Science.gov

Sample records for prefabricated structures

  1. Prefabricated building

    SciTech Connect

    Reaves, L.L.; Dawick, J.K.

    1987-03-10

    This patent describes a building constructed with prefabricated components comprising: front, back and side wall structures; prefabricated braced frame structures used in forming at least portions of the walls of the building constructed with prefabricated components. Each of the braced frame structures has a series of lateral wooden frame members interconnecting two longitudinal wooden frame members and a built-in wooden frame cross-bracing member extending in between the lateral wooden frame members. Metal connector plates interconnect the wooden members, the connector plates having teeth struck out from such plates and embedded into the wooden members; the wooden frame cross-bracing member in the braced frame structures being constructed so as to be formed by a series of wooden sections extending between the lateral frame members with the ends of the wooden sections abutting the sides of the respective adjacent the lateral frame members. Each of the wooden sections is interconnected with adjacent wooden sections and respective the lateral frame members by the metal connector plates.

  2. [Prefabrication of bone transplants].

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Kokemüller, H; Jehn, P; Vogt, P; Gellrich, N-C; Krettek, C

    2015-03-01

    Prefabrication of bone transplants is a promising option for large defects of the long bones, especially if there is compromised vascularization of the defect. This is especially true for postinfection bone defects and other types of atrophic nonunion. The generation of a foreign body membrane (Masquelet's technique) has been investigated in order to ameliorate the response of the host tissue surrounding the defect. In an experimental animal study, a blood vessel within a bone construct could be used to generate customized, vascularized osteogenic constructs that can be used to treat large bone defects in the future.

  3. The Prefabricated Interior Design Studio: An Exploration into the History and Sustainability of Interior Prefabrication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Deborah; Freihoefer, Kara

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the integration of prefabrication into an interior design studio. A review of the literature revealed that while there is a paucity of categorical research focused on this subject, the subject is historically significant with an abundance of evidence regarding the prefabrication of the interior environment dating back…

  4. Prefabricated Composite Graft for Eyelid Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Jaber, Omar; Tresoldi, Marco Mario; Pellegatta, Tommaso; Faga, Angela

    2015-10-01

    The authors propose a prefabricated chondromucosal composite graft to reconstruct full-thickness defects of the lower eyelid. The technique was used in a patient suffering from a locally invasive basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid, who had previously undergone an extensive submucosal nasal septum resection. One week prior to the eyelid resection, the anterior skin surface of the auricular concha was replaced with a full-thickness oral mucosa graft. One week later, a full-thickness excision of the right lower eyelid was performed and the prefabricated chondromucosal auricular graft was used to restore the posterior lamella. The anterior lamella was reconstructed with a bipedicled myocutaneous flap from the upper eyelid. Because of the patient's scheduling needs, the medial pedicle of the flap was divided 28 days later and the lateral one after further 37 days. All the procedures were performed under local anesthesia. This technique adds a simple key detail to other time-honored reliable techniques, thus outlining an extremely convenient sequence for full-thickness eyelid reconstruction. The easily prepared prefabricated chondromucosal graft might be associated with any of the previously described flaps, thus providing a versatile and reliable method of posterior lamella reconstruction. PMID:26579869

  5. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method.

  6. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation induced by a pre-fabricated surface groove.

    PubMed

    Kafka, K R P; Austin, D R; Li, H; Yi, A Y; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-07-27

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse (probe) from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form asynchronously, with the first one forming after 50 ps and others forming sequentially outward from the groove edge at larger time delays. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating including both the laser pulse and surface plasmon polariton excitation at the groove edge predicts ripple period, melt spot diameter, and qualitatively explains the asynchronous time-evolution of LIPSS formation.

  7. Studies of the Prefabricated Housing Construction Market in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziszewska-Zielina, Elżbieta; Gleń, Monika

    2014-11-01

    The directions of development of the construction market are not only related to the need to own one's own home but also to increasing functional and economic requirements and conditions of sustainable development. The perception and understanding of prefabrication in housing construction are undoubtedly starting to change. Sustainable construction criteria may constitute a significant turning point and support for the development of new prefabricated housing construction technologies. Entrepreneurs are slowly perceiving an opportunity for the development of prefabrication in the construction market. The implementation and popularisation of ready-made homes will undoubtedly constitute a favourable change in the Polish construction market; however, this will require a modification of habits. This article presents an historical analysis of the development of the prefabricated housing construction market as well as an attempt to answer questions concerning the future of prefabrication in housing construction in Poland based on the conducted studies.

  8. The prefabricated scapula flap consists of syngeneic bone, connective tissue, and a self-assembled epithelial coating.

    PubMed

    Kunstfeld, R; Petzelbauer, P; Wickenhauser, G; Schlenz, I; Korak, K; Vinzenz, K; Holle, J

    2001-12-01

    The reconstruction of maxillary defects is a challenge in plastic surgery. The so-called prefabricated scapula flap consists of syngeneic bone covered with syngeneic dermis and is used to reconstruct maxillary defects. After placing these flaps into the oral cavity, they are reepithelialized within a short time period, raising the question of the cellular origin of the "neomucosa." We therefore obtained sequential biopsy samples of the prefabricated flap and of the flap after being placed into the oral cavity and analyzed the keratin expression profile of epithelial cells. We expected that after placing the prefabricated flap into the oral cavity, keratinocytes from adnexal structures of the dermal component of the graft would migrate onto the surface and reepithelialize the flap. Unexpectedly, reepithelialization occurred earlier. The flap had acquired a mucosa-like epithelium at the interface between the Gore-Tex coating and the dermis while still being positioned within the scapular region. The keratin expression profile of this epithelium was very similar to that of mucosal epithelium. Thus, the prefabricated scapula flap not only consisted of bone covered with connective tissue, but was also covered with epithelial cells derived from adnexal structures of the dermal graft. This seems to be the reason for the rapid restoration of an intact mucosa and the excellent outcome achieved with this surgical technique.

  9. 4. Prefabricated concrete panel portion of Snowshed 29 abutting west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Prefabricated concrete panel portion of Snowshed 29 abutting west portal of Tunnel 41, view to east, 135mm lens. Function of the elevated portion is unknown, but it may help to channel exhaust fumes out of the shed and the two-mile long tunnel. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  10. Prefabricated custom impression trays for the altered cast technique.

    PubMed

    Lund, P S; Aquilino, S A

    1991-12-01

    Removable partial prosthodontic treatment requires multiple patient appointments with intermediate laboratory steps. A technique is described that allows the removable partial denture framework try-in and the impression for the altered cast to be efficiently completed in a single appointment. The method uses prefabricated custom impression trays that are readily attached to the framework after the try-in.

  11. Improving the Learning Process in the Latest Prefabricated School Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pons, Oriol; Oliva, Josep-Manuel; Maas, Sandra-Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000 hundreds of school centers have been constructed in Catalonia using industrialized technologies. These centers are modern, useful, educational edifices built using advantageous prefabricated technologies that improve the building process and reduce the environmental impact of the building. This article analyses whether these…

  12. Cryogenic line insulation made from prefabricated polyurethane shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, G.

    1975-01-01

    Prefabricated polyurethane foam insulation is inexpensive and easily installed on cryogenic lines. Insulation sections are semicircular half shells. Pair of half shells is placed to surround cryogenic line. Cylindrically-shaped knit sock is pulled over insulation then covered with polyurethane resin to seal system.

  13. Prefabrication: A History of Its Development in Great Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Establishment, Watford (England).

    A history of prefabrication in Britain from the first Victorian innovations in wood, glass, and cast iron, through the developments of the inter-war years and the buildings of the immediate post-war period to the 'system building' of today is presented. The study is not confined to houses and flats but examines the influences of non-traditional…

  14. Flap prefabrication and prelamination with tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Staudenmaier, Rainer; Hoang, T Nguyen; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Schurr, Christian; Frölich, Kathrin; Wenzel, Magdalene M; Aigner, Joachim

    2004-10-01

    In reconstructive surgery, the integration of tissue-engineered cartilage in a prefabricated free flap may make it possible to generate flaps combining a variety of tissue components, to meet the special requirements of particular defects. One aim of the present study was to investigate prefabrication of a microvascular free flap by implanting a vessel loop under a skin flap in a rabbit model. A second aim was to report on the authors' preliminary experiences in prelaminating prefabricated flaps with autologous tissue-engineered cartilage, in terms of matrix development, inflammatory reaction, and host-tissue interaction. The flap was prefabricated by implanting a vessel loop under a random-pattern abdominal skin flap. The tissue-engineered cartilage constructs were made by isolating chondrocytes from auricular biopsies. Following a period of amplification, the cells were seeded onto a non-woven scaffold made of a hyaluronic-acid derivative and cultivated for 2 weeks. One cell-biomaterial construct was placed beneath the prefabicated flap, and two additional constructs were placed subcutaneously and intramuscularly. In addition, a biomaterial sample without cells was placed subcutaneously to provide a control. All implanted specimens were left in position for 6 or 12 weeks. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and biomaterial construct was analyzed by angiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histologic and immunohistochemical methods. The prefabricated flaps showed a well-developed network of blood vessels between the implanted vessel loop and the original random-pattern blood supply. The tissue-engineered constructs remained stable in size and showed signs of tissue similar to hyaline cartilage, as evidenced by the expression of cartilage-specific collagen type II and proteoglycans. No inflammatory reactions were observed. The physiologic environment of the autologous rabbit model provided favorable conditions for matrix deposition

  15. Bending resistance of prefabricated titanium posts following molten cast core attachment.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Peter; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Schmage, Petra; Platzer, Ursula

    2004-01-01

    Posts and cores are used to restore endodontically treated teeth that have substantial loss of the coronal tooth structure. This in vitro study was designed to determine the mechanical properties of prefabricated titanium posts following attachment of their metal cores by molten casting (caston). Prefabricated tapered titanium posts (ER post-restoring system, Komet, Lemgo, Germany) in three diameter sizes (ISO 50, 90, 110) (n=9) were cast over with the metal cores of three different alloys (Au-Ag-Pt, Au-Pt-Pd, Co-Cr-Mo). Also, posts of each size were precision fit into the central core channels of the different cast metal cores to serve as control specimens. The 0.2% yield strengths (R0.2) of all specimens were tested on a universal testing machine. Statistical analyses of the results were carried out with an analysis of variance (ANOVA, one-way, two-way) and Bonferroni-Dunn's multiple comparisons post-hoc analysis for test groups (alpha=0.05). There was a significant decrease in yield strength (p<0.05) as a result of casting the various metals over the different post sizes, considered to be due to the detrimental thickening and porosity formation of the titanium surface oxide layer. Twenty-one percent, 51% and 33% reduction in yield strength, respectively, was obtained for the ISO 50, ISO 90 and ISO 110 cast-on groups relative to controls (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences in various core alloys were found only for the Au-Ag-Pt alloy compared to the Co-Cr-Mo alloy (post size ISO 50) and the Au-Pt-Pd alloy compared to the Co-Cr-Mo alloy (post size ISO 110) (p>0.05). Prefabricated titanium posts with metal cores cast over them showed inferior mechanical properties compared to precision-fit posts. These results indicate greater strength of the titanium posts when their cast cores were attached mechanically rather than by the molten casting method. PMID:15279479

  16. Prefabrication of bone by use of a vascularized periosteal flap and bone morphogenetic protein.

    PubMed

    Vögelin M D, E; Jones, N F; Lieberman, J R; Baker, J M; Tsingotjidou, A S; Brekke, J H

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to prefabricate a vascularized bone graft by using a vascularized periosteal flap containing osteoprogenitor cells, a structural matrix, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). In a rat model, a periosteal flap vascularized by the saphenous artery and vein was dissected off the medial surface of the tibia. This flap consisted of three layers-periosteum, muscle, and fascia-and was tubed on itself to form a watertight chamber that was then transferred on its vascular pedicle to the groin. A total of 78 vascularized periosteal chambers were constructed in 39 animals and divided into 10 groups. In group 1, the periosteal chamber was left empty. Groups 2, 3, and 4 consisted of the periosteal flap and rhBMP-2, but in group 3, the proximal vascular pedicle was ligated, and in group 4, the flap was harvested without the periosteal layer and turned inside out. Groups 5 through 10 consisted of the vascularized periosteal flap containing several different structural matrices (calcium alginate spheres, polylactic acid, or demineralized bone matrix) with or without rhBMP-2. Animals were killed at 2, 4, or 8 weeks in each group. The presence and density of any new bone formation was evaluated both radiologically and histologically. Significant bone formation was seen only in those periosteal flaps containing rhBMP-2 and either the calcium alginate or polylactic acid matrix. New bone formation increased both radiologically and histologically from 2 weeks to 8 weeks only in the periosteal flaps containing the polylactic acid matrix and rhBMP-2. This preliminary study therefore suggests that four factors-blood supply, osteoprogenitor cells in the periosteal layer, a biodegradable matrix, and rhBMP-2-are required for optimal prefabrication of a vascularized bone graft.

  17. Prefabricated foldable lunar base modular systems for habitats, offices, and laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hijazi, Yousef

    1992-01-01

    The first habitat and work station on the lunar surface undoubtedly has to be prefabricated, self-erecting, and self-contained. The building structure should be folded and compacted to the minimum size and made of materials of minimum weight. It must also be designed to provide maximum possible habitable and usable space on the Moon. For this purpose the concept of multistory, foldable structures was further developed. The idea is to contain foldable structural units in a cylinder or in a capsule adapted for launching. Upon landing on the lunar surface, the cylinder of the first proposal in this paper will open in two hinge-connected halves while the capsule of the second proposal will expand horizontally and vertically in all directions. In both proposals, the foldable structural units will self-erect providing a multistory building with several room enclosures. The solar radiation protection is maintained through regolith-filled pneumatic structures as in the first proposal, or two regolith-filled expandable capsule shells as in the second one, which provide the shielding while being supported by the erected internal skeletal structure.

  18. Sick building syndrome in like symptoms in emergency prefabricated accommodation.

    PubMed

    Muzi, G; Accattoli, M P; dell'Omo, M; Frillici, C; Sapia, I E; Abbritti, G

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the sources of discomfort and the symptoms reported by earthquake victims residing in temporary emergency prefabricated accommodation (prefab). The investigation was carried out by means of a questionnaire. 203 prefab occupants and 13 inhabitants of houses, who were chosen as reference population, replied in winter and 233 prefab occupants and 154 inhabitants of houses replied in summer. In both seasons more people living in prefabs indentified dry air, stuffy air, stale air, dust, dampness, uncomfortable temperature and bad odours as sources of discomfort. They also complained of general symptoms (headache, irritablility, insomnia, difficulty in concentration) and irritative symptoms of the eyes, upper and lower airways and skin. Multiple regression analysis identified the type of accommodation as the variable that most influenced the onset of general, ocular, upper and lower airway symptoms. Intrinsic characteristics of the prefabs (being constructed with synthetic materials, combustion sources, poor ventilation and insulation) and psychosocial factors e. losing their home, could have contributed to the onset of symptoms. PMID:15345200

  19. Prefabricated Refractory Panels for Use in KSC's Flame Deflectors: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Maria; Trejo, David

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been used to launch space vehicles for the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. NASA is currently designing and developing a new space vehicle. The launch complexes have been in service for a significant duration and the aggressive conditions of the Florida coast and the launches have resulted in failures within the launch complexes. Of particular interests is the performance of the refractory lining that covers the steel base structure for the diversion of the exhaust from the launched vehicles (i.e., the flame deflectors). An unprotected steel base structure would likely experience loss of strength and possible failure when subjected to the high temperatures during launches. The refractory lining is critical for successful launches. The refractory material currently used in the flame trenches was developed in 1959 and is the only refractory material approved for use in these facilities. Significant effort and costs are expended in repairing the lining system after each launch. NASA is currently performing a comprehensive research program to assess and develop refractory materials for improved performance in the flame trenches. However, one challenge associated with the use of refractory materials in the flame trench is that the materials should be cured, dried, and fired to maximize their properties and characteristics. Because of the large size of the deflectors and trenches, drying and firing of the lining system is difficult, if not impossible. Most refractory materials are dried and fired before use. Because the refractory materials used for the deflector lining cannot be dried and fired, the full potential of the materials are not being realized. A system that could use refractory materials that could be cured, dried, and sintered in a controlled environment would likely improve the performance of the lining system. This report evaluates the feasibility of fabricating and placing prefabricated

  20. Comparison of Stress Distribution in a Maxillary Central Incisor Restored with Two Prefabricated Post Systems with and without Ferrule Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Sabarinathan; Raja, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction When restoring an endodontically treated tooth with deficient coronal tooth structure, posts can be used to strengthen the tooth. Recently prefabricated posts are widely used as they exclude the need for complex laboratory procedures making the procedure time saving. But the post-placement can produce stresses that cause root fracture. Different techniques can be used to study the stress distribution due to different posts, but most of them are two-dimensional and difficult to reproduce. Aim The aim of the study was to compare the stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor with Titanium and Glass fiber posts with and without ferrule using the three dimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods In this study 3D finite element analysis was used. Four models P1(Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with a ferrule of coronal dentin and restored with parallel sided prefabricated titanium post and composite resin core), P2 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor restored with parallel sided prefabricated Titanium post and composite resin core without a ferrule of coronal dentin), P3 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with a ferrule of coronal dentin and restored with parallel sided prefabricated glass fiber reinforced composite post and composite core), P4 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor restored with parallel sided prefabricated glass fiber reinforced composite post and composite core without a ferrule of coronal dentin), were modeled using PRO E software. Then stress analysis was done using ANSYS WORKBENCH 10.0software. A load of 100 N was applied to the models at 2mm from the incisal edge on the palatal surface with an angle of 45o to the long axis of the tooth. Results The results suggested that maximum stresses were seen around posts in order of Titanium post without ferrule followed by Titanium post with ferrule next Glass fiber post without ferrule followed by Glass fiber post

  1. Technique for placement of a posterior prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite bridge.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Sarita; Meiers, Jonathan C

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) materials currently are used as alternatives for fixed restorations of edentulous areas within the posterior and anterior regions of the mouth. A chairside technique, using a prefabricated FRC framework, allows the clinician to offer the patient another fixed option for replacing a missing posterior tooth that is more time-efficient and cost-effective than other, more traditional approaches. Procedures that incorporate adhesive dentistry give dentists the ability to replace missing teeth and splint unstable teeth for periodontal or orthodontic purposes. This article demonstrates the sequence and chairside technique for placing a prefabricated FRC framework to restore a posterior edentulous area. PMID:17134075

  2. [Study of the revascularizing properties of the greater omentum for creating prefabricated complex autografts under experimantal conditions].

    PubMed

    Milanov, N O; Trofimov, E I; Sheremet'eva, G F; Bogomolova, N S; Zhidkov, I L; Startseva, O I; Shimbireva, O Iu

    2006-01-01

    The revascularizing properties of the greater omentum used as a vascular pedicle for the prefabrication of skin, skin/cartilage or skin/ bone autografts, and their viability after rotation and recipient zone infection were studied in rat experiments. The experiment showed that complexity factor did not have a significant effect on the revascularizing properties of the greater omentum, and required only an insignificant prolongation of prefabrication period. Skin/omental, skin/cartilageous, and skin/bony autografts based on the greater omentum formed by day 7, 14, and 21, respectively. After these periods prefabricated autografts remained viable upon rotation. In case of infection, the survival rate of prefabricated skin/bone autografts, revascularized with two-layer greater omentum, is lower than that of skin/cartilage ones. The technique of prefabrication of autografts including skin, cartilage, and bone, is a promising method for closure of vast multicomponent defects in complicated clinical situations.

  3. Comparative evaluation of retention of prefabricated and conventional cast post: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Suchismita; Begum, Zubeda; Choudhary, Prashant; Tripathi, Siddhi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the retention of various prefabricated posts and to compare them with that of the conventional cast post. Materials and Methods: A sample of 60 freshly extracted single-rooted human mandibular first premolars were sectioned horizontally, 1 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into four groups consisting of carbon fiber posts, glass fiber posts, stainless steel posts and cast metal posts. Cast metal post was the control group. Each group contained 15 specimen. The post space of 9 mm depth was prepared using specific drill supplied by the manufacturer. Resin patterns of the prepared post spaces were fabricated for 15 specimen and were cast in nickel chromium base metal alloy. All the posts were cemented with self-adhesive resin cement and mounted in acrylic cylinders. The teeth were subjected to tensile pull-out test using a universal testing machine. The force required to dislodge each post from the teeth was recorded. The data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test. Results: The bond strength of all the prefabricated posts was significantly lower than the conventional cast post. Among the prefabricated posts highest bond strength was obtained for prefabricated stainless steel post and lowest for carbon fiber posts. There was no significant difference in the mean bond strength obtained for stainless steel and glass fiber post. Conclusion: Though no single prefabricated post could achieve results close to the control group, most retentive among the experimental group were the stainless steel posts. However, conditions where nonmetallic posts are indicated most preferred type of post can be the glass fiber posts. PMID:25254191

  4. [Experimental investigation of neovascularisation in large prefabricated flaps after arteriovenous pedicle implantation].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The H; Klöppel, M; Staudenmaier, R; Biemer, E

    2004-08-01

    The principle of prefabricated flaps is based on the transformation of a formerly random-pattern vascularized flap, through implantation of a vascular pedicle, into a newly neovascularized axial flap, which can be transferred after a period of neovascularisation from the prepared donor site to the recipient site by using microvascular techniques. In 30 Chinchilla Bastard rabbits weighing from 3700 to 4200 g, a skeletonized arteriovenous pedicle with distal ligation harvested from the femoral and saphena magna artery and vein was implanted beneath an 8 x 15 cm abdominal skin flap to investigate the neovascularisation process in the flap over the course of time. In order to prevent neovascularisation occurring from the underlying vascular bed into the flap, a silicon sheet measuring 8 x 15 cm x 0.25 mm was placed and fixed on the abdominal wall. Flap vitality and neovascularisation process in prefabricated flaps were evaluated by macroscopic observation, blood analysis, selective microangiography, histology and scintigraphy at the various time intervals of 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 days. The study results showed that newly formed vessels sprouting from the implanted pedicle were seen four days after pedicle implantation. With the retention time of pedicle in the flaps, they continued to grow, became meander and more dense. Respective connections between newly formed vessels and the originally available vasculature of the abdominal flap were markedly observed in the 12- and 16-day groups. Twenty days after prefabrication, the abdominal flap was completely perfused by the blood flow supplied from the newly implanted arteriovenous pedicle through newly formed vessels arising from the implanted pedicle and their rich vascular communications. The neovascularisation in the prefabricated flap consisted of the implanted pedicle, newly formed vessels, the originally available vasculature and their vascular connections. In comparison to the control group (the quantification was

  5. Vapor-deposited amorphous metamaterials as visible near-perfect absorbers with random non-prefabricated metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Wei, Tiaoxing; Dong, Wenjing; Zhang, Kenan; Sun, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Spatial order or periodicity is usually required and constructed with tens of nanometers in the feature size, which makes it difficult to process the near-perfect metamaterial absorbers (PMAs) working in the visible range in large-area and mass-production scale. Although many established technologies and theoretical modeling methods used for order-based metamaterials, aperiodic or disordered structures have been gradually recognized to achieve similar functionalities for which the ordered structures are overwhelmingly used. Here, we demonstrated the vapor-deposited ‘amorphous’ metamaterials as controlled-reflectance surfaces and tunable PMAs without the use of the lithographically ordered arrays, the prefabricated colloidal metal nanoparticles (MNPs) or the multilayer of nanoparticles. The flexible construction, the control of the monolayer of MNPs and the atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) dielectric spacer layer provide more insight for understanding the controlled-reflectance surfaces. Such processes have a few key advantages of CMOS-compatible simple processing, low cost and large-area plating, allowing the PMAs to be flexibly constructed in mass-production scale. PMID:24810434

  6. An in vitro evaluation of a prototype CFRC prefabricated post developed for the restoration of pulpless teeth.

    PubMed

    King, P A; Setchell, D J

    1990-11-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFRC) in the form of a prefabricated post has recently been developed and is theoretically acceptable for consideration in an endodontic post-retained crown system. This study compared four different types of postcore system cemented into 40 extracted anterior human teeth. The test groups consisted of CFRC posts cemented with a composite resin luting agent, and used with either a cast gold alloy core (Group B) or a composite resin core (Group C). Two existing post-core techniques were used as controls for comparison with the CFRC groups. One control was a prefabricated wrought precious alloy post having a cast gold alloy core, and cemented with zinc phosphate cement (Group A). The other was a prefabricated stainless steel post with a composite resin core, and cemented with a composite resin luting agent (Group D). All specimens were restored with a gold alloy crown and tested to failure with an obliquely applied compressive load at 130 degrees in an Instron using a cross-head speed of 5 cm min-1. The results showed that post-retained crowns using a prefabricated CFRC post exhibited properties comparable with, and in some cases better than, those of existing prefabricated posts. The mode of failure of specimens restored with a CFRC post was more favourable to the remaining tooth tissue than was that of specimens restored with a metallic post.

  7. Individual prefabricated titanium implants and titanium mesh in skull base reconstructive surgery. A report of cases.

    PubMed

    Schipper, J; Ridder, G J; Spetzger, U; Teszler, C B; Fradis, M; Maier, W

    2004-05-01

    Titanium implants can be shaped by traditional hand forming, press shaping, modular construction by welding, construction on full-size models shaped from CT coordinates and, most recently, by computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that consist in the direct prefabrication of individual implants by milling them out of a solid block of titanium. The aim of our study was to present a set of preliminary cases of an ongoing program of reconstructive procedures of the skull base using titanium implants. The subjects underwent ablative procedures of the skull base with reconstruction either by titanium mesh or individual prefabricated CAD/CAM implants. Six patients have been operated on successfully since 2000: two received prefabricated CAD/CAM titanium plates and four others underwent reconstruction with titanium mesh. The stability of CAD/CAM plates is superior to that of mesh, thus it is more useful in reconstructing large lesions of the frontal skull base and the temporal and occipital bones. Titanium mesh was successfully used for defects smaller than 100 cm(2) or where selected viscerocranial defects are complicated in design and less reproducible by CAD/CAM. The intraoperative design, shaping and adjustment characteristic of titanium mesh can be dispensed with when CAD/CAM implants are used. The 3-D data set used in the CAD/CAM process also operates in the navigated simulation and planning of the ablation contours, the latter being of great assistance in establishing the optimal future defect. As a disadvantage, CAD/CAM technology is more expensive than titanium mesh, and the process is time-consuming as it is carried out in advance of surgery.

  8. Case History Report: Immediate Rehabilitation with a Prefabricated Fibula Flap Following Removal of a Locally Aggressive Maxillary Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nkenke, Emeka; Agaimy, Abbas; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Lell, Michael; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Eitner, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The present clinical case history report describes an interdisciplinary treatment protocol that combines maxillary tumor resection with immediate reconstruction to achieve functional rehabilitation. A fibula flap that received four dental implants and a split-thickness graft epithelial layer was prefabricated for a 31-year-old man. The flap was designed so that it could be adapted to fit in different extents of tumor resection. Resection and immediate reconstruction were successfully performed 6 weeks after flap prefabrication, with the final bar-retained dental prosthesis delivered 4 weeks later. PMID:26757329

  9. Assessment of past exposure to man-made vitreous fibers in the Swedish prefabricated house industry.

    PubMed

    Plato, N; Gustavsson, P; Krantz, S

    1997-10-01

    Large quantities of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) are handled in the Swedish prefabricated wooden house industry. The present study is part of a program to investigate mortality, cancer incidence, and current as well as previous exposure to MMVF among workers in the Swedish prefabricated wooden house industry. Since measurements of historical fiber exposure levels are lacking, these were calculated by the application of a matrix of multipliers to recently measured MMVF levels. The multipliers represented changes over time in production rate, technical properties of the fibers, manual handling vs. automation, and ventilation control. The multipliers were based on a similar matrix, developed for the MMVF-manufacturing industry, which was modified to reflect the conditions in the wooden house industry. The model was developed for the highest-exposed job title in the study, insulators. One hundred and twenty samples of airborne fiber were taken in 11 plants to reflect current exposure levels. The highest mean fiber exposure level for insulators was assessed as 0.18 f/ml (geometric mean), which occurred during the mid-1970s, compared to 0.10 f/ml at the end of the 1980s and the early 1960s. Changes in production rate, improved ventilation control, and the surface area of the total amount of MMVF sheets handled per insulator were the most important variables of the model. No increased risk of lung cancer was found in the present industry. PMID:9258388

  10. Assessment of past exposure to man-made vitreous fibers in the Swedish prefabricated house industry.

    PubMed

    Plato, N; Gustavsson, P; Krantz, S

    1997-10-01

    Large quantities of man-made vitreous fibers (MMVF) are handled in the Swedish prefabricated wooden house industry. The present study is part of a program to investigate mortality, cancer incidence, and current as well as previous exposure to MMVF among workers in the Swedish prefabricated wooden house industry. Since measurements of historical fiber exposure levels are lacking, these were calculated by the application of a matrix of multipliers to recently measured MMVF levels. The multipliers represented changes over time in production rate, technical properties of the fibers, manual handling vs. automation, and ventilation control. The multipliers were based on a similar matrix, developed for the MMVF-manufacturing industry, which was modified to reflect the conditions in the wooden house industry. The model was developed for the highest-exposed job title in the study, insulators. One hundred and twenty samples of airborne fiber were taken in 11 plants to reflect current exposure levels. The highest mean fiber exposure level for insulators was assessed as 0.18 f/ml (geometric mean), which occurred during the mid-1970s, compared to 0.10 f/ml at the end of the 1980s and the early 1960s. Changes in production rate, improved ventilation control, and the surface area of the total amount of MMVF sheets handled per insulator were the most important variables of the model. No increased risk of lung cancer was found in the present industry.

  11. Man as a Living Bioreactor: Prefabrication of a Custom Vascularized Bone Graft in the Gastrocolic Omentum.

    PubMed

    Wiltfang, Jörg; Rohnen, Michael; Egberts, Jan-Hendrik; Lützen, Ulf; Wieker, Henning; Açil, Yahya; Naujokat, Hendrik

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of critical-size jaw defects still remains challenging. The standard treatment today is transplantation of autologous bone grafts, which is associated with high donor-site morbidity and unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to reconstruct a mandibular discontinuity defect after ablative surgery using the gastrocolic omentum as a bioreactor for heterotopic ossification. Three-dimensional computed tomography data were used to produce an ideal virtual replacement for the mandibular defect. A titanium mesh cage was filled with bone mineral blocks, infiltrated with 12 mg of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2, and enriched with bone marrow aspirate. The scaffold was implanted into the gastrocolic omentum, and 3 months later, a free flap was harvested to reconstruct the mandibular defect. In vivo single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography revealed bone remodeling and mineralization inside the mandibular transplant during prefabrication and after transplantation. Reconstruction was possible without any further modifications of the graft. A histological evaluation revealed that large sections of the Bio-Oss material were covered with osteoid matrix 3 months after transplantation. The quality of life of the patient significantly increased with acquisition of the ability to masticate and the improvement in pronunciation and aesthetics. Heterotopic bone induction to form a mandibular replacement inside the gastrocolic omentum is possible in human subjects. Heterotopic prefabrication is associated with many advantages, like allowing a reduced operative burden compared with conventional techniques and good three-dimensional outcomes. PMID:27317022

  12. An Evaluation of Fracture Strength of Zirconium Oxide Posts Fabricated Using CAD-CAM Technology Compared with Prefabricated Glass Fibre Posts.

    PubMed

    Dayalan, Malathi; Jairaj, Abhishek; Nagaraj, K R; Savadi, Ravindra C

    2010-12-01

    Post and core therapy is regarded as the treatment of choice for restoring severely damaged endodontically treated teeth. Critical control of endodontic materials in the coronal third of the canal and pulp chamber is essential in order to maintain its colour and translucency. In addition to this, the duplication of the optical characteristics of an intact tooth, including shade translucency and fluorescence is often made difficult by the use of metal infrastructures. As a result of this tooth colored posts have gained popularity especially in aesthetic areas. Besides aesthetics, the post is also responsible for transmitting the occlusal forces to the remaining tooth structure making the mechanical properties of the post critical. However, there is no clear consensus regarding an ideal system as far as strength of the post is concerned. Hence this study aims to analyses and compares the fracture strength of traditional prefabricated glass fibre posts with zirconium oxide posts constructed using CAD CAM technology. PMID:22131666

  13. An ex vivo comparative study on the retention of custom and prefabricated posts

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Logani, Ajay; Shah, Naseem

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to comparatively evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the retention of custom-fabricated fiber-reinforced composite (CF-FRC), prefabricated metal, and glass fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Thirty mandibular first premolars decoronated at the CE junction were divided into three groups (n=10). Groups A, B, and C were restored using Para Post (Whale dent), Reforpost (Angelus), and CF-FRC post (Ribbond-THM), respectively. Five specimens from each group were subjected to cyclic loading. Tensile bond strength (TBS) was evaluated. Results: Pre-loading TBS values were statistically, significantly higher for all posts (P<0.05). Before and after loading, there was a significant difference between group C as compared to groups A and B. Conclusions: Cyclic loading reduced the retention of all posts but was comparatively lesser for the CF-FRC post. This system provides sufficient retention required for clinical success. PMID:22557821

  14. [Microorganisms growing on the inner surfaces of prefabricated houses and their control].

    PubMed

    Katircioğlu, Y Z; Gürcan, A

    1987-01-01

    Microorganisms which isolated from the plasters of prefabricated houses, constructed by Yübetaş company in Oran Ankara Were examined. As a result of isolations, Alternaria, Penicillium and Stemphylium species of fungi were founded on the plasters. The growth of the fungi was tested on Agrisan megess and Dyo Sadosan make plastic wall paints and it was found that these fungi showed a profuse growth in the former make paint, but not in the second one. When mancozeb (Dithan-M-45) in 0.2% and copper oxychloride (Mavi Bakir Sandoz) in 0.5% were added to the plaster the growth of the fungi were completely prevented, but Wettable powder sulfur in 0.4% did not prevent their growth but stimulated it. PMID:3441227

  15. [Moisture and mold on the inner walls of prefabricated building slabs--investigating a strange cause].

    PubMed

    Kaufhold, T; Fiedler, K; Jung, G; Lindner, M; Gassel, R P

    1997-04-01

    Reasons for indoor-moisture beyond the normal level can be caused by penetrating dampness, condensation-water, and apartment misuse. A fall in the air temperature below the dew point in connection with moulding inside buildings becomes evident mostly at places like badly insulated outer-walls or room-corners. In a number of houses built between 1980 and 1983 in the so called "Plattenbauweise" (prefabricated slabs), exclusively the inner-walls were covered in mould around cracks in the walls. Examinations showed connections between the apartment and the outer-corridor with a slight exchange of air through the cracks. Warm, wet air escaped from the apartment into the outer-corridor, and cold air entered the apartment from the outer-corridor. This temporary fall below the dewpoint caused by suitable variation of temperature probably resulted in the building materials and wallpapers becoming damp, as well as the growth of mould. PMID:9376065

  16. Sickness absence due to occupational dermatoses in a prefabrication construction factory.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L

    1986-07-01

    In a study of sickness absence due to occupational dermatoses among 360 construction workers in a prefabrication construction factory in 1984, we found 3 workers with allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement who required medical leave. There were 5 sickness absence spells due to occupational dermatoses and the number of days lost due to occupational dermatoses was 53 days for the year. This averaged out at 0.01 spells per worker per year, 0.15 days per worker per year and 15 days per spell. It appeared that the number of workers requiring sickness absence from occupational dermatoses was low, but that those with the condition required about 2 weeks of sickness absence. Allergic contact dermatitis from chromate in cement appeared to be the only occupational dermatosis causing sickness absence in the factory.

  17. Long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance for myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Doepel, M; Nilner, M; Ekberg, E; LE Bell, Y

    2012-04-01

    The long-term effectiveness of a prefabricated oral appliance (R) was compared with a stabilisation appliance (S) in patients with myofascial pain. Sixty-five patients diagnosed with myofascial pain at two centres for Stomatognathic Physiology in Sweden and Finland were included in a randomised controlled trial using Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, with history questionnaires and clinical examinations performed by blinded examiners at baseline and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were randomly assigned either to the R or the S group. Treatment outcome was measured according to IMMPACT for four chronic pain outcome domains: pain intensity, overall improvement, physical functioning and emotional functioning. Physical functioning was classified for Graded Chronic Pain severities and assessed by the Jaw Functional Limitation scale. Emotional functioning composed of scores of non-specific physical symptoms and depression. There were no differences between groups at baseline. At both follow-ups, all outcome domains showed significant within-group improvement, without significant differences between groups. At 12 months, 72% of all patients reported a 30% reduction in worst pain and 63% of the patients a 50% reduction in worst pain. Overall improvement 'better' to 'symptom-free' was observed in 81% in the R and 64% in the S group at the 12-month follow-up. Graded Chronic Pain, Functional Limitation of the Jaw, non-specific physical symptoms and depression showed statistically significant reduction at 12-month follow-up. Results support the hypothesis that the effectiveness of the prefabricated appliance is similar to that of the stabilisation appliance in the long-term when treating patients with myofascial pain.

  18. Single Phosphorus Ion Implantation into Prefabricated Nanometre Cells of Silicon Devices for Quantum Bit Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Jamieson, David N.; Pakes, Chris; Prawer, Steven; Dzurak, Andrew; Stanley, Fay; Spizziri, Paul; Macks, Linda; Gauja, Eric; Clark, Robert G.

    2003-06-01

    In the near future, devices that employ single atoms to store or manipulate information will be constructed. For example, a solid-state quantum computer has been proposed that encodes information in the nuclear spin of shallow arrays of single 31P atoms (quantum bits or qubits) in a matrix of pure silicon. Construction of these devices presents formidable challenges. One strategy is to use single ion implantation, with the energy range of 10 to 20 keV, to load the qubits into prefabricated cells of the device with a period of a few tens of nanometres. We have developed a method of single ion implantation that employs detector electrodes adjacent to the prefabricated qubit cells that can detect on-line single keV ion strikes appropriate for the fabrication of shallow arrays. Our method of the sub-20 keV single ion detection utilizes a pure silicon substrate with a very high resistivity, a thin (5 nm) SiO2 surface layer, biased electrodes applied to the surface and sensitive electronics that can detect the charge transient from single keV ion strikes. We show that our detectors have a near 100% efficiency for keV ions, extremely thin dead layer thickness (˜5 nm) and a wide sensitive region extending laterally from the electrodes (greater than 15 μm) where the nanometre cells can be constructed. We compare the method with the other methods, such as those of measuring the secondary electrons or phonons induced by single ion impacts.

  19. Effect of custom-made and prefabricated insoles on plantar loading parameters during running with and without fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Macián-Romero, Cecili; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Controversy exists whether custom-made insoles are more effective in reducing plantar loading compared to prefabricated insoles. Forty recreational athletes ran using custom-made, prefabricated, and the original insoles of their running shoes, at rest and after a fatigue run. Contact time, stride rate, and plantar loading parameters were measured. Neither the insole conditions nor the fatigue state modified contact time and stride rate. Addressing prevention of running injuries, post-fatigue loading values are of great interest. Custom-made insoles reduced the post-fatigue loading under the hallux (92 vs. 130 kPa, P < 0.05), medial midfoot (70 vs. 105 kPa, P < 0.01), and lateral midfoot (62 vs 96 kPa, P < 0.01). Prefabricated insoles provoked reductions in post-fatigue loading under the toes (120 vs. 175 kPa, P < 0.05), medial midfoot (71 vs. 105 kPa, P < 0.01), and lateral midfoot (68 vs. 96 kPa, P < 0.01). Regarding both study insoles, custom-made insoles reduced by 31% and 54% plantar loading under the medial and lateral heel compared to the prefabricated insoles. Finally, fatigue state did not influence plantar loading regardless the insole condition. In long-distance races, even a slight reduction in plantar loading at each foot strike may suppose a significant decrease in the overall stress experienced by the foot, and therefore the use of insoles may be an important protective mechanism for plantar overloading.

  20. Effect of custom-made and prefabricated insoles on plantar loading parameters during running with and without fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Macián-Romero, Cecili; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Controversy exists whether custom-made insoles are more effective in reducing plantar loading compared to prefabricated insoles. Forty recreational athletes ran using custom-made, prefabricated, and the original insoles of their running shoes, at rest and after a fatigue run. Contact time, stride rate, and plantar loading parameters were measured. Neither the insole conditions nor the fatigue state modified contact time and stride rate. Addressing prevention of running injuries, post-fatigue loading values are of great interest. Custom-made insoles reduced the post-fatigue loading under the hallux (92 vs. 130 kPa, P < 0.05), medial midfoot (70 vs. 105 kPa, P < 0.01), and lateral midfoot (62 vs 96 kPa, P < 0.01). Prefabricated insoles provoked reductions in post-fatigue loading under the toes (120 vs. 175 kPa, P < 0.05), medial midfoot (71 vs. 105 kPa, P < 0.01), and lateral midfoot (68 vs. 96 kPa, P < 0.01). Regarding both study insoles, custom-made insoles reduced by 31% and 54% plantar loading under the medial and lateral heel compared to the prefabricated insoles. Finally, fatigue state did not influence plantar loading regardless the insole condition. In long-distance races, even a slight reduction in plantar loading at each foot strike may suppose a significant decrease in the overall stress experienced by the foot, and therefore the use of insoles may be an important protective mechanism for plantar overloading. PMID:24823258

  1. En bloc prefabrication of vascularized bioartificial bone grafts in sheep and complete workflow for custom-made transplants.

    PubMed

    Kokemüller, H; Jehn, P; Spalthoff, S; Essig, H; Tavassol, F; Schumann, P; Andreae, A; Nolte, I; Jagodzinski, M; Gellrich, N-C

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine, in a new experimental model, whether complex bioartificial monoblocs of relevant size and stability can be prefabricated in a defined three-dimensional design, in which the latissimus dorsi muscle serves as a natural bioreactor and the thoracodorsal vessel tree is prepared for axial construct perfusion. Eighteen sheep were included in the study, with six animals in each of three experimental groups. Vitalization of the β-tricalcium phosphate-based constructs was performed by direct application of unmodified osteogenic material from the iliac crest (group A), in vivo application of nucleated cell concentrate (NCC) from bone marrow aspirate (group B), and in vitro cultivation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in a perfusion bioreactor system (group C). The contours of the constructs were designed digitally and transferred onto the bioartificial bone grafts using a titanium cage, which was bent over a stereolithographic model of the defined subvolume intraoperatively. At the end of the prefabrication process, only the axial vascularized constructs of group A demonstrated vital bone formation with considerable stability. In groups B and C, the applied techniques were not able to induce ectopic bone formation. The presented computer-assisted workflow allows the prefabrication of custom-made bioartificial transplants.

  2. A medical device for prefabrication of large bone grafts in modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, Claude; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2011-04-01

    Translating advances in the laboratory into sound clinical practice presents a series of formidable conceptual and technical challenges. One of them is our inability to maintain large grafts of living cells upon transfer from in vitro conditions into the host in vivo. This is due mainly to diffusion limitations within the grafting material. We embrace the well-known hypothesis of the "Diamond Concept" in bone tissue regeneration, which includes four key factors. Based on the understanding of basic elements of tissue engineering constructs, prefabrication and conditioning techniques and the nano-vascularisation of the scaffold, we furthermore hypothesize that combinations of cells, solid multipolymeric scaffold as the "core element" working as the extracellular matrix (ECM), growth factors and nano-vascularisation setting may eventually generate a large "ready-to-use"in vitro/in vivo graft. We are confident and think that growth factors will help in the construction of a step-by-step organisation of the bone tissue engineering construct (BTEC). A medical device, named in vitro/in vivo Bone Bioreactor Tissue Engineering Construct (IV2B2TEC), is proposed to fulfil the hypothesis. Soon, we hope to test the above hypothesis on a non-union bone defect in an animal model. This novel strategy will likely open new options for reconstructing extended bone defects and facilitate clinical translation of bone tissue engineering. As compared with conventional reconstructive methods, the strategy has four key advantages and might prove to be a novel armamentarium for clinicians in regenerative medicine.

  3. A custom-made nasal implant: prefabrication from curing of silicone adhesive.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Kang, J

    1996-02-01

    When nasal augmentation is performed with implants fashioned from a piece of solid silicone block or commercially available prefabricated implants, the precise sculpturing of the ventral surface of the implant in order to conform to the convex contour of the nose is often difficult to achieve, increasing the possibility for malposition and extrusion. We devised two methods of making soft silicone elastomer implants from nasal cast models obtained from alginate impressions of patients' noses: type I, in which the implant is made from the curing of silicone adhesive that is spread on both sides of the sheet blueprint placed on the cast model, and type II, in which the implant is made only from the curing of silicone adhesive. Because these custom-made implants have a ventral surface of exact concave contour conforming to the convex surface of the nasal framework, they blend in nicely with the various configurations of the existing nasal framework and thus minimize malposition and extrusion. These implants also avoid having a prototype nose for everyone and are more cost-effective than commercially available implants. PMID:8559830

  4. Low back injury risks during construction with prefabricated (panelised) walls: effects of task and design factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2011-01-01

    New technology designed to increase productivity in residential construction may exacerbate the risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among residential construction workers. Of interest here are panelised (prefabricated) wall systems (or panels) and facilitating an ongoing effort to provide proactive control of ergonomic exposures and risks among workers using panels. This study, which included 24 participants, estimated WMSD risks using five methods during common panel erection tasks and the influences of panel mass (sheathed vs. unsheathed) and size (wall length). WMSD risks were fairly high overall; e.g. 34% and 77% of trials exceeded the 'action limits' for spinal compressive and shear forces, respectively. Heavier (sheathed) panels significantly increased risks, although the magnitude of this effect differed with panel size and between tasks. Higher levels of risk were found in tasks originating from ground vs. knuckle height. Several practical recommendations based on the results are discussed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Panelised wall systems have the potential to increase productivity in residential construction, but may result in increased worker injury risks. Results from this study can be used to generate future panel design and construction processes that can proactively address WMSD risks.

  5. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Barekatain, Behnaz; Naseri, Roohollah; Zarezadeh, Hossein; Askari, Navid; Nasiri, Saman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove a cemented post from a root canal requiring endodontic retreatment. Various results have been reported from the studies that evaluated the effect of ultrasonic instruments in removing the posts cemented with resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic energy on the retention of prefabricated metal post cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty eight extracted single root premolars were decoronated with a diamond disc leaving a 13 mm long root and endodontically treated. The root canals were obturated by gutta-percha up to 5 mm with vertical condensation method and the 8 mm post-space was prepared to receive a no. 2 long Dentorama post. The roots were placed in an incubator for 48 h in 37°C and 100% humidity. After mounting the teeth in acrylic blocks, posts were cemented in the root canals using Panavia F2.0 in 24 specimens and Maxcem Elite in 24 others. For half of the specimens in each subgroup, an ultrasonic device was applied for 4 min. Universal testing machine was used to measure the force needed to remove the posts with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the post came out of the canal. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results: The removal force was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia) and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite) resin cements. PMID:24379864

  6. Large, Easily Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Study of concepts for large space structures will interest those designing scaffolding, radio towers, rescue equipment, and prefabricated shelters. Double-fold, double-cell module was selected for further design and for zero gravity testing. Concept is viable for deployment by humans outside space vehicle as well as by remotely operated manipulator.

  7. Preservation of keratinized mucosa around implants using a prefabricated implant-retained stent: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to clinically assess the impact of a prefabricated implant-retained stent clipped over healing abutments on the preservation of keratinized mucosa around implants after implant surgery, and to compare it with horizontal external mattress sutures. Methods A total of 50 patients were enrolled in this study. In the test group, a prefabricated implant-retained stent was clipped on the healing abutment after implant surgery to replace the keratinized tissue bucco-apically. In the control group, horizontal external mattress sutures were applied instead of using a stent. After the surgical procedure, the width of the buccal keratinized mucosa was measured at the mesial, middle, and distal aspects of the healing abutment. The change in the width of the buccal keratinized mucosa was assessed at 1 and 3 months. Results Healing was uneventful in both groups. The difference of width between baseline and 1 month was −0.26±0.85 mm in the test group, without any statistical significance (P=0.137). Meanwhile, the corresponding difference in the control group was −0.74±0.73 mm and it showed statistical significance (P<0.001). The difference of width between baseline and 3 months was −0.57±0.97 mm in the test group and −0.86±0.71 mm in the control group. These reductions were statistically significant (P<0.05); however, there was no difference between the 2 groups. Conclusions Using a prefabricated implant-retained stent was shown to be effective in the preservation of the keratinized mucosa around implants and it was simple and straightforward in comparison to the horizontal external mattress suture technique. PMID:27800215

  8. Vertical extended hemi crico-laryngectomy and reconstruction with a prefabricated tracheal free flap--initial results.

    PubMed

    Cox, G J; Goodacre, T E; Corbridge, R

    2000-01-01

    We describe our experiences of treating three patients with recurrent T3 squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, following initial treatment with radiotherapy; using the technique of partial crico-laryngectomy and autologous pre-fabricated tracheal flap reconstruction as described in 1998 by Delaere (1). We have found the technique to be technically challenging. The patients require extensive speech and swallowing rehabilitation following surgery, but the functional result offers significant advantages over the other surgical salvage procedures of total or near-total laryngectomy. We describe our early results of three patients that we have treated using this technique. PMID:10865483

  9. Single-tooth replacement with a chairside prefabricated fiber-reinforced resin composite bridge: a case study.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Sarita; Meiers, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    There are many fixed options for replacing a single anterior tooth, including implants; conventional full coverage; porcelain-fused-to-metal, all-ceramic, and fiber-reinforced composite designs; and minimal preparation designs that utilize lingual wing frameworks made from metal, ceramic, or fiber-reinforced composite. All of these approaches require at least two visits; however, it is possible to replace a missing anterior tooth in a single visit by using adhesive techniques with resin composite and fiber-reinforced resin composite materials. This approach has been developed and refined with a bridge created at chairside, using a prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite framework. This framework consists of a pontic substructure that is shaped to support a resin composite pontic, with one or two wings used to attach the pontic substructure to either the lingual or facial surfaces of the abutment teeth. This article describes a chairside technique for replacing a maxillary central incisor by using a prefabricated fiber-reinforced framework. PMID:15636277

  10. Evaluation of Columbia, USMARC-Composite, Suffolk, and Texel rams as terminal sires in an extensive rangeland production system: III. Prefabrication carcass traits and organ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate terminal sire breeds, harvest BW, prefabrication carcass measurements, and organ weights were evaluated over 3 yr, for 518 crossbred wether lambs. Lambs were produced by single-sire matings of 22 Columbia, 22 USMARC-Composite (Composite), 21 Suffolk, and 17 Texel rams to adult Rambouille...

  11. Use of a prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite resin framework to provide a provisional fixed partial denture over an integrating implant: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Meiers, Jonathan C; Freilich, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The development of fiber-reinforced composites offers new possibilities in minimally invasive tooth replacement approaches. This article describes the use of a prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite resin framework for the chairside fabrication of a provisional fixed partial denture over an integrating implant. The framework fabrication, theory, and a clinical scenario are illustrated. PMID:16399269

  12. Lung cancer risk among workers exposed to man-made mineral fibers (MMMF) in the Swedish prefabricated house industry.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P; Plato, N; Axelson, O; Brage, H N; Hogstedt, C; Ringbäck, G; Tornling, G; Wingren, G

    1992-01-01

    Mortality and cancer incidence was investigated among 2,807 workers, employed for at least one year before 1972, at 11 Swedish companies manufacturing prefabricated wooden houses. A total of 1,068 workers had been exposed to man-made mineral fibers (MMMF) used for insulation. Mortality was followed from 1969 to 1988 and cancer incidence from 1969 to 1985. Exposure conditions were investigated at all plants. There were 14 deaths from lung cancer in the total cohort, whereas 20.7 would be expected (SMR = 68; 95% CI:37-113), based on regional mortality. After a latency of 20 years of more, two lung cancer cases had occurred among all workers exposed to MMMF, whereas 4.3 would be expected (SMR = 46; 95% CI: 5-168). The exposure levels that have prevailed do not seem to be associated with an increased lung cancer rate, but extended follow-up is necessary for a definitive evaluation. PMID:1621690

  13. Design and use of a prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite substructure for the chairside replacement of missing premolars.

    PubMed

    Meiers, Jonathan C; Freilich, Martin A

    2006-06-01

    Fiber-reinforced resin composites (FRCs) have been used to make frameworks to support particulate resin composite veneers in the replacement of missing teeth. Both prosthetic laboratory-fabricated and chairside-fabricated approaches have been used with varying degrees of success. The chairside FRC fixed partial denture has been mainly used for anterior tooth replacement where the emphasis is on esthetics rather than withstanding occlusal load. This article focuses on the use of this technology in the chairside replacement of premolars. The concept of using a prefabricated framework is described in detail. This approach allows for the efficient delivery of a consistently made chairside prosthesis. This is in contrast with the time-consuming and less consistent result of FRC framework fabrication directly in the mouth. The goal for this concept is to use a premade framework finalized by the provider at chairside to provide medium- to long-term posterior tooth replacement, with minimal abutment tooth reduction. PMID:16752701

  14. Supporting Structures for Flat Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Strong supporting structures for flat solar photovoltaic arrays built with such commonly available materials as wood and galvanized steel sheet. Structures resist expected static loads from snow and ice as well as dynamic loads from winds and even Earthquake vibrations. Supporting structure uses inexpensive materials. Parts prefabricated to minimize assembly work in field.

  15. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  16. Dual Delivery of EPO and BMP2 from a Novel Modular Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Construct to Increase the Bone Formation in Prefabricated Bone Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Janki Jayesh; Modes, Jane E.; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Edwards, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) is a biocompatible polymer that has mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering; however, it must be integrated with biologics to stimulate bone formation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) delivered from PCL produces bone when implanted subcutaneously, and erythropoietin (EPO) works synergistically with BMP2. In this study, EPO and BMP2 are adsorbed separately on two 3D-printed PCL scaffold modules that are assembled for codelivery on a single scaffold structure. This assembled modular PCL scaffold with dual BMP2 and EPO delivery was shown to increase bone growth in an ectopic location when compared with BMP2 delivery along a replicate scaffold structure. EPO (200 IU/mL) and BMP2 (65 μg/mL) were adsorbed onto the outer and inner portions of a modular scaffold, respectively. Protein binding and release studies were first quantified. Subsequently, EPO+BMP2 and BMP2 scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 4 and 8 weeks, and the regenerated bone was analyzed with microcomputed tomography and histology; 8.6±1.4 μg BMP2 (22%) and 140±29 IU EPO (69.8%) bound to the scaffold and <1% BMP2 and 83% EPO was released in 7 days. Increased endothelial cell proliferation on EPO-adsorbed PCL discs indicated protein bioactivity. At 4 and 8 weeks, dual BMP2 and EPO delivery regenerated more bone (5.1±1.1 and 5.5±1.6 mm3) than BMP2 alone (3.8±1.1 and 4.3±1.7 mm3). BMP2 and EPO scaffolds had more ingrowth (1.4%±0.6%) in the outer module when compared with BMP2 (0.8%±0.3%) at 4 weeks. Dual delivery produced more dense cellular marrow, while BMP2 had more fatty marrow. Dual EPO and BMP2 delivery is a potential method to regenerate bone faster for prefabricated flaps. PMID:25809081

  17. The Influence of a Prefabricated Foot Orthosis on Lower Extremity Mechanics During Running in Individuals With Varying Dynamic Foot Motion.

    PubMed

    Almonroeder, Thomas G; Benson, Lauren C; O'Connor, Kristian M

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Background Orthotic prescription is often based on the premise that the mechanical effects will be more prominent in individuals with greater calcaneal eversion. Objective To compare the effects of a prefabricated foot orthosis on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between recreational athletes with high and low calcaneal eversion during running. Methods Thirty-one recreational athletes were included in this study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected while running with and without a foot orthosis. Participants were grouped based on the degree of calcaneal eversion during the running trials relative to a standing trial (dynamic foot motion). The effects of the orthosis on the frontal and transverse plane angles and moments of the hip and knee were compared between the 10 participants with the greatest and least amount of dynamic foot motion. Results There were no significant interactions (group by orthotic condition) for any of the kinematic or kinetic variables of interest. Conclusion The effects of an orthosis on the mechanics of the hip and knee do not appear to be dependent on an individual's dynamic foot motion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):749-755. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6253. PMID:27494054

  18. Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Obermiller, Josef; Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Edwards, James M.; Landry, Gregory J.; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

  19. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score), quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life). We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%), remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001), but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p<0.001). Full compliance (minimum wear 7 hours a day 7 days per week) was reported by 40% of participants and 76% of participants reported a minimum wear of 5 hours a day 5 days per week. There was no difference in patient perception between insoles. Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole

  20. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    PubMed

    von Bomhard, Achim; Veit, Johannes; Bermueller, Christian; Rotter, Nicole; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Storck, Katharina; The, Hoang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE) three-dimensional (3D) cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D) cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm) and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps and the

  1. Prefabrication of 3D Cartilage Contructs: Towards a Tissue Engineered Auricle – A Model Tested in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    von Bomhard, Achim; Veit, Johannes; Bermueller, Christian; Rotter, Nicole; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Storck, Katharina; The, Hoang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE) three-dimensional (3D) cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D) cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15×8 cm) and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps and the implanted

  2. Shielding evaluation and acceptance testing of a prefabricated, modular, temporary radiation therapy treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Ezzell, Gary A

    2004-01-01

    We have recently commissioned a temporary radiation therapy facility that is novel in two aspects: it was constructed using modular components, and the LINAC was installed in one of the modular sections before it was lifted into position. Additional steel and granular fill was added to the modular sections on-site during construction. The building will be disassembled and removed when no longer needed. This paper describes the radiation shielding specifications and survey of the facility, as well as the ramifications for acceptance testing occasioned by the novel installation procedure. The LINAC is a Varian 21EX operating at 6 MV and 18 MV. The radiation levels outside the vault satisfied the design criteria, and no anomalous leakage was detected along the joints of the modular structure. At 18 MV and 600 monitor units (MU) per minute, the radiation level outside the primary barrier walls was 8.5 micro Sv/h of photons; there were no detectable neutrons. Outside the direct-shielded door, the levels were 0.4 micro Sv/h of photons and 3.0 micro Sv/h of neutrons. The isocentricity of the accelerator met the acceptance criteria and was not affected by its preinstallation into an integrated baseframe and subsequent transport to the building site.

  3. An assessment of fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bhupinder; Pujari, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth with excessive loss of tooth structure would require to be restored with post and core to enhance the strength and durability of the tooth and to achieve retention for the restoration. The non-metallic posts have a superior aesthetic quality. Various core build-up materials can be used to build-up cores on the posts placed in endodontically treated teeth. These materials would show variation in their bonding with the non-metallic posts thus affecting the strength and resistance to fracture of the remaining tooth structure. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in extracted endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors of approximately of the same size and shape were selected for the study. They were divided randomly into 3 groups of 15 each, depending on the types of non-metallic posts used. Each group was further divided into 3 groups (A, B and C) of 5 samples each depending on three core build-up material used. Student’s unpaired ‘t’ test was also used to analyse and compare each group with the other groups individually, and decide whether their comparisons were statistically significant. Results. Luxacore showed the highest fracture resistance among the three core build-up materials with all the three posts systems. Ti-core had intermediate values of fracture resistance and Lumiglass had the least values of fracture resistance. PMID:25755926

  4. Rocker-sole footwear versus prefabricated foot orthoses for the treatment of pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot is a common condition which results in pain, stiffness and impaired ambulation. Footwear modifications and foot orthoses are widely used in clinical practice to treat this condition, but their effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This article describes the design of a randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of rocker-sole footwear and individualised prefabricated foot orthoses in reducing pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis. Methods Eighty people with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis will be randomly allocated to receive either a pair of rocker-sole shoes (MBT® Matwa, Masai Barefoot Technology, Switzerland) or a pair of individualised, prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Customs, Vasyli Medical™, Queensland, Australia). At baseline, the biomechanical effects of the interventions will be examined using a wireless wearable sensor motion analysis system (LEGSys™, BioSensics, Boston, MA, USA) and an in-shoe plantar pressure system (Pedar®, Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany). The primary outcome measure will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ), measured at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include the function, footwear and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ, severity of pain and stiffness at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (measured using 100 mm visual analog scales), global change in symptoms (using a 15-point Likert scale), health status (using the Short-Form-12® Version 2.0 questionnaire), use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain, the frequency and type of self-reported adverse events and physical activity levels (using the Incidental and Planned Activity Questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to compare the effectiveness of rocker

  5. The Value of SPECT/CT in Monitoring Prefabricated Tissue-Engineered Bone and Orthotopic rhBMP-2 Implants for Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miao; Peng, Xin; Mao, Chi; Tian, Jia-he; Zhang, Shu-wen; Xu, Fang; Tu, Jing-jing; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Min; Yu, Guang-yan

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering shows good prospects for mandibular reconstruction. In recent studies, prefabricated tissue-engineered bone (PTEB) by recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) applied in vivo has found to be an effective alternative for autologous bone grafts. However, the optimal time to transfer PTEB for mandibular reconstruction is still not elucidated. Thus, here in an animal experiment of rhesus monkey, the suitable transferring time for PTEB to reconstruct mandibular defects was evaluated by 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT, and its value in monitoring orthotopic rhBMP-2 implants for mandibular reconstruction was also evaluated. The result of SPECT/CT showed higher 99mTc-MDP uptake, indicating osteoinductivity, in rhBMP-2 incorporated demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) and coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) implants than those without BMP stimulation. 99mTc-MDP uptake of rhBMP-2 implant peaked at 8 weeks following implantation while CT showed the density of these implants increased after 13 weeks’ prefabrication. Histology confirmed that mandibular defects were repaired successfully with PTEB or orthotopically rhBMP-2 incorporated CHA implants, in accordance with SPECT/CT findings. Collectively, data shows 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool to monitor osteoinductivity and bone regeneration of PTEB and orthotopic implants. The PTEB achieved peak osteoinductivity and bone density at 8 to 13 weeks following ectopic implantation, which would serve as a recommendable time frame for its transfer to mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26340447

  6. Evaluation of Columbia, USMARC-Composite, Suffolk, and Texel rams as terminal sires in an extensive rangeland production system: III. Prefabrication carcass traits and organ weights.

    PubMed

    Mousel, M R; Notter, D R; Leeds, T D; Zerby, H N; Moeller, S J; Lewis, G S

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate terminal-sire breeds, harvest BW, prefabrication carcass measurements, and organ weights were evaluated over 3 yr for 518 crossbred wether lambs (ovis aries). Lambs were produced by single-sire matings of 22 Columbia, 22 USMARC-Composite (Composite), 21 Suffolk, and 17 Texel rams to adult Rambouillet ewes. Lambs were raised to weaning under an extensive western rangeland production system and finished in a feedlot on a high-energy finishing diet. Wethers were randomly assigned to be harvested at an average BW of 54.4, 61.2, or 68.0 kg and then transported to The Ohio State University abattoir for harvest. Wether BW was recorded before transport (off-test BW) and before harvest. Prefabrication carcass measurements and organ weights were recorded either after harvest or after an approximate 24-h chill. At comparable numbers of days on feed, Suffolk-sired lambs had heavier (P < 0.01) off-test BW, harvest BW, HCW, chilled carcass weight (CCW), and kidney weights than lambs sired by the other breeds. Suffolk-sired lambs had more (P < 0.01) kidney-pelvic fat than did Columbia-sired lambs; Composite- and Texel-sired lambs were intermediate and did not differ (P > 0.06) from the other crossbred lambs. Texel- and suffolk-sired lambs had larger lm area and greater conformation scores than Columbia-sired lambs (P < 0.03). Texel-sired lambs had greater (P < 0.01) body wall thickness, quality grades, and leg scores than Columbia-sired lambs. Composite- and Suffolk-sired lambs did not differ from each other or from lambs sired by any other breed for body wall thickness (P > 0.18) and were intermediate for quality grades and leg scores. Sire breed did not affect (P > 0.05) shipping shrink, dressing percentage, pelt weight, liver weight, and fat depth. Adjusting data to a comparable off-test BW or CCW modified sire breed rankings for some measurements. Texel-sired lambs were equal or superior to lambs sired by other breeds for HCW, CCW, dressing percentage, pelt weight

  7. The benefits of an additional worker are task-dependent: assessing low-back injury risks during prefabricated (panelized) wall construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2012-09-01

    Team manual material handling is a common practice in residential construction where prefabricated building components (e.g., wall panels) are increasingly used. As part of a larger effort to enable proactive control of ergonomic exposures among workers handling panels, this study explored the effects of additional workers on injury risks during team-based panel erection tasks, specifically by quantifying how injury risks are affected by increasing the number of workers (by one, above the nominal or most common number). Twenty-four participants completed panel erection tasks with and without an additional worker under different panel mass and size conditions. Four risk assessment methods were employed that emphasized the low back. Though including an additional worker generally reduced injury risk across several panel masses and sizes, the magnitude of these benefits varied depending on the specific task and exhibited somewhat high variability within a given task. These results suggest that a simple, generalizable recommendation regarding team-based panel erection tasks is not warranted. Rather, a more systems-level approach accounting for both injury risk and productivity (a strength of panelized wall systems) should be undertaken.

  8. [Prefabrication of vascularized facial bones].

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, R; Jehn, P; Spalthoff, S; Kokemüller, H; Gellrich, N-C

    2015-03-01

    Critical size defects in the craniomaxillofacial region often result from ablative tumor surgery, inflammation and posttraumatic deformities. To date, autologous bone grafts are still the gold standard for the reconstruction of these defects; however, they are frequently associated with severe donor site morbidity as well as functional and aesthetic compromises. In this context various resorbable and non-resorbable bone replacement materials have been developed and intensively investigated. Particularly in critical size defects these materials fail due to their lack of osteogenic potential and endogenous vascularization. The combination of alloplastic osteoconductive scaffolds, osteogenic cells, and axial prevascularization in bioartificial bone grafts might present an innovative approach for the microsurgical reconstruction of critical size defects.

  9. Integrated reactive ion etching to pattern cross-linked hydrophilic polymer structures for protein immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Strickland, Aaron D.; Kim, Il; Malliaras, George G.; Batt, Carl A.

    2007-04-01

    Patterning of cross-linked hydrophilic polymer features using reactive ion etching (RIE) capable of covalently immobilizing proteins has been achieved. Projection photolithography was used to pattern photoresist to create micromolds. Vapor phase molecular self-assembly of polymerizable monolayer in molds allowed covalent binding of hydrogel on surface during free-radical polymerization. Excess hydrogel blanket film was consumed with oxygen RIE resulting into hydrogel pattern of 1μm size aligned to prefabricated silicon oxide structures. Proteins were finally coupled through their primary amine groups selectively to acid functionalized hydrogel features through stable amide linkages using 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide.

  10. Structuralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piaget, Jean

    Provided is an overview of the analytical method known as structuralism. The first chapter discusses the three key components of the concept of a structure: the view of a system as a whole instead of so many parts; the study of the transformations in the system; and the fact that these transformations never lead beyond the system but always…

  11. Prefabricated panelized nuclear-hardened shelter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.

    1987-08-18

    This patent describes a shelter for protecting occupants therein from dynamic blast waves and barometric overpressure created by an above ground nuclear detonation proximate to the shelter, the shelter being buried below ground under soil, the soil comprising means for the attenuation of the dynamic blast wave generated by the detonation, the shelter having a semipherical domed roof and a base means supporting the roof, the semipherical domed roof being downwardly displaceable and having a lower edge which is vertically and downwardly movable in response to barometric overpressure generated by the detonation, the base means being a ring made up of a plurality of arcuate sections, the arcuate sections of the base means being crushable in response to the vertical downward movement of the roof to enable the roof to move downwardly to a lower position where it is supported on the crushed base member, the overpressure being transmitted through the soil surrounding the roof.

  12. Rapid production of structural color images with optical data storage capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Mohamad; Jiang, Hao; Qarehbaghi, Reza; Naghshineh, Mohammad; Kaminska, Bozena

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present novel methods to produce structural color image for any given color picture using a pixelated generic stamp named nanosubstrate. The nanosubstrate is composed of prefabricated arrays of red, green and blue subpixels. Each subpixel has nano-gratings and/or sub-wavelength structures which give structural colors through light diffraction. Micro-patterning techniques were implemented to produce the color images from the nanosubstrate by selective activation of subpixels. The nano-grating structures can be nanohole arrays, which after replication are converted to nanopillar arrays or vice versa. It has been demonstrated that visible and invisible data can be easily stored using these fabrication methods and the information can be easily read. Therefore the techniques can be employed to produce personalized and customized color images for applications in optical document security and publicity, and can also be complemented by combined optical data storage capabilities.

  13. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  14. Faxing Structures to the Moon: Freeform Additive Construction System (FACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Wilcox, Brian; McQuin, Christopher; Townsend, Julie; Rieber, Richard; Barmatz, Martin; Leichty, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the highly articulated All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robotic mobility system as a precision positioning tool, a variety of print head technologies can be used to 3D print large-scale in-situ structures on planetary surfaces such as the moon or Mars. In effect, in the same way CAD models can be printed in a 3D printer, large-scale structures such as walls, vaults, domes, berms, paving, trench walls, and other insitu derived elements can be FAXed to the planetary surface and built in advance of the arrival of crews, supplementing equipment and materials brought from earth. This paper discusses the ATHLETE system as a mobility / positioning platform, and presents several options for large-scale additive print head technologies, including tunable microwave "sinterator" approaches and in-situ concrete deposition. The paper also discusses potential applications, such as sintered-in-place habitat shells, radiation shielding, road paving, modular bricks, and prefabricated construction components.

  15. Evaluation of pre-fabricated root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Hew, Y S; Purton, D G; Love, R M

    2001-03-01

    In this in vitro study, properties of a titanium alloy post recently introduced to the market (IntegraPost), were compared with those of a clinically proven stainless steel post (ParaPost). The IntegraPost has a unique, perforated, spherical head and a microknurled shank surface. The posts were tested for rigidity, for retention within the root canals of extracted teeth and for ability to retain composite resin cores. The two post types exhibited similar properties in core and root canal retention, however, the IntegraPost was significantly less rigid than the ParaPost. PMID:11350574

  16. Prefabricated heat-exchanging fireplace. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schleper, M.A.

    1981-06-15

    A heat-exchanging fireplace was installed in a 2000 square foot home and the standard air distribution equipment was ducted directly to the forced-air heating system of the home. The standard air distribution equipment for the fireplace included two squirrel-cage blowers which were connected to a thermostat, allowing a choice of temperature ranges; and a snap disc thermostat was used to disconnect the blowers in order to avoid blowing cold air after the fire died out. Arranged in this manner, one is able to set the regular home thermostat a few degrees lower than the fireplace thermostat, and this will allow the regular heating system to turn on after the fire has gone out in the fireplace. Energy consumption in both the fireplace and the conventional heating system was monitored throughout a heating season and then compared with past heating seasons when only a conventional heating system was used.

  17. Scalable structural color printing using pixelated nanostructures in RGB primary colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-03-01

    Commercially available conventional color printing techniques mainly rely on patterning pigment-based pixels on a substrate. In recent years, structural colors have become increasingly important for their intrinsic advantages such as chemical stability, high resolution and color properties. However, to apply structural color pixels in printing color images for consumer-based demands remains a daunting challenge because such pixels usually require very high resolution patterning at a high speed and low cost. In this paper, we present novel color printing techniques based on micro-patterning of prefabricated nanostructure pixels in RGB primary colors. According to the micro-patterning techniques, the presented techniques are: a) solvent-free optical and thermal patterning of nanostructure pixels, b) photographic exposure through nanostructure color filters and c) inkjet printing of silver on nanostructures. These three presented techniques share some similar characteristics with popular conventional techniques, and can be considered as new-generation printing techniques evolved from their conventional counterparts. The preliminary results suggest that implementing the presented techniques, full-color images can be printed with much improved throughput than other nano-patterning techniques and imply these techniques can potentially be applied towards color production for general consumer use.

  18. Effect of reinforcement with resin composite on fracture strength of structurally compromised roots.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yuji; Komada, Wataru; Yoshida, Keiichi; Otake, Shiho; Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the fracture resistance of structurally compromised roots restored with four different post and core systems. Thirty-two bovine roots were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolar roots. The roots were divided into four groups based on the type of restoration: cemented cast post and core (Group MC), resin composite build-up (Group CR), resin composite and prefabricated glass fiber post build-up (Group FRC), and thick-layer dual-cured resin composite-reinforced small-diameter tapered cast post and core (Group CRM). After a static loading test, the failure mode and fracture resistance were recorded. Group CRM (719.38+/-196.73 N) exhibited a significantly high fracture resistance compared with the other groups (Group MC: 429.56+/-82.43 N; Group CR: 349.56+/-66.21 N; Group FRC: 398.94+/-112.71 N; p<0.05). In conclusion, Group CRM exhibited better mechanical properties for structurally compromised roots with no ferrules, although all types of restorations showed non-restorable fracture modes. PMID:19822992

  19. High-Throughput Processes and Structural Characterization of Single-Nanotube Based Devices for 3D Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, A. B.; Megerian, K. G.; Baron, R. L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 micron deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. The TEM analysis of our tubes revealed graphitic basal planes inclined to the central or fiber axis, with cone angles up to 30 deg. for the particular growth conditions used. In addition, bending tests performed using a custom nanoindentor, suggest that the tubes are well adhered to the Si substrate. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth.

  20. High-throughput processes and structural characterization of single-nanotube based devices for 3D electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, A. B.; Megerian, K. G.; Baron, R. L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 μm deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 °C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. The TEM analysis of our tubes revealed graphitic basal planes inclined to the central or fiber axis, with cone angles up to 30° for the particular growth conditions used. In addition, bending tests performed using a custom nanoindentor, suggest that the tubes are well adhered to the Si substrate. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth.

  1. Windmill structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.

    1980-01-15

    A windmill structure is disclosed in which a combined structure of sails and electrical generator device is pivotally suspended so that the position of the combined structure may be shifted in accordance with the wind velocity.

  2. Cell Structure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... apparatus , and lysosomes . « Previous (Cell Structure & Function) Next (Cell Function) » Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Accessibility | FOIA | File Formats ...

  3. On structures.

    PubMed

    Applegarth, A

    1989-01-01

    Some of the metapsychology involving the concept of structure is briefly reviewed, together with some difficulties presented by it. The concept of structure is defined, for purposes of the paper, and various kinds of structures are delineated. The author confines herself to the "microstructures," such as memories, cognitive structures, affect structures, defenses, identifications. Possible factors related to the development and maintenance of structures are discussed. In addition, the concept of structural change is taken up. It is suggested that an essential in such change is conscious review, however brief. The author proposes that structure formation and change is a fruitful area for mutual work by psychoanalysts and basic scientists.

  4. Website Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Larry S.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation reports the results of an exploratory data analysis investigation of the relationship between the structures used for information organization and access and the associated storage structures within state government websites. Extending an earlier claim that hierarchical directory structures are both the preeminent information…

  5. Development of a generic adenovirus delivery system based on structure-guided design of bispecific trimeric DARPin adapters.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Birgit; Honegger, Annemarie; Hess, Christian; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Mittl, Peer R E; Grütter, Markus G; Belousova, Natalya; Mikheeva, Galina; Krasnykh, Victor; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have shown promise as vectors for gene delivery in clinical trials. Efficient viral targeting to a tissue of choice requires both ablation of the virus' original tropism and engineering of an efficient receptor-mediated uptake by a specific cell population. We have developed a series of adapters binding to the virus with such high affinity that they remain fully bound for >10 d, block its natural receptor binding site and mediate interaction with a surface receptor of choice. The adapter contains two fused modules, both consisting of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), one binding to the fiber knob of adenovirus serotype 5 and the other binding to various tumor markers. By solving the crystal structure of the complex of the trimeric knob with three bound DARPins at 1.95-Å resolution, we could use computer modeling to design a link to a trimeric protein of extraordinary kinetic stability, the capsid protein SHP from the lambdoid phage 21. We arrived at a module which binds the knob like a trimeric clamp. When this clamp was fused with DARPins of varying specificities, it enabled adenovirus serotype 5-mediated delivery of a transgene in a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, epidermal growth factor receptor-, or epithelial cell adhesion molecule-dependent manner with transduction efficiencies comparable to or even exceeding those of Ad itself. With these adapters, efficiently produced in Escherichia coli, Ad can be converted rapidly to new receptor specificities using any ligand as the receptor-binding moiety. Prefabricated Ads with different payloads thus can be retargeted readily to many cell types of choice.

  6. Postural load and back pain of workers in the manufacturing of prefabricated concrete elements.

    PubMed

    Burdorf, A; Govaert, G; Elders, L

    1991-07-01

    In a population of male workers in a concrete manufacturing plant (n = 114), the occurrence of back pain was studied in relation to a control group of maintenance engineers (n = 52). The prevalence of back pain in the 12 months preceding the investigation was 59% among the concrete workers, and 31% among the controls. After excluding persons with existing back pain before starting work in the present factory, a comparison between concrete workers and maintenance engineers showed an aged-adjusted odds ratio for back pain of 2.80 (1.31-6.01). Postural load of workers in both plants were measured using the Ovako Working posture Analysis System. During 4009 observations working postures concerning the back, lower limbs, and lifting activities were recorded. The average time spent working with a bent and/or twisted position of the back was found to contribute to the prevalence of back pain. The results of this study also suggest that exposure to whole-body vibration, due to operating vibrotables, is a second risk factor for back pain.

  7. Zirconia-Prefabricated Crowns for Pediatric Patients With Primary Dentition: Technique and Cementation for Esthetic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, many clinicians tend to forego esthetic considerations when full-coverage restorations are indicated for pediatric patients with primary dentitions. However, the availability of new zirconia pediatric crowns and reliable techniques for cementation makes esthetic outcomes practical and consistent when restoring primary dentition. Two cases are described: a 3-year-old boy who presented with severe early childhood caries affecting both anterior and posterior teeth, and a 6-year-old boy who presented with extensive caries of his primary posterior dentition, including a molar requiring full coverage. The parents of both boys were concerned about esthetics, and the extent of decay indicated the need for full-coverage restorations. This led to the boys receiving treatment using a restorative procedure in which the carious teeth were prepared for and restored with esthetic tooth-colored zirconia crowns. In both cases, comfortable function and pleasing esthetics were achieved.

  8. Zirconia-Prefabricated Crowns for Pediatric Patients With Primary Dentition: Technique and Cementation for Esthetic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, many clinicians tend to forego esthetic considerations when full-coverage restorations are indicated for pediatric patients with primary dentitions. However, the availability of new zirconia pediatric crowns and reliable techniques for cementation makes esthetic outcomes practical and consistent when restoring primary dentition. Two cases are described: a 3-year-old boy who presented with severe early childhood caries affecting both anterior and posterior teeth, and a 6-year-old boy who presented with extensive caries of his primary posterior dentition, including a molar requiring full coverage. The parents of both boys were concerned about esthetics, and the extent of decay indicated the need for full-coverage restorations. This led to the boys receiving treatment using a restorative procedure in which the carious teeth were prepared for and restored with esthetic tooth-colored zirconia crowns. In both cases, comfortable function and pleasing esthetics were achieved. PMID:27608199

  9. Removable Partial Denture Supported by Implants with Prefabricated Telescopic Abutments - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Komal

    2014-01-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapy—biologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs. PMID:25121066

  10. Silicon sample holder for molecular beam epitaxy on pre-fabricated integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Paula J. (Inventor); Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The sample holder of the invention is formed of the same semiconductor crystal as the integrated circuit on which the molecular beam expitaxial process is to be performed. In the preferred embodiment, the sample holder comprises three stacked micro-machined silicon wafers: a silicon base wafer having a square micro-machined center opening corresponding in size and shape to the active area of a CCD imager chip, a silicon center wafer micro-machined as an annulus having radially inwardly pointing fingers whose ends abut the edges of and center the CCD imager chip within the annulus, and a silicon top wafer micro-machined as an annulus having cantilevered membranes which extend over the top of the CCD imager chip. The micro-machined silicon wafers are stacked in the order given above with the CCD imager chip centered in the center wafer and sandwiched between the base and top wafers. The thickness of the center wafer is about 20% less than the thickness of the CCD imager chip. Preferably, four titanium wires, each grasping the edges of the top and base wafers, compress all three wafers together, flexing the cantilever fingers of the top wafer to accommodate the thickness of the CCD imager chip, acting as a spring holding the CCD imager chip in place.

  11. In vitro maturation of oocytes via the pre-fabricated self-assembled artificial human ovary

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Jared C.; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Moore, Richard; Steinhoff, Margaret M.; Morgan, Jeffrey R.; Carson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Create a 3-Dimensional artificial human ovary to mature human oocytes. Methods Theca and granulosa cells were isolated from antral follicles of reproductive-aged women, seeded into micro-molded gels and self-assembled into complex 3D microtissues. Immunohistochemistry and live-dead staining confirmed theca cell identity and cellular viability at one week respectively. Placement of granulosa cell spheroids or cumulus-oocyte complexes into theca cell honeycomb openings resulted in creation of an artificial human ovary. Oocytes from this construct were assessed for polar body extrusion. Results Theca and granulosa cells self-assembled into complex microtissues, remaining viable for one week. At 72 h after artificial human ovary construction, theca cells completely surrounded the granulosa spheroids or COCs without stromal invasion or disruption. Polar body extrusion occurred in one of three COCs assessed. Conclusions An artifical human ovary can be created with self-assembled human theca and granulosa cell microtissues, and used for IVM and future oocyte toxicology studies. PMID:20737203

  12. On-site experiment for towing procedure of pre-fabricated tendon of TLP

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Masao; Ishikawa, Kuniteru; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Koichiro

    1994-12-31

    Research and development of the Tension Leg Platform (TLP) have been performed in the Offshore Oil and Gas Production Platform Project of Japan Ocean Industries Association (JOIA) promoted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan (MITI). In this project, the tendons that are planned to be fabricated and assembled on the land in an overall length will be horizontally toward to the site. After that, they will be installed there. The towing procedure, however, has been established neither theoretically nor empirically. Therefore, the on-site experiment was performed to investigate whether it is possible to plan the towing procedure at the sea. The bending moment and the towing force of the tendon model during the towing procedure were measured.

  13. A Dome Amidst the Hexagons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes the design of the gymnasium of York (South Carolina) Comprehensive High School, a circular 12,000 square foot structure with a prefabricated domed roof constructed of steel hubs and curved wooden beams. (JG)

  14. Aeropropulsion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.

    1987-01-01

    The structural engineer is faced with unique problems when dealing with aeropropulsion systems. He is faced with extremes in operating temperatures, rotational effects, and behaviors of advanced material systems which combine into complexities that require advances in many scientific disciplines involved in structural analysis and design procedures. This presentation provides an overview of the complexities of aeropropulsion structures and the theoretical, computational, and experimental research conducted to achieve the needed advances.

  15. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  16. Organisational Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of organisational structure can provide guidance for organisations that want to change and innovate. Many writers agree that this understanding allows organisations to shape how their work is done to ultimately achieve their business goals--and that too often structure is given little consideration in business strategy and…

  17. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  18. Curriculum Structure and Faculty Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazard, Geoffrey C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the law school curriculum is a product of the structure of the law school faculty, which may explain why the law school curriculum neither has changed very much over the years, despite repeated calls for reform, nor will change much in the future. (MSE)

  19. Spacecraft Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    This activity challenges students to solve a real-world problem that is part of the space program using creativity, cleverness and scientific knowledge while learning about forces, structures and e...

  20. Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  1. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  2. Structures research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Saba, Elias; Mcginley, Williams; Shen, Ji-Yao

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of the structures group is to provide quality aerospace research with the Center for Aerospace Research - A NASA Center for Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. The group includes dedicated faculty and students who have a proven record in the area of structures, in particular space structures. The participating faculty developed accurate mathematical models and effective computational algorithms to characterize the flexibility parameters of joint dominated beam-truss structures. Both experimental and theoretical modelling has been applied to the dynamic mode shapes and mode frequencies for a large truss system. During the past few months, the above procedures has been applied to the hypersonic transport plane model. The plane structure has been modeled as a lumped mass system by Doctor Abu-Saba while Doctor Shen applied the transfer matrix method with a piecewise continuous Timoshenko tapered beam model. Results from both procedures compare favorably with those obtained using the finite element method. These two methods are more compact and require less computer time than the finite element method. The group intends to perform experiments on structural systems including the hypersonic plane model to verify the results from the theoretical models.

  3. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  4. Centriole structure.

    PubMed

    Winey, Mark; O'Toole, Eileen

    2014-09-01

    Centrioles are among the largest protein-based structures found in most cell types, measuring approximately 250 nm in diameter and approximately 500 nm long in vertebrate cells. Here, we briefly review ultrastructural observations about centrioles and associated structures. At the core of most centrioles is a microtubule scaffold formed from a radial array of nine triplet microtubules. Beyond the microtubule triplets of the centriole, we discuss the critically important cartwheel structure and the more enigmatic luminal density, both found on the inside of the centriole. Finally, we discuss the connectors between centrioles, and the distal and subdistal appendages outside of the microtubule scaffold that reflect centriole age and impart special functions to the centriole. Most of the work we review has been done with electron microscopy or electron tomography of resin-embedded samples, but we also highlight recent work performed with cryoelectron microscopy, cryotomography and subvolume averaging. Significant opportunities remain in the description of centriolar structure, both in mapping of component proteins within the structure and in determining the effect of mutations on components that contribute to the structure and function of the centriole.

  5. Structural biology.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, K C

    1999-01-01

    Protein crystallography has become a major technique for understanding cellular processes. This has come about through great advances in the technology of data collection and interpretation, particularly the use of synchrotron radiation. The ability to express eukaryotic genes in Escherichia coli is also important. Analysis of known structures shows that all proteins are built from about 1000 primeval folds. The collection of all primeval folds provides a basis for predicting structure from sequence. At present about 450 are known. Of the presently sequenced genomes only a fraction can be related to known proteins on the basis of sequence alone. Attempts are being made to determine all (or as many as possible) of the structures from some bacterial genomes in the expectation that structure will point to function more reliably than does sequence. Membrane proteins present a special problem. The next 20 years may see the experimental determination of another 40,000 protein structures. This will make considerable demands on synchrotron sources and will require many more biochemists than are currently available. The availability of massive structure databases will alter the way biochemistry is done. PMID:10670018

  6. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  7. Tension Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The fabric structure pictured is the Campus Center of La Verne College, La Verne, California. Unlike the facilities shown on the preceding pages, it is not air-supported. It is a "tension structure," its multi-coned fabric membrane supported by a network of cables attached to steel columns which function like circus tent poles. The spider-web in the accompanying photo is a computer graph of the tension pattern. The designers, Geiger-Berger Associates PC, of New York City, conducted lengthy computer analysis to determine the the best placement of columns and cables. The firm also served as structural engineering consultant on the Pontiac Silverdome and a number of other large fabric structures. Built by Birdair Structures, Inc., Buffalo, New York, the La Verne Campus Center was the first permanent facility in the United States enclosed by the space-spinoff fabric made of Owens-Corning Beta fiber glass coated with Du Pont Teflon TFE. The flexible design permits rearrangement of the interior to accommodate athletic events, student activities, theatrical productions and other recreational programs. Use of fabric covering reduced building cost 30 percent below conventional construction.

  8. Microcavity structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.; Grudzien, D.; Feinerman, A.D.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of building mm-wave cavities using deep x-ray lithography techniques is being investigated. These cavities could be considered for linac accelerating structures, undulators, free electron lasers, or mm-wave amplifiers. The construction process includes making precision x-ray masks, x-ray exposure of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA), removal of PMMA, and electroplating a metal. Highly precise two-dimensional features can be machined onto wafers by this technique. The challenge is to fabricate the wafers onto three-dimensional rf structures. Rectangular cavity geometry is best suited to this fabrication technique. Status of wafer manufacture, fabrication and alignment techniques using capillaries bonded in precision grooves, 2{pi}/3 120-GHz linac structures, heat extraction analysis, and beam dynamics in a 5-meter-long 50-MeV linac will be discussed. Measurements made on 10X larger scale models that were built with conventional techniques will also be discussed.

  9. Structural Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    All over the world, officials charged with preserving historical structures are faced with a problem of environmental contamination of building materials that cause structural deterioration. First requisite for preserving the structure is identification of the nature of contaminants. A "non-invasive"technique based on space technology has been developed and tested. It employs a neutron source and a gamma ray detector. Placed on one side of the wall to be examined, the source fires neutrons created by the decay of a radioactive isotope. As they pass through the wall, the neutrons collide with atoms and the atoms, depending on their type, emit various kinds of gamma rays. These rays are identified by the gamma ray detector on the other side of the wall. Energy of the rays shows the kind of element present. The intensity level indicates the quantity. Composition of the contaminants within the walls is determined by a multichannel analyzer.

  10. Structure of

    PubMed

    Mahmoudkhani; Langer

    1999-10-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, dimethylammonium tetrachlorocobaltate(II), has been determined at four temperatures between 297 and 366 K, in order to investigate possible phase transitions at 313 and 353 K [Kapustianik, Polovinko & Kaluza et al. (1996). Phys. Status Solidi A, 153, 117-122]. We found that there is no significant change either in the hydrogen-bonding network or in the cell parameters, apart from a linear dilatation with temperature. This study reveals that the anomalous variation in electric conductivity and some of the other physical properties of the compound cannot be explained by structural changes.

  11. Structural evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1993-03-01

    In this special report, financial executives discuss key trends in power project finance, new funding sources and evolving project structures. Industry wide, financial firms and developers are striving to improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of project financing, for projects in both greenfield development and the growing secondary market.

  12. Nanocrystal structures

    DOEpatents

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  13. Structural Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Julianne; Titmus, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    This article explores an alternative conception held by high school and first-year university biology students regarding the structure of the left and right ventricles of the heart and the significance of the left ventricular wall being thicker than the right. The left ventricular wall of the heart is thicker than the right ventricular wall due to…

  14. Nanocrystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2008-12-30

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  15. Terminal structure

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frank; Allais, Arnaud; Mirebeau, Pierre; Ganhungu, Francois; Lallouet, Nicolas

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  16. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  17. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  18. Airfoil structure

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  19. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  20. Fabrication, Characterization, And Deformation of 3D Structural Meta-Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemayor, Lauren C.

    Current technological advances in fabrication methods have provided pathways to creating architected structural meta-materials similar to those found in natural organisms that are structurally robust and lightweight, such as diatoms. Structural meta-materials are materials with mechanical properties that are determined by material properties at various length scales, which range from the material microstructure (nm) to the macro-scale architecture (mum -- mm). It is now possible to exploit material size effect, which emerge at the nanometer length scale, as well as structural effects to tune the material properties and failure mechanisms of small-scale cellular solids, such as nanolattices. This work demonstrates the fabrication and mechanical properties of 3-dimensional hollow nanolattices in both tension and compression. Hollow gold nanolattices loaded in uniaxial compression demonstrate that strength and stiffness vary as a function of geometry and tube wall thickness. Structural effects were explored by increasing the unit cell angle from 30° to 60° while keeping all other parameters constant; material size effects were probed by varying the tube wall thickness, t, from 200nm to 635nm, at a constant relative density and grain size. In-situ uniaxial compression experiments reveal an order-of-magnitude increase in yield stress and modulus in nanolattices with greater lattice angles, and a 150% increase in the yield strength without a concomitant change in modulus in thicker-walled nanolattices for fixed lattice angles. These results imply that independent control of structural and material size effects enables tunability of mechanical properties of 3-dimensional architected meta-materials and highlight the importance of material, geometric, and microstructural effects in small-scale mechanics. This work also explores the flaw tolerance of 3D hollow-tube alumina kagome nanolattices with and without pre-fabricated notches, both in experiment and simulation

  1. Armor structures

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung [Idaho Falls, ID; Lacy, Jeffrey M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-04-01

    An armor structure includes first and second layers individually containing a plurality of i-beams. Individual i-beams have a pair of longitudinal flanges interconnected by a longitudinal crosspiece and defining opposing longitudinal channels between the pair of flanges. The i-beams within individual of the first and second layers run parallel. The laterally outermost faces of the flanges of adjacent i-beams face one another. One of the longitudinal channels in each of the first and second layers faces one of the longitudinal channels in the other of the first and second layers. The channels of the first layer run parallel with the channels of the second layer. The flanges of the first and second layers overlap with the crosspieces of the other of the first and second layers, and portions of said flanges are received within the facing channels of the i-beams of the other of the first and second layers.

  2. Digital structural

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    Magmatic and tectonic activity have both contributed significantly to the surface geology of Mars. Digital structural mapping techniques have now been used to classify and date centers of tectonic activity in the western equatorial region. For example, our results show a center of tectonic activity at Valles Marineris, which may be associated with uplift caused by intrusion. Such evidence may help explain, in part, the development of the large troughs and associated outflow channels and chaotic terrain. We also find a local centre of tectonic activity near the source region of Warrego Valles. Here, we suggest that the valley system may have resulted largely from intrusive-related hydrothermal activity. We hope that this work, together with the current Mars Global Surveyor mission, will lead to a better understanding of the geological processes that shaped the Martian surface.

  3. Asteroid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E.

    2014-07-01

    Even before the first space missions to asteroids, in the mid-1990s, it was known that asteroids have weird structures. Photometry indicated complicated shapes, and the pioneering radar investigations by Ostro and colleagues followed by adaptive optics campaigns and flybys showed odd binary forms, and confirmed the common presence of satellites, and indications of highly varying surface roughness. Some asteroids turned out to be dominated by a single major cratering event, while others showed no evidence of a major crater, or perhaps for global crater erasure. The first space mission to orbit an asteroid, NEAR, found a mixture of heavily cratered terrains and geomorphically active 'ponds', and indicated evidence for global seismicity from impact. The next mission to orbit an asteroid, Hayabusa, found what most agree is a rubble pile, with no major craters and an absence of fines. There is to date no direct evidence of asteroid interior geology, other than measurements of bulk density, and inferences made for mass distribution asymmetry based on dynamics, and inferences based on surface lineaments. Interpolating from the surface to the interior is always risky and usually wrong, but of course the answer is important since we are someday destined to require this knowledge in order to divert a hazardous asteroid from impact with the Earth. Even considering the near-subsurface, here we remain as ignorant as we were about the Moon in the early 1960s, whether the surface will swallow us up in dust, or will provide secure landing and anchoring points. Laboratory experimentation in close to zero-G is still in its early stages. Adventures such as mining and colonization will surely have to wait until we better know these things. How do we get from here to there? I will focus on 3 areas of progress: (1) asteroid cratering seismology, where we use the surface craters to understand what is going on inside; (2) numerical modeling of collisions, which predicts the internal

  4. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  5. Structured Data in Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Hopkins, Stewart

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computer data structures in finite-element structural analysis programs. A number of data structure types that have been shown to be useful in such programs are introduced and described. A simple finite-element model is used to demonstrate how the given set of data structure types naturally lend themselves to developing software for the model. Different methods of implementing data structures in the context of a program are discussed.

  6. Magnetic multilayer structure

    DOEpatents

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  7. Computational structural mechanics for engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The computational structural mechanics (CSM) program at Lewis encompasses: (1) fundamental aspects for formulating and solving structural mechanics problems, and (2) development of integrated software systems to computationally simulate the performance/durability/life of engine structures. It is structured to mainly supplement, complement, and whenever possible replace, costly experimental efforts which are unavoidable during engineering research and development programs. Specific objectives include: investigate unique advantages of parallel and multiprocesses for: reformulating/solving structural mechanics and formulating/solving multidisciplinary mechanics and develop integrated structural system computational simulators for: predicting structural performances, evaluating newly developed methods, and for identifying and prioritizing improved/missing methods needed. Herein the CSM program is summarized with emphasis on the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (ESCS). Typical results obtained using ESCS are described to illustrate its versatility.

  8. Temporary Ectopic Implantation of a Single Finger Using a Perforator as a Feeding Vessel, and Subsequent Prefabricated Chimeric Flap Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takumi, Yamamoto; Hisako, Hara; Yusuke, Yamamoto; Azusa, Oshima; Kazuki, Kikuchi; Harunosuke, Kato; Kumiko, Sata; Kentaro, Doi; Takeshi, Todokoro; Jun, Araki; Makoto, Mihara; Takuya, Higashino; Takuya, Iida; Isao, Koshima

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ectopic implantation was first reported by Godina in 1986. We herein present 2 cases in which amputated fingers were salvaged and reconstructed by means of temporary ectopic implantation utilizing perforator anastomoses and chimeric flaps. Methods: Case 1. A 30-year-old man injured his right hand. All of the fingers were completely crushed with the exception of the little finger. We performed an ectopic implantation by using the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator. Three months later, the little finger was transplanted with the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator flap, vascularized nerve, and the 2nd metacarpal bone. Case 2. A 29-year-old man suffered a degloving injury of the index finger. The digital artery was anastomosed to deep inferior epigastric artery perforator. One month later, a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap containing the ectopically transplanted index finger was transplanted, but the index fingertip became pale and necrotized. After debridement, a hemipulp transplantation was performed. Results/Conclusions: As the diameter of perforators is similar to that of digital arteries, and perforators are capable of supplying large areas of tissue, they can be used as recipient vessels for ectopic implantation in finger salvage procedures. Another advantage of perforators as feeding vessels in ectopic implantation is the possibility of forming an ectopic chimera; the finger can be incorporated as a part of the chimeric reconstructive flap. With respect to these advantages, the perforator can be used as a feeder in an ectopic implantation of single finger.

  9. Linear-motion tattoo machine and prefabricated needle sets for the delivery of plant viruses by vascular puncture inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular puncture inoculation (VPI) of plant viruses previously has been conducted either manually or by use of a commercial engraving tool and laboratory-fabricated needle arrays. In an effort to improve this technique, a linear-motion tattoo machine driving industry-standard needle arrays was tes...

  10. PREFABRICATION DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR A LONG-TERM ELECTRICALLY-ACTUATED ABDOMINAL LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (E-TYPE ALVAD)

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, James T.; Igo, Stephen R.; Poirier, Victor L.; Keiser, John T.; Hibbs, C. Wayne; Fuqua, John M.; Edmonds, Charles H.; Holub, Daniel A.; McGee, Michael G.; Fuhrman, Thomas M.; Joseph, Alexander R.; Norman, John C.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design and development of a long-term, low-profile intracorporeal left ventricular assist device is a multifaceted project involving a series of technical, anatomic and physiologic considerations. Patients with severe left ventricular failure refractory to all other forms of therapy could benefit from such a device. Prior to fabrication of such a blood pump, consideration must be given to physiologic parameters of the projected patient population. The pump must be designed to meet physiologic demands and yet conform to the anatomic constraints posed by the patient population. We measured the body surface area (BSA) of a group of patients (n=50) and found the mean BSA for this group to be 1.804 ± 0.161 m2. Using 25 ml/m2 as a stroke volume index indicative of left ventricular failure and a stroke volume index of 45 ml/m2 as normal, distributions of stroke volumes (normal and in left ventricular failure) were plotted for a potential population and demonstrated that 63% of the projected population can be returned to normal by a pump with a stroke volume ≥ 83 ml. Cadaver fitting studies established that 73% of the potential population can accommodate an ALVAD 10.8 cm in diameter. In-vitro tests demonstrated that a pump stroke volume ≥ 83 ml could be achieved by the proposed pump with a 15 mmHg filling pressure at rates up to 125 B/min. A pusher-plate stroke of 0.56 inches would be necessary to provide a stroke volume ≥ 83 ml. The percent of the patient population that could be served was determined by excluding those in whom the pump would not fit or in whom it would provide less than a normal resting stroke volume. Approximately 73% of the projected patient population would accommodate this pump and be returned to normal circulatory dynamics. PMID:15216047

  11. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  12. Variably porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Paul V.; Yu, Xindi

    2011-01-18

    A method of making a monolithic porous structure, comprises electrodepositing a material on a template; removing the template from the material to form a monolithic porous structure comprising the material; and electropolishing the monolithic porous structure.

  13. Intelligent adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.

    1990-01-01

    'Intelligent Adaptive Structures' (IAS) refers to structural systems whose geometric and intrinsic structural characteristics can be automatically changed to meet mission requirements with changing operational scenarios. An IAS is composed of actuators, sensors, and a control logic; these are integrated in a distributed fashion within the elements of the structure. The IAS concepts thus far developed for space antennas and other precision structures should be applicable to civil, marine, automotive, and aeronautical structural systems.

  14. Protein structure mining using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M; de Brevern, A G; Srinivasan, N; Offmann, B

    2008-05-01

    We present a comprehensive evaluation of a new structure mining method called PB-ALIGN. It is based on the encoding of protein structure as 1D sequence of a combination of 16 short structural motifs or protein blocks (PBs). PBs are short motifs capable of representing most of the local structural features of a protein backbone. Using derived PB substitution matrix and simple dynamic programming algorithm, PB sequences are aligned the same way amino acid sequences to yield structure alignment. PBs are short motifs capable of representing most of the local structural features of a protein backbone. Alignment of these local features as sequence of symbols enables fast detection of structural similarities between two proteins. Ability of the method to characterize and align regions beyond regular secondary structures, for example, N and C caps of helix and loops connecting regular structures, puts it a step ahead of existing methods, which strongly rely on secondary structure elements. PB-ALIGN achieved efficiency of 85% in extracting true fold from a large database of 7259 SCOP domains and was successful in 82% cases to identify true super-family members. On comparison to 13 existing structure comparison/mining methods, PB-ALIGN emerged as the best on general ability test dataset and was at par with methods like YAKUSA and CE on nontrivial test dataset. Furthermore, the proposed method performed well when compared to flexible structure alignment method like FATCAT and outperforms in processing speed (less than 45 s per database scan). This work also establishes a reliable cut-off value for the demarcation of similar folds. It finally shows that global alignment scores of unrelated structures using PBs follow an extreme value distribution. PB-ALIGN is freely available on web server called Protein Block Expert (PBE) at http://bioinformatics.univ-reunion.fr/PBE/. PMID:18004784

  15. Describing Cognitive Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard T.

    This paper discusses questions pertinent to a definition of cognitive structure as the knowledge one possesses and the manner in which it is arranged, and considers how to select or devise methods of describing cognitive structure. The main purpose in describing cognitive structure is to see whether differences in memory (or cognitive structure)…

  16. Teaching Structured Fortran without Structured Extensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worland, Peter B.

    Six control structures are used in teaching a college Fortran programing course: (1) simple sequences of instruction without any control statement, (2) IF-THEN selection, (3) IF-THEN-ELSE selection, (4) definite loop, (5) indefinite loop, and (6) generalized IF-THEN-ELSE case structure. Outlines, instead of flowcharts, are employed for algorithm…

  17. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  18. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae; Angel, Marian; Bement, Matthew; Salvino, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  19. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    1992-02-01

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  20. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  1. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  2. Reinforced structural plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowitz, H. R.; Kendrick, W. P.; Jones, J. F.; Thorpe, R. S.; Burns, E. A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Reinforced polyimide structures are described. Reinforcing materials are impregnated with a suspension of polyimide prepolymer and bonded together by heat and pressure to form a cured, hard-reinforced, polyimide structure.

  3. Lessons from Structural Genomics*

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Stuart, David; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-01-01

    A decade of structural genomics, the large-scale determination of protein structures, has generated a wealth of data and many important lessons for structural biology and for future large-scale projects. These lessons include a confirmation that it is possible to construct large-scale facilities that can determine the structures of a hundred or more proteins per year, that these structures can be of high quality, and that these structures can have an important impact. Technology development has played a critical role in structural genomics, the difficulties at each step of determining a structure of a particular protein can be quantified, and validation of technologies is nearly as important as the technologies themselves. Finally, rapid deposition of data in public databases has increased the impact and usefulness of the data and international cooperation has advanced the field and improved data sharing. PMID:19416074

  4. Space Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The duration of my Summer 2015 Internship Tour at NASA's Johnson Space Center was spent working in the Structural Engineering Division's Structures Branch. One of the two main roles of the Structures Branch, ES2, is to ensure the structural integrity of spacecraft vehicles and the structural subsystems needed to support those vehicles. The other main objective of this branch is to develop the lightweight structures that are necessary to take humans beyond Low-Earth Orbit. Within ES2, my four projects involved inflatable space structure air bladder material testing; thermal and impact material testing for spacecraft windows; structural analysis on a joint used in the Boeing CST-100 airbag system; and an additive manufacturing design project.

  5. Representing Substantive Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Fred N.; Stewart, James

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the meaning of Schwab's "substantive structures" of a discipline in terms of science philosophy. Presents three techniques for representing substantive structures and discusses some of their uses in science education research. (SK)

  6. Structural Engineering: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation presents the work of the Structural Engineering Division of the Engineering Directorate. The work includes: providing technical expertise and leadership for the development, evaluation, and operation of structural, mechanical, and thermal spaceflight systems.

  7. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  8. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  9. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  10. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  11. Synchronously Deployable Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Structure lightweight, readily deployed, and has reliable joints. New truss concept, designated as "pac truss," developed. Features easy deployment without need for complex mechanisms. Structures of this type deployed in free flight by controlled release of stored energy in torsional springs at selected hinges located throughout structure. Double-folding technique used in beam model applicable to flat planar trusses, allowing structures of large expanse to fold into compact packages and be deployed for space-platform applications.

  12. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  13. Optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Structural optimization is introduced and examples which illustrate potential problems associated with optimized structures are presented. Optimized structures may have very low load carrying ability for an off design condition. They tend to have multiple modes of failure occurring simultaneously and can, therefore, be sensitive to imperfections. Because composite materials provide more design variables than do metals, they allow for more refined tailoring and more extensive optimization. As a result, optimized composite structures can be especially susceptible to these problems.

  14. Endjoints For Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G.; Mikulas, Martin M.; Wallsom, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Endjoint and connecting-node system designed for use in erection of frames. System structurally sound and simple to operate. All nodes and struts interchangeable. Nodes and struts attach to form cubic cell structures to produce beams, platforms, towers, or combinations of these. Design suitable for use in construction of space structures and such terrestrial skeletal frameworks as antenna-reflector supports, roof structures for large buildings, lookout towers, radio-transmitter towers, powerline pylons, and scaffolds.

  15. Vitrified underground structures

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Mark T.; Buelt, James L.; Stottlemyre, James A.; Tixier, Jr., John S.

    1992-01-01

    A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

  16. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  17. Programing Structural Synthesis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Program aids research in analysis and optimization. Programing Structural Synthesis System (PROSSS2) developed to provide structural-synthesis capability by combining access to SPAR with CONMIN program and set of interface procedures. SPAR is large general-purpose finite-element structural-analysis program, and CONMIN is large general-purpose optimization program. PROSSS2 written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  18. Building safer structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Page, Robert A.; Seekins, Linda

    1995-01-01

    In this century, major earthquakes in the United States have damaged or destroyed numerous buildings, bridges, and other structures. By monitoring how structures respond to earthquakes and applying the knowledge gained, scientists and engineers are improving the ability of structures to survive major earthquakes. Many lives and millions of dollars have already been saved by this ongoing research.

  19. Organizational Knowledge Management Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization. Design/methodology/approach: The extant literature on the impact of organizational culture and its link to management structure is examined and used to develop a new knowledge sharing management structure. Roadblocks to…

  20. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  1. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  2. The Structures of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This booklet reveals how structural biology provides insight into health and disease and is useful in developing new medications. It contains a general introduction to proteins, coverage of the techniques used to determine protein structures, and a chapter on structure-based drug design. The booklet features "Student Snapshots," designed to…

  3. Weatherizing a Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with weatherizing a structure. Its objective is for the student to be able to analyze factors related to specific structures that indicate need for weatherizing activities and to determine steps to correct defects in structures that…

  4. Structural Enhancement of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumpower, David L.; Goldsmith, Timothy E.

    2004-01-01

    Structural learning aids, such as interactive overviews (IOs), have previously been shown to facilitate text comprehension and recall. In this study, we examined the effects of structural aids on learners' structural knowledge and their performance on a procedural transfer task. In Experiment 1, 90 college students were presented definitions of…

  5. Structured FORTRAN Preprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, J. A.; Lawson, C. L.; Van Snyder, W.; Tsitsivas, H. N.

    1985-01-01

    SFTRAN3 supports structured programing in FORTRAN environment. Language intended particularly to support two aspects of structured programing -- nestable single-entry control structures and modularization and top-down organization of code. Code designed and written using these SFTRAN3 facilities have fewer initial errors, easier to understand and less expensive to maintain and modify.

  6. Hypermedia 1990 structured Hypertext tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Hypermedia 1990 structured Hypertext tutorial is presented in the form of view-graphs. The following subject areas are covered: structured hypertext; analyzing hypertext documents for structure; designing structured hypertext documents; creating structured hypertext applications; structuring service and repair documents; maintaining structured hypertext documents; and structured hypertext conclusion.

  7. Modelling ionospheric density structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Large-scale density structures are a common feature in the high-latitude ionsphere. The structures were observed in the dayside cusp, polar cap, and nocturnal auroral region over a range of altitudes, including the E-region, F-region and topside ionosphere. The origins, lifetimes and transport characteristics of large-scale density structures were studied with the aid of a three-dimensional, time-dependent ionospheric model. Blob creation due to particle precipitation, the effect that structured electric fields have on the ionosphere, and the lifetimes and transport characteristics of density structures for different seasonal, solar cycle, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions were studied. The main conclusions drawn are: (1) the observed precipitation energy fluxes are sufficient for blob creation if the plasma is exposed to the precipitation for 5 to 10 minutes; (2) structured electric fields produce structured electron densities, ion temperatures, and ion composition; (3) the lifetime of an F-region density structure depends on several factors, including the initial location where it was formed, the magnitude of the perturbation, season, solar cycle and IMF; and (4) depending on the IMF, horizontal plasma convection can cause an initial structure to break up into multiple structures of various sizes, remain as a single distorted structure, or become stretched into elongated segments.

  8. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  9. Materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-08-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  10. Computers boost structural technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    1989-01-01

    Derived from matrix methods of structural analysis and finite element methods developed over the last three decades, computational structures technology (CST) blends computer science, numerical analysis, and approximation theory into structural analysis and synthesis. Recent significant advances in CST include stochastic-based modeling, strategies for performing large-scale structural calculations on new computing systems, and the integration of CST with other disciplinary modules for multidisciplinary analysis and design. New methodologies have been developed at NASA for integrated fluid-thermal structural analysis and integrated aerodynamic-structure-control design. The need for multiple views of data for different modules also led to the development of a number of sophisticated data-base management systems. For CST to play a role in the future development of structures technology and in the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles, major advances and computational tools are needed in a number of key areas.

  11. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  12. Adaptive structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Fanson, J. L.; Chen, G. S.; Kuo, C.-P.

    1990-01-01

    Future NASA missions will need large (20 to 100m) structural systems with precision position (few microns to submicron) requirements. Data are presented which indicate the technology deficiencies of previous programs and analyses in current state-of-the-art structural design approaches, analytical prediction capabilities, control of structure capabilities, and ground test technologies to meet the performance requirements of future large precision structural systems. Test results on laboratory truss structures that demonstrate static displacement control, active damping, and on-orbit system identification are described. It is shown that for large precision structures, adaptive structures provide not only a means to achieve the precision and characteristics required in space, but can also significantly alleviate the ground test requirements for flight-validating the hardware.

  13. 32 CFR 644.351 - Excess property exempted from reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other Government agencies. (e) Excess timber, sand, gravel and stone-quarried products, and growing... public domain pursuant to §§ 644.376 through 644.384. (g) Prefabricated movable structures, such as...), which are located on nonexcess land for off-site use. These types of structures shall be reported...

  14. 10 CFR 770.4 - What definitions are used in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... section 318 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2286g). DOE means the United States Department of..., together with the improvements, structures, and fixtures located on the land (usually including prefabricated or movable structures), and associated appurtenances under the control of any federal...

  15. 10 CFR 770.4 - What definitions are used in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... section 318 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2286g). DOE means the United States Department of..., together with the improvements, structures, and fixtures located on the land (usually including prefabricated or movable structures), and associated appurtenances under the control of any federal...

  16. 10 CFR 770.4 - What definitions are used in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...” within the meaning of section 318 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2286g). DOE means the...)). Real Property means all interest in land, together with the improvements, structures, and fixtures located on the land (usually including prefabricated or movable structures), and associated...

  17. From nuclear structure to nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    2014-08-01

    Similarities between nuclear structure study with many-body theory approach and nucleon structure calculations with lattice QCD are pointed out. We will give an example of how to obtain the connected sea partons from a combination of the experimental data, a global fit of parton distribution functions and a lattice calculation. We also present a complete calculation of the quark and glue decomposition of the proton momentum and angular momentum in the quenched approximation. It is found that the quark orbital angular momentum constitutes about 50% of the proton spin.

  18. Protein Structure Databases.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    Web-based protein structure databases come in a wide variety of types and levels of information content. Those having the most general interest are the various atlases that describe each experimentally determined protein structure and provide useful links, analyses, and schematic diagrams relating to its 3D structure and biological function. Also of great interest are the databases that classify 3D structures by their folds as these can reveal evolutionary relationships which may be hard to detect from sequence comparison alone. Related to these are the numerous servers that compare folds-particularly useful for newly solved structures, and especially those of unknown function. Beyond these are a vast number of databases for the more specialized user, dealing with specific families, diseases, structural features, and so on. PMID:27115626

  19. Pyramidal structures on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, M., Jr.; Ablordeppey, V. K.

    1974-01-01

    Triangular and polygonal pyramid like structures have been observed on the Martian surface. Located in the east central portion of Elysium Quadrangle (MC-15), these features are visible on the Mariner 9 photographs. B frames MTVS 4205-3 DAS 07794853 and MTVS 4296-24 DAS 12985882. The structures cast triangular and polygonal shadows. Steep-sided volcanic cones and impact craters occur only a few kilometers away. The mean diameter of the triangular pyramidal structures at the base is approximately 3.0 km, and the mean diameter of the polygonal structures is approximately 6.0 km. The observed Martian structures tend to line up suggesting joint or fault control. However, they do not appear to be controlled by the visible faults. The structures appear to be either wind-faceted volcanic cones and blocks or solidified blocks which have been rotated in semiconsolidated lava.

  20. Analysis of Geological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neville J.; Cosgrove, John W.

    1990-08-01

    A knowledge of structural geology is fundamental to understanding the processes by which the earth's crust has evolved. It is a subject of fundamental importance to students of geology, experienced field geologists and academic researchers as well as to petroleum and mining engineers. In contrast to many structural textbooks which dwell upon geometrical descriptions of geological structures, this book emphasises mechanical principles and the way in which they can be used to understand how and why a wide range of geological structures develop. Structures on all scales are considered but the emphasis of the book is on those that can be seen on the scale of hand specimen or outcrop. Drawing on their considerable teaching experience the authors present a coherent and lucid analysis of geological structures which will be welcomed by a wide variety of earth scientists.

  1. BOMB STABILIZING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, J.L.; Runyan, C.E.

    1963-12-10

    A stabilizinig structure capable of minimizing deviations of a falling body such as a bomb from desired trajectory is described. The structure comprises a fin or shroud arrangement of double-wedge configuration, the feeding portion being of narrow wedge shape and the after portion being of a wider wedge shape. The structure provides a force component for keeping the body on essentially desired trajectory throughout its fall. (AEC)

  2. Catalytic distillation structure

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  3. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  4. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  5. Photon structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed.

  6. Structural assembly in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Pruett, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A cost algorithm for predicting assembly costs for large space structures is given. Assembly scenarios are summarized which describe the erection, deployment, and fabrication tasks for five large space structures. The major activities that impact total costs for structure assembly from launch through deployment and assembly to scientific instrument installation and checkout are described. Individual cost elements such as assembly fixtures, handrails, or remote minipulators are also presented.

  7. [Hospital organizational structure].

    PubMed

    Bittar, O J

    1994-01-01

    The basic point for an Institution to work is the existence of a definite organizational structure that puts together similar areas allowing decisions and the operationalization of different tasks. Knowledge and analysis of structures of private and public hospitals and a bibliography review about the issue is the purpose of this paper. Suggestions are given about the elaboration of small structures and the utilization of matrix management in order to accomplish the hospitals objectives.

  8. Space station structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teller, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    A study of three interrelated tasks focusing on deployable Space Station truss structures is discussed. Task 1, the development of an alternate deployment system for linear truss, resulted in the preliminary design of an in-space reloadable linear motor deployer. Task 2, advanced composites deployable truss development, resulted in the testing and evaluation of composite materials for struts used in a deployable linear truss. Task 3, assembly of structures in space/erectable structures, resulted in the preliminary design of Space Station pressurized module support structures. An independent, redundant support system was developed for the common United States modules.

  9. Structural building response review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-15

    The integrity of a nuclear power plant during a postulated seismic event is required to protect the public against radiation. Therefore, a detailed set of seismic analyses of various structures and equipment is performed while designing a nuclear power plant. This report describes the structural response analysis method, including the structural model, soil-structure interaction as it relates to structural models, methods for seismic structural analysis, numerical integration methods, methods for non-seismic response analysis approaches for various response combinations, structural damping values, nonlinear response, uncertainties in structural properties, and structural response analysis using random properties. The report describes the state-of-the-art in these areas for nuclear power plants. It also details the past studies made at Sargent and Lundy to evaluate different alternatives and the conclusions reached for the specific purposes that those studies were intended. These results were incorporated here because they fall into the general scope of this report. The scope of the present task does not include performing new calculations.

  10. Integrated structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  11. Flexible Volumetric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Schlecht, Robin W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A flexible volumetric structure has a first spring that defines a three-dimensional volume and includes a serpentine structure elongatable and compressible along a length thereof. A second spring is coupled to at least one outboard edge region of the first spring. The second spring is a sheet-like structure capable of elongation along an in-plane dimension thereof. The second spring is oriented such that its in-plane dimension is aligned with the length of the first spring's serpentine structure.

  12. Structures and stochastic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies and research on structures and stochastic methods in the soil dynamics and earthquake engineering filed are covered in this book. The first section is on structures and includes studies on bridges, loaded tanks, sliding structures and wood-framed houses. The second section covers dams, retaining walls and slopes. The third section on underground structures covers pipelines, water supply, fire loss, buried lifeline, and underground transmission lines. The final section is on stochastic methods and includes applications in earthquake response spectra, lifeline aqueduct systems, and various other areas.

  13. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  14. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  15. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  16. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  17. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  18. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  19. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out. PMID:27126116

  20. Organisational Structure & Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Structural change is seen as a way to meet the challenges of the future that face many organisations. While some writers agree that broad-ranging structural change may not always transform an organisation or enhance its performance, others claim that innovation will be a major source of competitive advantage to organisations, particularly when…

  1. Generalized holomorphic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yicao

    2014-12-01

    We define the notion of generalized holomorphic principal bundles and establish that their associated vector bundles of holomorphic representations are generalized holomorphic vector bundles defined by M. Gualtieri. Motivated by our definition, several examples of generalized holomorphic structures are constructed. A reduction theorem of generalized holomorphic structures is also included.

  2. SOD: Framework structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. X.; Baur, W. H.

    This document is part of Subvolume E `Zeolite-Type Crystal Structures and their Chemistry. Framework Type Codes RON to STI' of Volume 14 `Microporous and other Framework Materials with Zeolite-Type Structures' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'.

  3. The Structure of Reciprocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molm, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocity is one of the defining features of social exchange and social life, yet exchange theorists have tended to take it for granted. Drawing on work from a decade-long theoretical research program, I argue that reciprocity is structured and variable across different forms of exchange, that these variations in the structure of reciprocity…

  4. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface.

  5. Structure of Skeletal Muscle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... nerves. This is directly related to the primary function of skeletal muscle, ... an impulse from a nerve cell. Generally, an artery and at least one vein ...

  6. Piaget's Structural Developmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughton, John M.

    1981-01-01

    Piaget's theory is identified as a branch of structuralism concerned with the concept of truth, in distinction from French structuralism, which is focused on meaning. The two branches are compared and contrasted, and relations between logic and language are explored. Similarities and differences in the theories of Piaget, Levi-Strauss, and Chomsky…

  7. The Changing Family Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue contains feature articles and short reports on how and why family structures are undergoing substantial change in many parts of the world. These articles include: (1) "The Changing Family Structure," a review of how families are changing and why; (2) "Peru: Families in the Andes"; (3) "Thailand: Families of the Garbage Dump";…

  8. Solution structure of (+)-discodermolide.

    PubMed

    Smith, A B; LaMarche, M J; Falcone-Hindley, M

    2001-03-01

    [structure: see text]. The solution structure of (+)-discodermolide (1) has been determined via 1- and 2-D NMR techniques in conjunction with Monte Carlo conformational analysis. Taken together, the results demonstrate that in solution (+)-discodermolide occupies a helical conformation remarkably similar to the solid state conformation.

  9. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  10. The Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Colin R.; Bruno, Ian J.; Lightfoot, Matthew P.; Ward, Suzanna C.

    2016-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal–organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  11. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  12. The Structures of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet, geared toward an advanced high school or early college-level audience, explains how structural biology provides insight into health and disease and is useful in developing new medications. This publication contains a general introduction to proteins, coverage of the techniques used to determine protein structures, and a chapter on…

  13. Tapered structure construction

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Eric D.; Takata, Rosalind K.; Slocum, Alexander H.; Nayfeh, Samir A.

    2016-04-05

    Feeding stock used to form a tapered structure into a curving device such that each point on the stock undergoes rotational motion about a peak location of the tapered structure; and the stock meets a predecessor portion of stock along one or more adjacent edges.

  14. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Agricultural Structures, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Burhoe, Steve

    This guide to a curriculum unit in agricultural structures is designed to expand the curriculum materials available in vocational agriculture in Missouri. It and Agricultural Structures I (see note) provide reference materials to systematize the curriculum. The six units cover working with concrete (19 lessons, 2 laboratory exercises), drawing and…

  16. Space Station structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, W.

    1985-04-01

    A brief overview of some structural results that came from space station skunk works is presented. Detailed drawings of the pressurized modules, and primary truss structures such as deployable single fold beams, erectable beams and deployable double folds are given. Typical truss attachment devices and deployable backup procedures are also given.

  17. Space Station structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief overview of some structural results that came from space station skunk works is presented. Detailed drawings of the pressurized modules, and primary truss structures such as deployable single fold beams, erectable beams and deployable double folds are given. Typical truss attachment devices and deployable backup procedures are also given.

  18. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  19. Trajectory structures and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2004-11-01

    The special problem of transport in two-dimensional divergence-free stochastic velocity fields is studied by developing a statistical approach, the nested subensemble method. The nonlinear process of trapping determined by such fields generates trajectory structures whose statistical characteristics are determined. These structures strongly influence the transport.

  20. Structures in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, anchored to the foot restraint on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), approaches the tower-like Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) device. The structure was just deployed by Ross and astronaut Sherwood Spring as the Atlantis flies over white clouds and blue ocean waters of the Atlantic.

  1. Folding Truss Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Aubrey D.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for foldable and deployable truss offers advantages of strength, rigidity, and mechanical simplicity. Structure consists of series of boxlike bays with 9-ft sides. Each box has panels on top and bottom and two sides. Two remaining sides open. Panels hinged at connecting edges. Adapted to terrestrial transportable structures, scaffolds, cranes, and rows of cubicles.

  2. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  3. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  4. Inflatable nested toroid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable structure comprises at least two generally toroidal, inflatable modules. When in a deployed mode, the first, inner module has a major diameter less than that of a second, outer module and is positioned within the inner circumference of the outer module such that the first module is nested circumferentially alongside the second module. The inflatable structure, in a non-deployed, non-inflated mode, is of compact configuration and adapted to be transported to a site of deployment. When deployed, the inflatable structure is of substantially increased interior volume. In one embodiment, access between the interior of the first module and the second module is provided by at least one port or structural pass-through. In another embodiment, the inflatable structure includes at least one additional generally toroidal module external of and circumferentially surrounding the second module.

  5. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  6. Iconicity as structure mapping

    PubMed Central

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience. PMID:25092669

  7. Trends in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.

    1978-01-01

    Recent developments indicate that there may soon be a revolution in aerospace structures. Increases in allowable operational stress levels, utilization of high-strength, high-toughness materials, and new structural concepts will highlight this advancement. Improved titanium and aluminum alloys and high-modulus, high-strength advanced composites, with higher specific properties than aluminum and high-strength nickel alloys, are expected to be the principal materials. Significant advances in computer technology will cause major changes in the preliminary design cycle and permit solutions of otherwise too-complex interactive structural problems and thus the development of vehicles and components of higher performance. The energy crisis will have an impact on material costs and choices and will spur the development of more weight-efficient structures. There will also be significant spinoffs of aerospace structures technology, particularly in composites and design/analysis software.

  8. Spin structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen, Alexandre Deur, Sebastian Kuhn, Zein-eddine Meziani

    2011-06-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have often brought out surprises and puzzles. The so-called "spin crisis" in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, Jefferson Lab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This chapter will highlight Jefferson Lab's unique contributions in the measurements of valence quark spin distributions, in the moments of spin structure functions at low to intermediate Q2, and in the transverse spin structure.

  9. Iconicity as structure mapping.

    PubMed

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-09-19

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience.

  10. Adaptive structures. [for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Fanson, J. L.; Crawley, E. F.

    1990-01-01

    Current research in the field of advanced adaptive structures for space applications is reviewed. A classification of adaptive structures is proposed whereby such structures are subdivided into adaptive, sensory, controlled, active, and intelligent structures. The definition and properties of each type of adaptive structures are presented, and methods of structure control are discussed.

  11. Solution Accounts for Structural Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    New analytical technique determines dynamic response of damped structures dominated by internal structural damping mechanisms. Though structural damping is often negligible compared with damping due to air friction and friction in joints, structural damping can be of major importance in structures having heavy damping treatments or in outer-space structures. Finite-element model includes nonlinear, nonviscous internal damping.

  12. Mobile marine operations structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalaik, A.; Braddick, P.W.; Brittin, D.S.; Johnson, G.L.

    1987-09-22

    This patent describes the process of installing a marine operations structure in a pre-determined sea floor location. The structure has a central core and a support base having at least two differently sloped ice wall surfaces for achieving fracturing of ice features, and having at least two series of circumferentially arranged ballast tanks. It consists of positioning the structure over a selected sea floor location by the use of at least three tug boats connected to the structure by tension cables arranged radially with respect to the structure; flooding a first series of lower ballast tanks in a sequential ballasting operation; flooding a second series of ballast tanks located at a higher elevation within the structure than the first series of ballast tanks; maintaining radial forces along the tension cables during the flooding steps; and after the structure has become founded on the bottom of the sea, pumping sea waver into fluid tanks some of which are located at an elevation above the water level.

  13. Photonic structures in biology.

    PubMed

    Vukusic, Pete; Sambles, J Roy

    2003-08-14

    Millions of years before we began to manipulate the flow of light using synthetic structures, biological systems were using nanometre-scale architectures to produce striking optical effects. An astonishing variety of natural photonic structures exists: a species of Brittlestar uses photonic elements composed of calcite to collect light, Morpho butterflies use multiple layers of cuticle and air to produce their striking blue colour and some insects use arrays of elements, known as nipple arrays, to reduce reflectivity in their compound eyes. Natural photonic structures are providing inspiration for technological applications.

  14. Tectonosphere: Structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, V. V.

    This volume includes papers on the structure and evolution of the earth tectonosphere. Attention is given to the relationship between crust and upper mantle structures and plate tectonics, and the major patterns in the internal structure and the spatial distribution of Mediterranian folded regions. Other papers are on the formational types of ophiolite profiles and the interpretation of ophiolites as remnants of oceanic crust; the relationship between continental volcanism, xenoliths, and lithospheric platform tectonics; and the shallow-water facies of the world ocean. Particular consideration is given to the magnetic field of the oceans and the Vine-Matthews (1963) hypothesis.

  15. Progressive failure of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, G. T. G.; Zanganeh, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is presented for determining the nonlinear behavior of structures subjected to extreme loading and the possibility of development of potential for progressive failure. The methodology takes into account the effect of both material and geometric nonlinearities. At a given stage of analysis, the individual components of the structure are checked against predetermined failure criteria. Subsequently, the failing components are removed and the modified structure is analyzed for overall failure. Examples, obtained from a computer program based on the proposed procedure, showing the applicability of the method are presented.

  16. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  17. Deployable geodesic truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Simonton, J. Wayne (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A deployable geodesic truss structure which can be deployed from a stowed state to an erected state is described. The truss structure includes a series of bays, each bay having sets of battens connected by longitudinal cross members which give the bay its axial and torsional stiffness. The cross members are hinged at their mid point by a joint so that the cross members are foldable for deployment or collapsing. The bays are deployed and stabilized by actuator means connected between the mid point joints of the cross members. Hinged longerons may be provided to also connect the sets of battens and to collapse for stowing with the rest of the truss structure.

  18. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  19. Australia's Political Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawer, Geoffrey

    1984-01-01

    Australia is an independent nation-state, federally constituted under a democratic parliamentary system. Being part of the Commonwealth of Nations, with feelings of loyalty to the Crown, Australia is also a democratic monarchy. Its political structure is discussed. (RM)

  20. Corotating shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of observed interplanetary shocks leads to the conclusion that a corotating forward shock has not been unambiguously identified at 1 AU. A reverse shock identified in September 1967 is a likely candidate for a corotating structure.

  1. Nonlinear damping in structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experimental results prove the feasibility of substructure testing to measure local damping properties directly. Dynamic responses of a structure can be predicted quantitatively, and specimens are less costly and more easily tested with better controlled tests and environments.

  2. Structure of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Nervous System Peripheral Nervous System Review Quiz Endocrine System Characteristics of Hormones Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Pituitary & ... Thyroid & Parathyroid Glands Adrenal Gland Pancreas Gonads Other Endocrine Glands ... Cardiovascular System Heart Structure of the Heart Physiology of the ...

  3. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  4. Grounding of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosela, P. A.; Fertis, D. G.; Shaker, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Space structures, such as the Space Station solar arrays, must be extremely light-weight, flexible structures. Accurate prediction of the natural frequencies and mode shapes is essential for determining the structural adequacy of components, and designing a controls system. The tension pre-load in the 'blanket' of photovoltaic solar collectors, and the free/free boundary conditions of a structure in space, causes serious reservations on the use of standard finite element techniques of solution. In particular, a phenomenon known as 'grounding', or false stiffening, of the stiffness matrix occurs during rigid body rotation. This paper examines the grounding phenomenon in detail. Numerous stiffness matrices developed by others are examined for rigid body rotation capability, and found lacking. A force imbalance inherent in the formulations examined is the likely cause of the grounding problem, suggesting the need for a directed force formulation.

  5. Bioinspired structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-24

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. Various natural objects which provide functionality of commercial interest have been characterized to understand how a natural object provides functionality. We have modeled and fabricated structures in the lab using nature's route and developed optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, optimum structures have been fabricated using smart materials and fabrication techniques. This feature article provides an overview of four topics: Lotus effect, rose petal effect, gecko feet, and shark skin.

  6. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Topics addressed include: strength and hygrothermal response of L-1011 fin components; wing fuel containment and damage tolerance development; impact dynamics; acoustic transmission; fuselage structure; composite transport wing technology development; spar/assembly concepts.

  7. Other Fabric Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Architects, engineers and building owners are turning increasingly to fabric structures because of their aesthetic appeal, relatively low initial cost, low maintenance outlays, energy efficiency and good space utilization. Several examples are shown.

  8. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  9. NASA Now: Inflatable Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA senior research engineer Judith Watson is one of a team of engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center who are studying inflatable structures that might one day be used to establish an outpo...

  10. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  11. Encapsulation with structured triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids provide excellent materials to encapsulate bioactive compounds for food and pharmaceutical applications. Lipids are renewable, biodegradable, and easily modified to provide additional chemical functionality. The use of structured lipids that have been modified with photoactive properties are ...

  12. Determining structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Michael A.; Kiraly, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of the methods and concepts developed to enhance and predict structural dynamic characteristics of advanced aeropropulsion systems. Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods are four disciplines that make up the research program at NASA/Lewis Research Center. The Aeroelasticity program develops analytical and experimental methods to minimize flutter and forced vibration of aerospace propulsion systems. Both frequency domain and time domain methods have been developed for applications on the turbofan, turbopump, and advanced turboprop. To improve life and performance, the Vibration Control program conceives, analyzes, develops, and demonstrates new methods to control vibrations in aerospace systems. Active and passive vibration control is accomplished with electromagnetic dampers, magnetic bearings, and piezoelectric crystals to control rotor vibrations. The Dynamic Systems program analyzes and verifies the dynamics of interacting systems, as well as develops concepts and methods for high-temperature dynamic seals. The Computational Structural Methods program uses computer science to improve solutions of structural problems.

  13. Structural Determination of Circulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenburg, William B.

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of both structural factors (demographics, economic conditions, and competition) and discretionary factors (content, design, and marketing techniques) and concludes that it is the former that determine a newspaper's circulation. (FL)

  14. Solar animal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.K.

    1984-07-31

    The present invention entails an animal housing structure equipped with a solar heating system for heating the structure. Solar energy is collected by a roof-attic solar collector arrangement and the collected solar energy in the form of heat is transferred to passing air. The heated passing air is selectively directed to the ground underlying the structure and is channeled generally horizontally through the underlying ground at a selected depth below ground level. Heat from the air is transferred to the earth below ground level and this heat is then slowly transferred upwardly through the ground towards ground level where it is ultimately emitted from the earth and acts to heat the interior of the structure and provide warmth for the animals.

  15. School Administrator Grapevine Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Joseph W.; Hack, Walter G.

    1980-01-01

    A study reveals that principals' grapevine structure shows both "guild-like" and "clan-like" grouping and reflects the patterns of occupational socialization of school principals and informal boundary spanning processes. (Author/JM)

  16. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  17. Structural traps 5

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

  18. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Greenstreet, B.L.

    1963-12-31

    A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

  19. Integrated support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruneau, Stephen D.; Campbell, John T.; Struven, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    This Major Qualifying Project is part of the Advanced Space Design Program at WPI. The goal is to design a support structure for a NASA GetAway Special experimental canister. The payload integration, weight, volume, and structural integrity of the canister as specified by NASA guidelines were studied. The end result is a complete set of design drawings with interface drawings and data to specify the design and leave a base on which the next group can concentrate.

  20. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  1. Meteorite Seymchan structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hontsova, S. S.; Petrova, E. V.; Muftahetdinova, R. F.; Chulanova, V. N.; Grokhovsky, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The meteorite Seymchan specimen was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Olivine grains have roundish shapes, which was formed during matter cooling. Different features of the metal structure such as plessite structure and Neimann bands were observed. The oxide edges were observed in the boundaries between phases. The oxides were formed in the terrestrial conditions. The boundary regions between metal and olivine in the meteorite contain grains of troilite, schreibersite, and chromite.

  2. Structure function monitor

    DOEpatents

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  3. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  4. Integral Textile Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David B.; Cox, Brian N.

    2008-08-01

    A new paradigm for ceramic composite structural components enables functionality in heat exchange, transpiration, detailed shape, and thermal strain management that significantly exceeds the prior art. The paradigm is based on the use of three-dimensional fiber reinforcement that is tailored to the specific shape, stress, and thermal requirements of a structural application and therefore generally requires innovative textile methods for each realization. Key features include the attainment of thin skins (less than 1 mm) that are nevertheless structurally robust, transpiration holes formed without cutting fibers, double curvature, compliant integral attachment to other structures that avoids thermal stress buildup, and microcomposite ceramic matrices that minimize spalling and allow the formation of smooth surfaces. All these features can be combined into structures of very varied gross shape and function, using a wide range of materials such as all-oxide systems and SiC and carbon fibers in SiC matrices. Illustrations are drawn from rocket nozzles, thermal protection systems, and gas turbine engines. The new design challenges that arise for such material/structure systems are being met by specialized computational modeling that departs significantly in the representation of materials behavior from that used in conventional finite element methods.

  5. Pleated and Creased Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudte, Levi; Wei, Zhiyan; Mahadevan, L.

    2012-02-01

    The strategic placement of curved folds on a paper annulus produces saddle-shaped origami. These exotic geometries resulting from simple design processes motivate our development of a computational tool to simulate the stretching, bending and folding of thin sheets of material. We seek to understand the shape of the curved origami figure by applying the computational tool to simulate a thin annulus with single or multiple folds. We aim to quantify the static geometry of this simplified model in order to delineate methods for actuation and control of similar developable structures with curved folds. Miura-ori pattern is a periodic pleated structure defined in terms of 2 angles and 2 lengths. The unit cell embodies the basic element in all non-trivial pleated structures - the mountain or valley folds, wherein four folds come together at a single vertex. The ability of this structure to pack and unpack with a few degrees of freedom leads to their use in deployable structures such as solar sails and maps, just as this feature is useful in insect wings, plant leaves and flowers. We probe the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the mechanical behavior of these structures with a view to optimizing material performance.

  6. Structural disorder in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Pancsa, Rita; Tompa, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Based on early bioinformatic studies on a handful of species, the frequency of structural disorder of proteins is generally thought to be much higher in eukaryotes than in prokaryotes. To refine this view, we present here a comparative prediction study and analysis of 194 fully described eukaryotic proteomes and 87 reference prokaryotes for structural disorder. We found that structural disorder does distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes, but its frequency spans a very wide range in the two superkingdoms that largely overlap. The number of disordered binding regions and different Pfam domain types also contribute to distinguish eukaryotes from prokaryotes. Unexpectedly, the highest levels--and highest variability--of predicted disorder is found in protists, i.e. single-celled eukaryotes, often surpassing more complex eukaryote organisms, plants and animals. This trend contrasts with that of the number of domain types, which increases rather monotonously toward more complex organisms. The level of structural disorder appears to be strongly correlated with lifestyle, because some obligate intracellular parasites and endosymbionts have the lowest levels, whereas host-changing parasites have the highest level of predicted disorder. We conclude that protists have been the evolutionary hot-bed of experimentation with structural disorder, in a period when structural disorder was actively invented and the major functional classes of disordered proteins established.

  7. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  8. Boston Infill Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Don; Heder, Lajos

    Concepts and recommendations are presented regarding a proposed system of dispersed classroom clusters or 'infill schools'. These small independent urban schools would be housed in prefabricated structures developed for infill housing in Boston. The infill unit uses pre-designed building components and can be constructed in a few weeks. The infill…

  9. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner’99 and Turner’04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  10. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  11. The Quality and Validation of Structures from Structural Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Marcin J.; Zheng, Heping; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek

    2014-01-01

    Quality control of three-dimensional structures of macromolecules is a critical step to ensure the integrity of structural biology data, especially those produced by structural genomics centers. Whereas the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has proven to be a remarkable success overall, the inconsistent quality of structures reveals a lack of universal standards for structure/deposit validation. Here, we review the state-of-the-art methods used in macromolecular structure validation, focusing on validation of structures determined by X-ray crystallography. We describe some general protocols used in the rebuilding and re-refinement of problematic structural models. We also briefly discuss some frontier areas of structure validation, including refinement of protein–ligand complexes, automation of structure redetermination, and the use of NMR structures and computational models to solve X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. PMID:24203341

  12. GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT TRAY STORAGE ROOM (STRUCTURE 11), WITH FRUIT DRYING AREA AND TRAM TRACKS IN FOREGROUND, FROM NORTHWEST - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  13. Controls for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  14. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  15. Solar efficient structure

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, F.B.

    1985-02-12

    A solar efficient structure is disclosed which comprises a central chase positioned vertically within the structure and connected in fluid communication with a duct network positioned in thermal contact with the ground and with the attic of the structure. A fan is provided for circulating air through a perforated attic duct, through the various rooms of the structure, and through the duct network and the chase. In one embodiment, the fan is reversible so as to circulate the air in one direction, or in the other direction. When operating in the heating mode, the ground acts as a heat source to heat the air circulating through the duct network. Conversely, when operating in the cooling mode, the ground acts as a heat sink to cool the airflow circulating therethrough. A dehumidifier, and a heating or cooling means is provided for assisting in the conditioning of the circulating airflow. In one embodiment, the heating means comprises a greenhouse room which permits ultraviolet radiation to enter and heat the air contained therein, and a damper means for controlling the flow rate of the air circulating through the greenhouse room. The structure is fully insulated and includes a vent skin positioned about the exterior walls and the roof thereof. A method is disclosed for insulating the roof line with loose insulation.

  16. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  17. PRSEUS Structural Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velicki, Alex; Jegley, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    A lighter, more robust airframe is one of the key technological advancements necessary for the successful launch of any large next-generation transport aircraft. Such a premise dictates that considerable improvements beyond current state-of-the-art aluminum structures is needed, and that improvements of this magnitude will require an extensive use of composite materials that are not only lightweight, but also economical to produce. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are developing a novel structural concept called the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. It is an integrally stiffened panel concept that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. In addition to improved structural performance, an important facet of this unique arrangement of stitched carbon fibers is its innovative manufacturing method that has the potential to lower fabrication costs by eliminating fasteners and autoclave cures. The rationale and development status for this new approach forms the basis of the work described in this paper. The test specimens described herein were fabricated, or are currently being fabricated, by The Boeing Company, while the structural analyses and testing tasks are being performed by NASA and Boeing personnel.

  18. Determining structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Michael A. (Editor); Brown, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David; Janetzke, David; Kascak, Albert; Kaza, Krishna; Kielb, Robert; Kiraly, Louis J.; Lawrence, Charles

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the methods and concepts developed to enhance and predict structural dynamic characteristics of advanced aeropropulsion systems is presented. Aeroelasticity, vibration control, dynamic systems, and computational structural methods are four disciplines that make up the structural dynamic effort at LeRC. The aeroelasticity program develops analytical and experimental methods for minimizing flutter and forced vibration of aerospace propulsion systems. Both frequency domain and time domain methods were developed for applications on the turbofan, turbopump, and advanced turboprop. In order to improve life and performance, the vibration control program conceives, analyzes, develops, and demonstrates new methods for controlling vibrations in aerospace systems. Active and passive vibration control is accomplished with electromagnetic dampers, magnetic bearings, and piezoelectric crystals to control rotor vibrations. The dynamic systems program analyzes and verifies the dynamics of interacting systems, as well as develops concepts and methods for high-temperature dynamic seals. Work in this field involves the analysis and parametric identification of large, nonlinear, damped, stochastic systems. The computational structural methods program exploits modern computer science as an aid to the solutions of structural problems.

  19. Designing plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammer, P. David

    This thesis describes methods and results used in the design of various photonic structures. The emphasis of this thesis is in the theoretical and computational methods employed in the design. Many structures were fabricated and experimentally characterized confirming simulation results. Theoretically, surface plasmons (SPs) or more generally the study of light near micro- or nano-fabricated metallic surfaces, play a major role in all structures in this thesis. An effective work-flow in designing "plasmonic" structures is detailed. Various applications are then discussed: (1) Enhanced transmission through subwavelength apertures in metal films; (2) long range SP hybrid waveguides for use in the area of micro-electronics; (3) circular micro-polarizers, which also filter for a specific color band, combined with linear polarizers for full stokes polarization imaging; and (4) using plasmonic couplers to increase efficiency of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junction detectors for use in the low THz. General conclusions about the efficacy of plasmonic structures, or the lack thereof, in these applications are discussed.

  20. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  1. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  2. The Structure Lacuna

    PubMed Central

    Boeyens, Jan C.A.; Levendis, Demetrius C.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular symmetry is intimately connected with the classical concept of three-dimensional molecular structure. In a non-classical theory of wave-like interaction in four-dimensional space-time, both of these concepts and traditional quantum mechanics lose their operational meaning, unless suitably modified. A required reformulation should emphasize the importance of four-dimensional effects like spin and the symmetry effects of space-time curvature that could lead to a fundamentally different understanding of molecular symmetry and structure in terms of elementary number theory. Isolated single molecules have no characteristic shape and macro-biomolecules only develop robust three-dimensional structure in hydrophobic response to aqueous cellular media. PMID:22942753

  3. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  4. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  5. Gene structure and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes the structure of genes in molecular terms and summarizes present knowledge about how their activity is regulated. It covers a range of topics, including a review of the structure and replication of DNA, transcription and translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene organization and expression, retroviruses and oncogenes. The book also includes a chapter on the methodology of DNA manipulation including sections on site-directed mutagenesis, the polymerase chain reaction, reporter genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The hemoglobin gene system and the genetics of the proteins of the immune system are presented in the latter half of the book to show the structure and expression of the most well-studied systems in higher eukaryotes. The final chapter reviews the differences between prokaryotic and the eukaryotic genomes.

  6. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  7. Rethinking cell structure.

    PubMed Central

    Penman, S

    1995-01-01

    Cell structure, emerging from behind the veil of conventional electron microscopy, appears far more complex than formerly realized. The standard plastic-embedded, ultrathin section can image only what is on the section surface and masks the elaborate networks of the cytoplasm and nucleus. Embedment-free electron microscopy gives clear, high-contrast micrographs of cell structure when combined with removal of obscuring material such as soluble proteins. The resinless ultrathin section is the technique of choice; it is simple and inexpensive, and it uses ordinary electron microscopes. The resulting pictures reveal a world of complex cell structure and function. These images necessarily change our conception of the cytoskeleton, nuclear matrix, mitosis, and the relation of membranes to cytostructure. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7777493

  8. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Castillo, D. I.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Omidi, N.; Kajdic, P.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetosheath is full of highly perturbed plasma. The inhomogeneity of this region leads to temperature anisotropies that can originate waves; e.g, mirror mode and ion cyclotron waves. Other structures like the magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) can also be present. These are structures reported from results of global hybrid simulations by Omidi et al. (2014) that are formed in the quasi-parallel region of the bow shock and they are convected into the magnetosheath. The MFS are characterized by field aligned enhancements of density and temperature that are anti-correlated. In this work we analyze magnetic field and plasma data from the THEMIS mission to explore the possible existence of MFS.

  9. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOEpatents

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  10. Modular arctic structures system

    SciTech Connect

    Reusswig, G. H.

    1984-12-04

    A modular and floatable offshore exploration and production platform system for use in shallow arctic waters is disclosed. A concrete base member is floated to the exploration or production site, and ballated into a predredged cavity. The cavity and base are sized to provide a stable horizontal base 30 feet below the mean water/ice plane. An exploration or production platform having a massive steel base is floated to the site and ballasted into position on the base. Together, the platform, base and ballast provide a massive gravity structure that is capable of resisting large ice and wave forces that impinge on the structure. The steel platform has a sloping hourglass profile to deflect horizontal ice loads vertically, and convert the horizontal load to a vertical tensile stress, which assists in breaking the ice as it advances toward the structure.

  11. [Structural sensitivity analysis].

    PubMed

    Carrera-Hueso, F J; Ramón-Barrios, A

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a structural sensitivity analysis of a decision model and to identify its advantages and limitations. A previously published model of dinoprostone was modified, taking two scenarios into account: eliminating postpartum hemorrhages and including both hemorrhages and uterine hyperstimulation among the adverse effects. The result of the structural sensitivity analysis shows the robustness of the underlying model and confirmed the initial results: the intrauterine device is more cost-effective than intracervical dinoprostone gel. Structural sensitivity analyses should be congruent with the situation studied and clinically validated. Although uncertainty may be only slightly reduced, these analyses provide information and add greater validity and reliability to the model.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    The composite aircraft program component (CAPCOMP) is a graduate level project conducted in parallel with a composite structures program. The composite aircraft program glider (CAPGLIDE) is an undergraduate demonstration project which has as its objectives the design, fabrication, and testing of a foot launched ultralight glider using composite structures. The objective of the computer aided design (COMPAD) portion of the composites project is to provide computer tools for the analysis and design of composite structures. The major thrust of COMPAD is in the finite element area with effort directed at implementing finite element analysis capabilities and developing interactive graphics preprocessing and postprocessing capabilities. The criteria for selecting research projects to be conducted under the innovative and supporting research (INSURE) program are described.

  13. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  14. Precision space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    NASA large space structures efforts to date aimed towards large, flexible antenna-like structures (30-100M) with relatively long wavelengths (1-30cm) and moderate disturbances leading to some structure-control interaction. Potential missions in the OPTICS regime require small reflectors/mirrors, short wavelengths (visible to 100 microns), very tight tolerances in surface, alignment, pointing stability, as well as the potential of considerable on-board disturbances. For optics systems: figure/surface control can be quasi-static, active/passive isolation schemes are possible, vibration control is necessary, and the attitude control system can be low BW - Ground testing of reflectors and mirrors is more feasible than with antennas.

  15. Prosodic Structure as a Parallel to Musical Structure.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Christopher C; Slevc, L Robert

    2015-01-01

    What structural properties do language and music share? Although early speculation identified a wide variety of possibilities, the literature has largely focused on the parallels between musical structure and syntactic structure. Here, we argue that parallels between musical structure and prosodic structure deserve more attention. We review the evidence for a link between musical and prosodic structure and find it to be strong. In fact, certain elements of prosodic structure may provide a parsimonious comparison with musical structure without sacrificing empirical findings related to the parallels between language and music. We then develop several predictions related to such a hypothesis. PMID:26733930

  16. Prosodic Structure as a Parallel to Musical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Christopher C.; Slevc, L. Robert

    2015-01-01

    What structural properties do language and music share? Although early speculation identified a wide variety of possibilities, the literature has largely focused on the parallels between musical structure and syntactic structure. Here, we argue that parallels between musical structure and prosodic structure deserve more attention. We review the evidence for a link between musical and prosodic structure and find it to be strong. In fact, certain elements of prosodic structure may provide a parsimonious comparison with musical structure without sacrificing empirical findings related to the parallels between language and music. We then develop several predictions related to such a hypothesis. PMID:26733930

  17. Nuclear structure research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. S.

    1992-07-01

    The TRISTAN on-line isotope separator and the capture gamma ray facility at the HFBR are the experimental foci of the program which has four principal research themes, three involving nuclear structure physics and one directed towards astrophysics. These themes are: (1) the manifestation of the proton-neutron interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure and its relation to collectivity; (2) the appearance and the role of symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei; (3) the study of new regions of magic nuclei; and (4) the characterization of nuclei important in r-process stellar nucleosynthesis.

  18. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  19. Structure of Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Ho, Joseph X.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its availability, low cost, stability, and unusual ligand-binding properties, serum albumin has been one of the mst extensively studied and applied proteins in biochemistry. However, as a protein, albumin is far from typical, and the widespread interest in and application of albumin have not been balanced by an understanding of its molecular structure. Indeed, for more than 30 years structural information was surmised based solely on techniques such as hydrodynamics, low-angle X-ray scattering, and predictive methods.

  20. Buckling of offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.C.; Ellinas, C.P.; Supple, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This new handbook gives detailed design guidance for a wide range of structural components and types of loading related to the buckling of offshore structures. It presents many hundreds of test results that have been examined and collated to give a common base of comparison, and its surveys all the relevant national and international design codes, comparing the relative accuracy of their predictions against the available test results. Contents are: unstiffened cord and bracing elements; ring-stiffened cylinders; stringer-stiffened and orthogonally-stiffened cylinders; flat panels; and end-closures and transition shells.

  1. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  2. Interest rates hierarchical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, T.; Aste, T.; Hyde, S. T.; Ramsden, S.

    2005-09-01

    We propose a general method to study the hierarchical organization of financial data by embedding the structure of their correlations in metric graphs in multi-dimensional spaces. An application to two different sets of interest rates is discussed by constructing triangular embeddings on the sphere. Three-dimensional representations of these embeddings with the correct metric geometry are constructed and visualized. The resulting graphs contain the minimum spanning tree as a sub-graph and they preserve its hierarchical structure. This produces a clear cluster differentiation and allows us to compute new local and global topological quantities.

  3. Multiscale structure of meanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; Zolezzi, G.; Abad, J. D.; Aalto, R.

    2016-04-01

    River meander planforms can be described based on wavelet analysis, but an objective method to identify the main characteristics of a meander planform over all spatial scales is yet to be found. Here we show how a set of simple metrics representing meander shape can be retrieved from a continuous wavelet transform of a planform geometry. We construct a synoptic multiple looping tree to establish the meander structure, revealing the embedding of dominant meander scales in larger-scale loops. The method can be applied beyond the case of rivers to unravel the meandering structure of lava flows, turbidity currents, tidal channels, rivulets, supraglacial streams, and extraterrestrial flows.

  4. Structural mechanics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffle, Johnny H.

    1992-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed.

  5. Objective Eulerian coherent structures.

    PubMed

    Serra, Mattia; Haller, George

    2016-05-01

    We define objective Eulerian Coherent Structures (OECSs) in two-dimensional, non-autonomous dynamical systems as the instantaneously most influential material curves. Specifically, OECSs are stationary curves of the averaged instantaneous material stretching-rate or material shearing-rate functionals. From these objective (frame-invariant) variational principles, we obtain explicit differential equations for hyperbolic, elliptic, and parabolic OECSs. As an illustration, we compute OECSs in an unsteady ocean velocity data set. In comparison to structures suggested by other common Eulerian diagnostic tools, we find OECSs to be the correct short-term cores of observed trajectory deformation patterns. PMID:27249950

  6. Stellar structure of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, JianMin; Zuo, Wei; Gu, JianZhong; Shang, XinLe

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars are strong magnetized neutron stars which could emit quiescent X-ray, repeating burst of soft gamma ray, and even the giant flares. We investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the structure of isolated magnetars. The stellar structure together with the magnetic field configuration can be obtained at the same time within a self-consistent procedure. The magnetar mass and radius are found to be weakly enhanced by the strong magnetic fields. Unlike other previous investigations, the magnetic field is unable to violate the mass limit of the neutron stars.

  7. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  8. Practical structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rego, E Hesper; Shao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is a method that can double the spatial resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy in three dimensions by using spatially structured illumination light. In this chapter, we introduce the basic principles of SIM and describe in detail several different implementations based on either a diffraction grating or liquid crystal spatial light modulators. We also describe nonlinear SIM, a method that in theory can achieve unlimited resolution. In addition, we discuss a number of key points important for high-resolution imaging. PMID:25391800

  9. Structural mechanics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, Johnny H.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed.

  10. Redundant structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, L. I.; Mintz, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    In many structural systems, it is desirable to perform analysis to determine how safe structure is when subjected to "yielding" loads. FRAME1 computer program analyzes, in both plastic and elastic ranges, redundant structures subjected to thermal and mechanical loads.

  11. Fire protection for relocatable structures

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

  12. Governance Structure: Palomar College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomar Coll., San Marcos, CA.

    The governance structure of Palomar College (PC) in San Marcos, California, is defined in the plan described in this document. Introductory material indicates that the plan was designed to provide appropriate representation for each of PC's constituent groups, delineate committee responsibilities and reporting relationships, establish the…

  13. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A system study to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector on the Space Station was accomplished by the Boeing Aerospace Company for NASA's Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to use a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration as the basis for focusing an experiment definition, so that the resulting accommodation requirements and interface constraints could be used as part of the mission requirements data base for Space Station. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of an optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments, and alignment of the optical components, would occur on a second experiment. The structure would then be moved to the payload point system for pointing, optical control, and scientific optical measurement for a third experiment. Experiment 1 will deploy the primary support truss while it is attached to the instrument module structure. The ability to adjust the mirror attachment points and to attach several dummy primary mirror segments with a robotic system will also be demonstrated. Experiment 2 will be achieved by adding new components and equipment to experiment one. Experiment 3 will demonstrate advanced control strategies, active adjustment of the primary mirror alignment, and technologies associated with optical sensing.

  14. Whence Structured Propositions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Lorraine Juliano

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a critical examination of "Structured Propositionalism" (SP), the view that propositions are complex entities composed of the semantic values of the (meaningful) parts of the sentences that express them. According to SP, propositions have constituents and are individuated by the identity and arrangement of their…

  15. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  16. Emerging Organizational Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carchidi, Daniel M.; Peterson, Marvin W.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of emerging higher educational organizational structures focuses on the increasing importance of distance education. Considers the emerging organizational landscape, three types of network organizations, six organization archetypes, organizational forms that support distance education, and implications for higher education planners. (DB)

  17. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  18. Chemical structure of interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interfacial structure of silicon/dielectric and silicon/metal systems is particularly amenable to analysis using a combination of surface spectroscopies together with a variety of chemical structures of Si/SiO2, Si/SiO2Si3N4, Si/Si2N2O, Si/SiO2/Al, and Si/Native Oxide interfaces using high resolution (0.350 eV FWHM) X ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The general structure of these dielectric interfaces entails a monolayer chemical transition layer at the Si/dielectric boundary. Amorphous Si substrates show a wide variety of hydrogenated Si and Si(OH) sub x states that are not observed in thermal oxidation of single crystal material. Extended SiO2 layers greater than 8 A in thickness are shown to be stoichiometric SiO2, but to exhibit a wide variety of local network structures. In the nitrogen containing systems, an approach to stoichiometric oxynitride compounds with interesting impurity and electron trapping properties are seen. In native oxides, substantial topographical nonuniformity in oxide thickness and composition are found. Analysis of metal/oxide interfacial layers is accomplished by analytical removal of the Si substrate by UHV XeF2 dry etching methods.

  19. Electrodes with fiber structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benczur-Uermoessy, G.; Berger, G.; Haschka, F.

    1986-01-01

    An electrode framework with a fiber structure, universally applicable in alkaline storage battery systems, was developed and readied for production. Storage batteries with these electrodes present higher energy and power densities and are economical to produce. The design is applicable to all rechargable storage batteries and might replace the previous variety of designs.

  20. Manipulating Combinatorial Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labelle, Gilbert

    This set of transparencies shows how the manipulation of combinatorial structures in the context of modern combinatorics can easily lead to interesting teaching and learning activities at every level of education from elementary school to university. The transparencies describe: (1) the importance and relations of combinatorics to science and…

  1. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  2. Visual Narrative Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Narratives are an integral part of human expression. In the graphic form, they range from cave paintings to Egyptian hieroglyphics, from the Bayeux Tapestry to modern day comic books (Kunzle, 1973; McCloud, 1993). Yet not much research has addressed the structure and comprehension of narrative images, for example, how do people create meaning out…

  3. Structured FORTRAN preprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, S.; Buckles, B.; Ryan, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Structured-programming features simplify software design. Programmer needs only few control statements to code program in format easy to debug and maintain, freeing him/her from flow constraints of standard FORTRAN. Program is written in ANSI FORTRAN and is compatible with machine supporting FORTRAN compiler that accepts ANSI statements. It has been implemented on IBM 370.

  4. Structured Mechanical Collage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhe; Wang, Jiang; Fu, Hongbo; Lau, Rynson W H

    2014-07-01

    We present a method to build 3D structured mechanical collages consisting of numerous elements from the database given artist-designed proxy models. The construction is guided by some graphic design principles, namely unity, variety and contrast. Our results are visually more pleasing than previous works as confirmed by a user study.

  5. Structured Programming: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Peter

    Designed for use by computer programming teachers, this booklet presents the concepts of structured programming and provides examples of how to implement this methodology, which provides a systematic way of organizing programs so that even large and complex programs are easier to understand and modify than unstructured programs. After a brief…

  6. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  7. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  8. The Structured Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljusberg, Anna-Lena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the organisation of the remedial classroom. The data were collected from observations and semi-structured interviews with 10 teachers in remedial classes for children seen and treated as having concentration deficits. The teachers use primarily compensatory language that places the deficits in the pupils.…

  9. Some Structural Ambiguities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stageberg, Norman C.

    1958-01-01

    The identification and study of 20 syntactical patterns responsible for much of the structural ambiguity found in literary composition can develop in students an audience awareness. When they realize that such constructions as "a dull boy's knife" and "the club will be open to members from Monday to Thursday" can be misinterpreted, they take more…

  10. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs. (LEW)

  11. Structured and Unstructured Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains four papers presented at a sympoisum on structured and unstructured learning moderated by Catherine Sleezer at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Designing Experiential Learning into Organizational Work Life: Proposing a Framework for Theory and Research" (Cheri Maben-Crouch) proposes a…

  12. Structural model of channelrhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Welke, Kai; Schneider, Franziska; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter; Elstner, Marcus

    2012-03-01

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation channels that mediate ion transport across membranes in microalgae (vectorial catalysis). ChRs are now widely used for the analysis of neural networks in tissues and living animals with light (optogenetics). For elucidation of functional mechanisms at the atomic level, as well as for further engineering and application, a detailed structure is urgently needed. In the absence of an experimental structure, here we develop a structural ChR model based on several molecular computational approaches, capitalizing on characteristic patterns in amino acid sequences of ChR1, ChR2, Volvox ChRs, Mesostigma ChR, and the recently identified ChR of the halophilic alga Dunaliella salina. In the present model, we identify remarkable structural motifs that may explain fundamental electrophysiological properties of ChR2, ChR1, and their mutants, and in a crucial validation of the model, we successfully reproduce the excitation energy predicted by absorption spectra. PMID:22241469

  13. Quark structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenbecler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics involved in the relativistic quark structure of nuclei such as the infinite momentum variables, scaling variables, counting rules, forward-backward variables, thermodynamic-like limit, QCD effects, higher quark bags, confinement, and many unanswered questions.

  14. Structuralism and the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Norman

    1983-01-01

    Argues that structuralism needs to be given a wider base than that of the highly specialized studies that are usually cited as examples. Rather, extension should be made philosophically, in the direction of phenomenology, and, practically, with some of the work being done in linguistics. (HOD)

  15. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  16. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  17. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  18. Acicular photomultiplier photocathode structure

    DOEpatents

    Craig, Richard A.; Bliss, Mary

    2003-09-30

    A method and apparatus for increasing the quantum efficiency of a photomultiplier tube by providing a photocathode with an increased surface-to-volume ratio. The photocathode includes a transparent substrate, upon one major side of which is formed one or more large aspect-ratio structures, such as needles, cones, fibers, prisms, or pyramids. The large aspect-ratio structures are at least partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material, i.e., a material that emits a photoelectron upon absorption of an optical photon. The large aspect-ratio structures may be substantially composed of the photoelectron emitting material (i.e., formed as such upon the surface of a relatively flat substrate) or be only partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material (i.e., the photoelectron emitting material is coated over large aspect-ratio structures formed from the substrate material itself.) The large aspect-ratio nature of the photocathode surface allows for an effective increase in the thickness of the photocathode relative the absorption of optical photons, thereby increasing the absorption rate of incident photons, without substantially increasing the effective thickness of the photocathode relative the escape incidence of the photoelectrons.

  19. Freedom Is Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papay, Twila Yates

    To make freedom work in the writing classroom, the instructor must be highly structured, possessing a clear sense of direction that includes a precise idea of the skills to be covered. Freedom refers to the view of writing as a liberal art, a liberating force with the capacity to open new channels of thought and lead students to discover…

  20. Imprinting artificial magnetic structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohstroh, W.

    1998-09-25

    Recently we created La/Fe multilayers with a helical magnetic structure imprinted from the conditions of growth rather than by the magnetic interactions between layers. Each sublayer was 30{angstrom} thick, and during deposition the sample was rotated in an external field of 3 Oe. a field strong enough to magnetize the Fe layer being deposited but not sufficient to perturb the magnetization of the Fe layers already grown. As a result adjacent Fe layers formed a helical structure with a chirality and periodicity determined by the rotational direction and speed of the substrate and the rate of deposition. Following this discovery, an extensive set of experiments (mainly using Kerr effect magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity) was undertaken to ascertain the stability of imprinted magnetic structures, and to understand the onset of magnetization during growth. La/Fe imprinted helical magnetic structures (of different La and Fe thicknesses) were found to be stable in time and to be permanently erased only by magnetic fields larger than 90 Oe.

  1. Solid electrolyte structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1984-01-01

    A solid electrolyte structure for fuel cells and other electrochemical devices providing oxygen ion transfer by a multiplicity of exposed internal surfaces made of a composition containing an oxide of a multivalent transition metal and forming small pore-like passages sized to permit oxygen ion transfer while limiting the transfer of oxygen gas.

  2. Air Structures: Inflatable Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valerio, Joseph M.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes and evaluates several avant garde'' examples of air structures. Included are a soft'' child's playpen, a pneudome that employs a water ballast for anchoring, a one-acre enclosed campus, an instant city'' constructed for an industrial design conference, and the Fuji Pavilion, at Expo '70 in Osaka, Japan, that was large enough to cover…

  3. Science as Structured Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cruz, Helen; De Smedt, Johan

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of scientific creativity based on theoretical models and experimental results of the cognitive sciences. Its core idea is that scientific creativity--like other forms of creativity--is structured and constrained by prior ontological expectations. Analogies provide scientists with a powerful epistemic tool to overcome…

  4. Structural Equation Model Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  5. Teaching Structure in Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merlin, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how the author has developed tasks for students that address the missed "essence of the matter" of algebraic transformations. Specifically, he has found that having students practice "perceiving" algebraic structure--by naming the "glue" in the expressions, drawing expressions using…

  6. Cell Structure Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use microscopes and digital images to examine Elodea, a fresh water plant, before and after the process of plasmolysis, identify plant cellular structures before and after plasmolysis, and calculate the size of the plant's vacuole. (ASK)

  7. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  8. Data Structures and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirth, Niklaus

    1984-01-01

    Built-in data structures are the registers and memory words where binary values are stored; hard-wired algorithms are the fixed rules, embodied in electronic logic circuits, by which stored data are interpreted as instructions to be executed. Various topics related to these two basic elements of every computer program are discussed. (JN)

  9. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  10. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  11. LUTE telescope structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (LUTE) Telescope Structural Design Study was to investigate the feasibility of designing an ultralightweight 1-m aperture system within optical performance requirements and mass budget constraints. This study uses the results from our previous studies on LUTE as a basis for further developing the LUTE structural architecture. After summarizing our results in Section 2, Section 3 begins with the overall logic we used to determine which telescope 'structural form' should be adopted for further analysis and weight estimates. Specific telescope component analysis showing calculated fundamental frequencies and how they compare with our derived requirements are included. 'First-order' component stress analyses to ensure telescope optical and structural component (i.e. mirrors & main bulkhead) weights are realistic are presented. Layouts of both the primary and tertiary mirrors showing dimensions that are consistent with both our weight and frequency calculations also form part of Section 3. Section 4 presents our calculated values for the predicted thermally induced primary-to-secondary mirror despace motion due to the large temperature range over which LUTE must operate. Two different telescope design approaches (one which utilizes fused quartz metering rods and one which assumes the entire telescope is fabricated from beryllium) are considered in this analysis. We bound the secondary mirror focus mechanism range (in despace) based on these two telescope configurations. In Section 5 we show our overall design of the UVTA (Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) via an 'exploded view' of the sub-system. The 'exploded view' is annotated to help aid in the understanding of each sub-assembly. We also include a two view layout of the UVTA from which telescope and telescope component dimensions can be measured. We conclude our study with a set of recommendations not only with respect to the LUTE structural architecture

  12. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  13. Improving RNA secondary structure prediction with structure mapping data.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to probe RNA secondary structure, such as small molecule modifying agents, secondary structure-specific nucleases, inline probing, and SHAPE chemistry, are widely used to study the structure of functional RNA. Computational secondary structure prediction programs can incorporate probing data to predict structure with high accuracy. In this chapter, an overview of current methods for probing RNA secondary structure is provided, including modern high-throughput methods. Methods for guiding secondary structure prediction algorithms using these data are explained, and best practices for using these data are provided. This chapter concludes by listing a number of open questions about how to best use probing data, and what these data can provide.

  14. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 2: Structural Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Lewis Structures Div. performs and disseminates results of research conducted in support of aerospace engine structures. These results have a wide range of applicability to practitioners of structural engineering mechanics beyond the aerospace arena. The engineering community was familiarized with the depth and range of research performed by the division and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive evaluation, constitutive models and experimental capabilities, dynamic systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology (HOST), aeroelasticity, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics, and structural mechanics computer codes.

  15. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 1: Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The specific purpose of the symposium was to familiarize the engineering structures community with the depth and range of research performed by the Structures Division of the Lewis Research Center and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive testing, dynamical systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics.

  16. Dedicated Deployable Aerobraking Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated deployable aerobraking structure concept was developed that significantly increases the effective area of a spacecraft during aerobraking by up to a factor of 5 or more (depending on spacecraft size) without substantially increasing total spacecraft mass. Increasing the effective aerobraking area of a spacecraft (without significantly increasing spacecraft mass) results in a corresponding reduction in the time required for aerobraking. For example, if the effective area of a spacecraft is doubled, the time required for aerobraking is roughly reduced to half the previous value. The dedicated deployable aerobraking structure thus enables significantly shorter aerobraking phases, which results in reduced mission cost, risk, and allows science operations to begin earlier in the mission.

  17. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  18. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  19. Structure Size Enhanced Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Kirschner, Matthias

    Direct volume visualization requires the definition of transfer functions (TFs) for the assignment of opacity and color. Multi-dimensional TFs are based on at least two image properties, and are specified by means of 2D histograms. In this work we propose a new type of a 2D histogram which combines gray value with information about the size of the structures. This structure size enhanced (SSE) histogram is an intuitive approach for representing anatomical features. Clinicians — the users we are focusing on — are much more familiar with selecting features by their size than by their gradient magnitude value. As a proof of concept, we employ the SSE histogram for the definition of two-dimensional TFs for the visualization of 3D MRI and CT image data.

  20. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  1. Densonucleosis virus structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D C; Moore, N F; Spilling, C R; Barwise, A H; Walker, I O

    1980-10-01

    The protein coats of two densonucleosis viruses (types 1 and 2) were examined by a variety of biophysical, biochemical, and serological techniques. The viruses were 24 nm in diameter, contained at least four polypeptides, were remarkably stable to extremes of pH and denaturing agents, and were serologically closely related. The two viruses could, however, be distinguished serologically and by differences in migration of their structural polypeptides. For each virus the "top component" (i.e., the protein coat minus DNA, found occurring naturally in infections) appeared to have a composition identical to that of the coat of the virus and was a more stable structure. Electrometric titration curves of the virus particles and top components demonstrated that the DNA phosphate in densonucleosis virus particles was neutralized by cations other than basic amino acid side chains of the protein coat. Circular dichroism studies showed that there was a conformational difference between the protein coats of top components and virus particles.

  2. NEUTRON-IRRADIATED STRUCTURES

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, E.L.; Ashley, J.W.; Bowker, H.W.; Hall, R.H.; Kendall, J.W.

    1959-02-01

    A moderator structure is described for a nuclear reactor of the heterogensous type wherein a large mass of moderator is provided with channels therethrough for the introduction of uranium serving as nuclear fuel and for the passage of a cooling fluid. The structure is comprised of blocks of moderator material in superposed horizontal layers, the blocks of each layer being tied together with spaces between them and oriented to have horizontal Wigner growth. The ties are strips of moderator material, the same as the blocks, with transverse Wigner growth, disposed horizontally along lines crossing at vertical axes of the blocks. The blocks are preferably rectangular with a larger or length dimension transverse to the directions of Wiguer growth and are stood on end to provide for horizontal growth.

  3. Structure of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The hundreds of exoplanets that have been discovered in the past two decades offer a new perspective on planetary structure. Instead of being the archetypal examples of planets, those of our solar system are merely possible outcomes of planetary system formation and evolution, and conceivably not even especially common outcomes (although this remains an open question). Here, we review the diverse range of interior structures that are both known and speculated to exist in exoplanetary systems--from mostly degenerate objects that are more than 10× as massive as Jupiter, to intermediate-mass Neptune-like objects with large cores and moderate hydrogen/helium envelopes, to rocky objects with roughly the mass of Earth.

  4. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Tudor, J.J.

    1963-08-01

    An improved moderator structure for nuclear reactors consists of moderator blocks arranged in horizontal layers to form a multiplicity of vertically stacked columns of blocks. The blocks in each vertical column are keyed together, and a ceramic grid is disposed between each horizontal layer of blocks. Pressure plates cover- the lateral surface of the moderator structure in abutting relationship with the peripheral terminal lengths of the ceramic grids. Tubular springs are disposed between the pressure plates and a rigid external support. The tubular springs have their axes vertically disposed to facilitate passage of coolant gas through the springs and are spaced apart a selected distance such that at sonae preselected point of spring deflection, the sides of the springs will contact adjacent springs thereby causing a large increase in resistance to further spring deflection. (AEC)

  5. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1987-01-01

    The development and application of composite materials to aerospace vehicle structures which began in the mid 1960's has now progressed to the point where what can be considered entire airframes are being designed and built using composites. Issues related to the fabrication of non-resin matrix composites and the micro, mezzo and macromechanics of thermoplastic and metal matrix composites are emphasized. Several research efforts are presented. They are entitled: (1) The effects of chemical vapor deposition and thermal treatments on the properties of pitch-based carbon fiber; (2) Inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; (3) Analysis of fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; (4) Delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; (5) Numerical investigation of the microhardness of composite fracture; and (6) General beam theory for composite structures.

  6. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  7. COI Structural Analysis Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the structural analysis of the Next Generation Space Telescope Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD) developed by Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) project. The mirror was submitted to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for cryogenic testing and evaluation. Once at MSFC, the mirror was lowered to approximately 40 K and the optical surface distortions were measured. Alongside this experiment, an analytical model was developed and used to compare to the test results. A NASTRAN finite element model was provided by COI and a thermal model was developed from it. Using the thermal model, steady state nodal temperatures were calculated based on the predicted environment of the large cryogenic test chamber at MSFC. This temperature distribution was applied in the structural analysis to solve for the deflections of the optical surface. Finally, these deflections were submitted for optical analysis and comparison to the interferometer test data.

  8. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  9. Structure of exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    The hundreds of exoplanets that have been discovered in the past two decades offer a new perspective on planetary structure. Instead of being the archetypal examples of planets, those of our solar system are merely possible outcomes of planetary system formation and evolution, and conceivably not even especially common outcomes (although this remains an open question). Here, we review the diverse range of interior structures that are both known and speculated to exist in exoplanetary systems--from mostly degenerate objects that are more than 10× as massive as Jupiter, to intermediate-mass Neptune-like objects with large cores and moderate hydrogen/helium envelopes, to rocky objects with roughly the mass of Earth. PMID:24379369

  10. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  11. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  12. Structure of exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, David S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The hundreds of exoplanets that have been discovered in the past two decades offer a new perspective on planetary structure. Instead of being the archetypal examples of planets, those of our solar system are merely possible outcomes of planetary system formation and evolution, and conceivably not even especially common outcomes (although this remains an open question). Here, we review the diverse range of interior structures that are both known and speculated to exist in exoplanetary systems—from mostly degenerate objects that are more than 10× as massive as Jupiter, to intermediate-mass Neptune-like objects with large cores and moderate hydrogen/helium envelopes, to rocky objects with roughly the mass of Earth. PMID:24379369

  13. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  15. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  16. Fractal structures and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Beard, D.A.; Percival, D.B.; Raymond, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Fractals and chaos are closely related. Many chaotic systems have fractal features. Fractals are self-similar or self-affine structures, which means that they look much of the same when magnified or reduced in scale over a reasonably large range of scales, at least two orders of magnitude and preferably more (Mandelbrot, 1983). The methods for estimating their fractal dimensions or their Hurst coefficients, which summarize the scaling relationships and their correlation structures, are going through a rapid evolutionary phase. Fractal measures can be regarded as providing a useful statistical measure of correlated random processes. They also provide a basis for analyzing recursive processes in biology such as the growth of arborizing networks in the circulatory system, airways, or glandular ducts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-27

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  18. Structural Case Assignment in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koak, Heeshin

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I aim to provide a theory on the distribution of structural Case in Korean. I propose the following Structural Case Assignment Hypothesis (SCAH) regarding the assignment of structural Case: "Structural Case is assigned by phase heads (C: nominative; v: accusative) to every argument in the c-command domain of the phase…

  19. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  20. Multi-functional composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Halloran, John; Popovich, Dragan; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Vaidyanathan, K. Ranji; Fulcher, Michael L.; Knittel, Kenneth L.

    2004-10-19

    Fibrous monolith processing techniques to fabricate multifunctional structures capable of performing more than one discrete function such as structures capable of bearing structural loads and mechanical stresses in service and also capable of performing at least one additional non-structural function.

  1. Reforming Science: Structural Reforms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Science has a critical role to play in addressing humanity's most important challenges in the twenty-first century. However, the contemporary scientific enterprise has developed in ways that prevent it from reaching maximum effectiveness and detract from the appeal of a research career. To be effective, the methodological and culture reforms discussed in the accompanying essay must be accompanied by fundamental structural reforms that include a renewed vigorous societal investment in science and scientists. PMID:22184420

  2. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  3. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, Robert G.; Wiberley, Stephen E.

    1988-01-01

    A decade long program to develop critical advanced composite technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concept and analysis, manufacturing, reliability, and life predictions is reviewed. Specific goals are discussed. The status of the chemical vapor deposition effects on carbon fiber properties; inelastic deformation of metal matrix laminates; fatigue damage in fibrous MMC laminates; delamination fracture toughness in thermoplastic matrix composites; and numerical analysis of composite micromechanical behavior are presented.

  4. Truss structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Carl S. (Inventor); Lees, Daniel A. (Inventor); McKitterick, Dennis Donald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integrally formed three-dimensional truss structure, including molds and methods for production of same, containing outer top and bottom plane surfaces thereof comprising interconnected rod segments integrally formed at their points of intersection on the outer top and bottom surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces also integrally joined together through additional interconnected rod segments passing through an integrally formed intersection, wherein the additional interconnected rod segments passing through the integrally formed intersection form a three-dimensional continuous array of triangles.

  5. Birefringent phononic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Psarobas, I. E. Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2014-12-15

    Within the framework of elastic anisotropy, caused in a phononic crystal due to low crystallographic symmetry, we adopt a model structure, already introduced in the case of photonic metamaterials, and by analogy, we study the effect of birefringence and acoustical activity in a phononic crystal. In particular, we investigate its low-frequency behavior and comment on the factors which determine chirality by reference to this model.

  6. Nucleon spin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Ruan, Jianhong

    2015-10-01

    This paper contains three parts relating to the nucleon spin structure in a simple picture of the nucleon: (i) The polarized gluon distribution in the proton is dynamically predicted starting from a low scale by using a nonlinear quantum chromodynamics (QCD) evolution equation — the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Paris (DGLAP) equation with the parton recombination corrections, where the nucleon is almost consisted only of valence quarks. We find that the contribution of the gluon polarization to the nucleon spin structure is much larger than the predictions of most other theories. This result suggests that a significant orbital angular momentum of the gluons is required to balance the gluon spin momentum. (ii) The spin structure function g1p of the proton is studied, where the perturbative evolution of parton distributions and nonperturbative vector meson dominance (VMD) model are used. We predict g1p asymptotic behavior at small x from lower Q2 to higher Q2. The results are compatible with the data including the early HERA estimations and COMPASS new results. (iii) The generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule is understood based on the polarized parton distributions of the proton with the higher twist contributions. A simple parameterized formula is proposed to clearly present the contributions of different components in the proton to Γ 1p(Q2). The results suggest a possible extended objects with size 0.2-0.3 fm inside the proton.

  7. Visual Structure Language

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL, PHILIP L.; ESPINOZA, JUAN

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we describe a new language, Visual Structure Language (VSL), designed to describe the structure of a program and explain its pieces. This new language is built on top of a general-purpose language, such as C. The language consists of three extensions: explanations, nesting, and arcs. Explanations are comments explicitly associated with code segments. These explanations can be nested. And arcs can be inserted between explanations to show data- or control-flow. The value of VSL is that it enables a developer to better control a code. The developer can represent the structure via nested explanations, using arcs to indicate the flow of data and control. The explanations provide a ''second opinion'' about the code so that at any level, the developer can confirm that the code operates as it is intended to do. We believe that VSL enables a programmer to use in a computer language the same model--a hierarchy of components--that they use in their heads when they conceptualize systems.

  8. Interpenetrated Cage Structures.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marina; Johnstone, Mark D; Clever, Guido H

    2016-09-26

    This Review covers design strategies, synthetic challenges, host-guest chemistry, and functional properties of interlocked supramolecular cages. Some dynamic covalent organic structures are discussed, as are selected examples of interpenetration in metal-organic frameworks, but the main focus is on discrete coordination architectures, that is, metal-mediated dimers. Factors leading to interpenetration, such as geometry, flexibility and chemical makeup of the ligands, coordination environment, solvent effects, and selection of suitable counter anions and guest molecules, are discussed. In particular, banana-shaped bis-pyridyl ligands together with square-planar metal cations have proven to be suitable building blocks for the construction of interpenetrated double-cages obeying the formula [M4 L8 ]. The peculiar topology of these double-cages results in a linear arrangement of three mechanically coupled pockets. This allows for the implementation of interesting guest encapsulation effects such as allosteric binding and template-controlled selectivity. In stimuli-responsive systems, anionic triggers can toggle the binding of neutral guests or even induce complete structural conversions. The increasing structural and functional complexity in this class of self-assembled hosts promises the construction of intelligent receptors, novel catalytic systems, and functional materials. PMID:27417259

  9. Interpenetrated Cage Structures.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marina; Johnstone, Mark D; Clever, Guido H

    2016-09-26

    This Review covers design strategies, synthetic challenges, host-guest chemistry, and functional properties of interlocked supramolecular cages. Some dynamic covalent organic structures are discussed, as are selected examples of interpenetration in metal-organic frameworks, but the main focus is on discrete coordination architectures, that is, metal-mediated dimers. Factors leading to interpenetration, such as geometry, flexibility and chemical makeup of the ligands, coordination environment, solvent effects, and selection of suitable counter anions and guest molecules, are discussed. In particular, banana-shaped bis-pyridyl ligands together with square-planar metal cations have proven to be suitable building blocks for the construction of interpenetrated double-cages obeying the formula [M4 L8 ]. The peculiar topology of these double-cages results in a linear arrangement of three mechanically coupled pockets. This allows for the implementation of interesting guest encapsulation effects such as allosteric binding and template-controlled selectivity. In stimuli-responsive systems, anionic triggers can toggle the binding of neutral guests or even induce complete structural conversions. The increasing structural and functional complexity in this class of self-assembled hosts promises the construction of intelligent receptors, novel catalytic systems, and functional materials.

  10. 7. Administrative structures.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    The basic systems of any society rarely can operate independently. Instead, they are dependent and often interdependent upon other entities. Such entities control the resources within their respective systems. Thus, coordination and control agencies require contracts or memoranda of understanding with these entities in order to assure access to the resources required during a crisis. These administrative structures include: (1) governmental institutions and agencies, including the military; (2) intergovernmental organisations; (3) nongovernmental organisations; (4) commercial private sector organisations; and (5) academic institutions. These dependencies create potential barriers to the provision of coordination and control including: (1) the complexity of the administrative structures with which coordination and control must interact; (2) the location of resources; (3) finding responsible person(s); (4) the competence and compatibility; (5) methods of access; (6) payment; (7) contracts and memoranda of understanding; (8) inventories of accessible resources; (9) competition for the mandate, power, and resources; and (10) jealousy. The need for potential interactions between administrative structures requires that agreements for the sharing of resources during crises be reached as part of planning and preparedness. Gaining an understanding of these relationships is an important area for research.

  11. Corneal structure and transparency

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Keith M.; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  12. Parasites alter community structure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chelsea L; Byers, James E; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Altman, Irit; Donahue, Megan J; Blakeslee, April M H

    2007-05-29

    Parasites often play an important role in modifying the physiology and behavior of their hosts and may, consequently, mediate the influence hosts have on other components of an ecological community. Along the northern Atlantic coast of North America, the dominant herbivorous snail Littorina littorea structures rocky intertidal communities through strong grazing pressure and is frequently parasitized by the digenean trematode Cryptocotyle lingua. We hypothesized that the effects of parasitism on host physiology would induce behavioral changes in L. littorea, which in turn would modulate L. littorea's influence on intertidal community composition. Specifically, we hypothesized that C. lingua infection would alter the grazing rate of L. littorea and, consequently, macroalgal communities would develop differently in the presence of infected versus uninfected snails. Our results show that uninfected snails consumed 40% more ephemeral macroalgal biomass than infected snails in the laboratory, probably because the digestive system of infected snails is compromised by C. lingua infection. In the field, this weaker grazing by infected snails resulted in significantly greater expansion of ephemeral macroalgal cover relative to grazing by uninfected snails. By decreasing the per-capita grazing rate of the dominant herbivore, C. lingua indirectly affects the composition of the macroalgal community and may in turn affect other species that depend on macroalgae for resources or habitat structure. In light of the abundance of parasites across systems, we suggest that, through trait-mediated indirect effects, parasites may be a common determinant of structure in ecological communities. PMID:17517667

  13. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  14. Magnetic structure of holmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechan, M. J.; Stassis, C.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic structure of high purity single crystals of holmium has been studied by neutron diffraction techniques. Although the general characteristics of the magnetic structure have been found to agree with earlier measurements, some discrepancies have been resolved and new features have been observed. The magnetic form factor has been measured and compared with relativistic atomic calculations. The low temperature structure (T<20 K) is that of a conical ferromagnet with wave vector (1/6)(2π/c) along the c axis. The basal plane moment is 9.7 μB and the c-axis ferromagnetic component is 1.6 μB at T=6 K. Bunching of the basal plane moments around the easy hexagonal direction has been observed below T=50 K. Evidence for asphericity in the magnetization density is presented and discussed. The wave vector of the basal plane modulation decreases monotonically with temperature in general accordance with the Elliott-Wedgewood theory. Several inflection points were observed, however, which correspond to commensurability with the chemical lattice. The measured temperature dependence of the c- and a-axis lattice constants shows significant magnetostriction. The possibility of a c-axis modulated moment is discussed.

  15. Corneal structure and transparency.

    PubMed

    Meek, Keith M; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  16. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  17. Structure of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Fromme, P; Jordan, P; Krauss, N

    2001-10-30

    In plants and cyanobacteria, the primary step in oxygenic photosynthesis, the light induced charge separation, is driven by two large membrane intrinsic protein complexes, the photosystems I and II. Photosystem I catalyses the light driven electron transfer from plastocyanin/cytochrome c(6) on the lumenal side of the membrane to ferredoxin/flavodoxin at the stromal side by a chain of electron carriers. Photosystem I of Synechococcus elongatus consists of 12 protein subunits, 96 chlorophyll a molecules, 22 carotenoids, three [4Fe4S] clusters and two phylloquinones. Furthermore, it has been discovered that four lipids are intrinsic components of photosystem I. Photosystem I exists as a trimer in the native membrane with a molecular mass of 1068 kDa for the whole complex. The X-ray structure of photosystem I at a resolution of 2.5 A shows the location of the individual subunits and cofactors and provides new information on the protein-cofactor interactions. [P. Jordan, P. Fromme, H.T. Witt, O. Klukas, W. Saenger, N. Krauss, Nature 411 (2001) 909-917]. In this review, biochemical data and results of biophysical investigations are discussed with respect to the X-ray crystallographic structure in order to give an overview of the structure and function of this large membrane protein.

  18. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  19. Weight estimation of unconventional structures by structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Shyu, Albert

    1986-01-01

    Automated techniques are presented that are used in structural optimization technology, with emphasis on modifications of finite element models to obtain an optimal material distribution for minimum weight while satisfying the prescribed design requirements. It is anticipated that the future development of computer aided engineering (CAE) system will provide environments where structural analysis, a design optimization, and weight evaluation modules are integrated, sharing a common data base. Structural optimization capabilities obtained by integrating a finite element structural analysis program and a numerical optimization code are developed and applied to two illustrative examples: marine gear housing structural weight minimization and joined wing structures.

  20. Structural Stability of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Toshi

    This thesis develops a technique for analyzing the internal structure of an irregularly shaped asteroid. This research focuses on asteroid (216) Kleopatra, a few-hundred-kilometer-sized main belt asteroid spinning about its maximum moment of inertia axis with a rotation period of 5.385 hours, to motivate the techniques. While Ostro et al. [117] reported its dog bone-like shape, estimation of its size has been actively discussed. There are at least three different size estimates: Ostro et al., Descamps et al., and Marchis et al. Descamps et al. reported that (216) Kleopatra has satellites and obtained the mass of this object. This research consists of determination of possible failure modes of (216) Kleopatra and its subsequent detailed stress analysis, with each part including an estimation of the internal structure. The first part of this thesis considers the failure mode of Kleopatra and evaluates the size from it. Possible failure modes are modeled as either material shedding from the surface or plastic failure of the internal structure. The surface shedding condition is met when a zero-velocity curve with the same energy level as one of the dynamical equilibrium points attaches to the surface at the slowest spin period, while the plastic failure condition is characterized by extending the theorem by Holsapple (2008) that the yield condition of the averaged stress over the whole volume is identical to an upper bound for global failure. The prime result shows that while surface shedding does not occur at the current spin period and thus cannot result in the formation of the satellites, the neck may be situated near its plastic deformation state. From the failure condition, we also find that the size estimated by Descamps et al. (2011) is the most structurally stable. The second part of this thesis discusses finite element analyses with an assumption of an elastic-perfectly plastic material and a non-associated flow rule. The yield condition is modeled as the

  1. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  2. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Markus; Conger, Robert; Bauer, Thomas; Newman, John

    2013-01-01

    An integrated, generic unibody composite pressurized structure (UCPS) combined with a positive expulsion device (PED), consisting of an elastomeric bladder for monopropellant hydrazine, has been quasi-standardized for spacecraft use. The combination functions as an all-composite, non-metallic, propellant tank with bladder. The integrated UCPS combines several previous innovations - specifically, the linerless, all-composite cryogenic tank technology; all-composite boss; resin formulation; and integrated stringer system. The innovation combines the UCPS with an integrated propellant management device (PMD), the PED or bladder, to create an entirely unique system for in-space use. The UCPS is a pressure vessel that incorporates skirts, stringers, and other structures so that it is both an in-space hydrazine tank, and also a structural support system for a spacecraft in a single, all-composite unit. This innovation builds on the progress in the development of a previous SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase I with Glenn Research Center and an SBIR III with Johnson Space Center that included the fabrication of two 42-in. (˜107-cm) diameter all-composite cryogenic (LOX and liquid methane) UCPS test tanks for a lunar lander. This Phase II provides hydra zine compatibility testing of the elastomeric bladder, a see-through PED to validate the expulsion process and model, and a complete UCPS-based PED with stringers and skirts that will be used to conduct initial qualification and expulsion tests. This extends the UCPS technology to include hydrazine-based, in-space pro - pulsion applications and can also be used for electric propulsion. This innovation creates a system that, in comparison to the traditional approach, is lower in weight, cost, volume, and production time; is stronger; and is capable of much higher pressures. It also has fewer failure modes, and is applicable to both chemical and electric propulsion systems.

  3. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  4. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  5. [Network structures in biological systems].

    PubMed

    Oleskin, A V

    2013-01-01

    Network structures (networks) that have been extensively studied in the humanities are characterized by cohesion, a lack of a central control unit, and predominantly fractal properties. They are contrasted with structures that contain a single centre (hierarchies) as well as with those whose elements predominantly compete with one another (market-type structures). As far as biological systems are concerned, their network structures can be subdivided into a number of types involving different organizational mechanisms. Network organization is characteristic of various structural levels of biological systems ranging from single cells to integrated societies. These networks can be classified into two main subgroups: (i) flat (leaderless) network structures typical of systems that are composed of uniform elements and represent modular organisms or at least possess manifest integral properties and (ii) three-dimensional, partly hierarchical structures characterized by significant individual and/or intergroup (intercaste) differences between their elements. All network structures include an element that performs structural, protective, and communication-promoting functions. By analogy to cell structures, this element is denoted as the matrix of a network structure. The matrix includes a material and an immaterial component. The material component comprises various structures that belong to the whole structure and not to any of its elements per se. The immaterial (ideal) component of the matrix includes social norms and rules regulating network elements' behavior. These behavioral rules can be described in terms of algorithms. Algorithmization enables modeling the behavior of various network structures, particularly of neuron networks and their artificial analogs.

  6. Refractory composites structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzero, G. V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the latest available data for the NASP Refractory Composites Materials and Structures Augmentation Program. The program's main goal is to provide the necessary information for a positive phase II to phase III plan for the X-30 to be built. After a brief overview of the program, the state-of-the-art fabrication of carbon/carbon subelements is presented. Material data packages for screening data, characterization data, damage and durability tolerance and actively-cooled airframe and engine program development are also presented.

  7. Windmill support structure

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.

    1984-09-04

    A windmill installation includes a windmill supported on a tower that includes three legs. The connections of the legs to their respective bases are provided by compliance members that are compliant enough that the natural frequency of axial bending of the windmill installation is less than the frequency with which blades of the windmill pass behind the tower. Also, a windmill compliance assembly provides the connection between the windmill and the tower and has enough compliance that the natural frequency of pivotal bending is also below that frequency. As a result, vibration at a resonant frequency of the structure is avoided during normal operation.

  8. Solar heated portable structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, E.V.; King, F.F.; King, J.M.

    1982-03-23

    A solar heated portable structure comprising a flexible bottom panel, a flexible side assembly and a flexible transmitting panel , all coupled together and supported to form an enclosed chamber. The transmitting panel is capable of transmitting a majority of the radiant energy from the solar radiation spectrum to heat the enclosed chamber like a sauna and has an area at least 0.7 the area of the bottom panel to maximize heating while minimizing material costs. The transmitting panel can be transparent to ultraviolet radiation to allow persons inside the chamber to be tanned.

  9. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  10. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  11. Other Fabric Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    There are two kinds of fabric structures - tension, supported by cables and pylons, and those supported by air pressure within an enclosed fabric envelope. They are becoming increasingly popular with architects, engineers, etc., because of their aesthetic appeal, low cost and maintenance, energy efficiency and good space utilization. The Structo-Fab roof weighs only 1/30 as much as a conventional roof of that size. Giant fans are used to blow air into the envelope between the roof's outer membrane and its inner liner automatically maintaining the pressure differential necessary for roof rigidity.

  12. Work breakdown structure guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-06

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  13. The Structure of Phenylglycinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simao, Alcides; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The most abundant conformer of the amino alcohol D-phenylglycinol has been observed in gas phase using broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW) and laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). The rotational spectra corresponding to seven monosubstituted 13C, one monosubstituted 15N and one monosubstituted 18O species have been observed in their natural abundance, and the rs structure has been derived. The observed conformer is stabilized by O-H\\cdotsN, N-H\\cdotsπ intramolecular hydrogen bond network.

  14. Structured Multifrontal Sparse Solver

    2014-05-01

    StruMF is an algebraic structured preconditioner for the interative solution of large sparse linear systems. The preconditioner corresponds to a multifrontal variant of sparse LU factorization in which some dense blocks of the factors are approximated with low-rank matrices. It is algebraic in that it only requires the linear system itself, and the approximation threshold that determines the accuracy of individual low-rank approximations. Favourable rank properties are obtained using a block partitioning which is amore » refinement of the partitioning induced by nested dissection ordering.« less

  15. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  16. Magnetic microhelix coil structures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elliot J; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-08-26

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials. PMID:21929266

  17. Magnetic Microhelix Coil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliot J.; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2011-08-01

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials.

  18. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  19. Tertiary structural propensities reveal fundamental sequence/structure relationships.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Jian; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2015-05-01

    Extracting useful generalizations from the continually growing Protein Data Bank (PDB) is of central importance. We hypothesize that the PDB contains valuable quantitative information on the level of local tertiary structural motifs (TERMs). We show that by breaking a protein structure into its constituent TERMs, and querying the PDB to characterize the natural ensemble matching each, we can estimate the compatibility of the structure with a given amino acid sequence through a metric we term "structure score." Considering submissions from recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, we found a strong correlation (R = 0.69) between structure score and model accuracy, with poorly predicted regions readily identifiable. This performance exceeds that of leading atomistic statistical energy functions. Furthermore, TERM-based analysis of two prototypical multi-state proteins rapidly produced structural insights fully consistent with prior extensive experimental studies. We thus find that TERM-based analysis should have considerable utility for protein structural biology.

  20. View facing northeast of Structure 1034, last numbered structure on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing northeast of Structure 103-4, last numbered structure on northern (Havre) end of Transmission Line - Havre Rainbow Transmission Line, Havre City to Great Falls vicinity, Montana, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  1. Piezoelectric Sensor Evaluation for Structural Health Monitoring of Cryogenic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, John; Engberg, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), and profiles piezoelectric sensors useful for SHM of cryogenic structures. The presentation also profiles impedance tests and other SHM tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Research in structures, structural dynamics and materials, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William F. (Compiler); Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Topics addressed include: composite plates; buckling predictions; missile launch tube modeling; structural/control systems design; optimization of nonlinear R/C frames; error analysis for semi-analytic displacement; crack acoustic emission; and structural dynamics.

  3. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-11-25

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  4. Structured wafer for device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-05-20

    A structured wafer that includes through passages is used for device processing. Each of the through passages extends from or along one surface of the structured wafer and forms a pattern on a top surface area of the structured wafer. The top surface of the structured wafer is bonded to a device layer via a release layer. Devices are processed on the device layer, and are released from the structured wafer using etchant. The through passages within the structured wafer allow the etchant to access the release layer to thereby remove the release layer.

  5. Probabilistic Design of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design evaluation of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, and service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation consists of: (1) design criteria, (2) modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, (3) simulation methods, and (4) the decision-making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically evaluated with accuracy and efficiency.

  6. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  7. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  8. Structure-borne noise transmission in stiffened structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, Rimas; Lyrintzis, Constantinos S.

    1987-01-01

    The structure-borne noise transmission of stiffened and interconnected structures under random loads is presented. The method is based on the transfer matrix for the structural response and on the modal decomposition for the interior acoustic field. The acoustic enclosure is taken to be rectangular in shape of which portion of the boundaries are elastic while the remaining surface is acoustically rigid. Numerical results are presented for several acousto-structural problems.

  9. Structure-borne noise transmission in stiffened structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaicaitis, Rimas; Lyrintzis, Constantinos S.

    1987-10-01

    The structure-borne noise transmission of stiffened and interconnected structures under random loads is presented. The method is based on the transfer matrix for the structural response and on the modal decomposition for the interior acoustic field. The acoustic enclosure is taken to be rectangular in shape of which portion of the boundaries are elastic while the remaining surface is acoustically rigid. Numerical results are presented for several acousto-structural problems.

  10. Crystal Structure of Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, Stefan; Svensson, Goeran

    2001-02-15

    The room temperature structures of the two-layer Aurivillius phases Bi{sub 2.5}Me{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (Me=Na, K) have been refined with the Rietveld method from powder neutron diffraction data ({lambda}=1.470 {angstrom}). They consist of (Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sup 2+} layers interleaved with perovskite (Bi{sub 0.5}Me{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sup 2-} (Me=Na, K) slabs. The structures were refined in the orthorhombic space group A2{sub 1}am, Z=4, and the unit cell parameters of the two oxides are a= 5.4937(3), b=5.4571(4), c=24.9169(14) {angstrom} and a=5.5005(8), b=5.4958(8), c=25.2524(16) {angstrom}, respectively. The orthorhombic distortion increases with decreasing Me+ cation size in the perovskite layer (Bi/Me){sup 2+} site and the lone pair electrons from the Bi{sup 3+} cation are influencing the site distortion. This is in agreement with other two-layer Aurivillius phases and originates from bonding requirements depending on size and electronic environment.

  11. Lower Hybrid Solitary Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Lower hybrid solitary structures (LHSS) have been observed by sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere for over a decade and a half. LHSS are spatial structures embedded in space plasmas containing ambient whistler mode hiss. They are characterized by a density depletion of a few percent to several tens of percent in which electric fields near, both above and below, the lower hybrid resonance are more intense than the background fields by a factor of three to five. LHSS have dimensions across the magnetic field of a few to many thermal ion gyroradii, usually 10-100 meters and a density profile that is Gaussian and consistent with cylindrical symmetry. Along the magnetic field the dimensions are estimated to be several kilometers to several hundred kilometers. Electric field interferometry reveals that the phase fronts of LHSS electric fields rotate azimuthally within the density depletions; right-hand above the lower hybrid resonance and left-hand below the lower hybrid resonance [Pincon et al., 1997; Schuck et al., 1998; Bonnell et al., 1998; Tjulin et al., 2003; Schuck et al., 2003]. The description of this phenomena was driven by the observations the Cornell University sounding rocket program headed by the late Paul Kintner.

  12. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  13. Structural Colors of Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cecilia; Dushkina, Natalia

    2016-03-01

    Structural colors create iridescent colors in bird feathers. The goal is to understand why structural colors act the way they do in certain situations. The research conducted over the course of the fall semester was to understand the optical phenomenon producing colors in individual barbules. Through the use of a polarizing optical microscope, certain hypotheses were built to explain certain phenomenon. Using a dark field illumination involving light acting at wide angles in microscopy, the barbules were not affected by polarization. So it can be suggested that the barbules have certain characteristics, possibly internal, which prevents wide-angle polarization. More recently, it was found that the barbules, when stacked upon one another, create a discoloration at the cross over point. It can be suggested that the barbules act as thin films and create a situation of thin film interference. More data will be taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope as well as getting cross sectional data to help understand the internal characteristics of the barbules. From the support of the Neimeyer-Hodgson Grant, Chris Stull, and Millersville University of Pennsylvania.

  14. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  15. Feed Structure For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A novel feed structure, for an antenna having a resonant electric field structure, comprising a patch element, an integrated circuit attached to the patch element, at least one inner conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the integrated circuit on a first end of the at least one inner conductor, wherein the at least one inner conductor extends through and is not electrically connected to the patch element, and wherein the at least one inner conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the at least one inner conductor, and an outer conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the patch element on a first end of the outer conductor, wherein the outer conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the outer conductor, and wherein the outer conductor concentrically surrounds the at least one inner conductor from the second end of the at least one inner conductor available for electrical connectivity to the first end of the outer conductor terminating at the patch element.

  16. Thermodynamics. [algebraic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental structure of thermodynamics is purely algebraic, in the sense of atopological, and it is also independent of partitions, composite systems, the zeroth law, and entropy. The algebraic structure requires the notion of heat, but not the first law. It contains a precise definition of entropy and identifies it as a purely mathematical concept. It also permits the construction of an entropy function from heat measurements alone when appropriate conditions are satisfied. Topology is required only for a discussion of the continuity of thermodynamic properties, and then the weak topology is the relevant topology. The integrability of the differential form of the first law can be examined independently of Caratheodory's theorem and his inaccessibility axiom. Criteria are established by which one can determine when an integrating factor can be made intensive and the pseudopotential extensive and also an entropy. Finally, a realization of the first law is constructed which is suitable for all systems whether they are solids or fluids, whether they do or do not exhibit chemical reactions, and whether electromagnetic fields are or are not present.

  17. Silk structure and degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Song, Yu-wei; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhi-jian; Pu, De-yong; Lin, Shao-qiang; Zhou, Chan; You, Hua-jian; Ma, Yan; Li, Jin-min; Yang, Li; Sung, K L Paul; Zhang, Yao-guang

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the structure of silk and its degradation properties, we have monitored the structure of silk using scanning electron microscopy and frozen sections. Raw silk and degummed raw silk were immersed in four types of degradation solutions for 156 d to observe their degradation properties. The subcutaneous implants in rats were removed after 7, 14, 56, 84, 129, and 145 d for frozen sectioning and subsequent staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.), DAPI, Beta-actin and Collagen I immunofluorescence staining. The in vitro weight loss ratio of raw silk and degummed raw silk in water, PBS, DMEM and DMEM containing 10% FBS (F-DMEM) were, respectively, 14%/11%, 12.5%/12.9%, 11.1%/14.3%, 8.8%/11.6%. Silk began to degrade after 7 d subcutaneous implantation and after 145 d non-degraded silk was still observed. These findings suggest the immunogenicity of fibroin and sericin had no essential difference. In the process of in vitro degradation of silk, the role of the enzyme is not significant. The in vivo degradation of silk is related to phagocytotic activity and fibroblasts may be involved in this process to secrete collagen. This study also shows the developing process of cocoons and raw silk. PMID:25982316

  18. Lagrange structure and quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, Peter O.; Lyakhovich, Simon L.; Sharapov, Alexey A.

    2005-07-01

    A path-integral quantization method is proposed for dynamical systems whose classical equations of motion do not necessarily follow from the action principle. The key new notion behind this quantization scheme is the Lagrange structure which is more general than the lagrangian formalism in the same sense as Poisson geometry is more general than the symplectic one. The Lagrange structure is shown to admit a natural BRST description which is used to construct an AKSZ-type topological sigma-model. The dynamics of this sigma-model in d+1 dimensions, being localized on the boundary, are proved to be equivalent to the original theory in d dimensions. As the topological sigma-model has a well defined action, it is path-integral quantized in the usual way that results in quantization of the original (not necessarily lagrangian) theory. When the original equations of motion come from the action principle, the standard BV path-integral is explicitly deduced from the proposed quantization scheme. The general quantization scheme is exemplified by several models including the ones whose classical dynamics are not variational.

  19. [Structural adjustment, cultural adjustment?].

    PubMed

    Dujardin, B; Dujardin, M; Hermans, I

    2003-12-01

    Over the last two decades, multiple studies have been conducted and many articles published about Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPs). These studies mainly describe the characteristics of SAPs and analyse their economic consequences as well as their effects upon a variety of sectors: health, education, agriculture and environment. However, very few focus on the sociological and cultural effects of SAPs. Following a summary of SAP's content and characteristics, the paper briefly discusses the historical course of SAPs and the different critiques which have been made. The cultural consequences of SAPs are introduced and are described on four different levels: political, community, familial, and individual. These levels are analysed through examples from the literature and individual testimonies from people in the Southern Hemisphere. The paper concludes that SAPs, alongside economic globalisation processes, are responsible for an acute breakdown of social and cultural structures in societies in the South. It should be a priority, not only to better understand the situation and its determining factors, but also to intervene and act with strategies that support and reinvest in the social and cultural sectors, which is vital in order to allow for individuals and communities in the South to strengthen their autonomy and identify.

  20. Structure of Human DROSHA.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S Chul; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Choi, Yeon-Gil; Jo, Myung Hyun; Hohng, Sungchul; Kim, V Narry; Woo, Jae-Sung

    2016-01-14

    MicroRNA maturation is initiated by RNase III DROSHA that cleaves the stem loop of primary microRNA. DROSHA functions together with its cofactor DGCR8 in a heterotrimeric complex known as Microprocessor. Here, we report the X-ray structure of DROSHA in complex with the C-terminal helix of DGCR8. We find that DROSHA contains two DGCR8-binding sites, one on each RNase III domain (RIIID), which mediate the assembly of Microprocessor. The overall structure of DROSHA is surprisingly similar to that of Dicer despite no sequence homology apart from the C-terminal part, suggesting that DROSHA may have evolved from a Dicer homolog. DROSHA exhibits unique features, including non-canonical zinc-finger motifs, a long insertion in the first RIIID, and the kinked link between Connector helix and RIIID, which explains the 11-bp-measuring "ruler" activity of DROSHA. Our study implicates the evolutionary origin of DROSHA and elucidates the molecular basis of Microprocessor assembly and primary microRNA processing. PMID:26748718

  1. Nonlocal Structures: Bilocal Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Roger E.

    1980-01-01

    As a starting point, it is postulated that all particles and fields are built from a single primitive field, which must then be a massless fermion with a σ spin of one-half. Two helicities are embodied in a τ spin of one-half. The vacuum is an open Fermi sea whose height is a wave number κ. Elementary particles are structures having the form of standing-wave systems floating on the vacuum sea, with the height κ providing both the scale of inner structural size and the mass unit for the elementary particle mass spectrum. A bilocal photon starts with a function describing two primitive quanta with parallel σ spin and opposite τ spin. A centroid-time wave equation then couples-in an infinite set of orthogonal functions. The introduction of an operator Q λ permits the reduction of the infinite secular determinant to a finite six-by-six determinant. Solutions (for the infinite expansion) are obtained describing photons with right-handed and left-handed polarizations. Superpositions of these give linearly polarized photons. Electric and magnetic field vectors, satisfying the vacuum Maxwell equations, are obtained from a bilocal Hertz vector given by п= (2/κ3 c)(∂/∂ t r)∇rΨ(1,2), where Ψ(1,2) is the bilocal wave function, and tr and r are the relative time and relative position variables.

  2. 161. North Carolina Route 80 grade separation structure. The structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    161. North Carolina Route 80 grade separation structure. The structure at Buck Creek Gap, built in 1942, has a clear span of 139. Both the roadway running atop and under the structure have a curving alignment. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. The Structure of Memory: Fixed of Flexible? Structural Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.

    Most current information processing theories of cognition and memory share one common feature: the structure (state-space) of memory is fixed and retrieval from memory involves searching through that structure. Learning, where it is treated at all, involves transforming one such structure into another. This form of representation is questioned and…

  4. Structure of mammalian metallothionein.

    PubMed Central

    Kägi, J H; Vasák, M; Lerch, K; Gilg, D E; Hunziker, P; Bernhard, W R; Good, M

    1984-01-01

    All mammalian metallothioneins characterized contain a single polypeptide chain of 61 amino acid residues, among them 20 cysteines providing the ligands for seven metal-binding sites. Native metallothioneins are usually heterogeneous in metal composition, with Zn, Cd, and Cu occurring in varying proportions. However, forms containing only a single metal species, i.e., Zn, Cd, Ni, Co, Hg, Pb, Bi, have now been prepared by in vitro reconstitution from the metal-free apoprotein. By spectroscopic analysis of such derivatives it was established that all cysteine residues participate in metal binding, that each metal ion is bound to four thiolate ligands, and that the symmetry of each complex is close to that of a tetrahedron. To satisfy the requirements of the overall Me7(Cys-)20 stoichiometry, the complexes must be combined to form metal-thiolate cluster structures. Experimental proof for the occurrence of such clusters comes from the demonstration of metal-metal interactions by spectroscopic and magnetic means. Thus, in Co(II)7-metallothionein, the Co(II)-specific ESR signals are effectively suppressed by antiferromagnetic coupling of juxtaposed paramagnetic metal ions. By monitoring changes in ESR signal size occurring on stepwise incorporation of Co(II) into the protein, it is possible to follow the building up of the clusters. This process is biphasic. Up to binding of four equivalents of Co(II), the ESR amplitude increases in proportion to the metal content, indicating generation of magnetically noninteracting high-spin complexes. However, upon addition of the remaining three equivalents of Co(II), these features are progressively suppressed, signaling the formation of clusters. The same mode of cluster formation has also been documented for Cd and Hg. The actual spatial organization of the clusters and the polypeptide chain remains to be established. An attractive possibility is the arrangement of the tetrahedral metal-thiolates in adamantane-like structures

  5. Removable fastener for large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulson, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Frame clamps lateral braces for assembling trusses, scaffolds, and other structures. Although approach originally proposed for assembling antennas and solar arrays in space, method is useful in temporary structures which require fastening before they are permanently welded or bonded.

  6. Classification & Structure of Blood Vessels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... return blood to the heart (veins). The primary function of capillaries is the ... cells. Capillary distribution varies with the metabolic activity of ...

  7. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  8. PSS-SQL: protein secondary structure - structured query language.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Dominika; Malysiak-Mrozek, Bozena; Kozielski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    Secondary structure representation of proteins provides important information regarding protein general construction and shape. This representation is often used in protein similarity searching. Since existing commercial database management systems do not offer integrated exploration methods for biological data e.g. at the level of the SQL language, the structural similarity searching is usually performed by external tools. In the paper, we present our newly developed PSS-SQL language, which allows searching a database in order to identify proteins having secondary structure similar to the structure specified by the user in a PSS-SQL query. Therefore, we provide a simple and declarative language for protein structure similarity searching.

  9. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  10. STRUCTURAL ENZYMOLOGY OF POLYKETIDE SYNTHASES

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shiou-Chuan (Sheryl); Ames, Brian Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes structural and associated enzymological studies of polyketide synthases, including isolated single domains and multidomain fragments. The sequence–structure–function relationship of polyketide biosynthesis, compared with homologous fatty acid synthesis, is discussed in detail. Structural enzymology sheds light on sequence and structural motifs that are important for the precise timing, substrate recognition, enzyme catalysis, and protein–protein interactions leading to the extraordinary structural diversity of naturally occurring polyketides. PMID:19362634

  11. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  12. Aluminum structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.

    1996-05-01

    Extensive research by aluminum producers and automakers in the 1980s resulted in the development of technologies that enable building of aluminum cars that meet and exceed all the expectations of today`s drivers and passengers, yet weigh several hundred pounds less than their steel counterparts. The Acura NSX sports car, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ220 have all been introduced. Ford has built 40 aluminum-intensive automobiles based on the Taurus/Sable for test purposes, and General Motors recently announced an aluminum-structured electric vehicle. The design flexibility that aluminum allows is shown by these examples. Each uses a somewhat different technology that is particularly suited to the vehicle and its market.

  13. Crystal structure of propaquizafop

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Jineun; Lee, Sangjin; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, C22H22ClN3O5 {systematic name: 2-(propan-2-yl­idene­amino­oxy)ethyl (R)-2-[4-(6-chloro­quin­oxalin-2-yl­oxy)phen­oxy]propionate}, is a herbicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the phenyl ring and the quinoxaline ring plane are 75.93 (7) and 82.77 (8)°. The crystal structure features C—H⋯O, C—H⋯N, and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, as well as weak π–π inter­actions [ring-centroid separation = 3.782 (2) and 3.5952 (19) Å], resulting in a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:25553037

  14. Picture Wall (Glass Structures)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Photo shows a subway station in Toronto, Ontario, which is entirely glass-enclosed. The all-glass structure was made possible by a unique glazing concept developed by PPG Industries, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of flat glass. In the TVS glazing system, transparent glass "fins" replace conventional vertical support members used to provide support for wind load resistance. For stiffening, silicone sealant bonds the fins to adjacent glass panels. At its glass research center near Pittsburgh, PPG Industries uses the NASTRAN computer program to analyze the stability of enclosures made entirely of glass. The company also uses NASTRAN to simulate stresses on large containers of molten glass and to analyze stress effects of solar heating on flat glass.

  15. Riboswitches: Structures and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A critical feature of the hypothesized RNA world would have been the ability to control chemical processes in response to environmental cues. Riboswitches present themselves as viable candidates for a sophisticated mechanism of regulatory control in RNA-based life. These regulatory elements in the modern world are most commonly found in the 5′-untranslated regions of bacterial mRNAs, directly interacting with metabolites as a means of regulating expression of the coding region via a secondary structural switch. In this review, we focus on recent insights into how these RNAs fold into complex architectures capable of both recognizing a specific small molecule compound and exerting regulatory control over downstream sequences, with an emphasis on transcriptional regulation. PMID:20943759

  16. Riboswitches: structures and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Edwards, Andrea L; Batey, Robert T

    2011-06-01

    A critical feature of the hypothesized RNA world would have been the ability to control chemical processes in response to environmental cues. Riboswitches present themselves as viable candidates for a sophisticated mechanism of regulatory control in RNA-based life. These regulatory elements in the modern world are most commonly found in the 5'-untranslated regions of bacterial mRNAs, directly interacting with metabolites as a means of regulating expression of the coding region via a secondary structural switch. In this review, we focus on recent insights into how these RNAs fold into complex architectures capable of both recognizing a specific small molecule compound and exerting regulatory control over downstream sequences, with an emphasis on transcriptional regulation. PMID:20943759

  17. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  18. Parametric State Space Structuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Tilgner, Marco

    1997-01-01

    Structured approaches based on Kronecker operators for the description and solution of the infinitesimal generator of a continuous-time Markov chains are receiving increasing interest. However, their main advantage, a substantial reduction in the memory requirements during the numerical solution, comes at a price. Methods based on the "potential state space" allocate a probability vector that might be much larger than actually needed. Methods based on the "actual state space", instead, have an additional logarithmic overhead. We present an approach that realizes the advantages of both methods with none of their disadvantages, by partitioning the local state spaces of each submodel. We apply our results to a model of software rendezvous, and show how they reduce memory requirements while, at the same time, improving the efficiency of the computation.

  19. Structural color in Myxomycetes.

    PubMed

    Inchaussandague, Marina; Skigin, Diana; Carmaran, Cecilia; Rosenfeldt, Sonia

    2010-07-19

    In this paper we report evidence of structural color in Myxomycetes, a group of eukaryotic microorganisms with an uncertain taxonomic position. We investigated the Diachea leucopoda, which belongs to the Physarales order, Myxomycetes class, and found that its peridium -protective layer that encloses the mass of spores- is basically a corrugated layer of a transparent material, which produces a multicolored pointillistic effect, characteristic of this species. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy techniques have been employed to characterize the samples. A simple optical model of a planar slab is proposed to calculate the reflectance. The chromaticity coordinates are obtained, and the results confirm that the color observed is a result of an interference effect.

  20. Activities report in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-10-01

    A stiffened plate macro-element; a macro-element of elastic pipe filled with liquid; modeling of the structural fuzzy in medium frequency computations; unsteady aerodynamic forces on jet engine air intakes; prediction of buffeting vibrations from unsteady pressure measurements taken in a wind tunnel; aeroelastic behavior of fan blades in the unstarted supersonic domain; wind tunnel study of a helicopter blade stall control; computer-controlled generator of turbulence in a wind tunnel; atmospheric turbulence statistics; adaptation of Neuber's theory to viscoplastic stress concentration; computation of a jet engine disk/flange assembly; and analysis of the damage done to a perforated composite plate under biaxial monotonic and cyclic loading are described.

  1. Junin virus structural proteins.

    PubMed Central

    De Martínez Segovia, Z M; De Mitri, M I

    1977-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified Junin virus revealed six distinct structural polypeptides, two major and four minor ones. Four of these polypeptides appeared to be covalently linked with carbohydrate. The molecular weights of the six proteins, estimated by coelectrophoresis with marker proteins, ranged from 25,000 to 91,000. One of the two major components (number 3) was identified as a nucleoprotein and had a molecular weight of 64,000. It was the most prominent protein and was nonglycosylated. The other major protein (number 5), with a molecular weight of 38,000, was a glucoprotein and a component of the viral envelope. The location on the virion of three additional glycopeptides with molecular weights of 91,000, 72,000, and 52,000, together with a protein with a molecular weight of 25,000, was not well defined. PMID:189088

  2. Electromagnetic structure of pion

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, Clayton S.; Cruz Filho, Jose P.; Da Silva, Edson O.; El-Bennich, Bruno; De Melo, J. P.; Filho, Victo S.

    2013-03-25

    In this work, we analyze the electromagnetic structure of the pion, an elementary particle composed by a quark-antiquark bound state, by considering the calculation of its electromagnetic radius and its electromagnetic form factor in low and intermediate energy range. Such observables are determined by means of a theoretical model that takes into account the constituent quark and antiquark of the pion, in the formalism of the light-front field theory. In particular, it is considered a nonsymmetrical vertex for such a model, in which we have calculated the electromagnetic form factor of the pion in an optimized way, by varying its regulator mass, so that we can obtain the best value for the pion electromagnetic radius when compared with the experimental one. The theoretical calculations are also compared with the most recent experimental data involving the pion electromagnetic form factor and the results show very good agreement.

  3. Structured treatment interruption workshop.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    A workshop on structured treatment interruptions (STI) took place in Boston in July 1999. The three basic reasons for initiating STI are to save or increase the immune system's response to HIV, to renew sensitivity to anti-HIV drugs, and to provide a break for people experiencing treatment fatigue or severe side effects. Discussions at the conference emphasized that research on STI is still preliminary and the benefits of STI are unclear at this time. The meeting concluded with a review of ongoing studies; a list of recommendations was proposed. Also discussed was the need to communicate a clear definition of STI that could be applied for large observational studies. A task force is being established to achieve this goal, which would include representatives from large studies. Contact information is provided. PMID:11367357

  4. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  5. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  6. Dynamic Structural Health Monitoring of Slender Structures Using Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Paulo; Travanca, Rui; Rodrigues, Hugo; Melo, José; Jara, José; Varum, Humberto; André, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the research activities at the Instituto de Telecomunicações—Pólo de Aveiro and University of Aveiro, in the field of fiber Bragg grating based sensors and their applications in dynamic measurements for Structural Health Monitoring of slender structures such as towers. In this work we describe the implementation of an optical biaxial accelerometer based on fiber Bragg gratings inscribed on optical fibers. The proof-of-concept was done with the dynamic monitoring of a reinforced concrete structure and a slender metallic telecommunication tower. Those structures were found to be suitable to demonstrate the feasibility of FBG accelerometers to obtain the structures' natural frequencies, which are the key parameters in Structural Health Monitoring and in the calibration of numerical models used to simulate the structure behavior. PMID:22778661

  7. Empirical Evidence for Narrative Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul; Grosjean, Francois

    1984-01-01

    Used experimental tasks--spontaneous telling of a story, reading, and parsing--to determine whether empirical data reflect narrative structure of stories. It was concluded that spontaneous pausing reflects the narrative structure and can be used as a guide to constructing theories of narrative structure and deciding between competing theories.…

  8. CSM parallel structural methods research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1989-01-01

    Parallel structural methods, research team activities, advanced architecture computers for parallel computational structural mechanics (CSM) research, the FLEX/32 multicomputer, a parallel structural analyses testbed, blade-stiffened aluminum panel with a circular cutout and the dynamic characteristics of a 60 meter, 54-bay, 3-longeron deployable truss beam are among the topics discussed.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics on random structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, S.M.; Reidys, C.M. |

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors consider the evolutionary dynamics of populations of sequences, under a process of selection at the phenotypic level of structures. They use a simple graph-theoretic representation of structures which captures well the properties of the mapping between RNA sequences and their molecular structure. Each sequence is assigned to a structure by means of a sequence-to-structure mapping. The authors make the basic assumption that every fitness landscape can be factorized through the structures. The set of all sequences that map into a particular random structure can then be modeled as a random graph in sequence space, the so-called neutral network. They analyze in detail how an evolving population searches for new structures, in particular how they switch from one neutral network to another. They verify that transitions occur directly between neutral networks, and study the effects of different population sizes and the influence of the relatedness of the structures on these transitions. In fitness landscapes where several structures exhibit high fitness, the authors then study evolutionary paths on the structural level taken by the population during its search. They present a new way of expressing structural similarities which are shown to have relevant implications for the time evolution of the population.

  10. AIR STRUCTURES FOR SCHOOL SPORTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBERTSON, NAN

    AIR STRUCTURES ARE FABRIC BUILDINGS BLOWN UP AND HELD UP BY AIR PRESSURE. EXPERIMENTS WITH SUCH STRUCTURES WERE CONDUCTED AS EARLY AS 1917. IN 1948 THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SOUGHT A NEW WAY OF HOUSING LARGE RADAR ANTENNAE PLANNED FOR THE ARCTIC. AS AN OUTCOME OF THEIR SEARCH, BIRDAIR STRUCTURES, INC., WHICH IS NOW ONE OF SEVERAL COMPANIES…

  11. Air Structures for School Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Nan

    Air structures are fabric buildings blown up and held up by air pressure. Experiments with such structures were conducted as early as 1917. In 1948 the United States Air Force sought a new way of housing large radar antennae planned for the arctic. As an outcome of their search, Birdair Structures, Inc., which is now one of several companies…

  12. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  13. Improved flux pinning by prefabricated SnO2 nanowires embedded in epitaxial YBa2Cu3Ox superconducting thin film tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Mallick, R.; Tao, X.; Yao, Y.; Heydari Gharahcheshmeh, M.; Xu, A.; Zhang, Y.; Galstyan, E.; Majkic, G.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed processes to fabricate SnO2 nanowires on single crystalline-like buffer surfaces on flexible metal substrates with controlled alignment and density while eliminating undesired in-plane nanostructures that can be deleterious to subsequent epitaxial growth of the superconductor film. The in-plane nanostructures formed due to the mobility of gold catalyst on the nucleating surface and a two-step process was developed to restrict this mobility. Post-ion bombardment of the surface with randomly aligned SnO2 nanowires has resulted in re-alignment of the nanowires along the ion beam direction as well as in the removal of the undesired in-plane nanostructures. The most effective and reproducible control of SnO2 nanowire density with near absence of in-plane nanostructures was achieved by growth on single crystalline-like CeO2 surfaces and use of colloidal gold catalysts of 30 nm in size. YBa2Cu3Ox superconductor films epitaxially grown on the single crystalline-like surfaces with SnO2 nanowires exhibit a 50% improvement in critical current at 77 K in a magnetic field of 1 Tesla aligned along the orientation of the embedded nanowires.

  14. Studies of house-entering habits of mosquitoes in The Gambia, West Africa: experiments with prefabricated huts with varied wall apertures.

    PubMed

    Snow, W F

    1987-01-01

    The house-entering behaviour of nocturnal mosquitoes was studied in The Gambia. Mosquitoes were captured as they attacked man in the open and in experimental huts which comprised 1.8 m cube frames with corrugated iron roofs and plywood walls of various heights. Catches of all species were similar in the open and in a roofed, but unwalled, hut frame. The mosquitoes taken in catches in unwalled huts and others with wall heights of 0.6, 1.2 and 1.7 m (giving an 8 cm eaves-level entry slit) fell into two categories. The first group, which included the endophilic species Anopheles gambiae Giles s.l., An. melas Theobald and Mansonia spp. were only slightly affected by increasing wall height, but the second group, including the exophilic mosquitoes Aedes spp., An. pharoensis Theobald, Cx poicilipes (Theobald) and Cx thalassius Theobald showed a very marked progressive exclusion. In comparisons of catches in two huts with 8 cm entry slits at eaves or ground level, large numbers of An. pharoensis found access through the ground level entry but not at eaves level. No consistent difference could be demonstrated for other species. It is concluded that the house-entering behaviour which distinguishes endophagic mosquito species includes at least two distinct responses: flight upwards to eaves level and the passage from outside to indoors. It is also suggested that house entry as a component in host-seeking behaviour and indoor resting are distinct, but not necessarily exclusive, behavioural traits. PMID:2908761

  15. Analysing photonic structures in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vignolini, Silvia; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2013-01-01

    The outer layers of a range of plant tissues, including flower petals, leaves and fruits, exhibit an intriguing variation of microscopic structures. Some of these structures include ordered periodic multilayers and diffraction gratings that give rise to interesting optical appearances. The colour arising from such structures is generally brighter than pigment-based colour. Here, we describe the main types of photonic structures found in plants and discuss the experimental approaches that can be used to analyse them. These experimental approaches allow identification of the physical mechanisms producing structural colours with a high degree of confidence. PMID:23883949

  16. Foam rigidized inflatable structural assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L. (Inventor); Schnell, Andrew R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An inflatable and rigidizable structure for use as a habitat or a load bearing structure is disclosed. The structure consists of an outer wall and an inner wall defining a containment member and a bladder. The bladder is pressurized to erect the structure from an initially collapsed state. The containment member is subsequently injected with rigidizable fluid through an arrangement of injection ports. Exhaust gases from the curing rigidizable fluid are vented through an arrangement of exhaust ports. The rate of erection can be controlled by frictional engagement with a container or by using a tether. A method for fabricating a tubular structure is disclosed.

  17. Structural diversity of ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    ter Beek, Josy; Guskov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a large superfamily of ATP-dependent protein complexes that mediate transport of a vast array of substrates across membranes. The 14 currently available structures of ABC transporters have greatly advanced insight into the transport mechanism and revealed a tremendous structural diversity. Whereas the domains that hydrolyze ATP are structurally related in all ABC transporters, the membrane-embedded domains, where the substrates are translocated, adopt four different unrelated folds. Here, we review the structural characteristics of ABC transporters and discuss the implications of this structural diversity for mechanistic diversity. PMID:24638992

  18. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Combs, Lisa M.; Paufler, David; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide an empennage structural assembly that will withstand the operational loads defined in FAR Part 23, as well as those specified in the statement of work, i.e. snow, rain, humidity, tiedown forces, etc. The goal is to provide a simple yet durable lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the tail surfaces through the most efficient load path to the airframe. The structure should be simple and cost-effective to manufacture and repair. All structures meet or exceed loading and fatigue criteria. The structure provides for necessary stiffness and ease of maintenance.

  19. Hydrodynamic loading of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroldsen, Anders S.; Johansen, Vegar; Skelton, Robert E.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces hydrodynamic loads for tensegrity structures, to examine their behavior in marine environments. Wave compliant structures are of general interest when considering large marine structures, and we are motivated by the aquaculture industry where new concepts are investigated in order to make offshore installations for seafood production. This paper adds to the existing models and software simulations of tensegrity structures exposed to environmental loading from waves and current. A number of simulations are run to show behavior of the structure as a function of pretension level and string stiffness for a given loading condition.

  20. A Molecular–Structure Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Boeyens, Jan C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The self-similar symmetry that occurs between atomic nuclei, biological growth structures, the solar system, globular clusters and spiral galaxies suggests that a similar pattern should characterize atomic and molecular structures. This possibility is explored in terms of the current molecular structure-hypothesis and its extension into four-dimensional space-time. It is concluded that a quantum molecule only has structure in four dimensions and that classical (Newtonian) structure, which occurs in three dimensions, cannot be simulated by quantum-chemical computation. PMID:21151437

  1. LTA structures and materials technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The state-of-the-art concerning structures and materials technology is reviewed. It is shown that many present materials developments resulting from balloon and aircraft research programs can be applied to new concepts in LTA vehicles. Both buoyant and semi-buoyant vehicles utilize similar approaches to solving structural problems and could involve pressurized non-rigid and unpressurized rigid structures. System designs common to both and vital to structural integrity include much of the past technology as well. Further research is needed in determination of structural loads, especially in future design concepts.

  2. Aerospace structural design process improvement using systematic evolutionary structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert Michael

    2000-10-01

    A multidisciplinary team tasked with an aircraft design problem must understand the problem requirements and metrics to produce a successful design. This understanding entails not only knowledge of what these requirements and metrics are, but also how they interact, which are most important (to the customer as well as to aircraft performance), and who in the organization can provide pertinent knowledge for each. In recent years, product development researchers and organizations have developed and successfully applied a variety of tools such as Quality Function Deployment (QFD) to coordinate multidisciplinary team members. The effectiveness of these methods, however, depends on the quality and fidelity of the information that team members can input. In conceptual aircraft design, structural information is of lower quality compared to aerodynamics or performance because it is based on experience rather than theory. This dissertation shows how advanced structural design tools can be used in a multidisciplinary team setting to improve structural information generation and communication through a systematic evolution of structural detail. When applied to conceptual design, finite element-based structural design tools elevate structural information to the same level as other computationally supported disciplines. This improved ability to generate and communicate structural information enables a design team to better identify and meet structural design requirements, consider producibility issues earlier, and evaluate structural concepts. A design process experiment of a wing structural layout in collaboration with an industrial partner illustrates and validates the approach.

  3. Regolith-structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein

    1991-11-01

    shielding for habitation and workspace. The habitat module is treated as a rigid cylindrical tube with a smooth exterior. By making the cylinder rigid, a complex interaction problem is reduced to a situation where we can consider the support regolith and the shielding regolith as behaving independently of the structural properties of the cylindrical structure. Medium-dense lunar simulant was placed around a scaled model of the habitat module to provide a radiation shield. This embankment-type shield was constructed in relatively thin but fine layers by compacting, by mechanical vibratory means, layer upon layer of simulant placed adjacent to the horizontally-aligned cylinder. structure. The actual process of local and/or global growth of instabilities or skip planes can also be observed.

  4. Oscillating water column structural model

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Guild; Bull, Diana L; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Gordon, Margaret Ellen

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  5. Combinatorics of γ-structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Hillary S W; Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2014-08-01

    In this article we study canonical γ-structures, a class of RNA pseudoknot structures that plays a key role in the context of polynomial time folding of RNA pseudoknot structures. A γ-structure is composed of specific building blocks that have topological genus less than or equal to γ, where composition means concatenation and nesting of such blocks. Our main result is the derivation of the generating function of γ-structures via symbolic enumeration using so called irreducible shadows. We furthermore recursively compute the generating polynomials of irreducible shadows of genus ≤ γ. The γ-structures are constructed via γ-matchings. For 1 ≤ γ ≤ 10, we compute Puiseux expansions at the unique, dominant singularities, allowing us to derive simple asymptotic formulas for the number of γ-structures.

  6. Structural Biology of TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins remain challenging targets for structural biologists, despite recent technical developments regarding sample preparation and structure determination. We review recent progress towards a structural understanding of TRP channels and the techniques used to that end. We discuss available low-resolution structures from electron microscopy (EM), X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and review the resulting insights into TRP channel function for various subfamily members. The recent high-resolution structure of TRPV1 is discussed in more detail in Chapter X. We also consider the opportunities and challenges of using the accumulating structural information on TRPs and homologous proteins for deducing full-length structures of different TRP channel subfamilies, such as building homology models. Finally, we close by summarizing the outlook of the “holy grail” of understanding in atomic detail the diverse functions of TRP channels. PMID:24961976

  7. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  8. Building large structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, T.

    1976-01-01

    The building of large structures in space would be required for the establishment of a variety of systems needed for different forms of space utilization. The problems involved in the building of such structures in space and the approaches which can be used to solve these problems are illustrated with the aid of an example involving a concept for packaging, transporting, and assembling two representative large space structures. The structure of a radio-astronomy telescope 200 m in diam was felt to be representative of the many medium-size structures of the Shuttle era. A typical very large structure is represented by the supporting structure for the transmission system of a 5000-Mw space solar power station.

  9. Combinatorics of γ-structures.

    PubMed

    Han, Hillary S W; Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2014-08-01

    In this article we study canonical γ-structures, a class of RNA pseudoknot structures that plays a key role in the context of polynomial time folding of RNA pseudoknot structures. A γ-structure is composed of specific building blocks that have topological genus less than or equal to γ, where composition means concatenation and nesting of such blocks. Our main result is the derivation of the generating function of γ-structures via symbolic enumeration using so called irreducible shadows. We furthermore recursively compute the generating polynomials of irreducible shadows of genus ≤ γ. The γ-structures are constructed via γ-matchings. For 1 ≤ γ ≤ 10, we compute Puiseux expansions at the unique, dominant singularities, allowing us to derive simple asymptotic formulas for the number of γ-structures. PMID:24689708

  10. Combinatorics of γ-Structures

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hillary S.W.; Li, Thomas J.X.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this article we study canonical γ-structures, a class of RNA pseudoknot structures that plays a key role in the context of polynomial time folding of RNA pseudoknot structures. A γ-structure is composed of specific building blocks that have topological genus less than or equal to γ, where composition means concatenation and nesting of such blocks. Our main result is the derivation of the generating function of γ-structures via symbolic enumeration using so called irreducible shadows. We furthermore recursively compute the generating polynomials of irreducible shadows of genus ≤ γ. The γ-structures are constructed via γ-matchings. For 1 ≤ γ ≤ 10, we compute Puiseux expansions at the unique, dominant singularities, allowing us to derive simple asymptotic formulas for the number of γ-structures. PMID:24689708

  11. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  12. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    The production of high-resolution topographic datasets is of increasing concern and application throughout the geomorphic sciences, and river science is no exception. Consequently, a wide range of topographic measurement methods have evolved. Despite the range of available methods, the production of high resolution, high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) generally requires a significant investment in personnel time, hardware and/or software. However, image-based methods such as digital photogrammetry have steadily been decreasing in costs. Initially developed for the purpose of rapid, inexpensive and easy three dimensional surveys of buildings or small objects, the "structure from motion" photogrammetric approach (SfM) is a purely image based method which could deliver a step-change if transferred to river remote sensing, and requires very little training and is extremely inexpensive. Using the online SfM program Microsoft Photosynth, we have created high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rivers from ordinary photographs produced from a multi-step workflow that takes advantage of free and open source software. This process reconstructs real world scenes from SfM algorithms based on the derived positions of the photographs in three-dimensional space. One of the products of the SfM process is a three-dimensional point cloud of features present in the input photographs. This point cloud can be georeferenced from a small number of ground control points collected via GPS in the field. The georeferenced point cloud can then be used to create a variety of digital elevation model products. Among several study sites, we examine the applicability of SfM in the Pedernales River in Texas (USA), where several hundred images taken from a hand-held helikite are used to produce DEMs of the fluvial topographic environment. This test shows that SfM and low-altitude platforms can produce point clouds with point densities considerably better than airborne LiDAR, with

  13. Marine stratocumulus structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Snider, Jack B.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-three Landsat TM scenes of California stratocumulus cloud fields were acquired as part of the FIRE Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observations in July 1987. They exhibit a wide variety of stratocumulus structures. Analysis has so far focused upon the July 7 scene, in which aircraft from NASA, NCAR, and the British Meteorological Office repeatedly gathered data across a stratocumulus-fair weather cumulus transition. The aircraft soundings validate the cloud base temperature threshold determined by spatial coherence analysis of the TM thermal band. Brightness variations in the stratocumulus region exhibit a -5/3 power-law decrease of the wavenumber spectra for scales larger than the cloud thickness, about 200 m, changing to a -3 power at smaller scales. Observations by an upward-looking three-channel microwave radiometer on San Nicolas Island also show the -5/3 power-law in total integrated liquid water, suggesting that the largest-scale TM brightness variations are primarily due to variations in the liquid water. The Kolmogorov 5/3 power suggests that for some purposes liquid water in turbulent stratocumulus clouds may be treated as a passive scalar, simply reflecting variations in vertical velocity. This may be tested using the velocities measured by the aircraft.

  14. Structure of Solar Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Cantó, J.; Lara, A.; González, R.; Schwenn, R.

    Solar Ejecta (SE) have been of interest in the last years, especially those which may reach Earth environment. It is possible to observe the SE early evolution, when they are in the field of view of coronagraphs. There are few indirect observations, as the case of interplanetary scintillation, of SEs in the interplanetary medium. Finally, we observe SEs in situ when they arrive at 1 AU.The SEs structure and evolution are important to understand the origin of these phenomena but to predict the possible effects in the space weather. It is of general acceptance that SEs are "Erupting Flux Ropes" traveling trough the Solar Wind. The "shapes" have been modeled as cylinders or as "ice cream cones" in order to represent the many different projections observed on Coronagraphs.We present a model of the SE evolution based on purely Hydrodynamic considerations. This model reproduces in good approximation some of the features observed in the images and in the measures of the shocks near Earth.

  15. Venus upper atmosphere structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Lake, L. R.

    1980-12-01

    Atmospheric densities of Venus were measured from the orbital decay of the Pioneer Venus from Dec. 9, 1978 to Aug. 7, 1979 near the 16 deg latitude between 140 and 190 km during the entire day. Comparative atmospheric densities on earth at 150 km are higher by a factor of 3.5 with only a 1% diurnal variation; an atmospheric composition, temperature, and density model based on the orbiter atmospheric drag (OAD) vertical structure is presented. The model shows that atomic oxygen is the major component in the Venus atmosphere above 145 km at night and above 160 km during the day with mixing ratios over 0.1 near 140 km; drag measurements indicate O concentrations from 1 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm in daytime to 3 x 10 to the 7th/cu cm at night. It is concluded that the neutral upper atmosphere of Venus is surprisingly insensitive to solar extreme UV variations and changes in the solar wind.

  16. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  17. Structural model of uramarsite

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Sidorenko, G. A.; Ivanova, A. G.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-09-15

    The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) A, b = 7.167(5) A, c = 9.30(1) A, {alpha} = 90.13(7){sup o}, {beta} = 90.09(4){sup o}, {gamma} = 89.96(4){sup o}, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[AsO{sub 4}][PO{sub 4},AsO{sub 4}][NH{sub 4}][H{sub 3}O] . 6H{sub 2}O (Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH{sub 4}, H{sub 3}O, and H{sub 2}O groups.

  18. Concealing with Structured Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingbo; Zeng, Jinwei; Wang, Xi; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2014-02-01

    While making objects less visible (or invisible) to a human eye or a radar has captured people's imagination for centuries, current attempts towards realization of this long-awaited functionality range from various stealth technologies to recently proposed cloaking devices. A majority of proposed approaches share a number of common deficiencies such as design complexity, polarization effects, bandwidth, losses and the physical size or shape requirement complicating their implementation especially at optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate an alternative way to conceal macroscopic objects by structuring light itself. In our approach, the incident light is transformed into an optical vortex with a dark core that can be used to conceal macroscopic objects. Once such a beam passed around the object it is transformed back into its initial Gaussian shape with minimum amplitude and phase distortions. Therefore, we propose to use that dark core of the vortex beam to conceal an object that is macroscopic yet small enough to fit the dark (negligibly low intensity) region of the beam. The proposed concealing approach is polarization independent, easy to fabricate, lossless, operates at wavelengths ranging from 560 to 700 nm, and can be used to hide macroscopic objects providing they are smaller than vortex core.

  19. High energy nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Boguta, J.; Kunz, J.

    1984-03-09

    In conventional nuclear physics the nucleus is described as a non-relativistic many-body system, which is governed by the Schroedinger equation. Nucleons interact in this framework via static two-body potentials, mesonic degrees of freedom are neglected. An alternative description of nuclear physics in terms of a relativistic field theory has been developed by Walecka. The model Lagrangian containing baryons, sigma-mesons and ..omega..-mesons was subsequently extended to include also ..pi..-mesons and rho-mesons. An essential feature of such a nuclear Lagrangian is its renormalizability. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicit treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Different types of soliton solutions occur in gauge theories with hidden symmetries. In the phenomenological Lagrangian the rho-meson is described by a non-abelian gauge field, that acquires its mass spontaneously due to the non-vanishing vacuum expectation value of a Higgs field. A general ansatz for soliton solutions of such a gauge theory was given by Dashen et al. A specific solution and its possible implications for nuclear physics like anomalous nuclear states were discussed by Boguta.

  20. Structural model of uramarsite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Sidorenko, G. A.; Ivanova, A. G.; Chukanov, N. V.

    2008-09-01

    The structural model of uramarsite, a new mineral of the uran-mica family from the Bota-Burum deposit (South Kazakhstan), is determined using a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The parameters of the triclinic unit cell are as follows: a = 7.173(2) Å, b = 7.167(5) Å, c = 9.30(1) Å, α = 90.13(7)°, β = 90.09(4)°, γ = 89.96(4)°, and space group P1. The crystal chemical formula of uramarsite is: (UO2)2[AsO4][PO4,AsO4][NH4][H3O] · 6H2O ( Z = 1). Uramarsite is the second ammonium-containing mineral of uranium and an arsenate analogue of uramphite. In the case of uramarsite, the lowering of the symmetry from tetragonal to triclinic, which is accompanied by a triclinic distortion of the tetragonal unit cell, is apparently caused by the ordering of the As and P atoms and the NH4, H3O, and H2O groups.