues; Dias, Cláudio Alberto Gellis de Mattos; Pinheiro, Marcelo de Sena; Gouveia, Amauri

    2014-12-01

    This research aims to describe the effects of a variable number of Danio rerio fish subjects, ranging from one to eight, in the light/dark box preference test. Four hundred eighty adult male short-finned phenotype zebrafish were tested in the light/dark box. There were four groups in this experiment and a different number of subjects was used in each group: the control group had only one subject, whereas the experimental groups had either two, four, or eight subjects simultaneously inside the apparatus in every session. The average occurrence (AO) of subjects in the white side of the aquarium and the first choice average (FC) were recorded. The AO revealed no difference between the control group and test groups with two and four subjects. The results for the test group with eight subjects showed significant difference when compared to the control group and from the test group with two subjects. The FC also showed no difference between the control group and test groups with two and four subjects. There was significant variation between the control and the test group with eight subjects. The results reflect a conflict between the animal's preference for dark places and the innate drive to explore new environments. Zebrafish are highly social animals, exhibiting preference for swimming in groups and other patterns of social cohesion. The reduced white avoidance behavior in the test group of eight subjects may possibly reflect the role of shoaling, which is a defensive behavior, in reducing anxiety and stress. On the other hand, the absence of difference between the control group and test groups with two and four subjects suggest that it is feasible to run the light/dark test with up to four subjects, becoming an alternative to streamline and simplify data collection and test analysis.

  7. The Role of Negative Statements on the Subjective Effects of Traffic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves Vera, M.; Vila, J.; Godoy, J. F.

    1995-12-01

    This study assesses subjective effects of traffic noise and the mediator role that negative statements about the noise and about oneself play. Eighty-four students underwent two 15-minute presentations of high intensity traffic noise, with and without negative statements. The potential effect of the negative statements was enhanced by the use of instructions concerning the expectation of negative noise effects and the credibility of the statements in half the subjects. Level of anxiety, subjective noise aversion and time estimation of the noise were taken. The State Anxiety Inventory and the Profile of Mood States Questionnaire were used as pre- and post-tests. Noise increased anxiety levels, these levels being higher during the Statements condition than during the Noise alone condition. Instructions further increased the effects of these negative statements. Subjects did not adapt to noise. Scores in the questionnaires were significantly higher in the post-test than in the pre-test. Implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Effect of visual input on normalized standing stability in subjects with recurrent low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongchul C; Ham, Yong Woon; Sung, Paul S

    2012-07-01

    Although a number of studies have evaluated kinematic stability changes in subjects with low back pain (LBP), the combined sensitivity of normalized standing stability from the ground force and kinematic rotational angle of the body segment were not carefully examined for postural responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normalized standing stability in subjects with and without recurrent LBP while they stood quietly with the tested foot parallel to the other lower extremity at hip width. The subjects were then instructed to stand freely on one leg for 25 s with the contra lateral hip flexed 90° based on dominance side (dominant leg vs. non-dominant lower extremity) and visual condition (eyes open vs. eyes closed). A total of 42 subjects (27 subjects without LBP and 15 subjects with LBP) participated in the study. The dominant leg standing stability was significantly different during the eyes closed condition (0.68±0.30 for control vs. 0.37±0.32 for LBP, T=-3.23, p=0.002) compared to the eyes open condition. The standing kinematic stability, especially of the dominant thigh, was greater in the control subjects than in the subjects with LBP (T=-2.43, p=0.02). This sensitive detection of kinematic imbalance with postural stability is important for effective rehabilitation strategies and to understanding compensatory mechanisms in subjects with recurrent LBP.

  9. Intravenous nicotine and caffeine: subjective and physiological effects in cocaine abusers.

    PubMed

    Garrett, B E; Griffiths, R R

    2001-02-01

    The subjective and physiological effects of intravenously administered caffeine and nicotine were compared in nine subjects with histories of using caffeine, tobacco, and cocaine. Subjects abstained from tobacco cigarette smoking for at least 8 h before each session. Dietary caffeine was eliminated throughout the study; however, to maintain consistency with the nicotine intake, subjects were administered caffeine (150 mg/70 kg b.i.d.) in capsules, with the last dose administered 15 to 18 h before each session. Under double-blind conditions, subjects received placebo, caffeine (100, 200, and 400 mg/70 kg), and nicotine (0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 mg/70 kg) in mixed order. Physiological and subjective data were collected before and repeatedly after drug or placebo administration. Compared with the highest dose of caffeine, the highest dose of nicotine produced greater subjective ratings on a number of scales. At doses that produced comparable ratings of drug effect (1.5 mg/70 kg of nicotine and 400 mg/70 kg of caffeine), both drugs produced similar increases in ratings of good effect, liking, high, stimulated, and bad effect. Nicotine showed a somewhat faster time to peak subjective effects than caffeine (2 versus 4 min). Subjective ratings that differentiated caffeine and nicotine were ratings of rush, blurry vision, and stimulant identification (elevated by nicotine) and ratings of unusual smell and/or taste (elevated by caffeine). Both caffeine and nicotine decreased skin temperature and increased diastolic blood pressure; however, caffeine decreased whereas nicotine increased heart rate. The study documents both striking similarities and some notable differences between caffeine and nicotine, which are among the most widely used mood-altering drugs. PMID:11160635

  10. Cocaine and methamphetamine produce different patterns of subjective and cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; De La Garza, Richard; Kalechstein, Ari D; Nestor, Liam

    2005-09-01

    The stimulant effects of cocaine and methamphetamine are mediated by changes in synaptic concentrations of brain monoamines; however, the drugs alter monoamine levels via different mechanisms. This study examined the subjective and cardiovascular responses produced by investigational administration of cocaine or methamphetamine, in order to examine the onset and patterns of subjective and cardiovascular responses. Subjects included 14 non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent and 11 non-treatment seeking methamphetamine-dependent volunteers. As part of ongoing research studies, cocaine and methamphetamine subjects received cocaine (40 mg, IV) or methamphetamine (30 mg, IV), respectively. Subjective and cardiovascular responses were assessed for 30 min and 60 min, respectively. The data reveal significant within groups differences for all subjective effects and cardiovascular effects (p<0.05). Significant between group differences in subjective effects were observed for "Any Drug Effect" (p<.008 for group, and p<.029 for group x time), for "High" (p<.002 for group, and p<.0001 for group x time) and for "Stimulated" (p<.001 for group, and p<.006 for group x time). Significant between group differences in cardiovascular effects were observed for Systolic blood pressure (p<.0001 for group, and p<.002 for group x time), Diastolic blood pressure (p<.0001 for group, though p=NS for group x time), and for Heart Rate (p<.0001 for group, and p<.0001 for group x time). The only difference between the groups for placebo was for heart rate, where there was a significant group x time effect (p<.005). Taken together, the data reveal that the subjective effects of cocaine tended to peak and then decline more rapidly than those produced by methamphetamine. The subjective effects of methamphetamine tended to rise more slowly, and remain elevated longer. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine and methamphetamine had similar onset, but effects of cocaine tended to decline more rapidly

  11. 19 CFR 148.6 - Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects subject to personal exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects... General Provisions § 148.6 Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects subject to personal exemptions. (a) Declaration to support free entry. When effects claimed to be free of duty under subheadings 9804.00.10,...

  12. 19 CFR 148.6 - Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects subject to personal exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects... General Provisions § 148.6 Entry of unaccompanied shipments of effects subject to personal exemptions. (a) Declaration to support free entry. When effects claimed to be free of duty under subheadings 9804.00.10,...

  13. Histone modifications predispose genome regions to breakage and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Bharat; Zhang, Zhuzhu Z.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Lieb, Jason D.; Misteli, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are well-established hallmarks of cancer cells and often occur at nonrandom sites in the genome. The molecular features that define recurrent chromosome breakpoints are largely unknown. Using a combination of bioinformatics, biochemical analysis, and cell-based assays, we identify here specific histone modifications as facilitators of chromosome breakage and translocations. We show enrichment of several histone modifications over clinically relevant translocation-prone genome regions. Experimental modulation of histone marks sensitizes genome regions to breakage by endonuclease challenge or irradiation and promotes formation of chromosome translocations of endogenous gene loci. Our results demonstrate that histone modifications predispose genome regions to chromosome breakage and translocations. PMID:26104467

  14. On the Effects of Intra- and Inter-Subject Variabilities on Human Inspiratory Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2007-11-01

    The effects of intra- and inter-subject variabilities on airflow patterns in the human central airways are investigated using large-eddy simulation (LES). The anatomical airway models are reconstructed from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) image data. The intra-subject study considers four models of the same human subject, including complete, partial, and no upper respiratory tract. Either pressure or velocity boundary conditions are specified at the mouth, mid pharynx, supraglottis, and tracheal entrance, respectively, with two different flow rates. The inter-subject study considers upper and intra-thoracic airways (up to 6 generations) of two human subjects. LES captures the turbulent laryngeal jet formed at the vocal cords. It is found that the use of a complete upper respiratory tract as well as the anatomically realistic airway geometry is essential to correctly reproduce the laryngeal jet behavior and turbulent coherent structures in particular.

  15. Effect of TV content in subjective assessment of video quality on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumisko, Satu H.; Ilvonen, Ville P.; Vaananen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa A.

    2005-03-01

    Selection of test materials in subjective assessment methodology recommendations is based mainly on technical parameters. Materials should test the ability of the codec to cope with spatial and temporal redundancy. However consumers watch TV for a reason -- one of the main criteria is the interesting content. In this study we examined whether the content recognition and subjects" personal interests have an effect on quality assessment. We also studied subjective assessment criteria for video quality. The study was done using small resolution and low bit rate video in mobile phones in a laboratory environment. Altogether 135 subjects, aged 18-65 years, participated in the tests. The test started with a subjective assessment of video quality using well-known TV content. Afterwards a survey was done to measure content recognition and level of interests in the content. The test session ended up with a qualitative interview about evaluation criteria. Our studies showed that there is a connection between interest in content and given quality score with TV content. Therefore we raise a concern on content selection and recommend measuring the evaluator"s interest in content in subjective assessment studies. The study on subjective evaluation criteria revealed that subjects pay attention on content and quality impairments especially in regions of interest.

  16. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines.

    PubMed

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders H; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype-envirotype interactions for other diseases.

  17. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T.; Lund, Anders H.; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype – envirotype interactions for other diseases. PMID:26263558

  18. How Pre-Service Teachers Observe Teaching on Video: Effects of Viewers' Teaching Subjects and the Subject of the Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Geraldine; Sturmer, Kathleen; Seidel, Tina

    2011-01-01

    As critical component of teachers' expertise, professional vision should be developed during teacher education. Professional vision draws on subject specific and generic knowledge, however, little is known about the knowledge interplay. This study systematically investigated pre-service teachers' (n = 32 majoring in mathematics/science; n = 56 in…

  19. Immediate Effect of Short-foot Exercise on Dynamic Balance of Subjects with Excessively Pronated Feet.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong-Chul; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Su-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the immediate effect of short-foot exercise (SFE) on the dynamic balance of subjects with excessively pronated feet. [Subjects] This study included 18 subjects with excessively pronated feet (navicular drop ≥ 10 mm) selected using the navicular drop test. [Methods] The limit of stability (LOS) was measured to determine the changes in the dynamic balance from before and after SFE in the standing and sitting positions. [Result] After the SFE, LOS increased significantly in all areas, namely, the left, right, front, back, and overall. [Conclusion] SFE immediately improved the dynamic balance of subjects with excessively pronated feet. Subsequent studies will be conducted to examine the effects of SFE performed over the long term on postural stability.

  20. Ectopic pregnancy and IUDs; incidence, risk rate and predisposing factors.

    PubMed

    Meirik, O; Nygren, K G

    1980-01-01

    During a period of 4 years, 1974-77, in Uppsala county; Sweden, 203 women underwent surgery for ectopic pregnancy with histological proof of the diagnosis. For the female population of fertile age this corresponds to 0.11 ectopics per 100 women 15-44 years of age, or 1.08 per 100 notified pregnancies, or 1.53 per 100 births. Fifty-five of the women with ectopic pregnancy were using an intrauterine device (IUD) (48 a copper-bearing IUD and 7 some other type of device), and 6 women used a low dose progestogen contraceptive. For users of copper-bearing IUDs the risk of an ectopic pregnancy was estimated to be 0.15 per 100 women years. When comparing this latter risk rate with the overall incidence rate of 0.11, it must be observed that the populations forming the denominator in these two rates differ with respect to some crucial characteristics. Nulliparity and predisposing factors were found statistically significantly more often in non-IUD-users with an ectopic pregnancy than in IUD-users. Such predisposing factors may be less prevalent in IUD-users, as in other populations. This may explain why ectopic pregnancy has been found to occur less frequently than theoretically expected among IUD-users. The "ectopic preventing" capacity of the IUD may therefore be considerably lower than has been previously claimed.

  1. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints.

    PubMed

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Troelsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that hip joint deformities may be major contributors to the development of osteoarthritis, and the term 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' may be inappropriate in many cases. Our study cohort was derived from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Sub-study, a cross sectional population-based database of 4151 individuals, all of whom had a standard anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic radiograph taken. Hip joints were classified according to type and degree of deformity. We defined hip osteoarthritis by a minimum joint space width of < or = 2 mm. This cut-off has a significant relationship in both sexes with the clinical presentation. The study cohort which fulfilled these inclusion criteria consisted of 322 females (149 right hips and 173 left hips) and 162 males (77 right hips and 85 left hips) with osteoarthritis. We found an overall prevalence of predisposing hip deformities in females of 62.4% and in males of 78.9%. Minor and major deformities showed the same prevalence. Both sexes had a comparable prevalence of minor and major hip joint deformity, except for pistol grip deformity, which was more prevalent in men. We concluded that 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' is uncommon, and that even minor predisposing deformities are associated with hip osteoarthritis.

  2. Mu Opioid Mediated Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of Tramadol: An Individual Subjects Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Rush, Craig R.; Stoops, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human subjects. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human subjects first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to subjects after acquiring the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all subjects. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual subject records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure. PMID:25664525

  3. Bias Corrections for Standardized Effect Size Estimates Used with Single-Subject Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugille, Maaike; Moeyaert, Mariola; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Ferron, John M.; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A multilevel meta-analysis can combine the results of several single-subject experimental design studies. However, the estimated effects are biased if the effect sizes are standardized and the number of measurement occasions is small. In this study, the authors investigated 4 approaches to correct for this bias. First, the standardized effect…

  4. Effects of whole body cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in subjects with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, S; Hassi, J; Juopperi, K; Rintamäki, H

    2001-04-01

    Patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) have abnormal digital vasoconstriction in response to cold. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in healthy male subjects and subjects with RP. There were two groups of subjects with primary RP: 12 subjects fulfilled the criteria of Lewis (L) and the other 12 the more critical criteria of Maricq (M). Control group (C) consisted of 19 healthy men. Subjects were exposed to 5 degrees C for 60 min. Skin temperatures were measured. Finger dexterity, pinch strength, abduction/adduction of fingers, pressure perception threshold and vibration perception threshold were tested during the exposure every 15 min. At the beginning of the exposure the mean (S.E.) finger temperature was 2.5 (1.2) degrees C (P<0.05) lower in M than in C. Manual performance and sensory perception were impaired due to the cooling, the impairment being significantly greater in M than in C. Responses of L were between those of M and C. In a given finger temperature vibration and pressure sensibility and manual performance were lower in M and L than in C. In conclusion, cold exposure decreased sensory perception and manual performance in the subjects with RP to a lower level than in the healthy subjects. Non-thermal factors may also decrease performance in RP.

  5. Revisiting multi-subject random effects in fMRI: advocating prevalence estimation.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J D; Vink, M; Benjamini, Y

    2014-01-01

    Random effect analysis has been introduced into fMRI research in order to generalize findings from the study group to the whole population. Generalizing findings is obviously harder than detecting activation within the study group since in order to be significant, an activation has to be larger than the inter-subject variability. Indeed, detected regions are smaller when using random effect analysis versus fixed effects. The statistical assumptions behind the classic random effect model are that the effect in each location is normally distributed over subjects, and "activation" refers to a non-null mean effect. We argue that this model is unrealistic compared to the true population variability, where due to function-anatomy inconsistencies and registration anomalies, some of the subjects are active and some are not at each brain location. We propose a Gaussian-mixture-random-effect that amortizes between-subject spatial disagreement and quantifies it using the prevalence of activation at each location. We present a formal definition and an estimation procedure of this prevalence. The end result of the proposed analysis is a map of the prevalence at locations with significant activation, highlighting activation regions that are common over many brains. Prevalence estimation has several desirable properties: (a) It is more informative than the typical active/inactive paradigm. (b) In contrast to the usual display of p-values in activated regions - which trivially converge to 0 for large sample sizes - prevalence estimates converge to the true prevalence. PMID:23988271

  6. Effects of cutouts on the behavior of symmetric composite laminates subjected to bending and twisting loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Shuart, M. J.; Bains, N. J.; Rouse, M.

    1993-01-01

    Composite structures are used for a wide variety of aerospace applications. Practical structures contain cutouts and these structures are subjected to in-plane and out-of-plane loading conditions. Structurally efficient designs for composite structures require a thorough understanding of the effects of cutouts on the response of composite plates subjected to inplane or out-of-plane loadings. Most investigations of the behavior of composite plates with cutouts have considered in-plane loadings only. Out-of-plane loadings suchas bending or twisting have received very limited attention. The response of homogeneous plates (e.g., isotropic or orthotropic plates) subjected to bending or twisting moments has been studied analytically. These analyses are for infinite plates and neglect finite-plate effects. Recently, analytical and experimental studies were conducted to determine the effects of cutouts on the response of laminated composite plates subjected to bending moments. No analytical or experimental results are currently available for the effects of cutouts on the response of composite laminates subjected to twisting moments.

  7. Effect of dietary phenylalanine restriction on visual attention span in mentally retarded subjects with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Giffin, F D; Clarke, J T; d'Entremont, D M

    1980-05-01

    An ABA within-subject study design was used to assess the effect of dietary phenylalanine restriction on the visual attention span of three mentally retarded males (9, 15, and 21 years old) with phenylketonuria. Visual attention span was measured by recording the amount of time the subjects visually fixated pictures projected on a screen according to a standardized test protocol. After 4-6 weeks of baseline testing (A-phase), each subject was placed on a phenylalanine-restricted diet, designed to maintain plasma phenylalanine levels at 0.3-0.9 mM, for 8-14 weeks (B-phase). A return to baseline phenylalanine intake (A-phase) was achieved by surreptitiously adding sufficient L-phenylalanine to the therapeutic diets to increase plasma concentrations of the amino acid to pretreatment levels. Diet treatment (B-phase) was associated with highly significant improvements in visual attention span in two subjects (multivariate analysis of variance, P less than 0.001); the third subject, the most retarded, showed no effect. No objectively demonstrable change in behavior was documented in any subject. However, the results support the view that phenylalanine toxicity extends beyond early childhood and that some component of the toxicity is reversible, even in severely retarded patients with phenylketonuria.

  8. Implicit Theories of Change and Stability Moderate Effects of Subjective Distance on the Remembered Self.

    PubMed

    Ward, Cindy L P; Wilson, Anne E

    2015-09-01

    Temporal self-appraisal theory suggests that people can regulate current self-view by recalling former selves in ways that flatter present identity. People critique their subjectively distant (but not recent) former selves, creating the illusion of improvement over time. However, this revisionist strategy might not apply to everyone: People with fixed (entity) beliefs may not benefit from critiquing even distant selves. In three studies, we found that implicit theories of change and stability moderate the effects of subjective distance on the remembered self. In all studies, participants rated past selves portrayed as subjectively close or distant (controlling calendar time). Incremental theorists (but not entity theorists) were more critical of their subjectively distant (but not recent) past attributes. We found the same pattern when measuring existing implicit theories (Studies 1, 2) or manipulating them (Study 3). The present research is the first to integrate temporal self-appraisal theory and the implicit theories literature. PMID:26089348

  9. Implicit Theories of Change and Stability Moderate Effects of Subjective Distance on the Remembered Self.

    PubMed

    Ward, Cindy L P; Wilson, Anne E

    2015-09-01

    Temporal self-appraisal theory suggests that people can regulate current self-view by recalling former selves in ways that flatter present identity. People critique their subjectively distant (but not recent) former selves, creating the illusion of improvement over time. However, this revisionist strategy might not apply to everyone: People with fixed (entity) beliefs may not benefit from critiquing even distant selves. In three studies, we found that implicit theories of change and stability moderate the effects of subjective distance on the remembered self. In all studies, participants rated past selves portrayed as subjectively close or distant (controlling calendar time). Incremental theorists (but not entity theorists) were more critical of their subjectively distant (but not recent) past attributes. We found the same pattern when measuring existing implicit theories (Studies 1, 2) or manipulating them (Study 3). The present research is the first to integrate temporal self-appraisal theory and the implicit theories literature.

  10. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  11. Pulmonary effects of ozone and nitrogen dioxide alone and combined in healthy and asthmatic adolescent subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Covert, D.S.; Smith, M.S.; van Belle, G.; Pierson, W.E.

    1988-12-01

    Separate exposures to 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) or 0.18 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have not demonstrated consistent changes in pulmonary function in adolescent subjects. However, in polluted urban air, O3 and NO2 occur in combination. Therefore, this project was designed to investigate the pulmonary effects of combined O3 and NO2 exposures during intermittent exercise in adolescent subjects. Twelve healthy and twelve well-characterized asthmatic adolescent subjects were exposed randomly to clean air or 0.12 ppm O3 and 0.30 ppm NO2 alone or in combination during 60 minutes of intermittent moderate exercise (32.5 1/min). The inhalation exposures were carried out while the subjects breathed on a rubber mouthpiece with nose clips in place. The following pulmonary functional values were measured before and after exposure: peak flow, total respiratory resistance, maximal flow at 50 and 75 percent of expired vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity (FVC). Statistical significance of pulmonary function changes was tested by analysis of covariance for repeated measures. After exposure to 0.12 ppm O3 a significant decrease was seen in maximal flow at 50% of FVC in asthmatic subjects. After exposure to 0.30 ppm NO2 a significant decrease was seen in FVC also in the asthmatic subjects. One possible explanation for these changes is the multiple comparison effect. No significant changes in any parameters were seen in the asthmatic subjects after the combined O3-NO2 exposure or in the healthy subjects after any of the exposures.

  12. Effect of hyperhydration on bone mineralization in physically healthy subjects after prolonged restriction of motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Federenko, Youri F.; Naexu, Konstantin A.

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of fluid and salt supplementation (FSS) on bone mineralization in physically healthy male volunteers after exposure to hypokinesia (decreased number of steps taken/day) over a period of 364 days. The studies were performed after exposure to 364 days of hypokinesia (HK) on 18 physically healthy male volunteers who had an average VO2max of 65 ml/kg/min and were aged between 19 and 24 years. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect the volunteers were kept under an average of 1000 steps/day. The subjects were divided into three equal groups of 6: 6 underwent a normal ambulatory life (control group), 6 were placed under HK (hypokinetic group) and the remaining 6 were subjected to HK and consumed a daily FSS (water 26 ml/kg body wt and NaCl 0.10 mg/kg body wt) (hyperhydrated group). The density of the ulnar, radius, tibia, fibular, lumbar vertebrae and calcenous was measured. Calcium and phosphorus changes, plasma volume, blood pressure and body weight were determined. Calcium content in the examined skeletal bones decreased more in the hypokinetic subjects than in the hyperhydrated subjects. Urinary calcium and phosphorus losses were more pronounced in hypokinetic than hyperhydrated subjects. Plasma volume and body weight increased in hyperhydrated subjects, while it decreased in hypokinetic subjects. It was concluded that a daily intake of FSS may be used to neutralize bone demineralization in physically healthy subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity.

  13. Comparative study of ecotoxicological effect of triorganotin compounds on various biological subjects.

    PubMed

    Fargasová, A

    1997-02-01

    The toxic and inhibitory effect of 10 triorganotin compounds (triphenlyl-, tribenzyl-, and tributyltins) were determined under standardized conditions on four biological subjects: Tubifex tubifex, Chironomus plumosus, Sinapis alba seeds, and the alga Scenedesmus quadricauda. Observed were the mortality of T. tubifex and Ch. plumosus after 96 hr, the root growth inhibition of S. alba seeds after 72 hr, and the inhibition of growth, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll a content of S. quadricauda after 12 days of cultivation. The effect of triorganotins was expressed as LC50 values for mortality and EC50 values for inhibition. For each subject and observed parameter the rank order of toxicity/or inhibition was arranged.

  14. Estimating intervention effects across different types of single-subject experimental designs: empirical illustration.

    PubMed

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M; Onghena, Patrick; Heyvaert, Mieke; Beretvas, S Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the multilevel meta-analysis of results from single-subject experimental designs of different types, including AB phase designs, multiple-baseline designs, ABAB reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs. Current methodological work on the meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs often focuses on combining simple AB phase designs or multiple-baseline designs. We discuss the estimation of the average intervention effect estimate across different types of single-subject experimental designs using several multilevel meta-analytic models. We illustrate the different models using a reanalysis of a meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs (Heyvaert, Saenen, Maes, & Onghena, in press). The intervention effect estimates using univariate 3-level models differ from those obtained using a multivariate 3-level model that takes the dependence between effect sizes into account. Because different results are obtained and the multivariate model has multiple advantages, including more information and smaller standard errors, we recommend researchers to use the multivariate multilevel model to meta-analyze studies that utilize different single-subject designs.

  15. Prenatal TCDD Exposure Predisposes for Mammary Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Sarah; Rowell, Craig; Wang, Jun; Lamartiniere, Coral A.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological data are conflicting in the link between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure and breast cancer causation. We have hypothesized that timing of exposure to endocrine disruptors, such as TCDD, will alter breast cancer susceptibility. Using a carcinogen induced rat mammary cancer model, we have shown that prenatal exposure to TCDD alters mammary gland differentiation and increases susceptibility for mammary cancer. Investigations into imprinting via DNA methylation mechanisms showed that there were no changes in protein expression in DNA methyltransferases, ER-alpha, ER-beta, GST-pi, or MDGI. Using 2-D gels and mass spectrometry, we have found seven proteins to be differentially regulated, including a decrease in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Down-regulation of SOD1 could provide an environment ill equipped to deal with subsequent free radical exposure. We conclude that prenatal TCDD can predispose for mammary cancer susceptibility in the adult offspring by altering the mammary proteome. PMID:17157473

  16. Rumen conditions that predispose cattle to pasture bloat.

    PubMed

    Majak, W; Howarth, R E; Cheng, K J; Hall, J W

    1983-08-01

    Rumen contents from the dorsal sac were examined before alfalfa ingestion to determine factors that predispose cattle to pasture bloat. Chlorophyll concentration, buoyancy of particulate matter, and rates of gas production were significantly higher in cattle that subsequently bloated than in those that did not. Higher chlorophyll in bloat cases indicated accumulation of suspended chloroplast particles in the dorsal sac, perhaps due to increased buoyancy of the particulate matter. The higher fermentation rates (in the presence of glucose) suggested that the latent capacity for gas production was due to microbial colonization of suspended feed particles. Chlorophyll 4 h after feeding was also higher in bloated as compared to unbloated animals. In short, the microbial colonization and retention of particulate matter provided active inocula for promoting rapid legume digestion. Consequently, gas production was enhanced when feeding commenced, but the fermentation gases were trapped by the buoyant, frothy ingesta, resulting in the condition of pasture bloat. PMID:6619348

  17. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; Haile, Colin N; Mahoney, James J; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R

    2015-11-30

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine's reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  18. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; Haile, Colin N; Mahoney, James J; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R

    2015-11-30

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine's reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine.

  19. No Effects of Acute Alcohol Ingestion on Subjective Visual Horizontal Determination During Eccentric Rotation.

    PubMed

    Lindgren; Svenson; Olsson; Ödkvist; Ledin

    1998-01-01

    Evaluating the function of the vestibular part of the inner ear comprises more than the classic analysis of the lateral semicircular canal function. In healthy subjects, positional alcohol nystagmus may be seen after acute alcohol ingestion. Posturography has shown a deteriorated equilibrium after even moderate doses of alcohol, which speculatively could be an effect of otolith disturbance or a central integrative effect. We tested the possibility of an otolith effect by using linear acceleration in the lateral direction by means of eccentric rotation, stimulating mainly the outermost ear's otolith organ. The subject is seated eccentrically in a rotatory chair facing the direction of rotation. Thus, the otolith organs are stimulated in steady-state rotation. The subject experiences a lateral tilt and, in darkness, is instructed to put a short light bar in the position thought to be that of a water surface, which is identical to the perceived tilt. Twenty healthy subjects (10 men, 10 women) aged 20-29 years were tested before and approximately 1 hour after ingestion of alcohol, the amounts consumed corresponding to an approximate blood alcohol level of 0.05%, well above the maximum permissible level for driving in Sweden. No significant effects of alcohol were found. The otolith function probably is not affected by moderate alcohol intoxication levels. From this point of view, equilibrium deterioration due to alcohol ingestion in the erect position is caused by a central integrative deficit and not by an otolith effect.

  20. Effect of visual stimulus using central and peripheral visual field on postural control of normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Park, Du-Jin

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of visual stimulus using central and peripheral vision fields on postural control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 40 young adult volunteers (15 males, 25 females) who had been informed of the study purpose and procedure. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of differing visual stimulus. Each group was given visual intervention in a standing position for 3 minutes. Postural control was evaluated before and after visual intervention. [Results] The results of the functional reach test and body sway test showed significant differences among the four groups. [Conclusion] The two-way peripheral vision-field group showed significantly more body sway after visual intervention than the other three groups. This finding may suggest two-way peripheral vision field is a more effective visual stimulus for training postural control and balance.

  1. Effect of visual stimulus using central and peripheral visual field on postural control of normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Park, Du-Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of visual stimulus using central and peripheral vision fields on postural control. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 40 young adult volunteers (15 males, 25 females) who had been informed of the study purpose and procedure. The subjects were randomly divided into four groups of differing visual stimulus. Each group was given visual intervention in a standing position for 3 minutes. Postural control was evaluated before and after visual intervention. [Results] The results of the functional reach test and body sway test showed significant differences among the four groups. [Conclusion] The two-way peripheral vision-field group showed significantly more body sway after visual intervention than the other three groups. This finding may suggest two-way peripheral vision field is a more effective visual stimulus for training postural control and balance. PMID:27390412

  2. Sequential contrast effects with retarded subjects after discrimination learning with and without errors.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J L

    1977-02-01

    Four retarded adults were exposed to a multiple variable interval-extinction schedule of reinforcement. The 2 min components were presented in a random order. Two subjects acquired the discrimination with an errorless procedure. The two other subjects learned the discrimination with errors. The schedule generated sequential contrast effects under both training procedures: response rates during periods of reinforcement were higher when a reinforcement period followed an extinction period than when it followed another reinforcement period. These results were confirmed in a second observation where eight retarded children were exposed to a multiple fixed ratio-extinction schedule of reinforcement. This study is the first demonstration of sequential contrast effects with human subjects during the acquisition of a discrimination without errors. The results are discussed in terms of Terrace's theory of errorless learning.

  3. The effect of graphic organizers on subjective and objective comprehension of a health education text.

    PubMed

    Kools, Marieke; van de Wiel, Margaretha W J; Ruiter, Robert A C; Crüts, Anica; Kok, Gerjo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the effect of graphic organizers on the comprehension of a health education brochure text and compared subjective with objective comprehension measures. Graphic organizers are graphical depictions of relations among concepts in a text. Participants read a brochure text about asthma with and without these organizers, and subjective and objective text comprehension was measured. It was found that graphic organizers had effects on four levels of objective comprehension as indicated by open comprehension questions. However, on the subjective comprehension measure using Likert-type scales, the groups with and without graphic organizers did not differ from each other. It is concluded that health education texts could benefit from relatively simple techniques to increase comprehension. Furthermore, in developing health education materials, comprehension should be measured objectively.

  4. [EFFECTS OF MUSIC-ACOUSTIC SIGNALS, ONLINE CONTROLLED BY EEG OSCILLATORS OF THE SUBJECT].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2015-08-01

    The effects of 2 variants of the method of musical EEG neurofeedback, in which the dominant spectral components of subject's EEG (EEG oscillators) are online converted to music-like signals similar by timbre to flute sounds, have been studied. In the first case, these music-like signals were smoothly varying by the pitch and intensity in accordance with the current amplitude of the EEG oscillator. In the second case, the same variations of flute-like sound were accompanied by such musical element as rhythm. After the single exposure, the modifications of subject's brain activity and positive changes in psycho-physiological state of the subject have been found. Particularly pronounced effects were observed under rhythmically organized music-like stimuli.

  5. [EFFECTS OF MUSIC-ACOUSTIC SIGNALS, ONLINE CONTROLLED BY EEG OSCILLATORS OF THE SUBJECT].

    PubMed

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2015-08-01

    The effects of 2 variants of the method of musical EEG neurofeedback, in which the dominant spectral components of subject's EEG (EEG oscillators) are online converted to music-like signals similar by timbre to flute sounds, have been studied. In the first case, these music-like signals were smoothly varying by the pitch and intensity in accordance with the current amplitude of the EEG oscillator. In the second case, the same variations of flute-like sound were accompanied by such musical element as rhythm. After the single exposure, the modifications of subject's brain activity and positive changes in psycho-physiological state of the subject have been found. Particularly pronounced effects were observed under rhythmically organized music-like stimuli. PMID:26591592

  6. Factors predisposing to wound infection in cardiac surgery. A prospective study of 517 patients.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A P; Livesey, S A; Treasure, T; Grüneberg, R N; Sturridge, M F

    1987-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection can greatly prolong hospital stay after cardiac surgery, so the identification of predisposing factors may help in prevention or early institution of treatment. Transfer of organisms from the leg to the sternum during coronary artery surgery has been proposed as a major additional cause of sepsis. The definition of wound infection is not standardised and therefore makes comparison between centres difficult. In a prospective study of 517 patients, a wound scoring method (ASEPSIS) has been used to register all abnormal wounds to maximise the chances of identifying factors predisposing to infection. Abnormal healing was noted in 99 (19%) sternal wounds and 29 (8%) leg wounds. Obesity was the principal risk factor (P less than 0.005). Diabetes, reoperation, length of preoperative hospital stay, age, sex, or previous cardiac surgery had little effect on wound healing. The range of bacteria isolated from chest wounds after coronary artery surgery was similar to that after valvular surgery, but the rate of isolation was significantly greater. With careful attention to technique, leg wound infection rarely presented a clinical problem and did not appear to be a source of bacteria infecting the chest wound.

  7. Bayesian analysis of uncertainty in predisposing and triggering factors for landslides hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandric, I.; Petropoulos, Y.; Chitu, Z.; Mihai, B.

    2012-04-01

    The landslide hazard analysis models takes into consideration both predisposing and triggering factors combined into a Bayesian temporal network with uncertainty propagation. The model uses as predisposing factors the first and second derivatives from DEM, the effective precipitations, runoff, lithology and land use. The latter is expressed not as land use classes, as for example CORINE, but as leaf area index. The LAI offers the advantage of modelling not just the changes from different time periods expressed in years, but also the seasonal changes in land use throughout a year. The LAI index was derived from Landsat time series images, starting from 1984 and up to 2011. All the images available for the Panatau administrative unit in Buzau County, Romania, have been downloaded from http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov, including the images with cloud cover. The model is run in a monthly time step and for each time step all the parameters values, a-priory, conditional and posterior probability are obtained and stored in a log file. The validation process uses landslides that have occurred during the period up to the active time step and checks the records of the probabilities and parameters values for those times steps with the values of the active time step. Each time a landslide has been positive identified new a-priory probabilities are recorded for each parameter. A complete log for the entire model is saved and used for statistical analysis and a NETCDF file is created

  8. Effects of the Sex of Both Interviewer and Subject on Reported Manifest Dream Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremsdorf, Ross B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined the effects of the sex of both interviewer and subject on the reported content of dreams. No sex differences in sexual content of dreams were found, although dreams of males were more vivid, active, and aggressive. Opposite-sex pairing mobilized reports of conflict within dreams. Same-sex pairing increased sexual content. (Author/BEF)

  9. Effect of Subject Types on the Production of Auxiliary "Is" in Young English-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Owen, Amanda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors tested the unique checking constraint (UCC) hypothesis and the usage-based approach concerning why young children variably use tense and agreement morphemes in obligatory contexts by examining the effect of subject types on the production of auxiliary "is". Method: Twenty typically developing 3-year-olds were…

  10. Habit Strength Differences in Motor Behavior: The Effects of Social Facilitation Paradigms and Subject Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landers, Daniel M.; And Others

    This document reports on research on the effects which the presence of other individuals have on another individual's performance. The experiment was conducted as follows: Selected male and female subjects were given the task of following a blind maze with a stylus. They were tested in performance under three different circumstances, alone, with a…

  11. Effects of inhaled rosemary oil on subjective feelings and activities of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sayorwan, Winai; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Piriyapunyporn, Teerut; Hongratanaworakit, Tapanee; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich; Siripornpanich, Vorasith

    2013-06-01

    Rosemary oil is one of the more famous essential oils widely used in aroma-therapy. However, the effects of rosemary oil on the human body, in particular the nervous system, have not been sufficiently studied. This study investigates the effects of the inhalation of rosemary oil on test subjects' feelings, as well as its effects on various physiological parameters of the nervous system. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. All subjects underwent autonomic nervous system (ANS) recording. This consisted of measurements of skin temperature; heart rate; respiratory rate; blood pressure; evaluations of the subjects' mood states; and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in the pre-, during treatment, and post-rosemary inhalation periods as compared with control conditions. Our results showed significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate after rosemary oil inhalation. After the inhalation treatments, subjects were found to have become more active and stated that they felt "fresher". The analysis of EEGs showed a reduction in the power of alpha1 (8-10.99 Hz) and alpha2 (11-12.99 Hz) waves. Moreover, an increment in the beta wave (13-30 Hz) power was observed in the anterior region of the brain. These results confirm the stimulatory effects of rosemary oil and provide supporting evidence that brain wave activity, autonomic nervous system activity, as well as mood states are all affected by the inhalation of the rosemary oil.

  12. Comparison of subjective, pharmacokinetic, and physiological effects of marijuana smoked as joints and blunts.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2009-08-01

    Recent increases in marijuana smoking among the young adult population have been accompanied by the popularization of smoking marijuana as blunts instead of as joints. Blunts consist of marijuana wrapped in tobacco leaves, whereas joints consist of marijuana wrapped in cigarette paper. To date, the effects of marijuana smoked as joints and blunts have not been systematically compared. The current within-subject, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study sought to directly compare the subjective, physiological, and pharmacokinetic effects of marijuana smoked by these two methods. Marijuana blunt smokers (12 women and 12 men) were recruited and participated in a 6-session outpatient study. Participants were blindfolded and smoked three puffs from either a blunt or a joint containing marijuana with varying Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations (0.0, 1.8, and 3.6%). Subjective, physiological (heart rate, blood pressure, and carbon monoxide levels) and pharmacokinetic effects (plasma THC concentration) were monitored before and at specified time points for 3h after smoking. Joints produced greater increases in plasma THC and subjective ratings of marijuana intoxication, strength, and quality compared to blunts, and these effects were more pronounced in women compared to men. However, blunts produced equivalent increases in heart rate and higher carbon monoxide levels than joints, despite producing lower levels of plasma THC. These findings demonstrate that smoking marijuana in a tobacco leaf may increase the risks of marijuana use by enhancing carbon monoxide exposure and increasing heart rate compared to joints. PMID:19443132

  13. The Effects of Objective Career Success on Subsequent Subjective Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumpf, Stephen A.; Tymon, Walter G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of working adults (N = 638) to explore the effects of past objective career success (mobility, promotions, and salary change) on current subjective success (human capital assessments by one's managers, core self evaluations, satisfaction with one's career) by gender, across an economic cycle (2004-2011), controlling for career…

  14. Effects of stereoscopic filming parameters and display duration on the subjective assessment of eye strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJsselsteijn, Wijnand A.; de Ridder, Huib; Vliegen, Joyce

    2000-05-01

    Despite many benefits that stereoscopic displays are known to have, there is evidence that stereoscopic displays can potentially cause discomfort to the viewer. The experiment reported in this paper was motivated by the need to quantify the potential subjective discomfort of viewing stereoscopic TV images. Observers provided direct subjective ratings of eye strain and quality in response to stereoscopic still images that varied in camera separation, convergence distance and focal length. Display duration of the images was varied between 1 an d15 seconds. Before and after the experiment, observers filled out a symptom checklist to assess any subjective discomfort resulting from the total experiment. Reported eye strain was on average around 'perceptible, but not annoying' for natural disparities. As disparity values increased reported eye strain increased to 'very annoying' and quality rating solved off and eventually dropped. This effect was most pronounced for the stereoscopic images that were produce using a short convergence distance. This effect may be attributed to an increase in keystone distortion in this condition. No significant effect of display duration was found. The results of the symptom checklist showed a slight increase in reported negative side-effects, with most observers reporting only mild symptoms of discomfort. Finally, our results showed that subjective stereoscopic image quality can be described as a function of reported eye strain and perceived depth.

  15. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H.; Jerome, Keith R.; Flamand, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6− subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm–Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm–Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6− subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73–6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23–7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6− without angina, iciHHV-6− with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6− subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina. PMID:26080419

  16. Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 as a predisposing risk factor for the development of angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Annie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Morissette, Guillaume; Sedlak, Ruth H; Jerome, Keith R; Flamand, Louis

    2015-06-30

    Inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6) results in the germ-line transmission of the HHV-6 genome. Every somatic cell of iciHHV-6+ individuals contains the HHV-6 genome integrated in the telomere of chromosomes. Whether having iciHHV-6 predisposes humans to diseases remains undefined. DNA from 19,597 participants between 40 and 69 years of age were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the presence of iciHHV-6. Telomere lengths were determined by qPCR. Medical records, hematological, biochemical, and anthropometric measurements and telomere lengths were compared between iciHHV-6+ and iciHHV-6- subjects. The prevalence of iciHHV-6 was 0.58%. Two-way ANOVA with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on continuous outcomes. Two-way logistic regression with a Holm-Bonferroni correction was used to determine the effects of iciHHV6, sex, and their interaction on disease prevalence. Of 50 diseases monitored, a single one, angina pectoris, is significantly elevated (3.3×) in iciHHV-6+ individuals relative to iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.017; 95% CI, 1.73-6.35). When adjusted for potential confounding factors (age, body mass index, percent body fat, and systolic blood pressure), the prevalence of angina remained three times greater in iciHHV-6+ subjects (P = 0.015; 95%CI, 1.23-7.15). Analyses of telomere lengths between iciHHV-6- without angina, iciHHV-6- with angina, and iciHHV-6+ with angina indicate that iciHHV-6+ with angina have shorter telomeres than age-matched iciHHV-6- subjects (P = 0.006). Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first large-scale analysis of disease association with iciHHV-6. Our results are consistent with iciHHV-6 representing a risk factor for the development of angina.

  17. Beginning Teachers' Conceptual Understandings of Effective History Teaching: Examining the Change from "Subject Knowers" to "Subject Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitano, Paul; Green, Nicole C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the investigation of change in preservice teachers' conceptions of effective history teaching across a secondary history methods course in a postgraduate diploma of education program. Using concept mapping to plot shifts in their expressed reflections, data were obtained that indicate personal constructs of effective history…

  18. Assessment of Safety, Cardiovascular and Subjective Effects After Intravenous Cocaine and Lofexidine

    PubMed Central

    De La Garza, R.; Galloway, G. P.; Newton, T.F.; Mendelson, J.; Haile, C.N.; Dib, E.; Hawkins, R. Y.; Chen, C-Y A.; Mahoney, J.J.; Mojsiak, J.; Lao, G.; Anderson, A.; Kahn, R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of lofexidine, an α2 receptor agonist, alone and concurrent with cocaine in non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent or cocaine-abusing participants. After screening, eligible participants received double-blind, randomized infusions of saline and 20 mg of cocaine on Day 1, and saline and 40 mg of cocaine on Day 2. Subjects were randomized and started receiving daily administration of placebo (N=4) or lofexidine on Day 3 and continued on this schedule until Day 7. Two dosing regimens for lofexedine were investigated: 0.8 QID (N=3) and 0.2 mg QID (N=11). On Days 6 and 7, subjects received double-blind infusions of saline and 20 mg of cocaine on Day 6, and saline and 40 mg of cocaine on Day 7. The data reveal a notable incidence of hemodynamic-related AEs over the course of the study. Two of the three participants at the 0.8 mg dose level discontinued, and five of 11 participants at the 0.2 mg dose level were withdrawn (or voluntarily discontinued) after hemodynamic AEs. Subjective effects and cardiovascular data were derived from all participants who were eligible to receive infusions (i.e., did not meet stopping criteria) on Days 6 and 7 (6 received lofexidine 0.2 mg, QID and 4 received placebo, QID). As expected, cocaine significantly increased heart rate and blood pressure, as well as several positive subjective effects. There was a trend for lofexidine to decrease cocaine-induced cardiovascular changes and cocaine-induced ratings for "Any Drug Effect", "Good Effects", and “Desire Cocaine”, but sample size issues limit the conclusions that can be drawn. Despite the trends to reduce cocaine-induced subjective effects, cardiovascular AEs may limit future utility of lofexidine as a treatment for this population. PMID:24316175

  19. Cognition and the Placebo Effect – Dissociating Subjective Perception and Actual Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Katharina A.; Büchel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The influence of positive or negative expectations on clinical outcomes such as pain relief or motor performance in patients and healthy participants has been extensively investigated for years. Such research promises potential benefit for patient treatment by deliberately using expectations as means to stimulate endogenous regulation processes. Especially regarding recent interest and controversies revolving around cognitive enhancement, the question remains whether mere expectancies might also yield enhancing or impairing effects in the cognitive domain, i.e., can we improve or impair cognitive performance simply by creating a strong expectancy in participants about their performance? Moreover, previous literature suggests that especially subjective perception is highly susceptible to expectancy effects, whereas objective measures can be affected in certain domains, but not in others. Does such a dissociation of objective measures and subjective perception also apply to cognitive placebo and nocebo effects? In this study, we sought to investigate whether placebo and nocebo effects can be evoked in cognitive tasks, and whether these effects influence objective and subjective measures alike. To this end, we instructed participants about alleged effects of different tone frequencies (high, intermediate, low) on brain activity and cognitive functions. We paired each tone with specific success rates in a Flanker task paradigm as a preliminary conditioning procedure, adapted from research on placebo hypoalgesia. In a subsequent test phase, we measured reaction times and success rates in different expectancy conditions (placebo, nocebo, and control) and then asked participants how the different tone frequencies affected their performance. Interestingly, we found no effects of expectation on objective measures, but a strong effect on subjective perception, i.e., although actual performance was not affected by expectancy, participants strongly believed that the placebo

  20. Oral Cannabidiol does not Alter the Subjective, Reinforcing or Cardiovascular Effects of Smoked Cannabis.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Malcolm, Robert J; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Cooper, Ziva D; Bedi, Gillinder; Gray, Kevin M; McRae-Clark, Aimee; Lofwall, Michelle R; Sparenborg, Steven; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a constituent of cannabis with few psychoactive effects, has been reported in some studies to attenuate certain aspects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) intoxication. However, most studies have tested only one dose of CBD in combination with one dose of oral THC, making it difficult to assess the nature of this interaction. Further, the effect of oral CBD on smoked cannabis administration is unknown. The objective of this multi-site, randomized, double-blind, within-subject laboratory study was to assess the influence of CBD (0, 200, 400, 800 mg, p.o.) pretreatment on the reinforcing, subjective, cognitive, and physiological effects of smoked cannabis (0.01 (inactive), 5.30-5.80% THC). Non-treatment-seeking, healthy cannabis smokers (n=31; 17M, 14 F) completed eight outpatient sessions. CBD was administered 90 min prior to cannabis administration. The behavioral and cardiovascular effects of cannabis were measured at baseline and repeatedly throughout the session. A subset of participants (n=8) completed an additional session to measure plasma CBD concentrations after administration of the highest CBD dose (800 mg). Under placebo CBD conditions, active cannabis (1) was self-administered by significantly more participants than placebo cannabis and (2) produced significant, time-dependent increases in ratings of 'High', 'Good Effect', ratings of the cannabis cigarette (eg, strength, liking), and heart rate relative to inactive cannabis. CBD, which alone produced no significant psychoactive or cardiovascular effects, did not significantly alter any of these outcomes. Cannabis self-administration, subjective effects, and cannabis ratings did not vary as a function of CBD dose relative to placebo capsules. These findings suggest that oral CBD does not reduce the reinforcing, physiological, or positive subjective effects of smoked cannabis. PMID:26708108

  1. Effect of CPAP on Endothelial Function in Subjects With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huajun; Wang, Yuyu; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is related to endothelial dysfunction. CPAP is the first-line treatment for OSA. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. The overall effects were measured by the weighted mean difference with a 95% CI. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity. Eleven studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. A random-effects model revealed that CPAP significantly improved endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilation (weighted mean difference of 2.92, 95% CI 2.21-3.63, P < .001), whereas there was no significant improvement in endothelial function in response to nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (weighted mean difference of 0.90, 95% CI -1.63 to 3.43, P = .48). Age, sex, CPAP compliance and duration, and sleep-related variables had no effect on reduction in arterial stiffness after CPAP. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the protective effect of CPAP on endothelial function was robust. CPAP significantly improved flow-mediated dilation in subjects with OSA. Long-term randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the positive effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA.

  2. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moulier, Virginie; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Isaac, Clémence; Allard, Anne-Camille; Bouaziz, Noomane; Sidhoumi, Djedia; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Benadhira, René; Thomas, Fanny; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency) or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs), and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life. PMID:26993786

  3. Effects of passive pedaling exercise on the intracortical inhibition in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Cortical reorganization can be induced by exercise below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of passive and active pedaling exercise on leg motor cortical area excitability of subjects with traumatic SCI. Ten subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were enrolled in the study. We found a significant effect of pedaling on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which did not interact with the experimental condition (active vs. passive). This corresponded to a significant reduction of SICI in the subjects with SCI, together with no evidence that this pattern differed for passive vs. active pedaling. We found no significant effect of pedaling on intracortical facilitation. Our results showed that also passive cycling may be beneficial in activating motor cortical regions and possibly also facilitating motor recovery after SCI. The present study confirms and extends the findings of previous studies that have observed task-specific cortical activation during passive pedaling. Therefore passive exercise therapies when applied below the level of the lesion in subjects with SCI could promote cortical neuroplastic reorganization.

  4. Effects of passive pedaling exercise on the intracortical inhibition in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Cortical reorganization can be induced by exercise below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of passive and active pedaling exercise on leg motor cortical area excitability of subjects with traumatic SCI. Ten subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were enrolled in the study. We found a significant effect of pedaling on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which did not interact with the experimental condition (active vs. passive). This corresponded to a significant reduction of SICI in the subjects with SCI, together with no evidence that this pattern differed for passive vs. active pedaling. We found no significant effect of pedaling on intracortical facilitation. Our results showed that also passive cycling may be beneficial in activating motor cortical regions and possibly also facilitating motor recovery after SCI. The present study confirms and extends the findings of previous studies that have observed task-specific cortical activation during passive pedaling. Therefore passive exercise therapies when applied below the level of the lesion in subjects with SCI could promote cortical neuroplastic reorganization. PMID:27108543

  5. Effects of exposure time during flight maneuvers on passenger subjective comfort rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were investigated of length of exposure time to a flight maneuver environment on subjective passenger evaluation of ride comfort. Four statistical analysis tests were performed on ride comfort ratings obtained during one two-hour test flight wherein eleven test subjects were exposed to two identical programmed sequences of twenty four flight segments which covered a wide range of maneuver conditions. The results of the analysis indicate that, for over ninety five percent of the segments, there is no significant change in the test subjects comfort ratings of identical segments spaced one hour apart. These results are in contrast to those found in previous studies involving a vibration environment, rather than flight maneuver environment, where increased exposure-time was found to cause a degradation of ride comfort ratings.

  6. Effects of varied doses of psilocybin on time interval reproduction in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jirí; Wittmann, Marc; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2008-04-11

    Action of a hallucinogenic substance, psilocybin, on internal time representation was investigated in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies: Experiment 1 with 12 subjects and graded doses, and Experiment 2 with 9 subjects and a very low dose. The task consisted in repeated reproductions of time intervals in the range from 1.5 to 5s. The effects were assessed by parameter kappa of the 'dual klepsydra' model of internal time representation, fitted to individual response data and intra-individually normalized with respect to initial values. The estimates kappa were in the same order of magnitude as in earlier studies. In both experiments, kappa was significantly increased by psilocybin at 90 min from the drug intake, indicating a higher loss rate of the internal duration representation. These findings are tentatively linked to qualitative alterations of subjective time in altered states of consciousness.

  7. Decreased Effective Connectivity from Cortices to the Right Parahippocampal Gyrus in Alzheimer's Disease Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu; Ward, B. Douglas; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to detect effective connectivity (EC) changes in the default mode network and hippocampus network in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 20 cognitively normal (CN) subjects, using multivariate Granger causality. The authors used the maximum coefficients in the multivariate autoregression model to quantitatively measure the different EC strength levels between the CN and AD groups. It was demonstrated that the EC strength difference can classify AD from CN subjects. Further, the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHP_R) showed imbalanced bidirectional EC connections. The PHP_R received weaker input connections from the neocortices, but its output connections were significantly increased in AD. These findings may provide neural physiological mechanisms for interpreting AD subjects' memory deficits during the encoding processes. PMID:25132215

  8. Inhaled vs. oral alprazolam: subjective, behavioral and cognitive effects, and modestly increased abuse potential

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Harrison, Joseph A.; Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Infrahuman and human studies suggest that a determinant of the abuse potential of a drug is rate of onset of subjective effects. Objectives This study sought to determine if the rate of onset of subjective effects and abuse potential of alprazolam would be increased when administered via inhalation vs. the oral route. Methods Placebo, inhaled alprazolam (0.5, 1, 2 mg), and oral alprazolam (1, 2, 4 mg) were administered under double-blind, double-dummy conditions using a cross-over design in 14 healthy participants with histories of drug abuse. Participant and observer ratings, and behavioral and cognitive performance measures were assessed repeatedly during 9 hour sessions. Results Both routes of administration produced orderly dose and time-related effects, with higher doses producing greater and longer lasting effects. Onset of subjective effects following inhaled alprazolam was very rapid (e.g., 2 vs. 49 minutes after 2 mg inhaled vs. oral). On measures of abuse potential (e.g., liking and good effects), inhaled alprazolam was more potent, as evidenced by a leftward shift in the dose response curve. Despite the potency difference, at the highest doses, peak ratings of subjective effects related to abuse potential (e.g., “drug liking”) were similar across the two routes. On other measures (e.g., sedation and performance) the routes were equipotent. Conclusions The inhaled route of administration modestly increased the abuse potential of alprazolam despite significantly increasing its rate of onset. If marketed, the reduced availability and increased cost of inhaled alprazolam may render the societal risk of increased abuse to be low. PMID:25199955

  9. Effects of azapropazone on pain-related brain activity in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, J; Mohammadian, P; Hummel, T; Florin, S; Brune, K; Geisslinger, G; Kobal, G

    1995-12-01

    1. The dose-related effects of azapropazone on (i) event-related and spontaneous EEG-activity and (ii) the subjects' pain ratings were investigated using an experimental human pain model based on both chemo-somatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERP) and subjects' pain ratings. 2. Healthy subjects (n = 20) participated in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, four-way cross-over study. Single doses of azapropazone (300 mg, 600 mg and 1200 mg) and placebo were administered intravenously. Each experiment consisted of five sessions (before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after administration of the medication). Each session lasted for approximately 40 min. In the first 20 min, pain was induced by short CO2-stimuli presented to the right nostril (phasic pain; interstimulus interval 30 s) and EEG was recorded from five positions. CSSERPs were obtained in response to painful CO2-stimuli. In the following 20 min period, tonic pain was induced by a constant stream of dry air introduced in the left nostril. Subjects rated the intensity of both phasic and tonic pain by means of a visual analogue scale. Additionally, a frequency analysis of the spontaneous EEG was performed. 3. Azapropazone reduced the pain-related CSSERP-amplitudes at frontal and parietal recording positions. This topographical pattern was observed in previous studies with opioids, while NSAIDs such as flurbiprofen and ketoprofen exerted effects at frontal and central positions. In contrast to other NSAIDs, administration of azapropazone resulted in a reduction of the frequency bands alpha 1, delta and theta of the spontaneous EEG. At the subjective level, analgesic effects of azapropazone were observed in the ratings of tonic pain. 4. Analgesic properties of azapropazone were demonstrated in man. The topographical pattern of the changes in the CSSERPs and the effects on EEG background activity suggest a central component of the analgesic action of azapropazone.

  10. The effect of age on diurnal variation in the pharmacokinetics of propranolol in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Shiga, T; Fujimura, A; Tateishi, T; Ohashi, K; Ebihara, A

    1993-01-01

    There is diurnal variation in the absorption rate of propranolol in younger subjects. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of age on the chronopharmacokinetics of propranolol. We gave 20 mg of propranolol orally to 13 younger and 11 older hypertensive subjects at 09.00 h (day study) or 21.00 h (night study) in a cross-over design. Plasma concentrations of propranolol and its metabolites, 4-hydroxypropranolol and naphthoxylactic acid, were determined just before and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after dosage. In the younger subjects the absorption rate constant (ka) of propranolol and its maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) were significantly higher and the time to maximum concentration (tmax) was significantly shorter in the day than at night. There were similar time-variant changes in Cmax and tmax for 4-hydroxypropranolol and naphthoxylactic acid. In contrast, there were no time-variant changes in ka, Cmax and tmax of propranolol and its metabolites in the older subjects. These results suggest that propranolol is absorbed more rapidly after morning dosing than after night-time dosing in younger but not in older subjects. Based on these findings, we speculate that the time-variance in the absorption rate or first-pass elimination, or both, of propranolol diminish with age.

  11. Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Anthropometric Measurements and Appetite Sensations in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Alan; Tseng, Jason; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. A patient-assessor-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled crossover trial was performed to investigate the effectiveness of laser acupuncture on anthropometric measurements and appetite sensation in obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-two obese subjects were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group or the sham laser acupuncture group. Subjects within each group received the relevant treatment three times a week for 8 weeks. After a two-week washout period, the subjects then received the treatment of the opposite group for another 8 weeks. BMI, body fat percentage, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist circumference, hip circumference, and appetite sensations were measured before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results. BMI, body fat percentage, WHR, waist circumference, and hip circumference decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the laser acupuncture group compared to baseline but there was no decrease in those variables in the sham laser acupuncture group. Laser acupuncture significantly improved scores on the fullness, hunger, satiety, desire to eat, and overall well-being relative to the baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Laser acupuncture is well tolerated and improves anthropometric measurements and appetite sensations in obese subjects. PMID:27051454

  12. Evaluation of the effects of subject thickness on the exposure index in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Takeshi; Takeda, Kazuki; Murakami, Seiichi; Ogawa, Haruhisa; Ogawa, Masato; Sakamoto, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The exposure index (EI) was proposed as a new X-ray dose index by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and has since been implemented as an international standard. The EI is calculated by use of an approximation equation under IEC-specified calibration conditions. However, several factors encountered in clinical practice, including the patient's body thickness and the tube voltage, differ with regard to these calibration conditions. We, therefore, require a solid water phantom-based function that can incorporate the IEC-specified conditions and different subject thicknesses to evaluate the effects of subject thickness on the EI. Here, we assumed average thicknesses of 10 cm for a child, 15 cm for slender patients, and 21 cm for an average adult abdomen and we evaluated errors, that are included in the EI, which were calculated by use of the function. Our results suggested that the EI depends on the subject thickness. At the 21-cm thickness (average adult abdomen), the display EI exhibited a small error level. In contrast, EI values calculated from the calibration conditions exhibited maximum errors that were as high as 34 % at the lower subject thicknesses (10 and 15 cm), suggesting a significant influence of the subject thickness on the EI. In conclusion, the EI should be used cautiously during the examination of children and thin patients, with a complete understanding of the discrepancy revealed by our study results.

  13. Discriminative-Stimulus, Subject-rated and Physiological Effects of Methamphetamine in Humans Pretreated with Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Sevak, Rajkumar J.; Vansickel, Andrea R.; Stoops, William W.; Glaser, Paul E. A.; Hays, Lon R.; Rush, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine is thought to produce its behavioral effects by releasing dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine. Results from animal studies support this notion, while results from human laboratory studies have not consistently demonstrated the importance of monoamine systems in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Human laboratory procedures of drug-discrimination are well suited to assess neuropharmacological mechanisms of the training drug by studying pharmacological manipulation. In this human laboratory study, six participants with a history of recreational stimulant use learned to discriminate 10 mg oral methamphetamine. After acquiring the discrimination (i.e., ≥80% correct responding on 4 consecutive sessions), the effects of a range of doses of methamphetamine (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg), alone and in combination with 0 and 20 mg aripiprazole (a partial agonist at D2 and 5-HT1A receptors), were assessed. Methamphetamine alone functioned as a discriminative stimulus, produced prototypical stimulant-like subject-rated drug effects (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects, Talkative-Friendly, and Willing to Pay For) and elevated cardiovascular indices. These effects were generally a function of dose. Aripiprazole alone did not occasion methamphetamine-appropriate responding or produce subject-rated effects, but modestly impaired performance. Administration of aripiprazole significantly attenuated the discriminative-stimulus and cardiovascular effects of methamphetamine, as well as some of the subject-rated drug effects. These results indicate that monoamine systems likely play a role in the behavioral effects of methamphetamine in humans. Moreover, given the concordance between past results with d-amphetamine and the present findings, d-amphetamine can likely serve as a model for the pharmacological effects of methamphetamine. PMID:21694622

  14. Effects of hydroxymethanesulfonate on airway function in subjects with asthma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.; Balmes, J.R.; Aris, R.M.; Christian, D.

    1989-06-30

    The organic ion hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMSA) has been measured in micro-molecular concentrations in acidic fogs in southern California. HMSA is a stable adduct in fogs with a pH range of 3-5, but it is likely to dissociate at pH 6.6, the pH of the human airways fluid lining. It was hypothesized that HMSA may have a specific bronchoconstrictor effect because HMSA may dissociate in the airway lumen generating SO{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}O, both of which have bronchoconstrictor potential. In order to determine whether HMSA has such an effect, a total of 19 subjects with mild to moderate asthma were studied in an exposure chamber in which freely breathing and exercising subjects inhaled simulated fogs containing HMSA at a concentration (1000 micro M) higher than the ambient levels for 1 hour. The results indicated no significant bronchoconstrictor effect for acute exposures of HMSA.

  15. Anxiety Sensitivity as a Predictor of Acute Subjective Effects of Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety sensitivity (i.e., AS; the degree to which one believes that anxiety and its related sensations are harmful) is a stable trait that is associated with habitual smoking. Yet, the mechanisms linking AS and smoking are unclear. A promising hypothesis is that high-AS individuals are more sensitive to the acute subjective reinforcing effects of smoking and are, therefore, more prone to tobacco dependence. This study examined trait AS as a predictor of several subjective effects of cigarette smoking. Methods: Adult non-treatment-seeking smokers (N = 87; 10+ cigarettes/day) completed a measure of AS during a baseline session. Prior to a subsequent experimental session, participants were asked to smoke normally before their appointment. At the outset of that visit, each participant smoked a single cigarette of their preferred brand in the laboratory. Self-report measures of affect and cigarette craving were completed before and after smoking, and post-cigarette subjective effect ratings were provided. Results: AS predicted greater increases in positive affect from pre- to post-cigarette (β = .30, p = .006) as well as greater smoking satisfaction and psychological reward (β = .23 to .48, ps < .03). Each of these effects remained statistically significant after adjusting for anxiety symptom severity. AS did not predict the degree of negative affect and craving suppression or post-cigarette aversive effects. Conclusions: These findings suggest that positive reinforcement mechanisms may be particularly salient etiological processes that maintain smoking in high-AS individuals. PMID:23144083

  16. The Essence of Conscious Conflict: Subjective Effects of Sustaining Incompatible Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Morsella, Ezequiel; Gray, Jeremy R.; Krieger, Stephen C.; Bargh, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Conflict constitutes one of the fundamental ‘tuggings and pullings’ of the human experience. Yet, the link between the various kinds of conflict in the nervous system and subjective experience remains unexplained. We tested a hypothesis that predicts why both the ‘hot’ conflicts involving self-control and motivation, and the ‘cooler’ response conflicts of the laboratory, lead to changes in subjective experience. From this standpoint, these changes arise automatically from the activation of incompatible skeletomotor intentions, because the primary function of consciousness is to integrate such intentions for adaptive skeletal muscle output. Accordingly, we demonstrated for the first time that merely sustaining incompatible intentions (to move right and left) in a motionless state produces stronger subjective effects than sustaining compatible intentions. The results held equally strongly for two different effector systems involving skeletal muscle: arm movements and finger movements. In contrast, no such effects were found with conflict in a smooth muscle effector system. Together, these findings illuminate aspects of the nature of subjective experience and the role of incompatible intentions in affect and failures of self-control. PMID:19803593

  17. Effects of goal-setting interventions on selected basketball skills: a single-subject design.

    PubMed

    Swain, A; Jones, G

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a goal-setting intervention program on selected components of basketball performance over the course of a competitive season. A multiple-baseline, single-subject design was used with baseline observations on various performance components (e.g., turnovers, rebounds), collected for four elite college basketball players during their first eight games of the season. At the midseason break, these players selected one aspect of their play that they felt would benefit from improvement. A goal-setting program was designed based on the goal attainment scaling procedure recommended by Smith (1988), whereby subjects generated numerical targets for their chosen components. Performance components were then assessed for the next eight games as they had been in the preintervention phase. Following the intervention, 3 of the 4 subjects showed consistent improvements in their targeted areas of performance. Also, there were no outcome changes in the performance components that weren't targeted by the subjects. The findings suggest that future studies may benefit from achieving greater ecological validity and utilizing alternative designs to the traditional nomothetic approaches which may tend to mask positive intervention effects on certain individuals.

  18. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers.

    PubMed

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-10-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4-6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects ('good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1-51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of 'good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder.

  19. Naltrexone Maintenance Decreases Cannabis Self-Administration and Subjective Effects in Daily Cannabis Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Margaret; Ramesh, Divya; Glass, Andrew; Pavlicova, Martina; Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D

    2015-01-01

    Given that cannabis use is increasing in the United States, pharmacological treatment options to treat cannabis use disorder are needed. Opioid antagonists modulate cannabinoid effects and may offer a potential approach to reducing cannabis use. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study, we assessed the effects of naltrexone maintenance on the reinforcing, subjective, psychomotor, and cardiovascular effects of active and inactive cannabis. Nontreatment-seeking, daily cannabis smokers were randomized to receive naltrexone (50 mg: n=18 M and 5 F) or placebo (0 mg; n=26 M and 2 F) capsules for 16 days. Before, during, and after medication maintenance, participants completed 10 laboratory sessions over 4–6 weeks, assessing cannabis' behavioral and cardiovascular effects. Medication compliance was verified by observed capsule administration, plasma naltrexone, and urinary riboflavin. Relative to placebo, maintenance on naltrexone significantly reduced both active cannabis self-administration and its positive subjective effects (‘good effect'). Participants in the placebo group had 7.6 times (95% CI: 1.1–51.8) the odds of self-administering active cannabis compared with the naltrexone group. This attenuation of reinforcing and positive subjective effects also influenced cannabis use in the natural ecology. Naltrexone had intrinsic effects: decreasing ratings of friendliness, food intake, and systolic blood pressure, and increasing spontaneous reports of stomach upset and headache, yet dropout rates were comparable between groups. In summary, we show for the first time that maintenance on naltrexone decreased cannabis self-administration and ratings of ‘good effect' in nontreatment-seeking daily cannabis smokers. Clinical studies in patients motivated to reduce their cannabis use are warranted to evaluate naltrexone's efficacy as a treatment for cannabis use disorder. PMID:25881117

  20. A Common Variant in the FTO Gene Is Associated with Body Mass Index and Predisposes to Childhood and Adult Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frayling, Timothy M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Perry, John R. B.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Rayner, Nigel W.; Shields, Beverley; Harries, Lorna W.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Knight, Bridget; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ness, Andrew R.; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ring, Susan M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sovio, Ulla; Bennett, Amanda J.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Karpe, Fredrik; Owen, Katharine R.; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Smith, George Davey; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a serious international health problem that increases the risk of several common diseases. The genetic factors predisposing to obesity are poorly understood. A genome-wide search for type 2 diabetes–susceptibility genes identified a common variant in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) gene that predisposes to diabetes through an effect on body mass index (BMI). An additive association of the variant with BMI was replicated in 13 cohorts with 38,759 participants. The 16% of adults who are homozygous for the risk allele weighed about 3 kilograms more and had 1.67-fold increased odds of obesity when compared with those not inheriting a risk allele. This association was observed from age 7 years upward and reflects a specific increase in fat mass. PMID:17434869

  1. Therapeutic satisfaction and subjective effects of different strains of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Tibor M; van Genugten, Marianne; Höner-Snoeken, Kathrin; van de Velde, Marco J; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2014-06-01

    In The Netherlands, pharmaceutical-grade cultivated cannabis is distributed for medicinal purposes as commissioned by the Ministry of Health. Few studies have thus far described its therapeutic efficacy or subjective (adverse) effects in patients. The aims of this study are to assess the therapeutic satisfaction within a group of patients using prescribed pharmaceutical-grade cannabis and to compare the subjective effects among the available strains with special focus on their delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol content. In a cross-sectional and natural design, users of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis were investigated with questionnaires. Medical background of the patients was asked as well as experienced therapeutic effects and characteristics of cannabis use. Subjective effects were measured with psychometric scales and used to compare among the strains of cannabis used across this group of patients. One hundred two patients were included; their average age was 53 years and 76% used it for more than a year preceding this study. Chronic pain (53%; n = 54) was the most common medical indication for using cannabis followed by multiple sclerosis (23%; n = 23), and 86% (n = 88) of patients (almost) always experienced therapeutic satisfaction when using pharmaceutical cannabis. Dejection, anxiety, and appetite stimulation were found to differ among the 3 strains of cannabis. These results show that patients report therapeutic satisfaction with pharmaceutical cannabis, mainly pain alleviation. Some subjective effects were found to differ among the available strains of cannabis, which is discussed in relation to their different tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol content. These results may aid in further research and critical appraisal for medicinally prescribed cannabis products.

  2. The Effect of Glycerol Supplements on Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance of Athletes and Sedentary Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Patlar, Suleyman; Yalçin, Hasan; Boyali, Ekrem

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycerol supplementation on aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance in sedentary subjects and athletes. The glycerol supplement treatments were as follows: 40 volunteers were selected and divided into two groups, sedentary and exercise groups. These two groups were further subdivided into two groups. The first group, the placebo (S), only consumed water; the second group (GS) consumed glycerol followed by water. Neither of these groups did any exercise for 20 days. The third and fourth groups consisted of the exercise group subjects; they were required to perform a 20-m shuttle run test every day for 20 days. The third group’s subjects, the placebo (E), only consumed water. The last group (GE) consumed glycerol followed by water. The Astrand Cycle Ergometer Test (ACET) was performed, and the Cosmed K4b2 portable gas analysis system was used to determine the aerobic capacity, while the Wingate Anaerobic Power Test (WAPT) was performed to determine the level of anaerobic power. The 20 Meter Shuttle Run Test (20MSRT) was performed after glycerol supplementation throughout the 20 days, and the exercise periods and distances were recorded. The glycerol supplement was found to have an increasing effect on aerobic and anaerobic performance in GS, E and GE. A similar effect was found for the covered distances and time in the same groups. However, an adverse effect was found on body weight. PMID:23487412

  3. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS ‘elated’ scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3–4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous

  4. Comparison of Caffeine and d-amphetamine in Cocaine-Dependent Subjects: Differential Outcomes on Subjective and Cardiovascular Effects, Reward Learning, and Salivary Paraxanthine.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy M; Rathnayaka, Nuvan; Fang, Wendy B; Ferré, Sergi; Moeller, F Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Due to indirect modulation of dopamine transmission, adenosine receptor antagonists may be useful in either treating cocaine use or improving disrupted cognitive-behavioral functions associated with chronic cocaine use. To compare and contrast the stimulant effects of adenosine antagonism to direct dopamine stimulation, we administered 150 mg and 300 mg caffeine, 20 mg amphetamine, and placebo to cocaine-dependent vs. healthy control subjects, matched on moderate caffeine use. Data were obtained on measures of cardiovascular effects, subjective drug effects (ARCI, VAS, DEQ), and a probabilistic reward-learning task sensitive to dopamine modulation. Levels of salivary caffeine and the primary caffeine metabolite paraxanthine were obtained on placebo and caffeine dosing days. Cardiovascular results revealed main effects of dose for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate; follow up tests showed that controls were most sensitive to 300 mg caffeine and 20 mg amphetamine; cocaine-dependent subjects were sensitive only to 300 mg caffeine. Subjective effects results revealed dose × time and dose × group interactions on the ARCI A, ARCI LSD, and VAS 'elated' scales; follow up tests did not show systematic differences between groups with regard to caffeine or d-amphetamine. Large between-group differences in salivary paraxanthine (but not salivary caffeine) levels were obtained under both caffeine doses. The cocaine-dependent group expressed significantly higher paraxanthine levels than controls under 150 mg and 3-4 fold greater levels under 300 mg at 90 min and 150 min post caffeine dose. However, these differences also covaried with cigarette smoking status (not balanced between groups), and nicotine smoking is known to alter caffeine/paraxanthine metabolism via cytochrome P450 enzymes. These preliminary data raise the possibility that adenosine antagonists may affect cocaine-dependent and non-dependent subjects differently. In conjunction with previous preclinical and

  5. Subjective, cognitive, and cardiovascular dose-effect profile of nabilone and dronabinol in marijuana smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D.; Haney, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Marijuana dependence is a substantial public health problem, with existing treatments showing limited efficacy. In laboratory and clinical studies, the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist oral Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol) has been shown to decrease marijuana withdrawal, but not relapse. Dronabinol has poor bioavailability, potentially contributing to its failure to decrease relapse. The synthetic THC analogue, nabilone, has better bioavailability than dronabinol. We therefore aimed to characterize nabilone's behavioral and physiological effects across a range of acute doses in current marijuana smokers, and compare these with dronabinol's effects. Participants (4F; 10M) smoking marijuana 6.6 (SD = 0.7) days/week completed this outpatient, within-subjects, double-blind, randomized protocol. Over 7 sessions, the time-dependent subjective, cognitive, and cardiovascular effects of nabilone (2, 4, 6, 8 mg), dronabinol (10, 20 mg) and placebo were assessed. Nabilone (4, 6, 8 mg) and dronabinol (10, 20 mg) increased ratings of feeling a good effect, a strong effect, and/or `high' relative to placebo; nabilone had a slower onset of peak subjective effects than dronabinol. Nabilone (6, 8 mg) modestly lowered psychomotor speed relative to placebo and dronabinol. There were dose-dependent increases in heart rate after nabilone, and nabilone (2 mg) and dronabinol (10 mg) decreased systolic blood pressure. Thus, nabilone produced sustained, dose-related increases in positive mood, few cognitive decrements, and lawful cardiovascular alterations. It had a longer time to peak effects than dronabinol and effects were more dose-related, suggesting improved bioavailability. Nabilone was well-tolerated by marijuana smokers, supporting further testing as a potential medication for marijuana dependence. PMID:22260337

  6. Subjective, cognitive and cardiovascular dose-effect profile of nabilone and dronabinol in marijuana smokers.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Marijuana dependence is a substantial public health problem, with existing treatments showing limited efficacy. In laboratory and clinical studies, the cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist oral Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol) has been shown to decrease marijuana withdrawal but not relapse. Dronabinol has poor bioavailability, potentially contributing to its failure to decrease relapse. The synthetic THC analogue, nabilone, has better bioavailability than dronabinol. We therefore aimed to characterize nabilone's behavioral and physiological effects across a range of acute doses in current marijuana smokers and compare these with dronabinol's effects. Participants (4 female; 10 male) smoking marijuana 6.6 (standard deviation = 0.7) days/week completed this outpatient, within-subjects, double-blind, randomized protocol. Over seven sessions, the time-dependent subjective, cognitive and cardiovascular effects of nabilone (2, 4, 6, 8 mg), dronabinol (10, 20 mg) and placebo were assessed. Nabilone (4, 6, 8 mg) and dronabinol (10, 20 mg) increased ratings of feeling a good effect, a strong effect and/or 'high' relative to placebo; nabilone had a slower onset of peak subjective effects than dronabinol. Nabilone (6, 8 mg) modestly lowered psychomotor speed relative to placebo and dronabinol. There were dose-dependent increases in heart rate after nabilone, and nabilone (2 mg) and dronabinol (10 mg) decreased systolic blood pressure. Thus, nabilone produced sustained, dose-related increases in positive mood, few cognitive decrements and lawful cardiovascular alterations. It had a longer time to peak effects than dronabinol, and effects were more dose-related, suggesting improved bioavailability. Nabilone was well tolerated by marijuana smokers, supporting further testing as a potential medication for marijuana dependence.

  7. Subjective, cognitive and cardiovascular dose-effect profile of nabilone and dronabinol in marijuana smokers.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Marijuana dependence is a substantial public health problem, with existing treatments showing limited efficacy. In laboratory and clinical studies, the cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist oral Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol) has been shown to decrease marijuana withdrawal but not relapse. Dronabinol has poor bioavailability, potentially contributing to its failure to decrease relapse. The synthetic THC analogue, nabilone, has better bioavailability than dronabinol. We therefore aimed to characterize nabilone's behavioral and physiological effects across a range of acute doses in current marijuana smokers and compare these with dronabinol's effects. Participants (4 female; 10 male) smoking marijuana 6.6 (standard deviation = 0.7) days/week completed this outpatient, within-subjects, double-blind, randomized protocol. Over seven sessions, the time-dependent subjective, cognitive and cardiovascular effects of nabilone (2, 4, 6, 8 mg), dronabinol (10, 20 mg) and placebo were assessed. Nabilone (4, 6, 8 mg) and dronabinol (10, 20 mg) increased ratings of feeling a good effect, a strong effect and/or 'high' relative to placebo; nabilone had a slower onset of peak subjective effects than dronabinol. Nabilone (6, 8 mg) modestly lowered psychomotor speed relative to placebo and dronabinol. There were dose-dependent increases in heart rate after nabilone, and nabilone (2 mg) and dronabinol (10 mg) decreased systolic blood pressure. Thus, nabilone produced sustained, dose-related increases in positive mood, few cognitive decrements and lawful cardiovascular alterations. It had a longer time to peak effects than dronabinol, and effects were more dose-related, suggesting improved bioavailability. Nabilone was well tolerated by marijuana smokers, supporting further testing as a potential medication for marijuana dependence. PMID:22260337

  8. Mutations in the transcriptional repressor REST predispose to Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Hanks, Sandra; Karlin, Kristen L; Zachariou, Anna; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Ruark, Elise; Shaw, Chad A; Renwick, Alexander; Ramsay, Emma; Yost, Shawn; Elliott, Anna; Birch, Jillian; Capra, Michael; Gray, Juliet; Hale, Juliet; Kingston, Judith; Levitt, Gill; McLean, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Stiller, Charles; Sebire, Neil; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-12-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal cancer. To identify mutations that predispose to Wilms tumor, we are conducting exome sequencing studies. Here we describe 11 different inactivating mutations in the REST gene (encoding RE1-silencing transcription factor) in four familial Wilms tumor pedigrees and nine non-familial cases. Notably, no similar mutations were identified in the ICR1000 control series (13/558 versus 0/993; P < 0.0001) or in the ExAC series (13/558 versus 0/61,312; P < 0.0001). We identified a second mutational event in two tumors, suggesting that REST may act as a tumor-suppressor gene in Wilms tumor pathogenesis. REST is a zinc-finger transcription factor that functions in cellular differentiation and embryonic development. Notably, ten of 11 mutations clustered within the portion of REST encoding the DNA-binding domain, and functional analyses showed that these mutations compromise REST transcriptional repression. These data establish REST as a Wilms tumor predisposition gene accounting for ∼2% of Wilms tumor. PMID:26551668

  9. Are reptiles predisposed to temperature-dependent sex determination?

    PubMed

    Georges, A; Ezaz, T; Quinn, A E; Sarre, S D

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrates show an astonishing array of sex determining mechanisms, including male and female heterogamety, multiple sex chromosome systems, environmental sex determination, parthenogenesis and hermaphroditism. Sex determination in mammals and birds is extraordinarily conservative compared to that of reptiles, amphibians and fish. In this paper, we explore possible explanations for the diversity of sex determining modes in reptiles, and in particular, address the prevalence of reptilian temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and its almost haphazard distribution across the reptile phylogeny. We suggest that reptiles are predisposed to evolving TSD from genotypic sex determination (GSD) by virtue of the uniquely variable thermal environment experienced by their embryos during the critical period in which sex is determined. Explicit mechanisms for canalization of sexual phenotype in the face of high thermal variation during development provide a context for thermolability in sex determination at extremes and the raw material for natural selection to move this thermolability into the developmental mainstream when there is a selective advantage to do so. Release of cryptic variation when canalization is challenged and fails at extremes may accelerate evolutionary transitions between GSD and TSD.

  10. Predisposing factors leading to depression in the British Army.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; McGee, Paula; Srinivasan, Mike; Simpson, Robin

    Few studies have explored the predisposing factors leading to depression within the British Army, and this qualitative investigation provides a novel approach to advance knowledge in this poorly researched area. Information was provided by army mental health (MH) clinicians, with results aligned to theoretical groupings under the headings of: occupational stressors; macho culture, stigma and bullying; unhappy young soldier; relationships and gender. These issues were influenced by peacetime and operational settings; the support offered by the Army Medical Services and unit command. The results indicate that Army personnel are exposed to multi-factorial stressors that are incremental/accumulative in nature. Soldiers can cope with extreme pressures, often in hostile environments, but often cannot cope with a failing relationship. Officers were worried about the occupational implications of reporting ill, and the negative impact on their career, and might seek support from private civilian agencies, which have potentially dangerous ramifications as they may still deploy. GPs refer female soldiers more frequently for a mental health assessment because women express their emotions more openly then men. Young disillusioned soldiers who want to leave the Army form the main group of personnel accessing mental health support, although often they are not clinically depressed.

  11. On the Effects of Time-Variant Sound Fields on Subjective Preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATAGI, J.; ANDO, Y.; UEDA, Y.

    2000-04-01

    Two experiments were performed to examine effects of modulated delay time of reflection on subjective preference. A time-variant model of an impulse response was applied for the sound stimuli. It consists of a direct sound and a single reflection whose delay time was modulated by a 0·1 Hz sinusoidal wave. The first experiment showed that the most preferred delay time of reflection is shortened when the delay time of reflection is modulated. It was found in the second experiment that the sound field with the modulated delay time of reflection is preferred to that with the fixed delay time of reflection especially in the case of performing changeful music with a small value of the effective duration of the autocorrelation function. Such a time-variant sound field may improve the subjective preference.

  12. Effect of RAAS blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high CVD risk subjects with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chaugai, Sandip; Sherpa, Lhamo Yanchang; Sepehry, Amir A.; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that atrial fibrillation significantly increases the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects. Application of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers for prevention of recurrence of atrial fibrillation and adverse clinical outcomes in subjects with atrial fibrillation is a theoretically appealing concept. However, results of clinical trials evaluating the effect of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on adverse clinical outcomes in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation remain inconclusive. A pooled study of 6 randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone blockers on subjects with atrial fibrillation was performed. A total of 6 randomized controlled trials enrolled a total of 53,510 patients followed for 1 to 5 years. RAAS blockade therapy was associated with 14% reduction in the incidence of heart failure (OR: 0.86, [95%CI: 0.76– 0.97], P=0.018) and 17% reduction in the incidence of CVE (OR: 0.83, [95%CI: 0.70–0.99], P = 0.038). The corresponding decline in absolute risk against heart failure (ARR: 1.4%, [95%CI: 0.2–2.6%], P = 0.018) and CVE (ARR: 3.5%, [95%CI: 0.0–6.9%], P = 0.045) in the AF group was much higher than the non-AF group for heart failure (ARR: 0.4%, [95%CI: 0.0–0.7%], P = 0.057) and CVE (ARR: 1.6%, [95%CI: –0.1% to 3.3%], P = 0.071). No significant effect was noted on all-cause or cardiovascular mortality, stroke, or myocardial infarction. This study suggests that RAAS blockade offers protection against heart failure and cardiovascular events in high cardiovascular disease risk subjects with atrial fibrillation. PMID:27368043

  13. Effects of practicing tandem gait with and without vibrotactile biofeedback in subjects with unilateral vestibular loss

    PubMed Central

    Dozza, Marco; Wall, Conrad; Peterka, Robert J.; Chiari, Lorenzo; Horak, Fay B.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with unilateral vestibular loss exhibit motor control impairments as shown by body and limb deviation during gait. Biofeedback devices have been shown to improve stance postural control, especially when sensory information is limited by environmental conditions or pathologies such as unilateral vestibular loss. However, the extent to which biofeedback could improve motor performance or learning while practicing a dynamic task such as narrow gait is still unknown. In this cross-over design study, 9 unilateral vestibular loss subjects practiced narrow gait with and without wearing a trunk-tilt, biofeedback device in 2 practice sessions. The biofeedback device informed the subjects of their medial-lateral angular tilt and tilt velocity during gait via vibration of the trunk. From motion analysis and tilt data, the performance of the subjects practicing tandem gait were compared over time with and without biofeedback. By practicing tandem gait, subjects reduced their trunk-tilt, center of mass displacement, medial-lateral feet distance, and frequency of stepping error. In both groups, use of tactile biofeedback consistently increased postural stability during tandem gait, beyond the effects of practice alone. However, one single session of practice with biofeedback did not result in conclusive short-term after-effects consistent with short-term retention of motor performance without this additional biofeedback. Results from this study support the hypothesis that tactile biofeedback acts similar to natural sensory feedback to improve dynamic motor performance but does not facilitate a recalibration of motor performance to improve function after short-term use. PMID:18525145

  14. Lipase inhibition attenuates the acute inhibitory effects of oral fat on food intake in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Deirdre; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Wishart, Judith; Horowitz, Michael

    2003-11-01

    The lipase inhibitor, orlistat, is used in the treatment of obesity and reduces fat absorption by about 30%. However, the mean weight loss induced by orlistat is less than expected for the degree of fat malabsorption. It was hypothesised that lipase inhibition with orlistat attenuates the suppressive effects of oral fat on subsequent energy intake in normal-weight subjects. Fourteen healthy, lean subjects (nine males, five females; aged 25 +/- 1.3 years) were studied twice, in a double-blind fashion. The subjects received a high-fat yoghurt 'preload' (males 400 g (2562 kJ); females 300 g (1923 kJ)), containing orlistat (120 mg) on one study day (and no orlistat on the other 'control' day), 30 min before ad libitum access to food and drinks; energy intake was assessed during the following 8 h. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals for the measurement of plasma cholecystokinin (CCK). Each subject performed a 3 d faecal fat collection following each study. Energy intake during the day was greater following orlistat (10,220 (SEM 928) kJ) v. control (9405 (SEM 824) kJ) (P=0.02). On both days plasma CCK increased (P<0.05) after the preload. Plasma CCK 20 min following ingestion of the preload was less after orlistat (4.1 (SEM 0.9) pmol/l) v. control (5.3 (SEM 0.9) pmol/l (P=0.028); however there was no difference in the area under the curve 0-510 min between the two study days. Fat excretion was greater following orlistat (1017 (SEM 168) kJ) v. control (484 (SEM 90) kJ) (P=0.004). In conclusion, in healthy, lean subjects the acute inhibitory effect of fat on subsequent energy intake is attenuated by orlistat and the increase in energy intake approximates the energy lost due to fat malabsorption. PMID:14667178

  15. Effect of thiocyanate levels in milk on thyroid function in iodine deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P A; Bergmark, A; Eltom, M; Björck, L; Claesson, O

    1985-05-01

    To utilize the antibacterial effect of the lactoperoxidase system to prevent bacterial spoilage of raw milk it is necessary to increase the thiocyanate concentration of the milk. Thiocyanate has, however, a potent antithyroid effect which is enhanced by iodine deficiency. In this study the thyroid function has been studied, before and after 4 weeks daily administration of 250 ml of such treated milk, in 55 goitrous subjects living in an endemic goiter region of western Sudan. The iodine content was 0.1 mg/l and the thiocyanate content was either 3.6 mg/l (n 19) or 19 mg/l (n 36) in the milk. At the start of the experiment all subjects were iodine deficient with a urinary excretion of 40-50 micrograms/g creatinine. After 4 weeks daily intake of 4.75 mg of thiocyanate by way of milk the serum thiocyanate level increased by approximately 1.7 mg/l. Both at the beginning and at the end of the experimental period the serum levels of thyroxine, triiodothyronine and TSH were in the normal range for all subjects. After 4 weeks the TSH levels had decreased significantly, (from 2.6 +/- 0.2 to 2.1 +/- 0.2 mU/l, p less than 0.001) probably as an effect of the supplementary intake of iodine. The thyroid hormone levels remained unchanged during the experimental period. In conclusion, the intake of milk with an iodine concentration of 0.1 mg/l and a thiocyanate concentration of 19 mg/l does not have a negative effect on the thyroid function in iodine deficient subjects.

  16. CHRNB2 promoter region: association with subjective effects to nicotine and gene expression differences.

    PubMed

    Hoft, N R; Stitzel, J A; Hutchison, K E; Ehringer, M A

    2011-03-01

    Smoking behavior is a complex, which includes multiple stages in the progression from experimentation to continued use and dependence. The experience of subjective effects, such as dizziness, euphoria, heart pounding, nausea and high, have been associated with varying degrees of persistence and subsequent abuse/dependence of marijuana, cocaine, tobacco and alcohol (Grant et al. 2005, Wagner & Anthony 2002). Previous studies have reported associations between neuronal nicotinic receptor (CHRN) genes and subjective effects to nicotine. We sought to replicate and expand this work by examining eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of adult smokers (n = 316) who reported subjective effects following cigarette smoking in a controlled laboratory environment. Two SNPs each in the CHRNB2, CHRNB3, CHRNA6 and CHRNA4 genes were examined. A significant association was found between two SNPs and physical effects reported after smoking the first experimental cigarette. SNP rs2072658 is upstream of CHRNB2 (P-value = 0.0046) and rs2229959 is a synonymous change in exon 5 of CHRNA4 (P value = 0.0051). We also examined possible functional relevance of SNP rs2072658 using an in vitro gene expression assay. These studies provided evidence that the minor allele of rs2072658 may lead to decreased gene expression, using two separate cell lines, P19 and SH-SY5Y (18% P < 0.001 and 26% P < 0.001 respectively). The human genetic study and functional assays suggest that variation in the promoter region of CHRNB2 gene may be important in mediating levels of expression of the β2 nicotinic receptor subunit, which may be associated with variation in subjective response to nicotine. PMID:20854418

  17. Subjective and physiological effects of oromucosal sprays containing cannabinoids (nabiximols): potentials and limitations for psychosis research.

    PubMed

    Schoedel, Kerri A; Harrison, Sarah Jane

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with a spectrum of effects including euphoria, relaxation, anxiety, perceptual alterations, paranoia, and impairments in attention and memory. Cannabis is made up of approximately 80 different cannabinoid compounds, which have synergistic or antagonistic effects on the principle active ingredient in cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The net overall effect of cannabis is thought to be related to the ratio of its composite constituents; in particular, the ratio of THC to cannabidiol (CBD). Since cannabinoids induce subjective and cognitive changes that share qualitative similarities with schizophrenia, cannabinoids have been used to model psychosis. Some limitations of cannabinoid models of psychosis include the relatively high variability in experiences between different individuals, the potential for inducing unwanted effects, such as toxic psychosis in study subjects, and the lack of data showing that effective anti-psychotic treatments can reverse the behavioural and cognitive/motor effects of cannabinoids. Nabiximols (Sativex®) is an oromucosal spray containing THC and CBD in an approximate 1:1 ratio. While not extensively studied, most studies confirm that nabiximols, despite the different route of administration and presence of CBD, have similar or slightly reduced subjective/cognitive effects compared to similar doses of oral THC. While the presence of CBD may have utility in some models, it is likely that the concentrations are not high enough to meaningfully affect those aspects important for psychosis research. This review suggests that while it may present an alternative to the use of oral THC, oromucosal nabiximols may not present substantial advantages for use in psychosis research. PMID:22716155

  18. Immediate effects of bilateral manipulation of talocrural joints on standing stability in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Santos-del-Rey, Miguel; Martín-Vallejo, Francisco Javier

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of bilateral talocrural joint manipulation on standing stability in healthy subjects. Sixty-two healthy subjects, 16 males and 46 females, aged from 18 to 32 years old (mean: 21+/-3 years old) participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups: an intervention group (n=32), who received manipulation of bilateral talocrural joints and a control group (n=30) which did not receive any intervention. Baropodometric and stabilometric evaluations were assessed pre- and 5 min post-intervention by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation. Intra-group and inter-group comparisons were analysed using appropriate parametric tests. The results indicated that changes on the X coordinate range, length of motion, and mean speed approximated to statistical significance (P=0.06), and changes on the Y coordinate range reached statistical significance (P=0.02). Average X and Y motions, and anterior-posterior or lateral velocities did not show significant differences. Our results showed that bilateral thrust manipulation of the talocrural joint did not modify standing stability, that is, the behavioural pattern of the projection of the centre of pressure, in healthy subjects.

  19. Effects of Daily Centrifugation on Segmental Fluid Distribution in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diedrich, Andre; Moore, S. T.; Stenger, M.; Arya, T. M.; Newby, N.; Tucker, J. M.; Milstead, L.; Acock, K.; Knapp, C.; Jevans, J.; Paloski, W.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of daily centrifugation on segmental fluid distribution have been studied during 21 days of 6 degree head down bedrest. One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of artificial gravity (AG) training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Fluid shifts of thoracic(VTO), abdominal (VAB), thigh (VTH), and calf (VCA) regions were measured by the tetrapolar segmental body impedance technique. Untrained subjects reduced their total volume from 18.9 plus or minus 0.5L to 17.9 plus or minus 0.9L (MN plus or minus SE, P less than 0.05) while trained subjects maintained their total volume. In untrained, control, subjects after bed rest, there was a trend toward reduced volume in all segments, with significant reductions in thigh and calf (fig, P less than 0.05). Trained subjects maintained volume in all segments. Our data indicate that artificial gravity treatment counteracts bed rest-induced hypovolemia.

  20. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on clearance from small ciliated airways in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, K; Philipson, K; Svartengren, M; Camner, P

    1998-01-01

    Mucociliary transport is an important clearance mechanism of larger airways, but in the smallest ciliated airways (bronchioles) it may be less effective. The present study aimed at investigating whether clearance from the bronchioles in subjects with healthy airways was stimulated by an adrenergic agonist (terbutaline sulphate). Tracheobronchial clearance was studied twice in 10 healthy subjects after inhalation of 6-micron (aerodynamic diameter) monodisperse Teflon particles labeled with 111In. At one exposure, oral treatment with terbutaline sulphate, known to stimulate clearance in large airways, began immediately after inhalation of the particles. The other exposure was a control measurement. The particles were inhaled at an extremely slow flow, 0.05 L/s, which gave deposition mainly in the small ciliated airways (bronchioles). Lung retention was measured at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h. Clearance was significant every 24 h for both exposures (p < .05, two-tailed paired t-test), with similar fractions of retained particles at all time points. During treatment with terbutaline sulphate, the subjects' pulse rates tended to be higher, but clearance rates did not increase. We found, as expected, no significant correlation between lung retention and lung function in either exposure. This study shows that an adrenergic agonist does not significantly influence overall clearance from the bronchiolar region in healthy subjects. This suggests that mucociliary transport does not significantly contribute to clearance from the smallest ciliated airways. Other mechanisms may be more important for the transportation of mucus from these airways. PMID:9555573

  1. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account.

    PubMed

    Imbir, Kamil K

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  2. Effective Inclusion of e-Learning in a Subject of Physics Experiments: Introductory Electronics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, T.; Abe, K.; Yamazaki, N.; Ooe, A.; Igarashi, K.; Hayashi, S.; Suzuki, M.

    2010-07-01

    A Web-based e-Learning homework system was introduced in the undergraduate subject of the introductory electronics experiment; "Introductory Electronics Laboratory". This homework is appended to practical trainings and face-to-face guidance in the laboratory (blended-type e-Learning). The e-Learning is mainly prepared to teach basic electronics and to guide necessary apparatus before the practical training. The overall impression about this subject in students' questionnaires has improved from 3.5 for 2005/2006 (e-Learning not introduced) to 3.9 2007/2008 (e-Learning introduced) (5 for good, 3 for average, and 1 for bad). Students understanding of the experiments has also improved from 3.43 for 2005/2006 to 3.45 for 2007/2008 (5, 4, 3, 2 for S, A, B, C grade). This subject is compulsory for all second-year students in our department (˜120 students). The e-Learning system in our case is considered to be effective especially for required subjects of experiments and large classes.

  3. The epidemiology of bovine respiratory disease: What is the evidence for predisposing factors?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jared D.; Fulton, Robert W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Step, Douglas L.; Confer, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most costly disease of beef cattle in North America. It is multi-factorial, with a variety of physical and physiological stressors combining to predispose cattle to pneumonia. However, efforts to discern which factors are most important have frequently failed to establish definitive answers. Calves are at highest risk shortly after transport. Risk factors include purchasing from sale barns and commingling. It is unclear whether or not these practices increase susceptibility, increase exposure, or are proxies for poor management. Lighter-weight calves appear to be at greater risk, although this has not been consistent. Persistent infection (PI) with bovine virus diarrhea virus increases BRD occurrence, but it is unclear if PI calves affect other cattle in the feedlot. The complexity of BRD has made it difficult to define involvement of individual factors. Stressors may play a role as “necessary but not sufficient” components, requiring additive effects to cause disease. PMID:21197200

  4. The effectiveness and practicality of occupational stress management interventions: a survey of subject matter expert opinions.

    PubMed

    Bellarosa, C; Chen, P Y

    1997-07-01

    Stress management (SM) subject matter experts (SMEs) evaluated 6 widely used occupational SM interventions (relaxation, physical fitness, cognitive restructuring, meditation, assertiveness training, and stress inoculation) on the basis of 10 practicality criteria and 7 effectiveness objectives. Relaxation was evaluated overall as the most practical intervention, while meditation and stress inoculation were judged as the least practical. Physical fitness was chosen to be the most effective intervention, while both meditation and assertiveness training were rated overall as the least effective. The findings also revealed that the SMEs considered history of success and duration of effect, rather than "relevance to program objectives," as the most important factors when selecting SM interventions. Incongruence between effectiveness ratings and actual choices of interventions are discussed.

  5. Protective effects of bacterial osmoprotectant ectoine on bovine erythrocytes subjected to staphylococcal alpha-haemolysin.

    PubMed

    Bownik, Adam; Stępniewska, Zofia

    2015-06-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is a bacterial compatible solute with documented protective action however no data are available on its effects on various cells against bacterial toxins. Therefore, we determined the in vitro influence of ECT on bovine erythrocytes subjected to staphylococcal α-haemolysin (HlyA). The cells exposed to HlyA alone showed a distinct haemolysis and reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) level, however the toxic effects were attenuated in the combinations of HlyA + ECT suggesting ECT-induced protection of erythrocytes from HlyA.

  6. Effect of cisapride on the gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal in normal human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C A; Holden, S; Brown, C; Read, N W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cisapride, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, on the transit of a standard meal through the stomach, small intestine and colon was studied in 10 normal subjects. Cisapride had no significant effect on gastric emptying but decreased mouth to caecum transit time (p less than 0.01). Stool weight and frequency were not significantly increased but the time for the first appearance of stool markers and the arrival of 20% and 50% of stool markers was decreased after cisapride (p less than 0.05). PMID:3817579

  7. Are adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and ankylosing spondylitis counter-opposing conditions? A hypothesis on biomechanical contributions predisposing to these spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Dorsch, J L; Cholewicki, J

    2003-01-01

    Human spinal biomechanics are profoundly complex and not well understood, especially in terms of the dynamic spine function. Translation of biomechanics to disease is difficult, particularly since cause must be separated from effect. Primary dynamics predisposing to the onset of chronic spinal disorders, e.g., adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS), must clearly be differentiated from secondary alterations. This commentary addresses primary biomechanics that may predispose to these idiopathic diseases. A novel hypothesis is proposed, based upon inferences regarding their contrasting muscular dynamics. The hypothesis postulates opposing inherent muscle tonicity in AIS versus AS. Converse degrees of spinal stability may predispose to the respective curvature deformities of AIS and the enthesopathy lesions of AS. One condition is suspected to counter-oppose the other, within a polymorphic spectrum of spinal stability.

  8. Effect of cimetidine on 24-hour intragastric acidity in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, R E; Williams, J G; Milton-Thompson, G J; Misiewicz, J J

    1976-01-01

    The effect of H2-receptor blockade on intragastric acidity was studied in nine normal males. The pH of their gastric contents was measured at hourly daytime and two hourly nighttime intervals for 48 hours. The subjects ate identical meals, drank identical volumes of fluid, and smoked the same number of cigarettes during the two study days. Their physical activity was unrestricted in a ward environment. Blood cimetidine and plasma gastrin were measured in serial blood samples. The nine subjects were treated in random sequence with cimetidine 0-8-1-0 g on one day and placebo capsules on the other. The drug was given in four divided doses: four subjects received it before, and five after, the three main meals. All took the fourth dose at bedtime. Replicate studies in an additional subject given placebo on both study days showed good reproducibility (r=0-80, P less than 0-01). Cimetidine therapy decreased intragastric acidity in all nine subjects. The decrease was similar in the two groups taking the drug before or after meals, mean 24 h intragastric hydrogen ion activity being lowered by 70 and 72% respectively. Nocturnal anacidity was recorded in only two of 45 samples. Administration of cimetidine before meals produced earlier and higher drug blood levels than post-prandial medication, but when it was taken after food the blood levels were highest at the time when the buffer capacity of the food was waning. Blood concentrations of cimetidine exceeded the secretory IC50 level for most of the time between doses. The results show that cimetidine 0-8-1-0 g/day in four divided doses produces a striking and consistent decrease of intragastric acidity. Although variation in the timing of the dose in relation to meals did not affect the decrease of acidity, the absorption data suggest that patients should take the drug after meals. PMID:4361

  9. Variation in Telangiectasia Predisposing Genes Is Associated With Overall Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tanteles, George A.; Murray, Robert J.S.; Mills, Jamie; Barwell, Julian; Chakraborti, Prabir; Chan, Steve; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Ennis, Dawn; Khurshid, Nazish; Lambert, Kelly; Machhar, Rohan; Meisuria, Mitul; Osman, Ahmed; Peat, Irene; Sahota, Harjinder; Woodings, Pamela; Talbot, Christopher J.; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In patients receiving radiotherapy for breast cancer where the heart is within the radiation field, cutaneous telangiectasiae could be a marker of potential radiation-induced heart disease. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes known to cause heritable telangiectasia-associated disorders could predispose to such late, normal tissue vascular damage. Methods and Materials: The relationship between cutaneous telangiectasia as a late normal tissue radiation injury phenotype in 633 breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy was examined. Patients were clinically assessed for the presence of cutaneous telangiectasia and genotyped at nine SNPs in three candidate genes. Candidate SNPs were within the endoglin (ENG) and activin A receptor, type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) genes, mutations in which cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene associated with ataxia-telangiectasia. Results: A total of 121 (19.1%) patients exhibited a degree of cutaneous telangiectasiae on clinical examination. Regression was used to examine the associations between the presence of telangiectasiae in patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, controlling for the effects of boost and known brassiere size (n=388), and individual geno- or haplotypes. Inheritance of ACVRL1 SNPs marginally contributed to the risk of cutaneous telangiectasiae. Haplotypic analysis revealed a stronger association between inheritance of a ATM haplotype and the presence of cutaneous telangiectasiae, fibrosis and overall toxicity. No significant association was observed between telangiectasiae and the coinheritance of the candidate ENG SNPs. Conclusions: Genetic variation in the ATM gene influences reaction to radiotherapy through both vascular damage and increased fibrosis. The predisposing variation in the ATM gene will need to be better defined to optimize it as a predictive marker for assessing radiotherapy late effects.

  10. [Subjective probability of reward receipt and the magnitude effect in probability discounting].

    PubMed

    Isomura, Mieko; Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2008-06-01

    Previous research suggested that larger probabilistic rewards were discounted more steeply than smaller probabilistic rewards (the magnitude effect). This research tests the hypothesis that the magnitude effect reflects the extent to which individuals distrust the stated probability of receiving different amounts of rewards. The participants were 105 college students. Probability discounting of two different amounts of rewards (5 000 yen and 100 000 yen) and the subjective probability of reward receipt of the different amounts (5 000 yen, 100 000 yen and 1 000 000 yen) were measured. The probabilistic 100 000 yen was discounted more steeply than the probabilistic 5 000 yen. The subjective probability of reward receipt was higher in the 5 000 yen than in the 100 000 yen condition. The proportion of subjective probability of receiving 5 000 yen to that of receiving 100 000 yen was significantly correlated with the proportion of degree of probability discounting for 5 000 yen to that for 100 000 yen. These results were consistent with the hypothesis stated above.

  11. Absence of respiratory effects in subjects exposed to low concentrations of TDI and MDI

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.; Peters, J.M.; DiBerardinis, L.; Murphy, R.L.

    1982-10-01

    One hundred seven subjects from a polyurethane plastic manufacturing plant have been followed over a five-year period with measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Environmental concentrations of toluene diisocyanate and diphenyl methyl diisocyanate were extensively monitored to provide accurate estimates of the upper-limits of exposure of the subjects. Current mean levels of FEV1 in this population were higher than those predicted for healthy subjects. The five-year change in FEV1 did not exceed that expected from aging. No acute change in FEV1 could be demonstrated over the course of a Monday either before or after a two-week vacation. No improvement in ventilatory function was observed over the vacation period. The presence of cough or sputum was related to smoking but was not related to isocyanate exposure. The results indicate that exposure of workers to extremely low levels of isocyanates (time-weighted average concentrations of the order of 0.001 parts per million (ppm)) is not associated with chronic respiratory symptoms or effects on ventilatory capacity. The results suggest that isocyanates can be controlled to the point of eliminating effects as measured by these techniques.

  12. Prebiotic Effects of Xylooligosaccharides on the Improvement of Microbiota Balance in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Liang-Mao; Chang, Jung-Su

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that probiotics can be nourished by consuming prebiotics in order to function more efficiently, allowing the bacteria to stay within a healthy balance. In this study, we investigated the effects of xylooligosaccharides- (XOS-) enriched rice porridge consumption on the ecosystem in the intestinal tract of human subjects. Twenty healthy subjects participated in this 6-week trial, in which 10 subjects received XOS-enriched rice porridge while the others received placebo rice porridge. Fecal samples were collected at the end of weeks 0, 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 for microorganism examination. The results showed that 6-week daily ingestion of the XOS-enriched rice porridge induced significant increases in fecal bacterial counts of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp., as well as decreases in Clostridium perfringens without changing the total anaerobic bacterial counts, compared to that of placebo rice porridge. However, fluctuations in the counts of coliforms were observed in both groups during the 6-week intervention. In conclusion, the intestinal microbiota balance was improved after daily consumption of 150 g of rice porridge containing XOS for 6 weeks, demonstrating the prebiotic potential of XOS incorporated into foods. This also indicates the effectiveness of XOS as a functional ingredient in relation to its role as a prebiotic compound.

  13. Improved clinical tolerance to chronic lactose ingestion in subjects with lactose intolerance: a placebo effect?

    PubMed Central

    Briet, F; Pochart, P; Marteau, P; Flourie, B; Arrigoni, E; Rambaud, J

    1997-01-01

    Background—Uncontrolled studies of lactose intolerant subjects have shown that symptom severity decreases after chronic lactose consumption. Adaptation of the colonic flora might explain this improvement. 
Aims—To compare the effects of regular administration of either lactose or sucrose on clinical tolerance and bacterial adaptation to lactose. 
Methods—Forty six lactose intolerant subjects underwent two 50 g lactose challenges on days 1 and 15. Between these days they were given 34 g of lactose or sucrose per day, in a double blind protocol. Stool samples were obtained on days 0 and 14, to measure faecal β-galactosidase and pH. Symptoms, breath H2 excretion, faecal weight and electrolytes, and orofaecal transit time were assessed. 
Results—Except for faecal weight, symptoms were significantly milder during the second challenge in both groups, and covariance analysis showed no statistical difference between them. In the lactose group, but not in the sucrose group, faecal β-galactosidase activity increased, pH dropped, and breath H2 excretion decreased. 
Conclusion—Bacterial adaptation occurred when lactose intolerant subjects ingested lactose for 13 days, and all symptoms except diarrhoea regressed. Clinical improvement was also observed in the control group which displayed no signs of metabolic adaptation. This suggests that improved clinical tolerance may be just a placebo effect. 

 Keywords: lactose; lactose intolerance; colonic adaptation; lactase deficiency PMID:9414969

  14. Prebiotic Effects of Xylooligosaccharides on the Improvement of Microbiota Balance in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Liang-Mao; Chang, Jung-Su

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that probiotics can be nourished by consuming prebiotics in order to function more efficiently, allowing the bacteria to stay within a healthy balance. In this study, we investigated the effects of xylooligosaccharides- (XOS-) enriched rice porridge consumption on the ecosystem in the intestinal tract of human subjects. Twenty healthy subjects participated in this 6-week trial, in which 10 subjects received XOS-enriched rice porridge while the others received placebo rice porridge. Fecal samples were collected at the end of weeks 0, 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 for microorganism examination. The results showed that 6-week daily ingestion of the XOS-enriched rice porridge induced significant increases in fecal bacterial counts of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp., as well as decreases in Clostridium perfringens without changing the total anaerobic bacterial counts, compared to that of placebo rice porridge. However, fluctuations in the counts of coliforms were observed in both groups during the 6-week intervention. In conclusion, the intestinal microbiota balance was improved after daily consumption of 150 g of rice porridge containing XOS for 6 weeks, demonstrating the prebiotic potential of XOS incorporated into foods. This also indicates the effectiveness of XOS as a functional ingredient in relation to its role as a prebiotic compound. PMID:27651791

  15. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  16. Prebiotic Effects of Xylooligosaccharides on the Improvement of Microbiota Balance in Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Chou, Liang-Mao; Chien, Yi-Wen; Chang, Jung-Su; Lin, Ching-I

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that probiotics can be nourished by consuming prebiotics in order to function more efficiently, allowing the bacteria to stay within a healthy balance. In this study, we investigated the effects of xylooligosaccharides- (XOS-) enriched rice porridge consumption on the ecosystem in the intestinal tract of human subjects. Twenty healthy subjects participated in this 6-week trial, in which 10 subjects received XOS-enriched rice porridge while the others received placebo rice porridge. Fecal samples were collected at the end of weeks 0, 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 for microorganism examination. The results showed that 6-week daily ingestion of the XOS-enriched rice porridge induced significant increases in fecal bacterial counts of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp., as well as decreases in Clostridium perfringens without changing the total anaerobic bacterial counts, compared to that of placebo rice porridge. However, fluctuations in the counts of coliforms were observed in both groups during the 6-week intervention. In conclusion, the intestinal microbiota balance was improved after daily consumption of 150 g of rice porridge containing XOS for 6 weeks, demonstrating the prebiotic potential of XOS incorporated into foods. This also indicates the effectiveness of XOS as a functional ingredient in relation to its role as a prebiotic compound. PMID:27651791

  17. The contrasting physiological and subjective effects of chewing gum on social stress.

    PubMed

    Gray, Gemma; Miles, Christopher; Wilson, Nigel; Jenks, Rebecca; Cox, Martin; Johnson, Andrew J

    2012-04-01

    Uncertainty exists with respect to the extent to which chewing gum may attenuate stress-induced rises in cortisol secretion (Johnson, Jenks, Miles, Albert, & Cox, 2011; Scholey et al., 2009; Smith, 2010). The present study used the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST: Kirschbaum, Pirke, & Hellhammer, 1993), a task known to elevate cortisol secretion (Kudielka, Schommer, Hellhammer, & Kirschbaum, 2004), in order to examine the moderating physiological and subjective effects of chewing gum on social stress. Forty participants completed the TSST either with or without chewing gum. As expected, completion of the TSST elevated both cortisol and subjective stress levels, whilst impairing mood. Although gum moderated the perception of stress, cortisol concentrations were higher following the chewing of gum. The findings are consistent with Smith (2010) who argued that elevations in cortisol following the chewing of gum reflect heightened arousal. The findings suggest that chewing gum only benefits subjective measures of stress. The mechanism remains unclear; however, this may reflect increased cerebral blood flow, cognitive distraction, and/or effects secondary to task facilitation. PMID:22123610

  18. Potential Subjective Effectiveness of Active Interior Noise Control in Propeller Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control technology offers the potential for weight-efficient aircraft interior noise reduction, particularly for propeller aircraft. However, there is little information on how passengers respond to this type of interior noise control. This paper presents results of two experiments that use sound quality engineering practices to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control (ANC) systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two experiments differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons based on preference in the first and numerical category scaling of noisiness in the second. Although the results of the two experiments were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference. The reductions in subjective response due to the ANC conditions were predicted with reasonable accuracy by reductions in measured loudness level. Inclusion of corrections for the sound quality characteristics of tonality and fluctuation strength in multiple regression models improved the prediction of the ANC effects.

  19. Prebiotic Effects of Xylooligosaccharides on the Improvement of Microbiota Balance in Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Chou, Liang-Mao; Chien, Yi-Wen; Chang, Jung-Su; Lin, Ching-I

    2016-01-01

    It has been indicated that probiotics can be nourished by consuming prebiotics in order to function more efficiently, allowing the bacteria to stay within a healthy balance. In this study, we investigated the effects of xylooligosaccharides- (XOS-) enriched rice porridge consumption on the ecosystem in the intestinal tract of human subjects. Twenty healthy subjects participated in this 6-week trial, in which 10 subjects received XOS-enriched rice porridge while the others received placebo rice porridge. Fecal samples were collected at the end of weeks 0, 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 for microorganism examination. The results showed that 6-week daily ingestion of the XOS-enriched rice porridge induced significant increases in fecal bacterial counts of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp., as well as decreases in Clostridium perfringens without changing the total anaerobic bacterial counts, compared to that of placebo rice porridge. However, fluctuations in the counts of coliforms were observed in both groups during the 6-week intervention. In conclusion, the intestinal microbiota balance was improved after daily consumption of 150 g of rice porridge containing XOS for 6 weeks, demonstrating the prebiotic potential of XOS incorporated into foods. This also indicates the effectiveness of XOS as a functional ingredient in relation to its role as a prebiotic compound.

  20. Ingroup favoritism or the black sheep effect: Perceived intentions modulate subjective responses to aggressive interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Jiehui; Meng, Liang; Lu, Qiang; Ma, Qingguo

    2016-07-01

    Social categorization plays an important role in provoking the victim's responses to aggressive interactions. Pioneering studies suggested that uncertainty in the perpetrator's hostile intention influences whether ingroup favoritism or the black sheep effect (ingroup strictness) will be manifested to a greater extent. However, when the hostile intention is ambiguous, subjective perception of the perpetrator's intention may still be quite different due to the inherent information gap between participants, and this discrepancy in perceived intentions may further modulate subjective responses to social aggression. In the present study, subjects played as responders of the Ultimatum Game, and received varied offers proposed by either ingroup or outgroup members. Electrophysiological results showed that, when proposers were perceived to be intentional, unfair offers from ingroups elicited significantly larger Feedback-related Negativity (FRN) than those from outgroups, potentially providing neural evidence for the black sheep effect. The opposite FRN pattern was observed when proposers were perceived to be unintentional, which might suggest ingroup favoritism. Interestingly, despite contrary neural patterns, perceived intentions did not modulate behavioral response to aggressive interactions. Thus, converging results suggested that, when the perpetrator's hostile intention remained ambiguous, perceived intentions modulated the victim's electrophysiological response while not the rational behavioral response to aggressive interactions. PMID:26851770

  1. Comparative effects of lactulose and magnesium sulfate on urea metabolism and nitrogen excretion in cirrhotic subjects.

    PubMed

    Weber, F L; Fresard, K M

    1981-05-01

    In previous studies with cirrhotic subjects administration of oral lactulose caused a reduction in the urea production rate associated with an increase in fecal nitrogen excretion. The change in urea production rate in response to lactulose therapy was an indirect measure of a reduction in total gut ammonia production. In this study, the effect of magnesium sulfate administration was compared with lactulose therapy in 5 cirrhotic subjects to determine whether the effects of lactulose on nitrogen metabolism might be attributed to a nonspecific, cathartic effect. Both magnesium sulfate (5-15 g/day) and lactulose (40-80 g/day) caused significant and comparable increases in stool weight, solids, and total nitrogen. Only lactulose caused a reduction in fecal pH. Magnesium sulfate had no significant effect on the urea production rate or urinary nitrogen excretion, whereas lactulose caused a 25% reduction in the urea production rate and an 18% reduction in urinary nitrogen excretion. The latter was accounted for by a fall in urinary urea. Nitrogen balance was more negative during magnesium sulfate than during control or lactulose periods since magnesium sulfate increased fecal nitrogen without altering urinary nitrogen excretion. These data demonstrated that the effects of lactulose on nitrogen excretion and urea metabolism were not duplicated by equivalent cathartic doses of magnesium sulfate. PMID:7202981

  2. Cognitive, psychomotor, and subjective effects of sodium oxybate and triazolam in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Griffiths, Roland R.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Illicit gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has received attention as a “date rape drug” that produces robust amnesia; however, there is little experimental evidence in support of GHB’s amnestic effects. Objectives This study compared the cognitive effects of GHB (sodium oxybate) with those of triazolam in healthy volunteers. Materials and methods Doses of sodium oxybate (1.125, 2.25, and 4.5 g/70 kg), triazolam (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/70 kg), and placebo were administered to 15 volunteers under repeated measures, counterbalanced, double-blind, double-dummy conditions. The time course and peak physiological, psychomotor, subjective, and cognitive effects were examined. Results Sodium oxybate and triazolam produced similar increases in participant ratings of drug effects. Performance on psychomotor, working memory, and episodic memory tasks was impaired to a greater extent after triazolam than sodium oxybate. Conclusions Together, these data suggest that sodium oxybate produces less psychomotor and cognitive impairment than triazolam at doses that produce equivalent participant-rated subjective effects in healthy volunteers. PMID:19543883

  3. Effect of Painful and Non-Painful Sensorimotor Manipulations on Subjective Body Midline

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Jason; Gagné, Martin; Mercier, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain often show disturbances in their body perception. Understanding the exact role played by pain is however complex, as confounding factors can contribute to the observed deficits in these clinical populations. To address this question, acute experimental pain was used to test the effect of lateralized pain on body perception in healthy subjects. Subjects were asked to indicate the position of their body midline (subjective body midline, SBM) by stopping a moving luminescent dot projected on a screen placed in front of them, in a completely dark environment. The effect of other non-painful sensorimotor manipulations was also tested to assess the potential unspecific attentional effects of stimulating one side of the body. SBM judgment was made in 17 volunteers under control and three experimental conditions: (1) painful (heat) stimulation; (2) non-painful vibrotactile stimulation; and (3) muscle contraction. The effects of the stimulated side and the type of trial (control vs. experimental condition), were tested separately for each condition with a 2 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA. The analyses revealed a significant interaction in both pain (p = 0.05) and vibration conditions (p = 0.04). Post hoc tests showed opposite effects of pain and vibration. Pain applied on the right arm deviated the SBM toward the right (stimulated) side (p = 0.03) while vibration applied on the left arm deviated the SBM toward the right (not stimulated) side (p = 0.01). These opposite patterns suggest that the shift in SBM is likely to be specifically linked to the stimulation modality. It is concluded that acute experimental pain can induce an SBM shift toward the stimulated side, which might be functionally beneficial to protect the painful area of the body. Interestingly, it appears to be easier to bias SBM toward the right side, regardless of the modality and of the stimulated side. PMID:23504448

  4. Effect of weightlessness and centrifugation on red cell survival in rats subjected to space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Landaw, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 936 for 18.5 d during August, 1977. Five rats were subjected to near-weightless space flight, as with Cosmos 782, and five rats were subjected to a 1-G force via an on-board centrifuge. These rats and three control groups were injected with 2-(C-14) glycine 19 d preflight. The flight rats were recovered from orbit after 18.5 d of space flight. Erythrocyte hemolysis and lifespan were evaluated in the five groups of rats by quantitation of radioactive carbon monoxide exhaled in the breath which arises from the breakdown of the previously labeled hemoglobin. The results support the previous findings wherein hemolysis was found to increase as a result of weightless space flight. A comparison to the centrifuged animals indicates that artificial gravity attenuates the effect of weightlessness on hemolysis and appears to normalize the hemolytic rate in the early postflight period.

  5. Effect of vitamin and trace-element supplementation on immune responses and infection in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Chandra, R K

    1992-11-01

    Ageing is associated with impaired immune responses and increased infection-related morbidity. This study assessed the effect of physiological amounts of vitamins and trace elements on immunocompetence and occurrence of infection-related illness. 96 independently living, healthy elderly individuals were randomly assigned to receive nutrient supplementation or placebo. Nutrient status and immunological variables were assessed at baseline and at 12 months, and the frequency of illness due to infection was ascertained. Subjects in the supplement group had higher numbers of certain T-cell subsets and natural killer cells, enhanced proliferation response to mitogen, increased interleukin-2 production, and higher antibody response and natural killer cell activity. These subjects were less likely than those in the placebo group to have illness due to infections (mean [SD] 23 [5] vs 48 [7] days per year, p = 0.002). Supplementation with a modest physiological amount of micronutrients improves immunity and decreases the risk of infection in old age.

  6. The effect of subject characteristics and respirator features on respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Coffey, Christopher C; Ann, Roland Berry

    2005-12-01

    A recent study was conducted to compare five fit test methods for screening out poor-fitting N95 filtering-facepiece respirators. Eighteen models of NIOSH-certified, N95 filtering-facepiece respirators were used to assess the fit test methods by using a simulated workplace protection factor (SWPF) test. The purpose of this companion study was to investigate the effect of subject characteristics (gender and face dimensions) and respirator features on respirator fit. The respirator features studied were design style (folding and cup style) and number of sizes available (one size fits all, two sizes, and three sizes). Thirty-three subjects participated in this study. Each was measured for 12 face dimensions using traditional calipers and tape. From this group, 25 subjects with face size categories 1 to 10 tested each respirator. The SWPF test protocol entailed using the PortaCount Plus to determine a SWPF based on total penetration (face-seal leakage plus filter penetration) while the subject performed six simulated workplace movements. Six tests were conducted for each subject/respirator model combination with redonning between tests. The respirator design style (folding style and cup style) did not have a significant effect on respirator fit in this study. The number of respirator sizes available for a model had significant impact on respirator fit on the panel for cup-style respirators with one and two sizes available. There was no significant difference in the geometric mean fit factor between male and female subjects for 16 of the 18 respirator models. Subsets of one to six face dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with SWPFs (p < 0.05) in 16 of the 33 respirator model/respirator size combinations. Bigonial breadth, face width, face length, and nose protrusion appeared the most in subsets (five or six) of face dimensions and their multiple linear regression coefficients were significantly different from zero (p < 0.05). Lip length was found in

  7. Host genetic factors predisposing to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Levine, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in transforming the lives of HIV-infected individuals with access to these drugs is tempered by the increasing threat of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to their overall health and quality of life. Intensive investigations over the past two decades have underscored the role of host immune responses, inflammation, and monocyte-derived macrophages in HAND, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying HAND remain only partially delineated. Complicating research efforts and therapeutic drug development are the sheer complexity of HAND phenotypes, diagnostic imprecision, and the growing intersection of chronic immune activation with aging-related comorbidities. Yet, genetic studies still offer a powerful means of advancing individualized care for HIV-infected individuals at risk. There is an urgent need for 1) longitudinal studies using consistent phenotypic definitions of HAND in HIV-infected subpopulations at very high risk of being adversely impacted, such as children, 2) tissue studies that correlate neuropathological changes in multiple brain regions with genomic markers in affected individuals and with changes at the RNA, epigenomic, and/or protein levels, and 3) genetic association studies using more sensitive subphenotypes of HAND. The NIH Brain Initiative and Human Connectome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving systems biology and machine learning approaches for analyzing high-throughput genetic, transcriptomic and epigenetic data, hold promise for identifying actionable biological processes and gene networks that underlie HAND. This review summarizes the current state of understanding of host genetic factors predisposing to HAND in light of past challenges and suggests some priorities for future research to advance the understanding and clinical management of HAND in the cART era. PMID:24996618

  8. Somatic Overgrowth Predisposes to Seizures in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brachini, Francesca; Apicella, Fabio; Cosenza, Angela; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Guerrini, Renzo; Muratori, Filippo; Romano, Maria Francesca; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Tancredi, Raffaella; Sicca, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Background Comorbidity of Autism Spectrum Disorders with seizures or abnormal EEG (Autism-Epilepsy Phenotype) suggests shared pathomechanisms, and might be a starting point to identify distinct populations within the clinical complexity of the autistic spectrum. In this study, we tried to assess whether distinct subgroups, having distinctive clinical hallmarks, emerge from this comorbid condition. Methods Two-hundred and six individuals with idiopathic Autism Spectrum Disorders were subgrouped into three experimental classes depending on the presence of seizures and EEG abnormalities. Neurobehavioral, electroclinical and auxological parameters were investigated to identify differences among groups and features which increase the risk of seizures. Our statistical analyses used ANOVA, post-hoc multiple comparisons, and the Chi-squared test to analyze continuous and categorical variables. A correspondence analysis was also used to decompose significant Chi-squared and reduce variables dimensions. Results The high percentage of children with seizures (28.2% of our whole cohort) and EEG abnormalities (64.1%) confirmed that the prevalence of epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders exceeds that of the general population. Seizures were associated with severe intellectual disability, and not with autism severity. Interestingly, tall stature (without macrocephaly) was significantly associated with EEG abnormalities or later onset seizures. However, isolated macrocephaly was equally distributed among groups or associated with early onset seizures when accompanied by tall stature. Conclusions Tall stature seems to be a phenotypic “biomarker” of susceptibility to EEG abnormalities or late epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders and, when concurring with macrocephaly, predisposes to early onset seizures. Growth pattern might act as an endophenotypic marker in Autism-Epilepsy comorbidity, delineating distinct pathophysiological subtypes and addressing personalized diagnostic work

  9. [Speech impairment predisposes to cognitive deterioration in hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Meparidze, M M; Kodua, T E; Lashkhi, K S

    2010-04-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible neuro-psychiatric syndrome that complicates liver insufficiency. The changes are complex and disorders are detected in digestive and neural systems. Disturbed consciousness and intellectual deterioration, particularly communicative difficulties are observed: speech is slurred, voice monotonous, writing disturbances, amimic face and rigid posture. Difficulties of socialization and tendency to self-isolation are observed. Memory, attention and perception are decreased. We suppose that disorders of cognitive functions are determined by impairment of speech and other communicative abilities. According to the theories of linguistic determinism and linguistic relativity thought categories move through the mould of native language. That means, speech impairment causes misperception of the real world. To confirm this hypothesis we investigated 106 patients with following diseases: peptic ulcer - 46, fatty liver - 30, liver cirrhosis - 19, viral hepatitis - 11 and 19 controls. Brain magnetic resonance tomography was carried out and psychometric tests were performed to patients with symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Atrophic changes in frontal, temporal and insular area of brain cortex were revealed in most cases. Those regions are responsible for actor observation, imitation and emotion, i.e. for empathy and sociability. They are very sensitive to the increased levels of ammonia and glutamine. In case of early treatment only slight atrophic changes are presented but without treatment atrophic processes become stable and expressed by impairments of speech and entire communicative ability. Human beings are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. They do not live in the objective world alone, or in the world of social activity alone. Accordingly, damage of speech in hepatic encephalopathy is primary and predisposes to cognitive dysfunction. PMID:20495225

  10. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    PubMed

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment.

  11. The Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Subjective Response to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Three decades of research demonstrate that individual differences in subjective response (SR) to acute alcohol effects predict heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, the SR patterns conferring the greatest risk remain under debate. Morean and Corbin (2010) highlighted that extant SR measures commonly have limitations within the following areas: assessment of a comprehensive range of effects, assessment of effects over the complete course of a drinking episode, and/or psychometric validation. Furthermore, the consistent pairing of certain SR measures and theoretical models has made integration of findings difficult. To address these issues, we developed the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS), a novel, psychometrically sound SR measure for use in alcohol administration studies. Pilot data ensured that the SEAS comprised a comprehensive range of effects that varied in terms of valence and arousal and were perceived as plausible effects of drinking. For validation purposes, the SEAS was included in a two-site placebo-controlled alcohol administration study (N=215). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified a 14-item, 4-factor model categorizing effects into affective quadrants (high/low arousal positive; high/low arousal negative). SEAS scores evidenced the following: (1) scalar measurement invariance by limb of the blood alcohol curve (BAC) and beverage condition (2) good internal consistency, (3) convergence/divergence with extant SR measures, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol use, and (4) concurrent/incremental utility in accounting for alcohol-related outcomes, highlighting the novel high arousal negative and low arousal positive subscales. PMID:23647036

  12. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  13. The effect of local cryotherapy on subjective and objective recovery characteristics following an exhaustive jump protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hohenauer, Erich; Clarys, Peter; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Clijsen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this controlled trial was to investigate the effects of a single local cryotherapy session on the recovery characteristics over a period of 72 hours. Twenty-two young and healthy female (n=17; mean age: 21.9±1.1 years) and male (n=5;mean age: 25.4±2.8 years) adults participated in this study. Following an exhaustive jump protocol (3×30 countermovement jumps), half of the participants received either a single local cryotherapy application (+8°C) or a single local thermoneutral application (+32°C) of 20-minute duration using two thigh cuffs. Subjective measures of recovery (delayed-onset muscle soreness and ratings of perceived exertion) and objective measures of recovery (vertical jump performance and peak power output) were assessed immediately following the postexercise applications (0 hours) and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the jump protocol. Local cryotherapy failed to significantly affect any subjective recovery variable during the 72-hour recovery period (P>0.05). After 72 hours, the ratings of perceived exertion were significantly lower in the thermoneutral group compared to that in the cryotherapy group (P=0.002). No significant differences were observed between the cryotherapy and the thermoneutral groups with respect to any of the objective recovery variables. In this experimental study, a 20-minute cryotherapy cuff application failed to demonstrate a positive effect on any objective measures of recovery. The effects of local thermoneutral application on subjective recovery characteristics were superior when compared to the effects of local cryotherapy application at 72 hours postapplication. PMID:27579000

  14. Indentation Size Effect (ISE) in Copper Subjected to Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Joshua D.; Achuthan, Ajit; Morrison, David J.

    2014-05-01

    The characteristic length scale of deformation in copper specimens subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) through surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was studied with indentation experiments. Annealed copper disks were shot peened with 6-mm diameter tungsten carbide spheres with an average velocity of 2.3 m/s for 15 minutes in a vibrating chamber. The SMAT-treated specimens were cross-sectioned, and the exposed face was studied under nanoindentation in order to determine the effect of dislocation density on surface hardness and indentation size effect (ISE). Since the specimen preparation of the exposed face involved mechanical polishing, which in turn introduced additional SPD on the indenting face, the effect of mechanical polishing on hardness measurement was investigated first. To this end, the mechanically polished specimens were subjected to various durations of electrochemical polishing. Hardness measurements on these specimens showed that the effect of mechanical polishing was substantial for both microindentation and nanoindentation, the impact being significantly larger for nanoindentation. Consequently, the measured depth of influence of the SMAT process, determined on specimens subjected to longer durations of electrochemical polishing, shows larger values compared to those previously reported in the literature. The ISE shows a bilinear relationship between the square of hardness and the reciprocal of indentation depth. The slope of this behavior, corresponding to smaller indentation loads, which is a measure of the ISE associated with a strain gradient, shows a power-law relationship with an increase in the distance away from the SMAT surface, instead of the constant value expected with the Nix-Gao type model.

  15. The effect of local cryotherapy on subjective and objective recovery characteristics following an exhaustive jump protocol.

    PubMed

    Hohenauer, Erich; Clarys, Peter; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Clijsen, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this controlled trial was to investigate the effects of a single local cryotherapy session on the recovery characteristics over a period of 72 hours. Twenty-two young and healthy female (n=17; mean age: 21.9±1.1 years) and male (n=5;mean age: 25.4±2.8 years) adults participated in this study. Following an exhaustive jump protocol (3×30 countermovement jumps), half of the participants received either a single local cryotherapy application (+8°C) or a single local thermoneutral application (+32°C) of 20-minute duration using two thigh cuffs. Subjective measures of recovery (delayed-onset muscle soreness and ratings of perceived exertion) and objective measures of recovery (vertical jump performance and peak power output) were assessed immediately following the postexercise applications (0 hours) and at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the jump protocol. Local cryotherapy failed to significantly affect any subjective recovery variable during the 72-hour recovery period (P>0.05). After 72 hours, the ratings of perceived exertion were significantly lower in the thermoneutral group compared to that in the cryotherapy group (P=0.002). No significant differences were observed between the cryotherapy and the thermoneutral groups with respect to any of the objective recovery variables. In this experimental study, a 20-minute cryotherapy cuff application failed to demonstrate a positive effect on any objective measures of recovery. The effects of local thermoneutral application on subjective recovery characteristics were superior when compared to the effects of local cryotherapy application at 72 hours postapplication. PMID:27579000

  16. Relationship between cocaine-induced subjective effects and dopamine transporter occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.; Wang, G.J.

    1997-05-01

    The ability of cocaine to occupy the dopamine transporter has been linked to its reinforcing properties. However, such a relationship has not been demonstrated in humans. Methods: Positron Emission Tomography and [C-11]cocaine were used to estimate dopamine transporter occupancies after different doses of cocaine in 18 active cocaine abusers. The ratio of the distribution volume of [C-11]cocaine in striatum to that in cerebellum, which corresponds to Bmax/Kd +1 and is insensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow, was our measure of dopamine transporter availability. In parallel subjective effects were measured to assess the relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and cocaines behavioral effects. Intravenous cocaine produced a significant dose,-dependent blockade of dopamine transporters: 73 % for 0.6 mg/kg; 601/6 for 0.3 mg/kg; 48 % for 0.1 mg/kg iv and 40 % for 0.05 mg/kg. In addition, dopamine transporter occupancies were significantly correlated with cocaine plasma concentration (r = 0.55 p < 0.001). Cocaine also produced dose-dependent increases in self-reported ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} which were significantly correlated with the levels of dopamine transporter blockade. Discussion: These results provide the first documentation in humans that dopamine transporter occupancy is associated with cocaine induced subjective effects. They also suggest that dopamine transporter occupancies equal to or greater than 60% are required to produce significant effects on ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  17. Effect of Frustration on Brain Activation Pattern in Subjects with Different Temperament.

    PubMed

    Bierzynska, Maria; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Marchewka, Artur; Debowska, Weronika; Duszyk, Anna; Zajkowski, Wojciech; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Nowicka, Anna; Strelau, Jan; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging session, the subjects underwent 2 weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tactile task based on discrimination of Braille-like raised dots patterns and negative feedback. Effectiveness of this procedure has been confirmed in a pilot study using galvanic skin response and questionnaires. Brain activation pattern during tactile discrimination task before and after frustration were compared directly. Results revealed changes in brain activity in structures mostly reported in acute stress studies: striatum, cingulate cortex, insula, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus and in structures engaged in tactile Braille discrimination: SI and SII. Temperament type affected activation pattern. Subjects with low tolerance for arousal showed higher activation in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule than high reactivity group. Even though performance in the discrimination trials following frustration was unaltered, we observed increased activity of primary and secondary somatosensory cortex processing the tactile information. We interpret this effect as an indicator of additional involvement required to counteract the effects of frustration.

  18. Effect of Frustration on Brain Activation Pattern in Subjects with Different Temperament

    PubMed Central

    Bierzynska, Maria; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Marchewka, Artur; Debowska, Weronika; Duszyk, Anna; Zajkowski, Wojciech; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Nowicka, Anna; Strelau, Jan; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging session, the subjects underwent 2 weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tactile task based on discrimination of Braille-like raised dots patterns and negative feedback. Effectiveness of this procedure has been confirmed in a pilot study using galvanic skin response and questionnaires. Brain activation pattern during tactile discrimination task before and after frustration were compared directly. Results revealed changes in brain activity in structures mostly reported in acute stress studies: striatum, cingulate cortex, insula, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus and in structures engaged in tactile Braille discrimination: SI and SII. Temperament type affected activation pattern. Subjects with low tolerance for arousal showed higher activation in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule than high reactivity group. Even though performance in the discrimination trials following frustration was unaltered, we observed increased activity of primary and secondary somatosensory cortex processing the tactile information. We interpret this effect as an indicator of additional involvement required to counteract the effects of frustration. PMID:26793136

  19. Effects of Inhaled Rosemary Oil on Subjective Feelings and Activities of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Sayorwan, Winai; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Piriyapunyporn, Teerut; Hongratanaworakit, Tapanee; Kotchabhakdi, Naiphinich; Siripornpanich, Vorasith

    2013-01-01

    Rosemary oil is one of the more famous essential oils widely used in aroma-therapy. However, the effects of rosemary oil on the human body, in particular the nervous system, have not been sufficiently studied. This study investigates the effects of the inhalation of rosemary oil on test subjects’ feelings, as well as its effects on various physiological parameters of the nervous system. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in the experiment. All subjects underwent autonomic nervous system (ANS) recording. This consisted of measurements of skin temperature; heart rate; respiratory rate; blood pressure; evaluations of the subjects’ mood states; and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings in the pre-, during treatment, and post-rosemary inhalation periods as compared with control conditions. Our results showed significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate after rosemary oil inhalation. After the inhalation treatments, subjects were found to have become more active and stated that they felt “fresher”. The analysis of EEGs showed a reduction in the power of alpha1 (8–10.99 Hz) and alpha2 (11–12.99 Hz) waves. Moreover, an increment in the beta wave (13–30 Hz) power was observed in the anterior region of the brain. These results confirm the stimulatory effects of rosemary oil and provide supporting evidence that brain wave activity, autonomic nervous system activity, as well as mood states are all affected by the inhalation of the rosemary oil. PMID:23833718

  20. Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Barros, Lillian; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-06-01

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic yeast infection. Candida species and other microorganisms are involved in this complicated fungal infection, but Candida albicans continues to be the most prevalent. In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients, but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a widely variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome. Due to rapid increase in the incidence in these infections, this is the subject of numerous studies. Recently, the focus of attention is the treatment and, above all, the prevention of those complications. The diagnosis of candidiasis could become quite complicated. Prevention is the most effective "treatment," much more than eradication of the yeast with antifungal agents. There are several aspects to consider in the daily routine that can provide a strength protection. However, a therapeutic approach is necessary when the infection is established, and therefore, other alternatives should be explored. This review provides an overview on predisposition factors, prevention and diagnosis of candidiasis, highlighting alternative approaches for candidiasis treatment.

  1. Biomarkers for the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, G J H; de Visser, S J; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2005-01-01

    Aims Studies of novel centrally acting drugs in healthy volunteers are traditionally concerned with kinetics and tolerability, but useful information may also be obtained from biomarkers of clinical endpoints. This paper provides a systematic overview of CNS-tests used with SSRIs in healthy subjects. A useful biomarker should meet the following requirements: a consistent response across studies and drugs; a clear response of the biomarker to a therapeutic dose; a dose–response relationship; a plausible relationship between biomarker, pharmacology and pathogenesis. Methods These criteria were applied to all individual tests found in studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), performed in healthy subjects since 1966, identified with a systematic MedLine search. Separate databases were created to evaluate the effects of single or multiple dose SSRI-studies, and for amitriptyline whenever the original report included this antidepressant as a positive control. Doses of the antidepressant were divided into high- and low-dose ranges, relative to a medium range of therapeutic doses. For each test, the drug effects were scored as statistically significant impairment/decrease (−), improvement/increase (+) or no change (=) relative to placebo. Results 56 single dose studies and 22 multiple dose studies were identified, investigating the effects of 13 different SSRIs on 171 variants of neuropsychological tests, which could be clustered into seven neuropsychological domains. Low single doses of SSRIs generally stimulated tests of attention and memory. High doses tended to impair visual/auditory and visuomotor systems and subjective performance, while showing an acceleration in motor function. The most pronounced effects were observed using tests that measure flicker discrimination (improvement at low doses: 75%, medium doses: 40%, high doses: 43% of studies); REM sleep (inconsistent decrease after medium doses, decrease in 83% of studies after high doses

  2. Environmental disruption of circadian rhythm predisposes mice to osteoarthritis-like changes in knee joint.

    PubMed

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Voigt, Robin M; Ellman, Michael B; Summa, Keith C; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Keshavarizian, Ali; Turek, Fred W; Meng, Qing-Jun; Stein, Gary S; van Wijnen, Andre J; Chen, Di; Forsyth, Christopher B; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction is linked to many diseases, yet pathophysiological roles in articular cartilage homeostasis and degenerative joint disease including osteoarthritis (OA) remains to be investigated in vivo. Here, we tested whether environmental or genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis predisposes to OA-like pathological changes. Male mice were examined for circadian locomotor activity upon changes in the light:dark (LD) cycle or genetic disruption of circadian rhythms. Wild-type (WT) mice were maintained on a constant 12 h:12 h LD cycle (12:12 LD) or exposed to weekly 12 h phase shifts. Alternatively, male circadian mutant mice (Clock(Δ19) or Csnk1e(tau) mutants) were compared with age-matched WT littermates that were maintained on a constant 12:12 LD cycle. Disruption of circadian rhythms promoted osteoarthritic changes by suppressing proteoglycan accumulation, upregulating matrix-degrading enzymes and downregulating anabolic mediators in the mouse knee joint. Mechanistically, these effects involved activation of the PKCδ-ERK-RUNX2/NFκB and β-catenin signaling pathways, stimulation of MMP-13 and ADAMTS-5, as well as suppression of the anabolic mediators SOX9 and TIMP-3 in articular chondrocytes of phase-shifted mice. Genetic disruption of circadian homeostasis does not predispose to OA-like pathological changes in joints. Our results, for the first time, provide compelling in vivo evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is a risk factor for the development of OA-like pathological changes in the mouse knee joint.

  3. Black/white differences in prenatal care utilization: an assessment of predisposing and enabling factors.

    PubMed Central

    LaVeist, T A; Keith, V M; Gutierrez, M L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article reports on analysis of the predisposing and enabling factors that affect black/white differences in utilization of prenatal care services. DATA SOURCES. We use a secondary data source from a survey conducted by the Michigan Department of Public Health. STUDY DESIGN. The study uses multivariate analysis methods to examine black/white differences in (1) total number of prenatal care visits, (2) timing of start of prenatal care, and (3) adequacy of care received. We use the model advanced by Aday, Andersen, and Fleming (1980) to examine the effect of enabling and predisposing factors on black/white differences in prenatal care utilization. DATA COLLECTION. A questionnaire was administered to all women who delivered in Michigan hospitals with an obstetrical unit. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Enabling factors fully accounted for black/white differences in timing of start of prenatal care; however, the model could not fully account for black/white differences in the total number or the adequacy of prenatal care received. CONCLUSION. Although there are no black/white differences in the initiation of prenatal care, black women are still less likely to receive adequate care as measured by the Kessner index, or to have as many total prenatal care contacts as white women. It is possible that barriers within the health care system that could not be assessed in this study may account for the differences we observed. Future research should consider the characteristics of the health care system that may account for the unwillingness or inability of black women to continue to receive care once they initiate prenatal care. PMID:7721584

  4. Metabolic effects of dietary fructose and surcose in types I and II diabetic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.P.; Laine, D.C.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-12-19

    To learn more about the metabolic effects of dietary fructose and sucrose, 12 type 1 and 12 type II diabetic subjects were fed three isocaloric (or isoenergic) diets for eight days each according to a randomized, crossover design. The three diets provided, respectively, 21% of the energy as fructose, 23% of the energy as sucrose, and almost all carbohydrate energy as starch. The fructose diet resulted in significantly lower one- and two-hour postprandial plasma glucose levels, overall mean plasma glucose levels, and urinary glucose excretion in both type I and type II subjects than did the starch diet. There were no significant differences between the sucrose and starch diets in any of the measures of glycemic control in either subject group. The fructose and sucrose diets did not significantly increase serum triglyceride values when compared with the starch diet, but both increased postprandial serum lactate levels. The authors conclude that short-term replacement of other carbohydrate sources in the diabetic diet with fructose will improve glycemic control, whereas replacement with sucrose will not aggravate glycemic control.

  5. Sulfur dioxide and ammonium sulfate effects on pulmonary function and bronchial reactivity in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Shanty, F.; Kerr, H.D.; Farrell, B.P.; Miller, W.R.; Milman, J.H.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of exposures to 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and 500 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ respirable ammonium sulfate ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was studied in 20 nonsmoking subjects to determine if a response can be measured at these atmospheric levels and if the response is additive or synergistic. Four-hour separate and combined exposures were employed. Each subject acted as his or her own control and performed two light-to-moderate exercise stints (612 kg-m/min) for 15 minutes on each day's confinement in the environmental chamber. Pulmonary function tests (body plethysmography and spirometry) and bronchial reactivity to methacholine were performed to assess the response of these exposures. No significant changes in pulmonary function or bronchial reactivity were observed in the individual exposures ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or SO/sub 2/), the combined exposure ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and SO/sub 2/), or 24 hours post-exposure. This study design and the observed results did not demonstrate any readily apparent risk to healthy subjects with these exposures. Since no significant changes were measured, it was not possible to conclude if these two pollutants in combination produce an additive or synergistic response.

  6. The effects of UCP-1 polymorphisms on obesity phenotypes among Korean female subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Hyoung Doo; Kim, Kil Soo; Cha, Min Ho; Yoon, Yoosik . E-mail: ysyoon66@naver.com

    2005-09-23

    Three SNPs of UCP-1 including A-3826G, A-1766G, and Ala64Thr (G+1068A) were genotyped among 453 overweight Korean female subjects recruited from an obesity clinic. Four common haplotypes with frequency greater than 0.04 were constructed with three SNPs. For an accurate evaluation of the effects of UCP-1 polymorphism on body fat accumulation, all subjects were tested using computerized tomography to measure the cross-sectional fat tissue areas at abdominal and distal part of the body. By statistical analyses, ht4[GAA] showed a significant association with decreased abdominal fat tissue area (P = 0.02, dominant model), fat tissue area at thigh (P = 0.008, dominant model), body fat mass (P = 0.002, dominant model), and waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.01, dominant model). In addition, ht3[GAG] was associated with the accelerated reduction of waist-to-hip ratio and body fat mass by very low calorie diet among subjects who finished one-month-weight control program (P = 0.05-0.006)

  7. Laboratory study of effects of sonic boom shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability. The study utilized the sonic boom simulator at the Langley Research Center. A wide range of symmetrical, front-shock-minimized signature shapes were investigated together with a limited number of asymmetrical signatures. Subjective loudness judgments were obtained from 60 test subjects by using an 11-point numerical category scale. Acceptability judgments were obtained using the method of constant stimuli. Results were used to assess the relative predictive ability of several noise metrics, determine the loudness benefits of detailed boom shaping, and derive laboratory sonic boom acceptability criteria. These results indicated that the A-weighted sound exposure level, the Stevens Mark 7 Perceived Level, and the Zwicker Loudness Level metrics all performed well. Significant reductions in loudness were obtained by increasing front-shock rise time and/or decreasing front-shock overpressure of the front-shock minimized signatures. In addition, the asymmetrical signatures were rated to be slightly quieter than the symmetrical front-shock-minimized signatures of equal A-weighted sound exposure level. However, this result was based on a limited number of asymmetric signatures. The comparison of laboratory acceptability results with acceptability data obtained in more realistic situations also indicated good agreement.

  8. Effects of grapefruit juice on pharmacokinetic exposure to indinavir in HIV-positive subjects.

    PubMed

    Shelton, M J; Wynn, H E; Hewitt, R G; DiFrancesco, R

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of double-strength grapefruit juice on gastric pH and systemic bioavailability of indinavir in HIV-infected subjects receiving indinavir. Fourteen HIV-infected subjects took 800 mg of indinavir with 6 ounces (180 ml) of water or double-strength grapefruit juice. Gastric pH was measured and blood samples were collected for 5 hours after indinavir dosing. Grapefruit juice increased the mean gastric pH (from 1.39 +/- 0.4 to 3.20 +/- 0.3; p < 0.05) and slightly delayed the absorption of indinavir (tmax increased from 1.12 +/- 0.8 h to 1.56 +/- 0.6 h; p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in indinavir exposure. Cmax was 16.7 +/- 7.3 microM with water versus 13.9 +/- 4.2 microM with grapefruit juice (p = NS), and AUC0-8 was 37.5 +/- 19 with water versus 36.9 +/- 15 with grapefruit juice (p = NS). The authors concluded that concomitant administration of grapefruit juice increases gastric pH and delays indinavir absorption but does not uniformly affect the systemic bioavailability of indinavir in HIV-infected subjects.

  9. Beneficial Effects of an 8-Week, Very Low Carbohydrate Diet Intervention on Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yunjuan; Yu, Haoyong; Li, Yuehua; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Yu, Weihui; Xiao, Yunfeng; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effects of weight loss during an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) on improvement of metabolic parameters, adipose distribution and body composition, and insulin resistance and sensitivity in Chinese obese subjects. Methods. Fifty-three healthy obese volunteers were given an 8-week VLCD. The outcomes were changes in anthropometry, body composition, metabolic profile, abdominal fat distribution, liver fat percent (LFP), and insulin resistance and sensitivity. Results. A total of 46 (86.8%) obese subjects completed the study. The VLCD caused a weight loss of −8.7 ± 0.6 kg (mean ± standard error (SE), P < 0.0001) combined with a significant improvement of metabolic profile. In both male and female, nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) significantly decreased (−166.2 ± 47.6 μmol/L, P = 0.001) and β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHA) increased (0.15 ± 0.06 mmol/L, P = 0.004) after eight weeks of VLCD intervention. The significant reductions in subcutaneous fat area (SFA), visceral fat area (VFA), and LFP were −66.5 ± 7.9 cm2, −35.3 ± 3.9 cm2, and −16.4 ± 2.4%, respectively (all P values P < 0.0001). HOMA IR and HOMA β significantly decreased while whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) increased (all P values P < 0.001). Conclusion. Eight weeks of VLCD was an effective intervention in obese subjects. These beneficial effects may be associated with enhanced hepatic and whole-body lipolysis and oxidation. PMID:23573151

  10. Effects of age of serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in cocaine abusers and normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J.

    1995-05-01

    We measured the effect of age on serotonin 5-HT2 receptor availability and compared it with the effects on dopamine D2 receptors on 19 chronic cocaine abusers (35.2{plus_minus}9.8 years, range 18-54 years old) and 19 age matched normal controls using positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18 N-methylspiperone (NMS). 5-HT2 Receptor availability was measure din frontal (FR), occipital (OC), cingulate (CI) and orbitofrontal (OF) cortices using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest to that in the cerebelium (CB) which is a function of Bmax/Kd. D2 receptor availability in the basal ganglia was measured using the {open_quotes}ratio index{close_quotes} (slope of striatum/CB versus time over 180 min of the scan) which is a function of Bmax. 5-HT2 Receptor availability differed among regions and were as follows: CI>OF>OC>FC.5-HT2 Receptor availability decreased significantly with age. This effect was more accentuated for 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR than in OC(df=1, p<0.025). Striatal dopamine D2 receptors were also found to decrease significantly with age (r=0.63, p<0.007). In a given subject, D2 receptor availability was significantly correlated with 5-HT2 receptor availability in FR (r=0.51, p<0.035) but not in OC. The values for 5-HT2 receptor availability were not different in normal subjects and cocaine abusers. These results document a decline in 5-HT2 and D2 receptors with age and document an association between frontal 5-HT2 and striatal D2 receptor availability. These results did not show any changes in 5-HT2 receptor availability in cocaine abusers as compared to control subjects.

  11. Associations between Health Effects and Particulate Matter and Black Carbon in Subjects with Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Karen L.; Larson, Timothy V.; Koenig, Jane Q.; Mar, Therese F.; Fields, Carrie; Stewart, Jim; Lippmann, Morton

    2005-01-01

    We measured fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), spirometry, blood pressure, oxygen saturation of the blood (SaO2), and pulse rate in 16 older subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Seattle, Washington. Data were collected daily for 12 days. We simultaneously collected PM10 and PM2.5 (particulate matter ≤10 μm or ≤2.5 μm, respectively) filter samples at a central outdoor site, as well as outside and inside the subjects’ homes. Personal PM10 filter samples were also collected. All filters were analyzed for mass and light absorbance. We analyzed within-subject associations between health outcomes and air pollution metrics using a linear mixed-effects model with random intercept, controlling for age, ambient relative humidity, and ambient temperature. For the 7 subjects with asthma, a 10 μg/m3 increase in 24-hr average outdoor PM10 and PM2.5 was associated with a 5.9 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.9–8.9] and 4.2 ppb (95% CI, 1.3–7.1) increase in FENO, respectively. A 1 μg/m3 increase in outdoor, indoor, and personal black carbon (BC) was associated with increases in FENO of 2.3 ppb (95% CI, 1.1–3.6), 4.0 ppb (95% CI, 2.0–5.9), and 1.2 ppb (95% CI, 0.2–2.2), respectively. No significant association was found between PM or BC measures and changes in spirometry, blood pressure, pulse rate, or SaO2 in these subjects. Results from this study indicate that FENO may be a more sensitive marker of PM exposure than traditional health outcomes and that particle-associated BC is useful for examining associations between primary combustion constituents of PM and health outcomes. PMID:16330357

  12. Interactive Effects of OPRM1 and DAT1 Genetic Variation on Subjective Responses to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Lara A.; Bujarski, Spencer; Squeglia, Lindsay M.; Ashenhurst, James R.; Anton, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Subjective response to alcohol represents a marker of alcoholism risk. The A118G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene has been associated with subjective response to alcohol. Recently, the dopamine transporter (DAT1) variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR; SLC6A3) has been found to interact with the OPRM1 A118G SNP in predicting neural and behavioral responses to naltrexone and to alcohol. This exploratory study examines the OPRM1 × DAT1 interaction on subjective responses to alcohol. Methods: Non-treatment-seeking problem drinkers (n = 295) were assessed in the laboratory for alcohol dependence. Following prospective genotyping for the OPRM1 gene, 43 alcohol-dependent individuals were randomized to two intravenous infusion sessions, one of alcohol (target BrAC = 0.06 g/dl) and one of saline. Measures of subjective responses to alcohol were administered in both infusion sessions. Results: Analyses revealed significant Alcohol × OPRM1 × DAT1 interactions for alcohol-induced stimulation, vigor and positive mood as well as significant Alcohol × OPRM1 × DAT1 × Time interactions for stimulation and positive mood. These effects were such that, compared with other genotype groups, OPRM1 G-allele carriers + DAT1 A10 homozygotes reported steeper increases in stimulation and positive mood across rising BrAC, when compared with placebo. All Alcohol × OPRM1 × DAT1 interactions remained significant when analyses were restricted to a subsample of Caucasian participants (n = 34); however, 4-way interactions did not reach statistical significance in this subsample. Conclusions: This study suggests that the contribution of OPRM1 genotype to alcohol-induced stimulation, vigor and positive mood is moderated by DAT1 genotype. These findings are consistent with the purported interaction between opioidergic and dopaminergic systems in determining the reinforcing properties of alcohol. PMID:24421289

  13. Absence of the predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with overreaching and overtraining in physical fitness centers

    PubMed Central

    Ackel‐D'Elia, Carolina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Castelo, Adauto; Nouailhetas, Viviane Louise Andrée; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of the well‐known predisposing factors and signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining syndrome in physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. METHOD: A questionnaire consisting of 13 question groups pertaining to either predisposing factors (1‐7) or signs and symptoms (8‐13) was given to 413 subjects. The general training schedule of the volunteers was characterized by workout sessions of 2.18 ± 0.04 h for a total of 11.0 ± 0.3 h/week for 33 ± 2 months independent of the type of exercise performed (walking, running, spinning, bodybuilding and stretching). A mean score was calculated ranging from 1 (completely absent) to 5 (severe) for each question group. A low occurrence was considered to be a question group score lower than 4, which was observed in all 13 question groups. RESULTS: The psychological evaluation by POMS Mood State Questionnaire indicated a normal non‐inverted iceberg. The hematological parameters, creatine kinase activity, cortisol, total testosterone and free testosterone concentrations were within the normal ranges for the majority of the volunteers selected for this analysis (n  =  60). CONCLUSION: According to the questionnaire score analysis, no predisposing factors or signs and symptoms usually associated with either overreaching or overtraining were detected among the members of physical fitness centers in São Paulo City, Brazil. This observation was corroborated by the absence of any significant hematological or stress hormone level alterations in blood analyses of the majority of the selected volunteers (n  =  60). PMID:21243291

  14. Positive inotropic effects mediated by alpha 1 adrenoceptors in intact human subjects.

    PubMed

    Curiel, R; Pérez-González, J; Brito, N; Zerpa, R; Téllez, D; Cabrera, J; Curiel, C; Cubeddu, L

    1989-10-01

    The role of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (adrenoceptors) on cardiac contractility was investigated in human subjects. The effect of methoxamine, a selective alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, and angiotensin II, on cardiac contractility was determined by means of noninvasive assessment of the slope of the end-systolic pressure (ESP)/end-systolic dimension (ESD) relationship. The slope (m) of this ratio was significantly higher with methoxamine (17.0; SD = 9.0 mm Hg/mm) than with angiotensin II (4.8; SD = 1.9 mm Hg/mm) (p less than 0.05). Slopes with methoxamine were higher when heart rates (HRs) were reflexly reduced, and were significantly diminished when reflex bradycardia was prevented by atropine (p less than 0.05) or atrial pacing (p less than 0.01). Previous treatment with propranolol did not modify m values with methoxamine (m = 15.5; SD = 4.4 mm Hg/mm). Phentolamine, given at peak methoxamine effect, did not consistently modify m values, resulting in an average slope not significantly different from that obtained with methoxamine alone. However, the addition of phentolamine did not cause an increase in ESDs at each level of ESP with respect to methoxamine. In the same subjects, infusion of phentolamine after angiotensin did not modify ESDs at comparable ESP levels. These findings suggest the existence of a positive inotropic effect mediated by alpha 1 adrenoceptors in the intact human heart.

  15. Cerebral oxygenation and haemodynamic effects induced by nimodipine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Canova, Daniela; Roatta, Silvestro; Micieli, Giuseppe; Bosone, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cerebrovascular effects of nimodipine are still poorly understood even in the healthy condition; in particular, its effects on tissue oxygenation have never been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in cerebral oxygenation and blood volume upon oral administration of nimodipine (90 mg) in the healthy condition. In eight subjects, changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume were determined simultaneously with changes in blood velocity of the middle cerebral artery (VMCA) by using, respectively, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The subjects also underwent non-invasive assessment of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and end-tidal CO2. TCD and NIRS CO2 reactivity indices were also extracted. Nimodipine significantly reduced ABP (11±13%) and increased heart rate, as well as NIRS oxygenation (6.0±4.8%) and blood volume indices (9.4±10.1%), while VMCA was not significantly decreased (2.0±3.5%). Nimodipine slightly but significantly reduced the VMCA response to changes in pCO2 whereas the CO2 reactivity of NIRS parameters was improved. The observed changes in cerebral tissue oxygenation and blood volume indicate nimodipine-induced cerebrovascular dilation and increased perfusion, while the effect on VMCA possibly results from dilation of the insonated artery. The present results cast doubt on the putative nimodipine-induced impairment of CO2 reactivity. PMID:23402678

  16. Comparison of hangover effects among triazolam, flunitrazepam and quazepam in healthy subjects: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Taro; Okajima, Yuka; Otsubo, Tempei; Shinoda, Junko; Mimura, Masaru; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Kamijima, Kunitoshi

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the hangover effects of night-time administration of triazolam (0.25 mg), flunitrazepam (1 mg) and quazepam (15 mg) in healthy subjects. Daytime sleepiness and performance level following the night-time administration of the drugs were assessed using Standford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ), Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), actigraphy recordings and Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Fifteen healthy volunteers were given one of the three hypnotics at each drug session, which lasted for 1 week, in a single-blind cross-over fashion. No significant between-drug difference was observed for the psychomotor performance assessed by CPT. Subjective hangover effects assessed by SSS and SEQ in the morning were prominent for flunitrazepam and quazepam relative to triazolam, whereas objective indices such as MSLT or activity counts obtained in actigraphy indicated a marked hangover effect of quazepam compared with the other two compounds restrictively in the afternoon, which were nearly in accordance with their pharmacokinetic profiles.

  17. Effect of acetaldehyde on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis subjected to environmental shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, G.A.; Hobley, T.J.; Pamment, N.B.

    1997-01-05

    The lag phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to a step increase in temperature or ethanol concentration was reduced by as much as 60% when acetaldehyde was added to the medium at concentrations less than 0.1 g/L. Maximum specific growth rates were also substantially increased. Even greater proportional reductions in lag time due to acetaldehyde addition were observed for ethanol-shocked cultures of Zymomonas mobilis. Acetaldehyde had no effect on S. cerevisiae cultures started from stationary phase inocula in the absence of environmental shock and its lag-reducing effects were greater in complex medium than in a defined synthetic medium. Acetaldehyde reacted strongly with the ingredients of complex culture media. It is proposed that the effect of added acetaldehyde may be to compensate for the inability of cells to maintain transmembrane acetaldehyde gradients following an environmental shock.

  18. We know very little about the subjective effects of drugs in females.

    PubMed

    Bevins, Rick A; Charntikov, Sergios

    2015-03-18

    Pharmaceutical companies assessing the nervous system effects of candidate therapeutics often use a behavioral assay in rodents that assesses the drug's subjective (internal stimulus) effects. Variants of this so-called "drug discrimination task" have also been widely used by basic scientist for more than 50 years to study the receptor actions of a host of ligands related to disease states and neuropathologies. Notably, most published research with this task has used male rats or mice. This situation is unfortunate and severely limits the utility of the research, given the well-documented differences between women and men on drug efficacy and safety, as well as known sex differences in the neural and behavioral effects of drugs. In this Viewpoint, we highlight the need for basic researchers, as well as pharmaceutical scientists, to include females in drug discrimination studies in a manner that allows detection and interpretation of potential sex differences. PMID:25627010

  19. Effect of external chest wall oscillation on gas exchange in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dolmage, T E; De Rosie, J A; Avendano, M A; Goldstein, R S

    1995-02-01

    Effective gas exchange can be maintained in animals without the need for endotracheal intubation using external chest wall oscillation (ECWO). The clinical application of this technique has been limited by equipment which was either impractical or uncomfortable. We evaluated a prototype of a new oscillator in which an oscillatory profile of negative and positive pressure was imposed on a negative baseline pressure within a cuirass. In seven healthy subjects, we identified an oscillatory cuirass pressure that could effectively ventilate but would not result in severe hypocapnia over 5 min. We then measured the influence of changing the frequency of oscillation (fo) on PaCO2 and spontaneous ventilation. Lastly, we evaluated the capability of this prototype to achieve targeted changes in chamber pressure. Subjects were ventilated with an inspiratory chamber pressure of -20 +/- 4 cm H2O, an expiratory chamber pressure of 5 cm H2O and an inspiratory-expiratory ratio of 1:1 at 9 oscillatory frequencies (fo: 1 to 5 Hz at 0.5-Hz increments). Each subject was ventilated for 5 min with consecutive periods of ECWO being separated from each other by 10 min of unassisted breathing. Oscillatory tidal volume (Vo) was sampled and PaCO2 was determined from the expired carbon dioxide concentration (FECO2) measured at the mouth. The change in PaCO2 (delta PaCO2) was the difference in PaCO2 immediately before and after ECWO. We found that delta PaCO2 and Vo were inversely related to fo. At 1 Hz the delta PaCO2 was -13 +/- 1 mm Hg and Vo was 344 +/- 34 mL in the absence of spontaneous breathing (fb = 0). At 3 Hz and above, at the chamber pressures used, the delta PaCO2 was small (-1 to -2 mm Hg) and the Vo was less than the predicted dead space. Subjects breathed spontaneously but at a frequency below that of their resting fb. With this prototype, chamber pressure changes up to 30 cm H2O could be accurately achieved at 1, 2.5, and 4 Hz. In conclusion, ECWO can provide effective

  20. Angiogenesis induced by prenatal ischemia predisposes to periventricular hemorrhage during postnatal mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Cigdem; Hong, Caron; Carusillo, Brianna; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Three risk factors are associated with hemorrhagic forms of encephalopathy of prematurity (EP): (i) prematurity, (ii) in utero ischemia (IUI) or perinatal ischemia, and (iii) mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that IUI would induce an angiogenic response marked by activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), the latter degrading vascular basement membrane and increasing vulnerability to raised intravenous pressure during positive pressure mechanical ventilation. METHODS We studied a rat model of hemorrhagic-EP characterized by periventricular hemorrhages in which a 20-min episode of IUI is induced at E19, pups are born naturally at E21–22, and on P0, are subjected to a 20-min episode of positive pressure mechanical ventilation. Tissues were studied by H&E staining, immunolabeling, immunoblot and zymography. RESULTS Mechanical ventilation of rat pups 2–3 days after 20-min IUI caused widespread hemorrhages in periventricular tissues. IUI resulted in upregulation of VEGF and MMP-9. Zymography confirmed significantly elevated gelatinase activity. MMP-9 activation was accompanied by severe loss of MMP-9 substrates, collagen IV and laminin, in microvessels in periventricular areas. CONCLUSION Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that positive pressure mechanical ventilation of the newborn in the context of recent prenatal ischemia/hypoxia can predispose to periventricular hemorrhages. PMID:25665055

  1. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Intrahepatocellular and Intramyocellular Lipids in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Andrea; Kreis, Roland; Allemann, Sabin; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter; Buehler, Tania; Boesch, Chris; Christ, Emanuel R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrahepatocellular (IHCL) and intramyocellular (IMCL) lipids are ectopic lipid stores. Aerobic exercise results in IMCL utilization in subjects over a broad range of exercise capacity. IMCL and IHCL have been related to impaired insulin action at the skeletal muscle and hepatic level, respectively. The acute effect of aerobic exercise on IHCL is unknown. Possible regulatory factors include exercise capacity, insulin sensitivity and fat availability subcutaneous and visceral fat mass). Aim To concomitantly investigate the effect of aerobic exercise on IHCL and IMCL in healthy subjects, using Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Methods Normal weight, healthy subjects were included. Visit 1 consisted of a determination of VO2max on a treadmill. Visit 2 comprised the assessment of hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. At Visit 3, subcutaneous and visceral fat mass were assessed by whole body MRI, IHCL and IMCL before and after a 2-hours aerobic exercise (50% of VO2max) using 1H-MR-spectroscopy. Results Eighteen volunteers (12M, 6F) were enrolled in the study (age, 37.6±3.2 years, mean±SEM; VO2max, 53.4±2.9 mL/kg/min). Two hours aerobic exercise resulted in a significant decrease in IMCL (−22.6±3.3, % from baseline) and increase in IHCL (+34.9±7.6, % from baseline). There was no significant correlation between the exercise-induced changes in IMCL and IHCL and exercise capacity, subcutaneous and visceral fat mass and hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity. Conclusions IMCL and IHCL are flexible ectopic lipid stores that are acutely influenced by physical exercise, albeit in different directions. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00491582 PMID:23967125

  2. Proinflammatory cytokine responses correspond with subjective side effects after influenza virus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Lisa M.; Porter, Kyle; Karlsson, Erik; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Background Though typically mild, side effects to the influenza virus vaccine are common and may contribute to negative perceptions including the belief that the vaccine can cause the flu. However, the extent to which subjective symptoms correspond with biological response indicators is poorly understood. Methods This study examined associations among subjective side effects (soreness at the site of injection and illness-like symptoms), serum proinflammatory cytokines and body temperature a baseline, 1, 2, and 3 days following receipt of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) in a sample of 56 women 18–40 years in age. Results In relation to local reactions, women reporting being very sore at the injection site at 1 day post-vaccination exhibited greater increases in serum TNF-α and MIF in the days following vaccination compared to those with no or mild soreness. In addition, higher basal body temperature was observed in this group compared to other groups (98.7°F versus 98.0°–98.1°). In relation to systemic reactions, women endorsing illness-like symptoms (headache, fatigue, nausea, sore throat, dizziness, achiness, or mild fever) exhibited marginally higher IL-6 at baseline (p = .055) and greater increases in serum MIF at 2 days post-vaccination than those reporting no systemic symptoms. Associations of systemic symptoms with inflammatory responses were not accounted for by concomitant local reactions. As expected, antibody responses to the vaccine were highly similar in women regardless of local or systemic symptoms. Conclusions These results are consistent with the notion that subjective reports of local and systemic reactions following vaccination may be predicted by and correspond with biological indicators of inflammatory status, but are not meaningful predictors of antibody responses. To improve adherence to vaccine recommendations, clinicians should provide assurance that such symptoms may be related to normal mild inflammatory responses to

  3. Effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir on the pharmacokinetics of dolutegravir in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Ivy; Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Peppercorn, Amanda; Wajima, Toshihiro; Piscitelli, Stephen C

    2014-11-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is an HIV integrase inhibitor (INI) with demonstrated activity in INI-naive and INI-resistant patients. The objective of this open-label, 2-period, single-sequence study was to evaluate the effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir (FPV-RTV) on the steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of DTG. Twelve healthy subjects received 50 mg DTG once daily for 5 days (period 1), followed by 10 days of 50 mg DTG once daily in combination with 700/100 mg FPV-RTV every 12 h (period 2). All doses were administered in the fasting state. Serial pharmacokinetic samples for DTG and amprenavir and safety assessments were obtained throughout the study. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and geometric least-squares mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals were generated for within-subject treatment comparison. Fosamprenavir-ritonavir decreased the DTG area under the concentration-time curve, maximum concentration in plasma, and concentration in plasma at the end of the dosing interval by 35%, 24%, and 49%, respectively. Both DTG and DTG with FPV-RTV were well tolerated; no subject withdrew because of adverse events. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events were rash, abnormal dreams, and nasopharyngitis. The modest decrease in DTG exposure when it was coadministered with FPV-RTV is not considered clinically significant, and DTG dose adjustment is not required with coadministration of FPV-RTV in INI-naive patient populations on the basis of established "no-effect" boundaries of DTG. In the INI-resistant population, as a cautionary measure, alternative combinations that do not include FPV-RTV should be considered. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01209065.). PMID:25155604

  4. The Effect of Dolutegravir on the Pharmacokinetics of Metformin in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ivy H.; Zong, Jian; Borland, Julie; Jerva, Fred; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J.; Humphreys, Joan E.; Bowers, Gary D.; Choukour, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dolutegravir is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) licensed for use in HIV-1 infection and is an inhibitor of organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2). This study assessed the effect of dolutegravir on the pharmacokinetics of metformin, an OCT2 substrate. Design: This was an open-label, parallel-group, 3-period crossover study in healthy adult subjects. Subjects were enrolled into 1 of 2 treatment cohorts (15 subjects/cohort) receiving metformin 500 mg q12h for 5 days in period 1; metformin 500 mg q12h plus dolutegravir 50 mg q24h (cohort 1) or 50 mg q12h (cohort 2) for 7 days in period 2; and metformin 500 mg q12h for 10 days in period 3. There were no washout periods between treatments. Effects of dolutegravir on metformin transport and paracellular permeability were evaluated in vitro. Results: Co-administration of dolutegravir 50 mg q24h increased metformin area under the curve(0–τ) by 79% and Cmax by 66%, whereas dolutegravir 50 mg q12h increased metformin area under the curve(0–τ) and Cmax by 145% and 111%, respectively. Metformin t(1/2) remained unchanged. Increased metformin exposure during dolutegravir co-administration returned to period 1 levels after dolutegravir discontinuation in period 3. Co-administration of dolutegravir and metformin was well tolerated. In vitro, dolutegravir was not a clinically relevant inhibitor of OCT1, OCT3, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 2-K, or plasma membrane monoamine transporter, and it did not affect metformin paracellular permeability or uptake into an intestinal cell line. Conclusions: Dolutegravir significantly increased metformin plasma exposure, which can be partially explained by OCT2 inhibition. It is recommended that dose adjustments of metformin be considered to maintain optimal glycemic control when patients are starting/stopping dolutegravir while taking metformin. PMID:26974526

  5. Sensory stimulation (TENS): effects of parameter manipulation on mechanical pain thresholds in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine E; Lundeberg, Thomas; Wright, Christine C; Baxter, G David

    2002-09-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a popular form of electrostimulation. Despite an extensive research base, there remains no consensus regarding the parameter selection required to achieve maximal hypoalgesic effects. The aim of this double blind, sham-controlled study was to investigate the relative hypoalgesic effects of different TENS parameters (frequency, intensity and stimulation site) upon experimentally induced mechanical pain. Two hundred and forty participants were recruited in order to provide statistical analysis with 80% power at alpha = 0.05. Subjects were randomised to one of the six TENS groups, a control, and a sham TENS group (n = 30, 15 males, 15 females, per group). TENS groups differed in their combinations of stimulation; frequency (4 or 110 Hz), intensity ('to tolerance' or 'strong but comfortable') and stimulation site (segmental--over the distribution of the radial nerve or, extrasegmental--over acupuncture point 'gall bladder 34', or a combination of both segmental and extrasegmental). Pulse duration was fixed at 200 micros. Stimulation was delivered for 30 min and subjects were then monitored for a further 30 min. Mechanical pain threshold (MPT) was measured using a pressure algometer and taken from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant hand, ipsilateral to the stimulation site. MPT measures were taken, at baseline, and at 10-min intervals for 60 min. Difference scores were analysed using repeated measures and one-way ANOVA and relevant post hoc tests. Low frequency, high intensity, extrasegmental stimulation produced a rapid onset hypoalgesic effect, which increased during the stimulation period (P < 0.0005 control and sham) and was sustained for 30 min post-stimulation (P < 0.0005(control), P = 0.024(sham)). Whilst high frequency, 'strong but comfortable' intensity, segmental stimulation produced comparable hypoalgesic levels during stimulation, this effect was not sustained post

  6. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Some Landing Characteristics During Counter Movement Jumps in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key points We investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies. We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps. Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  7. The Predisposing Factors between Dental Caries and Deviations from Normal Weight

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Amandeep; Rao, Nanak Chand; Gupta, Nidhi; Vashisth, Shelja; Lakhanpal, Manav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and deviations from normal weight are two conditions which share several broadly predisposing factors. So it's important to understand any relationship between dental state and body weight if either is to be managed appropriately. Aims: The study was done to find out the correlation between body mass index (BMI), diet, and dental caries among 12-15-year-old schoolgoing children in Panchkula District. Materials and Methods: A multistage sample of 12-15-year-old school children (n = 810) in Panchkula district, Haryana was considered. Child demographic details and diet history for 5 days was recorded. Data regarding dental caries status was collected using World Health Organization (1997) format. BMI was calculated and categorized according to the World Health Organization classification system for BMI. The data were subjected to statistical analysis using chi-square test and binomial regression developed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 20.0. Results: The mean Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) score was found to be 1.72 with decayed, missing, and filled teeth to be 1.22, 0.04, and 0.44, respectively. When the sample was assessed based on type of diet, it was found that vegetarians had higher mean DMFT (1.72) as compared to children having mixed diet. Overweight children had highest DMFT (3.21) which was followed by underweight (2.31) and obese children (2.23). Binomial regression revealed that females were 1.293 times at risk of developing caries as compared to males. Fair and poor Simplified-Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) showed 3.920 and 4.297 times risk of developing caries as compared to good oral hygiene, respectively. Upper high socioeconomic status (SES) is at most risk of developing caries. Underweight, overweight, and obese are at 2.7, 2.5, and 3 times risk of developing caries as compared to children with normal BMI, respectively. Conclusion: Dental caries and deviations from normal weight are two conditions

  8. Predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with high service use in a public mental health system.

    PubMed

    Lindamer, Laurie A; Liu, Lin; Sommerfeld, David H; Folsom, David P; Hawthorne, William; Garcia, Piedad; Aarons, Gregory A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) To investigate the individual- and system-level characteristics associated with high utilization of acute mental health services according to a widely-used theory of service use-Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use -in individuals enrolled in a large, public-funded mental health system; and (2) To document service utilization by high use consumers prior to a transformation of the service delivery system. We analyzed data from 10,128 individuals receiving care in a large public mental health system from fiscal years 2000-2004. Subjects with information in the database for the index year (fiscal year 2000-2001) and all of the following 3 years were included in this study. Using logistic regression, we identified predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics associated with being categorized as a single-year high use consumer (HU: >3 acute care episodes in a single year) or multiple-year HU (>3 acute care episodes in more than 1 year). Thirteen percent of the sample met the criteria for being a single-year HU and an additional 8% met the definition for multiple-year HU. Although some predisposing factors were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as a HU (younger age and female gender) relative to non-HUs, the characteristics with the strongest associations with the HU definition, when controlling for all other factors, were enabling and need factors. Homelessness was associated with 115% increase in the odds of ever being classified as a HU compared to those living independently or with family and others. Having insurance was associated with increased odds of being classified as a HU by about 19% relative to non-HUs. Attending four or more outpatient visits was an enabling factor that decreased the chances of being defined as a HU. Need factors, such as having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or other psychotic disorder or having a substance use disorder

  9. Predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with high service use in a public mental health system.

    PubMed

    Lindamer, Laurie A; Liu, Lin; Sommerfeld, David H; Folsom, David P; Hawthorne, William; Garcia, Piedad; Aarons, Gregory A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) To investigate the individual- and system-level characteristics associated with high utilization of acute mental health services according to a widely-used theory of service use-Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use -in individuals enrolled in a large, public-funded mental health system; and (2) To document service utilization by high use consumers prior to a transformation of the service delivery system. We analyzed data from 10,128 individuals receiving care in a large public mental health system from fiscal years 2000-2004. Subjects with information in the database for the index year (fiscal year 2000-2001) and all of the following 3 years were included in this study. Using logistic regression, we identified predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics associated with being categorized as a single-year high use consumer (HU: >3 acute care episodes in a single year) or multiple-year HU (>3 acute care episodes in more than 1 year). Thirteen percent of the sample met the criteria for being a single-year HU and an additional 8% met the definition for multiple-year HU. Although some predisposing factors were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as a HU (younger age and female gender) relative to non-HUs, the characteristics with the strongest associations with the HU definition, when controlling for all other factors, were enabling and need factors. Homelessness was associated with 115% increase in the odds of ever being classified as a HU compared to those living independently or with family and others. Having insurance was associated with increased odds of being classified as a HU by about 19% relative to non-HUs. Attending four or more outpatient visits was an enabling factor that decreased the chances of being defined as a HU. Need factors, such as having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or other psychotic disorder or having a substance use disorder

  10. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z.; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged. PMID:27790111

  11. Investigation of Control Inceptor Dynamics and Effect on Human Subject Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanco, Anthony A.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Grube, Richard C.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2013-01-01

    The control inceptor used in a vehicle simulation is an important part of adequately representing the dynamics of the vehicle. The inceptor characteristics are typically based on a second order spring mass damper system with damping, force gradient, breakout force, and natural frequency parameters. Changing these parameters can have a great effect on pilot control of the vehicle. A quasi transfer of training experiment was performed employing a high fidelity and a low fidelity control inceptor. A disturbance compensatory task was employed which involved a simple horizon line disturbed in roll by a sum of sinusoids presented in an out-the-window display. Vehicle dynamics were modeled as 1/s and 1/s2. The task was to maintain level flight. Twenty subjects were divided between the high and the low fidelity training groups. Each group was trained to a performance asymptote, and then transferred to the high fidelity simulation. RMS tracking error, a PSD analysis, and a workload analysis were performed to quantify the transfer of training effect. Quantitative results of the experiments show that there is no significant difference between the high and low fidelity training groups for 1/s plant dynamics. For 1/s2 plant dynamics there is a greater difference in tracking performance and PSD; and the subjects are less correlated with the input disturbance function

  12. Effects of elastic band exercise on subjects with rounded shoulder posture and forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; An, Da-In; Lee, Hye-Yun; Jeong, Ho-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study performed to investigate the effect of elastic band exercise program on the posture of subjects with rounded shoulder and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] The body length, forward shoulder angle, craniovertebral angle, and cranial rotation angle of participants (n=12) were measured before and after the exercise program. Furthermore, the thicknesses of the pectoralis major, rhomboid major, and upper trapezius were measured using an ultrasonographic imaging device. The exercises program was conducted with elastic bands, with 15 repetitions per set and 3 sets in total. [Results] The length of the pectoralis major, forward shoulder angle, and craniovertebral angle showed significant changes between before and after the exercise program, whereas the changes in the other measurements were not significant. The thickness of the upper trapezius showed a significant increase between before and after the elastic band exercise. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the elastic band exercise program used in the study is effective for lengthening the pectoralis major and correcting rounded shoulder and forward head posture. PMID:27390405

  13. Differential effects of chitooligosaccharides on serum cytokine levels in aged subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Min; Hong, Seung Heon; Yoo, Su Jin; Baek, Kyung Sin; Jeon, You Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2006-01-01

    Free amine chitooligosaccharides (FACOS, Kitto Life, Seoul, Republic of Korea) with an average molecular mass of 3.5 kDa were efficiently produced using an ultrafiltration membrane reactor system. To evaluate the effect of chitooligosaccharides on serum cytokine levels in elderly adults after oral intake, 5.1 g/day of FACOS was given to elderly (age range, 74-86 years; mean, 80 +/- 3 years) volunteers during an 8-week experimental period. Interleukin (IL)-12 and interferonã levels were significantly higher in the FACOS group than in the control group (P < .05). However, levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha decreased after FACOS intake during the experimental period. The results of this study suggest that the oral intake of chitooligosaccharides may have beneficial effects on specific cell-mediated immunity while also acting as an anti-inflammatory agent in aged subjects.

  14. Calculation of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields and Their Effects in MRI of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christopher M.; Wang, Zhangwei

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency magnetic fields are critical to nuclear excitation and signal reception in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The interactions between these fields and human tissues in anatomical geometries results in a variety of effects regarding image integrity and safety of the human subject. In recent decades numerical methods of calculation have been used increasingly to understand the effects of these interactions and aid in engineering better, faster, and safer equipment and methods. As MRI techniques and technology have evolved through the years, so too have the requirements for meaningful interpretation of calculation results. Here we review the basic physics of RF electromagnetics in MRI and discuss a variety of ways RF field calculations are used in MRI in engineering and safety assurance from simple systems and sequences through advanced methods of development for the future. PMID:21381106

  15. The "subjective" pupil old/new effect: is the truth plain to see?

    PubMed

    Montefinese, Maria; Ambrosini, Ettore; Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    Human memory is an imperfect process, prone to distortion and errors that range from minor disturbances to major errors that can have serious consequences on everyday life. In this study, we investigated false remembering of manipulatory verbs using an explicit recognition task and pupillometry. Our results replicated the "classical" pupil old/new effect as well as data in false remembering literature that show how items must be recognize as old in order for the pupil size to increase (e.g., "subjective" pupil old/new effect), even though these items do not necessarily have to be truly old. These findings support the strength-of-memory trace account that affirms that pupil dilation is related to experience rather than to the accuracy of recognition. Moreover, behavioral results showed higher rates of true and false recognitions for manipulatory verbs and a consequent larger pupil diameter, supporting the embodied view of language. PMID:23665094

  16. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  17. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  18. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  19. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  20. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  1. Effects of flurbiprofen enantiomers on pain-related chemo-somatosensory evoked potentials in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lötsch, J; Geisslinger, G; Mohammadian, P; Brune, K; Kobal, G

    1995-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic effects of flurbiprofen enantiomers using an experimental pain model based on both chemo-somatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERP) and subjective pain ratings. 2. Healthy female volunteers (n = 16, age 23-36 years) participated in a placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind, four-way crossover study. Single doses of (S)-flurbiprofen (50 mg), (R)-flurbiprofen (50 and 100 mg) and placebo were administered orally. Measurements were taken before and 2 h after administration of the medications. During each measurement, 32 painful stimuli of gaseous carbon dioxide (200 ms duration, interval approximately 30 s) of two concentrations (60 and 65% CO2 v/v) were applied to the right nostril. EEG was recorded from five positions and CSSERP were obtained in response to the painful CO2- stimuli. Additionally, subjects rated the perceived intensity of the painful stimuli by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS). 3. The CSSERP-amplitude P2, a measure of analgesic effect, decreased after administration of both (R)- and (S)-flurbiprofen, while it increased after placebo. This was statistically significant at recording positions C4 (P < 0.01) and Fz (P < 0.05). The analgesia-related decreases in evoked potential produced by (R)-flurbiprofen were dose-dependent. Comparing similar doses of (R)- and (S)-flurbiprofen, the decrease in CSSERP-amplitudes produced by the (S)-enantiomer was somewhat more pronounced, indicating a higher analgesic potency. 4. The present data indicate that both enantiomers of flurbiprofen produce analgesic effects. Since (R)-flurbiprofen caused only little toxicity in rats as compared with the (S)-enantiomer or the racemic compound, a reduction of the quantitatively most important side effects in the gastrointestinal tract might be achieved by employing (R)-flurbiprofen in pain therapy. PMID:8554936

  2. Effects of flurbiprofen enantiomers on pain-related chemo-somatosensory evoked potentials in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, J; Geisslinger, G; Mohammadian, P; Brune, K; Kobal, G

    1995-10-01

    1. The aim of the study was to investigate the analgesic effects of flurbiprofen enantiomers using an experimental pain model based on both chemo-somatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERP) and subjective pain ratings. 2. Healthy female volunteers (n = 16, age 23-36 years) participated in a placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind, four-way crossover study. Single doses of (S)-flurbiprofen (50 mg), (R)-flurbiprofen (50 and 100 mg) and placebo were administered orally. Measurements were taken before and 2 h after administration of the medications. During each measurement, 32 painful stimuli of gaseous carbon dioxide (200 ms duration, interval approximately 30 s) of two concentrations (60 and 65% CO2 v/v) were applied to the right nostril. EEG was recorded from five positions and CSSERP were obtained in response to the painful CO2- stimuli. Additionally, subjects rated the perceived intensity of the painful stimuli by means of a visual analogue scale (VAS). 3. The CSSERP-amplitude P2, a measure of analgesic effect, decreased after administration of both (R)- and (S)-flurbiprofen, while it increased after placebo. This was statistically significant at recording positions C4 (P < 0.01) and Fz (P < 0.05). The analgesia-related decreases in evoked potential produced by (R)-flurbiprofen were dose-dependent. Comparing similar doses of (R)- and (S)-flurbiprofen, the decrease in CSSERP-amplitudes produced by the (S)-enantiomer was somewhat more pronounced, indicating a higher analgesic potency. 4. The present data indicate that both enantiomers of flurbiprofen produce analgesic effects. Since (R)-flurbiprofen caused only little toxicity in rats as compared with the (S)-enantiomer or the racemic compound, a reduction of the quantitatively most important side effects in the gastrointestinal tract might be achieved by employing (R)-flurbiprofen in pain therapy.

  3. Predisposing conditions for Candida spp. carriage in the oral cavity of denture wearers and individuals with natural teeth.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Juliana Pereira; da Costa, Sérgio Carvalho; Totti, Valéria Maria Gomes; Munhoz, Maira Forestti Vieira; de Resende, Maria Aparecida

    2006-05-01

    Candida species are a normal commensal present in a large percentage of healthy individuals. Denture wearers are predisposed to the development of candidosis and to the presence of Candida spp. The presence of the yeast, even in healthy subjects, should be considered more carefully. We investigated the prevalence of Candida spp. in 112 denture wearers and 103 individuals with natural teeth, patients from the clinic of total prosthesis of the Dental School of the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and from the School of Pharmacy and Dentistry of Alfenas, Brazil. Factors like gender, age over 60 years, low education, and xerostomia were directly associated with the presence of Candida yeasts at a significance level of 5% (p > 0.05). However, the major predisposing factor for the carrier state was wearing dentures (p = 0.001). Candida isolates were identified using morphological and biochemical profiles. Seventy-one isolates were identified as C. albicans (65.1%), 15 as C. glabrata (13.7%), 8 as C. parapsilosis (7.3%), 3 as C. krusei (2.7%), and 12 as C. tropicalis (11.0%). Susceptibility testing to fluconazole and itraconazole was also performed with the strains obtained. Both drugs showed a strong inhibition against most oral isolates.

  4. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  5. Depression, hypertension, and comorbidity: disentangling their specific effect on disability and cognitive impairment in older subjects.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Spazzafumo, Liana; Cipriani, Luca; Gianni, Walter; Corsonello, Andrea; Cravello, Luca; Repetto, Lazzaro; Bustacchini, Silvia; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Sebastiani, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to demonstrate that depression and hypertension are associated independently of each other with disability and cognitive impairment in older subjects and that such an association is not attributable to number and severity of comorbidities. An observational study was performed on elderly patients admitted to the Hospital Network of the Italian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA) from January 2005 to December 2006. Depression was defined according to 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS) score; physical disability according to activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scores; cognitive impairment on the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) test; the number and severity of comorbidities by means of physician-administered cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS). Among 6180 older subjects (age=79.3 ± 5.8 years; 47% men), 48.3% were normotensive, 21.8% normotensive depressed, 21.7% hypertensive, and 8.2% hypertensive and depressed. Both depression and hypertension remained significantly associated with functional disability and cognitive impairment. When controlling for age, gender, the number and severity of comorbidities, hypertension was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of having functional disability or cognitive impairment only in the presence of depression (odds ratio=OR=2.02, 95% confidence interval=95%CI=1.60-2.54, p<0.001 for functional disability; OR=2.21, 95%CI=1.79-2.74, p<0.001 for cognitive impairment) as compared to normotensive controls without depression. We conclude that depression per se' or co-occurrence of hypertension and depression is associated with higher functional disability and cognitive impairment in older subjects. This effect is not attributable to the number or to the severity of comorbidities.

  6. Effect of Fosamprenavir-Ritonavir on the Pharmacokinetics of Dolutegravir in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Julie; Chen, Shuguang; Peppercorn, Amanda; Wajima, Toshihiro; Piscitelli, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is an HIV integrase inhibitor (INI) with demonstrated activity in INI-naive and INI-resistant patients. The objective of this open-label, 2-period, single-sequence study was to evaluate the effect of fosamprenavir-ritonavir (FPV-RTV) on the steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of DTG. Twelve healthy subjects received 50 mg DTG once daily for 5 days (period 1), followed by 10 days of 50 mg DTG once daily in combination with 700/100 mg FPV-RTV every 12 h (period 2). All doses were administered in the fasting state. Serial pharmacokinetic samples for DTG and amprenavir and safety assessments were obtained throughout the study. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed, and geometric least-squares mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals were generated for within-subject treatment comparison. Fosamprenavir-ritonavir decreased the DTG area under the concentration-time curve, maximum concentration in plasma, and concentration in plasma at the end of the dosing interval by 35%, 24%, and 49%, respectively. Both DTG and DTG with FPV-RTV were well tolerated; no subject withdrew because of adverse events. The most frequently reported drug-related adverse events were rash, abnormal dreams, and nasopharyngitis. The modest decrease in DTG exposure when it was coadministered with FPV-RTV is not considered clinically significant, and DTG dose adjustment is not required with coadministration of FPV-RTV in INI-naive patient populations on the basis of established “no-effect” boundaries of DTG. In the INI-resistant population, as a cautionary measure, alternative combinations that do not include FPV-RTV should be considered. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01209065.) PMID:25155604

  7. Effects of inhalation of acidic compounds on pulmonary function in allergic adolescent subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Covert, D.S.; Pierson, W.E.

    1989-02-01

    There is concern about the human health effects of inhalation of acid compounds found in urban air pollution. It was the purpose of this study to investigate three of these acid compounds, sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), and nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) in a group of allergic adolescent subjects. Subjects were exposed during rest and moderate exercise to 0.7 mumole/m/sup 3/ (68 micrograms/m/sup 3/) H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 4.0 mumole/m/sup 3/ (0.1 ppm) SO/sub 2/, or 2.0 mumole/m/sup 3/ (0.05 ppm) HNO/sub 3/. Pulmonary functions (FEV1, total respiratory resistance, and maximal flow) were measured before and after exposure. Preliminary analysis based on nine subjects indicates that exposure to 0.7 mumole/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone and in combination with SO/sub 2/ caused significant changes in pulmonary function, whereas exposure to air or SO/sub 2/ alone did not. FEV1 decreased an average of 6% after exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone and 4% when the aerosol was combined with SO/sub 2/. The FEV1 decrease was 2% after both air and SO/sub 2/ exposures. Total respiratory resistance (RT) increased 15% after the combined H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exposures, 12% after H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone, and 7% after exposure to air. After exposures to HNO3 alone, FEV1 decreased by 4%, and RT increased by 23%. These results are preliminary; final conclusions must wait for completion of the study.

  8. Effects of inhalation of acidic compounds on pulmonary function in allergic adolescent subjects.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J Q; Covert, D S; Pierson, W E

    1989-02-01

    There is concern about the human health effects of inhalation of acid compounds found in urban air pollution. It was the purpose of this study to investigate three of these acid compounds, sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), and nitric acid (HNO3) in a group of allergic adolescent subjects. Subjects were exposed during rest and moderate exercise to 0.7 mumole/m3 (68 micrograms/m3) H2SO4, 4.0 mumole/m3 (0.1 ppm) SO2, or 2.0 mumole/m3 (0.05 ppm) HNO3. Pulmonary functions (FEV1, total respiratory resistance, and maximal flow) were measured before and after exposure. Preliminary analysis based on nine subjects indicates that exposure to 0.7 mumole/m3 H2SO4 alone and in combination with SO2 caused significant changes in pulmonary function, whereas exposure to air or SO2 alone did not. FEV1 decreased an average of 6% after exposure to H2SO4 alone and 4% when the aerosol was combined with SO2. The FEV1 decrease was 2% after both air and SO2 exposures. Total respiratory resistance (RT) increased 15% after the combined H2SO4 exposures, 12% after H2SO4 alone, and 7% after exposure to air. After exposures to HNO3 alone, FEV1 decreased by 4%, and RT increased by 23%. These results are preliminary; final conclusions must wait for completion of the study.

  9. Aging Effects on Cardiac and Respiratory Dynamics in Healthy Subjects across Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Aicko Y.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Penzel, Thomas; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Respiratory and heart rate variability exhibit fractal scaling behavior on certain time scales. We studied the short-term and long-term correlation properties of heartbeat and breathing-interval data from disease-free subjects focusing on the age-dependent fractal organization. We also studied differences across sleep stages and night-time wake and investigated quasi-periodic variations associated with cardiac risk. Design: Full-night polysomnograms were recorded during 2 nights, including electrocardiogram and oronasal airflow. Setting: Data were collected in 7 laboratories in 5 European countries. Participants: 180 subjects without health complaints (85 males, 95 females) aged from 20 to 89 years. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Short-term correlations in heartbeat intervals measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent α1 show characteristic age dependence with a maximum around 50–60 years disregarding the dependence on sleep and wake states. Long-term correlations measured by α2 differ in NREM sleep when compared with REM sleep and wake, besides weak age dependence. Results for respiratory intervals are similar to those for α2 of heartbeat intervals. Deceleration capacity (DC) decreases with age; it is lower during REM and deep sleep (compared with light sleep and wake). Conclusion: The age dependence of α1 should be considered when using this value for diagnostic purposes in post-infarction patients. Pronounced long-term correlations (larger α2) for heartbeat and respiration during REM sleep and wake indicate an enhanced control of higher brain regions, which is absent during NREM sleep. Reduced DC possibly indicates an increased cardiovascular risk with aging and during REM and deep sleep. Citation: Schumann AY; Bartsch RP; Penzel T; Ivanov PC; Kantelhardt JW. Aging effects on cardiac and respiratory dynamics in healthy subjects across sleep stages. SLEEP 2010;33(7):943-955. PMID:20614854

  10. Frequency and effects of apolipoprotein E polymorphism in Mexican-American NIDDM subjects.

    PubMed

    Shriver, M D; Boerwinkle, E; Hewett-Emmett, D; Hanis, C L

    1991-03-01

    We typed 254 non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDDM) Mexican Americans living in Starr County, Texas, for the three common apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles. Typing was performed via DNA amplification and Hha I restriction. The allele frequencies (epsilon 2 = 0.041, epsilon 3 = 0.860, epsilon 4 = 0.099) were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi 2 = 0.60, df = 3) and did not differ from a random sample from the same population (chi 2 = 0.16, df = 2). Analysis of variance was used to test for mean differences in lipid, lipoprotein, and glucose levels among apoE types. Significant differences among types were detected for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-chol; P = 0.042, R2 = 2.6) and beta-lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.019, R2 = 3.3) levels. Mean LDL-chol in E2/3 individuals was 2.69 mM, E3/3 was 3.26 mM, and E4/3 was 3.36 mM. Mean beta-lipoprotein cholesterol in E2/3 individuals was 3.05 mM, E3/3 was 3.64 mM, and E4/3 was 3.67 mM. Based on these results, we conclude that the effects of the apoE polymorphism on lipid profiles and glucose levels are the same in NIDDM subjects as in nondiabetic Mexican Americans and other populations. Other studies investigating the role of apoE polymorphism in diabetic subjects have found increased triglyceride levels in individuals possessing an epsilon 2-allele and an increased frequency of the epsilon 2-allele in hyperlipidemic diabetic subjects. We found no significant difference in mean triglyceride levels among genotypes. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, including DNA- versus protein-typing methods. PMID:1999275

  11. Beneficial effect of chromium-rich yeast on glucose tolerance and blood lipids in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Offenbacher, E G; Pi-Sunyer, F X

    1980-11-01

    Twenty-four volunteers, mean age 78, including eight mildly non-insulin-dependent diabetics, were randomly allocated to one of two groups and were fed (daily for 8 wk) 9 g of either chromium-rich brewers' yeast (experimental) or chromium-poor torula yeast (control). Before and after yeast supplementation, the serum glucose and insulin response to 100 g oral glucose was measured at 30 min intervals for 2 h. Fasting serum cholesterol, total lipids, and triglycerides were also determined. In the total experimental group (normals + diabetics) and in both the diabetic and nondiabetic experimental subgroups, glucose tolerance improved significantly and insulin output decreased after supplementation. Cholesterol and total lipids fell significantly after supplementation in the total experimental group. The cholesterol decrease was particularly marked in hypercholesterolemic subjects (cholesterol > 300 mg/dl). In the control group, no significant change in glucose tolerance, insulin, triglycerides, or total lipids was found. Cholesterol was significantly lowered in the nondiabetic but not in the diabetic group. Thus, chromium-rich brewers' yeast improved glucose tolerance and total lipids in elderly subjects, while chromium-poor torula yeast did not. An improvement in insulin sensitivity also occurred with brewers' yeast supplementation. This supports the thesis that elderly people may have a low level of chromium and that an effective source for chromium repletion, such as brewers' yeast, may improve their carbohydrate tolerance and total lipids. The improvement in serum cholesterol in some control subjects, as well as in the total experimental group, also suggests the presence of a hypocholesterolemic factor other than chromium in both brewers' and torula yeast.

  12. Dietary fish oil effects on seasonal hay fever and asthma in pollen-sensitive subjects.

    PubMed

    Thien, F C; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Lee, T H

    1993-05-01

    The effects of taking 18 capsules a day of Max-EPA (3.2 g/day eicosapentaenoic acid) on clinical symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness were studied in pollen-sensitive subjects over a pollen season in a parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled (olive oil) fashion. The study was conducted over the 1990 and 1991 pollen seasons in London, England. A total of 37 nonsmoking pollen-sensitive asthmatic subjects were entered into the trial, and 25 completed the 6-month study period over the 2 yr. The preseasonal geometric mean PD35 SGaw of histamine for the fish oil (n = 12) and placebo (n = 9) groups were 0.62 and 0.42 mumol, respectively. During the middle of the pollen season, histamine PD35 SGaw fell significantly for both the fish oil (0.11 mumol, p < 0.0001) and placebo groups (0.10 mumol, p < 0.007), indicating increased bronchial reactivity compared with preseasonal values, but there was no significant difference between the groups. Similarly, morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF), diurnal variability in PEF, nocturnal cough and wheeze, daytime wheeze, and activity, as well as nasal symptoms and increased usage of medication, were not significantly different between the groups. Compliance was confirmed by neutrophil and plasma phospholipid analysis, which showed significant rises in eicosapentaenoic acid content in the fish oil group but not in the placebo group. We conclude that dietary fish oil supplementation does not prevent seasonal hay fever and asthma in pollen-sensitive subjects during the pollen season.

  13. Temporal dynamics of the face familiarity effect: bootstrap analysis of single-subject event-related potential data.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Prieto, Esther; Pancaroglu, Raika; Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Handy, Todd; Barton, Jason J S; Oruc, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Prior event-related potential studies using group statistics within a priori selected time windows have yielded conflicting results about familiarity effects in face processing. Our goal was to evaluate the temporal dynamics of the familiarity effect at all time points at the single-subject level. Ten subjects were shown faces of anonymous people or celebrities. Individual results were analysed using a point-by-point bootstrap analysis. While familiarity effects were less consistent at later epochs, all subjects showed them between 130 and 195 ms in occipitotemporal electrodes. However, the relation between the time course of familiarity effects and the peak latency of the N170 was variable. We concluded that familiarity effects between 130 and 195 ms are robust and can be shown in single subjects. The variability of their relation to the timing of the N170 potential may lead to underestimation of familiarity effects in studies that use group-based statistics.

  14. Effects of kiwifruit consumption on serum lipid profiles and antioxidative status in hyperlipidemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Liu, Jen-Fang

    2009-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most important adult health problem in the world. Epidemiological studies and laboratory experiments have shown that fruit and vegetable consumption has protective effects against CVD. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of consumption of two kiwifruit per day on the lipid profile, antioxidants and markers of lipid peroxidation in hyperlipidemic adult men and women in Taiwan. Forty-three subjects who had hyperlipidemia, including 13 males and 30 females, participated in this study. They were asked to consume two kiwifruit per day for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measurements were made. Before the intervention and at 4 and 8 weeks of the intervention, fasting blood samples were analyzed for total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Additionally vitamin E and vitamin C, the malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal concentration, and the lag time of LDL oxidation were determined. No significant differences from baseline to 8 weeks of the intervention were detected for triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, or LDL cholesterol. However, after 8 weeks of consumption of kiwifruit, the HDL-C concentration was significantly increased and the LDL cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio were significantly decreased. Vitamin C and vitamin E also increased significantly. In addition, the lag time of LDL oxidation and malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal had significantly changed at 4 and 8 weeks during the kiwifruit intervention. Regular consumption of kiwifruit might exert beneficial effects on the antioxidative status and the risk factors for CVD in hyperlipidemic subjects.

  15. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sather, T M

    2000-12-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia. PMID:11324988

  16. Effects of cholinergic and beta-adrenergic blockade on orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses during a graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol were compared before and after atropine and propranolol administration to test the hypothesis that both sympathetic and parasympathetic control of cardio-acceleration are associated with syncopal predisposition to orthostatic stress in healthy subjects. Eleven men were categorized into two groups having high (HT, N = 6) or low (LT, N = 5) tolerance based on their total time before the onset of presyncopal symptoms. HT and LT groups were similar in physical characteristics, fitness, and baseline cardiovascular measurements. Atropine treatment had no effect on LBNP tolerance or mean arterial pressure at presyncope, despite an atropine-induced increase in heart rate. Propranolol treatment reduced (p<0.05) LBNP tolerance in both groups. Diminished LBNP tolerance after propranolol administration was associated with reductions in cardiac output, whereas increase in systemic peripheral resistance from baseline to presyncope was unaffected by propranolol. Reduction in cardiac output and LBNP tolerance after beta blockade reflected a chronotropic effect because lower LBNP tolerance for the HT (-50%) and LT (-39%) groups was associated with dramatic reductions (p <0.05) in the magnitude of LBNP-induced tachycardia without significant effects on stroke volume at presyncope. Absence of an atropine-induced difference in cardiac output and systemic peripheral resistance between HT and LT groups failed to support the notion that cardiac vagal withdrawal represents a predominant mechanism that could account for differences in orthostatic tolerance. Because a reduction in LBNP tolerance in both HT and LT groups after propranolol treatment was most closely associated with reduced tachycardia, the data suggest that a primary autonomically mediated mechanism for maintenance of mean arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance in healthy subjects is beta adrenergic-induced tachycardia.

  17. The Cardiovascular Effects of Morphine THE PERIPHERAL CAPACITANCE AND RESISTANCE VESSELS IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Zelis, Robert; Mansour, Edward J.; Capone, Robert J.; Mason, Dean T.

    1974-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of morphine on the peripheral venous and arterial beds, 69 normal subjects were evaluated before and after the intravenous administration of 15 mg morphine. Venous tone was determined by three independent techniques in 22 subjects. The venous pressure measured in a hand vein during temporary circulatory arrest (isolated hand vein technique) fell from 20.2±1.4 to 13.4±0.9 mm Hg (P < 0.01) 10 min after morphine, indicating that a significant venodilation had occurred. With the acute occlusion technique, morphine induced a reduction in forearm venous tone from 12.8±1.1 to 7.9±2.3 mm Hg/ml/100 ml (P < 0.01). Although forearm venous volume at a pressure of 30 mm Hg (VV[30]) was increased from 2.26±0.17 to 2.55±0.26 ml/100 ml, measured by the equilibration technique, the change was not significant (P > 0.1). Of note is that the initial reaction to morphine was a pronounced venoconstriction, demonstrated during the first 1-2 min after the drug. (Isolated hand vein pressure increased to 37.2±5.4 mm Hg, P < 0.01). This rapidly subsided, and by 5 min a venodilation was evident. Morphine did not attenuate the venoconstrictor response to a single deep breath, mental arithmetic, or the application of ice to the forehead when measured by either the isolated hand vein technique or the equilibration technique. To evaluate the effects of morphine on the peripheral resistance vessels in 47 normal subjects, forearm blood flow was measured plethysmographically before and 10-15 min after the intravenous administration of 15 mg of morphine. Although mean systemic arterial pressure was unchanged, forearm blood flow increased from 2.92±0.28 to 3.96±0.46 ml/min/100 ml (P < 0.01), and calculated vascular resistance fell from 42.4±5.2 to 31.6±3.2 mm Hg/ml/min/100 ml (P < 0.01). When subjects were tilted to the 45° head-up position, morphine did not block the increase in total peripheral vascular resistance that occurs; however, it did significantly

  18. Effect of non-alcoholic beer on Subjective Sleep Quality in a university stressed population.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Bravo, R; Galán, C; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Cubero, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Sleep deprivation affects the homeostasis of the physiological functions in the human organism. Beer is the only beverage that contains hops, a plant which has a sedative effect. Our objective is to determine the improvement of subjective sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The sample was conducted among a population of 30 university students. The study took place during a period of 3 weeks, the first 7 days were used for the Control, and during the following 14 days the students ingested beer (were asked to drink non-alcoholic beer) while having dinner. The results revealed that Subjective Sleep Quality improved in the case of those students who drank one beer during dinner compared to the Control, this is corroborated by the fact that Sleep Latency decreased (p < 0.05) compared to their Control. The overall rating Global Score of Quality of Sleep also improved significantly (p < 0.05). These results confirm that the consumption of non-alcoholic beer at dinner time helps to improve the quality of sleep at night.

  19. Learned helplessness in the rat: effect of response topography in a within-subject design.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Cristiano Valerio; Gehm, Tauane; Hunziker, Maria Helena Leite

    2011-02-01

    Three experiments investigated learned helplessness in rats manipulating response topography within-subject and different intervals between treatment and tests among groups. In Experiment 1, rats previously exposed to inescapable shocks were tested under an escape contingency where either jumping or nose poking was required to terminate shocks; tests were run either 1, 14 or 28 days after treatment. Most rats failed to jump, as expected, but learned to nose poke, regardless of the interval between treatment and tests and order of testing. The same results were observed in male and female rats from a different laboratory (Experiment 2) and despite increased exposure to the escape contingencies using a within-subject design (Experiment 3). Furthermore, no evidence of helplessness reversal was observed, since animals failed to jump even after having learned to nose-poke in a previous test session. These results are not consistent with a learned helplessness hypothesis, which claims that shock (un)controllability is the key variable responsible for the effect. They are nonetheless consistent with the view that inescapable shocks enhance control by irrelevant features of the relationship between the environment and behavior.

  20. Effect of non-alcoholic beer on Subjective Sleep Quality in a university stressed population.

    PubMed

    Franco, L; Bravo, R; Galán, C; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Cubero, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Sleep deprivation affects the homeostasis of the physiological functions in the human organism. Beer is the only beverage that contains hops, a plant which has a sedative effect. Our objective is to determine the improvement of subjective sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The sample was conducted among a population of 30 university students. The study took place during a period of 3 weeks, the first 7 days were used for the Control, and during the following 14 days the students ingested beer (were asked to drink non-alcoholic beer) while having dinner. The results revealed that Subjective Sleep Quality improved in the case of those students who drank one beer during dinner compared to the Control, this is corroborated by the fact that Sleep Latency decreased (p < 0.05) compared to their Control. The overall rating Global Score of Quality of Sleep also improved significantly (p < 0.05). These results confirm that the consumption of non-alcoholic beer at dinner time helps to improve the quality of sleep at night. PMID:25183509

  1. Acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Özdal, Mustafa

    2016-06-15

    The acute effects of inspiratory muscle warm-up on pulmonary functions were examined in 26 healthy male subjects using the pulmonary function test (PFT) in three different trials. The control trial (CON) did not involve inspiratory muscle warm-up, while the placebo (IMWp) and experimental (IMW) trials involved inspiratory muscle warm-up. There were no significant changes between the IMWp and CON trials (p>0.05). All the PFT measurements, including slow vital capacity, inspiratory vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and maximal inspiratory pressure were significantly increased by 3.55%, 12.52%, 5.00%, 2.75%, 2.66%, and 7.03% respectively, in the subjects in the IMW trial than those in the CON trial (p<0.05). These results show that inspiratory muscle warm-up improved the pulmonary functions. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are probably associated with the concomitant increase in the inspiratory muscle strength, and the cooperation of the upper thorax, neck, and respiratory muscles, and increased level of reactive O2 species in muscle tissue, and potentially improvement of muscle O2 delivery-to-utilization. However, further investigation is required to determine the precise mechanisms responsible from among these candidates. PMID:26903486

  2. Effectiveness of a heat and moisture exchanger in preventing hyperpnoea induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Gravelyn, T R; Capper, M; Eschenbacher, W L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a heat and moisture exchanger, a device with hygroscopic material for conditioning inspired air, on hyperpnoea induced bronchoconstriction was studied in nine non-smoking volunteers with asthma, aged 19-32 years. Each had previously shown an increase of at least 100% in specific airways resistance (sRaw) to isocapnic hyperpnoea with dry air. On two separate days the subject performed isocapnic hyperpnoea with dry air at 60-70 l min-1 for five minutes. Before, immediately after, and five minutes after completion of a test sRaw measurements were made. Heat and moisture exchangers were placed in the breathing circuit on one of the two days. All subjects had an increase in sRaw of 100% or more without the heat and moisture exchangers (average increase 300%) but were protected from bronchoconstriction with the devices in place (average increase 7%) (p less than 0.005). The exchanger's resistance to airflow was less than 1 cm H2O for flow rates of 100 l min-1. A heat and moisture exchanger designed as a facemask or mouthpiece may allow a person with asthma to exercise without the need for prophylactic drugs. PMID:3424269

  3. Inhibitory effects of stress on postprandial gastric myoelectrical activity and vagal tone in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Levanon, D; Chen, J D Z

    2004-12-01

    The aim was to investigate gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and vagal activity in response to stress. The study was performed in 10 healthy subjects in three sessions (control, relaxation and stress). The control session was composed of 30-min recordings before and 30-min recordings after a test meal. The protocol of two other sessions was similar except that the fasting recording was extended to 60 min and the subjects were continuously watching a horror movie (stress) or guided meditation tape (relaxation) after the 30-min baseline. GMA was recorded using electrogastrography and heart rate variability (HRV) was derived from the electrocardiogram. Meal resulted in a postprandial increase in the dominant frequency (2.91 cpm vs 3.17 cpm, P < 0.007), dominant power (30.0 dB vs 32.5 dB, P < 0.05), and percentage of normal slow waves (79.8%vs 87.4%, P = 0.09). Similar responses were found in the relaxation session. Stress inhibited all these normal postprandial response and reduced the regularity of gastric slow waves (82.0%vs 66.0%, P < 0.01). In addition, spectral analysis of the HRV demonstrated an inhibition of postprandial vagal activity and an increase of postprandial sympathetic activity with stress. Stress has an inhibitory effect on postprandial GMA and this may involve both vagal and sympathetic pathway.

  4. Functional effects of genetic polymorphism in inflammatory genes in subjective memory complainers.

    PubMed

    Lau, Simon; Bates, Kristyn Alissa; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Rodrigues, Mark; Martins, Georgia; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Taddei, Kevin; Laws, Simon M; Martins, Ian J; Mastaglia, Francis L; Foster, Jonathan K; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Martins, Ralph N

    2012-06-01

    A number of genetic risk factors have been identified for Alzheimer's disease (AD) including genes involved in the inflammatory response (interleukin 1A, [IL-1α (-889)], interleukin 1B (IL-1β [+3953]), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF [-308 and -850]). We investigated the prevalence and functional consequences (baseline cognitive performance, plasma cytokine levels) of possession of these putative genetic risk factors within a group of subjective memory complainers (SMC, n = 226) and age and sex matched noncomplainers (NMC, n = 167). We observed no effect of any of the genetic factors investigated on cognitive performance. Further, there was no difference in the frequency of the disease-associated alleles, or cytokine levels between subjective memory complainers and noncomplainer participants. There was no relationship between TNF polymorphisms and TNF levels. There was a significant increase in plasma IL-1β levels in those homozygous for the disease-associated allele (i.e., IL-1β +3953 TT). Follow-up longitudinal assessments on this cohort will provide insight as to how these polymorphisms may affect the risk of cognitive decline over time.

  5. Differential effect of caffeine intake in subjects with genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prakash M; Paing, Swe Swe Thet; Li, HuiHua; Pavanni, R; Yuen, Y; Zhao, Y; Tan, Eng King

    2015-11-02

    We examined if caffeine intake has a differential effect in subjects with high and low genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder. A case control study involving 812 subjects consisting of PD and healthy controls were conducted. Caffeine intake assessed by a validated questionnaire and genotyping of PD gene risk variant (LRRK2 R1628P) was carried out. Compared to caffeine takers with the wild-type genotype (low genetic susceptibility), non-caffeine takers with R1628P variant (high genetic susceptibility) had a 15 times increased risk of developing PD (OR = 15.4, 95% CI = (1.94, 122), P = 0.01), whereas caffeine takers with R1628P (intermediate susceptibility) had a 3 times risk (OR = 3.07, 95% CI = (2.02, 4.66), P < 0.001). Caffeine intake would significantly reduce the risk of PD much more in those with high genetic susceptibility compared to those with low genetic susceptibility.

  6. Effects of Visual Cortex Activation on the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  7. Effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; Dewitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.

    1990-12-06

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases FVC and increases sRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airways responses. In the study the authors employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy non-smoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for one hour while exercising at 20 l/min/m{sup 2} (BSA). Prior to and immediately following exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and sRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300 ml bolus of a 0.5 micrometers triphenyl phosphate (TPP) aerosol injected into a 2 liters tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 liters of clean air was inhaled from FRC; at depth B after 1.2 liters; and at depth C after 1.2 liters but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW).

  8. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  9. Effect of concentration on taste-taste interactions in foods for elderly and young subjects.

    PubMed

    Mojet, Jos; Heidema, Johannes; Christ-Hazelhof, Elly

    2004-10-01

    An increase in concentration of one of the tastants in a 'real food' might affect not only the perception of the taste quality of that manipulated tastant but also the other perceivable taste qualities. The influence of concentration increase of sodium or potassium chloride in tomato soup, sucrose or aspartame in iced tea, acetic or citric acid in mayonnaise, caffeine or quinine HCl in chocolate drink, monosodium glutamate (MSG) or inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) in broth on the other perceivable taste qualities in these foods was studied in 21 young subjects (19-33 years) and 21 older subjects (60-75 years). The results showed that for each of these tastants, except for the two acids, increasing the concentration provoked significant positive or negative interaction effects on the perception of one or more other taste qualities of the product. Especially in the young, olfaction plays a larger role in the assessment of taste intensity than has been hitherto assumed. The elderly are less able to discriminate between the taste qualities in a product, whereas the young are more able to do so.

  10. Long-term effectiveness of unboosted atazanavir plus abacavir/lamivudine in subjects with virological suppression

    PubMed Central

    Llibre, Josep M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Court; Ristola, Matti; Losso, Marcelo; Mocroft, Amanda; Mitsura, Viktar; Falconer, Karolin; Maltez, Fernando; Beniowski, Marek; Vullo, Vincenzo; Hassoun, Gamal; Kuzovatova, Elena; Szlavik, János; Kuznetsova, Anastasiia; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Duvivier, Claudine; Edwards, Simon; Laut, Kamilla; Paredes, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effectiveness data of an unboosted atazanavir (ATV) with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) switch strategy in clinical routine are scant. We evaluated treatment outcomes of ATV + ABC/3TC in pretreated subjects in the EuroSIDA cohort when started with undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral load (pVL), performing a time to loss of virological response (TLOVR <50 copies/mL) and a snapshot analysis at 48, 96, and 144 weeks. Virological failure (VF) was defined as confirmed pVL >50 copies/mL. We included 285 subjects, 67% male, with median baseline CD4 530 cells, and 44 months with pVL ≤50 copies/mL. The third drug in the previous regimen was ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) in 79 (28%), and another ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) in 29 (10%). Ninety (32%) had previously failed with a PI. Proportions of people with virological success at 48/96/144 weeks were 90%/87%/88% (TLOVR) and 74%/67%/59% (snapshot analysis), respectively. The rates of VF were 8%/8%/6%. Rates of adverse events leading to study discontinuation were 0.4%/1%/2%. The multivariable adjusted analysis showed an association between VF and nadir CD4+ (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42–0.93] per 100 cells higher), time with pVL ≤50 copies/mL (HR 0.87 [95% CI: 0.79–0.96] per 6 months longer), and previous failure with a PI (HR 2.78 [95% CI: 1.28–6.04]). Resistance selection at failure was uncommon. A switch to ATV + ABC/3TC in selected subjects with suppressed viremia was associated with low rates of VF and discontinuation due to adverse events, even in subjects not receiving ATV/r. The strategy might be considered in those with long-term suppression and no prior PI failure. PMID:27749561

  11. Positive effects of astaxanthin on lipid profiles and oxidative stress in overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye Duck; Youn, Yeo Kyu; Shin, Wan Gyoon

    2011-11-01

    Astaxanthin, a carotenoid, has antioxidant activity as well as many positive effects, such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the effects of astaxanthin on lipid profiles and oxidative stress in overweight and obese adults in Korea. In total, 27 subjects with body mass index >25.0 kg/m(2) were enrolled and randomly assigned into two groups administered astaxanthin or placebo capsules for 12 weeks. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) were measured before and after intervention. Malondialdehyde (MDA), isoprostane (ISP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), as oxidative stress biomarkers, were measured at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after intervention. LDL cholesterol and ApoB were significantly lower after treatment with astaxanthin, compared with the start of administration, whereas none of the lipid profiles was changed in the placebo group. At the baseline, all four biomarkers were not significantly different between the two groups. Compared with the placebo group, MDA and ISP were significantly lower, but TAC was significantly higher in the astaxanthin group at 12 weeks. These results suggest that supplementary astaxanthin has positive effects by improving the LDL cholesterol, ApoB, and oxidative stress biomarkers.

  12. Biomarkers of Dose and Effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human controlled exposure studies have generally focused on subjects exposed to ozone (O3) while exercising while exposures in rats have been done at rest. We exposed resting subjects to labeled O3 (18O3, 0.4 ppm, for 2 hr) and compared O3 dose and effects with our...

  13. Effects of consuming various foods and nutrients on objective and subjective aspects of human performance and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.; Lieberman, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of behavioral tests were established and studies performed on young healthy subjects who received tryptophan, tyrosine or placeboes and on young and old subjects receiving protein and carbohydrate meals. The behavioral effect of the homone melatonin on human circadian rhythms was examined. The results are discussed.

  14. Effect Sizes as Result Interpretation Aids in Single-Subject Experimental Research: Description and Application of Four Nonoverlap Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakap, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Single-subject experimental research (SSER), one of the most commonly used research methods in special education and applied behaviour analysis, is a scientific, rigorous and valid method to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioural, educational and psychological treatments. However, studies using single-subject experimental research designs are…

  15. Effects of grapefruit juice on cortisol metabolism in healthy male Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ya-Jie; Hu, Miao; Tomlinson, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Grapefruit juice (GFJ) inhibits intestinal CYP3A4 activity and it has been suggested that GFJ may also inhibit renal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD2), which converts cortisol to cortisone. This study examined the effect of GFJ on the urinary excretion of cortisol, cortisone and 6β-hydroxycortisol (6β-OHC) and their ratios to asses these effects. Healthy male Chinese subjects took single doses of GFJ (200, 400, and 600 mL, respectively) at weekly intervals. Urine was collected over 24 h the day before and following GFJ intake. Subsequently, volunteers drank 400 mL GFJ for 7 days and urine was collected from 0 to 4 h daily. GFJ had dose-dependent effects on increasing cortisol excretion (P <0.05) and the ratio of cortisol to cortisone (P <0.005) and reducing 6β-OHC excretion (P <0.05) and the ratio of 6β-OHC to cortisol (P <0.005). There was no significant effect on cortisone excretion. Maximal effects were observed within 4 h after GFJ ingestion. Repeated doses had persistent but no cumulative effects. GFJ significantly reduced the ratio of 6β-OHC to cortisol. It increased the ratio of cortisol to cortisone and this appeared largely due to increased cortisol excretion related to impaired CYP3A4-mediated cortisol metabolism although a true inhibitory effect on 11β-HSD2 in the kidney cannot be excluded.

  16. Immediate effects of acupuncture on biceps brachii muscle function in healthy and post-stroke subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of acupuncture on muscle function in healthy subjects are contradictory and cannot be extrapolated to post-stroke patients. This study evaluated the immediate effects of manual acupuncture on myoelectric activity and isometric force in healthy and post-stroke patients. Methods A randomized clinical trial, with parallel groups, single-blinded study design, was conducted with 32 healthy subjects and 15 post-stroke patients with chronic hemiparesis. Surface electromyography from biceps brachii during maximal isometric voluntary tests was performed before and after 20-min intermittent, and manual stimulation of acupoints Quchi (LI11) or Tianquan (PC2). Pattern differentiation was performed by an automated method based on logistic regression equations. Results Healthy subjects showed a decrease in the root mean-squared (RMS) values after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 1.392 ± 0.826 V; post: 0.612 ± 0.0.320 V; P = 0.002) and PC2 (pre: 1.494 ± 0.826 V; post: 0.623 ± 0.320 V; P = 0.001). Elbow flexion maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) was not significantly different after acupuncture stimulation of LI11 (pre: 22.2 ± 10.7 kg; post: 21.7 ± 9.5 kg; P = 0.288) or PC2 (pre: 18.8 ± 4.6 kg; post: 18.7 ± 6.0 kg; P = 0.468). Post-stroke patients did not exhibit any significant decrease in the RMS values after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 0.627 ± 0.335 V; post: 0.530 ± 0.272 V; P = 0.187) and PC2 (pre: 0.601 ± 0.258 V; post: 0.591 ± 0.326 V; P = 0.398). Also, no significant decrease in the MIVC value was observed after the stimulation of LI11 (pre: 9.6 ± 3.9 kg; post: 9.6 ± 4.7 kg; P = 0.499) or PC2 (pre: 10.7 ± 5.6 kg; post: 10.2 ± 5.3 kg; P = 0.251). Different frequency of patterns was observed among healthy subjects and post-stroke patients groups (χ2 = 9.759; P = 0.021). Conclusion Manual acupuncture provides sufficient neuromuscular stimuli to promote immediate changes in motor unit gross recruitment without repercussion in

  17. Age and gender effects on nasal respiratory function in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vig, P S; Zajac, D J

    1993-05-01

    One hundred and ninety-seven normal individuals between the ages of 5 and 73 years were evaluated to determine nasal resistance, nasal cross-sectional area, and respiratory mode during quiet breathing. Subjects were categorized into three age groups. Nasal resistance and respiratory mode were directly determined using posterior rhinomanometry and the SNORT technique, respectively. Nasal cross-sectional area was estimated using the hydrokinetic equation. Results indicated significant effects of age on all variables; significant gender differences were found for respiratory mode. Weak correlations were found between respiratory mode and nasal resistance. The results are presented as normative data on nasorespiratory characteristics to facilitate diagnostic and treatment decisions relative to individuals with normal morphology as well as to patients with craniofacial anomalies. A fundamental issue of both clinical and theoretical importance arising from the study pertains to the definitions of normality and impairment.

  18. Effects of Garcinia cambogia extract on serum sex hormones in overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Tomi, Hironori; Kaneko, Izuru; Shen, Manzhen; Soni, Madhu G; Yoshino, Gen

    2008-06-01

    (-) Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), an active ingredient extracted from the Garcinia cambogia fruit rind, has been commonly used as a dietary supplement for weight management. Given the controversy over HCA related testicular toxicity in animal studies, we investigated changes in serum sex hormones levels as an extension of our previous double-blind placebo-controlled trial in human subjects, in which 44 participants received either G. cambogia extract (1667.3 mg/day equivalent to 1000 mg HCA/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. Compared to the placebo group, administration of the extract did not significantly alter the serum testosterone, estrone, and estradiol levels. Similarly, hematology, serum triacylglycerol and serum clinical pathology parameters did not reveal any significant adverse effects. The results of this preliminary investigation indicate that ingestion of G. cambogia extract at dose levels commonly recommended for human use does not affect serum sex hormone levels and blood parameters. PMID:18316163

  19. Subjective evaluation of the effect of noise and interference on frequency modulated NTSC television signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, M.; Chouinard, G.; Trenholm, R.

    1984-12-01

    The future environment of broadcasting satellites may well be governed by the limiting factor of interference between television signals from neighboring satellites. A program of tests was performed to evaluate subjectively the effect of aggregate interference and/or noise on the impairment of television pictures. Up to four interfering channels were added in an environment resembling that of future broadcasting satellite systems including up to two co-frequency channels and up to two adjacent channels. Also results of just-perceptible interference tests due to adjacent channel interferer at various intercarrier spacings and for different receive filter characteristics on the wanted signal path are presented. The results of these tests are considered valuable in the study of the quality standard for the RARC-83 for the planning of the broadcasting-satellite service.

  20. Age and gender effects on nasal respiratory function in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Vig, P S; Zajac, D J

    1993-05-01

    One hundred and ninety-seven normal individuals between the ages of 5 and 73 years were evaluated to determine nasal resistance, nasal cross-sectional area, and respiratory mode during quiet breathing. Subjects were categorized into three age groups. Nasal resistance and respiratory mode were directly determined using posterior rhinomanometry and the SNORT technique, respectively. Nasal cross-sectional area was estimated using the hydrokinetic equation. Results indicated significant effects of age on all variables; significant gender differences were found for respiratory mode. Weak correlations were found between respiratory mode and nasal resistance. The results are presented as normative data on nasorespiratory characteristics to facilitate diagnostic and treatment decisions relative to individuals with normal morphology as well as to patients with craniofacial anomalies. A fundamental issue of both clinical and theoretical importance arising from the study pertains to the definitions of normality and impairment. PMID:8292136

  1. Memory effects in schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory deformation.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-05-20

    We consider two schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, motivated by the observations, in computer simulations of a model glass, of a nonequilibrium transition from a localized to a diffusive regime as the shear amplitude is increased, and of persistent memory effects in the localized regime. The first of these schematic models is the NK model, a spin model with disordered multi-spin interactions previously studied as a model for sheared amorphous solids. The second model, a transition matrix model, is an abstract formulation of the manner in which occupancy of local energy minima evolves under oscillatory deformation cycles. In both of these models, we find a behavior similar to that of an atomic model glass studied earlier. We discuss possible further extensions of the approaches outlined.

  2. Memory effects in schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    We consider two schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, motivated by the observations, in computer simulations of a model glass, of a nonequilibrium transition from a localized to a diffusive regime as the shear amplitude is increased, and of persistent memory effects in the localized regime. The first of these schematic models is the NK model, a spin model with disordered multi-spin interactions previously studied as a model for sheared amorphous solids. The second model, a transition matrix model, is an abstract formulation of the manner in which occupancy of local energy minima evolves under oscillatory deformation cycles. In both of these models, we find a behavior similar to that of an atomic model glass studied earlier. We discuss possible further extensions of the approaches outlined.

  3. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2016-07-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  4. On the effect of bias on the behavior of MOS structures subjected to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using a quantitative model [6], the analysis of published data on the effect of the gate bias on the behavior of MOS structure subjected to ionizing radiation is performed. It is shown that, along with hydrogen-containing traps, there are hydrogen-free hole traps in samples with a low content of hydrogen; traps of both types are distributed inhomogeneously over the thickness of the gate insulator. In addition to ionized hydrogen, neutral hydrogen is involved in the formation of surface states and provides the main contribution to this process at negative gate bias. A decrease in the shift of the threshold voltage in the case of high fields is caused by an increase in the drift component of the hole drain to the electrodes.

  5. Effect of licorice on the reduction of body fat mass in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; De Palo, C B; Mattarello, M J; Spinella, P; Zaccaria, M; Ermolao, A; Palermo, M; Fiore, C; Sartorato, P; Francini-Pesenti, F; Karbowiak, I

    2003-07-01

    The history of licorice, as a medicinal plant, is very old and has been used in many societies throughout the millennia. The active principle, glycyrrhetinic acid, is responsible for sodium retention and hypertension, which is the most common side-effect. We show an effect of licorice in reducing body fat mass. We studied 15 normal-weight subjects (7 males, age 22-26 yr, and 8 females, age 21-26 yr), who consumed for 2 months 3.5 g a day of a commercial preparation of licorice. Body fat mass (BFM, expressed as percentage of total body weight, by skinfold thickness and by bioelectrical impedance analysis, BIA) and extracellular water (ECW, percentage of total body water, by BIA) were measured. Body mass index (BMI) did not change. ECW increased (males: 41.8+/-2.0 before vs 47.0+/-2.3 after, p<0.001; females: 48.2+/-1.4 before vs 49.4+/-2.1 after, p<0.05). BFM was reduced by licorice: (male: before 12.0+/-2.1 vs after 10.8+/-2.9%, p<0.02; female: before 24.9+/-5.1 vs after 22.1+/-5.4, p<0.02); plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone were suppressed. Licorice was able to reduce body fat mass and to suppress aldosterone, without any change in BMI. Since the subjects were consuming the same amount of calories during the study, we suggest that licorice can reduce fat by inhibiting 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 at the level of fat cells. PMID:14594116

  6. Effect of high altitude and exercise on microvascular parameters in acclimatized subjects.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andreas; Demetz, Florian; Bruegger, Dirk; Schmoelz, Martin; Schroepfer, Sebastian; Martignoni, André; Baschnegger, Heiko; Hoelzl, Josef; Thiel, Manfred; Choukér, Alexander; Peter, Klaus; Gamble, John; Christ, Frank

    2006-02-01

    The role of microvascular fluid shifts in the adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia and its contribution to the pathophysiology of AMS (acute mountain sickness) is unresolved. In a systematic prospective study, we investigated the effects of hypobaric hypoxia and physical exercise alone, and in combination, on microvascular fluid exchange and related factors. We used computer-assisted VCP (venous congestion plethysmography) on the calves of ten altitude-acclimatized volunteers. We investigated the effects of: (i) actively climbing to an altitude of 3196 m, (ii) airlifting these subjects to the same altitude, and (iii) exercise at low altitude. CFC (capillary filtration capacity), Pvi (isovolumetric venous pressure) and Qa (calf blood flow) were assessed before and after each procedure and then repeated after an overnight rest. Measurements of CFC showed no evidence of increased microvascular permeability after any of the procedures. Pvi was significantly decreased (P<0.001) from 20.3+/-4.4 to 8.9+/-4.3 mmHg after active ascent, and was still significantly lower (P=0.009) after overnight rest at high altitude (13.6+/-5.9 mmHg). No such changes were observed after the passive ascent (16.7+/-4.0 mmHg at baseline; 17.3+/-4.5 mmHg after passive ascent; and 19.9+/-5.3 mmHg after overnight rest) or after exercise at low altitude. After the active ascent, Qa was significantly increased. We also found a significant correlation between Qa, Pvi and the number of circulating white blood cells. In conclusion, we found evidence to support the hypothesis that increased microvascular permeability associated with AMS does not occur in acclimatized subjects. We also observed that the microvascular equilibrium pressure (Pvi) fell in inverse relation to the increase in Qa, especially in hypoxic exercise. We hypothesize that this inverse relationship reflects the haemodynamic changes at the microvascular interface, possibly attributable to the flow-induced increases in endothelial surface

  7. Effects of recreational soccer on physical fitness and health indices in sedentary healthy and unhealthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chamari, K; Slimani, M; Shephard, RJ; Yousfi, N; Tabka, Z; Bouhlel, E

    2016-01-01

    Recreational soccer (RS) is becoming a popular alternative to the classical continuous exercise mode used for the improvement of cardiovascular and metabolic fitness in untrained people. The objective of this paper was to conduct a detailed systematic review of the literature, identifying the physiological responses to RS and the training effects of RS on aerobic fitness and health in untrained healthy individuals and clinical patients. PubMed, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect databases were searched using terms related to recreational soccer. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) that assessed acute physiological responses to RS or the training effects of RS on physical fitness and health in sedentary, untrained subjects of any age or health status. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria; seven examined the acute response to RS, and 28 assessed training effects. Clear evidence was found that RS had positive effects on many health-related indices and variables, including VO2max (gains of 7-16%), blood pressure (reductions of 6-13 mmHg), body composition (decreased fat mass and improved indices of bone health), and metabolic and cardiac function. These positive effects were observed in both healthy individuals and clinical patients, irrespective of age or sex. Although this review provides clear evidence of the positive effects of RS on health, most studies had limitations of methodology (an average PEDro score < 6). Furthermore, many of the training studies were from a small number of research groups. Future studies should be extended to other countries and institutions to ensure generality of the results. Regular RS training leads to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations and gains of health both in sedentary individuals and clinical patients at all ages, suggesting that RS is a potentially highly motivational method to enhance population health

  8. Effects of recreational soccer on physical fitness and health indices in sedentary healthy and unhealthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Hammami, A; Chamari, K; Slimani, M; Shephard, R J; Yousfi, N; Tabka, Z; Bouhlel, E

    2016-06-01

    Recreational soccer (RS) is becoming a popular alternative to the classical continuous exercise mode used for the improvement of cardiovascular and metabolic fitness in untrained people. The objective of this paper was to conduct a detailed systematic review of the literature, identifying the physiological responses to RS and the training effects of RS on aerobic fitness and health in untrained healthy individuals and clinical patients. PubMed, Google Scholar and ScienceDirect databases were searched using terms related to recreational soccer. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCT) that assessed acute physiological responses to RS or the training effects of RS on physical fitness and health in sedentary, untrained subjects of any age or health status. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria; seven examined the acute response to RS, and 28 assessed training effects. Clear evidence was found that RS had positive effects on many health-related indices and variables, including VO2max (gains of 7-16%), blood pressure (reductions of 6-13 mmHg), body composition (decreased fat mass and improved indices of bone health), and metabolic and cardiac function. These positive effects were observed in both healthy individuals and clinical patients, irrespective of age or sex. Although this review provides clear evidence of the positive effects of RS on health, most studies had limitations of methodology (an average PEDro score < 6). Furthermore, many of the training studies were from a small number of research groups. Future studies should be extended to other countries and institutions to ensure generality of the results. Regular RS training leads to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations and gains of health both in sedentary individuals and clinical patients at all ages, suggesting that RS is a potentially highly motivational method to enhance population health

  9. Two necrotic enteritis predisposing factors, dietary fishmeal and Eimeria infection, induce large changes in the caecal microbiota of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Biao; Stanley, Dragana; Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A; Moore, Robert J

    2014-03-14

    It is widely established that a high-protein fishmeal supplemented starter diet and Eimeria infection can predispose birds to the development of clinical necrotic enteritis symptoms following Clostridium perfringens infection. However, it has not been clearly established what changes these treatments cause to predispose birds to succumb to necrotic enteritis. We analysed caecal microbiota of 4 groups of broilers (n=12) using deep pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons: (1) control chicks fed a control diet, (2) Eimeria infected chicks fed control diet, (3) chicks fed fishmeal supplemented diet and lastly (4) both fishmeal fed and Eimeria infected chicks. We found that the high-protein fishmeal diet had a strong effect on the intestinal microbiota similar to the previously reported effect of C. perfringens infection. We noted major changes in the prevalence of various lactobacilli while the total culturable Lactobacillus counts remained stable. The Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, unknown Clostridiales and Lactobacillaceae families were most affected by fishmeal with increases in a number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that had previously been linked to Crohn's disease and reductions in OTUs known to be butyrate producers. Eimeria induced very different changes in microbiota; Ruminococcaceae groups were reduced in number and three unknown Clostridium species were increased in abundance. Additionally, Eimeria did not significantly influence changes in pH, formic, propionic or isobutyric acid while fishmeal induced dramatic changes in all these measures. Both fishmeal feeding and Eimeria infection induced significant changes in the gut microbiota; these changes may play an important role in predisposing birds to necrotic enteritis.

  10. Acute effects of ethanol and acetate on glucose kinetics in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Koivisto, V.A.; Ylikahri, R.; Taskinen, M.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of two ethanol doses on glucose kinetics and assessed the role of acetate as a mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance. Ten normal males were studied on four occasions, during which either a low or moderate ethanol, acetate, or saline dose was administered. Both ethanol doses similarly inhibited basal glucose production. The decrease in R{sub a} was matched by a comparable decrease in glucose utilization (R{sub d}), resulting in maintenance of normoglycemia. During hyperinsulinemia glucose disposal was lower in the moderate than the low-dose ethanol or saline studies. During acetate infusion, the blood acetate level was comparable with those in the ethanol studies. Acetate had no effect on glucose kinetics. In conclusion, (1) in overnight fasted subjects, ethanol does not cause hypoglycemia because its inhibitory effect on R{sub a} is counterbalanced by equal inhibition of R{sub d}; (2) basal R{sub a} and R{sub d} are maximally inhibited already by small ethanol doses, whereas inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal requires a moderate ethanol dose; and (3) acetate is not the mediator of ethanol-induced insulin resistance.

  11. Dimethyltryptamine (DMT): subjective effects and patterns of use among Australian recreational users.

    PubMed

    Cakic, Vince; Potkonyak, Jacob; Marshall, Alex

    2010-09-01

    Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is an endogenous hallucinogen with traditional use as a sacrament in the orally active preparation of ayahuasca. Although the religious use of ayahuasca has been examined extensively, very little is known about the recreational use of DMT. In this study, Australian participants (n=121) reporting at least one lifetime use of DMT completed an online questionnaire recording patterns of use, subjective effects and attitudes towards their DMT use. Smoking DMT was by far the most common route of administration (98.3%) with a comparatively smaller proportion reporting use of ayahuasca (30.6%). The reasons for first trying DMT were out of a general interest in hallucinogenic drugs (46.6%) or curiosity about DMT's effects (41.7%), while almost one-third (31.1%) cited possible psychotherapeutic benefits of the drug. An increase in psychospiritual insight was the most commonly reported positive effect of both smoked DMT (75.5%) and ayahuasca (46.7%), a finding that is consistent with other studies examining the ritualised use of ayahuasca in a religious context. Although previous studies of DMT use have examined ayahuasca use exclusively, the present study demonstrates the ubiquity of smoking as the most prevalent route of administration among recreational DMT users.

  12. A simple pain model for the evaluation of analgesic effects of NSAIDs in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sycha, Thomas; Gustorff, Burkhard; Lehr, Stephan; Tanew, Adrian; Eichler1, Hans-Georg; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-01-01

    Aims Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are believed to counteract inflammation and inflammation-induced sensitization of nociceptors by inhibiting peripheral prostaglandin synthesis. We evaluated an experimental pain model for NSAIDs, that included an inflammatory component to mimic clinical inflammatory pain conditions. Methods The study was performed in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover design on 32 healthy volunteers. A small skin area of the proximal upper leg was irradiated with a UVB source using three times the individually estimated minimal erythema dose. Twenty hours after irradiation skin temperature, heat pain threshold and tolerance in sunburn spot were measured using a thermal sensory testing. These measurements were repeated 2 h after medication of either 800 mg ibuprofen as single oral dose or placebo capsules. Effects of ibuprofen on outcome parameters were assessed with analyses of covariance (ancova). Results Placebo did not affect heat pain threshold or tolerance. By contrast, ibuprofen increased heat pain threshold by 1.092 °C [confidence interval (CI) 0.498, 1.695; P = 0.0008) compared with placebo. Heat pain tolerance also increased significantly by 1.618 °C (CI 1.062, 2.175; P = 0.0001). Conclusion The pain model we evaluated was well tolerated in all subjects and the effects of ibuprofen were highly significant. This model is simple, sensitive to NSAIDs' effects and therefore has potential for future experimental pain studies. PMID:12895189

  13. Skilled musicians are not subject to the McGurk effect.

    PubMed

    Proverbio, Alice M; Massetti, Gemma; Rizzi, Ezia; Zani, Alberto

    2016-07-25

    The McGurk effect is a compelling illusion in which humans auditorily perceive mismatched audiovisual speech as a completely different syllable. In this study evidences are provided that professional musicians are not subject to this illusion, possibly because of their finer auditory or attentional abilities. 80 healthy age-matched graduate students volunteered to the study. 40 were musicians of Brescia Luca Marenzio Conservatory of Music with at least 8-13 years of musical academic studies. /la/, /da/, /ta/, /ga/, /ka/, /na/, /ba/, /pa/ phonemes were presented to participants in audiovisual congruent and incongruent conditions, or in unimodal (only visual or only auditory) conditions while engaged in syllable recognition tasks. Overall musicians showed no significant McGurk effect for any of the phonemes. Controls showed a marked McGurk effect for several phonemes (including alveolar-nasal, velar-occlusive and bilabial ones). The results indicate that the early and intensive musical training might affect the way the auditory cortex process phonetic information.

  14. Skilled musicians are not subject to the McGurk effect

    PubMed Central

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Massetti, Gemma; Rizzi, Ezia; Zani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The McGurk effect is a compelling illusion in which humans auditorily perceive mismatched audiovisual speech as a completely different syllable. In this study evidences are provided that professional musicians are not subject to this illusion, possibly because of their finer auditory or attentional abilities. 80 healthy age-matched graduate students volunteered to the study. 40 were musicians of Brescia Luca Marenzio Conservatory of Music with at least 8–13 years of musical academic studies. /la/, /da/, /ta/, /ga/, /ka/, /na/, /ba/, /pa/ phonemes were presented to participants in audiovisual congruent and incongruent conditions, or in unimodal (only visual or only auditory) conditions while engaged in syllable recognition tasks. Overall musicians showed no significant McGurk effect for any of the phonemes. Controls showed a marked McGurk effect for several phonemes (including alveolar-nasal, velar-occlusive and bilabial ones). The results indicate that the early and intensive musical training might affect the way the auditory cortex process phonetic information. PMID:27453363

  15. The effect of hyperoxia on central blood pressure in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Siński, Maciej; Dobosiewicz, Anna; Przybylski, Jacek; Abramczyk, Piotr; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperoxia increases total peripheral resistance by acting locally but also inhibits the activity of carotid body chemoreceptors. We studied the effect of hyperoxia on central pressure in normotensive subjects. Material and methods Medical air followed by 100% oxygen was provided to 19 subjects (12/7 female/male, age 28.2 ±1.1 years) for 15 min through a non-rebreather mask. Central blood pressure was then measured using applanation tonometry. Results After the first 2 min of hyperoxia, heart rate decreased significantly (65 ±2.6 beats/min vs. 61 ±2.1 beats/min, p = 0.0002). Peripheral and central blood pressure remained unchanged, while hemoglobin oxygen saturation and subendocardial viability ratio index increased (97 ±0.4% vs. 99 ±0.2%, p = 0.03; 168 ±8.4% vs. 180 ±8.2%, p = 0.009). After 15 min of 100% oxygen ventilation, heart rate and peripheral and central blood pressures remained unchanged from the first 2 min. The augmentation index, augmentation pressure and ejection duration increased as compared to baseline values and those obtained at 2 min (–5.1 ±2.9% vs. –1.2 ±2.6%, p = 0.005 and –4.6 ±2.7% vs. –1.2 ±2.6%, p = 0.0015; –1.3 ±0.7 mm Hg vs. –0.2 ±1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.003 and –1.1 ±0.7 mm Hg vs. –0.2 ±1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.012; 323 ±3.6 ms vs. 330 ±3.5 ms, p = 0.0002 and 326 ±3.5 ms vs. 330 ±3.5 ms, p = 0.021, respectively). Conclusions The present study shows that hyperoxia does not affect central blood pressure in young healthy subjects and may improve myocardial blood supply estimated indirectly from applanation tonometry. PMID:27695489

  16. Effects of walking speed and age on the muscle forces of unimpaired gait subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliger, Carlos G.; Crespo, Marcos J.; Braidot, Ariel A.; Ravera, Emiliano P.

    2016-04-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders and also provides a mean for a more comprehensive treatment plan. However, direct measures of muscle forces are difficult to obtain in clinical settings because it generally requires invasive techniques. Techniques of musculoskeletal modeling have been used for several decades to improve the benefits of clinical gait analysis, but many of the previous studies were focused on analyzing separately the muscle forces distribution of children or adult subjects with only one condition of walking speed. For these reason, the present study aims to enhance the current literature by describing the age and speed gait effects on muscle forces during walking. We used a musculoskeletal model with 23 degrees of freedom and 92 musculotendon actuators to represent 76 muscles in the lower extremities and torso. The computed muscle control algorithm was used to estimate the muscle forces from the kinematics and to adjust the model obtained in the residual reduction algorithm. We find that hamstrings has an important peak in the mid-stance phase in the adult group but this peak disappears in the children group with the same walking speed condition. Furthermore, the rectus femoris presents an increase in the muscle force during the pre- and mid-swing in concordance with the increment in the walking speed of subjects. This behavior could be associated with the role that the rectus femoris has in the acceleration of the knee joint. Finally, we show that the soleus is the muscle that perform the major force throughout the gait cycle regardless of age and walking speed.

  17. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  18. The effect of tafamidis on the QTc interval in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klamerus, Karen J; Watsky, Eric; Moller, Robert; Wang, Ronnie; Riley, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Aims The transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer, tafamidis, has demonstrated efficacy and safety in the treatment of TTR familial amyloid polyneuropathy (20 mg day−1). Tafamidis use in TTR cardiomyopathy led to the study of the potential effect of tafamidis on the QTc interval in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, three treatment, three period, six sequence crossover study with placebo, a positive control (moxifloxacin 400 mg) and tafamidis (400 mg, to achieve a supra-therapeutic Cmax of ∽20 µg ml−1) was conducted in healthy volunteers at three clinical research units. Oral dosing in each of the three treatment periods was separated by a washout period of  ≥ 14 days. Serial triplicate 12-lead electrocardiograms were performed. QTc intervals were derived using the Fridericia correction method. Safety and tolerability were assessed by physical examination, vital signs measurement, laboratory analyses and monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 42 subjects completed the study. The upper limit of the two-sided 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the difference in baseline-adjusted QTcF between tafamidis 400 mg and placebo was <10 ms (non-inferiority criterion) for all time points. The lower limit of the two-sided 90% CI between moxifloxacin 400 mg and placebo exceeded 5 ms at the pre-specified moxifloxacin tmax of 3 h post-dose, confirming assay sensitivity. Cmax and AUC(0,24 h) for tafamidis were 20.36 µg ml−1 and 305.4 µg ml−1 h, respectively. There were no serious/severe AEs or treatment discontinuations due to AEs. Conclusions This thorough QTc study suggests that a supra-therapeutic single 400 mg oral dose of tafamidis does not prolong the QTc interval and is well-tolerated in healthy volunteers. PMID:25546001

  19. The effect of ozone exposure on the dispersion of inhaled aerosol boluses in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, M.J.; Bennett, W.D.; DeWitt, P.; Seal, E.; Strong, A.A.; Gerrity, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Acute exposure of humans to low levels of ozone are known to cause decreases in FVC and increases in SRaw. These alterations in lung function do not, however, elucidate the potential for acute small airway responses. In this study we employed a test of aerosol dispersion to examine the potential effects of ozone on small airways in humans. Twenty-two healthy nonsmoking male volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone for 1 h while exercising at 20 L/min/m2 body surface area. Before and immediately after exposure, tests of spirometry (FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75) and plethysmography (Raw and SRaw) were performed. Subjects also performed an aerosol dispersion test before and after exposure. Each test involved a subject inhaling five to seven breaths of a 300-ml bolus of a 0.5 micron triphenyl phosphate aerosol injected into a 2-L tidal volume. The bolus was injected into the tidal breath at three different depths: at Depth A the bolus was injected after 1.6 L of clean air were inhaled from FRC, at Depth B after 1.2 L, and at Depth C after 1.2 L but with inhalation beginning from RV. The primary measure of bolus dispersion was the expired half-width (HW). Secondary measures were the ratio (expressed as percent) of peak exhaled aerosol concentration to peak inhaled concentration (PR), shift in the median bolus volume between inspiration and expiration (VS), and percent of total aerosol recovered (RC). Changes in pulmonary function after ozone exposure were consistent with previous findings.

  20. The effect of a bile acid sequestrant on glucose metabolism in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smushkin, Galina; Sathananthan, Matheni; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Law, Jennie H; Cobelli, Claudio; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Rizza, Robert A; Vella, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    We designed an experiment to examine the effect of bile acid sequestration with Colesevelam on fasting and postprandial glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. To do so, we tested the hypothesis that Colesevelam increases the disposition index (DI), and this increase is associated with increased glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations. Thirty-eight subjects on metformin monotherapy were studied using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. Subjects were studied before and after 12 weeks of Colesevelam or placebo using a labeled triple-tracer mixed meal to measure the rate of meal appearance (Meal Ra), endogenous glucose production (EGP), and glucose disappearance (Rd). Insulin sensitivity and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the oral minimal model and then used to calculate DI. Therapy with Colesevelam was associated with a decrease in fasting (7.0 ± 0.2 vs. 6.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L; P = 0.004) and postprandial glucose concentrations (3,145 ± 138 vs. 2,896 ± 127 mmol/6 h; P = 0.01) in the absence of a change in insulin concentrations. Minimal model-derived indices of insulin secretion and action were unchanged. Postprandial GLP-1 concentrations were not altered by Colesevelam. Although EGP and Rd were unchanged, integrated Meal Ra was decreased by Colesevelam (5,191 ± 204 vs. 5,817 ± 204 μmol/kg/6 h; P = 0.04), suggesting increased splanchnic sequestration of meal-derived glucose.

  1. Water- versus land-based exercise in elderly subjects: effects on physical performance and body composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergamin, Marco; Ermolao, Andrea; Tolomio, Silvia; Berton, Linda; Sergi, Giuseppe; Zaccaria, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 24-week exercise protocol carried out in geothermal spring water to improve overall physical function and muscle mass in a group of healthy elderly subjects. A further aim was to compare this water-based protocol with a land-based protocol and a control group. For this purpose, 59 subjects were recruited and randomly allocated to three groups: aquatic group (AG), land group (LG), and control group (CG). AG and LG followed a 6-month, twice-weekly, multimodality exercise intervention. AG underwent the protocol in hot-spring water (36°C) while LG did it in a land-based environment. After the intervention, knee-extension strength was maintained in AG and LG. The 8-foot up-and-go test showed a reduction in both exercise groups (AG −19.3%, P < 0.05; LG −12.6%, P < 0.05), with a significantly greater decrease in AG. The back-scratch test revealed an improvement only in AG (25.8%; P < 0.05), while the sit-and-reach test improved in all groups. Finally, AG reduced fat mass by 4% (P < 0.05), and dominant forearm fat decreased by 9.2% (P < 0.05). In addition, calf muscle density increased by 1.8% (P < 0.05). In summary, both water- and land-based activities were beneficial in maintaining strength and in improving lower-body flexibility. Aquatic exercise appeared a better activity to improve dynamic balance. Thermal swimming pools and the use of rating of perceived exertion as a method of exercise monitoring should be considered potentially useful tools to enhance physical performance and body composition in healthy elderly. PMID:24009416

  2. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The light-intensity threshold for humans is not known. In past space flights owing to power restrictions, light intensities have been minimal and reported to be as low as 15 ft. c. This study was conducted to determine whether the light (L)/dark (D) environment of 16L : 8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft. c. was adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects. Six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 years were exposed for 21 days to a 16L : 8D photoperiod. During the first 7 days the light intensity was 100 ft. c.; it was reduced to 15 ft. c. during the next 7 days and increased again to 100 ft. c. during the last 7 days of the study. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously throughout the 21 days of the study. In the 100 ft. c. 16L : 8D the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. When the light intensity was decreased to 15 ft. c. the periodicity of the HR rhythm was significantly decreased and this rhythm showed marked instability. In contrast the period of the RT rhythm did not change but a consistent phase delay occurred due to a delay in the lights-on associated rise in RT. These divergent effects on these two rhythms in internal desynchronization and performance decrement during the 15 ft. c. exposure. The data emphasize the need for establishing accurately the minimal lighting requirements for the maintenance of circadian rhythms of humans in confined environments.

  3. Preserving Subjective Wellbeing in the Face of Psychopathology: Buffering Effects of Personal Strengths and Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Elisabeth H.; Snippe, Evelien; de Jonge, Peter; Jeronimus, Bertus F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies on resilience have shown that people can succeed in preserving mental health after a traumatic event. Less is known about whether and how people can preserve subjective wellbeing in the presence of psychopathology. We examined to what extent psychopathology can co-exist with acceptable levels of subjective wellbeing and which personal strengths and resources moderate the association between psychopathology and wellbeing. Methods Questionnaire data on wellbeing (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life/Happiness Index), psychological symptoms (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales), and personal strengths and resources (humor, Humor Style questionnaire; empathy, Empathy Quotient questionnaire; social company; religion; daytime activities, Living situation questionnaire) were collected in a population-based internet study (HowNutsAreTheDutch; N = 12,503). Data of the subset of participants who completed the above questionnaires (n = 2411) were used for the present study. Regression analyses were performed to predict wellbeing from symptoms, resources, and their interactions. Results Satisfactory levels of wellbeing (happiness score 6 or higher) were found in a substantial proportion of the participants with psychological symptoms (58% and 30% of those with moderate and severe symptom levels, respectively). The association between symptoms and wellbeing was large and negative (-0.67, P < .001), but less so in persons with high levels of self-defeating humor and in those with a partner and/or pet. Several of the personal strengths and resources had a positive main effect on wellbeing, especially self-enhancing humor, having a partner, and daytime activities. Conclusions Cultivating personal strengths and resources, like humor, social/animal company, and daily occupations, may help people preserve acceptable levels of wellbeing despite the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. PMID:26963923

  4. The effect of sweeteners on bitter taste in young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Gatlin, L A; Sattely-Miller, E A; Graham, B G; Heiman, S A; Stagner, W C; Erickson, R P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the degree of reduction in perceived bitterness by sweeteners at both threshold and suprathreshold concentrations of bitter compounds. Detection and recognition thresholds were determined for six bitter compounds (caffeine, denatonium benzoate, magnesium chloride, quinine hydrochloride, sucrose octaacetate, and urea) in the absence and presence of several suprathreshold concentrations of five sweeteners. The sweeteners were: sucrose, aspartame, sodium saccharin, mannitol, and sorbitol. Polycose was also tested along with the sweeteners. The degree to which bitter thresholds were affected by the addition of sweeteners was dependent on the chemical classification of the sweeteners and their concentrations. In general, the natural sweeteners, sucrose, mannitol, and sorbitol, were more effective than the noncaloric sweeteners, aspartame and sodium saccharin, in elevating the detection and recognition thresholds of the bitter compounds. A sweetness intensity approximating that of 6% sucrose (0.175 M sucrose) or greater was required to elevate thresholds. For elderly subjects, sweeteners did not significantly elevate thresholds for denatonium benzoate and sucrose octaacetate. The degree to which sorbitol and sucrose can decrease the perceived bitterness intensity of suprathreshold concentrations of the six bitter compounds was also determined. The concentrations of sweeteners and bitter compounds were selected to be of moderate to high subjective intensity. The levels of sweeteners used in the mixtures were: sucrose (none, 0.946 M, and 2.13 M) and sorbitol (none, 2.1 M, and 3.68 M). Both sweeteners significantly reduced the bitterness ratings of almost every concentration of the six bitter compounds. The greatest reductions in bitterness were 87.0% for 0.192 microM denatonium benzoate mixed with 2.13 M sucrose and 84.7% for 1.8 M urea mixed with 3.68 M sorbitol.

  5. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect.

  6. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect. PMID:27544374

  7. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  8. Acute Effects of Modafinil on Brain Resting State Networks in Young Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pieramico, Valentina; Ferretti, Antonio; Macchia, Antonella; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Manna, Antonietta; Navarra, Riccardo; Cieri, Filippo; Stuppia, Liborio; Tartaro, Armando; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects. Methodology A single dose (100 mg) of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM) before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI) was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. Principal Findings Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; p<0.04) and Dorsal Attention (DAN; p<0.04) networks. No modifications in structural connectivity were observed. Conclusions and Significance Overall, our findings support the notion that modafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. PMID:23935959

  9. Effects of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant on respiration during sleep in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Naoto; McCrea, Jacqueline; Sun, Hong; Donikyan, Mardik; Zammit, Gary; Liu, Rong; Louridas, Bonnie; Marsilio, Sabrina; Lines, Christopher; Troyer, Matthew D; Wagner, John

    2015-10-01

    Suvorexant is an orexin receptor antagonist for treating insomnia. The maximum approved dose in the United States and Japan is 20 mg. We evaluated suvorexant effects on respiration during sleep in a randomized, double-blind, 3-period crossover study of healthy adult men (n = 8) and women (n = 4) ≤ 50 years old who received single-dose suvorexant 40 mg, 150 mg, and placebo. Respiration during sleep was measured by oxygen saturation (SpO2 , primary end point) and the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI). The study was powered to detect a reduction greater than 5% in SpO2 . There was no effect of suvorexant on mean SpO2 during sleep. The mean (90%CI) treatment differences versus placebo were -0.3 (-1.2-0.6) for 40 mg and 0.0 (-0.9-0.9) for 150 mg. There were no dose-related trends in individual SpO2 values. Mean SpO2 was >96% for all treatments during total sleep time and during both non-REM and REM sleep. There was no effect of either suvorexant dose on AHI. The mean (90%CI) treatment differences versus placebo were 0.8 (-0.7-2.3) for 40 mg and -0.2 (-1.7-1.3) for 150 mg. Suvorexant was generally well tolerated; there were no serious adverse experiences or discontinuations. These data from healthy subjects suggest that suvorexant lacks clinically important respiratory effects during sleep at doses greater than the maximum recommended dose for treating insomnia.

  10. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance. PMID:26849997

  11. Antihypertensive effect of green coffee bean extract on mildly hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Kozuma, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Shigemi; Kohori, Jun; Hase, Tadashi; Tokimitsu, Ichiro

    2005-09-01

    A water-soluble green coffee bean extract (GCE) has been shown to be effective against hypertension in both spontaneously hypertensive rats and humans. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study evaluated the dose-response relationship of GCE in 117 male volunteers with mild hypertension. Subjects were randomized into four groups: a placebo and three drug groups that received 46 mg, 93 mg, or 185 mg of GCE once a day. After 28 days, systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the placebo, 46 mg, 93 mg, and 185 mg groups was reduced by -1.3+/-3.0 mmHg, -3.2+/-4.6 mmHg, -4.7+/-4.5 mmHg, and -5.6+/-4.2 mmHg from the baseline, respectively. The decreases in SBP in the 93 mg group (p<0.05) and the 185 mg group (p<0.01) were statistically significant compared with the placebo group. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in the placebo, 46 mg, 93 mg, and 185 mg groups was reduced by -0.8+/-3.1 mmHg, -2.9+/-2.9 mmHg, -3.2+/-3.2 mmHg, and -3.9+/-2.8 mmHg from the baseline, respectively, and significant effects were observed in the 93 mg group (p<0.05) and the 185 mg group (p<0.01) compared with the placebo group. Both blood pressures were significantly reduced in a dose-related manner by GCE (p<0.001). Adverse effects caused by GCE were not observed. The results suggested that daily use of GCE has a blood pressure-lowering effect in patients with mild hypertension.

  12. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance.

  13. Effect of Tongkat Ali on stress hormones and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Eurycoma longifolia is a medicinal plant commonly called tongkat ali (TA) and “Malaysian ginseng.” TA roots are a traditional “anti-aging” remedy and modern supplements are intended to improve libido, energy, sports performance and weight loss. Previous studies have shown properly-standardized TA to stimulate release of free testosterone, improve sex drive, reduce fatigue, and improve well-being. Methods We assessed stress hormones and mood state in 63 subjects (32 men and 31 women) screened for moderate stress and supplemented with a standardized hot-water extract of TA root (TA) or Placebo (PL) for 4 weeks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with significance set at p < 0.05 was used to determine differences between groups. Results Significant improvements were found in the TA group for Tension (−11%), Anger (−12%), and Confusion (−15%). Stress hormone profile (salivary cortisol and testosterone) was significantly improved by TA supplementation, with reduced cortisol exposure (−16%) and increased testosterone status (+37%). Conclusion These results indicate that daily supplementation with tongkat ali root extract improves stress hormone profile and certain mood state parameters, suggesting that this “ancient” remedy may be an effective approach to shielding the body from the detrimental effects of “modern” chronic stress, which may include general day-to-day stress, as well as the stress of dieting, sleep deprivation, and exercise training. PMID:23705671

  14. Effects of exercise on inflammation markers in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Hopps, E; Canino, B; Caimi, G

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and plasma markers of inflammation are significantly increased in type 2 diabetics. Several proinflammatory cytokines, acute-phase proteins, and cell adhesion molecules, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukines (IL), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), seem to play a role in the low-grade systemic inflammation observed in these subjects. Lifestyle changes are necessary to prevent atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Physical exercise is known to reduce markers of inflammation by decreasing adipocytokine production and cytokine release from skeletal muscles, endothelial cells, and immune system and also improving antioxidant status. In type 2 diabetics, aerobic and resistance training have different effects on cytokine levels, and the differences in the modalities of exercise (type, duration, and intensity) and especially in the examined population could produce different results. Recent research showed that combined exercise has greater anti-inflammatory effects than aerobic or resistance exercise alone causing a deepest decrease in CRP, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, leptin, and resistin and a higher increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and adiponectin.

  15. Beyond intensity: Spectral features effectively predict music-induced subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Emotions in music are conveyed by a variety of acoustic cues. Notably, the positive association between sound intensity and arousal has particular biological relevance. However, although amplitude normalization is a common procedure used to control for intensity in music psychology research, direct comparisons between emotional ratings of original and amplitude-normalized musical excerpts are lacking. In this study, 30 nonmusicians retrospectively rated the subjective arousal and pleasantness induced by 84 six-second classical music excerpts, and an additional 30 nonmusicians rated the same excerpts normalized for amplitude. Following the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models of acoustic communication, we hypothesized that arousal and pleasantness ratings would be similar for both versions of the excerpts, and that arousal could be predicted effectively by other acoustic cues besides intensity. Although the difference in mean arousal and pleasantness ratings between original and amplitude-normalized excerpts correlated significantly with the amplitude adjustment, ratings for both sets of excerpts were highly correlated and shared a similar range of values, thus validating the use of amplitude normalization in music emotion research. Two acoustic parameters, spectral flux and spectral entropy, accounted for 65% of the variance in arousal ratings for both sets, indicating that spectral features can effectively predict arousal. Additionally, we confirmed that amplitude-normalized excerpts were adequately matched for loudness. Overall, the results corroborate our hypotheses and support the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models.

  16. Metabolic effects of high dose amiloride and spironolactone: a comparative study in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, J A; Fraser, R; Mason, P; Leckie, B; Cumming, A M; Robertson, J I

    1984-01-01

    Amiloride (75 mg daily) and spironolactone (300 mg daily) were given to five normal subjects for 7 days in order to compare metabolic effects at maximal doses. Blood pressure, body weight, Na+ and K+ balance, and plasma concentrations of Na+, K+, active and total renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), 18-hydroxydeoxycorticosterone (18-OH DOC), corticosterone (B), 18-hydroxycorticosterone (18-OH B) and cortisol were measured before and on each day of treatment. Natriuresis and K+ retention were significantly greater with amiloride. Plasma K+ increased from 4.1 +/- 0.2 to 4.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/l (mean +/- s.d.) on amiloride and from 4.0 +/- 0.2 to 4.4 +/- 0.2 mmol/l with spironolactone. Stimulation of renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone and 18-OH B occurred with both drugs but was greater with amiloride in each case. A transient decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed after 2 days of spironolactone treatment but not with amiloride. The slope of the regression of aldosterone on angiotensin II during spironolactone treatment was less than that with amiloride, consistent with partial blockade of aldosterone synthesis by spironolactone. These data suggest that the maximum metabolic effects of amiloride exceed those of spironolactone. PMID:6386025

  17. Beyond intensity: Spectral features effectively predict music-induced subjective arousal.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Emotions in music are conveyed by a variety of acoustic cues. Notably, the positive association between sound intensity and arousal has particular biological relevance. However, although amplitude normalization is a common procedure used to control for intensity in music psychology research, direct comparisons between emotional ratings of original and amplitude-normalized musical excerpts are lacking. In this study, 30 nonmusicians retrospectively rated the subjective arousal and pleasantness induced by 84 six-second classical music excerpts, and an additional 30 nonmusicians rated the same excerpts normalized for amplitude. Following the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models of acoustic communication, we hypothesized that arousal and pleasantness ratings would be similar for both versions of the excerpts, and that arousal could be predicted effectively by other acoustic cues besides intensity. Although the difference in mean arousal and pleasantness ratings between original and amplitude-normalized excerpts correlated significantly with the amplitude adjustment, ratings for both sets of excerpts were highly correlated and shared a similar range of values, thus validating the use of amplitude normalization in music emotion research. Two acoustic parameters, spectral flux and spectral entropy, accounted for 65% of the variance in arousal ratings for both sets, indicating that spectral features can effectively predict arousal. Additionally, we confirmed that amplitude-normalized excerpts were adequately matched for loudness. Overall, the results corroborate our hypotheses and support the cue-redundancy and Brunswik lens models. PMID:24215647

  18. Acute effect of caffeine intake on hemodynamics after resistance exercise in young non-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diego; Casonatto, Juliano; Poton, Roberto; Willardson, Jeffrey; Polito, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of caffeine on hemodynamics after a resistance exercise session. Fifteen subjects completed two randomly ordered experimental resistance exercise sessions 45 min after the ingestion of either caffeine (4 mg.kg(-1)) or placebo. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were measured before consuming caffeine; SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured immediately before and after each of the sessions; SBP, DBP and MAP were measured for 9 hours after sessions. Caffeine increased (p < 0.05) pre-exercise DBP and MAP. In caffeine and placebo conditions significant decreases (p < 0.05) were noted in SBP, MAP, and PVR between the pre- and post-exercise time points. Notwithstanding, the mean values for SBP, DBP and MAP during the 9 h of post-exercise monitoring were increased (p < 0.05) for the caffeine. In conclusion, the cardiovascular effects of caffeine are different over the post-exercise period after resistance exercise in normotensive young adults. PMID:24950113

  19. Acute effect of caffeine intake on hemodynamics after resistance exercise in young non-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diego; Casonatto, Juliano; Poton, Roberto; Willardson, Jeffrey; Polito, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of caffeine on hemodynamics after a resistance exercise session. Fifteen subjects completed two randomly ordered experimental resistance exercise sessions 45 min after the ingestion of either caffeine (4 mg.kg(-1)) or placebo. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean (MAP) blood pressures were measured before consuming caffeine; SBP, DBP, MAP, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were measured immediately before and after each of the sessions; SBP, DBP and MAP were measured for 9 hours after sessions. Caffeine increased (p < 0.05) pre-exercise DBP and MAP. In caffeine and placebo conditions significant decreases (p < 0.05) were noted in SBP, MAP, and PVR between the pre- and post-exercise time points. Notwithstanding, the mean values for SBP, DBP and MAP during the 9 h of post-exercise monitoring were increased (p < 0.05) for the caffeine. In conclusion, the cardiovascular effects of caffeine are different over the post-exercise period after resistance exercise in normotensive young adults.

  20. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z.; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E.; Ingraham, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Methods Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Results Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. Conclusions CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice. PMID:26401845

  1. Both Host and Pathogen Factors Predispose to Escherichia coli Urinary-Source Bacteremia in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Jonas; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy; Warren, David K.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The urinary tract is the most common source for Escherichia coli bacteremia. Mortality from E. coli urinary-source bacteremia is higher than that from urinary tract infection. Predisposing factors for urinary-source E. coli bacteremia are poorly characterized. Methods. In order to identify urinary-source bacteremia risk factors, we conducted a 12-month prospective cohort study of adult inpatients with E. coli bacteriuria that were tested for bacteremia within ±1 day of the bacteriuria. Patients with bacteremia were compared with those without bacteremia. Bacterial isolates from urine were screened for 16 putative virulence genes using high-throughput dot-blot hybridization. Results. Twenty-four of 156 subjects (15%) had E. coli bacteremia. Bacteremic patients were more likely to have benign prostatic hyperplasia (56% vs 19%; P = .04), a history of urogenital surgery (63% vs 28%; P = .001), and presentation with hesitancy/retention (21% vs 4%; P = .002), fever (63% vs 38%; P = .02), and pyelonephritis (67% vs 41%; P = .02). The genes kpsMT (group II capsule) (17 [71%] vs 62 [47%]; P = .03) and prf (P-fimbriae family) (13 [54%] vs 40 [30%]; P = .02) were more frequent in the urinary strains from bacteremic patients. Symptoms of hesitancy/retention (odds ratio [OR], 7.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–37), history of a urogenital procedure (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 2–14.7), and presence of kpsMT (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1–8.2) independently predicted bacteremia. Conclusions. Bacteremia secondary to E. coli bacteriuria was frequent (15%) in those tested for it. Urinary stasis, surgical disruption of urogenital tissues, and a bacterial capsule characteristic contribute to systemic invasion by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:22431806

  2. Why do young women smoke? III. Attention and impulsivity as neurocognitive predisposing factors.

    PubMed

    Yakir, Avi; Rigbi, Amihai; Kanyas, Kyra; Pollak, Yehudah; Kahana, Gazit; Karni, Osnat; Eitan, Renana; Kertzman, Semion; Lerer, Bernard

    2007-04-01

    Since nicotine has been shown to facilitate sustained attention and control of impulsivity, impairment in these domains may influence individuals who initiate smoking for various reasons to continue to smoke cigarettes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether young women who smoke regularly but are not abstinent at the time of testing, differ in their cognitive functioning from non-smokers and whether they resemble women who smoked in the past but quit. Female undergraduate students aged 20-30 years were recruited by advertisement from institutes of higher education in the Jerusalem area. The study sample consisted of 91 current smokers (CS), 40 past smokers (PS) and 151 non-smokers (NS). 46 occasional smokers (OS) were also tested. Confounding by withdrawal state was neutralized by including only CS and OS who smoked their last cigarette less than 90 min before testing. Subjects performed a computerized neurocognitive battery, which tests the domains of attention, memory, impulsivity, planning, information processing and motor performance. Analyses were controlled for age. The results showed that CS made significantly more errors than NS on the Continuous Performance Task (CPT), Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFFT) and Tower of London (TOL) test. PS were significantly worse than NS on the MFFT and TOL test. PS did not differ significantly from CS on any test. No association was found between duration of smoking and performance. These findings suggest that a neurocognitive profile characterized by impairments in sustained attention and control of impulsivity may be one of the factors that predispose young women who initiate cigarette smoking to maintain the habit.

  3. Effects of pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sileno, A. P.; deMeireles, J. C.; Dua, R.; Pimplaskar, H. K.; Xia, W. J.; Marinaro, J.; Langenback, E.; Matos, F. J.; Putcha, L.; Romeo, V. D.; Behl, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of formulation pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide, the single most effective drug available for the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by motion sickness. METHODS: Human subjects received scopolamine nasally at a dose of 0.2 mg/0.05 mL or 0.4 mg/0.10 mL, blood samples were collected at different time points, and plasma scopolamine concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Following administration of a 0.2 mg dose, the average Cmax values were found to be 262+/-118, 419+/-161, and 488+/-331 pg/ mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At the 0.4 mg dose the average Cmax values were found to be 503+/-199, 933+/-449, and 1,308+/-473 pg/mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At a 0.2 mg dose, the AUC values were found to be 23,208+/-6,824, 29,145+/-9,225, and 25,721+/-5,294 pg x min/mL for formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. At a 0.4 mg dose, the average AUC value was found to be high for pH 9.0 formulation (70,740+/-29,381 pg x min/mL) as compared to those of pH 4.0 (59,573+/-13,700 pg x min/mL) and pH 7.0 (55,298+/-17,305 pg x min/mL) formulations. Both the Cmax and AUC values were almost doubled with doubling the dose. On the other hand, the average Tmax, values decreased linearly with a decrease in formulation pH at both doses. For example, at a 0.4 mg dose, the average Tmax values were 26.7+/-5.8, 15.0+/-10.0, and 8.8+/-2.5 minutes at formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects increased substantially with increases in formulation pH and dose.

  4. The Combined Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Subjective Experience, Impulsivity and Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C.; Kassel, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N=146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about 4 standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants’ habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to contribute to

  5. Stress and Performance: Effects of Subjective Work Load and Time Urgency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Kenneth E.

    1982-01-01

    Measured subjective work load, time urgency, and other stress/motivation variables for management personnel taking a demanding problem-solving exam. Data suggest increases in psychological stresses like subjectively high work load and time urgency uniformly impair performance across the whole range of these variables. (Author)

  6. Effects of bolus size and hardness on within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, Ana M; Throckmorton, Gaylord S; Buschang, Peter H

    2008-04-01

    This study analysed how bolus hardness and size affect within-subject variability of chewing cycle kinematics. Two independent prospective studies were performed; both tracked chin movements using an optoelectronic recording system. Computer programs identified each subject's ten most representative cycles, and multilevel modelling procedures were used to estimate variances. One study evaluated 38 subjects who chewed 1, 2, 4 or 8 g of gum presented in random order. The second study evaluated 26 subjects who chewed approximately 2.5 g of harder (670 g) or softer (440 g) gum, also presented in random order. In terms of bolus size, the 2g and 1g boluses produced the least and greatest relative within-subject variability, respectively; the largest differences were found for cycle duration and excursions. Within-subject variability when chewing the harder gum was consistently greater than when chewing the softer gum, except for lateral movement towards the balancing side. Because bolus hardness and bolus size influence within-subject variability differently, they must be taken into consideration when designing experiments to study masticatory kinematics. We conclude that a 2g bolus of soft gum should be used in studies of chewing cycle kinematics in order to reduce within-subject variability and increase statistical power.

  7. Effect of yoga based lifestyle intervention on subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ratna; Gupta, Nidhi; Bijlani, R L

    2008-01-01

    Yoga is assuming importance in improving mental health and quality of life in the treatment of a number of psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders. The present study was a prospective controlled study to explore the short-term impact of a comprehensive but brief lifestyle intervention, based on yoga, on subjective well being levels in normal and diseased subjects. Normal healthy individuals and subjects having hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus or a variety of other illnesses were included in the study. The outcome measures were 'subjective well being inventory' (SUBI) scores, taken on the first and last day of the course. The inventory consists of questions related to one's feelings and attitude about various areas of life, such as happiness, achievement and interpersonal relationship. There was significant improvement in the subjective well being scores of the 77 subjects within a period of 10 days as compared to controls. These observations suggest that a short lifestyle modification and stress management educational program leads to remarkable improvement in the subjective well being scores of the subjects and can therefore make an appreciable contribution to primary prevention as well as management of lifestyle diseases. PMID:19130855

  8. Effect of yoga based lifestyle intervention on subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ratna; Gupta, Nidhi; Bijlani, R L

    2008-01-01

    Yoga is assuming importance in improving mental health and quality of life in the treatment of a number of psychiatric and psychosomatic disorders. The present study was a prospective controlled study to explore the short-term impact of a comprehensive but brief lifestyle intervention, based on yoga, on subjective well being levels in normal and diseased subjects. Normal healthy individuals and subjects having hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus or a variety of other illnesses were included in the study. The outcome measures were 'subjective well being inventory' (SUBI) scores, taken on the first and last day of the course. The inventory consists of questions related to one's feelings and attitude about various areas of life, such as happiness, achievement and interpersonal relationship. There was significant improvement in the subjective well being scores of the 77 subjects within a period of 10 days as compared to controls. These observations suggest that a short lifestyle modification and stress management educational program leads to remarkable improvement in the subjective well being scores of the subjects and can therefore make an appreciable contribution to primary prevention as well as management of lifestyle diseases.

  9. The Effect of Subject-Determined Verbalization on Discrimination Learning in Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Joseph L.

    Previous experiments with nursery school children have suggested that (1) subjects of preschool age do not verbalize during transfer learning or that (2) for these subjects, self-produced verbal cues have little influence on the learning process. To investigate the relative merits of these alternative positions, research was conducted among 80…

  10. Statistical Comparison of Four Effect Sizes for Single-Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jonathan M.

    2004-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding appropriate methods for summarizing treatment outcomes for single-subject designs. Nonregression- and regression-based methods have been proposed to summarize the efficacy of single-subject interventions with proponents of both methods arguing for the superiority of their respective approaches. To compare findings for…

  11. Estimating Intervention Effects across Different Types of Single-Subject Experimental Designs: Empirical Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Ferron, John M.; Onghena, Patrick; Heyvaert, Mieke; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Van den Noortgate, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the multilevel meta-analysis of results from single-subject experimental designs of different types, including AB phase designs, multiple-baseline designs, ABAB reversal designs, and alternating treatment designs. Current methodological work on the meta-analysis of single-subject experimental designs…

  12. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation.

  13. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. PMID:17960613

  14. Putting the brakes on mammary tumorigenesis: Loss of STAT1 predisposes to intraepithelial neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Schneckenleithner, Christine; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Dolznig, Helmut; Neugebauer, Nina; Kollmann, Karoline; Kolbe, Thomas; Decker, Thomas; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Müller, Mathias; Stoiber, Dagmar; Sexl, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    Multiparous Stat1−/− mice spontaneously develop mammary tumors with increased incidence: at an average age of 12 months, 55% of the animals suffer from mammary cancer, although the histopathology is heterogeneous. We consistently observed mosaic expression or down-regulation of STAT1 protein in wild-type mammary cancer evolving in the control group. Transplantation experiments show that tumorigenesis in Stat1−/− mice is partially influenced by impaired CTL mediated tumor surveillance. Additionally, STAT1 exerts an intrinsic tumor suppressing role by controlling and blocking proliferation of the mammary epithelium. Loss of STAT1 in epithelial cells enhances cell growth in both transformed and primary cells. The increased proliferative capacity leads to the loss of structured acini formation in 3D-cultures. Analogous effects were observed when Irf1−/− epithelial cells were used. Accordingly, the rate of mammary intraepithelial neoplasias (MINs) is increased in Stat1−/− animals: MINs represent the first step towards mammary tumors. The experiments characterize STAT1/IRF1 as a key growth inhibitory and tumor suppressive signaling pathway that prevents mammary cancer formation by maintaining growth control. Furthermore, they define the loss of STAT1 as a predisposing event via enhanced MIN formation. PMID:22185785

  15. Evaluating the subject-performed task effect in healthy older adults: relationship with neuropsychological tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Rita; Pinho, Maria Salomé; Souchay, Céline; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background An enhancement in recall of simple instructions is found when actions are performed in comparison to when they are verbally presented – the subject-performed task (SPT) effect. This enhancement has also been found with older adults. However, the reason why older adults, known to present a deficit in episodic memory, have a better performance for this type of information remains unclear. In this article, we explored this effect by comparing the performance on the SPT task with the performance on other tasks, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms that may explain this effect. Objective We hypothesized that both young and older adult groups should show higher recall in SPT compared with the verbal learning condition, and that the differences between age groups should be lower in the SPT condition. We aimed to explore the correlations between these tasks and known neuropsychological tests, and we also measured source memory for the encoding condition. Design A mixed design was used with 30 healthy older adults, comparing their performance with 30 healthy younger adults. Each participant was asked to perform 16 simple instructions (SPT condition) and to only read the other 16 instructions (Verbal condition – VT). The test phase included a free recall task. Participants were also tested with a set of neuropsychological measures (speed of processing, working memory and verbal episodic memory). Results The SPT effect was found for both age groups; but even for SPT materials, group differences in recall persisted. Source memory was found to be preserved for the two groups. Simple correlations suggested differences in correlates of SPT performance between the two groups. However, when controlling for age, the SPT and VT tasks correlate with each other, and a measure of episodic memory correlated moderately with both SPT and VT performance. Conclusions A strong effect of SPT was observed for all but one, which still displayed the expected aging

  16. Differential effects of nicotinic acid in subjects with different LDL subclass patterns.

    PubMed

    Superko, H R; Krauss, R M

    1992-07-01

    Twenty-six subjects (20 male, 6 female) at high risk for CAD events were treated with moderate doses of nicotinic acid to investigate whether there was a differential lipoprotein response in patients with different LDL subclass patterns. Subjects were selected to have either pattern A (predominance of large LDL, peak particle diameter greater than 262 A, n = 9) or pattern B (predominance of small LDL, peak particle diameter less than 255 A, n = 17) as assessed by 2-16% gradient gel electrophoresis of plasma. Nicotinic acid dose was similar in pattern A (2111 +/- 651 mg/day) and pattern B subjects (1875 +/- 698 mg/day). Total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol decreased by similar amounts in pattern A (-41 +/- 26 mg/dl and -37 +/- 18 mg/dl) and pattern B (-51 +/- 44 mg/dl and -44 +/- 45 mg/dl) subjects. Triglycerides tended to be reduced more in pattern B subjects (-100 +/- 175 mg/dl) compared to pattern A subjects (-23 +/- 34 mg/dl) although this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.08 for triglycerides log transformed). HDL cholesterol increased significantly more in the pattern B group (11.9 +/- 14.2 mg/dl) compared to pattern A subjects (0.7 +/- 8.5 mg/dl), (P less than 0.04). Similarly, LDL particle diameter increased significantly more in the pattern B subjects (9.8 +/- 6.9 A) compared to the pattern A subjects (3.6 +/- 3.0 A), (P less than 0.02). All pattern B subjects who achieved a plasma triglyceride less than 140 mg/dl converted to pattern A.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Effect of Daylight on Melatonin and Subjective General Health Factors in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    KARAMI, Zohre; GOLMOHAMMADI, Rostam; HEIDARIPAHLAVIAN, Ahmad; POOROLAJAL, Jalal; HEIDARIMOGHADAM, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Background: This paper investigated the effect of daylight on morning and night melatonin, subjective general health using GHQ questionnaire, sleepiness and alertness on elderly who lived in nursing houses. Methods: Nineteen nursing home residents participated voluntarily. They exposed to daylight from 9 to 10 a.m. and from 4 to 5 p.m. for 6 wk. The level of melatonin in the morning and at night was measured. General health of all participants was evaluated using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) as well. Results: Daylight exposure significantly affected morning melatonin from 25.39 pg/ml to 59.77 pg/ml (P=0.001) and night melatonin were changed from 40.30pg/ml to 34.41pg/ml (P=0.081). Mean score of general health changed 36.31 to 29.89 (P=0.003). Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) showed increase sleepiness and decrease alertness from 3:00 to 7:00 a.m. Sleepiness decreased and alertness increased during 1:00 p.m. and 20:00 p.m. Conclusions: Daylight exposure could delay sleep phase and correction of circadian rhythm in elderly. Anxiety and insomnia could be improved with daylight exposure. It suggests that elders should be exposed to scheduled daylight in morning and evening for prevention and improvement of mental disorders. Adequate light should be provided for elder’s homes and nursing house. PMID:27398336

  18. Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Punniaraj, Karthy; Ishak, Sherif

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of changing work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload. Data regarding travel time, average speed, maximum percent braking force and location of lane changes were collected by using a full size driving simulator. The NASA-TLX was used to measure self-reported workload ratings during the driving task. Conventional lane merge (CLM) and joint lane merge (JLM) were modeled in a driving simulator, and thirty participants (seven female and 23 male), navigated through the two configurations with two levels of traffic density. The mean maximum braking forces was 34% lower in the JLM configuration, and drivers going through the JLM configuration remained in the closed lane longer. However, no significant differences in speed were found between the two merge configurations. The analysis of self-reported workload ratings show that participants reported 15.3% lower total workload when driving through the JLM. In conclusion, the implemented changes in the JLM make it a more favorable merge configuration in both high and low traffic densities in terms of optimizing traffic flow by increasing the time and distance cars use both lanes, and in terms of improving safety due to lower braking forces and lower reported workload.

  19. Effectiveness of chiropractic management for patellofemoral pain syndrome's symptomatic control phase: a single subject experiment.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J J; Zachman, Z J; Keating, J C; Traina, A D

    1990-01-01

    Chiropractic management of patellofemoral pain syndrome has not been well documented. A time-series experimental design was employed to assess the effectiveness of chiropractic care during the symptomatic control phase in a patient with bilateral knee pain. Treatment consisted of long axis tibiofemoral adjustment, passive patellofemoral mobilization, and continuous ultrasound. Mediating variables, derived from physical examination findings, were subject to periodic randomized observation sampling by a second observer who was blinded to the first observer, but unblinded to the experimental phases. Strong interexaminer reliability (K = 0.78, p less than .005) was observed for patellar tracking jitter. Poor agreement (K = 0.31, NS) was observed for the patellar grinding test graded on an oridinal scale, but moderate interexaminer agreement (K = 0.52; p less than .01) was obtained with the test on a nominal scale. Clinical outcome measures of pain, patellar tracking, and patellar grinding tests were observed to visually covary throughout the experiment. A reliable 3-4 wk lag was observed between treatment phases and demonstrable changes in the patient's signs and symptoms. PMID:2273335

  20. Rheological effects in the 3D creeping flow past a sedimenting sphere subject to orthogonal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas D.; Tanner, Roger I.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the rheological parameters of nonlinear differential constitutive models in the isothermal, steady, creeping, flow past a sedimenting sphere, in an incompressible viscoelastic matrix fluid, subject to simple shear in a plane perpendicular to the direction of sedimentation are studied analytically. The viscoelasticity of the ambient fluid is modeled using the Upper Convected Maxwell, Oldroyd-B, exponential Phan-Thien-Tanner, Giesekus, and FENE-P constitutive equations. The solution of the governing equations is expanded as a regular perturbation series for small values of the Deborah number, and the resulting sequence of three-dimensional partial differential equations is solved analytically up to fourth order. Approximate analytical expressions for the angular velocity of the rigid sphere, as well as for the drag force on the sphere, are derived and discussed. The solutions reveal both the increase of the drag in case of Boger-type fluids (modeled with the FENE-P model) and the decrease of the drag in case of elastic fluids (modeled with the Giesekus model).

  1. Frataxin mRNA Isoforms in FRDA Patients and Normal Subjects: Effect of Tocotrienol Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bolotta, Alessandra; Malisardi, Gemma; Manfredini, Stefano; Pini, Antonella; Tasco, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by deficient expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin involved in the formation of iron-sulphur complexes and by consequent oxidative stress. We analysed low-dose tocotrienol supplementation effects on the expression of the three splice variant isoforms (FXN-1, FXN-2, and FXN-3) in mononuclear blood cells of FRDA patients and healthy subjects. In FRDA patients, tocotrienol leads to a specific and significant increase of FXN-3 expression while not affecting FXN-1 and FXN-2 expression. Since no structural and functional details were available for FNX-2 and FXN-3, 3D models were built. FXN-1, the canonical isoform, was then docked on the human iron-sulphur complex, and functional interactions were computed; when FXN-1 was replaced by FXN-2 or FNX-3, we found that the interactions were maintained, thus suggesting a possible biological role for both isoforms in human cells. Finally, in order to evaluate whether tocotrienol enhancement of FXN-3 was mediated by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG), PPARG expression was evaluated. At a low dose of tocotrienol, the increase of FXN-3 expression appeared to be independent of PPARG expression. Our data show that it is possible to modulate the mRNA expression of the minor frataxin isoforms and that they may have a functional role. PMID:24175286

  2. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. Several key features of the flow are observed. Strong axial flows cause fluid containing vorticity to move from the ``troughs'' of the initially wavy vortex tube to the ``peaks.'' This process is associated with distinct differences in vortex concentration at the peak and the trough, which lead to the establishment of an axial pressure gradient. Furthermore, the primary and secondary vortices interact to form additional small-scale vortex rings. The exact number and orientation of these small-scale rings is highly dependent on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the ground. Finally, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation, core size, and topology, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  3. Subjective effects of displacement errors in electronically processed stereo-television pictures.

    PubMed

    Wöpking, M; Beldie, I P; Pastoor, S

    1988-01-01

    Several aspects of the roles of object contours and of rivalry and suppression in binocular vision are considered in a TV engineering context. Three experiments, using 3D b/w stills, were conducted to explore subjective effects of irregular horizontal shifts at object contours (displacement errors), which are expected to be a typical picture impairment problem of future 3D TV multi-viewpoint systems. Performance and rating tasks on a wide range of impairment magnitudes and various picture parameters served to give a quantitative estimate of the influence of displacement errors on: (1) correctness of binocular depth perception; and (2) picture quality. Two experiments (constant vs. variable location of impairments over time) with vertical grating stimuli showed binocular depth perception to withstand levels of up to 90% misplaced contour elements in one part of the stereo pair. Quality assessments were much more critical. They depended both on the proportion of impaired pixels and on the maximum horizontal width of individual impairments. A corresponding stimulus model was found to be valid for pictures with natural content, too. Impairments were less annoying when visible by only one eye instead of both. A specific formulation is given of the influence of contrast and spatial frequency features on performance. PMID:3153662

  4. Effects of histamine type 2 receptor stimulation on myocardial function in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, J; Dargie, H J; Brown, M J; Krikler, D M; Dollery, C T

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial histamine(H)2 receptor stimulation has been studied in six normal men. Since histamine is a potent vasodilator, the haemodynamic effects of histamine infusion were compared with those of nitroprusside at equihypotensive doses, to identify changes in myocardial contractility attributable to vasodilatation. After H1 receptor blockade with mepyramine, subjects received, in single blind crossover fashion, either histamine alone and with the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine, or nitroprusside alone and with cimetidine. Echocardiographic left ventricular dimensions, plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured. The rise in catecholamines suggested similar baroreflex activation by both histamine and nitroprusside. Echo ejection phase indices did not alter significantly after nitroprusside, but histamine caused an increase in percentage fractional shortening from 38.2 +/- 4.1 to 53.5 +/- 3-6% and in mean fibre shortening velocity from 1.31 +/- 0.19 to 1.99 +/- 0.22 cm/s. These changes were both greatly reduced by cimetidine and suggest that H2 receptor stimulation in man causes a direct positive inotropic response. PMID:7082501

  5. Effects of Ketoconazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Ponatinib in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dorer, David J; Niland, Katie; Haluska, Frank; Sonnichsen, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    Ponatinib is a BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients resistant or intolerant to prior TKIs. In vitro studies suggested that metabolism of ponatinib is partially mediated by CYP3A4. The effects of CYP3A4 inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of ponatinib and its CYP3A4-mediated metabolite, AP24567, were evaluated in a single-center, randomized, two-period, two-sequence crossover study in healthy volunteers. Subjects (N = 22) received two single doses (orally) of ponatinib 15 mg, once given alone and once coadministered with daily (5 days) ketoconazole 400 mg, a CYP3A4 inhibitor. Ponatinib plus ketoconazole increased ponatinib maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) compared with ponatinib alone. The estimated mean ratios for AUC0–∞, AUC0–t, and Cmax indicated increased exposures to ponatinib of 78%, 70%, and 47%, respectively; exposure to AP24567 decreased by 71%. Exposure to AP24567 was marginal after ponatinib alone (no more than 4% of the exposure to ponatinib). These results suggest that caution should be exercised with the concurrent use of ponatinib and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors and that a ponatinib dose decrease to 30 mg daily, from the 45 mg daily starting dose, could be considered. PMID:23801357

  6. Subjective effects of displacement errors in electronically processed stereo-television pictures.

    PubMed

    Wöpking, M; Beldie, I P; Pastoor, S

    1988-01-01

    Several aspects of the roles of object contours and of rivalry and suppression in binocular vision are considered in a TV engineering context. Three experiments, using 3D b/w stills, were conducted to explore subjective effects of irregular horizontal shifts at object contours (displacement errors), which are expected to be a typical picture impairment problem of future 3D TV multi-viewpoint systems. Performance and rating tasks on a wide range of impairment magnitudes and various picture parameters served to give a quantitative estimate of the influence of displacement errors on: (1) correctness of binocular depth perception; and (2) picture quality. Two experiments (constant vs. variable location of impairments over time) with vertical grating stimuli showed binocular depth perception to withstand levels of up to 90% misplaced contour elements in one part of the stereo pair. Quality assessments were much more critical. They depended both on the proportion of impaired pixels and on the maximum horizontal width of individual impairments. A corresponding stimulus model was found to be valid for pictures with natural content, too. Impairments were less annoying when visible by only one eye instead of both. A specific formulation is given of the influence of contrast and spatial frequency features on performance.

  7. Personality and the effects of acute alcohol intake. A contingent negative variation study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Fattapposta, Francesco; Venturi, Piero; Carella Prada, Ozrem; Costamagna, Luisa; D'Alessio, Carmelo; Mostarda, Mirella; Mina, Concetta; Parisi, Leoluca; Pirro, Cristina; Amabile, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) and contingent negative variation (CNV). Fourteen healthy subjects were divided on the basis of their personality profiles--the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Hs+Hy+D/3)--into a high score (HS) and low score (LS) subgroup. The CNV was recorded using a choice-reaction time (RT) task. CNV recording was performed in two conditions: inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1500 ms and 2500 ms at three different BACs (0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 g/L) after acute alcohol administration. At the high BAC (0.8 g/L), both subgroups showed a reduced CNV amplitude area and a longer RT (p<.05) in both ISI conditions. No effects either on the CNV or on the RT were observed at the low BAC (0.3 g/L). At the intermediate BAC (0.5 g/L), the HS subgroup displayed an increased CNV amplitude (p<.05), not accompanied by a significantly longer RT (short ISI condition), and a reduced late CNV (p<.05) with a longer RT (p<.05) (long ISI condition). In the LS group, only a longer RT was observed in the long ISI condition. CNV modifications point to an individual, apparently personality-related, threshold of sensitivity to different alcohol levels. PMID:15212113

  8. Effectiveness of chiropractic management for patellofemoral pain syndrome's symptomatic control phase: a single subject experiment.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J J; Zachman, Z J; Keating, J C; Traina, A D

    1990-01-01

    Chiropractic management of patellofemoral pain syndrome has not been well documented. A time-series experimental design was employed to assess the effectiveness of chiropractic care during the symptomatic control phase in a patient with bilateral knee pain. Treatment consisted of long axis tibiofemoral adjustment, passive patellofemoral mobilization, and continuous ultrasound. Mediating variables, derived from physical examination findings, were subject to periodic randomized observation sampling by a second observer who was blinded to the first observer, but unblinded to the experimental phases. Strong interexaminer reliability (K = 0.78, p less than .005) was observed for patellar tracking jitter. Poor agreement (K = 0.31, NS) was observed for the patellar grinding test graded on an oridinal scale, but moderate interexaminer agreement (K = 0.52; p less than .01) was obtained with the test on a nominal scale. Clinical outcome measures of pain, patellar tracking, and patellar grinding tests were observed to visually covary throughout the experiment. A reliable 3-4 wk lag was observed between treatment phases and demonstrable changes in the patient's signs and symptoms.

  9. How Many Is Enough? Effect of Sample Size in Inter-Subject Correlation Analysis of fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Inter-subject correlation (ISC) is a widely used method for analyzing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during naturalistic stimuli. A challenge in ISC analysis is to define the required sample size in the way that the results are reliable. We studied the effect of the sample size on the reliability of ISC analysis and additionally addressed the following question: How many subjects are needed for the ISC statistics to converge to the ISC statistics obtained using a large sample? The study was realized using a large block design data set of 130 subjects. We performed a split-half resampling based analysis repeatedly sampling two nonoverlapping subsets of 10–65 subjects and comparing the ISC maps between the independent subject sets. Our findings suggested that with 20 subjects, on average, the ISC statistics had converged close to a large sample ISC statistic with 130 subjects. However, the split-half reliability of unthresholded and thresholded ISC maps improved notably when the number of subjects was increased from 20 to 30 or more. PMID:26884746

  10. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels.

    PubMed

    Rahim, H A; Abdulmalek, M; Soh, P J; Rani, K A; Hisham, N; Vandenbosch, G A E

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  11. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade.

  12. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels.

    PubMed

    Rahim, H A; Abdulmalek, M; Soh, P J; Rani, K A; Hisham, N; Vandenbosch, G A E

    2016-07-20

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade.

  13. Acute, subacute and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans: a pooled analysis of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Studerus, Erich; Kometer, Michael; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-11-01

    Psilocybin and related hallucinogenic compounds are increasingly used in human research. However, due to limited information about potential subjective side effects, the controlled medical use of these compounds has remained controversial. We therefore analysed acute, short- and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans by pooling raw data from eight double-blind placebo-controlled experimental studies conducted between 1999 and 2008. The analysis included 110 healthy subjects who had received 1-4 oral doses of psilocybin (45-315 µg/kg body weight). Although psilocybin dose-dependently induced profound changes in mood, perception, thought and self-experience, most subjects described the experience as pleasurable, enriching and non-threatening. Acute adverse drug reactions, characterized by strong dysphoria and/or anxiety/panic, occurred only in the two highest dose conditions in a relatively small proportion of subjects. All acute adverse drug reactions were successfully managed by providing interpersonal support and did not need psychopharmacological intervention. Follow-up questionnaires indicated no subsequent drug abuse, persisting perception disorders, prolonged psychosis or other long-term impairment of functioning in any of our subjects. The results suggest that the administration of moderate doses of psilocybin to healthy, high-functioning and well-prepared subjects in the context of a carefully monitored research environment is associated with an acceptable level of risk.

  14. Subject-Specific Effect of Metallic Body Accessories on Path Loss of Dynamic on-Body Propagation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, H. A.; Abdulmalek, M.; Soh, P. J.; Rani, K. A.; Hisham, N.; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the investigation of path loss variation for subject-specific on-body radio propagation channels, considering the effect of metallic spectacles and loop like metallic accessories. Adding metallic items may affect the operability of Body Centric Wireless Communications (BCWC). Measurements were carried out in an RF-shielded room lined with microwave absorbing sheets for strategically placed bodyworn antennas covering the upper front torso and the lower limbs. The path loss of the on-body radio channel was characterized explicitly taking into account the body size of the subjects. For metallic loop-like accessories, the results indicate that for underweight subjects, there was a slightly higher influence, up to 2%, compared to normal and overweight subjects. Our findings indicate that a noticeable effect exists on on-body channels for dynamic movements where the metallic watch acts as a local scatterer that affects the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) signal path between transmitter and receiver for underweight subjects in comparison to normal and overweight subjects. The path loss decreases when the receiving terminal was positioned very close to the metallic item. If a loop-like metallic accessory is not appropriately considered when designing the radio channel on a subject, the reliability of the body-centric wireless system may degrade. PMID:27436496

  15. Effect of beverages on bovine dental enamel subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Amoras, Dinah Ribeiro; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated by an in vitro model the effect of beverages on dental enamel previously subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid. The factor under study was the type of beverage, in five levels: Sprite® Zero Low-calorie Soda Lime (positive control), Parmalat® ultra high temperature (UHT) milk, Ades® Original soymilk, Leão® Ice Tea Zero ready-to-drink low-calorie peach-flavored black teaand Prata® natural mineral water (negative control). Seventy-five bovine enamel specimens were distributed among the five types of beverages (n=15), according to a randomized complete block design. For the formation of erosive wear lesions, the specimens were immersed in 10 mL aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid 0.01 M for 2 min. Subsequently, the specimens were immersed in 20 mL of the beverages for 1 min, twice daily for 2 days at room temperature. In between, the specimens were kept in 20 mL of artificial saliva at 37ºC. The response variable was the quantitative enamel microhardness. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed highly significant differences (p<0.00001) in the enamel exposed to hydrochloric acid and beverages. The soft drink caused a significantly higher decrease in microhardness compared with the other beverages. The black tea caused a significantly higher reduction in microhardness than the mineral water, UHT milk and soymilk, but lower than the soft drink. Among the analyzed beverages, the soft drink and the black tea caused the most deleterious effects on dental enamel microhardness. PMID:23207851

  16. Effects of Body Weight Reduction on Serum Irisin and Metabolic Parameters in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Satoshi; Shinno, Hiromi; Thi Thu, Ha Cao; Takao, Nana; Tsutsumi, Hiromi; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Kimura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Irisin is a myokine implicated in lipid and glucose metabolism. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of a body weight reduction on the serum irisin level and physical indicators in obese Japanese patients without diabetes. Methods The subjects were 22 patients (male/female, 5/17; age, 46.1±16.0 years; body mass index [BMI], 36.9±5.0 kg/m2) who completed a 6-month body weight reduction program at our clinic. The program included diet, exercise therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. Blood parameters, body composition, exercise tolerance, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and serum irisin were determined before and after intervention, and relationships among changes in these data were examined. Results There were significant decreases in body weight and BMI after the intervention. Irisin before the intervention was significantly positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r=0.434, P<0.05). The mean irisin level showed no significant change after the intervention in all participants. However, improvements in % body fat, subcutaneous fat area, triglycerides, and fasting glucose were significantly greater in patients with an increase in irisin compared to those with a decrease in irisin after the intervention. Patients with an increase in irisin also had significantly lower fasting insulin (9.7±4.8 vs. 16.4±8.2, P<0.05) and HOMA-IR (2.2±1.1 vs. 3.7±1.6, P<0.05) after the intervention, compared to patients with a decrease in irisin. Conclusion Body weight reduction did not alter irisin levels. However, irisin may play important roles in fat and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance, and the effects of body weight reduction on irisin kinetics may be a key for obesity treatment. PMID:27766246

  17. Effects of cadmium and monensin on spleen of mice, subjected to subacute cadmium intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gluhcheva, Yordanka; Ivanova, Juliana; Ganeva, Sonja; Mitewa, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cadmium (Cd) and monensin on spleen function in mice, subjected to subacute Cd-intoxication. Adult male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 6 per group) as follows: control group (received distilled water and food ad libitum); Cd-treated (20 mg/kg/b.w./day Cd(II) acetate for the first 2 weeks of the experimental protocol); monensin-treated mice (20 mg/kg/day Cd(II) acetate for the first 2 weeks followed by treatment with 16 mg/kg b.w./day monensin from days 15 to 28. On day 29, mice were sacrificed under light ether anesthesia. Exposure to Cd induced an increase in spleen index (SI). The treatment of cd-intoxicated mice with monensin significantly reduced SI compared to Cd alone. The data from the atomic absorbption analysis of spleen revealed a significant Cd accumulation in Cd-treated mice compared to controls, accompanied by a significant depletion of Fe concentration up to 30%. The treatment of the Cd-administered mice with monensin resulted in a significant decrease of Cd in spleen by 50% compared to Cd alone. Fe recovery occured in spleen of monensin-treated mice. Histopathological analysis of spleen showed that Cd significantly decreased the number of megakaryocytes and disturbed extramedullary hematopoiesis. The number of megakaryocytes increased when monensin was added. The data in this study suggest that monensin was able to reduce the effects of Cd on hematopoesis in mice. PMID:23514074

  18. Effect of beverages on bovine dental enamel subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Amoras, Dinah Ribeiro; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated by an in vitro model the effect of beverages on dental enamel previously subjected to erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid. The factor under study was the type of beverage, in five levels: Sprite® Zero Low-calorie Soda Lime (positive control), Parmalat® ultra high temperature (UHT) milk, Ades® Original soymilk, Leão® Ice Tea Zero ready-to-drink low-calorie peach-flavored black teaand Prata® natural mineral water (negative control). Seventy-five bovine enamel specimens were distributed among the five types of beverages (n=15), according to a randomized complete block design. For the formation of erosive wear lesions, the specimens were immersed in 10 mL aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid 0.01 M for 2 min. Subsequently, the specimens were immersed in 20 mL of the beverages for 1 min, twice daily for 2 days at room temperature. In between, the specimens were kept in 20 mL of artificial saliva at 37ºC. The response variable was the quantitative enamel microhardness. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed highly significant differences (p<0.00001) in the enamel exposed to hydrochloric acid and beverages. The soft drink caused a significantly higher decrease in microhardness compared with the other beverages. The black tea caused a significantly higher reduction in microhardness than the mineral water, UHT milk and soymilk, but lower than the soft drink. Among the analyzed beverages, the soft drink and the black tea caused the most deleterious effects on dental enamel microhardness.

  19. Assessing reproducibility by the within-subject coefficient of variation with random effects models.

    PubMed

    Quan, H; Shih, W J

    1996-12-01

    In this paper we consider the use of within-subject coefficient of variation (WCV) for assessing the reproducibility or reliability of a measurement. Application to assessing reproducibility of biochemical markers for measuring bone turnover is described and the comparison with intraclass correlation is discussed. Both maximum likelihood and moment confidence intervals of WCV are obtained through their corresponding asymptotic distributions. Normal and log-normal cases are considered. In general, WCV is preferred when the measurement scale bears intrinsic meaning and is not subject to arbitrary shifting. The intraclass correlation may be preferred when a fixed population of subjects can be well identified.

  20. Predisposing, Enabling and Need Correlates of Mental Health Treatment Utilization Among Homeless Men

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S.; Kennedy, David P.; Ewing, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization. PMID:24595594

  1. Predisposing, enabling and need correlates of mental health treatment utilization among homeless men.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Harmony; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett

    2014-11-01

    There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization. PMID:24595594

  2. Effect of a single dose of lactase on symptoms and expired hydrogen after lactose challenge in lactose-intolerant subjects.

    PubMed

    Sanders, S W; Tolman, K G; Reitberg, D P

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a single dose or oral lactase on symptoms, breath hydrogen concentration, and glucose absorption in lactose-intolerant subjects challenged with lactose was studied. Volunteers underwent a lactose challenge test; those whose breath hydrogen concentrations increased 20 ppm or more and who met other criteria were admitted as subjects. After fasting, the subjects were given three chewable lactase tablets (total lactase dose, 9900 FCC units) or placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind, crossover manner. The subjects also consumed 8 oz of whole milk in which 37.5 g of lactose powder was dissolved (total lactose content, 50 g). The washout period between lactose challenges was at least one week. Breath hydrogen and plasma glucose concentrations were measured before and at intervals after the challenges, and the subjects completed symptom-evaluation questionnaires every eight hours for four days. Twenty-four subjects completed the study. The maximum mean breath hydrogen concentration was significantly lower after lactase treatment than after placebo treatment. In 21 subjects, the area under the hydrogen concentration-time curve (AUC) was lower after lactase than after placebo; three subjects had hydrogen AUCs more than 300 ppm.hr lower. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose levels. Subjective ratings of the severity of abdominal cramping, belching, flatulence, and diarrhea were lower during the first eight hours after challenge in lactase-treated subjects; ratings for bloating were lower during the next eight hours. Single doses of a chewable lactase tablet reduced the concentration of expired hydrogen and symptoms of lactose intolerance after a lactose challenge.

  3. Relative Effectiveness of Titles, Abstracts, and Subject Headings for Machine Retrieval from the COMPENDEX Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jerry R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigated the relative merits of searching on titles, subject headings, abstracts, free-language terms, and combinations of these elements. The combination of titles and abstracts came the closest to 100 percent retrieval. (Author/PF)

  4. Air toxics and epigenetic effects: ozone altered microRNAs in the sputum of human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Rebecca C.; Rager, Julia E.; Bauer, Rebecca; Sebastian, Elizabeth; Peden, David B.; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a criteria air pollutant that is associated with numerous adverse health effects, including altered respiratory immune responses. Despite its deleterious health effects, possible epigenetic mechanisms underlying O3-induced health effects remain understudied. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators of genomic response to environmental insults and unstudied in relationship to O3 inhalation exposure. Our objective was to test whether O3 inhalation exposure significantly alters miRNA expression profiles within the human bronchial airways. Twenty healthy adult human volunteers were exposed to 0.4 ppm O3 for 2 h. Induced sputum samples were collected from each subject 48 h preexposure and 6 h postexposure for evaluation of miRNA expression and markers of inflammation in the airways. Genomewide miRNA expression profiles were evaluated by microarray analysis, and in silico predicted mRNA targets of the O3-responsive miRNAs were identified and validated against previously measured O3-induced changes in mRNA targets. Biological network analysis was performed on the O3-associated miRNAs and mRNA targets to reveal potential associated response signaling and functional enrichment. Expression analysis of the sputum samples revealed that O3 exposure significantly increased the expression levels of 10 miRNAs, namely miR-132, miR-143, miR-145, miR-199a*, miR-199b-5p, miR-222, miR-223, miR-25, miR-424, and miR-582-5p. The miRNAs and their predicted targets were associated with a diverse range of biological functions and disease signatures, noted among them inflammation and immune-related disease. The present study shows that O3 inhalation exposure disrupts select miRNA expression profiles that are associated with inflammatory and immune response signaling. These findings provide novel insight into epigenetic regulation of responses to O3 exposure. PMID:24771714

  5. Hypoglycemic effect of triphala on selected non insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sowmya S.; Antony, Seema

    2008-01-01

    Modern life style is characterized by high stress, increased automation, junk food consumption and sedentary life style which have lead to the incidence of Diabetes. The study involved selection of NIDDM subjects who were supplemented with Triphala powder called, The Three Myrobalans (Terminalia bellirica- Belliric myrobalan, Terminalia chebula-Inknut, Embilica officinalis - Indian gooseberry) for a period of 45 days. Statistical evaluation of the blood profile showed significant reduction in the blood glucose level of the subjects. PMID:22557278

  6. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhan; Gay, Laura J; Strange, Amy; Palles, Claire; Band, Gavin; Whiteman, David C; Lescai, Francesco; Langford, Cordelia; Nanji, Manoj; Edkins, Sarah; van der Winkel, Anouk; Levine, David; Sasieni, Peter; Bellenguez, Céline; Howarth, Kimberley; Freeman, Colin; Trudgill, Nigel; Tucker, Art T; Pirinen, Matti; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Laan, Luc J W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Drenth, Joost P H; Peters, Wilbert H; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot P; McManus, Ross; Grabsch, Heike; Prenen, Hans; Bisschops, Raf; Krishnadath, Kausila; Siersema, Peter D; van Baal, Jantine W P M; Middleton, Mark; Petty, Russell; Gillies, Richard; Burch, Nicola; Bhandari, Pradeep; Paterson, Stuart; Edwards, Cathryn; Penman, Ian; Vaidya, Kishor; Ang, Yeng; Murray, Iain; Patel, Praful; Ye, Weimin; Mullins, Paul; Wu, Anna H; Bird, Nigel C; Dallal, Helen; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Murray, Liam J; Koss, Konrad; Bernstein, Leslie; Romero, Yvonne; Hardie, Laura J; Zhang, Rui; Winter, Helen; Corley, Douglas A; Panter, Simon; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brian J; Sargeant, Ian; Gammon, Marilie D; Smart, Howard; Dhar, Anjan; McMurtry, Hugh; Ali, Haythem; Liu, Geoffrey; Casson, Alan G; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rutter, Matt; Tawil, Ashref; Morris, Danielle; Nwokolo, Chuka; Isaacs, Peter; Rodgers, Colin; Ragunath, Krish; MacDonald, Chris; Haigh, Chris; Monk, David; Davies, Gareth; Wajed, Saj; Johnston, David; Gibbons, Michael; Cullen, Sue; Church, Nicholas; Langley, Ruth; Griffin, Michael; Alderson, Derek; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah E; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Anderson, Mark; Brooks, Claire; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Atherfold, Paul; Nicholson, Anna M; Gellatly, Nichola L; Glancy, Deborah; Cooper, Sheldon C; Cunningham, David; Lind, Tore; Hapeshi, Julie; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Brown, Julia; Love, Sharon; Attwood, Stephen; MacGregor, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Sanders, Scott; Ek, Weronica; Harrison, Rebecca F; Moayyedi, Paul; de Caestecker, John; Barr, Hugh; Stupka, Elia; Vaughan, Thomas L; Peltonen, Leena; Spencer, Chris C A; Tomlinson, Ian; Donnelly, Peter; Jankowski, Janusz A Z

    2012-10-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia, and it strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumor with a very poor prognosis. We report the first genome-wide association study on Barrett's esophagus, comprising 1,852 UK cases and 5,172 UK controls in the discovery stage and 5,986 cases and 12,825 controls in the replication stage. Variants at two loci were associated with disease risk: chromosome 6p21, rs9257809 (Pcombined=4.09×10(-9); odds ratio (OR)=1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.13-1.28), within the major histocompatibility complex locus, and chromosome 16q24, rs9936833 (Pcombined=2.74×10(-10); OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.10-1.19), for which the closest protein-coding gene is FOXF1, which is implicated in esophageal development and structure. We found evidence that many common variants of small effect contribute to genetic susceptibility to Barrett's esophagus and that SNP alleles predisposing to obesity also increase risk for Barrett's esophagus.

  7. An Overview of IAEA Activities to Support Pre-disposal Management of Radioactive Wastes in Member States - 12334

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Samanta, Susanta; Drace, Zoran; Ojovan, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) promotes safe and effective management of radioactive waste and has suitable programmes in place to serve the needs of Member States in this area. These programmes cover the development and use of safety standards, planning, technologies and approaches needed for the management of different types of radioactive waste, resulting both from the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications. In the pre-disposal area, the assistance to Members States covers a wide range of topics, including policy and strategy, inventory assessment, technologies and approaches for waste minimization, selection of technical options for waste processing and storage, improvement in operating practices at nuclear facilities, optimization of waste management capacity, etc. and is delivered through the publication of technical guidance documents, coordinated research projects, networks, technical cooperation projects and organization of training and technical review services. This report presents an overview of recent IAEA accomplishments aiming to support activities in pre-disposal management of radioactive waste with focus on technological aspects. (authors)

  8. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Barrett’s Esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia. Barrett’s Esophagus strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumour with a very poor prognosis. We have undertaken the first genome-wide association study on Barrett’s Esophagus, comprising 1,852 UK cases and 5,172 UK controls in discovery and 5,986 cases and 12,825 controls in the replication. Two regions were associated with disease risk: chromosome 6p21, rs9257809 (Pcombined=4.09×10−9, OR(95%CI) =1.21(1.13-1.28)) and chromosome 16q24, rs9936833 (Pcombined=2.74×10−10, OR(95%CI) =1.14(1.10-1.19)). The top SNP on chromosome 6p21 is within the major histocompatibility complex, and the closest protein-coding gene to rs9936833 on chromosome 16q24 is FOXF1, which is implicated in esophageal development and structure. We found evidence that the genetic component of Barrett’s Esophagus is mediated by many common variants of small effect and that SNP alleles predisposing to obesity also increase risk for Barrett’s Esophagus. PMID:22961001

  9. Metacognition of Working Memory Performance: Trial-by-Trial Subjective Effects from a New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Andrew C; Bhangal, Sabrina; Velasquez, Anthony G; Geisler, Mark W; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the fleeting urges and inclinations that subjects experience when performing tasks involving response interference and working memory. Building on this research, we developed a paradigm in which subjects, after learning to press certain buttons when presented with certain letters, are presented with two action-related letters (the memoranda) but must withhold responding (4 s) until cued to emit the response associated with only one of the two letters. In the Congruent condition, the action corresponds to the cue (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = B); in the Incongruent condition, the action corresponds to the other item of the memoranda (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = A). After each trial, subjects inputted a rating regarding their subjectively experienced "urge to err" on that trial. These introspection-based data revealed that, as found in previous research, urges to err were strongest for incongruent trials. Our findings reveal, first, that subjects can successfully perform this new task, even though it is more complex than that of previous studies, and second, that, in this new paradigm, reliable subjective, metacognitive data can be obtained on a trial-by-trial basis. We hope that our novel paradigm will serve as a foundation for future experimental projects on the relationship between working memory performance and consciousness-an under-explored nexus whose investigation is likely to reveal insights about working memory, cognitive control, and metacognition.

  10. Study of respiratory effects from exposure to 2 ppm formaldehyde in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, E.N.; Witek, T.J. Jr.; Tosun, T.; Leaderer, B.P.; Beck, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a common indoor air pollutant with irritative properties. It has been suggested that FA may produce physiologic alterations of the respiratory system. To study such responses, 15 nonsmoking, healthy subjects were exposed in a double blind, random manner to 0 and 2 ppm FA for 40 min in an environmental chamber. In addition, the same exposures were repeated on a separate day with the subjects performing moderate exercise (450 kpm/min) for 10 min. Exposures were carried out under controlled environmental conditions (temperature = 23/sup 0/C, relative humidity = 50%). Pulmonary function was measured before, during, and after exposures using partial and maximal flow-volume curves and airway resistance. Symptom diaries were given to the subjects; upper and lower airway symptoms were recorded for up to 24 hr following exposures. No significant bronchoconstriction was noted in this group. In 3 subjects, sequential measurements of peak flow over a 24-hr period following FA exposure failed to reveal any delayed airway response. On a separate day, 6 healthy subjects failed to demonstrate changes from their baseline responsiveness to methacholine after exposure to 2 ppm FA. Respiratory symptoms were, in general, confined to the upper airways and were mild to moderate in severity. We conclude that short exposures to 2 ppm FA do not result in acute or subacute changes in lung function among healthy individuals either at rest or with exercise. Subjective complaints following such exposures are confined to irritative phenomena of the upper airways.

  11. Metacognition of Working Memory Performance: Trial-by-Trial Subjective Effects from a New Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Andrew C.; Bhangal, Sabrina; Velasquez, Anthony G.; Geisler, Mark W.; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the fleeting urges and inclinations that subjects experience when performing tasks involving response interference and working memory. Building on this research, we developed a paradigm in which subjects, after learning to press certain buttons when presented with certain letters, are presented with two action-related letters (the memoranda) but must withhold responding (4 s) until cued to emit the response associated with only one of the two letters. In the Congruent condition, the action corresponds to the cue (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = B); in the Incongruent condition, the action corresponds to the other item of the memoranda (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = A). After each trial, subjects inputted a rating regarding their subjectively experienced “urge to err” on that trial. These introspection-based data revealed that, as found in previous research, urges to err were strongest for incongruent trials. Our findings reveal, first, that subjects can successfully perform this new task, even though it is more complex than that of previous studies, and second, that, in this new paradigm, reliable subjective, metacognitive data can be obtained on a trial-by-trial basis. We hope that our novel paradigm will serve as a foundation for future experimental projects on the relationship between working memory performance and consciousness—an under-explored nexus whose investigation is likely to reveal insights about working memory, cognitive control, and metacognition. PMID:27445897

  12. Effects of vestibular training on motion sickness, nystagmus, and subjective vertical.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Deguine, Olivier; Bourg, Mathieu; Pavy-LeTraon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Pitch head-and-trunk movements during constant velocity rotation are a provocative vestibular stimulus that produces vertigo and nausea. When exposed to this stimulus repeatedly, motion sickness symptoms diminish as the subjects habituate. Acetylleucine is a drug that is used to treat acute vestibular vertigo. In this study, we wanted to ascertain whether this drug (a) lessened motion sickness or delayed habituation; (b) accelerated the recovery following habituation; and (c) whether changes in the subjective vertical accompanied habituation. Twenty subjects were administered acetylleucine or placebo in a double-blind study during a five-day vestibular training. Horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus, smooth pursuit, and subjective visual vertical were evaluated before, during, and up to two months after the vestibular training. Based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria, motion sickness decreased steadily in each vestibular training session, and there was no difference between the scores in the acetylleucine and placebo groups. Post-rotatory nystagmus peak velocity and time constant also declined in both groups at the same rate. Thus, acetylleucine neither reduced the nausea associated with this provocative stimulus, nor hastened the acquisition or retention of vestibular habituation of motion sickness and nystagmus. There was no difference in optokinetic nystagmus and smooth pursuit between the acetylleucine and placebo groups. However, subjects showed larger error in the subjective visual vertical after habituation, which indicates that spatial orientation is also affected by vestibular training.

  13. Metacognition of Working Memory Performance: Trial-by-Trial Subjective Effects from a New Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Andrew C; Bhangal, Sabrina; Velasquez, Anthony G; Geisler, Mark W; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the fleeting urges and inclinations that subjects experience when performing tasks involving response interference and working memory. Building on this research, we developed a paradigm in which subjects, after learning to press certain buttons when presented with certain letters, are presented with two action-related letters (the memoranda) but must withhold responding (4 s) until cued to emit the response associated with only one of the two letters. In the Congruent condition, the action corresponds to the cue (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = B); in the Incongruent condition, the action corresponds to the other item of the memoranda (e.g., memoranda = AB, cue = B, response = A). After each trial, subjects inputted a rating regarding their subjectively experienced "urge to err" on that trial. These introspection-based data revealed that, as found in previous research, urges to err were strongest for incongruent trials. Our findings reveal, first, that subjects can successfully perform this new task, even though it is more complex than that of previous studies, and second, that, in this new paradigm, reliable subjective, metacognitive data can be obtained on a trial-by-trial basis. We hope that our novel paradigm will serve as a foundation for future experimental projects on the relationship between working memory performance and consciousness-an under-explored nexus whose investigation is likely to reveal insights about working memory, cognitive control, and metacognition. PMID:27445897

  14. Assessing predictive capacity and conditional independence of landslide predisposing factors for shallow landslides susceptibility models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, S.; Zêzere, J. L.; Bateira, C.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the landslide predisposing factors combination, using a bivariate statistical model that best predict landslide susceptibility. The best predictive model should have a good performance in terms of suitability and predictive power, and should be based on landslide predisposing factors that are conditionally independent. The study area is the Santa Marta de Penaguião council (70 km2) located in the Northern Portugal. Several destructive landslides occurred in this area in the last decades promoting landscape degradation and other negative human and economic impacts. A landslide inventory was built in 2005-2009 using aerial photo-interpretation (1/5.000 scale) and field work validation. This inventory contains 767 shallow translational slides. The landslide density is 11 events/square kilometre, and each landslide has, on average, 136 m2 and the depth of the slip surface typically ranges from 1 to 1.5 m. The landslide layer was crossed individually with seven landslide predisposing factors (Aspect; Curvature; Slope Angle; Geomorphological Units; Land Use; Inverse Wetness Index; Lithology) and each class within each predisposing theme was weighted using the Information Value Method. In order to identify the best combination of landslide predisposing factors, all possible combinations were tested which resulted in 120 predictive models. The goodness of fit of each landslide susceptibility model was evaluated by constructing the Success Rate Curves and by computing the Area Under the Curve (AUC). The best landslide susceptibility model was selected according to the model degree of fitness and on the basis of a conditional independence criterion. Two tests were performed to the entire dataset to assess conditional independence: the Overall Conditional Independence (OCI) and the Agterberg & Cheng Conditional Independence Test (ACCIT) (Agterberg and Cheng, 2002). The best landslide susceptibility model was constructed with only three

  15. Effects of method and format on subjects' responses to a control of variables reasoning problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staver, John R.

    Excessive time and training demands have rendered Piaget's clinical method of reasoning assessment impractical for researchers and science teachers who work with large numbers of students. The published literature[Note ][See: Lawson, A. E. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1978, 15(1), 11-24; Shayer, M., Adey, P., & Wylam, H. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1981, 18(2), 157-168; Staver, J. R., & Gabel, D. L. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1979, 16(6), 534-544; Tobin, K. G., & Capie, W. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 1981, 41(2), 413-424.] indicates that reliable, valid alternatives to clinical assessment are feasible. However, the overestimate/underestimate of reasoning for different methods and formats remains unresolved through research. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various methods and formats on subjects' responses to a Piagetian reasoning problem requiring control of variables. The task chosen for this investigation was the Mealworm problem.[Note ][See: Karplus, R., Lawson, A., Wollman, W., Appel, M., Bernoff, R., Howe, A., Rusch, J., & Sullivan, F. Science teaching and the development of reasoning. Berkeley, CA: University of California, 1977.] The task was presented by three methods: (1) individual clinical interview; (2) group presentation of task followed by paper-and-pencil problem with illustration; and (3) group administration of paper-and-pencil instrument with illustration. Each method included four formats: (1) completion answer with essay justification; (2) completion answer with multiplechoice justification; (3) multiple-choice answer with essay justification; and (4) multiple-choice answer with multiple-choice justification. Two hundred and fifty-three (253) students who were enrolled in a freshman level biological science class participated in the study. The research design was a 3 × 4 factorial design with method and format of assessment as the main effects

  16. Effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Talungchit, Sineepat; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; Chayakul, Panthip; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Pruphetkaew, Nannapat

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine the effects of long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. METHODS Oral examination and measurement of saliva flow rate of both unstimulated and wax-stimulated whole saliva were performed in HIV-infected subjects with and without HAART, and in non-HIV individuals. The following data were recorded; duration and risk of HIV infection, type and duration of HAART, CD4 cell count, viral load, presence of orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral burning sensation, oral lesions, cervical caries, and periodontal pocket. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the effects of long-term use of HAART on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-seven HIV-infected subjects – 99 on HAART (age range 23–57 years, mean 39 years) and 58 not on HAART (age range 20–59 years, mean 34 years) – and 50 non-HIV controls (age range 19–59 years, mean 36 years) were enrolled. The most common HAART regimen was 2 NRTI + 2 NNRTI. HIV-infected subjects without HAART showed greater risks of having orofacial pain, oral dryness, oral lesions, and periodontal pockets than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.01). The subjects with long-term HAART were found to have a greater risk of having oral lesions than those with short-term HAART (P < 0.05). The unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates of the subjects with HAART were significantly lower than in those without HAART (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION We conclude that long-term HAART has adverse effects on oral health status of HIV-infected subjects. PMID:20202089

  17. Determining effective subject-specific strength levels for forward dives using computer simulations of recorded performances.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Kong, Pui W; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2009-12-11

    This study used optimisation procedures in conjunction with an 8-segment torque-driven computer simulation model of the takeoff phase in springboard diving to determine appropriate subject-specific strength parameters for use in the simulation of forward dives. Kinematic data were obtained using high-speed video recordings of performances of a forward dive pike (101B) and a forward 2 1/2 somersault pike dive (105B) by an elite diver. Nine parameters for each torque generator were taken from dynamometer measurements on an elite gymnast. The isometric torque parameter for each torque generator was then varied together with torque activation timings until the root mean squared (RMS) percentage difference between simulation and performance in terms of joint angles, orientation, linear momentum, angular momentum, and duration of springboard contact was minimised for each of the two dives. The two sets of isometric torque parameters were combined into a single set by choosing the larger value from the two sets for each parameter. Simulations using the combined set of isometric torque parameters matched the two performances closely with RMS percentage differences of 2.6% for 101B and 3.7% for 105B. Maximising the height reached by the mass centre during the flight phase for 101B using the combined set of isometric parameters and by varying torque generator activation timings during takeoff resulted in a credible height increase of 38 mm compared to the matching simulation. It is concluded that the procedure is able to determine appropriate effective strength levels suitable for use in the optimisation of simulated forward rotating dive performances.

  18. Effect of aerosol particle size on bronchodilatation with nebulised terbutaline in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Clay, M M; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1986-05-01

    The bronchodilatation achieved by the beta 2 agonist terbutaline sulphate given as nebulised aerosol from different devices has been measured in seven patients with mild asthma (mean FEV1 76% predicted) over two hours after inhalation. The subjects were studied on four occasions. On three visits they received 2.5 mg terbutaline delivered from three different types of nebuliser, selected on the basis of the size distribution of the aerosols generated; and on a fourth (control) visit no aerosol was given. The size distributions of the aerosols expressed in terms of their mass median diameter (MMD) were: A: MMD 1.8 microns; B: 4.6 microns; C: 10.3 microns. The aerosols were given under controlled conditions of respiratory rate and tidal volume to minimise intertreatment variation. Bronchodilator response was assessed by changes in FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal flow after expiration of 50% and 75% FVC (Vmax50, Vmax25) from baseline (before aerosol) and control run values. For each pulmonary function index all three aerosols gave significantly better improvement over baseline than was seen in the control (p less than 0.05) and had an equipotent effect on FEV1, FVC, and PEF. Aerosol A (MMD 1.8 microns) produced significantly greater improvements in Vmax50 and Vmax25 than did B or C (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that for beta 2 agonists small aerosols (MMD less than 2 microns) might be advantageous in the treatment of asthma. PMID:3750243

  19. Oxidant and acid aerosol exposure in healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Part 1. Effects of oxidants, combined with sulfuric or nitric acid, on the pulmonary function of adolescents with asthma. Part 2. Effects of sequential sulfuric acid and ozone exposures on the pulmonary function of healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Research report, February 1989-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Covert, D.S.; Pierson, W.E.; Hanley, Q.S.; Rebolledo, V.

    1994-11-01

    The study investigated the pulmonary effects of acid summer haze in a controlled laboratory setting. Of 28 adolescent subjects with allergic asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm, and a positive response to a standardized methacholine challenge enrolled in the study, 22 completed the study. For two consecutive days each subject inhaled each of four test atmospheres by mouthpiece. The order of exposure to the four test atmospheres was assigned via a random protocol; air, oxidants (0.12 parts per million (ppm) ozone plus 0.30 ppm nitrogen dioxide), oxidants plus sulfuric acid at 70 micro/m3 of air, or oxidants plus 0.05 ppm nitric acid. Exposure to each of the different atmospheres was separated by at least one week. A postexposure methacholine challenge was performed on Day 3.

  20. Differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, Tomoko; Tsuyama, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify differences in understanding and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation between user families and rehabilitation providers. [Subjects] The subjects were home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families. [Methods] Home-visit rehabilitation providers and user families completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding the content and subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation. For statistical analysis, the McNemar’s test was used. [Results] Fifty pairs of responses met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of user families was 65.0 ± 11.2 years, and 58.0% (29/50) were spouses of users (user mean age, 77.7 ± 10.2 years; 48.0% (24/50) female). With regard to home-visit rehabilitation content, user families thought that paralysis improvement exercise, massage, and self-care activities were implemented to a greater degree than did rehabilitation providers. With regard to the subjective effects of home-visit rehabilitation, a higher proportion of user families noticed “maintenance/improvement” effects on symptoms and sequelae, as well as pain and suffering, compared with providers. [Conclusion] User families believed that rehabilitation would also improve users’ symptoms and pain. Care providers should explain the aims of home-visit rehabilitation to users and their families, both of which require a strong understanding of home-visit rehabilitation in order to achieve rehabilitation goals. PMID:26834364

  1. Mixed Effects Models for Resampled Network Statistics Improves Statistical Power to Find Differences in Multi-Subject Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Manjari; Allen, Genevera I.

    2016-01-01

    Many complex brain disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, exhibit a wide range of symptoms and disability. To understand how brain communication is impaired in such conditions, functional connectivity studies seek to understand individual differences in brain network structure in terms of covariates that measure symptom severity. In practice, however, functional connectivity is not observed but estimated from complex and noisy neural activity measurements. Imperfect subject network estimates can compromise subsequent efforts to detect covariate effects on network structure. We address this problem in the case of Gaussian graphical models of functional connectivity, by proposing novel two-level models that treat both subject level networks and population level covariate effects as unknown parameters. To account for imperfectly estimated subject level networks when fitting these models, we propose two related approaches—R2 based on resampling and random effects test statistics, and R3 that additionally employs random adaptive penalization. Simulation studies using realistic graph structures reveal that R2 and R3 have superior statistical power to detect covariate effects compared to existing approaches, particularly when the number of within subject observations is comparable to the size of subject networks. Using our novel models and methods to study parts of the ABIDE dataset, we find evidence of hypoconnectivity associated with symptom severity in autism spectrum disorders, in frontoparietal and limbic systems as well as in anterior and posterior cingulate cortices. PMID:27147940

  2. Mixed Effects Models for Resampled Network Statistics Improves Statistical Power to Find Differences in Multi-Subject Functional Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Manjari; Allen, Genevera I

    2016-01-01

    Many complex brain disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, exhibit a wide range of symptoms and disability. To understand how brain communication is impaired in such conditions, functional connectivity studies seek to understand individual differences in brain network structure in terms of covariates that measure symptom severity. In practice, however, functional connectivity is not observed but estimated from complex and noisy neural activity measurements. Imperfect subject network estimates can compromise subsequent efforts to detect covariate effects on network structure. We address this problem in the case of Gaussian graphical models of functional connectivity, by proposing novel two-level models that treat both subject level networks and population level covariate effects as unknown parameters. To account for imperfectly estimated subject level networks when fitting these models, we propose two related approaches-R (2) based on resampling and random effects test statistics, and R (3) that additionally employs random adaptive penalization. Simulation studies using realistic graph structures reveal that R (2) and R (3) have superior statistical power to detect covariate effects compared to existing approaches, particularly when the number of within subject observations is comparable to the size of subject networks. Using our novel models and methods to study parts of the ABIDE dataset, we find evidence of hypoconnectivity associated with symptom severity in autism spectrum disorders, in frontoparietal and limbic systems as well as in anterior and posterior cingulate cortices.

  3. Biomarkers of Dose and Effect of Inhaled Ozone in Resting versus Exercising Human Subjects: Comparison with Resting Rats.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Gary E; McKee, John; Brown, James; McDonnell, William; Seal, Elston; Soukup, Joleen; Slade, Ralph; Crissman, Kay; Devlin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To determine the influence of exercise on pulmonary dose of inhaled pollutants, we compared biomarkers of inhaled ozone (O3) dose and toxic effect between exercise levels in humans, and between humans and rats. Resting human subjects were exposed to labeled O3 ((18)O3, 0.4 ppm, for 2 hours) and alveolar O3 dose measured as the concentration of excess (18)O in cells and extracellular material of nasal, bronchial, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We related O3 dose to effects (changes in BALF protein, LDH, IL-6, and antioxidant substances) measurable in the BALF. A parallel study of resting subjects examined lung function (FEV1) changes following O3. Subjects exposed while resting had (18)O concentrations in BALF cells that were 1/5th of those of exercising subjects and directly proportional to the amount of O3 breathed during exposure. Quantitative measures of alveolar O3 dose and toxicity that were observed previously in exercising subjects were greatly reduced or non-observable in O3 exposed resting subjects. Resting rats and resting humans were found to have a similar alveolar O3 dose.

  4. The effect of acute ethanol consumption on the human retinal circulation: a study in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Dhasmana, D; Herbert, L; Patel, V; Chen, H C; Jones, M; Kohner, E M

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol consumption on retinal haemodynamics and retinal vascular autoregulation to oxygen in the human retinal circulation were studied in 10 diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 38.2 +/- 11.1) and 16 non-diabetic (mean age +/- SD: 32.4 +/- 8.8) subjects. Subjects drank 0.5 g of ethanol, as vodka, per kg of body weight, diluted in sugar-free orange juice. Retinal blood flow was determined using laser Doppler velocimetry and computerised image analysis. The effect of ethanol on oxygen reactivity, as a measure of autoregulation, was also determined after 60% oxygen inhalation. All subjects demonstrated a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure (control group 3.3%, p = 0.04, diabetic subjects 5.7%, p = 0.05), after ethanol intake. Ethanol caused no significant change in retinal blood flow. Oxygen reactivity was found to be 38.3% (22.4-47.7, median and interquartile range) in the non-diabetic subjects at baseline, and 30.7% (10.8-42.1) after ethanol ingestion. In diabetic subjects, the oxygen reactivity was 33.2% (19.8-46.8) at baseline and 24.5% (21.1-32.1) after ethanol. In this study ethanol did not significantly affect retinal blood flow or impair autoregulation. These results suggest that the retinal circulation may be able to autoregulate despite the presence of ethanol, in contrast to other vascular beds where ethanol changes flow. PMID:7819729

  5. Soft drinks with aspartame: effect on subjective hunger, food selection, and food intake of young adult males.

    PubMed

    Black, R M; Tanaka, P; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1991-04-01

    Ingestion of aspartame-sweetened beverages has been reported to increase subjective measures of appetite. This study examined the effects of familiar carbonated soft drinks sweetened with aspartame on subjective hunger, energy intake and macronutrient selection at a lunch-time meal. Subjects were 20 normal weight young adult males, classified as either restrained or nonrestrained eaters. Four treatments of carbonated beverages included 280 ml of mineral water, one can of a soft drink (280 ml) consumed in either 2 or 10 minutes, or two cans of a soft drink (560 ml) consumed in 10 minutes, administered at 11:00 a.m. Subjective hunger and food appeal were measured from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and food intake data were obtained from a buffet lunch given at 12:00 noon. There were no treatment effects on energy intake, macronutrient selection or food choice at the lunch-time meal, or food appeal, though restrained eaters consumed more than nonrestrained eaters in all four treatment conditions. Consumption of two soft drinks (560 ml, 320 mg aspartame) significantly reduced subjective hunger from 11:05 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. compared to one soft drink (280 ml, 160 mg aspartame) or 280 ml of mineral water. Thus ingestion of soft drinks containing aspartame did not increase short-term subjective hunger or food intake.

  6. Protective Effects of Quercetin on Selected Oxidative Biomarkers in Bovine Spermatozoa Subjected to Ferrous Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Tvrdá, E; Tušimová, E; Kováčik, A; Paál, D; Libová, Ľ; Lukáč, N

    2016-08-01

    Quercetin (QUE) is a natural flavonol-type flavonoid with antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-aggregatory properties. It is also a powerful reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger and chelating agent. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of QUE to reverse ROS-mediated alterations to the motility, viability and intracellular antioxidant profile of bovine spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were washed out of fresh bovine semen, suspended in 2.9% sodium citrate and subjected to QUE treatment (7.5, 25, 50 and 100 μmol/l) in the presence or absence of a pro-oxidant, that is ferrous ascorbate (FeAA; 150 μmol/l FeSO4 and 750 μmol/l ascorbic acid) during a 6-h in vitro culture. Spermatozoa motion characteristics were assessed using the SpermVision computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) system. Cell viability was examined with the metabolic activity (MTT) assay, ROS generation was quantified via luminometry, and the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test was applied to quantify the intracellular superoxide formation. Cell lysates were prepared at the end of the in vitro culture to investigate the intracellular activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). FeAA treatment led to a reduced sperm motility (p < 0.001), viability (p < 0.001) and decreased the antioxidant parameters of the sperm samples (p < 0.001) but increased the ROS generation (p < 0.001), superoxide production (p < 0.001) and lipid peroxidation (p < 0.001). QUE administration resulted in a preservation of the spermatozoa vitality and antioxidant characteristics (p < 0.01 with respect to the enzymatic antioxidants, p < 0.001 in relation to GSH) with a concentration range of 50-100 μmol/l QUE revealing to be the most effective. Our results suggest that QUE exhibits significant ROS-scavenging and metal-chelating properties which may prevent spermatozoa alterations

  7. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, p<0.05) after training. Muscle desaturation was not enhanced by low volume aerobic training in this study, possibly because the training volume was too low. However, our findings suggest that aerobic training may potentially enhance muscle desaturation at peak exercise in elderly subjects.

  8. Effect of positive acceleration (+gz) on electrocardiogram of subjects with vasoregulatory abnormality.

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, P K; Balasubramanian, K V; Dham, S K; Rai, K; Hoon, R S

    1977-01-01

    ST-T wave changes in the electrocardiogram detected during routine examination and aggravated by erect posture, hyperventilation, and exercise in apparently healthy young individuals have been termed vasoregulatory abnormalities. No evidence of ischaemic heart disease has been found in such subjects. Ten young healthy air crew with vasoregulatory abnormalities were subjected to maximal exercise on treadmill and procedure repeated after 120 mg propranolol daily for 3 days. After one week, they were subjected to a stress of positive acceleration (+gz) in a human centrifuge at 2-5 g and 3-5 g for 15 seconds each at a constant rate of rise of 0-1 g/s and the electrocardiogram was monitored during and in the post-acceleration phase. The procedure was repeated after propranolol 120 mg daily for 3 days. The stress of positive acceleration resulted in pronounced prominence of P waves and inversion of T waves (as has been reported in normal subjects) with minimal ST depression in the electrocardiogram. ST segment depression during exercise, at heart rates corresponding to those achieved during peak centrifuge runs, was significantly more pronounced. The ST, P, and T wave changes were returned to normal after propranolol. It is concluded that minimal ST segment depression after stress of positive acceleration as compared with conspicuous ST segment depression during exercise at corresponding heart rates, and their normalisation after propranolol, rules out ischaemia as an aetiological factor in subjects with vasoregulatory abnormalities. Images PMID:849393

  9. Subjective effects of antidepressants: a pilot study of the varieties of antidepressant-induced experiences in meditators.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Robin; Hillman, Lorena; Victor, Bruce; Walsh, Roger

    2003-10-01

    The use of antidepressants continues to increase, yet relatively little is known about their precise subjective effects, and there is growing concern about subtle psychological side effects. One novel investigative approach to these problems may be to use introspectively trained subjects such as meditators. Experienced meditators recently taking antidepressants rated antidepressant effects on multiple dimensions of experience and reported significant emotional, motivational, and cognitive effects and benefits. This study suggests that a) meditators may benefit both clinically and meditatively from antidepressants, b) meditators may provide significant novel information on antidepressant effects, c) meditators may prove valuable for phenomenological investigations of psychopathology, drug effects, and therapies, d) meditation may prove a helpful maintenance therapy for depression, and e) enhanced equanimity may contribute to the broad therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants.

  10. Effect of N-acetylcysteine in subjects with slow pulmonary mucociliary clearance.

    PubMed

    Todisco, T; Polidori, R; Rossi, F; Iannacci, L; Bruni, B; Fedeli, L; Palumbo, R

    1985-01-01

    There is significant evidence that in the general population there are subjects either with fast or slow pulmonary mucociliary clearance rates. At the moment we do not know the physiological importance of such finding. Slow clearers should be regarded as a subpopulation at risk for bronchopulmonary diseases. Therefore, it would be of considerable interest if their mucociliary function could be stimulated by drugs for preventive purposes. Twelve apparently healthy subjects with slow mucociliary clearance rate, selected in an epidemiologic survey in a non-smokers population were given 0.6 g oral N-acetylcysteine/day/60 days in a double-blind cross-over randomized study. After treatment their mucociliary clearance rates increased by about 35% as compared with baseline values, and returned to pre-treatment values after the washout period. Subjects were unresponsive to placebo treatment. It would seem that slow clearers are protected against lung aggressions by prevention and/or mucus-active drugs.

  11. Arginine‐16 β2 adrenoceptor genotype predisposes to exacerbations in young asthmatics taking regular salmeterol

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C N A; Lipworth, B J; Lee, S; Ismail, T; Macgregor, D F; Mukhopadhyay, S

    2006-01-01

    Background The homozygous presence of the arginine‐16 variant of the β2 adrenoceptor gene ADRB2 reverses the benefits from the regular use of short acting β2 agonists in asthmatic adults compared with the homozygous glycine‐16 genotype. We studied the effect of this polymorphic variation on asthma exacerbations in children and young adults and its relation to long acting β2 agonists. Methods A cross‐sectional survey was undertaken using electronic records, direct interviews, and genotype determination of position 16 and 27 of the ADRB2 gene in DNA from mouthwash samples of 546 children and young asthmatics attending paediatric and young adult asthma clinics in Tayside, Scotland during 2004–5. The primary outcome measure was asthma exacerbations over the previous 6 months. Results There was an increased hazard of asthma exacerbations across all treatment steps of the British Thoracic Society (BTS) asthma guidelines when the homozygous genotypes Arg/Arg and Gly/Gly were compared (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.53, p = 0.010), particularly in patients treated with salmeterol (OR 3.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 9.40, p = 0.022). The Glu27Gln polymorphism had no significant effect on asthma exacerbations in any treatment group. Conclusions The arginine‐16 genotype of ADRB2 predisposes to exacerbations in asthmatic children and young adults, particularly in those exposed to regular salmeterol. This may be explained by genotype selective salmeterol induced downregulation and impaired receptor coupling, and associated subsensitivity of the response. PMID:16772309

  12. A nonsense polymorphism (R392X) in TLR5 protects from obesity but predisposes to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Clerici, Mario; Al-Attas, Omar; Forni, Diego; Alokail, Majed S; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sabico, Shaun; Mohammed, Abdul Khader; Cagliani, Rachele; Sironi, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    The TLR5 gene encodes an innate immunity receptor. Mice lacking Tlr5 (T5KO) develop insulin resistance and increased adiposity. Owing to the segregation of a dominant nonsense polymorphism (R392X, rs5744168), a portion of humans lack TLR5 function. We investigated whether the nonsense polymorphism influences obesity and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). R392X was genotyped in two cohorts from Saudi Arabia, a region where obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are highly prevalent. The nonsense allele was found to protect from obesity (p(combined) = 0.0062; odds ratio, 0.51) and to associate with lower body mass index (BMI) (p(combined) = 0.0061); this allele also correlated with a reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines. A significant interaction was noted between rs5744168 and sex in affecting BMI (p(interaction) = 0.006), and stratification by gender revealed that the association is driven by females (p(combined) = 0.0016 and 0.0006 for obesity and BMI, respectively). The nonsense polymorphism also associated with BMI in nonobese women. After correction for BMI, the 392X allele was found to represent a risk factor for T2D with a sex-specific effect (p(interaction) = 0.023) mediated by females (p = 0.021; odds ratio, 2.60). Fasting plasma glucose levels in nondiabetic individuals were also higher in women carrying the nonsense allele (p = 0.012). Thus, in contrast to T5KO mice, loss of human TLR5 function protects from weight gain, but in analogy to the animal model, the nonsense allele predisposes to T2D. These effects are apparently sex-specific. Data in this study reinforce the hypothesis that metabolic diseases, including T2D, are associated with immune dysregulation.

  13. Respiratory effects of 2-hr exposure to 1. 0 ppm nitric oxide in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, J.

    1982-04-01

    Eight adult healthy male volunteers were exposed to 1.0 ppm nitric oxide (NO) with intermittent light exercise for 2 hr. No one showed any symptoms during NO exposure. A small, but significant, decrease of specific airway conductance was observed in half of the subjects. As a group, a significant reduction of the percentage increase of maximal expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity while breathing a He-O/sub 2/ gas mixture as compared with air was observed among various pulmonary function tests. These results suggested that some physiological response to NO exposure might be observed in some subjects when performing exercise.

  14. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kido, Megumi; Asakawa, Akihiro; Koyama, Ken-Ichiro K; Takaoka, Toshio; Tajima, Aya; Takaoka, Shigeru; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Takamine, Kazunori T; Sameshima, Yoshihiro; Inui, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m(2)) consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol) or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC) value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into consideration

  15. Acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on blood glucose and polysomnography levels in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Megumi; Asakawa, Akihiro; Koyama, Ken-Ichiro K.; Takaoka, Toshio; Tajima, Aya; Takaoka, Shigeru; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Okutsu, Kayu; Takamine, Kazunori T.; Sameshima, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol consumption is a lifestyle factor associated with type 2 diabetes. This relationship is reportedly different depending on the type of alcohol beverage. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effects of traditional Japanese alcohol beverages on biochemical parameters, physical and emotional state, and sleep patterns. Methods. Six healthy subjects (three men and three women; age, 28.8 ± 9.5 years; body mass index, 21.4 ± 1.6 kg/m2) consumed three different types of alcohol beverages (beer, shochu, and sake, each with 40 g ethanol) or mineral water with dinner on different days in the hospital. Blood samples were collected before and 1, 2, and 12 h after drinking each beverage, and assessments of physical and emotional state were administered at the same time. In addition, sleep patterns and brain waves were examined using polysomnography. Results. Blood glucose levels at 1 h and the 12-h area under the curve (AUC) value after drinking shochu were significantly lower than that with water and beer. The 12-h blood insulin AUC value after drinking shochu was significantly lower than that with beer. Blood glucose × insulin level at 1 h and the 2-h blood glucose × insulin AUC value with shochu were significantly lower than that with beer. The insulinogenic indexes at 2 h with beer and sake, but not shochu, were significantly higher than that with water. The visual analogue scale scores of physical and emotional state showed that the tipsiness levels with beer, shochu, and sake at 1 h were significantly higher than that with water. These tipsiness levels were maintained at 2 h. The polysomnography showed that the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency with shochu and sake were shorter than that with water and beer. Conclusions. Acute consumption of alcohol beverages with a meal resulted in different responses in postprandial glucose and insulin levels as well as REM sleep latency. Alcohol beverage type should be taken into consideration

  16. Identifying Some Factors That Might Predispose Drug Abuse among Learners in a South African Township School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobler, R.; Khatite, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study inquires into some of the factors that might predispose the use and abuse of drugs among secondary school learners in a township school. The objective of this research is to identify these factors and to offer a few suggestions on how the abuse may be prevented. A quantitative research strategy is used and a document analysis technique…

  17. Predisposing, Precipitating, Perpetuating, Professional Help, and Prevention Factors of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Chanko, Cathy

    This report describes an eating disorder as a multi-dimensional physiological, psychological, social, and cultural illness. A chart describing the typical anorexic and bulimic is included which has on its horizontal axis the predisposing, precipitating, perpetuating, professional help, and prevention factors of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. On its…

  18. APOH interacts with FTO to predispose to healthy thinness.

    PubMed

    Hasstedt, Sandra J; Coon, Hilary; Xin, Yuanpei; Adams, Ted D; Hunt, Steven C

    2016-02-01

    We identified eight candidate thinness predisposition variants from the Illumina HumanExome chip genotyped on members of pedigrees selected for either healthy thinness or severe obesity. For validation, we tested the candidates for association with healthy thinness in additional pedigree members while accounting for effects of obesity-associated genes: NPFFR2, NPY2R, FTO, and MC4R. Significance was obtained for the interaction of FTO rs9939609 with APOH missense variant rs52797880 (minor allele frequency 0.054). The thinness odds ratio was estimated as 2.15 (p < 0.05) for the combination of APOH heterozygote with the homozygote for the non-obesity FTO allele. Significance was not obtained for any other combination of a candidate variant with an obesity gene or for any of the eight candidates tested independently.

  19. Depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction: within-subject associations and the moderating effects of gender and neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Davila, Joanne; Karney, Benjamin R; Hall, Todd W; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2003-12-01

    Given the emphasis on within-subject associations between depression and marital quality in recent theory and practice, this study was undertaken with three goals: to examine within-subject associations between depressive symptoms and marital quality over time, to address gender differences in the magnitude and direction of these associations, and to determine whether neuroticism moderates the strength of these associations. A total of 164 newly wed couples provided 8 waves of data over 4 years of marriage. Hierarchical linear modeling confirmed the existence of bidirectional within-subject associations between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms. Gender differences were rarely significant. Although neuroticism strengthened the effect of marital distress on symptoms as predicted, it weakened the effect of symptoms on marital distress among husbands. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Effects of Counselor Disability Status on Disabled Subjects' Perceptions of Counselor Attractiveness and Expertness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; Biggs, Donald A.

    1983-01-01

    Studied the influence of client-counselor group membership similarity, counselor reputation cues, and attending behavior on disabled subject's perceptions. Physically disabled adults (N=40) viewed a series of vignettes and rated counselor expertness and attractiveness. Results do not support the belief that client-counselor group membership…

  1. Effect of displacement, velocity, and combined vibrotactile tilt feedback on postural control of vestibulopathic subjects.

    PubMed

    Wall, C; Kentala, E

    2010-01-01

    Vibrotactile tilt feedback was used to help vestibulopathic subjects control their anterioposterior (AP) sway during sensory organization tests 5 and 6 of Equitest computerized dynamic posturography. We used four kinds of signals to activate the feedback. The first signal was proportional (P) to the measured tilt of the subject, while the second used the first derivative (D) of the tilt. The third signal was the sum of the proportional and one half of the first derivative signals (PD). The final signal used a prediction of the subject's sway projected 100 msec in advance. The signals were used to activate vibrators mounted on the front of the torso to signal forward motion, and on the back of the torso for backward motion. Subject responses varied significantly with the kind of feedback signal. Proportional and derivative feedback resulted in similar root mean squared tilt, but the PD signal significantly reduced the tilt compared to either P or D feedback. The predicted motion signal also reduced the response compared to the PD signal. These preliminary results are somewhat consistent with an inverted pendulum model of postural control, but need to be confirmed with a larger study that also considers mediolateral tilt and feedback. The improvement by using a predictor is consistent with compensating for a neural processing delay. PMID:20555168

  2. Effects of individual sound sources on the subjective loudness and acoustic comfort in underground shopping streets.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Qi; Jin, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human evaluation of subjective loudness and acoustic comfort depends on a series of factors in a particular situation rather than only on sound pressure levels. In the present study, a large-scale subjective survey has been undertaken on underground shopping streets in Harbin, China, to determine how individual sound sources influence subjective loudness and acoustic comfort evaluation. Based on the analysis of case study results, it has been shown that all individual sound sources can increase subjective loudness to a certain degree. However, their levels of influence on acoustic comfort are different. Background music and the public address system can increase acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of 0.18 to 0.32 and 0.21 to 0.27, respectively, where a five-point bipolar category scale is used. Music from shops and vendor shouts can decrease acoustic comfort, with a mean difference of -0.11 to -0.38 and -0.39 to -0.62, respectively. The feasibility of improving acoustic comfort by changing certain sound sources is thus demonstrated.

  3. Ideograms Versus Alphabets: Effects of Script on Memory in "Biscriptual" Korean Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Soja; Arbuckle, Tannis Y.

    1977-01-01

    Four experiments examined the memory of Korean subjects for words written in the two writing systems used in Korea, one alphabetic, the other ideographic. The impetus for the investigation was the apparently different encoding properties of the two scripts, with alphabets seeming to encode sound and ideograms, meaning. (Editor)

  4. Effect of 6-day hypokinesia on oxygen metabolism indices in elderly and senile subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, L. A.; Orlov, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    After a strict 6 day confinement to bed of elderly and senile subjects the oxygen supply of the subcutaneous cellular tissue was impaired, and the intensity of its tissue respiration was somewhat reduced. The vacat-oxygen of the blood and urine, the coefficient of incomplete oxidation, and the oxygen deficiency in the organism were increased.

  5. Effects of industrial respirator wear during exercise in subjects with restrictive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hodous, T.K.; Boyles, C.; Hankinson, J.

    1986-03-01

    Few studies have examined the response of individuals with restrictive lung disease (RLD) to respirator wear. Such information should be of theoretical and practical interest when the need to determine fitness to wear respirators is considered. Seventeen females performed progressive submaximal treadmill exercise. Twelve control subjects with total lung capacity (TLC) = 5.71 +/- .19L (mean +/- SEM) and DLCO = 25.8 +/- 1.0 mL/min/mm Hg were compared to five RLD subjects with TLC + 3.70 +/- 0.22 and DLCO = 14.5 +/- 0.7. Mean age, height and weight were similar. Separate exercise trials were performed with no added resistance (NAR), and with 5 cm H/sub 2/O/L/sec inspiratory and 1.5 cm H/sub 2/O/L/sec expiratory resistance (R/sub 2/) to simulate widely used respiratory masks. Comparisons of exercise data were made at an oxygen consumption of 0.8 L/min. With NAR, RLD subjects had significantly higher minute ventilation (V/sub E/) (29.0 vs. 21.2 L/min for controls), higher respiratory rate (RR), and lower tidal volume (V/sub T/). Heart rate, end-tidal PCO/sub 2/ (P/sub ET/CO/sub 2/), and mouth pressure swing (Poral) were not different from control values. With R/sub 2/ compared to NAR, the controls had reduced RR and V/sub E/; and increased V/sub T/, P/sub ET/CO/sub 2/, and Poral. While changes with R/sub 2/ for the RLD subjects were in the same directions as controls, only the increase in Poral was statistically significant. Analysis of the differences showed that none of the changes with R/sub 2/ in RLD subjects was different from control changes except for the greater increase in Poral and the smaller increase in V/sub T/. The former was explained by the RLD subjects' higher V/sub E/ and flow rates, and the non-linear nature of R/sub 2/ at higher flow rates. Our data suggest that the stress to RLD subjects of the resistance used is minor compared to that of mild exercise.

  6. Hypothesis: conjugate vaccines may predispose children to autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Richmand, Brian J

    2011-12-01

    The first conjugate vaccine was approved for use in the US in 1988 to protect infants and young children against the capsular bacteria Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Since its introduction in the US, this vaccine has been approved in most developed countries, including Denmark and Israel where the vaccine was added to their national vaccine programs in 1993 and 1994, respectively. There have been marked increases in the reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among children in the US beginning with birth cohorts in the late 1980s and in Denmark and Israel starting approximately 4-5 years later. Although these increases may partly reflect ascertainment biases, an exogenous trigger could explain a significant portion of the reported increases in ASDs. It is hypothesized here that the introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine in the US in 1988 and its subsequent introduction in Denmark and Israel could explain a substantial portion of the initial increases in ASDs in those countries. The continuation of the trend toward increased rates of ASDs could be further explained by increased usage of the vaccine, a change in 1990 in the recommended age of vaccination in the US from 15 to 2 months, increased immunogenicity of the vaccine through changes in its carrier protein, and the subsequent introduction of the conjugate vaccine for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although conjugate vaccines have been highly effective in protecting infants and young children from the significant morbidity and mortality caused by Hib and S. pneumoniae, the potential effects of conjugate vaccines on neural development merit close examination. Conjugate vaccines fundamentally change the manner in which the immune systems of infants and young children function by deviating their immune responses to the targeted carbohydrate antigens from a state of hypo-responsiveness to a robust B2 B cell mediated response. This period of hypo-responsiveness to carbohydrate antigens coincides

  7. Hypothesis: conjugate vaccines may predispose children to autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Richmand, Brian J

    2011-12-01

    The first conjugate vaccine was approved for use in the US in 1988 to protect infants and young children against the capsular bacteria Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Since its introduction in the US, this vaccine has been approved in most developed countries, including Denmark and Israel where the vaccine was added to their national vaccine programs in 1993 and 1994, respectively. There have been marked increases in the reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among children in the US beginning with birth cohorts in the late 1980s and in Denmark and Israel starting approximately 4-5 years later. Although these increases may partly reflect ascertainment biases, an exogenous trigger could explain a significant portion of the reported increases in ASDs. It is hypothesized here that the introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine in the US in 1988 and its subsequent introduction in Denmark and Israel could explain a substantial portion of the initial increases in ASDs in those countries. The continuation of the trend toward increased rates of ASDs could be further explained by increased usage of the vaccine, a change in 1990 in the recommended age of vaccination in the US from 15 to 2 months, increased immunogenicity of the vaccine through changes in its carrier protein, and the subsequent introduction of the conjugate vaccine for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although conjugate vaccines have been highly effective in protecting infants and young children from the significant morbidity and mortality caused by Hib and S. pneumoniae, the potential effects of conjugate vaccines on neural development merit close examination. Conjugate vaccines fundamentally change the manner in which the immune systems of infants and young children function by deviating their immune responses to the targeted carbohydrate antigens from a state of hypo-responsiveness to a robust B2 B cell mediated response. This period of hypo-responsiveness to carbohydrate antigens coincides

  8. Aging predisposes to acute inflammatory induced pathology after tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Zamora, Anthony E.; Maverakis, Emanual; Wilkins, Danice E.C.; Alderson, Kory L.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Redelman, Doug; Taub, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer commonly occurs in the elderly and immunotherapy (IT) is being increasingly applied to this population. However, the majority of preclinical mouse tumor models assessing potential efficacy and toxicities of therapeutics use young mice. We assessed the impact of age on responses to systemic immune stimulation. In contrast to young mice, systemic cancer IT regimens or LPS given to aged mice resulted in rapid and lethal toxicities affecting multiple organs correlating with heightened proinflammatory cytokines systemically and within the parenchymal tissues. This inflammatory response and increased morbidity with age was independent of T cells or NK cells. However, prior in vivo depletion of macrophages in aged mice resulted in lesser cytokine levels, increased survival, and decreased liver histopathology. Furthermore, macrophages from aged mice and normal human elderly volunteers displayed heightened TNF and IL-6 production upon in vitro stimulation. Treatment of both TNF knockout mice and in vivo TNF blockade in aged mice resulted in significant increases in survival and lessened pathology. Importantly, TNF blockade in tumor-bearing, aged mice receiving IT displayed significant anti-tumor effects. These data demonstrate the critical role of macrophages in the age-associated hyper-inflammatory cytokine responses to systemic immunostimulation and underscore the importance of performing preclinical assessments in aged mice. PMID:24081947

  9. Analysis of Predisposing Factors for Hearing Loss in Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Seob; Choi, Hyo Geun; Jang, Jeong Hun; Sim, Songyong; Hong, Sung Kwang; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Hyung-Jong

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to estimate the effects of various risk factors on hearing level in Korean adults, using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We examined data from 13,369 participants collected between 2009 and 2011. Average hearing thresholds at low (0.5, 1, and 2 kHz) and high frequencies (3, 4, and 6 kHz), were investigated in accordance with various known risk factors via multiple regression analysis featuring complex sampling. We additionally evaluated data from 4,810 participants who completed a questionnaire concerned with different types of noise exposure. Low body mass index, absence of hyperlipidemia, history of diabetes mellitus, low incomes, low educational status, and smoking were associated with elevated low frequency hearing thresholds. In addition, male sex, low body mass index, absence of hyperlipidemia, low income, low educational status, smoking, and heavy alcohol consumption were associated with elevated high frequency hearing thresholds. Participants with a history of earphone use in noisy circumstances demonstrated hearing thresholds which were 1.024 dB (95% CI: 0.176 to 1.871; P = 0.018) higher, at low-frequencies, compared to participants without a history of earphone use. Our study suggests that low BMI, absence of hyperlipidemia, low household income, and low educational status are related with hearing loss in Korean adults. Male sex, smoking, and heavy alcohol use are related with high frequency hearing loss. A history of earphone use in noisy circumstances is also related with hearing loss.

  10. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  11. Sustained-Release Buprenorphine (RBP-6000) Blocks the Effects of Opioid Challenge With Hydromorphone in Subjects With Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Azmi F; Greenwald, Mark K; Vince, Bradley; Fudala, Paul J; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Liu, Yongzhen; Jones, J P; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-01

    A major goal for the treatment of opioid use disorder is to reduce or eliminate the use of illicit opioids. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist and kappa opioid receptor antagonist, is now being developed as a monthly, sustained-release formulation (RBP-6000). The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RBP-6000 blocks the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of the μ-opioid receptor agonist hydromorphone (intramuscularly administered) in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder. Subjects were first inducted and dose stabilized on sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone (8-24 mg daily; dose expressed as the buprenorphine component), then received two subcutaneous injections of RBP-6000 (300 mg) on Day 1 and Day 29. Hydromorphone challenges (6 mg, 18 mg or placebo administered in randomized order) occurred on 3 consecutive days of each study week before and after receiving RBP-6000. Subjects reported their responses to each challenge on various 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). Subjects also completed a choice task to assess the reinforcing efficacy of each hydromorphone dose relative to money. At baseline, mean "drug liking" VAS scores for hydromorphone 18 mg and 6 mg versus placebo were 61 mm (95% confidence interval, 52.3-68.9) and 45 mm (95% confidence interval, 37.2-53.6), respectively. After 300 mg RBP-6000 was administered, mean VAS score differences from placebo were less than 10 mm through week 12. The reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone decreased in a parallel manner. This study demonstrated that RBP-6000 at a 300 mg dose provides durable and potent blockade of the subjective effects and reinforcing efficacy of hydromorphone in subjects with moderate or severe opioid use disorder.

  12. Can brain dysfunction be a predisposing factor for metabolic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram B; Pella, Daniel; Mechirova, Viola; Otsuka, Kuniaki

    2004-10-01

    The various mechanisms that may explain the association between brain dysfunction and the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MS) leading to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes have been reviewed. A Medline search was conducted until September 2003, and articles published in various national and international journals were reviewed. Experts working in the field were also consulted. Compelling evidence was found that saturated and total fat and low dietary n-3 fatty acids and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in conjunction with sedentary behavior and mental stress combined with various personality traits can enhance sympathetic activity and increase the secretion of catecholamine, cortisol and serotonin, all of which appear to be underlying mechanisms involved in MS. Excess secretion of these neurotransmitters in conjunction with underlying long-chain PUFA deficiency may damage the neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus and insulin receptors in the brain, in particular during fetal life, infancy and childhood, and lead to their dysfunction. Since 30-50% of the fatty acids in the brain are long-chain PUFAs, especially omega-3 fatty acids which are incorporated in the cell membrane phospholipids, it is possible that their supplementation may have a protective effect. Omega-3 fatty acids are also known to enhance parasympathetic activity and to increase the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as acetylecholine in the hippocampus. It is possible that a marginal deficiency of long-chain PUFAs, especially n-3 fatty acids, due to poor dietary intake during the critical period of brain growth and development in the fetus, and later in the infant and also possibly in the child, adolescent and adult may enhance the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) interleukin (IL)-1, 2 and 6 and cause neuronal dysfunction. Experimental studies indicate that ventromedial hypothalamic lesions in rats induce hyperphagia, resulting in

  13. [Host and environmental factors predisposing to cancer development].

    PubMed

    Kono, Suminori

    2010-04-01

    Descriptive epidemiology, particularly regarding the cancer pattern in Japanese and Koreans in the United States, indicates that lifestyle factors contribute substantially to the development of common cancers such as gastric, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. Sex and age are important determinants of many cancers, and the variation in cancer incidence according to these factors is also indicative of the role of environmental factors. While cancer of first-degree relatives or parental cancer was related to an approximately 2-fold increased risk for most site-specific cancers, a large Scandinavian twin study suggested that the contribution of genetic factors was generally small and that a statistically significant effect of hereditable factors was observed only for prostate, colorectal and breast cancers. It was roughly estimated in this article that infectious agents contributed to 20% of incident cases of cancer in Japan. In a recent cohort study in Japan, it is estimated that 29% of male cancers and 3% of female cancers can be ascribed to smoking. Among other lifestyle factors, alcohol consumption and obesity have provided convincing evidence as factors conferring increased risks of various cancers. The increased risks of colorectal cancer and breast cancer associated with alcohol drinking have been recently acknowledged internationally. Among dietary factors, red meat, aflatoxin and beta-carotene are considered to increase risks of colorectal, liver and lung cancers, respectively. Vegetables and fruits probably decrease the risk of cancer at various sites, and calcium specifically decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. Evidence for increased risk of gastric cancer associated with salted foods is judged to be not sufficient, although a high-salt diet enhanced gastric cancer in animals infected with Helicobacter pylori. The role of dietary factors in cancer development will be more clearly established by research on gene-environment interaction focusing on

  14. Do founder mutations characteristic of some cancer sites also predispose to pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Lener, Marcin R; Scott, Rodney J; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Baszuk, Piotr; Cybulski, Cezary; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Pietrzak, Sandra; Soluch, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the etiology and risk of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still poorly understood. This study evaluated the prevalence of 10 Polish founder mutations in four genes among PaCa patients and assessed their possible association with the risk of disease in Poland. In the study 383 PaCa patients and 4,000 control subjects were genotyped for founder mutations in: BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G > A, del5395, I157T), NBS1 (657del5) and PALB2 (509_510delGA, 172_175delTTGT). A statistically significant association between the 657del5 mutation and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed for NBS1 gene. The Slavic NBS1 gene mutation (657delACAAA) was detected in 8 of 383 (2.09%) unselected cases compared with 22 of 4,000 (0.55%) controls (OR: 3.80, p = 0.002). The PALB2 509_510delGA and 172_175delTTGT mutations combined were seen in 2 (0.52%) unselected cases of PaCa and in 8 (0.20%) of 4,000 controls (OR: 2.61, p = 0.49). For BRCA1, the three mutations combined were detected in 4 of 383 (1.04%) PaCa patients and in 17 of 4,000 (0.42%) controls (OR: 2.46, p = 0.20). CHEK2 mutations were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.11, p = 0.72). The founder mutation in NBS1 (657del5) was associated with an increased risk of PaCa in heterozygous carriers, indicating that this mutation appears to predispose to cancer of the pancreas. By identifying pancreatic cancer risk groups, founder mutation testing in Poland should be considered for people at risk for PaCa. PMID:27038244

  15. Nicotine content and abstinence state have different effects on subjective ratings of positive versus negative reinforcement from smoking.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Kimberly P; Bracken, Bethany K; Maclean, Robert R; Ryan, Elizabeth T; Lukas, Scott E; Frederick, Blaise Deb

    2013-02-01

    Despite the well-known adverse health consequences of smoking, approximately 20% of US adults smoke tobacco cigarettes. Much of the research on smoking reinforcement and the maintenance of tobacco smoking behavior has focused on nicotine; however, a number of other non-nicotine factors are likely to influence the reinforcing effects of smoked tobacco. A growing number of studies suggest that non-nicotine factors, through many pairings with nicotine, are partially responsible for the reinforcing effect of smoking. Additionally, both clinical studies and preclinical advances in our understanding of nicotinic receptor regulation suggest that abstinence from smoking may influence smoking reinforcement. These experiments were conducted for 2 reasons: to validate a MRI-compatible cigarette smoking device; and to simultaneously investigate the impact of nicotine, smoking-associated conditioned reinforcers, and smoking abstinence state on subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement. Participants smoked nicotine and placebo cigarettes through an fMRI compatible device in an overnight-abstinent state or in a nonabstinent state, after having smoked a cigarette 25minutes prior. Outcome measures were within-subject changes in physiology and subjective ratings of craving and drug effect during the smoking of nicotine or placebo cigarettes on different days in both abstinence states. Cigarette type (nicotine vs. placebo) had a significant effect on positive subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement ("High", "Like Drug", "Feel Drug"; nicotine>placebo). In contrast, abstinence state was found to have significant effects on both positive and negative ratings of smoking reinforcement ("Crave", "Anxiety", "Irritability"; abstinence>nonabstinence). Interaction effects between abstinence and nicotine provide clues about the importance of neuroadaptive mechanisms operating in dependence, as well as the impact of conditioned reinforcement on subjective ratings of smoking-induced high.

  16. Residual effects of zolpidem, triazolam, rilmazafone and placebo in healthy elderly subjects: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Sachiko Ito; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Wakasa, Masahiko; Satake, Masahiro; Ito, Wakako; Shimizu, Kazumi; Shioya, Takanobu; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Nishino, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    With current hypnotic agents, next-day residual effects are a common problem. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the residual effects of the commercially available hypnotics - zolpidem, triazolam, and rilmazafone - on the physical and cognitive functions of healthy elderly people in the early morning and the day following drug administration. In this study, the next-day residual effects of zolpidem, triazolam, and rilmazafone, following bedtime dosing in elderly subjects, were evaluated. Women (n = 11) and men (n = 2) aged 60-70 years received a single dose (at 23:00) of one of these, zolpidem 5 mg, triazolam 0.125 mg, rilmazafone 1 mg and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. Measures of objective parameters and psychomotor performances (Timed up and Go test, Functional Reach Test, body sway test, critical flicker fusion test, simple discrimination reaction test, short-term memory test) and subjective ratings were obtained at 04:00, 07:00, and the next time of the day. All hypnotics were generally well tolerated; there were no serious adverse side effects and no subjects discontinued the evaluations. Compared to placebo, zolpidem and rilmazafone had good results on the Functional Reach Test. Although subjective assessments tended to be poor in the early morning, rilmazafone significantly improved the body sway test in the other hypnotics. A single dose of zolpidem 5 mg and triazolam 0.125 mg did not have any next-day residual effects on healthy elderly subjects. Residual effects appeared to be related to the compound's half-life and the dose used. Rilmazafone 1 mg exhibited steadiness in static and dynamic balance and seemed to be more favorable for the elderly with early morning awakening. PMID:26498242

  17. Nicotine content and abstinence state have different effects on subjective ratings of positive versus negative reinforcement from smoking.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Kimberly P; Bracken, Bethany K; Maclean, Robert R; Ryan, Elizabeth T; Lukas, Scott E; Frederick, Blaise Deb

    2013-02-01

    Despite the well-known adverse health consequences of smoking, approximately 20% of US adults smoke tobacco cigarettes. Much of the research on smoking reinforcement and the maintenance of tobacco smoking behavior has focused on nicotine; however, a number of other non-nicotine factors are likely to influence the reinforcing effects of smoked tobacco. A growing number of studies suggest that non-nicotine factors, through many pairings with nicotine, are partially responsible for the reinforcing effect of smoking. Additionally, both clinical studies and preclinical advances in our understanding of nicotinic receptor regulation suggest that abstinence from smoking may influence smoking reinforcement. These experiments were conducted for 2 reasons: to validate a MRI-compatible cigarette smoking device; and to simultaneously investigate the impact of nicotine, smoking-associated conditioned reinforcers, and smoking abstinence state on subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement. Participants smoked nicotine and placebo cigarettes through an fMRI compatible device in an overnight-abstinent state or in a nonabstinent state, after having smoked a cigarette 25minutes prior. Outcome measures were within-subject changes in physiology and subjective ratings of craving and drug effect during the smoking of nicotine or placebo cigarettes on different days in both abstinence states. Cigarette type (nicotine vs. placebo) had a significant effect on positive subjective ratings of smoking reinforcement ("High", "Like Drug", "Feel Drug"; nicotine>placebo). In contrast, abstinence state was found to have significant effects on both positive and negative ratings of smoking reinforcement ("Crave", "Anxiety", "Irritability"; abstinence>nonabstinence). Interaction effects between abstinence and nicotine provide clues about the importance of neuroadaptive mechanisms operating in dependence, as well as the impact of conditioned reinforcement on subjective ratings of smoking-induced high

  18. The reinforcing, subject-rated, performance, and cardiovascular effects of d-amphetamine: Influence of sensation-seeking status

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, William W.; Lile, Joshua A.; Robbins, C. Glenn; Martin, Catherine A.; Rush, Craig R.; Kelly, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences that may contribute to vulnerability to abuse drugs have been identified. Sensation-seeking status has been shown to influence both vulnerability to drug use and response to acute drug administration. The purpose of the present experiment was to examine the reinforcing effects of d-amphetamine in high and low sensation-seeking subjects using a modified progressive-ratio procedure. A battery of subject-rated, performance, and cardiovascular measures was also included to better characterize the effects of d-amphetamine in these groups. Ten high sensation seekers and ten low sensation seekers that were matched for education, age, drug use, height, and weight, first sampled doses of d-amphetamine (0, 8, and 16 mg). In subsequent sessions, subjects were offered the opportunity to work for the sampled dose on a modified progressive-ratio procedure. d-Amphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like effects (e.g., increased subject-ratings of Like Drug, enhanced performance, and increased heart rate). High sensation seekers were more sensitive than low sensation seekers to the reinforcing and some of the subject-rated effects of d-amphetamine. The results of the present experiment extend those of previous findings by demonstrating that the reinforcing effects of d-amphetamine vary as a function of the biologically based sensation-seeking personality trait. These results suggest that increased stimulant drug use and abuse among high sensation seekers may be related, in part, to increased sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of stimulants among these individuals. PMID:17011712

  19. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis (epidVdr−∕− and epidCasr−∕−). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β–catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr−∕− mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the epidVdr−∕− or epidCasr−∕−. But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr (epidVdr−∕−/epidCasr−∕− [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β–catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  20. Fumonisins affect the intestinal microbial homeostasis in broiler chickens, predisposing to necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Croubels, Siska; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Devreese, Mathias; Verlinden, Marc; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Antlinger, Birgit; Novak, Barbara; Martel, An; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-09-23

    Fumonisins (FBs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi. This study aimed to investigate the effect of these feed contaminants on the intestinal morphology and microbiota composition, and to evaluate whether FBs predispose broilers to necrotic enteritis. One-day-old broiler chicks were divided into a group fed a control diet, and a group fed a FBs contaminated diet (18.6 mg FB1+FB2/kg feed). A significant increase in the plasma sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in the FBs-treated group (0.21 ± 0.016) compared to the control (0.14 ± 0.014) indicated disturbance of the sphingolipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, villus height and crypt depth of the ileum was significantly reduced by FBs. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed a shift in the microbiota composition in the ileum in the FBs group compared to the control. A reduced presence of low-GC containing operational taxonomic units in ileal digesta of birds exposed to FBs was demonstrated, and identified as a reduced abundance of Candidatus Savagella and Lactobaccilus spp. Quantification of total Clostridium perfringens in these ileal samples, previous to experimental infection, using cpa gene (alpha toxin) quantification by qPCR showed an increase in C. perfringens in chickens fed a FBs contaminated diet compared to control (7.5 ± 0.30 versus 6.3 ± 0.24 log10 copies/g intestinal content). After C. perfringens challenge, a higher percentage of birds developed subclinical necrotic enteritis in the group fed a FBs contaminated diet as compared to the control (44.9 ± 2.22% versus 29.8 ± 5.46%).

  1. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis ((epid) Vdr (-∕-) and (epid) Casr (-∕-)). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β-catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr (-∕-) mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the (epid) Vdr (-∕-) or (epid) Casr (-∕-). But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr ((epid) Vdr (-∕-)/(epid) Casr (-∕-) [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β-catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  2. Effects of Anxiety and Depression on Anagram Performance, Ratings of Cognitive Interference, and the Negative Subjective Evaluation of Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarantonello, Matthew; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Studied the effects of anxiety and depression on anagram performance displayed by college students (N=72). Results showed that depressed-anxious and anxious subjects tended toward reduced efficiency in anagram solution, rated themselves as having experienced signficantly more cognitive interference, and displayed a significantly more negative…

  3. Nonsmoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke. III. Oral Fluid and Blood Drug Concentrations and Corresponding Subjective Effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; Bigelow, George E; Herrmann, Evan S; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ronald; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    The increasing use of highly potent strains of cannabis prompted this new evaluation of human toxicology and subjective effects following passive exposure to cannabis smoke. The study was designed to produce extreme cannabis smoke exposure conditions tolerable to drug-free nonsmokers. Six experienced cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes [5.3% Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in Session 1 and 11.3% THC in Sessions 2 and 3] in a closed chamber. Six nonsmokers were seated alternately with smokers during exposure sessions of 1 h duration. Sessions 1 and 2 were conducted with no ventilation and ventilation was employed in Session 3. Oral fluid, whole blood and subjective effect measures were obtained before and at multiple time points after each session. Oral fluid was analyzed by ELISA (4 ng/mL cutoff concentration) and by LC-MS-MS (limit of quantitation) for THC (1 ng/mL) and total THCCOOH (0.02 ng/mL). Blood was analyzed by LC-MS-MS (0.5 ng/mL) for THC, 11-OH-THC and free THCCOOH. Positive tests for THC in oral fluid and blood were obtained for nonsmokers up to 3 h following exposure. Ratings of subjective effects correlated with the degree of exposure. Subjective effect measures and amounts of THC absorbed by nonsmokers (relative to smokers) indicated that extreme secondhand cannabis smoke exposure mimicked, though to a lesser extent, active cannabis smoking.

  4. Associations of endothelial dysfunction with exposure to ambient fine particles in diabetic subjects: are the effects modified by patient characteristics?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: Exposure to fme airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) has been shown to be responsible for cardiovascular and hematological effects, especially in older people with cardiovascular disease. Results of epidemiological studies suggest that subjects with diabetes may be a pa...

  5. The Effect of Six Thinking Hats on Student Success in Teaching Subjects Related to Sustainable Development in Geography Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of six thinking hats technique in teaching subjects related to sustainable development in geography classes. The study was in both a quantitative and qualitative form. The quantitative part of the study was designed according to pre-test, post-test control group research model, and in the qualitative…

  6. The Effect of Applying Elements of Instructional Design on Teaching Material for the Subject of Classification of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdilek, Zehra; Ozkan, Muhlis

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of instructional materials for the subject of classification of matter as solids, liquids and gases that were developed using a holistic instructional design model on student achievement. In the study a pre-test/post-test with control group experimental design was used. The study was conducted in the…

  7. Toward Independent L2 Readers: Effects of Text Adjuncts, Subject Knowledge, L1 Reading, and L2 Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Cindy; Hammadou Sullivan, JoAnn; Strube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    With 97 learners in an advanced Spanish course, the study examines the effects of textual enhancement adjuncts, prior subject knowledge, first language (L1) reading ability, and second language (L2) Spanish proficiency on L2 comprehension of scientific passages. Readings included two texts with two types of embedded questions: a pause or written…

  8. Stimulus-Dominance Effects and Lateral Asymmetries for Language in Normal Subjects and in Patients with a Single Functional Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stefano, Marirosa; Marano, Elena; Viti, Marzia

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of language laterality by the dichotic fused-words test may be impaired by interference effects revealed by the dominant report of one member of the stimuli-pair. Stimulus-dominance and ear asymmetry were evaluated in normal population (48 subjects of both sex and handedness) and in 2 patients with a single functional hemisphere.…

  9. EFFECT OF INHALED ENDOTOXIN ON AIRWAY AND CIRCULATING INFLAMMATORY CELL PHAGOCYTOSIS AND CD11B EXPRESSION IN ATOPIC ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of inhaled endotoxin on airway and circulating inflammatory cell phagocytosis and CD11b expression in atopic asthmatic subjects

    Neil E. Alexis, PhD, Marlowe W. Eldridge, MD, David B. Peden, MD, MS

    Chapel Hill and Research Triangle Park, NC

    Backgrou...

  10. The Effect of Internet-Based Education on Student Success in Teaching of 8th Grade Triangles Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Deniz; Kesan, Cenk; Izgiol, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    In the study, it was researched the effect of internet-based application on student success. Internet-based application was used at the teaching of triangles subject which is included in 8th grade units of triangles and algebra. The study was carried out over the internet with a computer software program: Vitamin Program. The study was carried out…

  11. The Effects of Classic and Web-Designed Conceptual Change Texts on the Subject of Water Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Erol; Gülen, Salih; Öner, Zeynep; Özyürek, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to research the effects of traditional and web-assisted conceptual change texts for the subject of water chemistry on the success, conceptual errors and permanent learning of students. A total of 37 8th graders in a secondary school of Samsun participated in this study which had a random experimental design with…

  12. Do Functional Behavioral Assessments Improve Intervention Effectiveness for Students with ADHD? A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faith G.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this quantitative synthesis of single-subject research was to investigate the relative effectiveness of function-based and non-function-based behavioral interventions for students diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In addition, associations between various participant, assessment, and intervention…

  13. Do Functional Behavioral Assessments Improve Intervention Effectiveness for Students Diagnosed with ADHD? A Single-Subject Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faith G.; Lee, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this quantitative synthesis of single-subject research was to investigate the relative effectiveness of function-based and non-function-based behavioral interventions for students diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In addition, associations between various participant, assessment, and intervention…

  14. The Effects of Form-Focused Instruction on the Acquisition of Subject-Verb Inversion in German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindseth, Martina

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effects of form-focused instruction (FFI) on the acquisition of subject-verb inversion word order in declarative sentences in German. A group of U.S. college students who participated in a semester-long study abroad program in Germany and were comparable in terms of preprogram oral proficiency levels and accuracy scores in…

  15. Nonsmoker Exposure to Secondhand Cannabis Smoke. III. Oral Fluid and Blood Drug Concentrations and Corresponding Subjective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Edward J.; Bigelow, George E.; Herrmann, Evan S.; Mitchell, John M.; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ronald; Vandrey, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of highly potent strains of cannabis prompted this new evaluation of human toxicology and subjective effects following passive exposure to cannabis smoke. The study was designed to produce extreme cannabis smoke exposure conditions tolerable to drug-free nonsmokers. Six experienced cannabis users smoked cannabis cigarettes [5.3% Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in Session 1 and 11.3% THC in Sessions 2 and 3] in a closed chamber. Six nonsmokers were seated alternately with smokers during exposure sessions of 1 h duration. Sessions 1 and 2 were conducted with no ventilation and ventilation was employed in Session 3. Oral fluid, whole blood and subjective effect measures were obtained before and at multiple time points after each session. Oral fluid was analyzed by ELISA (4 ng/mL cutoff concentration) and by LC–MS-MS (limit of quantitation) for THC (1 ng/mL) and total THCCOOH (0.02 ng/mL). Blood was analyzed by LC–MS-MS (0.5 ng/mL) for THC, 11-OH-THC and free THCCOOH. Positive tests for THC in oral fluid and blood were obtained for nonsmokers up to 3 h following exposure. Ratings of subjective effects correlated with the degree of exposure. Subjective effect measures and amounts of THC absorbed by nonsmokers (relative to smokers) indicated that extreme secondhand cannabis smoke exposure mimicked, though to a lesser extent, active cannabis smoking. PMID:26139312

  16. Subject Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gayle; And Others

    Three newspaper librarians described how they manage the files of newspaper clippings which are a necessary part of their collections. The development of a new subject classification system for the clippings files was outlined. The new subject headings were based on standard subject heading lists and on local need. It was decided to use a computer…

  17. The effect of tadalafil on the time to exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia in subjects with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dean; Kloner, Robert; Effron, Mark; Emmick, Jeffrey; Bedding, Alun; Warner, Margaret; Mitchell, Malcolm; Braat, Simon; MacDonald, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of tadalafil on the time to exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Background CAD and erectile dysfunction (ED) share similar risk factors. It is important to know the cardiovascular effects of tadalafil in patients with CAD during physical exertion that is comparable with sexual activity. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, two-period, crossover study comparing the effects of tadalafil 10 mg and placebo on the time to exercise treadmill test (ETT)-induced myocardial ischaemia in subjects with stable CAD (n = 23; age range: 53–75 years, all exhibited ST-segment depression >1.5 mm at screening ETT at >5METS). Haemodynamic responses to sublingual nitroglycerin (NTG) were assessed before and after ETT. Results Compared with placebo, tadalafil did not significantly affect the time to ETT-induced ischaemia (13 min/31 s vs. 13 min/36 s, respectively). Before exercise, NTG evoked decreases in sitting systolic blood pressure (SBP) that were significantly greater when subjects received tadalafil compared with placebo, and after exercise, more subjects experienced a decrease in SBP <85 mmHg in response to NTG after taking tadalafil vs. placebo. When subjects received tadalafil compared with placebo, SBP was lower at rest (−7 mmHg; −12,-2), during ETT (−10 mmHg; −16, −3), and after ETT (−13 mmHg; −19, −7). Conclusion Tadalafil did not significantly alter the time to ETT-induced ischaemia compared with placebo in subjects with CAD. Tadalafil reduced resting and exercise SBP. Due to the potential for hypotension, the concomitant use of nitrates and tadalafil is contraindicated. PMID:16236035

  18. [The effects of the drug Mirtilene Sifi on retinal sensitivity in healthy subjects].

    PubMed

    Iliuţă, C; Nicodin, A; Ispăşoiu, C T; Mitulescu, D

    1999-01-01

    Our study involve 15 normal ophthalmological subjects, when take 4 doses a day of Mirtelene Sifi for 15 days. The assessment of the efficiency of this drug on visual performances was made by comparison of the results (before and after the administration) obtained by testing the retinal sensibility (threshold central 30-2, Humphrey visual field analyzer) and the adaptation ability to dark of the retina. The results show the real efficiency of the drug on both the parameters.

  19. Effect of co-trimoxazole and sulfamethoxazole on serum creatinine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Roy, M T; First, M R; Myre, S A; Cacini, W

    1982-01-01

    Significant elevation of serum creatinine concentration and reduction in creatinine clearance have been reported following cotrimoxazole therapy in patients with normal and impaired renal function. Both components of co-trimoxazole, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, have been proposed as the causative agent. Ten healthy male volunteers were treated for seven days with either sulfamethoxazole (5 subjects) or co-trimoxazole (5 subjects) in the usual recommended doses. After a one-week recovery period, the subjects were allocated to the alternate treatment regimen for another seven days. Cotrimoxazole caused a mean elevation in the serum creatinine concentration of 0.12 mg/dl over the base-line value (p less than 0.05). Sulfamethoxazole produced an insignificant fall in the serum creatinine level. The increase in the serum creatinine concentration induced by co-trimoxazole was reversed seven days after discontinuation of the drug. From this study, it can be concluded that either trimethoprim alone or an interaction between trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole is responsible for the increase in serum creatinine observed following co-trimoxazole therapy and that sulfamethoxazole alone is not the causative agent. PMID:7071907

  20. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of (1- TC)palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H2 YO dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting.

  1. Effect of inhaled furosemide and torasemide on bronchial response to ultrasonically nebulized distilled water in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Foresi, A; Pelucchi, A; Mastropasqua, B; Cavigioli, G; Carlesi, R M; Marazzini, L

    1992-08-01

    Inhaled furosemide has been shown to reduce the bronchoconstriction induced by several indirect stimuli, including ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW). Because the protective effect could be due to the inhibition of the Na(+)-2Cl(-)-K+ cotransport system of bronchial epithelium, we have compared the protective effect of inhaled furosemide with that of inhaled torasemide, a new and more potent loop diuretic, on UNDW-induced bronchoconstriction in a group of 12 asthmatic subjects. UNDW challenge was performed by constructing a stimulus-response curve with five increasing volume outputs of distilled water (from 0.5 to 5.2 ml/min) and the bronchial response expressed as the provocative output causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PO20UNDW). On different days, each subject inhaled an equal dose (28 mg) of furosemide and torasemide in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 5 min prior to an UNDW challenge. Furosemide and torasemide had no significant effect on resting lung function. The geometric mean value of PO20UNDW measured after placebo was 1.73 ml/min. This was significantly lower than that recorded after furosemide (4.25 ml/min; p < 0.025), but not after torasemide (3.05 ml/min; p = 0.07). Inhaled furosemide totally blocked bronchial response to UNDW in five subjects. In two of five subjects the response was also blocked by inhaled torasemide. A remarkable increase in diuresis was noted only after torasemide in most subjects. We conclude that inhaled furosemide has a better protective effect than does inhaled torasemide against UNDW-induced bronchoconstriction. However, the protective effect of furosemide is variable, with some asthmatic patients showing no change in bronchial response to UNDW.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1489126

  2. Subjective Effects of Ethanol, Morphine, Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol, and Ketamine Following a Pharmacological Challenge Are Related to Functional Brain Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kleinloog, Daniël; Rombouts, Serge; Zoethout, Remco; Klumpers, Linda; Niesters, Marieke; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop

    2015-12-01

    This analysis examines the neuronal foundation of drug-induced psychomimetic symptoms by relating the severity of these symptoms to changes in functional connectivity for a range of different psychoactive compounds with varying degrees of psychomimetic effects. The repeated measures design included 323 resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series and measures of subjective effects in 36 healthy male volunteers. Four different pharmacological challenges with ethanol, morphine, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and ketamine (12 subjects per drug) were applied. A set of 10 "template" resting-state networks was used to determine individual connectivity maps. Linear regression was used for each individual subject to relate these connectivity maps to three clusters of drug-induced subjective psychomimetic effects ("perception," "relaxation," and "dysphoria") as measured with visual analogue scales. Group analysis showed that the subjective effects of perception correlated significantly across drugs with the connectivity of the posterior cingulate cortex and precentral gyrus with the sensorimotor network (p < 0.005, corrected). No significant correlations were found for relaxation or dysphoria. The posterior cingulate cortex has a role in visuospatial evaluation and the precentral gyrus has been associated with auditory hallucinations. Both the posterior cingulate cortex and the precentral gyrus show changes in activation in patients with schizophrenia, which can be related to the severity of positive symptoms (i.e., hallucinations and delusions), and have previously been related to changes induced by psychoactive drugs. The similarity of functional connectivity changes for drug-induced psychomimetic effects and symptoms of psychosis provides further support for the use of pharmacological challenges with psychomimetic drugs as models for psychosis.

  3. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  4. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  5. Air toxics and epigenetic effects: ozone altered microRNAs in the sputum of human subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone (03) is a criteria air pollutant that is associated with numerous adverse health effects, including altered respiratory immune responses. Despite its deleterious health effects, possible epigenetic mechanisms underlying 03-induced health effects remain understudied. MicroRN...

  6. Effect of potassium and calcium loading on healthy subjects under hypokinesia and physical exercise with fluid and salt supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Naexu, Konstantin A.; Federenko, Youri F.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the acute responses to the electrolyte challenges under hypokinesia and physical exercise (PE) of different intensities with fluid and salt supplementation (FSS). The studies were performed on 12 physically healthy male volunteers aged 19-24 years under 364 days of hypokinesia (decreased number of steps per day) with a set of PE with FSS. The volunteers were divided into two equal groups. The first group was subjected to a set of intensive PE and the second group was submitted to a set of moderate PE. Both groups of subjects consumed daily water and salt supplements that aimed to increase the body hydration level. For simulation of the hypokinetic effect all subjects were kept under an average of 3000 steps per day. Functional tests with a potassium chloride (KCl) and calcium lactate (Cal) load were performed during the hypokinetic period of 364 days and the 60-day prehypokinetic period that served as control, while both groups of subjects consumed daily calcium and potassium supplements. The concentration of electrolyte and hormone levels in the blood and their excretion rate in urine were determined. Renal excretion of calcium and potassium and the blood concentration thereof increased markedly in both groups of subjects. With the potassium chloride load tests the increased potassium excretion was accompanied by higher aldosterone and insulin blood levels, and with the calcium lactate load tests the increased calcium excretion was accompanied by a decreased parathyroid content in the blood. FSS and PE, regardless of intensity, failed to attenuate calcium and potassium losses. Additional intake of KCl and Cal also failed to normalize potassium and calcium abnormalities. It was concluded that during the KCl and Cal loading tests, the increased losses of potassium and calcium in the hypokinetic subjects were due to the inability of their bodies to retain these electrolytes, and that electrolyte abnormalities could

  7. Effect of yogic exercises on thyroid function in subjects resident at sea level upon exposure to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, S. B.; Singh, M. V.; Tyagi, A. K.; Selvamurthy, W.; Chaudhuri, B. N.

    1994-03-01

    Using radioactive iodine, the effect of 1 month's yogic exercises has been investigated on the thyroid function of subjects resident at sea level (SL) specially after their exposure to high altitude (HA). The results have been compared with a group of SL subjects who underwent physical training (PT) exercises for the same duration. Ten healthy male volunteers in the age range of 20 30 years were used as test subjects in this study with each serving as his own control. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups of 5 each. One group practised hatha yogic exercises, while the other group performed the regular PT exercises. The thyroidal accumulation and release of radioactive iodine have been measured in each of the subjects of both groups before and after 1 month of their respective exercises at SL. One month of yogic exercises at SL has been observed to cause a significant reduction in the trans-thy-roidal availability of radioiodine. The thyroid radioactivity in this group of subjects was always below normal levels with the exception of two peaks of radioactive iodine uptake, when the levels of radioactivity in the thyroid were similar to the control values of pre-yogic exercises. The release of radiolabel at 24 48 h was significantly increased after yogic exercises. In contrast, the subjects performing PT exercises for the same duration at SL showed significant thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine at 24 h. Subsequently their131I uptake continued to rise slowly until 72 h without any demonstrable thyroidal release of radiolabel. This indicated that increased thyroid activity was induced by conventional PT exercise. Exposure of SL residents to HA irrespective of their exercise regime altered the thyroidal handling of radioiodine. Thyroidal concentrations of freshly administered radioiodine at early and late sampling intervals were very high in both of the groups, especially the yogics, after their return to SL from HA. Possible mechanisms of the observed

  8. Effects of medroxyprogesterone acetate on subjective arousal, arousal to erotic stimulation, and nocturnal penile tumescence in male sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Wincze, J P; Bansal, S; Malamud, M

    1986-08-01

    Three chronic pedophiliac sex offenders were treated individually with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) over a minimum of 3 months. Genital and subjective response to erotic stimulation, nocturnal penile tumescence, self-reporting of sexual urges, and testosterone levels were recorded repeatedly throughout the study. A single-subject reversal design was used and medication was administered through a double-blind procedure. The results showed that self-report of arousal outside of a laboratory setting was unreliable as a measure of the drug effect. In a laboratory setting, however, there appeared to be a significant reduction in the report of arousal to erotic stimuli while genital arousal decreased only slightly. Reversal of these responses occurred in only one subject during a final placebo phase. Nocturnal penile tumescence was significantly decreased during MPA administration and appeared to be related to decreases in total testosterone.

  9. Angiotensin infusion effects on left ventricular function. Assessment in normal subjects and in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Laskey, W K; Makey, D G; Shafer, R B

    1980-02-01

    Radionuclide multigating of the cardiac cycle was employed to assess effects of angiotensin infusion on left ventricular function. In six normal subjects, angiotensin infusion decreased heart rate (HR) from 72 +/- SEM 2 to 57 +/- 2 beats/min (P less than 0.001); while systolic blood pressure (BP) increased from 119 +/- 2 to 178 +/- 1 mm Hg (P less than 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) declined from 58 +/- 1 to 47 +/- 2 percent (P less than 0.05). In contrast, in 11 normal subjects, supine exercise increased HR and systolic BP by 55 and 49 percent, whereas EF increased from 64 +/- 1 to 71 +/- 1 (P less than 0.001). In ten patients with CAD, angiotensin infusion produced no change in HR, increased systolic BP by 34 percent, and decreased EF by 11 percent. Angiotensin infusion induced left ventricular depression in normal subjects and in patients with CAD. It cannot substitute for exercise in intervention radionuclide ventriculography.

  10. A-Class Genitive Subject Effect: A Pragmatic and Discourse Grammar Approach to A- and O-Class Genitive Subject Selection in Hawaiian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, C. M. Kaliko

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores genitive class selection of genitive case subjects in nominalizations and relative clauses in Hawaiian. The amount of research in the area of Hawaiian's "a"- and "o"-class is far from sufficient. Since Wilson (1976a), there has been minimal critical new inquiry to "a"- and…

  11. [Maximal exercise in spinal cord injured subjects: effects of an antigravity suit].

    PubMed

    Bazzi-Grossin, C; Bonnin, P; Bailliart, O; Bazzi, H; Kedra, A W; Martineaud, J P

    1996-01-01

    Paraplegics have low aerobic capacity because of the spinal cord injury. Their functional muscle mass is reduced and usually untrained. They have to use upperbody muscles for displacements and daily activities. Sympathic nervous system injury is responsible of vasomotricity disturbances in leg vessels and possible abdominal vessels, proportionally to level injury. If cord injury level is higher than T5, then sympathic cardiac efferences may be damaged. Underbody muscles atrophy and vasomotricity disturbances contribute to phlebostasis. This stasis may decrease venous return, preload and stroke volume (Starling). To maintain appropriate cardiac output, tachycardia is necessary, especially during exercise. Low stroke volume, all the more since it is associated with cardio-acceleration disturbances, may reduce cardiac output reserve, and so constitutes a limiting factor for adaptation to exercise. The aim of this study was to verify if use of an underlesional pressure suit may increase cardiac output reserve because of lower venous stasis, and increase performance. We studied 10 able-bodied and 14 traumatic paraplegic subjects. Able-bodied subjects were 37 +/- 6 years old, wellbeing, not especially trained with upperbody muscles: there were 2 women and 8 men. Paraplegics were 27 +/- 7 years old, wellbeing except paraplegia, five of them practiced sport regularly (athletism or basket for disabled), and the others just daily propelled their wheelchair; there were 5 women and 9 men. For 8 of them, cord injury levels were located below T7, between T1 and T6 for the others. The age disability varied from 6 months to 2 years for 9 of them, it was approximately five years for 4 of them, and 20 years for one. We used a maximal triangular arm crank exercise with an electro-magnetic ergocycle Gauthier frame. After five minutes warm up, it was proceeded in one minute successive stages until maximal oxygen consumption is raised. VO2, VCO2, RER were measured by direct method with

  12. Antihypertensive effect of alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade in obese and lean hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Wofford, M R; Anderson, D C; Brown, C A; Jones, D W; Miller, M E; Hall, J E

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of the adrenergic system in mediating hypertension in obese and lean patients. Thirteen obese, hypertensive patients with a body mass index (BMI) > or =28 kg/m2 (obese) and nine lean patients with a BMI < or =25 kg/m2 (lean) were recruited. After a 1-week washout period, participants underwent daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Participants were then treated with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist doxazosin, titrating to 4 mg QHS in 1 week. In the next week, the beta-adrenergic antagonist atenolol was added at an initial dose of 25 mg/day and titrated to 50 mg/day within 1 week. One month after the addition of atenolol, all patients underwent a second ABPM session. There were no differences between the obese and lean subjects in baseline systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), or mean arterial pressures (MAP) measured by office recording or ABPM. However, obese subjects had higher heart rates than lean subjects (87.5+/-2.4 v 76.8+/-4.9 beats/min). After 1 month of treatment with the adrenergic blockers, obese patients had a significantly lower SBP (130.0+/-2.5 v 138.9+/-2.1 mm Hg, P = .02) and MAP (99.6+/-2.3 v 107.0+/-1.5 mm Hg, P = .02) than lean patients. Obese patients also tended to have a lower DBP than lean patients (84.3+/-2.5 v 90.9+/-1.6 mm Hg, P = .057), but there was no significant difference in heart rate after 1 month of adrenergic blockade. These results indicate that blood pressure is more sensitive to adrenergic blockade in obese than in lean hypertensive patients and suggest that increased sympathetic activity may be an important factor in the maintenance of hypertension in obesity.

  13. Effect of experience of severe stroke on subjective valuations of quality of life after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, R; Sackley, C; Miller, P; Harwood, R

    2001-01-01

    Previous work suggests that the quality of life associated with severe disability after stroke is rated very poorly by members of the public, often as being worse than death. Other evidence suggests that experience of illness alters perceptions of its severity. This was tested for severe stroke. Eleven patients with severely disabling stroke, but able to complete a standard gamble interview, 22 age and sex matched controls, and 20 health professionals participated. A standard gamble interview was carried out to determine the quality of life (utility) associated with three hypothetical scenarios representing mild, moderate, and severe stroke, and current health. A sample was retested for reliability, and comparisons were made with other measures of health status. All three subject groups showed wide variation in the utilities they attached to each of the scenarios. The control subjects' valuations were lower than those of either patients or staff members, especially for moderate stroke (median 0.30, 0.73, and 0.68 respectively). There were weak to moderate correlations between utilities and other measures of health status including the Barthel index (r=0.51) and Rivermead mobility score (r=0.24). Test retest-reliability was modest (reliability coefficient 0.75), but indicators of the internal validity of the results were good. In conclusion, it cannot be assumed that general population valuations are valid for patient groups. In clinical practice it is unsafe to make any assumption about subjective quality of life after stroke, due to the wide range of valuations given, although many people rate severe and moderate stroke at least as bad as death.

 PMID:11309467

  14. Effect of standing on neurohumoral responses and plasma volume in healthy subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Ertl, A. C.; Shannon, J. R.; Furlan, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Upright posture leads to rapid pooling of blood in the lower extremities and shifts plasma fluid into surrounding tissues. This results in a decrease in plasma volume (PV) and in hemoconcentration. There has been no integrative evaluation of concomitant neurohumoral and PV shifts with upright posture in normal subjects. We studied 10 healthy subjects after 3 days of stable Na+ and K+ intake. PV was assessed by the Evans blue dye method and by changes in hematocrit. Norepinephrine (NE), NE spillover, epinephrine (Epi), vasopressin, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, osmolarity, and kidney response expressed by urine osmolality and by Na+ and K+ excretion of the subjects in the supine and standing postures were all measured. We found that PV fell by 13% (375 +/- 35 ml plasma) over approximately 14 min, after which time it remained relatively stable. There was a concomitant decrease in systolic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate that peaked at the time of maximal decrease in PV. Plasma Epi and NE increased rapidly to this point. Epi approached baseline by 20 min of standing. NE spillover increased 80% and clearance decreased 30% with 30 min of standing. The increase in plasma renin activity correlated with an increase in aldosterone. Vasopressin increased progressively, but there was no change in plasma osmolarity. The kidney response showed a significant decrease in Na+ and an increase in K+ excretion with upright posture. We conclude that a cascade of neurohumoral events occurs with upright posture, some of which particularly coincide with the decrease in PV. Plasma Epi levels may contribute to the increment in heart rate with maintained upright posture.

  15. Effects of alprazolam and clonidine on carbon dioxide-induced increases in anxiety rating in healthy human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, S.W.; Krystal, J.H.; Heninger, G.R.; Charney, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate possible neurobiologic mechanisms underlying carbon dioxide-induced anxiety, the effects of oral alprazolam 0.75 mg and intravenous clonidine 2 mcg/kg on CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of subjective anxiety, pulse rate, and ventilation were measured in healthy human subjects. Pretreatment with alprazolam but not with clonidine significantly reduced the CO/sub 2/-induced increases in ratings of anxiety. Neither drug altered CO/sub 2/-induced increases in pulse rate or ventilatory responses. Clonidine did produce potent sedative and hypotensive effects. The behavioral data suggest that the mechanisms through which CO/sub 2/ induces anxiety-like effects involve neural systems regulated by benzodiazepine receptors and, secondly, that they appear not to require normal functioning of noradrenergic systems. Carbon dioxide may provide a useful model system for identification of new drugs with anxiolytic properties.

  16. The subjective effect of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A., Jr.; Cauley, M. A.; Groumpos, P. P.

    1983-01-01

    As the geostationary orbit/spectrum becomes saturated, there is a need for the ability to reuse frequency assignments. Protection ratios (the ratio of wanted signal power to interfering signal power at the receiver) play a key role in determining efficient frequency reuse plans. A knowledge of the manner in which multiple sources of co-channel interference combine is vital in determining protection ratio requirements such that suitable margin may be allocated for multiple interfering signals. Results of tests examining the subjective assessment of multiple co-channel frequency modulated television signals interfering with another frequency modulated TV system are presented.

  17. Frequency-dependent effects of sine-wave cranial transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Lee, C T

    1992-01-01

    In a double-blind protocol, ninety healthy volunteer subjects received 30 minutes of constant current sine-wave cranial transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 5 Hertz (Hz), 100 Hz, or 2000 Hz frequency (current maintained below .5 mA for safety), placebo TENS, or no treatment. The five groups were compared on pre- to posttreatment changes in blood pressure, heart rate, peripheral temperature, and anxiety. Analysis showed significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate after 100 Hz cranial TENS as compared to the other groups. No other differences achieved significance. PMID:1357927

  18. Effect of Different Cooling Regimes on the Mechanical Properties of Cementitious Composites Subjected to High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiangtao; Weng, Wenfang; Yu, Kequan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different cooling regimes (quenching in water and cooling in air) on the residual mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composite (ECC) subjected to high temperature up to 800°C was discussed in this paper. The ECC specimens are exposed to 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800°C with the unheated specimens for reference. Different cooling regimens had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of postfire ECC specimens. The microstructural characterization was examined before and after exposure to fire deterioration by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results from the microtest well explained the mechanical properties variation of postfire specimens. PMID:25161392

  19. Effect of different cooling regimes on the mechanical properties of cementitious composites subjected to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiangtao; Weng, Wenfang; Yu, Kequan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of different cooling regimes (quenching in water and cooling in air) on the residual mechanical properties of engineered cementitious composite (ECC) subjected to high temperature up to 800°C was discussed in this paper. The ECC specimens are exposed to 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800°C with the unheated specimens for reference. Different cooling regimens had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of postfire ECC specimens. The microstructural characterization