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Sample records for prefer cylindrical morphology

  1. Quantitative study of temperature-dependent order in thin films of cylindrical morphology block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vindhya; Kramer, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Disordering and defect generation in block copolymer systems at high temperatures is of significance to get a better understanding of the physics governing these systems, which can also direct efforts to minimize them. We have studied the smectic-nematic-isotropic transition in confined monolayers and bilayers of cylindrical morphology poly (styrene-b-2vinyl pyridine) diblock copolymer. Previous studies of melting phenomena in block copolymer thin films have relied on quantitative AFM studies alone. We have supplemented AFM studies with grazing incidence small angle X-ray diffraction lineshape analysis to quantify the decay of translational and orientational order with increasing temperature. The results have been interpreted in the context of the Toner-Nelson theory of melting for layered systems.

  2. Morphology and breaking of latex particle deposits at a cylindrical collector in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Duval, Jérome F L; Adachi, Yasuhisa

    2010-12-15

    We report an analysis for the morphology and breaking behavior of deposits of spherical latex particles (1 and 3.6 μm in diameter) at a cylindrical collector in a microfluidic channel fabricated by soft-lithography. In-situ observation of particle deposition over a large range of flow rate conditions evidence the relationship between deposit morphology and mode of particle transport toward the collector. For low Péclet number (Pe), particle deposits are nearly uniform all over the collector surface except at the rear where particles do not attach. Upon increase of Pe, deposits gradually adopt a columnar morphology at the collector stagnation point. These results are qualitatively consistent with previously reported Monte Carlo simulations of deposits formation in stagnation point flow systems. However, these simulations fail to quantitatively predict the observed deposition at the rear of the collector for sufficiently high flow rate. Additional deposit breaking experiments together with numerical evaluations of particle flux around the collector suggest that such "anomalous" deposition at large Pe is significantly governed by concomitant detachment of deposited particles at the stagnation point and the presence of recirculation flow at the collector rear. Finally, kinetics of deposition are discussed in connection with particle size-dependence of deposit breaking features.

  3. Morphological stability of a solid-liquid interface growing in a cylindrical mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The morphological stability of the planar interface of dilute alloys solidifying in a cylindrical mold is analyzed based on the perturbation model presented by Mullins and Sekerka under the assumption that the interface crosses the mold wall at right angles, to examine the effect of the inside diameter of the mold. When the interface grows in a mold of a larger inside diameter, the stability-instability criterion of the planar interface is coincident with the MS criterion. On the other hand, in a mold of a smaller diameter, the rippled interface is permitted to take a frequency of discrete values (the permitted frequency), and the planar interface grows stably under thermal conditions slightly exceeding the MS criterion. Also, there exists a minimum permitted frequency ωmin, and the critical inside diameter dc is derived from ωmin. When the alloy solidifies in a mold of an inside diameter less than dc, the interface grows stably under thermal conditions in which the MS model predicts unstable growth of the interface. Moreover, there is a lower limit dG in dc, and when the alloy solidifies in a mold of an inside diameter less than dG, the interface grows stably even at a zero temperature gradient in the liquid.

  4. Men's preferences for women's breast morphology in New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Barnaby J; Vasey, Paul L; Sagata, Katayo; Sibanda, Nokuthaba; Linklater, Wayne L; Dixson, Alan F

    2011-12-01

    Sexual selection via mate choice may have influenced the evolution of women's breast morphology. We conducted an image-based questionnaire quantifying and comparing the preferences of men from Papua New Guinea (PNG), Samoa, and New Zealand (NZ) for images of women's breast size, breast symmetry, areola size, and areolar pigmentation. Results showed that men from PNG preferred larger breasts to a greater extent than men from Samoa and NZ, providing some support for the hypothesis that men from subsistence living cultures have a greater preference for morphological cues indicative of caloric reserves. Symmetrical breasts were most attractive to men in each culture. However, preferences were highest among NZ men, followed by men from Samoa, and were lowest among men from PNG. These results did not support the hypothesis that people living in higher pathogen environments have a greater preference for traits indicative of pathogen resistance and developmental stability. Large areolae were preferred among men from PNG, and to a lesser extent in Samoa, while in NZ men preferred medium-sized areolae. Thus, men's preferences for women's areolar size appear to be highly culturally specific. Darkly pigmented areolae were most attractive to men from Samoa and PNG, whereas men from NZ preferred areolae with medium pigmentation. These findings suggest that areolar pigmentation indicative of sexual maturity is preferred by men rather than lighter pigmentation, which may signal that a woman is in the early years of reproductive maturity. This study highlights the importance of cross-cultural research when testing the role of morphological cues in mate choice.

  5. An Analytic Solution of the Cable Equation Predicts Frequency Preference of a Passive Shunt-End Cylindrical Cable in Response to Extracellular Oscillating Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Monai, Hiromu; Omori, Toshiaki; Okada, Masato; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Aonishi, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Under physiological and artificial conditions, the dendrites of neurons can be exposed to electric fields. Recent experimental studies suggested that the membrane resistivity of the distal apical dendrites of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons may be significantly lower than that of the proximal dendrites and the soma. To understand the behavior of dendrites in time-varying extracellular electric fields, we analytically solved cable equations for finite cylindrical cables with and without a leak conductance attached to one end by employing the Green's function method. The solution for a cable with a leak at one end for direct-current step electric fields shows a reversal in polarization at the leaky end, as has been previously shown by employing the separation of variables method and Fourier series expansion. The solution for a cable with a leak at one end for alternating-current electric fields reveals that the leaky end shows frequency preference in the response amplitude. Our results predict that a passive dendrite with low resistivity at the distal end would show frequency preference in response to sinusoidal extracellular local field potentials. The Green's function obtained in our study can be used to calculate response for any extracellular electric field. PMID:20159148

  6. A high-accuracy roundness measurement for cylindrical components by a morphological filter considering eccentricity, probe offset, tip head radius and tilt error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuanzhi; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Tong; Kuang, Ye

    2016-08-01

    A morphological filter is proposed to obtain a high-accuracy roundness measurement based on the four-parameter roundness measurement model, which takes into account eccentricity, probe offset, probe tip head radius and tilt error. This paper analyses the sample angle deviations caused by the four systematic errors to design a morphological filter based on the distribution of the sample angle. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through simulations and experiments performed with a roundness measuring machine. Compared to the morphological filter with the uniform sample angle, the accuracy of the roundness measurement can be increased by approximately 0.09 μm using the morphological filter with a non-uniform sample angle based on the four-parameter roundness measurement model, when eccentricity is above 16 μm, probe offset is approximately 1000 μm, tilt error is approximately 1″, the probe tip head radius is 1 mm and the cylindrical component radius is approximately 37 mm. The accuracy and reliability of roundness measurements are improved by using the proposed method for cylindrical components with a small radius, especially if the eccentricity and probe offset are large, and the tilt error and probe tip head radius are small. The proposed morphological filter method can be used for precision and ultra-precision roundness measurements, especially for functional assessments of roundness profiles.

  7. Associations between body morphology, mating success and mate preferences among Slovak males and females.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol; Fedor, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human body morphology is thought to be correlated with sexual behaviour and sociosexuality (defined as an increased willingness to engage in sex without commitment) influences the perception of certain cues of physical attractiveness. Based on a sample of Slovak university students, we investigated relationships between 1) male and female mating success and reported body morphology (body mass index, BMI and waist-to-hip ratio, WHR) and 2) mate preference characteristics and mating success. Both males and females reported a similar number of long-term sexual partners and frequency of engaging in extra-pair copulation (EPC). The mating success of both sexes was positively mediated by self-perceived attractiveness. However, female BMI was inversely associated with mating success whereas increasing BMI was positively associated with male mating success (the total number of lifetime sexual partners) as well as with the likelihood of engaging in EPC. Unrestricted sociosexuality positively correlated with direct and indirect benefits from mating and negatively with the religious/political background of a potential mate and with the desire for a home/ children. These results confirm the hypothesis that human body morphology is associated with sexual behaviour and that cues of direct/indirect benefits in a potential mate positively correlate with sociosexuality.

  8. Cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Lemos, Jose P. S.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the existence of static, cylindrically symmetric wormholes does not require violation of the weak or null energy conditions near the throat, and cylindrically symmetric wormhole geometries can appear with less exotic sources than wormholes whose throats have a spherical topology. Examples of exact wormhole solutions are given with scalar, spinor and electromagnetic fields as sources, and these fields are not necessarily phantom. In particular, there are wormhole solutions for a massless, minimally coupled scalar field in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, and for an azimuthal Maxwell electromagnetic field. All these solutions are not asymptotically flat. A no-go theorem is proved, according to which a flat (or string) asymptotic behavior on both sides of a cylindrical wormhole throat is impossible if the energy density of matter is everywhere nonnegative.

  9. Numerical study into the morphology and formation mechanisms of three-dimensional particle structures in vibrated cylindrical cavities with various heating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    The present analysis extends the author's earlier work [Lappa, Phys. Fluids 26, 093301 (2014), 10.1063/1.4893078] on the properties of patterns formed by the spontaneous accumulation and ordering of solid particles in certain types of flow. It is shown that under certain conditions, when subjected to vibrations to induce natural flow, nonisothermal fluids with dispersed solid particles are characterized by intervals of solid-pattern-forming behavior due to particle rearrangements preceded by intervals in which no recognizable structures of solid matter can be detected. The dynamics of these systems are highly nonlinear in nature. Because this family of particle attractors is known to exhibit strong sensitivity to the symmetry properties of the considered vibrated system and related geometrical constraints, the present study attempts to clarify the related dynamics in a geometry with curved walls (cylindrical enclosure). In particular, by assuming vibrations always directed perpendicularly to the imposed temperature gradient, we show that the morphology, spatial extension (percentage of physical volume occupied), separation (spatial distance), and mechanisms responsible for the formation of the resulting particle structures change significantly according to whether the temperature gradient is parallel or perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the cylinder. This indicates that the physics is not invariant with respect to 90° rotations in space of the specific forcing considered (direction of the imposed temperature gradient and associated perpendicular vibrations). Additional insights into the problem are obtained by assessing separately the influence played by the time-averaged (mean) and oscillatory effects. According to the numerical results, the intriguing diversity of particle agglomerates results from the different role or importance played by (curved or straight) boundaries in constraining particles and from the different structure and topology of the

  10. Incompatibility and preferred morphology in the self-accommodation microstructure of β-titanium shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, T.; Hosoda, H.; Miyazaki, S.

    2013-02-01

    The frequency distribution of habit plane variant (HPV) clusters and the deviation from twin orientation relationships (ORs) at the junction plane (JP) are investigated by transmission electron microscopy together with theoretical evaluation of the kinematic compatibility (KC) at the JP in a β-titanium shape memory alloy. Even though there are more than 10 types of possible HPV clusters, only three types are formed. V-shaped couplings of HPVs by {111} type I twins (VI: 49%) and by ⟨211⟩ type II twins (VII: 42%) are the predominant types. A triangular morphology due to coupling of {111} type I twins is observed with a frequency of only 9%. These preferred morphologies are well explained by the degree of incompatibility (the rotation necessary for compatible connection of HPVs). The exact twin OR and KC are maintained at the JP in a VI cluster instead of KC at the habit plane (HP), whereas the JP in a VII cluster is incompatible and the ⟨211⟩ type II twin OR shows slight deviation at the JP by about 0.4°. The competition between KC at the JP and KC at the HP (invariant plane) is responsible for the frequency distribution of HPV clusters and the character of the interfaces in the self-accommodation microstructure.

  11. Controllable growth of conical and cylindrical TiO2-carbon core-shell nanofiber arrays and morphologically dependent electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongsheng; Hu, Liangsheng; Huo, Kaifu; Fu, Jijiang; Ni, Hongwei; Tang, Yan; Chu, Paul K

    2011-12-16

    Quasi-aligned cylindrical and conical core-shell nanofibers consisting of carbon shells and TiO(2) nanowire cores are produced in situ on Ti foils without using a foreign metallic catalyst and template. A cylindrical nanofiber has a TiO(2) nanowire core 30-50 nm in diameter and a 5-10 nm-thick cylindrical carbon shell, while in the conical nanostructure the TiO(2) nanowire core has a diameter of 20-40 nm and the thickness of the carbon shell varies from about 200 nm at the bottom to about 5 nm at the tip. Electrochemical analysis reveals well-defined redox peaks of the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox couple and heterogeneous charge-transfer rate constants of 0.010 and 0.062 cm  s(-1) for the cylindrical and conical nanofibers, respectively. The coverage of exposed edge planes on the cylindrical and conical carbon shells is estimated to be 2.5 and 15.5 % respectively. The more abundant exposed edge planes on the conical nanofiber decrease the overpotential and increase the voltammetric resolution during electrochemical detection of uric acid and ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that the density of edge-plane sites estimated from Raman scattering is not necessarily equal to the density of exposed edge-plane sites, and only carbon electrodes with a large density of exposed edge planes or free graphene sheet ends exhibit better electrochemical performance.

  12. Cylindrical Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Thomas E.

    1999-04-29

    The CS system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The Cylindrical Scanner moves a vertical transceiver array rapidly around a person standing stationary. The software can be segmented in to three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 10 to 12 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task automatically reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP boards. The third task displays the resulting images, as they become available, to the computer screen for user review and analysis.

  13. Arecoline Alters Taste Bud Cell Morphology, Reduces Body Weight, and Induces Behavioral Preference Changes in Gustatory Discrimination in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Hau; Chau, Yat-Pang; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Kung, Hsiu-Ni

    2016-01-01

    Arecoline, a major alkaloid in areca nuts, is involved in the pathogenesis of oral diseases. Mammalian taste buds are the structural unit for detecting taste stimuli in the oral cavity. The effects of arecoline on taste bud morphology are poorly understood. Arecoline was injected intraperitoneally (IP) into C57BL/6 mice twice daily for 1-4 weeks. After arecoline treatment, the vallate papillae were processed for electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry analysis of taste receptor proteins (T1R2, T1R3, T1R1, and T2R) and taste associated proteins (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, and SNAP25). Body weight, food intake and water consumption were recorded. A 2-bottle preference test was also performed. The results demonstrated that 1) arecoline treatment didn't change the number and size of the taste buds or taste bud cells, 2) electron microscopy revealed the change of organelles and the accumulation of autophagosomes in type II cells, 3) immunohistochemistry demonstrated a decrease of taste receptor T1R2- and T1R3-expressing cells, 4) the body weight and food intake were markedly reduced, and 5) the sweet preference behavior was reduced. We concluded that the long-term injection of arecoline alters the morphology of type II taste bud cells, retards the growth of mice, and affects discrimination competencies for sweet tastants.

  14. Leaf Morphological Characters Can Be a Factor for Intra-Varietal Preference of Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) among Eggplant Varieties.

    PubMed

    Hasanuzzaman, Abu Tayeb Mohammad; Islam, Md Nazrul; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chen-Yang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) MEAM1, is considered a serious pest of horticultural and many other crops. While eggplant (Solanum melongena) is one of the most favored host plants, the whiteflies exhibit preferences among different varieties. We hypothesized that certain morphological leaf characteristics of different varieties, like leaf trichome density, trichome length, leaf lamina thickness and leaf color, may affect whitefly landing, feeding and oviposition. In this study, we investigated the variation in leaf morphological characters among selected eggplant varieties and evaluated the effect of these leaf characteristics in rendering eggplant varieties either susceptible or resistant to B. tabaci. We evaluated eight eggplant varieties in choice feeding tests, and we found that the varieties JinSheng Zilongchangqie (JSZ) and H149 were the highly preferred varieties with the highest numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. Significantly lower numbers of whitefly adult eggs were found on the resistant variety Tuo Lu Bamu (TLB). The varieties JinGuangbo Luqie (JGL), JinGuangbo Ziquanqie (JGZ), DaYang Ziguanqie (DYZ), QinXing Ziguanqie (QXZ), and QinXing Niuxinqie (QXN) were moderately favored by B. tabaci. Leaf trichome density, trichome length and leaf lamina thickness were positively correlated with numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. B. tabaci was less attracted to the leaves that reflect long and middle wavelength light (higher R and G values) than to the bright green leaves (medium G value), but the short wavelength light (higher B value) had no significant effect on whitefly preference. The degree of hue had a positive effect, and saturation and brightness had a negative effect on whitefly attraction.

  15. Leaf Morphological Characters Can Be a Factor for Intra-Varietal Preference of Whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) among Eggplant Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Chen-Yang; Liu, Tong-Xian

    2016-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) MEAM1, is considered a serious pest of horticultural and many other crops. While eggplant (Solanum melongena) is one of the most favored host plants, the whiteflies exhibit preferences among different varieties. We hypothesized that certain morphological leaf characteristics of different varieties, like leaf trichome density, trichome length, leaf lamina thickness and leaf color, may affect whitefly landing, feeding and oviposition. In this study, we investigated the variation in leaf morphological characters among selected eggplant varieties and evaluated the effect of these leaf characteristics in rendering eggplant varieties either susceptible or resistant to B. tabaci. We evaluated eight eggplant varieties in choice feeding tests, and we found that the varieties JinSheng Zilongchangqie (JSZ) and H149 were the highly preferred varieties with the highest numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. Significantly lower numbers of whitefly adult eggs were found on the resistant variety Tuo Lu Bamu (TLB). The varieties JinGuangbo Luqie (JGL), JinGuangbo Ziquanqie (JGZ), DaYang Ziguanqie (DYZ), QinXing Ziguanqie (QXZ), and QinXing Niuxinqie (QXN) were moderately favored by B. tabaci. Leaf trichome density, trichome length and leaf lamina thickness were positively correlated with numbers of whitefly adults and eggs. B. tabaci was less attracted to the leaves that reflect long and middle wavelength light (higher R and G values) than to the bright green leaves (medium G value), but the short wavelength light (higher B value) had no significant effect on whitefly preference. The degree of hue had a positive effect, and saturation and brightness had a negative effect on whitefly attraction. PMID:27081849

  16. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  17. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  18. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  19. Cylindrically symmetric wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2005-05-15

    This paper discusses traversable wormholes that differ slightly but significantly from those of the Morris-Thorne type under the assumption of cylindrical symmetry. The throat is a piecewise smooth cylindrical surface resulting in a shape function that is not differentiable at some value. It is proposed that the regular derivative be replaced by a one-sided derivative at this value. The resulting wormhole geometry satisfies the weak energy condition.

  20. Morphological features of the tongue and laryngeal entrance in two predatory birds with similar feeding preferences: common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) and Hume's tawny owl (Strix butleri).

    PubMed

    Abumandour, Mohamed M A; El-Bakary, Neveen E R

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this investigation was to describe the morphological characters of the tongue of two predatory birds with similar feeding preferences, i.e. the common kestrel and Hume's tawny owl. Descriptive information on the lingual morphology of these two birds, particularly Hume's tawny owl, is incomplete. We found that the lingual apex of the owl has an oval, concave, shovel-like form with a bifid lingual tip, while that of the kestrel has the shape of a horny tip-like spoon with a central process in addition to there being several filiform-like papillae on the dorsal surface of the apex and body. In the owl, the dorsal surface of the apex and body is subdivided into four U-shaped regions: lingual tip, two lateral regions and a median region. The two lateral regions are characterized by the presence of papillae and several openings of lingual glands, while the median region carries filiform-like papillae. In both birds, the papillary crest is located between the body and root. In the kestrel, there is an additional row of papillae rostral to crest, while in the owl there is a rostral lateral extension of papillae on the lateral lingual surface so the distribution pattern has a W-shape. In the kestrel, the posterior part of lingual body has several openings of glands, while the root lacks glands completely, although it has many taste buds. In the owl, the lingual root is folded and has a large number of gland openings. In the kestrel caudally to the glottis, there are two paramedian transverse rows of pharyngeal papillae with a pair of median huge papillae, while in the owl, there is only one transverse row of papillae. The dorsal and ventral lingual surfaces of both birds are lined with non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium.

  1. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  2. Differentiation between cooking bananas and dessert bananas. 1. Morphological and compositional characterization of cultivated Colombian Musaceae (Musa sp.) in relation to consumer preferences.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Olivier; Dufour, Dominique; Giraldo, Andrés; Sánchez, Teresa; Reynes, Max; Pain, Jean-Pierre; González, Alonso; Fernández, Alejandro; Díaz, Alberto

    2009-09-09

    The morphological, physical, and chemical characteristics of 23 unripe cultivated varieties of Colombian Musaceae were assessed. Fresh pulp dry matter helped to discriminate the following consumption subgroups: FHIA dessert hybrids (hydes: 24.6%) < dessert bananas (des: 29.4%) < nonplantain cooking bananas (cook: 32.0%) < FHIA cooking hybrids (hycook: 34.2%) < plantains (pl: 41.1%). Banana flour starch content on dry basis (db) varied from 74.2 to 88.2% among the varieties, with: pl: 86.5% > cook and hycook: 84% > des: 81.9% > hydes: 79.7% (p preferences.

  3. Cylindrical Mixing Layer Model in Stellar Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Seung-Urn; Yu, Kyoung Hee

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a cylindrical mixing layer model of a stellar jet including cooling effect in order to understand an optical emission mechanism along collimated high velocity stellar jets associated with young stellar objects. The cylindrical results have been calculated to be the same as the 2D ones presented by Canto & Raga(1991) because the entrainment efficiency in our cylindrical model has been obtained to be the same value as the 2D model has given. We have discussed the morphological and physical characteristics of the mixing layers by the cooling effect. As the jet Mach number increases, the initial temperature of the mixing layer goes high because the kinetic energy of the jet partly converts to the thermal energy of the mixing layer. The initial cooling of the mixing layer is very severe, changing its outer boundary radius. A subsequent change becomes adiabatic. The number of the Mach disks in the stellar jet and the total radiative luminosity of the mixing layer, based on our cylindrical calculation, have quite agreed with the observation.

  4. Hilly Surroundings (cylindrical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 360-degree view of the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit was taken on the rover's 189th sol on Mars (July 15, 2004). It was assembled from images taken by the rover's navigation camera at a position referred to as Site 72, which is at the base of the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills.' The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  5. Static cylindrically symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjällborg, Mikael

    2007-05-01

    We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically symmetric Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.

  6. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  7. Cylindrical holographic radar camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1998-12-01

    A novel personnel surveillance system has been developed to rapidly obtain 360 degree, full-body images of humans for the detection and identification of concealed threats. Detectable threats include weapons fabricated with metal, plastic, and ceramic, as well as explosive solids and liquids. This new system uses a cylindrical mechanical scanner to move a seven-foot, 384 element, Ka band (26 - 30 GHz) array circumferentially around a person in four to seven seconds. Low power millimeter-waves, which are nonionizing and not harmful to humans, are employed because they readily penetrate clothing barriers and reflect from concealed threats. The reflected waves provide information that is reconstructed into 3-D cylindrical holographic images with high-speed, digital signal processing (DSP) boards. This system is capable of displaying in an animation format eight, sixteen, thirty-two or sixty-four image frames at various aspect angles around the person under surveillance. This new prototype surveillance system is operational and is presently under laboratory testing and evaluation.

  8. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  9. Cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2013-11-15

    Making use of the complex-source-point method in cylindrical coordinates, an exact solution representing a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam of arbitrary waist w(0) satisfying both the Helmholtz and Maxwell's equations is introduced. The Cartesian components of the electromagnetic field are derived stemming from different polarizations of the magnetic and electric vector potentials based on Maxwell's vectorial equations and Lorenz's gauge condition, without any approximations. Computations illustrate the theory for tightly focused and quasi-collimated cylindrical beams. The results are particularly useful in beam-forming design using high-aperture or collimated cylindrical laser beams in imaging microscopy, particle manipulation, optical tweezers, and the study of scattering, radiation forces, and torque on cylindrical structures.

  10. Morphology selection via geometric frustration in chiral filament bundles.

    PubMed

    Hall, Douglas M; Bruss, Isaac R; Barone, Justin R; Grason, Gregory M

    2016-07-01

    In assemblies, the geometric frustration of a locally preferred packing motif leads to anomalous behaviours, from self-limiting growth to defects in the ground state. Here, we demonstrate that geometric frustration selects the equilibrium morphology of cohesive bundles of chiral filaments, an assembly motif critical to a broad range of biological and synthetic nanomaterials. Frustration of inter-filament spacing leads to optimal shapes of self-twisting bundles that break the symmetries of packing and of the underlying inter-filament forces, paralleling a morphological instability in spherical two-dimensional crystals. Equilibrium bundle morphology is controlled by a parameter that characterizes the relative costs of filament bending and the straining of cohesive bonds between filaments. This parameter delineates the boundaries between stable, isotropic cylindrical bundles and anisotropic, twisted-tape bundles. We also show how the mechanical and interaction properties of constituent amyloid fibrils may be extracted from the mesoscale dimensions of the anisotropic bundles that they form.

  11. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  12. Exact solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells in cylindrical bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analytic elasticity solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells under cylindrical bending are presented. The material of the shell is assumed to be general cylindrically anisotropic. Based on the theory of cylindrical anisotropic elasticity, coupled governing partial differential equations are developed. The general expressions for the stresses and displacements in the laminated composite cylinders are discussed. The closed form solutions based on Classical Shell Theory (CST) and Donnell's (1933) theory are also derived for comparison purposes. Three examples illustrate the effect of radius-to-thickness ratio, coupling and stacking sequence. The results show that, in general, CST yields poor stress and displacement distributions for thick-section composite shells, but converges to the exact elasticity solution as the radius-to-thickness ratio increases. It is also shown that Donnell's theory significantly underestimates the stress and displacement response.

  13. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  14. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  15. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-01

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke’s discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  16. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 μA and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices.

  17. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fi

    2007-07-24

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation. __________________________________________________

  18. Optimization of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Artem Smirnov, Erik Granstedt, and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2007-11-27

    The cylindrical Hall thruster features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, and ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel with performance comparable with the state-of-the-art annular Hall thrusters. These characteristics were demonstrated in low and medium power ranges. Optimization of miniaturized cylindrical thrusters led to performance improvements in the 50-200W input power range, including plume narrowing, increased thruster efficiency, reliable discharge initiation, and stable operation.

  19. Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.C. )

    1994-09-01

    Electron diffraction intensities from cylindrical objects can be conveniently analyzed using Bessel functions. Analytic formulas and geometry of the diffraction patterns from cylindrical carbon nanotubes are presented in general forms in terms of structural parameters, such as the pitch angle and the radius of a tubule. As an example the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a graphitic tubule of structure [18,2] has been simulated to illustrate the characteristics of such diffraction patterns. The validity of the projection approximation is also discussed.

  20. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  1. Sexual Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, Washington, DC.

    This document considers sexual preference as it specifically relates to women. Divided into two parts, the document presents a fact sheet about lesbianism and contains a workshop resource guide on sexual preference. The fact sheet, arranged in a question-answer format, focuses on the following concerns: (1) lesbianism as a woman's issue; (2) legal…

  2. Generalized offset surfaces of cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi Hristov

    2016-12-01

    Cylindrical surfaces play an important role in geometric modeling and architecture. In this paper, we describe a way for constructing a new cylindrical surface from a given cylindrical surface. Our approach is based on the differential geometry of cylindrical surfaces and a generalization of the notion of offset surface. We examine the case of a similarity offset of an arbitrary cylindrical surface which is closely related to direct similarities of Euclidean 3-space. Some illustrative examples are included.

  3. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  4. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  5. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…

  6. Blast waves from cylindrical charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knock, C.; Davies, N.

    2013-07-01

    Comparisons of explosives are often carried out using TNT equivalency which is based on data for spherical charges, despite the fact that many explosive charges are not spherical in shape, but cylindrical. Previous work has shown that it is possible to predict the over pressure and impulse from the curved surface of cylindrical charges using simple empirical formulae for the case when the length-to-diameter ( L/ D) ratio is greater or equal to 2/1. In this paper, by examining data for all length-to-diameter ratios, it is shown that it is possible to predict the peak over pressure, P, for any length-to-diameter ratio from the curved side of a bare cylindrical charge of explosive using the equation P=K_PM(L/D)^{1/3}/R^3, where M is the mass of explosive, R the distance from the charge and K_P is an explosive-dependent constant. Further out where the cylindrical blast wave `heals' into a spherical one, the more complex equation P=C_1(Z^' ' })^{-3}+C_2(Z^' ' })^{-2}+C_3(Z^' ' })^{-1} gives a better fit to experimental data, where Z^' ' } = M^{1/3}(L/D)^{1/9}/D and C_1, C_2 and C_3 are explosive-dependent constants. The impulse is found to be independent of the L/ D ratio.

  7. Plastic buckling of cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Eckert, H.

    1994-05-01

    Cylindrical shells exhibit buckling under axial loads at stresses much less than the respective theoretical critical stresses. This is due primarily to the presence of geometrical imperfections even through such imperfections could be very small (e.g., comparable to thickness). Under internal pressure, the shell regains some of its buckling strength. For a relatively large radius-to-tickness ratio and low internal pressure, the effect can be reasonably estimated by an elastic analysis. However, for low radius-to-thickness ratios and greater pressures, the elastic-plastic collapse controls the failure load. In order to quantify the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of cylindrical shells, an analysis program was carried out by use of the computer code BOSOR5 developed by Bushnell of Lockheed Missiles and Space company. The analysis was performed for various radius-to- thickness ratios and imperfection amplitudes. The analysis results are presented in this paper.

  8. GRIPPING DEVICE FOR CYLINDRICAL OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Pilger, J.P.

    1964-01-21

    A gripping device is designed for fragile cylindrical objects such as for drawing thin-walled tubes. The gripping is done by multiple jaw members held in position by two sets of slots, one defined by keystone-shaped extensions of the outer shell of the device and the other in a movable sleeve held slidably by the extensions. Forward movement oi the sleeve advances the jaws, thereby exerting a controlled, radial pressure on the object being gripped. (AEC)

  9. Bremsstrahlung from cylindrical beta sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. W.; Silverman, J.

    1972-01-01

    Refined experimental measurements of the bremsstrahlung number and energy fluxes from thick cylindrical sources of several nuclides are presented, dose rates calculated from experimental energy fluxes are compared with theoretical results based on Wyard's thick-target approximation, and experiments are correlated with both thick- and thin-target bremsstrahlung theory to obtain accurate values of bremsstrahlung yields. The data presented should prove useful for the design of radioisotope power supplies, particularly those used in spacecraft and in biological applications.

  10. Solutions of the cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Ding, Chunling; Lü, Xin-You; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical nonlinear optics is a burgeoning research area which describes cylindrical electromagnetic wave propagation in nonlinear media. Finding new exact solutions for different types of nonlinearity and inhomogeneity to describe cylindrical electromagnetic wave propagation is of great interest and meaningful for theory and application. This paper gives exact solutions for the cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations and presents an interesting connection between the exact solutions for different cylindrical nonlinear Maxwell equations. We also provide some examples and discussion to show the application of the results we obtained. Our results provide the basis for solving complex systems of nonlinearity and inhomogeneity with simple systems.

  11. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  12. Sympatric speciation: perfume preferences of orchid bee lineages.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Duncan E

    2008-12-09

    Female attraction to an environmentally derived mating signal released by male orchid bees may be tightly linked to shared olfactory preferences of both sexes. A change in perfume preference may have led to divergence of two morphologically distinct lineages.

  13. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects.

  14. Chiral structures from achiral liquid crystals in cylindrical capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Kang, Louis; Davidson, Zoey S.; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry-broken configurations of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) confined to cylindrical capillaries with homeotropic anchoring on the cylinder walls (i.e., perpendicular surface alignment). Interestingly, achiral nematic LCs with comparatively small twist elastic moduli relieve bend and splay deformations by introducing twist deformations. In the resulting twisted and escaped radial (TER) configuration, LC directors are parallel to the cylindrical axis near the center, but to attain radial orientation near the capillary wall, they escape along the radius through bend and twist distortions. Chiral symmetry-breaking experiments in polymer-coated capillaries are carried out using Sunset Yellow FCF, a lyotropic chromonic LC with a small twist elastic constant. Its director configurations are investigated by polarized optical microscopy and explained theoretically with numerical calculations. A rich phenomenology of defects also arises from the degenerate bend/twist deformations of the TER configuration, including a nonsingular domain wall separating domains of opposite twist handedness but the same escape direction and singular point defects (hedgehogs) separating domains of opposite escape direction. We show the energetic preference for singular defects separating domains of opposite twist handedness compared with those of the same handedness, and we report remarkable chiral configurations with a double helix of disclination lines along the cylindrical axis. These findings show archetypally how simple boundary conditions and elastic anisotropy of confined materials lead to multiple symmetry breaking and how these broken symmetries combine to create a variety of defects. PMID:25825733

  15. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  16. Evaluation of transmitting performance of cylindrical polycapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, Lin; Yude, Li; Guotai, Tan; Tianxi, Sun

    2007-03-01

    Based on a detailed ray-tracing code for capillary optics, a MATLAB program for the simulation of X-ray transmission in a cylindrical polycapillary is described. The simulated and experimental results for the spatial distributions and power density gain of the X-rays in the beam guided through a cylindrical polycapillary are in good agreement, and the results show that the spatial distribution of the X-rays in the beam guided through a cylindrical polycapillary is uneven.

  17. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  18. Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Varun

    2014-08-01

    I utilize effective field theory(EFT) techniques to calculate the Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear in the presence of a polarizable but neutral object and present results for the energy and torque as a function of angle for a gear with multiple cogs, as well as for the case of a concentric cylindrical gear.

  19. Thin cylindrical sheets of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur; Beilharz, Daniel; Guyon, Axel; Li, Er Qiang; Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2014-11-01

    Drops impacting at low velocities onto a pool surface can stretch out thin hemispheric sheets of air. These air sheets can remain intact until they reach submicron thicknesses, whereby they rupture to form myriad of microbubbles. By impacting a higher-viscosity drop onto a lower-viscosity pool, we have explored new geometries of such air films. In this way we are able to maintain stable air-layers which can wrap around the entire drop to form anti-bubbles, i.e. spherical air layers bounded by inner and outer liquid masses. Furthermore, for the most viscous drops they enter the pool trailing a viscous thread from the pinch-off from the nozzle. The air sheet can also wrap around these treads and remain stable over extended time to form a cylindrical air sheet. We study the parameter regime where these structures appear and their subsequent breakup. The stability of these air cylinders is inconsistent with inviscid stability theory, suggesting stabilization by lubrication forces within the submicron air layer.

  20. Radially sandwiched cylindrical piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yong; Hu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A new type of radially sandwiched piezoelectric short cylindrical transducer is developed and its radial vibration is studied. The transducer is composed of a solid metal disk, a radially polarized piezoelectric ceramic short tube and a metal tube. The radial vibrations of the solid metal disk, the radially polarized piezoelectric tube and the metal tube are analyzed and their electromechanical equivalent circuits are introduced. Based on the mechanical boundary conditions among the metal disk, the piezoelectric tube and the metal tube, a three-port electromechanical equivalent circuit for the radially sandwiched transducer is obtained and the frequency equation is given. The theoretical relationship of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient with the geometrical dimensions is analyzed. The radial vibration of the sandwiched transducer is simulated by using two different numerical methods. It is shown that the analytical resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results. The transducer is expected to be used in piezoelectric resonators, actuators and ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic and underwater sound applications.

  1. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  2. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  3. Damage experiments in cylindrical geometry update

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Anne; Holtkamp, David; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    Using a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Previous experiments provided data about failure initiation in aluminum in a cylindrical geometry and the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime. The current series of experiments studied the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. Results from the current experiments will be presented.

  4. Object recognition using cylindrical harmonic filter.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Bermúdez, Jáder

    2004-06-28

    We present the cylindrical harmonic filter for three-dimensional (3D) discrete correlation between range data. The filter guarantees invariance of the correlation peak intensity under target rotation around z-axis. It can be considered a harmonic decomposition, in cylindrical coordinates, of the 3D Fourier spectrum of the target. Some simulation results confirm the in-plane rotation invariance and the discrimination of the filter.

  5. View factors of cylindrical spiral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Solovjov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    Analytical expressions are presented for the view factors (radiative configuration factors) associated with the flat right cylindrical spiral surface. Such cylindrical spiral systems are widely applied as electrical resistance heating elements for lighting devices, electronic radio tubes, high-speed gas flow heaters, and other appliances used for scientific, industrial and domestic purposes. Derivation of the view factors is based on the invariant principles and the results presented in Lebedev (2000, 2003,1988) [1-3].

  6. Cylindrical Antenna Using Near Zero Index Metamaterial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-24

    device for enhancing the directivity and port isolation of a dual-frequency dual- polarization (DFDP) microstrip antenna by using metamaterial... Directivity Microstrip Patch Antenna Based on Zero-Index Metamaterial," IEEE Antennas and Wireless Prop. Letters, vol.8, no., pp.538-541, 2009. [0008...Invention [0003] The present invention is generally directed towards a cylindrical antenna and more specifically directed towards a cylindrical

  7. Spontaneous transition from flat to cylindrical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Frycz, P.; Infeld, E. )

    1989-07-24

    Flat, cylindrical, and spherical soliton solutions to various model equations are known. Many of these exact solutions have been seen in numerical simulations. However, there are few simulations that actually show that exact flat solitons can break up into an array of exact cylindrical or spherical solitons and follow this on a step by step basis. This Letter presents the first of these two kinds of transition for the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation governing ion acoustic solitons in strongly magnetized plasmas.

  8. Simulating flow and segregation of cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongzhi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and accurate simulation of cylindrical particles using discrete element method (DEM) is a challenge. Typical approaches to simulating cylindrical particle systems are based on the glued spheres method, which has low accuracy, or real shape models, which have high computational cost. In this work we utilize super-ellipsoids, which belong to super-quadrics, to model cylindrical particles in DEM simulations. Simulations of a single cylinder impacting a flat wall indicate that super-ellipsoids provide the same accuracy as real shape models and much better accuracy than the glued sphere method. Simulations of super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles in rotating tumblers result in nearly the same angle of repose as experiments and real shape simulations, demonstrating the accuracy of super-ellipsoid DEM simulations for multi-particle systems. The segregation of bidisperse cylindrical particles differing in length in a bounded heap was simulated by super-ellipsoid DEM, and the results are similar to the experiment. In spite of these advantages of using super-ellipsoid cylindrical particles, simulations of filling a box with particles indicate that the simulation times for super-ellipsoid cylinders is about an order of magnitude longer than that for the same number of spherical particles.

  9. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to…

  10. Kinetic assembly of block copolymers in solution helical cylindrical micelles and patchy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Sheng

    uniform structural parameters, including the width of the micelles, width of the helix, and the pitch distance. There is no preference to the handedness, and both handednesses are observed, which is understandable since there are no chiral molecules or specific binding effects applied during the assembly. The helical structure is a product of kinetic process. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy has been employed to monitor the morphological transformation. The study indicates there are two complicated but reproducible kinetic pathways to form the helices. One pathway involves the stacks of bended cylinders at early stages and the subsequent interconnection of these bended cylinders. Spherical micelles bud off of the interconnected nanostructure as the final step towards a defect-free helix. Another kinetic pathway shows very short helices are formed at first and aligned via head-to-tail style in the solution, and the subsequent sequential addition of these short helices results in prolonged mature helices. By using a ninhydrin-staining technique, amine molecules within the micellar corona are visualized and confirmed to preferentially locate in the inner side of the helical turns. The aggregation of amine molecules provides a strong attraction force due to electrostatic association between oppositely charged amine and acid groups and accumulation of hydrogen bonding among amine molecules to coil the cylindrical micelles into helical twisting features which are stabilized by the repulsion forces due to the chain packing frustration within the hydrophobic core, steric hindrance of amine molecules as well as the Coulomb repulsion of the excess charged amine groups. The formation mechanism of the helix offers the feasibility to manipulate the helical pitch distance and formation kinetics. The helical pitch distance can be enlarged or shrunk by varying the type and amount of amine molecules used in assembly, introducing inorganic salts, and changing pH. Luckily, the

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of converging cylindrical shock waves propagating in narrow cylindrical chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, Gley

    1992-09-01

    The propagation and stability of converging cylindrical shocks produced in an annular shock tube equipped with a three increment area contraction were investigated for various cylindrical chamber widths and two annular shock Mach numbers of 1.26 and 1.44. The method of characteristics, integrated using the Hartree scheme, was employed to determine the shock Mach number and pressure-time variations in the cylindrical chamber. These numerical values were verified experimentally by employing a set of piezoelectric pressure transducers placed at five different locations. In narrow cylindrical chambers, a new test section was used to determine the boundary layer effect on the shock strength. For a cylindrical chamber width of 2.5 mm, experimental results were found to be in excellent agreement with the inviscid numerical solution. For smaller widths, an empirical equation of the shock Mach number variation was developed. Stability of the converging shocks was examined from the series of spark shadowgraphs taken near the geometric center.

  12. The Dizzying Depths of the Cylindrical Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWeerd, Alan J.; Hill, S. Eric

    2005-02-01

    A typical introduction to geometrical optics treats plane and spherical mirrors. At first glance, it may be surprising that texts seldom mention the cylindrical mirror, except for the occasional reference to use in fun houses and to viewing anamorphic art.1,2 However, even a cursory treatment reveals its complexity. Holzberlein used an extended object to qualitatively illustrate that images are produced both before and behind a concave cylindrical mirror.3 He also speculated on how this extreme astigmatism results in an observer's dizziness. By considering a simple point object, we make a more detailed analysis of the cylindrical mirror and the dizziness it induces. First, we illustrate how rays from a point object reflect to form not one point image but two line images. Next, we describe how an observer perceives a likeness of the object. Finally, we suggest how confusing depth cues induce dizziness. Although we focus on the concave cylindrical mirror, the discussion is easy to generalize to the convex cylindrical mirror.

  13. Solid particle impingement erosion characteristics of cylindrical surfaces, pre-existing holes and slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion characteristics of aluminum cylinders sand-blasted with both spherical and angular erodent particles were studied and compared with results from previously studied flat surfaces. The cylindrical results are discussed with respect to impact conditions. The relationship between erosion rate and pit morphology (width, depth, and width to depth ratio) is established. The aspects of (1) erosion rate versus time curves on cylindrical surfaces; (2) long-term exposures; and (3) erosion rate versus time curves with spherical and angular particles are presented. The erosion morphology and characteristics of aluminum surfaces with pre-existing circular cylindrical and conical holes of different sizes were examined using weight loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, a profilometer, and a depth gage. The morphological features (radial and concentric rings) are discussed with reference to flat surfaces, and the erosion features with spherical microglass beads. The similarities and differences of erosion and morphological features are highlighted. The erosion versus time curves of various shapes of holes are discussed and are compared with those of a flat surface. The erosion process at slits is considered.

  14. Current pulse effects on cylindrical damage experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M; Rousculp, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    A series of joint experiments between LANL and VNIIEF use a VNIIEF-designed helical generator to provide currents for driving a LANL-designed cylindrical spallation experimental load. Under proper driving conditions, a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material. In addition, the damaged material is able to come to a complete stop due to its strength, avoiding application of further forces. Thus far, experiments have provided data about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and behavior of material recollected after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will focus on the effects of tailoring the driving current pulse to obtain the desired data.

  15. Beamtracking in cylindrical and cartesian coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Schillinger, B.; Weiland, T.

    1997-02-01

    For the design of devices with circular optical axes, e.g. bending magnets or spectrometers, the use of cylindrical coordinates for field calculations could be favourable. Additionally, in case of applications like bending systems with nonorthogonal entry and exit faces, the coupling of cylindrical and cartesian coordinates improves the simulation of fringe fields. In this context we have implemented a consistent coupling between the two coordinate systems and have extended the tracking code of the electromagnetic simulator MAFIA to cylindrical coordinates. This extensions could be of interest for the calculation of transfer maps of ionoptical devices using the tracked particle orbit as reference trajectory and including fringe field effects in a more general manner. We will give a short introduction to the extensions and show some examples for bending systems with nonorthogonal entries.

  16. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Reichert, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing.

  17. Laser diode assembly including a cylindrical lens

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. 11 figs.

  18. Cylindrical polarization symmetry for nondestructive nanocharacterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Qiwen

    2003-07-01

    Recently there is an increasing interest in laser beams with radial symmetry in polarization. Due to the cylindrical symmetry in polarization, these beams have unique focusing properties, which may find wide applications in a variety of nanometer scale applications, including high-resolution metrology, high-density data storage, and multi-functional optical microtool. In this paper, simple method of generating cylindrically polarized beams is presented and their potential applications to nondestructive nano-characterization are discussed. A high resolution surface plasmon microscope and a surface plasmon enhanced apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope are proposed. An automatic scanning microellipsometer that uses the cylindrical symmetry to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio in high-spatial-resolution ellipsometric measurement will also be presented.

  19. Thermomechanical fracture on pressurized cylindrical vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Robert D. Y.; Chiu, Kwong S.; Beraun, Jorge E.; Chen, Jinn Kuen

    1998-09-01

    This work studies the rapid fracture developed on the surface of a pressurized cylindrical vessel when heated by an intensified energy source. The primary concerns are the interactions between the rapid thermal expansion and the internal pressure that exerts on the interior surface. From a mechanical point of view, the thermal loading tends to develop a crack along the circumferential direction of the cylindrical vessel. The excessive internal pressure established within the cylindrical vessel, on the other hand, tends to develop a crack in the axial direction. Combination of the two mechanisms results in a capricious pattern of rapid fracture that needs to be fully understood in thermal processing. Special features in this work include the dynamics plasticity induced by the combined thermomechanical loading at short times, as well as the temperature-dependent thermomechanical properties that evolve in the load-time history.

  20. Dewetting processes in a cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Callegari, G; Calvo, A; Hulin, J P

    2005-03-01

    Dewetting of liquid films of water-glycerol solutions of different viscosities has been studied experimentally in PVC cylindrical tubes. In contrast with plane surfaces, the dewetting capillary number Ca(vd) increases with the film thickness ho over a large part of the experimental range and follows a same global trend independent of viscosity as a function of ho. This increase is only partly explained by variations of the capillary driving force predicted in a recent theoretical work for a cylindrical geometry. An additional explanation is suggested, based on different spatial distributions of the viscous dissipation in the dewetting bump in the planar and cylindrical geometries. This mechanism is investigated for films of different thicknesses in a numerical model assuming a polynomial variation of the liquid thickness with distance in the bump region.

  1. Design of tunable cylindrical dielectric nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Inder; Reena; Kalra, Yogita; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-09-01

    A tunable cylindrical all dielectric optical nanoantenna has been proposed. A silicon nanocylinder of radius 60 nm and height 150 nm has been considered. The azimuthally symmetric, complete forward scattering at first Kerker's condition and backward scattering with minimum forward scattering at second generalized Kerker's condition in near infra-red region has been observed for the proposed design which makes silicon nanocylinder a promising candidate for optical nanoantenna applications. The effect of the dimensions of the dielectric nanocylinder on the scattering properties of the cylindrical nanoantenna has been analyzed using finite element method. We have analyzed that the variation in diameter of nanocylinder has great influence on the strength of interference of electric and magnetic dipolar resonances. Further, we have observed tuning ability of the cylindrical nanoantenna with respect to the variation in its radius.

  2. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm.

  3. Cylindrical roller bearings with profiled contacting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creţu, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    An initial loading of cylindrical roller bearings in the elastic-plastic domain was performed to induce elastic shakedown phenomena able to change the basic profiles of both, rollers and raceways, which endorses a different value for the basic reference rating life. Fatigue life tests carried out on four lots of NJ206 cylindrical roller bearings revealed much higher values of L10 and Lm criteria for the bearings lots which experienced a suitable initial loading operation in the elastic-plastic domain. The reference rating lives, evaluated by using the lamina technique, confirmed the superiority of bearings lots which undergone an appropriate primary loading in the elastic-plastic domain.

  4. Measuring Children's Food Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Leann L.; Sullivan, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Measures of preference are useful predictors of children's food consumption patterns. The paper discusses children's affective response to food and describes the preference assessment procedure which obtains information on children's likes and dislikes. The methodology helps investigate factors influencing development of preferences and food…

  5. Cylindrical coordinate representation for multiband Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takhtamirov, Eduard

    2012-10-01

    Rotationally invariant combinations of the Brillouin zone-center Bloch functions are used as basis function to express in cylindrical coordinates the valence-band and Kane envelope-function Hamiltonians for wurtzite and zinc-blende semiconductor heterostructures. For cylindrically symmetric systems, this basis allows to treat the envelope functions as eigenstates of the operator of projection of total angular momentum on the symmetry axis, with the operator's eigenvalue conventionally entering the Hamiltonians as a parameter. Complementing the Hamiltonians with boundary conditions for the envelope functions on the symmetry axis, we present for the first time a complete formalism for efficient modeling and description of multiband electron states in low-dimensional semiconductor structures with cylindrical symmetry. To demonstrate the potency of the cylindrical symmetry approximation and establish a criterion of its applicability for actual structures, we map the ground and several excited valence-band states in an isolated wurtzite GaN quantum wire of a hexagonal cross-section to the states in an equivalent quantum wire of a circular cross-section.

  6. Cylindrical Induction Melter Modicon Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, G.E.

    1998-04-01

    In the last several years an extensive R{ampersand}D program has been underway to develop a vitrification system to stabilize Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm) inventories at SRS. This report documents the Modicon control system designed for the 3 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM).

  7. Distributed neural signals on parabolic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    Parabolic cylindrical shells are commonly used as key components in communication antennas, space telescopes, solar collectors, etc. This study focuses on distributed modal neural sensing signals on a flexible simply-supported parabolic cylindrical shell panel. The parabolic cylindrical shell is fully laminated with a piezoelectric layer on its outer surface and the piezoelectric layer is segmented into infinitesimal elements (neurons) to investigate the microscopic distributed neural sensing signals. Since the dominant vibration component of the shell is usually the transverse oscillation, a new transverse mode shape function is defined. Two shell cases, i.e., the ratio of the meridian height to the half span distance of a parabola at 1:4 (shallow) and 1:1 (deep), are studied to reveal the curvature effect to the neural sensing signals. Studies suggest that the membrane signal component dominates for lower natural modes and the bending signal component dominates for higher natural modes. The meridional membrane and bending signal components are mostly concentrated on the high-curvature areas, while the longitudinal bending component is mostly concentrated on the relatively flat areas. The concentration behavior becomes more prominent as the parabolic cylindrical shell deepens, primarily resulting from the enhanced membrane effect due to the increased curvature.

  8. Tamm plasmon polaritons in multilayered cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, C. E.; Anufriev, R.; Iorsh, I.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Abram, R. A.; Brand, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is shown that cylindrical Bragg reflector structures with either a metal core, a metal cladding, or both can support Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs) that can propagate axially along the interface between the metallic layer and the adjacent dielectric. A transfer matrix formalism for cylindrical multilayered structures is used in association with cavity phase matching considerations to design structures that support Tamm plasmon polaritons at specified frequencies, and to explore the field distributions and the dispersion relations of the excitations. The cylindrical TPPs can exist in both the TE and TM polarizations for the special cases of modes with either azimuthal isotropy or zero axial propagation constant and also as hybrid cylindrical modes when neither of those conditions applies. In the cases considered the TPPs have low effective masses and low group velocities. Also, when there is both metallic core and cladding, near degenerate modes localized at each metallic interface can couple to produce symmetric and antisymmetric combinations whose frequency difference is in the terahertz regime.

  9. Biomimetic surface structuring using cylindrical vector femtosecond laser beams.

    PubMed

    Skoulas, Evangelos; Manousaki, Alexandra; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-03-22

    We report on a new, single-step and scalable method to fabricate highly ordered, multi-directional and complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized by exploiting the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond (fs) laser beams. It is shown that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual- micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni upon line and large area scanning with radial and azimuthal polarization beams. Depending on the irradiation conditions, new complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark's skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus' leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser materials processing, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of applications.

  10. Biomimetic surface structuring using cylindrical vector femtosecond laser beams

    PubMed Central

    Skoulas, Evangelos; Manousaki, Alexandra; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new, single-step and scalable method to fabricate highly ordered, multi-directional and complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized by exploiting the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond (fs) laser beams. It is shown that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual- micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni upon line and large area scanning with radial and azimuthal polarization beams. Depending on the irradiation conditions, new complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark’s skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus’ leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser materials processing, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of applications. PMID:28327611

  11. Biomimetic surface structuring using cylindrical vector femtosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoulas, Evangelos; Manousaki, Alexandra; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-03-01

    We report on a new, single-step and scalable method to fabricate highly ordered, multi-directional and complex surface structures that mimic the unique morphological features of certain species found in nature. Biomimetic surface structuring was realized by exploiting the unique and versatile angular profile and the electric field symmetry of cylindrical vector (CV) femtosecond (fs) laser beams. It is shown that, highly controllable, periodic structures exhibiting sizes at nano-, micro- and dual- micro/nano scales can be directly written on Ni upon line and large area scanning with radial and azimuthal polarization beams. Depending on the irradiation conditions, new complex multi-directional nanostructures, inspired by the Shark’s skin morphology, as well as superhydrophobic dual-scale structures mimicking the Lotus’ leaf water repellent properties can be attained. It is concluded that the versatility and features variations of structures formed is by far superior to those obtained via laser processing with linearly polarized beams. More important, by exploiting the capabilities offered by fs CV fields, the present technique can be further extended to fabricate even more complex and unconventional structures. We believe that our approach provides a new concept in laser materials processing, which can be further exploited for expanding the breadth and novelty of applications.

  12. Cylindrically converging shock and detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, H.

    1983-07-01

    The non-self-similar implosion of cylindrical shock and detonation waves generated by an instantaneous energy release at a cylindrical wall is analyzed theoretically by the method of integral relations. The analysis shows that as the wave propagates towards the axis, the solutions tend to approach but never reach the self-similar implosion limit. The rate of approach appears to be slower than expected, and the region of applicability of the self-similar solution appears to be restricted to a very small region behind the front. This tendency is more pronounced for the detonation case. It is also demonstrated that for detonations where the initiation energy is negligible in comparison with the chemical energy, the Chapman-Jouguet detonation jump conditions apply at the front except near the axis and near the outer wall. The chemical heating in the detonation process increases the pressure and the temperature but considerably reduces the density near the front.

  13. Dynamic Buckling of Composite Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sai-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Considering the effect of stress wave, the dynamic buckling governing equations and boundary conditions of composite cylindrical shells under axial step load are derived based on the Hamilton principle. The expression of radial displacement function along the circumferential direction is assumed since the cylindrical shell is closed. The solutions of the governing equations are obtained by the state-space technique. The determinant of the coefficient matrix must be equal to zero if the linear equations have a non-trivial solution. The relationship between the critical load and length and the influences of boundary conditions, modes, etc. on critical load are obtained by programming with MATLAB software before and after the reflection of stress wave.

  14. Surface superconductivity in thin cylindrical Bi nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingliang; Wang, Jian; Ning, Wei; Mallouk, Thomas E; Chan, Moses H W

    2015-03-11

    The physical origin and the nature of superconductivity in nanostructured Bi remains puzzling. Here, we report transport measurements of individual cylindrical single-crystal Bi nanowires, 20 and 32 nm in diameter. In contrast to nonsuperconducting Bi nanoribbons with two flat surfaces, cylindrical Bi nanowires show superconductivity below 1.3 K. However, their superconducting critical magnetic fields decrease with their diameter, which is the opposite of the expected behavior for thin superconducting wires. Quasiperiodic oscillations of magnetoresistance were observed in perpendicular fields but were not seen in the parallel orientation. These results can be understood by a model of surface superconductivity with an enhanced surface-to-bulk volume in small diameter wires, where the superconductivity originates from the strained surface states of the nanowires due to the surface curvature-induced stress.

  15. Experimental study of cylindrical air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viitanen, M.; Lamminen, J.; Lampinen, M. J.

    1991-11-01

    The electrodes studied here are cylindrical and prepared to be placed inside the inner surface of a sintered brass tube, which is nickel-plated. Previously we have reported on the preparation of flat air electrodes and also on long run tests carried out with these electrodes. The electrode material was prepared by the so-called wet method to obtain a carbon dough which is easy to handle. The material preparation remains the same, but owing to the different geometrical shape, the preparation of the electrode itself is quite different. We have studied here the long-term performance of these new cylindrical air electrodes and at the same time measured the carbonate content of the electrolyte. We have also analyzed by comparative methods which property of the electrode lowers the performance after a fairly long period.

  16. Variable-focus cylindrical liquid lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wu-xiang; Liang, Dong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Chao; Zang, Shang-fei; Wang, Qiong-hua

    2013-06-01

    A variable-focus cylindrical liquid lens array based on two transparent liquids of different refractive index is demonstrated. An elastic membrane divides a transparent reservoir into two chambers. The two chambers are filled with liquid 1 and liquid 2, respectively, which are of different refractive index. The micro-clapboards help liquid 1, liquid 2 and the elastic membrane form a cylindrical lens array. Driving these two liquids to flow can change the shape of the elastic membrane as well as the focal length. In this design, the gravity effect of liquid can be overcome. A demo lens array of positive optical power is developed and tested. Moreover, a potential application of the proposed lens array for autostereoscopic 3D displays is emphasized.

  17. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  18. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  19. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-09-21

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  20. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  1. Machining Thin-Walled Cylindrical Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbak, Joe; Spagnolo, Jim; Kraus, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Cylindrical walls only few thousandths of inch thick machined accurately and without tears or punctures with aid of beryllium copper mandrel. Chilled so it contracts, then inserted in cylinder. As comes to room temperature, mandrel expands and fits snugly inside cylinder. Will not allow part to slide and provides solid backup to prevent deflection when part machined by grinding wheel. When machining finished, cylinder-and-mandrel assembly inserted in dry ice, mandrel contracts and removed from part.

  2. Aberrations of sphero-cylindrical ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Malacara, Z; Malacara, D

    1990-04-01

    The authors have presented in two previous articles the graphic solutions resembling Tscherning ellipses, for spherical as well as for aspherical ophthalmic lenses free of astigmatism or power error. These solutions were exact, inasmuch as they were based on exact ray tracing, and not third-order theory as frequently done. In this paper sphero-cylindrical lenses are now analyzed, also using exact ray tracing. The functional dependence of the astigmatism and the power error for these lenses is described extensively.

  3. Mixed FE analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arıbaş, Ü. N.; Omurtag, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes with circular and square cross section is investigated by using the mixed FEM based on Timoshenko beam theory. The Kelvin model is used for the viscoelastic behavior. The analysis is performed in the Laplace domain and the results are transformed back to time domain numerically by Modified Durbin algorithm. The outcome is quite satisfactory besides the necessary engineering precision.

  4. Order, topology and preference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sertel, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some standard order-related and topological notions, facts, and methods are brought to bear on central topics in the theory of preference and the theory of optimization. Consequences of connectivity are considered, especially from the viewpoint of normally preordered spaces. Examples are given showing how the theory of preference, or utility theory, can be applied to social analysis.

  5. Transformation from Globular to Cylindrical Mixed Micelles through Molecular Exchange that Induces Micelle Fusion.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Grethe V; Lund, Reidar; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2016-06-02

    Transformations between different micellar morphologies in solution induced by changes in composition, salt, or temperature are well-known phenomena; however, the understanding of the associated kinetic pathways is still limited. Especially for mixed surfactant systems, the micelles can take a very wide range of structures, depending on the surfactant packing parameter and other thermodynamic conditions. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in combination with fast mixing using a stopped-flow apparatus can give direct access to the structural kinetics on a millisecond time scale. Here, this approach is used to study the formation of cylindrical micelles after mixing two solutions with globular micelles of the nonionic surfactant dodecyl maltoside (DDM) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), respectively. Two separate processes were identified: (i) a transition in micellar shell structure, interpreted as exchange of surfactant molecules resulting in mixed globular micelles, and subsequently, (ii) fusion into larger, cylindrical structures.

  6. Preferred Orientation in Polymer Fiber Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, C.; Hsiao , B; Chu, B

    2010-01-01

    Fiber symmetry is one of the most important sample geometries encountered in both wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) of polymers, applicable both to natural polymers like collagen or cellulose and to many synthetic polymers that come in fiber form or otherwise exhibit cylindrical rotational symmetry. The structural information to be determined in scattering experiments from such fiber systems includes both the structure of the individual structural unit and qualitative and quantitative information about the preferred orientation state of the ensemble. Existing approaches and new developments to analyze fiber scattering patterns are rigorously reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the calculation of complete SAXS and WAXS fiber scattering patterns, and various practical examples including collagen and cellulose fibers as well as fibers based on copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene are discussed.

  7. Motion parallax in immersive cylindrical display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliard, N.; Reymond, G.; Kemeny, A.; Berthoz, A.

    2012-03-01

    Motion parallax is a crucial visual cue produced by translations of the observer for the perception of depth and selfmotion. Therefore, tracking the observer viewpoint has become inevitable in immersive virtual (VR) reality systems (cylindrical screens, CAVE, head mounted displays) used e.g. in automotive industry (style reviews, architecture design, ergonomics studies) or in scientific studies of visual perception. The perception of a stable and rigid world requires that this visual cue be coherent with other extra-retinal (e.g. vestibular, kinesthetic) cues signaling ego-motion. Although world stability is never questioned in real world, rendering head coupled viewpoint in VR can lead to the perception of an illusory perception of unstable environments, unless a non-unity scale factor is applied on recorded head movements. Besides, cylindrical screens are usually used with static observers due to image distortions when rendering image for viewpoints different from a sweet spot. We developed a technique to compensate in real-time these non-linear visual distortions, in an industrial VR setup, based on a cylindrical screen projection system. Additionally, to evaluate the amount of discrepancies tolerated without perceptual distortions between visual and extraretinal cues, a "motion parallax gain" between the velocity of the observer's head and that of the virtual camera was introduced in this system. The influence of this artificial gain was measured on the gait stability of free-standing participants. Results indicate that, below unity, gains significantly alter postural control. Conversely, the influence of higher gains remains limited, suggesting a certain tolerance of observers to these conditions. Parallax gain amplification is therefore proposed as a possible solution to provide a wider exploration of space to users of immersive virtual reality systems.

  8. Radiation of sound from unflanged cylindrical ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartharan, S. L.; Bayliss, A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of sound radiated from unflanged cylindrical ducts are presented. The numerical simulation models the problem of an aero-engine inlet. The time dependent linearized Euler equations are solved from a state of rest until a harmonic solution is attained. A fourth order accurate finite difference scheme is used and solutions are obtained from a fully vectorized Cyber-203 computer program. Cases of both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Spin modes model the sound generated by a turbofan engine. Boundary conditions for both plane waves and spin modes are treated. Solutions obtained are compared with experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center.

  9. Digital Perspective Correction For Cylindrical Holographic Stereograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffey, Stephen M.; Dutta, Kalyan

    1983-04-01

    This paper discusses digital perspective correction in the multiplex hologram,also known as Cross hologram or white light cylindrical holographic stereogram. It presents digital analogues of previously reported optical methods, and demonstrates the digital implementation of Benton's method. It introduces a non-linear remapping of the input views to compensate for a non-uniform color viewing position. Simulation results are included on the relative accuracy of different algorithms. Digital correction can be applied to both real and artificial objects such as computed tomography (CT) data.

  10. Cullet Manufacture Using the Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.

    2000-01-20

    The base process for vitrification of the Am/Cm solution stored in F-canyon uses 25SrABS cullet as the glass former. A small portion of the cullet used in the SRTC development work was purchased from Corning while the majority was made in the 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5). Task 1.01 of TTR-NMSS/SE-006, Additional Am-Cm Process Development Studies, requested that a process for the glass former (cullet) fabrication be specified. This report provides the process details for 25SrAB cullet production thereby satisfying Task 1.01.

  11. Enhanced Performance of Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses, A. Smirnov, and N.J. Fisch

    2007-05-14

    The cylindrical thruster differs significantly in its underlying physical mechanisms from the conventional annular Hall thruster. It features high ionization efficiency, quiet operation, ion acceleration in a large volume-to-surface ratio channel, and performance comparable with the state-of-the-art conventional Hall thrusters. Very significant plume narrowing, accompanied by the increase of the energetic ion fraction and improvement of ion focusing, led to 50%–60% increase of the thruster anode efficiency. These improvements were achieved by overrunning the discharge current in the magnetized thruster plasma.

  12. Single-mode cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jingjing; Huang, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A cylindrical graphene plasmon waveguide (CGPW) which consists of two rolled graphene ribbons, a dielectric core and a dielectric interlayer is proposed. An analytical model for the single-mode condition and cutoff frequency of high-order graphene surface plasmon (GSP) modes is presented and verified by finite element method (FEM) simulations. Single-mode operation region of CGPW is identified in the frequency-radius space. By varying the separation between two graphene sheets and the Fermi level of graphene, a large tunability of the mode behavior is also demonstrated. The proposed structure may provide a new freedom to manipulate GSPs, and would lead to novel applications in optics.

  13. Note: Electrochemical etching of cylindrical nanoprobes using a vibrating electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yufeng; Zeng, Yongbin Qu, Ningsong; Zhu, Di

    2015-07-15

    An electrochemical etching process using a vibrating electrolyte of potassium hydroxide to prepare tungsten cylindrical nanotips is developed. The vibrating electrolyte eases the effects of a diffusion layer and extends the etching area, which aid in the production of cylindrical nanotips. Larger amplitudes and a vibration frequency of 35 Hz are recommended for producing cylindrical nanotips. Nanotips with a tip radius of approximately 43 nm and a conical angle of arctan 0.0216 are obtained.

  14. Patient preferences for dentists.

    PubMed

    Furnham, Adrian; Swami, Viren

    2009-03-01

    A representative British sample of 257 adults completed a questionnaire in which they indicated their preference for eight dentists stratified by sex, age, and training location. These data were analysed in relation to participants' own sex and age, the latter stratified by a median split. A mixed analysis of variance indicated two main effects: a preference for younger (rather than older) dentists and dentists trained in Britain (rather than in Asia). There were also a significant two-way interaction between dentist age and training location: for the British-trained there was a preference for younger dentists, whereas for the Asian-trained there was a preference for older dentists. Limitations of the study design are discussed in conclusion.

  15. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Data fusion for cylindrical form measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pei; Jusko, Otto; Tutsch, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    For high-precision form measurements of cylindrical workpieces form profiles such as roundness and straightness profiles are independently acquired via a bird-cage strategy. The 3D point cloud reconstructed by fusing these intersected profiles is meaningful in dimension and form assessment for cylinder, since enhanced accuracy can be achieved by fusion results. Moreover, it plays an important role as the input to other calculations. However, these data cannot be accurately aligned in form reconstruction, due to random absolute offsets in profiles and a lack of absolute positions. Therefore, we propose an approach to data fusion of these profiles to reconstruct cylindrical form. The uncertainties of the fused profile are evaluated, taking an individual contribution of a single profile and a global contribution of all profiles into account. The associated uncertainties are propagated using the Monte Carlo method. Experimental study results indicate that the data fusion procedure improves the accuracy of available datasets. After fusion, all available data points are capable of being used in the form assessment.

  17. Scattering and radiation from cylindrically conformal antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempel, Leo Charles

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observability over more conventional protruding antennas. Two hybrid finite element methods are presented and are used to examine the scattering and radiation behavior of cylindrically conformal patches. In conjunction with a new divergence-free cylindrical shell element, the finite element-boundary integral method is shown to have low computational and memory requirements when compared with competing approaches. This method uses an efficient creeping wave series for the computation of the dyadic Green's function and a uniform surface mesh so that a fast Fourier transform may be used to reduce the computational and memory burden of the method. An alternative finite element-absorbing boundary condition approach incorporates a new conformal vector condition which minimizes the computational domain. The latter method is more flexible than the former because it can incorporate surface coatings and protruding antennas. Guidelines are established for minimal ABC displacement from the aperture. These two hybrid finite element methods are used to study the scattering, radiation, and input impedance of typical conformal antenna arrays. In particular, the effect of curvature and cavity size is examined for both discrete and wraparound antenna arrays.

  18. Low distortion laser welding of cylindrical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Sonja

    2011-02-01

    Automotive components are for the most part cylindrical and thus the weld seams are of radial shape. Radial weld seams are usually produced by starting at a point on the component's surface rotating the component resulting in an overlap zone at the start/end of the weld. In this research, it is shown that the component's distortion strongly depends on the overlap of weld start and end. A correlation between overlap zone and distortion is verified by an experimental study. In order to reduce distortion generated by the overlap zone a special optics is used which allows shaping the laser beam into a ring shape which is then focused on the cylindrical surface and produces a radial ring weld seam simultaneously by one laser pulse. In doing this, the overlap zone is eliminated and distortion can be reduced. Radial weld seams are applied on precision samples and distortion is measured after welding. The distortion of the precision samples is measured by a tactile measuring method and a comparison of the results of welding with the ring optics to reference welds is done.

  19. Low distortion laser welding of cylindrical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Sonja

    2010-09-01

    Automotive components are for the most part cylindrical and thus the weld seams are of radial shape. Radial weld seams are usually produced by starting at a point on the component's surface rotating the component resulting in an overlap zone at the start/end of the weld. In this research, it is shown that the component's distortion strongly depends on the overlap of weld start and end. A correlation between overlap zone and distortion is verified by an experimental study. In order to reduce distortion generated by the overlap zone a special optics is used which allows shaping the laser beam into a ring shape which is then focused on the cylindrical surface and produces a radial ring weld seam simultaneously by one laser pulse. In doing this, the overlap zone is eliminated and distortion can be reduced. Radial weld seams are applied on precision samples and distortion is measured after welding. The distortion of the precision samples is measured by a tactile measuring method and a comparison of the results of welding with the ring optics to reference welds is done.

  20. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  1. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  2. Preference for newspaper size.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Steve N H; Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2014-05-01

    The past few years has seen a change in the size of newspapers, with publishers moving to a smaller size format. Five 'standard' newspaper sizes are used in different countries: Broadsheet, Rhensch, Tabloid, Tall Tabloid and Berliner. These papers vary in both width and height of pages and hence there are implications for human reading comfort, which may be dependent on reading location such as on a lounge chair or on a train. Experiments were carried out to determine preferences for the different sizes and to relate these preferences to the geometric characteristics of the newspapers. For both comfortable and cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, the rank order of preference for paper types was, from least to most-preferred, Broadsheet, Rhensch, Berliner, Tall Tabloid and Tabloid. Preferences were much stronger when determined in cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, where most comparisons were significantly different. There was good correlation between participant ratings on several scales and preference, where most factors were related to comfort of holding and controlling the paper.

  3. A large electrochemical setup for the anodization of aluminum towards highly ordered arrays of cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Assaud, Loïc; Bochmann, Sebastian; Christiansen, Silke; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-07-01

    A new electrochemical setup and the associated procedures for growing ordered anodic aluminum oxide pore arrays on large surfaces are presented. The typical size of the samples is 14 × 14 cm(2). The most crucial experimental parameters that allow for the stabilization of the high-field procedures are a very efficient cooling of sample and electrolyte, as well as the initial ramping up of the voltage at an accurately defined rate. The morphology of the cylindrical, parallel alumina pores is similar to those obtained on smaller scales with standard setups. Our setup facilitates the availability of porous anodic alumina as a template system for a number of applications.

  4. Combination of cylindrical confinement and spark discharge for signal improvement using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zongyu; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Jianmin; Ni, Weidou; Li, Zheng

    2014-06-02

    Spark discharge has been proved to be an effective way to enhance the LIBS signal while moderate cylindrical confinement is able to increase the signal repeatability with limited signal enhancement effects. In the present work, these two methods were combined together not only to improve the pulse-to-pulse signal repeatability but also to simultaneously and significantly enhance the signal as well as SNR. Plasma images showed that the confinement stabilized the morphology of the plasma, especially for the discharge assisted process, which explained the improvement of the signal repeatability.

  5. Performance of a hybrid cylindrical roller bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Stephen M.

    1992-08-01

    A 206-size hybrid (ceramic/steel) cylindrical roller bearing was tested in MIL-L-23699 C oil at several speeds and loads. Heat-generation data was collected and subsequently correlated with bearing-analysis software. Bearing-cage slip data was also collected at various oil-flow rates, oil temperatures, and with both MIL-L-7808 J and MIL-L-23699 C oils. The hybrid bearing was tested in MIL-L-23699 C oil for for 25 hours at 2220 N radial load and 1.08 MDN shaft speed. The hybrid bearing technology demonstrated in the report is applicable to the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative.

  6. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  7. SPSM and its application in cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wu; Zhou, Su-Lian; Peng, Hui

    2008-03-01

    In naval architectures, the structure of prismatic shell is used widely. But there is no suitable method to analyze this kind of structure. Stiffened prismatic shell method (SPSM) presented in this paper, is one of the harmonic semi-analytic methods. Theoretically, strong stiffened structure can be analyzed economically and accurately. SPSM is based on the analytical solution of the governing differential equations for orthotropic cylindrical shells. In these differential equations, the torsional stiffness, bending stiffness and the exact position of each stiffener are taken into account with the Heaviside singular function. An algorithm is introduced, in which the actions of stiffeners on shells are replaced by external loads at each stiffener position. Stiffened shells can be computed as non-stiffened shells. Eventually, the displacement solution of the equations is acquired by the introduction of Green function. The stresses in a corrugated transverse bulkhead without pier base of an oil tanker are computed by using SPSM.

  8. Electrochemical cell having cylindrical electrode elements

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A secondary, high temperature electrochemical cell especially adapted for lithium alloy negative electrodes, transition metal chalcogenide positive electrodes and alkali metal halide or alkaline earth metal halide electrolyte is disclosed. The cell is held within an elongated cylindrical container in which one of the active materials is filled around the outside surfaces of a plurality of perforate tubular current collectors along the length of the container. Each of the current collector tubes contain a concentric tubular layer of electrically insulative ceramic as an interelectrode separator. The active material of opposite polarity in elongated pin shape is positioned longitudinally within the separator layer. A second electrically conductive tube with perforate walls can be swagged or otherwise bonded to the outer surface of the pin as a current collector and the electrically insulative ceramic layer can be coated or otherwise layered onto the outer surface of this second current collector. Alternatively, the central pin electrode can include an axial core as a current collector.

  9. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  10. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  11. MIRW properties of cylindrical holes array nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chunchao; Fu, Yuegang; Dong, Tingting; Zhou, Jianhong; Guo, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    To improve mediate infrared wavelength (MIRW) light energy transferring efficiency, the optical properties of antireflection micro/nanostructure with cylindrical holes periodic array on incident angle, wavelength, polarized angle and azimuth orientation was researched based on finite time-domain difference (FDTD) method. Results shows that the antireflection characteristics can be promised in wider spectral range and lager incident angles. Reflectivity function also presents different features as polarization and azimuth angles changed. These structure parameters were optimized to be period of 1 µm, duty cycle of 0.85 and erosion height of 0.5 µm. Samples of the structure were fabricated by electron beam exposure and reaction ion etch technology on silicon substrate. Finally, the diverse shape effect of bionic moth-eye was explored to give respective ideal parameters suitable for MIRW.

  12. Stresses in rotating composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James T.-S.; Lin, Chien-Chang

    Stresses in composite cylindrical shells rotating with a constant speed about their longitudinal axis are analyzed. Each ply or ply group is treated as a separate thin layer of homogeneous and orthotropic material under the interfacial stresses as surface loading. There is no limitation on the total thickness of the shell. The circumferential stress, motivated by the conventional thin shell theory, is assumed to vary linearly through the thickness of the layer. The radial stress is determined in terms of the circumferential stress through the equilibrium condition, and an average compatibility condition through the thickness of the thin layer is used. Numerical results using the present analysis show nearly perfect agreement with the exact solution for homogeneous and isotropic cylinders. Some results for cylinders having orthotropic layers are presented for illustrative purposes.

  13. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  14. Buckling of cylindrical panels under axial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Weller, T.; Agarwal, B. L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of boundary conditions and panel width on the axially compressive buckling behavior of unstiffened, isotropic, circular cylindrical panels. Numerical results are presented for eight different sets of boundary conditions along the straight edges of the panels. For all sets of boundary conditions except one (SS1), the results show that the panel buckling loads monotonically approach the complete cylinder buckling load from above as the panel width is increased. Low buckling loads, sometimes less than half the complete cylinder buckling load, are found for simply supported panels with free in-plane edge displacements (SS1). It is observed that the prevention of circumferential edge displacement is the most important in-plane boundary condition from the point of view of increasing the buckling load; and that the prevention of edge rotation in the circumferential direction also significantly increases the buckling load.

  15. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  16. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-09-14

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  17. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  18. Integral equation theory for hard spheres confined on a cylindrical surface: anisotropic packing entropically driven.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Takafumi; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2005-09-22

    The structure of two-dimensional (2D) hard-sphere fluids on a cylindrical surface is investigated by means of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with the Percus-Yevick and the hypernetted-chain approximation. The 2D cylindrical coordinate breaks the spherical symmetry. Hence, the pair-correlation function is reformulated as a two-variable function to account for the packing along and around the cylinder. Detailed pair-correlation function calculations based on the two integral equation theories are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. In general, the Percus-Yevick theory is more accurate than the hypernetted-chain theory, but exceptions are observed for smaller cylinders. Moreover, analysis of the angular-dependent contact values shows that particles are preferentially packed anisotropically. The origin of such an anisotropic packing is driven by the entropic effect because the energy of all the possible system configurations of a dense hard-sphere fluid is the same. In addition, the anisotropic packing observed in our model studies serves as a basis for linking the close packing with the morphology of an ordered structure for particles adsorbed onto a cylindrical nanotube.

  19. Cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by phantom energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of Darmois-Israel formalism, the general equations describing the motion of cylindrical thin-shell wormholes supported by equation of state of phantom energy are derived. The linear perturbation approach is used to investigate the stability of a cylindrical thin-shell wormhole of a static solution.

  20. Development of the Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining Process.

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    Results of applying the wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) process to generate precise cylindrical forms on hard, difficult-to-machine materials are presented. A precise, flexible, and corrosion-resistant underwater rotary spindle was designed and added to a conventional two-axis wire EDM machine to enable the generation of free-form cylindrical geometries. A detailed spindle error analysis identifies the major source of error at different frequency. The mathematical model for the material removal of cylindrical wire EDM process is derived. Experiments were conducted to explore the maximum material removal rate for cylindrical and 2D wire EDM of carbide and brass work-materials. Compared to the 2D wire EDM, higher maximum material removal rates may be achieved in the cylindrical wire EDM. This study also investigates the surface integrity and roundness of parts created by the cylindrical wire EDM process. For carbide parts, an arithmetic average surface roughness and roundness as low as 0.68 and 1.7 {micro}m, respectively, can be achieved. Surfaces of the cylindrical EDM parts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify the craters, sub-surface recast layers and heat-affected zones under various process parameters. This study has demonstrated that the cylindrical wire EDM process parameters can be adjusted to achieve either high material removal rate or good surface integrity.

  1. Patients' preferences for information

    PubMed Central

    Kindelan, K.; Kent, G.

    1986-01-01

    In a study of patients' views of the type of information they would like to receive from the doctor 265 patients from four general practices were given a list of five areas of information — diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, aetiology and social effects of their illness — and asked to rank these in order of importance for that visit. In general, information on diagnosis and prognosis was the most highly valued, while the ways the illness would affect daily activities was the least preferred. Although information on treatment was rarely selected as the first preference it was often the second or third preference. Conversely, diagnosis was the first choice of the largest proportion of patients and the least valued information for 26%. PMID:3440990

  2. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  3. Cylindrical mirror multipass Lissajous system for laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-yuan; Qiang, Shi; Wu, Guo-rong; Qi, Li; Feng, Dang; Zhu, Qing-shi; Hong, Zhang

    2002-05-01

    A simple optical multiple reflection system is developed with two cylindrical concave mirrors at an appropriate spacing. The two cylindrical mirrors have different focal lengths and their principal sections are orthogonal. The alternate focusing of the two cylindrical mirrors at different direction keep the reflecting spots small. The reflecting spots fall on Lissajous patterns on the cylindrical mirrors. The mathematics for this optical system is described and the calculated coordinates of beam spots are very close matches of the experimental observations. The cylindrical mirror optical system is easy to construct and align, with a suitable method for obtaining long optical paths and a large number of passes in small volumes. In a photoacoustic spectrometer the beam family enhance the effective power in the photoacoustic cell and thus the signal-to-noise ratio of photoacoustic signal. An experimental result for photoacoustic spectrum of HDSe gas is given.

  4. Fast calculation method for computer-generated cylindrical holograms.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Fujii, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Since a general flat hologram has a limited viewable area, we usually cannot see the other side of a reconstructed object. There are some holograms that can solve this problem. A cylindrical hologram is well known to be viewable in 360 deg. Most cylindrical holograms are optical holograms, but there are few reports of computer-generated cylindrical holograms. The lack of computer-generated cylindrical holograms is because the spatial resolution of output devices is not great enough; therefore, we have to make a large hologram or use a small object to fulfill the sampling theorem. In addition, in calculating the large fringe, the calculation amount increases in proportion to the hologram size. Therefore, we propose what we believe to be a new calculation method for fast calculation. Then, we print these fringes with our prototype fringe printer. As a result, we obtain a good reconstructed image from a computer-generated cylindrical hologram.

  5. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  6. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  7. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  8. Combining symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models of cylindrically symmetric multiple bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penotti, Fabio E.; Cooper, David L.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the symmetry properties of spin-coupled (or full generalised valence bond) wavefunctions for C2H2 and N2. The symmetry-separated (σ,π) and bent-bond (ω) solutions are totally symmetric only in the D4h and D3h subgroups of D∞h, respectively. Two fairly different strategies are explored for imposing full cylindrical symmetry, with one of them (small nonorthogonal configuration interaction calculations involving rotated versions of the wavefunction) turning out to be somewhat preferable on energetic grounds to the other one (application of additional spin constraints to a single spatial configuration). It is also shown that mixing together the cylindrically symmetric symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models leads to relatively small energy improvements unless the valence orbitals in each type of configuration are reoptimised.

  9. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bourasseau, E; Malfreyt, P; Ghoufi, A

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  10. Surface tension and long range corrections of cylindrical interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bourasseau, E.; Ghoufi, A.

    2015-12-21

    The calculation of the surface tension of curved interfaces has been deeply investigated from molecular simulation during this last past decade. Recently, the thermodynamic Test-Area (TA) approach has been extended to the calculation of surface tension of curved interfaces. In the case of the cylindrical vapour-liquid interfaces of water and Lennard-Jones fluids, it was shown that the surface tension was independent of the curvature of the interface. In addition, the surface tension of the cylindrical interface is higher than that of the planar interface. Molecular simulations of cylindrical interfaces have been so far performed (i) by using a shifted potential, (ii) by means of large cutoff without periodic boundary conditions, or (iii) by ignoring the long range corrections to the surface tension due to the difficulty to estimate them. Indeed, unlike the planar interfaces there are no available operational expressions to consider the tail corrections to the surface tension of cylindrical interfaces. We propose here to develop the long range corrections of the surface tension for cylindrical interfaces by using the non-exponential TA (TA2) method. We also extend the formulation of the Mecke-Winkelmann corrections initially developed for planar surfaces to cylindrical interfaces. We complete this study by the calculation of the surface tension of cylindrical surfaces of liquid tin and copper using the embedded atom model potentials.

  11. Cylindrical optic figuring dwell time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2000-11-01

    The Constellation-X, grazing incidence, x-ray telescope may be fabricated from replicated segments. A series of mandrels will serve as the 'masters' in the replication processes. Diamond turning (milling) followed by abrasive figuring followed by a super polishing are the steps currently envisioned in making just one (of many) mandrel. The abrasive figuring of a mandrel is accomplished by moving a grinding tool along a helical path on this almost cylindrical surface. The measurement of the surface is, however, performed along 'axial' scan lines which intercept this helical path. This approach to figuring and measuring permits a relatively simple scheme to be implemented for the determination of the optimal dwell times of the figuring tool. These optimal dwell times are determined by a deconvolution which approaches the problem in a linear programming context and uses the Simplex Method. The approach maximizes the amount of material removed at any point subject to inequality constraints. The effects of using these 'optimum' dwell times is to significantly improve the tools effectiveness at removing the higher spatial frequencies while staying (strictly) within the bounds and constraints imposed by the hardware. In addition, the ringing at the edges of the optic, frequently present in deconvolution problems, is completely eliminated.

  12. Cylindrical shell buckling through strain hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Xu, J.; Shteyngart, S.; Gupta, D.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the authors published results of plastic buckling analysis of cylindrical shells. Ideal elastic-plastic material behavior was used for the analysis. Subsequently, the buckling analysis program was continued with the realistic stress-strain relationship of a stainless steel alloy which does not exhibit a clear yield point. The plastic buckling analysis was carried out through the initial stages of strain hardening for various internal pressure values. The computer program BOSOR5 was used for this purpose. Results were compared with those obtained from the idealized elastic-plastic relationship using the offset stress level at 0.2% strain as the yield stress. For moderate hoop stress values, the realistic stress-grain case shows a slight reduction of the buckling strength. But, a substantial gain in the buckling strength is observed as the hoop stress approaches the yield strength. Most importantly, the shell retains a residual strength to carry a small amount of axial compressive load even when the hoop stress has exceeded the offset yield strength.

  13. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  14. Jet Mixing in a Reacting Cylindrical Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  15. Cylindrical Hall Thrusters with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-10-18

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction of both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50W-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT. __________________________________________________

  16. Cylindrical Hall thrusters with permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Merino, Enrique; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2010-11-01

    The use of permanent magnets instead of electromagnet coils for low power Hall thrusters can offer a significant reduction in both the total electric power consumption and the thruster mass. Two permanent magnet versions of the miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) of different overall dimensions were operated in the power range of 50-300 W. The discharge and plasma plume measurements revealed that the CHT thrusters with permanent magnets and electromagnet coils operate rather differently. In particular, the angular ion current density distribution from the permanent magnet thrusters has an unusual halo shape, with a majority of high energy ions flowing at large angles with respect to the thruster centerline. Differences in the magnetic field topology outside the thruster channel and in the vicinity of the channel exit are likely responsible for the differences in the plume characteristics measured for the CHTs with electromagnets and permanent magnets. It is shown that the presence of the reversing-direction or cusp-type magnetic field configuration inside the thruster channel without a strong axial magnetic field outside the thruster channel does not lead to the halo plasma plume from the CHT.

  17. Cylindrical gravity currents in a rotating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ching-Sen; Dai, Albert

    2016-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the dynamical processes in the formation of stable cylindrical gravity currents, by a full-depth lock release, in a rotating system conducted by direct numerical simulations. The simulations reproduce the major features observed in the laboratory and provide more detailed flow information. Both the qualitative and quantitative measures are provided through the flow patterns and the predicted energy budgets. At the initial stage, during tenth of a revolution of the system, the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices form and the flow structure maintain nearly axisymmetric. Afterwards, three-dimensionality of flow quickly develops and the outer rim of current breaks away from the body, which gives rise to the maximum dissipation rate in the system. The detached outer rim continues to propagate outward until a maximum radius of propagation is attained. Then the body of current exhibits a regularly contraction-relaxation motion in a period, the energy is transformed back and forth between potential energy and kinetic energy. With the use of high-resolution of numerical computations, the formation of lobe-and-cleft structure and swirling strength for the rotating gravity currents are clearly observed.

  18. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    PubMed

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  19. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  20. Morphology of nematic and smectic vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiangjun; Shin, Homin; Bowick, Mark J.; Yao, Zhenwei; Jia, Lin; Li, Min-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments on vesicles formed from block copolymers with liquid-crystalline side chains reveal a rich variety of vesicle morphologies. The additional internal order (“structure”) developed by these self-assembled block copolymer vesicles can lead to significantly deformed vesicles as a result of the delicate interplay between two-dimensional ordering and vesicle shape. The inevitable topological defects in structured vesicles of spherical topology also play an essential role in controlling the final vesicle morphology. Here we develop a minimal theoretical model for the morphology of the membrane structure with internal nematic/smectic order. Using both analytic and numerical approaches, we show that the possible low free energy morphologies include nano-size cylindrical micelles (nano-fibers), faceted tetrahedral vesicles, and ellipsoidal vesicles, as well as cylindrical vesicles. The tetrahedral vesicle is a particularly fascinating example of a faceted liquid-crystalline membrane. Faceted liquid vesicles may lead to the design of supramolecular structures with tetrahedral symmetry and new classes of nano-carriers. PMID:22431595

  1. The Vocational Preference Inventory Scores and Environmental Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunce, Joseph T.; Kappes, Bruno Maurice

    1976-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between vocational interest measured by the Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) and preferences of 175 undergraduates for structured or unstructured environments. Males having clear-cut preferences for structured situations had significantly higher Realistic-Conventional scores than those without…

  2. The design of parabolic cylindrical antenna with light emitting plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Shi, Jia-ming; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Ji-kui; Li, Zhi-gang

    2016-11-01

    By using the electromagnetic wave reflection characteristics of the plasma, the plasma can be used to design the reflector antenna. the paper designs a metal parabolic cylindrical antenna and a plasma luminescence parabolic cylindrical antenna, and uses CST software calculating the radiative properties of them, analysising the key parameters of plasma luminescence parabolic cylindrical antenna radiation and scattered radiation resistance. Simulation results show that selecting appropriate plasma column spacing, plasma frequency, collision frequency, the plasma luminescence parabolic cylindrical antenna has the same radiation performance with metal parabolic antenna, at the same time, the RCS of plasma antenna in working and not working are smaller compared with the metal antenna, especially in plasma does not work ,the bistatic RCS reduced to a greater extent than the previous related literature design.

  3. Cylindrical Cardboard Model for a Rotating System in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a cylindrical cardboard model that helps students at the graduate or undergraduate level to visualize the nature of simultaneity and the propagation of light in a rotating coordinate system. (HM)

  4. Electron acceleration by a tightly focused cylindrical vector Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the electron acceleration by a tightly focused cylindrical vector Gaussian beam. Different from the Lax series field, cylindrical vector Gaussian beams are vector-beam solutions of Maxwell’s equations and its focusing property can be numerically analyzed by the Richards-Wolf vectorial diffraction theory. Field differences exist between the cylindrical vector Gaussian beam and the Lax series field. The cylindrical vector Gaussian beam increases the asymmetry of the electromagnetic fields, which is more beneficial to the electron acceleration. When the beam waist falls down to the order of the wavelength, the high laser intensity zone is more proper to define the reflection, capture and transmission conditions of the electrons. The injection energy and the injected angle of the electron and the initial phase of the laser beam play important roles for the electron to enter and be trapped by the high laser intensity zone.

  5. Mathematical model for characterizing noise transmission into finite cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2005-02-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of the sound transmission into a finite cylinder under coupled structural and acoustic vibration. Particular attention of this study is focused on evaluating a dimensionless quantity, ``noise reduction,'' for characterizing noise transmission into a small cylindrical enclosure. An analytical expression of the exterior sound pressure resulting from an oblique plane wave impinging upon the cylindrical shell is first presented, which is approximated from the exterior sound pressure for an infinite cylindrical structure. Next, the analytical solution of the interior sound pressure is computed using modal-interaction theory for the coupled structural acoustic system. These results are then used to derive the analytical formula for the noise reduction. Finally, the model is used to predict and characterize the sound transmission into a ChamberCore cylindrical structure, and the results are compared with experimental data. The effects of incidence angle and internal acoustic damping on the sound transmission into the cylinder are also parametrically studied. .

  6. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  7. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  8. Cylindrical Invisibility Cloak with Simplified Material Parameters is Inherently Visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Min; Ruan, Zhichao; Qiu, Min

    2007-12-01

    It was proposed that perfect invisibility cloaks can be constructed for hiding objects from electromagnetic illumination [J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1125907]. The cylindrical cloaks experimentally demonstrated [D. Schurig , Science 314, 977 (2006)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1133628] and theoretically proposed [W. Cai , Nat. Photon. 1, 224 (2007)1749-488510.1038/nphoton.2007.28] have however simplified material parameters in order to facilitate easier realization as well as to avoid infinities in optical constants. Here we show that the cylindrical cloaks with simplified material parameters inherently allow the zeroth-order cylindrical wave to pass through the cloak as if the cloak is made of a homogeneous isotropic medium, and thus visible. To all high-order cylindrical waves, our numerical simulation suggests that the simplified cloak inherits some properties of the ideal cloak, but finite scatterings exist.

  9. Effects of vortex generator on cylindrical protrusion aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh Ram, P. S.; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-02-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of vortex generator on a small cylindrical protrusion at Mach number 2.0. The experiments were performed using the supersonic blow down wind tunnel on different heights of cylindrical protrusion with vortex generator placed ahead of them. The upstream and downstream flow around the cylindrical protrusion is influenced by vortex generator as is observed using both visualization and pressure measurement techniques. Numerical studies using three dimensional steady implicit formulations with standard k-ω turbulence model was performed. Results obtained through the present computation are compared with the experimental results at Mach 2.0. Good agreements between computation and experimental results have been achieved. The results indicate that the aerodynamic drag acting on cylindrical protrusion can be reduced by adopting vortex generator.

  10. 20. OBLIQUE VIEW, VANE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OBLIQUE VIEW, VANE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN SIGNAL SHOP - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  11. 19. FRONT VIEW, VALVE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. FRONT VIEW, VALVE LINE RELAY, CYLINDRICAL HOUSING, NEW HAVEN SIGNAL SHOP - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  12. 16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING SHOE AND LATERAL BRACING. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rio Puerco Bridge, Mainline Road, spanning Rio Puerco, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  13. The DART Cylindrical, Infrared, 1 Meter Membrane Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Rhonda M.; Agnes, Greg S.; Barber, Dan; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hatheway, Al E.; Marcin, Marty

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescopes (DART) is an architecture for large aperture space telescopes that enables the use of membranes. A membrane can be readily shaped in one direction of curvature using a combination of boundary control and tensioning, yielding a cylindrical reflector. Two cylindrical reflectors (orthogonal and confocal) comprise the 'primary mirror' of the telescope system. The aperture is completely unobstructed and ideal for infrared and high contrast observations.

  14. High speed cylindrical rolling element bearing analysis 'CYBEAN' - Analytic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.; Castelli, V.

    1979-01-01

    This paper documents the analytic foundation and software architecture for the computerized mathematical simulation of high speed cylindrical rolling element bearing behavior. The software, CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis), considers a flexible, variable geometry outer ring, EHD films, roller centrifugal and quasidynamic loads, roller tilt and skew, mounting fits, cage and flange interactions. The representation includes both steady state and time transient simulation of thermal interactions internal to and coupled with the surroundings of the bearing. A sample problem illustrating program use is presented.

  15. Therapeutic Recreation Majors' Work Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Elizabeth H.; Magafas, Anita

    1992-01-01

    Investigates the client age/disability work preference of 76 therapeutic recreation undergraduate students at 3 universities. Results indicate a preference to work with younger clients, disability groups, and physically impaired clients. Chronically ill clients were last in work preference. Students need exposure to the benefits of working with…

  16. Shifting Preferences in Pornography Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zillmann, Dolf; Bryant, Jennings

    1986-01-01

    Concludes that subjects with considerable prior exposure to common, nonviolent pornography preferred to watch uncommon pornography. Male nonstudents preferred it almost exclusively, as did male students to a lesser extent. Females also exhibited this consumption preference, though it was far less pronounced, especially in female students. (JD)

  17. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  18. Intensity distribution in cylindrical-circular receivers for nonperfect cylindrical-parabolic concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Nicols, R.O.

    1985-08-15

    A 2-D optical analysis is described that allows determination of the intensity distribution on a circular cylinder located in the focal zone of nonperfect concentrators. We call nonperfect concentrators those in which the normal to each differential element of the specular surface departs from its correct position by an angle epsilon, the possible values of which follow a Gaussian distribution of mean value epsilon-bar and standard deviation sigma. The analysis is based on a previous one developed to calculate the intensity distribution at the receiver plane of nonperfect cylindrical concentrators. The analysis permits the consideration of circular receivers displaced from the focus by distance delta/sub f/ in any direction and directions of the incident rays nonparallel to the parabola's symmetry plane. Results for different sets of parameters characterizing the behavior of a given concentrator are shown and compared.

  19. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  20. Design and evaluation of a novel microphone-based mechanomyography sensor with cylindrical and conical acoustic chambers.

    PubMed

    Posatskiy, A O; Chau, T

    2012-10-01

    Mechanomyography has recently been proposed as a control modality for alternative access technologies for individuals with disabilities. However, MMG recordings are highly susceptible to contamination from limb movements. Pressure-based transducers are touted to be the most robust to external movement although there is some debate about their optimal chamber geometry, in terms of low frequency gain and spectral flatness. To investigate the question of preferred geometry, transducers with cylindrical and conical chambers of varying dimensions were designed, manufactured and tested. Using a computer-controlled electrodynamic shaker, the frequency response of each chamber geometry was empirically derived. Of the cylindrical chambers, the highest gain and the flattest frequency response was exhibited by a chamber 10 mm in diameter and 5-7 mm in height. However, conical chambers offered an average rise in gain of 6.79 ± 1.06 dB/Hz over that achievable with cylindrical geometries. The highest gain and flattest response was achieved with a transducer consisting of a low-frequency MEMS microphone, a 4 μm aluminized mylar membrane and a rigid conical chamber 7 mm in diameter and 5mm in height. This design is recommended for MMG applications where limb movement is prevalent.

  1. Monolithic Cylindrical Fused Silica Resonators with High Q Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Suyong; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) is a typical Coriolis vibratory gyroscope whose performance is determined by the Q factor and frequency mismatch of the cylindrical resonator. Enhancing the Q factor is crucial for improving the rate sensitivity and noise performance of the CRG. In this paper, for the first time, a monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator with a Q factor approaching 8 × 105 (ring-down time over 1 min) is reported. The resonator is made of fused silica with low internal friction and high isotropy, with a diameter of 25 mm and a center frequency of 3974.35 Hz. The structure of the resonator is first briefly introduced, and then the experimental non-contact characterization method is presented. In addition, the post-fabrication experimental procedure of Q factor improvement, including chemical and thermal treatment, is demonstrated. The Q factor improvement by both treatments is compared and the primary loss mechanism is analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the work presented in this paper represents the highest reported Q factor for a cylindrical resonator. The proposed monolithic cylindrical fused silica resonator may enable high performance inertial sensing with standard manufacturing process and simple post-fabrication treatment. PMID:27483263

  2. Fast rendering scheme for 3D cylindrical ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung Pill; Ra, Jong Beom

    2000-04-01

    3D ultrasound imaging is an emerging and prospective modality in the ultrasound scanning area. Since 3D ultrasound dat are often acquired by translation or rotation of 2D data acquisition systems, the data can be directly sampled on cylindrical or spherical structured girds rather tan on rectilinear grids. However, visualization of cylindrical or spherical data is more complex than that of rectilinear grids. Therefore, conventional rendering methods resample the grids into rectilinear grids and visualize the resampled rectilinear dat. However, resampling introduces an undesired resolution loss. In this paper a direct rendering scheme of cylindrical ultrasound data is considered. Even though cell sin cylindrical grids have different sizes, they are very similar in shape and contain some regularity. We use this similarity and regularity of cells to reduce rendering time in a projection-based rendering method. To achieve high sped rendering, we prose a simple projection ordering method and a fast projection method using a common edge table. And also, to produce good rendering results, an efficient bilinear interpolation scheme is prosed for the hexahedral projection. In this scheme, since weighting coefficients are calculated in the image plane, we can avoid calculating crossing point sin the object space. Based on the proposed techniques above, we can produce high resolution rendered images directly form a cylindrical 3D ultrasound data set.

  3. Flow morphologies after oblique shock acceelration of a cylindrical density interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Simons, Dylan; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental study of instabilities developing after an oblique shock interaction with a heavy gas column. The heavy gas in our experiments is sulfur hexafluoride infused with 11% acetone by mass. A misalignment of the pressure and density gradients results in three-dimensional vorticity deposition on the gaseous interface, dtriggering the onset of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Shortly thereafter, other instabilities develop along the interface, including a shear-driven instability that presents itself on the leading (with respect to the shock) and trailing edges of the column. This leads to the development of rows of co-rotating ``cat's eye'' vortices, characteristic of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Characteristics of the KHI, such as growth rate and wavelength, depend on several factors including the Mach number of the shock, the shock tube angle of inclination α (equal to the angle between the axis of the column and the plane of the shock), and the Atwood number. This work is supported by the US National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) via grant DE-NA0002913.

  4. Numerical simulation of hydrate formation morphology in cylindrical experimental sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Moridis, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    Using X-ray computed tomography (CT), formation of methane hydrate in columns of moist sand was observed under various conditions of initial water saturation, porosity, pressure, and temperature. Contrary to many studies in porous media that assumed methane hydrate forms uniformly throughout the media, x-ray CT observations of laboratory studies involving hydrate formation showed nonuniform patterns that included circular bands, centered around the core axis, locally concentrations, or uniformly disseminations. Nucleation and accumulation of methane hydrate in porous media can be affected by many factors such as porosity, water saturation, relative permeability, heat conductivity, and inhibiting salts. However, there is no clear explanation on how or why these various patterns of heterogeneous distribution of hydrate formation take place. We conducted numerical simulations using TOUGH+Hydrate to investigate the nonuniform hydrate formation in moist sand, and compared the numerical predictions to the experiment results. The simulations were able to generate the various patterns of hydrate formation and to provide an understanding of the dynamic processes governing the hydrate formation. We conducted sensitivity analyses with respect to the initial water saturation, inhibitor concentration, and porosity, and we evaluated the impact of those parameters on the hydrate formation patterns.

  5. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    elevated pressures. Flow-corrected flame speeds in the small cylindrical chamber used here agree well with previously reported flame speeds from large spherical chambers. Previous papers presenting burning velocities from cylindrical chambers report performing data analysis on flame radii less than 0.5 or 0.6 times the wall radius, where the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects may be low by {proportional_to}15 or 20%, respectively. For cylindrical chambers, data analysis should be restricted to flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius or a flow correction should be employed to account for the burned gas motions. With regard to the design of future vessels, larger vessels that minimize the flow aberrations for the same flame radius are preferred. Larger vessels maximize the relatively unaffected region of data allowing for a more straightforward approach to interpret the experimental data. (author)

  6. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  7. Design of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak with layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Lin, Guochang; Wang, Youshan

    2017-01-01

    Thermal cloak has potential applications in thermal protection and sensing. Based on the theories of spatial transformation and effective medium, layered structure of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak was designed. According to theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, the layered structure has typical characteristics of perfect thermal cloak. The external temperature field remains unchanged, while the internal temperature gradient decreases obviously. Meanwhile, the cloaking effect is stable in any direction. The cloaking effect can be improved by increasing the number of discretization layers or reducing the cloak thickness. The elliptic cylindrical cloak can be considered as cylindrical cloak when the focal distance is close to zero. This study has provided an effective way for realizing thermal cloak with more complex shapes.

  8. Determination of thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies being cooled

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.

    1996-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of an analytical model for determining the thermal diffusivities of the individual solid cylindrical bodies subjected to cooling is presented. Applications of this model were made using the experimental center temperature data obtained from the cylindrical products (e.g., cucumber and grape) during air cooling at the flow velocity of 2 m/s. As an experimental result, the thermal diffusivities of products were found to be 1.45{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for cucumber and 1.68{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for grape. It can be concluded that the present model is capable of determining the thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies during cooling in a simple and effective form.

  9. Arbitrarily laminated, anisotropic cylindrical shell under internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, Reaz Z.; Balaraman, K.; Kunukkasseril, Vincent X.

    1986-01-01

    An arbitrarily laminated, anisotropic cylindrical shell of finite length, under uniform internal pressure, is analyzed using Love-Timoshenko's kinematic relations and under the framework of classical lamination theory. The previously obtained solutions for asymmetrically laminated orthotropic (cross-ply) as well as unbalanced-symmetric and balanced-unsymmetric (angle-ply) cylindrical shells under the same loading conditions have been shown to be special cases of the present closed-form solution. Numerical results have been presented for a two-layer cylindrical shell and compared with those obtained using finite element solutions based on the layerwise constant shear-angle theory. These are expected to serve as benchmark solutions for future comparisons and to facilitate the use of unsymmetric lamination in design.

  10. Bidirectional surface wave splitters excited by a cylindrical wire.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Jiang, Quan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-03-14

    Bidirectional surface wave splitters excited by a cylindrical wire in the microwave frequency have been proposed and fabricated. Compared to the bidirectional subwavelength-slit splitter, the novelty of the proposed structure is the coupling mechanism from the cylindrical wire to the surface gratings. By designing the grating structures with different depths and the feeding wire, electromagnetic waves at the designed frequencies will be confined and guided in the predetermined opposite directions. The finite integral time-domain method is used to model the splitters. Experimental results are presented in the microwave frequencies to verify the new structure, which have very good agreements to the simulated results. Based on the same coupling mechanism, a bidirectional surface wave splitter excited by a cylindrical wire in the terahertz (THz) frequencies is further been proposed and modeled. The simulation results demonstrate the validity of the THz splitter.

  11. Heightened sour preferences during childhood.

    PubMed

    Liem, Djin Gie; Mennella, Julie A

    2003-02-01

    Basic research has revealed that the chemical sensory world of children is different from that of adults, as evidenced by their heightened preferences for sweet and salty tastes. However, little is known about the ontogeny of sour taste preferences, despite the growing market of extreme sour candies. The present study investigated whether the level of sourness most preferred in a food matrix and the ability to discriminate differences in sour intensity differed between 5- to 9-year-old children and their mothers, by using a rank-by-elimination procedure embedded in the context of a game. Mothers also completed a variety of questionnaires and children were asked several questions to assess whether children's temperament and food preferences and habits related to sour preferences. The results indicated that, although every mother and all but two of the children (92%) were able to rank the gelatins from most to least sour, more than one-third (35%) of the children, but virtually none of the adults, preferred the high levels of sour taste (0.25 M citric acid) in gelatin. Those children who preferred the extreme sour tastes were significantly less food neophobic (P < 0.05) and tended to experience a greater variety of fruits when compared with the remaining children (P = 0.11). Moreover, the children's preference for sour tastes generalized to other foods, such as candies and lemons, as reported by both children and mothers. These findings are the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that sour taste preferences are heightened during childhood and that such preferences are related to children's food habits and preferences. Further research is needed to unfold the relationship between the level of sour taste preferred and the actual consumption of sour-tasting foods and flavors in children.

  12. Centimeter to Decimeter Size Spherical and Cylindrical Features in Gale Crater Sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Clegg, S.; Fabre, C.; Nachon, M.; Rubin, D.; Goetz, W.; Mangold, N.; Schroeder, S.; Rapin, W.; Milliken, R.; Fairen, A. G.; Oehler, D.; Forni, O.; Sautter, V.; Blaney, D.; Le Moulelic, S.; Anderson, R. B.; Cousin, A.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity rover traverse in Gale crater has explored a large series of sedimentary deposits in an ancient lake on Mars. Over the nine kilometers of traverse a recurrent observation has been southward-dipping sedimentary strata, from Shaler at the edge of Yellowknife Bay to the striated units near the Kimberley. Within the sedimentary strata cm- to decimeter- size hollow spheroidal objects and some apparent cylindrical objects have been observed. These features have not been seen by previous landed missions. The first of these were observed on sol 122 in the Gillespie Lake member at Yellowknife Bay. Additional hollow features were observed in the Point Lake outcrop in the same area. More recently a spherical and apparently hollow object, Winnipesaukee, was observed by ChemCam and Mastcam on sol 653. Here we describe the settings, morphology, and associated compositions, and we discuss possible origins of these objects.

  13. Metallurgical Evaluation of the Five-Inch Cylindrical Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    2000-08-15

    A metallurgical evaluation of the 5-inch cylindrical induction melter (CIM) vessel was performed by the Materials Technology Section to evaluate the metallurgical condition after operating for approximately 375 hours at 1400 to 1500 Degrees Celsius during a 2 year period. Results indicate that wall thinning and significant grain growth occurred in the lower portion of the conical section and the drain tube. No through-wall penetrations were found in the cylindrical and conical sections of the CIM vessel and only one leak site was identified in the drain tube. Failure of the drain tube was associated with a localized over heating and intercrystalline fracture.

  14. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived and the generated field is compared to that of a Halbach cylinder of equal dimensions. The ideal remanence magnet is shown in most cases to generate a significantly lower field than the equivalent Halbach cylinder, although the field is generated with higher efficiency. The most efficient Halbach cylinder is shown to generate a field exactly twice as large as the equivalent ideal remanence magnet.

  15. The evanescent wavefield part of a cylindrical vector beam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The evanescent wave of the cylindrical vector field is analyzed using the vector angular spectrum of the electromagnetic beam. Comparison between the contributions of the TE and TM terms of both the propagating and the evanescent waves associated with the cylindrical vector field in free space is demonstrated. The physical pictures of the evanescent wave and the propagating wave are well illustrated from the vectorial structure, which provides a new approach to manipulating laser beams by choosing the states of polarization in the cross-section of the field. PMID:24104116

  16. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1999-01-01

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image.

  17. Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

    1999-01-12

    A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

  18. Trapping of Microparticles in Cylindrical Standing Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeongwon; Hwang, Haerang; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to determine the positions where microparticles are trapped in a cylindrical standing wave field, we derived equations giving the radiation force and potential energy distribution. Then, the trapped pattern and its variation with time in a hollow cylindrical transducer were simulated. The simulation results showed that polystyrene particles moved to and aggregated near positions corresponding to pressure nodes, which were estimated from the derived equations. These were confirmed by measurement. In addition, it was demonstrated that biological particles of the green algae chlorella show similar trapping phenomena to polystyrene particles.

  19. Active Constrained Layer Damping of Thin Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAY, M. C.; OH, J.; BAZ, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effectiveness of the active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is presented. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. Experiments are performed to verify the numerical predictions. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  20. Analytic descriptions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A simple but highly efficient approach for dealing with the problem of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagation in a nonlinear medium is proposed based on an exact solution proposed recently. We derive an analytical explicit formula, which exhibiting rich interesting nonlinear effects, to describe the propagation of any amount of cylindrical electromagnetic waves in a nonlinear medium. The results obtained by using the present method are accurately concordant with the results of using traditional coupled-wave equations. As an example of application, we discuss how a third wave affects the sum- and difference-frequency generation of two waves propagation in the nonlinear medium. PMID:26073066

  1. Liquid bridge as a tunable-focus cylindrical liquid lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Tabatabaei, N.; Amirfazli, A.

    2017-01-01

    We proposed a method to create a tunable-focus cylindrical liquid lens using a liquid bridge between two narrow surfaces. Due to the surface edge effect, the interface of the liquid bridge (on the long side) was shown to be able to serve as a tunable-focus cylindrical liquid lens. The working distance of the lens can be adjusted by changing either or both of the height of the bridge (H) and the volume of the liquid (V). By varying H and V, the lens can serve as either diverging or converging lens, with a minimum working distance of 2.11 mm.

  2. Non-modal analysis of the diocotron instability: Cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2013-04-15

    The temporal evolution of the linear diocotron instability of the cylindrical annular plasma column is investigated by employing the extension of the shearing modes methodology to the cylindrical geometry. It was obtained that the spatial time-dependent distortion of the electron density initial perturbations by shear flows leads to the non-modal evolution of the potential, which was referred to as the manifestation of the continuous spectrum. The evolution process leads toward the convergence to the phase-locking configuration of the mutually growing normal modes.

  3. Simple model of capillary condensation in cylindrical pores.

    PubMed

    Szybisz, Leszek; Urrutia, Ignacio

    2002-11-01

    A simple model based on an approximation of the dropletlike model is formulated for studying adsorption of fluids into cylindrical pores. This model yields a nearly universal description of capillary condensation transitions for noble gases confined by alkali metals. The system's thermodynamical behavior is predicted from the values of two dimensionless parameters: D* (the reduced asymptotic strength of the fluid-adsorber interaction, a function of temperature) and R* (the reduced radius of the pore). The phenomenon of hysteresis inherently related to capillary condensation is discussed. The connection to a previously proposed universality for cylindrical pores is also established.

  4. Simple model of capillary condensation in cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek; Urrutia, Ignacio

    2002-11-01

    A simple model based on an approximation of the dropletlike model is formulated for studying adsorption of fluids into cylindrical pores. This model yields a nearly universal description of capillary condensation transitions for noble gases confined by alkali metals. The system's thermodynamical behavior is predicted from the values of two dimensionless parameters: D* (the reduced asymptotic strength of the fluid-adsorber interaction, a function of temperature) and R* (the reduced radius of the pore). The phenomenon of hysteresis inherently related to capillary condensation is discussed. The connection to a previously proposed universality for cylindrical pores is also established.

  5. Microwave guiding in air by a cylindrical filament array waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Payeur, S.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2008-03-03

    Microwave guiding was demonstrated over 16 cm in air using a large diameter hollow plasma waveguide. The waveguide was generated with the 100 TW femtosecond laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility. A deformable mirror was used to spatially shape the intense laser pulses in order to generate hundreds of filaments judiciously distributed in a cylindrical shape, creating a cylindrical plasma wall that acts as a microwave waveguide. The microwaves were confined for about 10 ns, which corresponds to the free electron plasma wall recombination time. The characteristics of the plasma waveguide and the results of microwave guiding are presented.

  6. Assessing Preference for Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Casey J.; Samaha, Andrew L.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Bogoev, Bistra K.; Boyle, Megan A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined a procedure to assess preference for social interactions in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Preferences were identified in five individuals using a paired-choice procedure in which participants approached therapists who provided different forms of social interactions. A subsequent tracking test showed that…

  7. Squirrel Foraging Preferences: Gone Nuts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Randi A.

    2007-01-01

    This field exercise examines the feeding preferences of Gray Squirrels ("Sciurus carolinensis"). Students present squirrels with a variety of food types in a cafeteria-style arrangement in order to test hypotheses about foraging preferences. This exercise, which is appropriate for introductory biology, ecology, and animal behavior classes, is…

  8. Temporal Constraint Reasoning With Preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Morris, Paul; Morris, Robert; Rossi, Francesca

    2001-01-01

    A number of reasoning problems involving the manipulation of temporal information can naturally be viewed as implicitly inducing an ordering of potential local decisions involving time (specifically, associated with durations or orderings of events) on the basis of preferences. For example. a pair of events might be constrained to occur in a certain order, and, in addition. it might be preferable that the delay between them be as large, or as small, as possible. This paper explores problems in which a set of temporal constraints is specified, where each constraint is associated with preference criteria for making local decisions about the events involved in the constraint, and a reasoner must infer a complete solution to the problem such that, to the extent possible, these local preferences are met in the best way. A constraint framework for reasoning about time is generalized to allow for preferences over event distances and durations, and we study the complexity of solving problems in the resulting formalism. It is shown that while in general such problems are NP-hard, some restrictions on the shape of the preference functions, and on the structure of the preference set, can be enforced to achieve tractability. In these cases, a simple generalization of a single-source shortest path algorithm can be used to compute a globally preferred solution in polynomial time.

  9. Preferences for Academic Advising Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Susan B.; Dickman, Marcia M.; Fuqua, Dale R.

    2005-01-01

    This psychometric study was designed to test the feasibility of measuring college students' preferences for developmental and prescriptive advising styles as separate constructs. Part 5 of the Academic Advising Inventory (Winston & Sandor, 1984b) was revised into two independent scales, one for measuring preferences for developmental advising…

  10. Voter-Weighted Environmental Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Jason; Huber, Joel; Viscusi, W. Kip

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the political economy of preferences with respect to the environment using a new stated preference survey that presents the first benefit values for national water quality levels. The mean valuation greatly exceeds the median value, as the distribution of valuations is highly skewed. The study couples the survey valuations…

  11. Children Reason about Shared Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Christine A.; Markson, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Two-year-old children's reasoning about the relation between their own and others' preferences was investigated across two studies. In Experiment 1, children first observed 2 actors display their individual preferences for various toys. Children were then asked to make inferences about new, visually inaccessible toys and books that were described…

  12. Children's Reading Preferences in Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Rob; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Children, ages 8-9 and 11-12, rated fiction they had just read. Boys preferred supernatural, adventure and mystery stories while girls rated fairy and pony stories highly. Both preferred characters of their own sex. Sex differences were smaller in the 11-12 age group (f=fiche number). (CP)

  13. Morphological Consequences of Frustration in ABC Triblock Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Radlauer, Madalyn R.; Sinturel, Christophe; Asai, Yusuke; Arora, Akash; Bates, Frank S.; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2016-12-19

    Three poly(styrene)-block-poly(isoprene)-block-poly(lactide) (PS-b-PI-b-PLA, SIL) triblock terpolymers were synthesized and characterized in the bulk and as thin films. The pronounced incompatibility of the covalently connected PI and PLA led to significant frustration and the tendency to minimize their intermaterial dividing surface area. This resulted in the formation of a core–shell cylinder morphology with exaggerated nonconstant mean curvature from triblock polymers with equal block volume fractions rather than the more typical lamellar morphology. The effect of frustration was magnified in thin films by both confinement and interfacial interactions such that the PI domains became discontinuous. Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) calculations emphasize that the marked difference in the PS/PI and PI/PLA interaction parameters promotes the formation of nonlamellar morphologies. However, SCFT predicts that lamellar morphology is more stable than the observed cylindrical morphology, demonstrating a limitation that arises from the underlying assumptions.

  14. Hypersonic Magneto-Fluid-Dynamic Compression in Cylindrical Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, Joseph S.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic magneto-fluid-dynamic interaction has been successfully performed as a virtual leading-edge strake and a virtual cowl of a cylindrical inlet. In a side-by-side experimental and computational study, the magnitude of the induced compression was found to be depended on configuration and electrode placement. To better understand the interacting phenomenon the present investigation is focused on a direct current discharge at the leading edge of a cylindrical inlet for which validating experimental data is available. The present computational result is obtained by solving the magneto-fluid-dynamics equations at the low magnetic Reynolds number limit and using a nonequilibrium weakly ionized gas model based on the drift-diffusion theory. The numerical simulation provides a detailed description of the intriguing physics. After validation with experimental measurements, the computed results further quantify the effectiveness of a magnet-fluid-dynamic compression for a hypersonic cylindrical inlet. At a minuscule power input to a direct current surface discharge of 8.14 watts per square centimeter of electrode area produces an additional compression of 6.7 percent for a constant cross-section cylindrical inlet.

  15. Loss Processes of Metastable Molecules in Cylindrical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    2000-10-01

    Assuming a closed cylindrical volume, the spatiotemporal variation of the density distribution of the metastable molecules N_2(A^3Σ_u^+) in the cylindrical volume are calculated from the diffusion equation analysis under the different reflection coefficients at the flat electrode surfaces and at the cylindrical wall.(S.Suzuki, H.Itoh, N.Ikuta and H.Sekizawa:Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 39, 1333, 2000)(S. Suzuki, H. Itoh, H. Sekizawa and N. Ikuta: Papers of Technical Meeting on Electrical Discharges, ED-98-128, 17, 1998 (in Japanese)) We solve the diffusion equation by separation of variables using the boundary condition of the third kind that is taken account of the reflection at the electrode surfaces.(S. Suzuki, H. Itoh, N. Ikuta and H. Sekizawa: J. Phys. D : Appl. Phys., 25, 1568, 1992) The obtained solution of the diffusion equation are possible to describe the density profiles along the longitudinal and the radial directions. The influence of the density distribution by the different reflection coefficient at each of electrodes and at the cylindrical wall is investigated. Furthermore, the effective lifetime of the diffusing metastable molecules is also discussed under different reflection coefficients.

  16. Wave propagation in laminated orthotropic circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1976-01-01

    An exact three-dimensional analysis of wave propagation in laminated orthotropic circular cylindrical-shells is developed. Numerical results are presented for three-ply shells, and for various axial wave lengths, circumferential wave numbers, and thicknesses. Results from a thin shell theory and a refined approximate theory are compared with the exact results.

  17. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Redmon, John W. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly (15) made of beams (18, 19, 20, 21) joined by a center box structure (23). The assembly (15) is adapted to be mounted by brackets (16) to the outer end of a cylindrical case (11). The center box structure (23) has a vertical shaft (25) rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly (15). Secured to the vertical shaft (25) is a radius arm (28) which is adapted to rotate with shaft (25). On the longer end of the radius arm (28) is a measuring tip (30) which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm (28). An electric servomotor (49) rotates the vertical shaft (25) and an electronic resolver (61) provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft (25). The electric signals are provided to a computer station (73) which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  18. Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-05-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  19. Calibrated cylindrical Mach probe in a plasma wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Dandurand, D.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Lukin, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    A simple cylindrical Mach probe is described along with an independent calibration procedure in a magnetized plasma wind tunnel. A particle orbit calculation corroborates our model. The probe operates in the weakly magnetized regime in which probe dimension and ion orbit are of the same scale. Analytical and simulation models are favorably compared with experimental calibration.

  20. Static Solutions of Einstein's Equations with Cylindrical Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trendafilova, C. S.; Fulling, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    In analogy with the standard derivation of the Schwarzschild solution, we find all static, cylindrically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations for vacuum. These include not only the well-known cone solution, which is locally flat, but others in which the metric coefficients are powers of the radial coordinate and the spacetime is…

  1. Optical scanning apparatus for indicia imprinted about a cylindrical axis

    DOEpatents

    Villarreal, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation.

  2. Applications of bent cylindrical mirrors to x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    Bent cylindrical mirrors are considered as substitutes for paraboloidal and ellipsoidal mirrors in x-ray beamlines. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations in the application of bent cylinders to typical beamline configurations.

  3. QUASI-PML FOR WAVES IN CYLINDRICAL COORDINATES. (R825225)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We prove that the straightforward extension of Berenger's original perfectly matched layer (PML) is not reflectionless at a cylindrical interface in the continuum limit. A quasi-PLM is developed as an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for the finite-difference time-domain method...

  4. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  5. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  6. Simulated, Theoretical and Experimental Shock Trajectories in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzleiter, Randall; Atchison, Walter; Bowers, Richard; Guzik, Joyce

    2001-06-01

    The current work compares computations and similarity relations for convergent shocks with experimental data from cylindrical implosions on the Shiva Star capacitor bank at AFRL. These experiments consisted of a solid cylindrical aluminum liner that is magnetically imploded onto a central target. The central target consists of an inner Lucite cylinder surrounded by an outer Sn layer. Shock propagation within the Lucite is measured to provide comparisons between simulations and theory of convergent shocks. Target design utilized the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) Eulerian hydrodynamics code RAGE in 2- and 3D. 1D models of the solid liner utilizing the RAVEN MHD code set initial liner/target interaction parameters, which are then used as initial conditions for the RAGE calculations. At liner/target impact, a convergent shock is generated that drives subsequent hydrodynamics experiments. In concentric targets, shocks will converge on axis, characterizing the symmetry of the liner driver. By shifting the Lucite target center away from the liner symmetry axis, variations in shock propagation velocity generate off-center shock convergence. Comparison of experimentally measured and simulated shock trajectories will be discussed as will convergence effects associated with cylindrical geometry. Efforts are currently underway to compare equation-of-state effects by utilizing a Gruneisen EOS instead of the original SESAME tables. Radial convergence is examined through comparisons with similarity solutions in cylindrical geometry.

  7. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Redmon, John W., Sr. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly made of beams joined by a center box structure. The assembly is adapted to be mounted by brackets to the outer end of a cylindrical case. The center box structure has a vertical shaft rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly. Secured to the vertical shaft is a radius arm which is adapted to rotate with the shaft. On the longer end of the radius arm is a measuring tip which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm. An electric servomotor rotates the vertical shaft and an electronic resolver provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft. The electric signals are provided to a computer station which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  8. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  9. The cylindrical or tubiliform glands of Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Candelas, G C; Ortiz, A; Molina, C

    1986-02-01

    The cylindrical or tubiliform glands of the spider Nephila clavipes have been studied and compared to the large ampullates on which we have previously reported. The three pairs of cylindrical or tubiliform glands secrete the fibroin for the organism's egg case. Their solubilized luminar contents migrate as a homogeneous band in Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and turn out to be a larger protein than that produced by the large ampullates. The excised cylindrical glands remain metabolically active for several hours in a simple culture medium, where fibroin synthesis can be monitored through the incorporation of 14C alanine. The glands' response to a fibroin production stimulus does not reach the magnitude displayed by the large ampullates, but this is to be expected since their products supply different functions in this organism. This fibroin also seems to be elongated discontinuously. Translational pauses have been detected in the secretory epithelium of cylindrical and large ampullate glands of Nephila as well as in the silk glands of Bombyx mori. Since these glands produce the fibroin for the females egg case, they should prove to be an interesting model system.

  10. Capillary condensation of 4He in cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Szybisz, Leszek

    2004-10-01

    The adsorption of superfluid 4He confined into cylindrical pores of alkali metals is illustrated by looking at the case of Na. A density functional formalism is utilized for the theoretical description. The energetics and density profiles are determined as a function of the radius of cylinders and the filling fraction. These results are compared with those provided by a simple model recently proposed.

  11. A circumferential crack in a cylindrical shell under tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan-Fama, M. E.; Sanders, J. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A closed cylindrical shell under uniform internal pressure has a slit around a portion of its circumference. Linear shallow shell theory predicts inverse square-root-type singularities in certain of the stresses at the crack tips. This paper reports the computed strength of these singularities for different values of a dimensionless parameter based on crack length, shell radius and shell thickness.

  12. Buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirano, Y.

    1979-01-01

    This note presents closed-form solutions for axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling of angle-ply laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression. The axisymmetrical and axially unsymmetrical buckling stress are found to be different from each other, and the best lamination angles which give the highest buckling stress are obtained.

  13. Cylindrical Millemeter-Wave Imaging Technique and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2006-08-01

    The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurements for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data is used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

  14. Screen of cylindrical lenses produces stereoscopic television pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nork, C. L.

    1966-01-01

    Stereoscopic television pictures are produced by placing a colorless, transparent screen of adjacent parallel cylindrical lenses before a raster from two synchronized TV cameras. Alternate frames from alternate cameras are displayed. The viewers sensory perception fuses the two images into one three-dimensional picture.

  15. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  16. Constitutive sensitivity of the oscillatory behaviour of hyperelastic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Iglesias, D.; Vadillo, G.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Free and forced nonlinear radial oscillations of a thick-walled cylindrical shell are investigated. The shell material is taken to be incompressible and isotropic within the framework of finite nonlinear elasticity. In comparison with previous seminal works dealing with the dynamic behaviour of hyperelastic cylindrical tubes, in this paper we have developed a broader analysis on the constitutive sensitivity of the oscillatory response of the shell. In this regard, our investigation is inspired by the recent works of Bucchi and Hearn (2013) [28,29], who carried out a constitutive sensitivity analysis of similar problem with hyperelastic cylindrical membranes subjected to static inflation. In the present paper we consider two different Helmholtz free-energy functions to describe the material behaviour: Mooney-Rivlin and Yeoh constitutive models. We carry out a systematic comparison of the results obtained by application of both constitutive models, paying specific attention to the critical initial and loading conditions which preclude the oscillatory response of the cylindrical tube. It has been found that these critical conditions are strongly dependent on the specific constitutive model selected, even though both Helmholtz free-energy functions were calibrated using the same experimental data.

  17. Dynamics of a Liquid Dielectric Attracted by a Cylindrical Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Rafael; Lemos, Nivaldo A.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a liquid dielectric attracted by a vertical cylindrical capacitor are studied. Contrary to what might be expected from the standard calculation of the force exerted by the capacitor, the motion of the dielectric is different depending on whether the charge or the voltage of the capacitor is held constant. The problem turns out to…

  18. Cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuators reinforced with inextensible fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulbourne, Nakhiah C. S.

    2006-03-01

    Novel actuator configurations for various applications can be obtained using cylindrical dielectric elastomer actuators. A new configuration for a contractile electro-elastomer is presented here for the first time. A cylindrical or tubular configuration is used to realize simultaneous axial shortening and radial expansion when a voltage is applied across the thickness of the hollow cylinder. In this configuration, the inner and outer surfaces of a cylindrical dielectric elastomer are coated with compliant electrodes. The outer cylindrical surface is then enclosed by a network of helical fibers that are very thin, very flexible and inextensible. Fiber networks or cord families are commonly used in many different materials and for a variety of applications. The primary purpose of these networks is structural, that is to say, for reinforcement. The composite active structure proposed here is reminiscent of the McKibben actuator, a pneumatically actuated cylindrical construct consisting of a flexible rubber bladder sheathed in a fiber network, which garners its impressive contracting force from the inextensible fibers that prevent axial extension when an inflation pressure is applied to the internal bladder [1]. The system is modeled using an electro- elastic formulation derived from the large deformation theory of reinforced cylinders [2]. The model combines Maxwell-Faraday electrostatics and nonlinear elasticity theory [3]. Illustratively, solutions are obtained assuming a Mooney-Rivlin material model for a silicone actuator. The results indicate that the relationship between the axial contraction force and the axial shortening is linear for the voltage range considered. The importance of other system parameters such as the fiber angle and the applied constant pressure is also reported.

  19. Preferences in Data Production Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Brafman, Ronen; Pang, Wanlin

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the data production problem, which consists of transforming a set of (initial) input data into a set of (goal) output data. There are typically many choices among input data and processing algorithms, each leading to significantly different end products. To discriminate among these choices, the planner supports an input language that provides a number of constructs for specifying user preferences over data (and plan) properties. We discuss these preference constructs, how we handle them to guide search, and additional challenges in the area of preference management that this important application domain offers.

  20. A Method to Calculate the Surface Tension of a Cylindrical Droplet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xiaosong; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2010-01-01

    The history of Laplace's equations for spherical and cylindrical droplets and the concept of dividing surface in Gibbs' thermodynamic theory of capillary phenomena are briefly reviewed. The existing theories of surface tensions of cylindrical droplets are briefly reviewed too. For cylindrical droplets, a new method to calculate the radius and the…

  1. Teachers' Preferences for Reading Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canney, George; Neuenfeldt, Christine

    1993-01-01

    Reports a survey of 639 teachers (grades K-9) that revealed most preferred using a combination of basal and tradebooks in their reading programs regardless of teaching experience, formal training in reading, or grade level. (NH)

  2. Enriching tortoises: assessing color preference.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiza F; Mello, Humberto Espirito Santo; Young, Robert John

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment is a principle that is used to enhance the quality of care for nonhuman animals in captivity. To achieve this, it is necessary to understand the animal's needs. This study focused on color preference to provide food stimuli as a source of environmental enrichment for the tortoise, Chelonoidis denticulata. During this study, the stimuli green-, blue-, yellow-, and red-colored bananas and plaster blocks were randomly offered to the tortoises. Analysis of the data showed that the tortoises had a preference for the stimuli dyed with colors red and yellow over the other presented colors. It was possible to conclude that presenting food in different colors stimulated the animals to evaluate their environment and make choices in relation to their color preference. Thus, this experiment introduced an element of choice into their lives, beyond identifying color food preferences for the tortoises. The element of choice is known to be important to animal welfare.

  3. Clothing preferences of older consumers.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, U

    1998-06-01

    The study focused on identifying the apparel needs of older men and women in a midwestern county. A survey technique was used to collect data on older peoples' preferences for apparel including accessories, most preferred items, identified similarity with previous apparel choices, and identification of buyer of the apparel. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Implications of the findings for future research and possibility of use by apparel designers, manufacturers, and retailers are discussed.

  4. Human preference for individual colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen E.; Schloss, Karen B.

    2010-02-01

    Color preference is an important aspect of human behavior, but little is known about why people like some colors more than others. Recent results from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP) provide detailed measurements of preferences among 32 chromatic colors as well as other relevant aspects of color perception. We describe the fit of several color preference models, including ones based on cone outputs, color-emotion associations, and Palmer and Schloss's ecological valence theory. The ecological valence theory postulates that color serves an adaptive "steering' function, analogous to taste preferences, biasing organisms to approach advantageous objects and avoid disadvantageous ones. It predicts that people will tend to like colors to the extent that they like the objects that are characteristically that color, averaged over all such objects. The ecological valence theory predicts 80% of the variance in average color preference ratings from the Weighted Affective Valence Estimates (WAVEs) of correspondingly colored objects, much more variance than any of the other models. We also describe how hue preferences for single colors differ as a function of gender, expertise, culture, social institutions, and perceptual experience.

  5. Liquid inflow to a baffled cylindrical tank during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staskus, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in which the behavior of liquid inflow to a cylindrical tank containing inlet baffles was observed during weightlessness. A single tank radius (2 cm), inlet radius (0.2 cm), and liquid (ethanol)were used. The inlet end of the tank was hemispherical with a 30 deg convergent inlet. All the baffle configurations tested were cylindrically symmetric and mounted coaxially with the tank within the hemispherical end. Both stable and unstable inflow behavior were observed using each baffle. It was found that, depending on which of the baffles was used, the critical inflow velocity at which a transition to unstable inflow began was from 2.5 to 12 times greater than the corresponding velocity in an unbaffled tank.

  6. Enhanced converse magnetoelectric effect in cylindrical piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Ning

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced converse magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been experimentally observed in cylindrical PZT-Terfenol-D piezoelectric-magnetostrictive bilayered composites, where the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive components are coupled through normal stresses instead of shear stresses that act in most of previous multiferroic composites. A theoretical model based on elastodynamics analysis has been proposed to describe the frequency response of converse ME effect for axial and radial modes in the bilayered cylindrical composites. The theory shows good agreement with the experimental results. The different variation tendency of resonant converse ME coefficient, as well as different variation rate of resonance frequency with bias magnetic field for axial and radial modes is interpreted in terms of demagnetizing effect. This work is of theoretical and technological significance for the application of converse ME effect as magnetic sensor, transducers, coil-free flux switch, etc.

  7. Precise DOA Estimation Using SAGE Algorithm with a Cylindrical Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Ohgane, Takeo

    A uniform circular array (UCA) is a well-known array configuration which can accomplish estimation of 360° field of view with identical accuracy. However, a UCA cannot estimate coherent signals because we cannot apply the SSP owing to the structure of UCA. Although a variety of studies on UCA in coherent multipath environments have been done, it is impossible to estimate the DOA of coherent signals with different incident polar angles. Then, we have proposed Root-MUSIC algorithm with a cylindrical array. However, the estimation performance is degraded when incident signals arrive with close polar angles. To solve this problem, in the letter, we propose to use SAGE algorithm with a cylindrical array. Here, we adopt a CLA Root-MUSIC for the initial estimation and decompose two-dimensional search to double one-dimensional search to reduce the calculation load. The results show that the proposal achieves high resolution with low complexity.

  8. Stable plasma configurations in a cylindrical magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levchenko, I.; Romanov, M.; Keidar, M.; Beilis, I. I.

    2004-09-20

    Transition between different plasma configurations is studied in a system with negative biased cylindrical target in crossed ExB fields. It was found that the diffuse plasma torus formed around the cylindrical target in relatively small magnetic field (0.02 T on target surface) changes the shape with magnetic field to form a thin disk with a width lower than 1 cm when target voltage is less than -400 V. The target current decreases sharply when the magnetic field reaches some critical value. When the target voltage exceeds 400 V, the target current increases with the magnetic field and the plasma has always toroidal shape. The plasma behavior can be understood taking in account the interaction of the drift currents and the magnetic field.

  9. Sound Transmission through a Cylindrical Sandwich Shell with Honeycomb Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Robinson, Jay H.; Silcox, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Sound transmission through an infinite cylindrical sandwich shell is studied in the context of the transmission of airborne sound into aircraft interiors. The cylindrical shell is immersed in fluid media and excited by an oblique incident plane sound wave. The internal and external fluids are different and there is uniform airflow in the external fluid medium. An explicit expression of transmission loss is derived in terms of modal impedance of the fluids and the shell. The results show the effects of (a) the incident angles of the plane wave; (b) the flight conditions of Mach number and altitude of the aircraft; (c) the ratios between the core thickness and the total thickness of the shell; and (d) the structural loss factors on the transmission loss. Comparisons of the transmission loss are made among different shell constructions and different shell theories.

  10. Nonlinear dynamo action in a cylindrical container driven by precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nore, C.; Léorat, J.; Guermond, J.-L.; Luddens, F.

    2011-12-01

    Precession, which results simply from the composition of two rotations with distinct axes, is an efficient way to drive a 3D flow in a closed rigid container. Are such flows relevant to dynamo action in some astrophysical bodies? Positive answers are available for a spherical and a spheroidal containers, using parameters which are, however, not realistic. An experimental approach could be relevant to natural dynamos and seems within reach using a cylindrical container (cf. the experiment now planned at the DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies in Germany (DRESDYN), F. Stefani, personal communication, 2011). Using a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code (SFEMaNS), we numerically demonstrate that precession is able to drive a cylindrical dynamo.

  11. Precession of cylindrical dust particles in the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, N.; Ticoş, C. M.

    2015-10-15

    The vertical precession of cylindrical dust particles levitated in the sheath of an rf plasma is experimentally investigated. Typically, the dust particles have two equilibrium positions depending on the orientation of their longitudinal axis: horizontal and vertical. A transition between these two states is induced by rapidly increasing the neutral gas pressure in the plasma chamber. During this transition, the cylindrical dust particles make an angle with the horizontal and rotate about their center of mass. The rotation speed increases as the dust rods aligned with the vertical axis. All dust particles will eventually end up in the vertical state while spinning fast about their longitudinal axis. Dust-dust interaction and the attracting ion wakes are possible mechanisms for inducing the observed dust precession.

  12. Coupled domain wall oscillations in magnetic cylindrical nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Murapaka, Chandrasekhar; Goolaup, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-02-07

    We report on transverse domain wall (DW) dynamics in two closely spaced cylindrical nanowires. The magnetostatically coupled DWs are shown to undergo an intrinsic oscillatory motion along the nanowire length in addition to their default rotational motion. In the absence of external forces, the amplitude of the DW oscillation is governed by the change in the frequency of the DW rotation. It is possible to sustain the DW oscillations by applying spin-polarized current to the nanowires to balance the repulsive magnetostatic coupling. The current density required to sustain the DW oscillation is found to be in the order of 10{sup 5 }A/cm{sup 2}. Morover, our analysis of the oscillation reveals that the DWs in cylindrical nanowires possess a finite mass.

  13. Single-file diffusion of protein drugs through cylindrical nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-07-27

    A new drug delivery device using cylindrical block copolymer nanochannels was successfully developed for controlled protein drug delivery applications. Depending on the hydrodynamic diameter of the protein drugs, the pore size in cylindrical nanochannels could be controlled precisely down to 6 nm by Au deposition. Zero-order release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human growth hormone (hGH) by single-file diffusion, which has been observed for gas diffusion through zeolite pores, was realized up to 2 months without protein denaturation. Furthermore, a nearly constant in vivo release of hGH from the drug delivery nanodevice implanted to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was continued up to 3 weeks, demonstrating the feasibility for long-term controlled delivery of therapeutic protein drugs.

  14. Development of cylindrical secondary lithium/polyaniline batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changzhi, Li; Borong, Zhang; Baochen, Wang

    1993-04-01

    The cylindrical 'D'-size batteries were fabricated by polyaniline paste cathode and lithium foil anode sandwiched with microporous polypropylene separator. The electrolyte used was LiClO 4 dissolved in a mixed solvent of propylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane. The results of charge/discharge curves, charge/discharge cycles, the short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage storage and the change of discharge capacity with temperature, discharge current are reported.

  15. Analysis of cylindrical arrays of microstrip rectangular patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. M.; Lumini, F.; Lacava, J. C. D.; Richards, F. P.

    1991-04-01

    A model for analysis of the radiation characteristics of cylindrical arrays of microstrip rectangular patches is presented. The model is based on the Green function for the multilayered structure calculated in the Fourier domain. The fields radiated by the array are calculated through an asymptotic expression obtained by the application of the stationary phase method. Radiation characteristics such as the directivity function, the ripple and the crosspolarization level are discussed for arrays excited in the TM(01) mode.

  16. Evaluation of direct-exchange areas for a cylindrical enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Sika, J. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on a method for calculating the radiative heat transfer direct-exchange areas for surface-to-surface, volume-to-surface, and volume-to-volume pairs of zones in axisymmetric cylindrical geometries. With this method the calculation of the direct-exchange areas can be transformed from the original four-, five-, and sixfold integrals in the defining relations to just single and/or double integrals. Gray gas with absorption coefficient K is assumed.

  17. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime.

  18. Liquid-drop-like model for cylindrical helium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    2000-08-01

    Free liquid 4He at T=0 K with cylindrical symmetry is studied. The ground-state energy and chemical potential are computed by using a density functional approach. A liquid-drop-like model is formulated for analyzing the behavior of these observables as a function of the size of the systems. It is shown that such a model allows to get precise information about the asymptotic values of the energy per particle and surface tension.

  19. Transition in Electron Transport in a Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Parker, Y. Raitses, and N.J. Fisch

    2010-06-02

    Through the use of high-speed camera and Langmuir probe measurements in a cylindrical Hall thruster, we report the discovery of a rotating spoke of increased plasma density and light emission which correlates with increased electron transport across the magnetic field. As cathode electron emission is increased, a sharp transition occurs where the spoke disappears and electron transport decreases. This suggests that a significant fraction of the electron current might be directed through the spoke.

  20. Cylindrical Panel Interior Noise Control Using a Pair of Piezoelectric Actuator and Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIN, O. R.; LIU, Z.-X.; WANG, Z.-L.

    2001-09-01

    Active control of acoustic pressure in a cylindrical cavity with a flexible cylindrical panel using a pair of piezoelectric actuator and sensor, which is one part of the cylindrical panel, is simulated. Model expansion method is used in the establishment of the state equation of the system. The active vibration control of the cylindrical panel and the interior noise reduction are performed by applying the linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control theory to the structural acoustic coupled system. Two cases of different external forces acting on the cylindrical panel are illustrated. The results demonstrate that such a control system can efficiently reduce the structural-borne noise.

  1. A Novel Automated Method for Analyzing Cylindrical Computed Tomography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Burke, E. R.; Rauser, R. W.; Martin, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel software method is presented that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography. This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2-D sheets in the vertical direction in addition to volume rendering and normal plane views provided by traditional CT software. The method is based on interior and exterior surface edge detection and under proper conditions, is FULLY AUTOMATED and requires no input from the user except the correct voxel dimension from the CT scan. The software is available from NASA in 32- and 64-bit versions that can be applied to gigabyte-sized data sets, processing data either in random access memory or primarily on the computer hard drive. Please inquire with the presenting author if further interested. This software differentiates itself in total from other possible re-slicing software solutions due to complete automation and advanced processing and analysis capabilities.

  2. Characteristics of Cylindrical Microwave Plasma Source at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seungil; Youn, S.; Kim, S. B.; Yoo, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    A microwave plasma source with a cylindrical resonance cavity has been proposed to generate the plasma at low pressure. This plasma source consists of magnetron, waveguide, antenna, and cavity. The microwave generating device is a commercial magnetron with 1 kW output power at the frequency of 2.45 GHz. The microwave is transmitted through the rectangular waveguide with the whistle shape, and coupled to the cavity by the slot antenna. The resonant mode of the cylindrical cavity is the TE111 mode. The operating pressure is between 0.1 Torr and 0.3 Torr with the Argon and nitrogen gas. The electron temperature and electron number density of argon plasma were measured with the optical emission spectroscopy measurement. And Ar1s5 metastable density was measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The plasma diagnostic results of a cylindrical microwave plasma source would be described in this study. This work was supported by R&D Program of ``Plasma Advanced Technology for Agriculture and Food (Plasma Farming)'' through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI) funded by the Government funds.

  3. THE ATHENA ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE IN CYLINDRICAL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: ostriker@astro.umd.ed

    2010-05-15

    A method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code is described. The extension follows the approach of Athena's original developers and has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport (CT), a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the Riemann solvers. Angular momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and CT updates. Finally, we present a test suite of standard and novel problems in one, two, and three dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the Web.

  4. Chain-based communication in cylindrical underwater wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Nadeem; Jafri, Mohsin Raza; Khan, Zahoor Ali; Alrajeh, Nabil; Imran, Muhammad; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2015-02-04

    Appropriate network design is very significant for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs). Application-oriented UWSNs are planned to achieve certain objectives. Therefore, there is always a demand for efficient data routing schemes, which can fulfill certain requirements of application-oriented UWSNs. These networks can be of any shape, i.e., rectangular, cylindrical or square. In this paper, we propose chain-based routing schemes for application-oriented cylindrical networks and also formulate mathematical models to find a global optimum path for data transmission. In the first scheme, we devise four interconnected chains of sensor nodes to perform data communication. In the second scheme, we propose routing scheme in which two chains of sensor nodes are interconnected, whereas in third scheme single-chain based routing is done in cylindrical networks. After finding local optimum paths in separate chains, we find global optimum paths through their interconnection. Moreover, we develop a computational model for the analysis of end-to-end delay. We compare the performance of the above three proposed schemes with that of Power Efficient Gathering System in Sensor Information Systems (PEGASIS) and Congestion adjusted PEGASIS (C-PEGASIS). Simulation results show that our proposed 4-chain based scheme performs better than the other selected schemes in terms of network lifetime, end-to-end delay, path loss, transmission loss, and packet sending rate.

  5. Method for fabrication of cylindrical microlenses of selected shape

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.; Baer, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. The present invention has many applications, such as integrated optics, optical detectors and laser diodes. The lens, when connected to a laser diode bar, can provide a high intensity source of laser radiation for pumping a high average power solid state laser. In integrated optics, a lens can be used to couple light into and out of apertures such as waveguides. The lens can also be used to collect light, and focus it on a detector.

  6. Method for fabrication of cylindrical microlenses of selected shape

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.; Baer, T.M.

    1992-01-14

    The present invention provides a diffraction limited, high numerical aperture (fast) cylindrical microlens. The method for making the microlens is adaptable to produce a cylindrical lens that has almost any shape on its optical surfaces. The cylindrical lens may have a shape, such as elliptical or hyperbolic, designed to transform some particular given input light distribution into some desired output light distribution. In the method, the desired shape is first formed in a glass preform. Then, the preform is heated to the minimum drawing temperature and a fiber is drawn from it. The cross-sectional shape of the fiber bears a direct relation to the shape of the preform from which it was drawn. During the drawing process, the surfaces become optically smooth due to fire polishing. The present invention has many applications, such as integrated optics, optical detectors and laser diodes. The lens, when connected to a laser diode bar, can provide a high intensity source of laser radiation for pumping a high average power solid state laser. In integrated optics, a lens can be used to couple light into and out of apertures such as waveguides. The lens can also be used to collect light, and focus it on a detector. 11 figs.

  7. Inflation of stressed cylindrical tubes: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiming; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Ji, Hongwei; Wang, Zhiyong; Cai, Songbao

    2014-06-01

    The inflation of an initially stressed cylindrical shell provides a good illustration of the phenomenon of the initiation and propagation of an instability, which shares the same mathematical and mechanical features with a variety of other strain localization phenomena in engineering structures and materials. The high speed CCD camera and digital image processing system were used to measure the 3D shape of the inflated cylindrical tube. The localized bulge of a cylindrical tube with closed ends forms when the internal pressure reaches a critical value Pcr. As more air is filled into the tube, the pressure drops but the radius at the centre of the bulge will increase until it reaches a maximum value rmax. With continued inflation, the pressure stays at a constant value Pp. The purpose of this study is to investigate the critical and propagation pressures in the tubes and the profile outside when the shells under axial tension and internal pressure were inflating. We focus on the influence of the axial tension on the critical pressure. In this paper the problem is explored through experimental efforts. A series of experiments were conducted on commercially available natural rubber latex tubes involving different geometries and initial axial tensions, which were regarded as isotropic, homogeneous, incompressible and hyper-elastic materials.

  8. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  9. Determining the axis orientation of cylindrical magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhaojin; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Tielong; Lui, Anthony; Wang, Yuming; Dunlop, malcolm; Zhang, Yongcun; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new simple method for inferring the orientation of a magnetic flux rope, which is assumed to be a time-independent cylindrically symmetric structure via the direct single-point analysis of magnetic field structure. The model tests demonstrate that, for the cylindrical flux rope regardless of whether it is force-free or not, the method can consistently yield the axis orientation of the flux rope with higher accuracy and stability than the minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field and the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. Moreover, the radial distance to the axis center and the current density can also be estimated consistently. Application to two actual flux transfer events observed by the four satellites of the Cluster mission demonstrates that the method is more appropriate to be used for the inner part of flux rope, which might be closer to the cylindrical structure, showing good agreement with the results obtained from the optimal Grad-Shafranov reconstruction and the least squares technique of Faraday's law, but fails to produce such agreement for the outer satellite that grazes the flux rope. Therefore, the method must be used with caution.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments in a cylindrically convergent geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B.; Weir, S.

    1995-08-25

    Due to the sensitivity of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities to initial conditions and due to the difficulty of forming well controlled cylindrical or spherical fluid interfaces, Rayleigh-Taylor experiments are often performed with simple, planar interfaces. Rayleigh-Taylor instability phenomena of practical interest, however, (e.g., underwater explosions, supernova core collapses, and inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions) are typically associated with cylindrical or spherical interfaces in which convergent flow effects have an important influence on the dynamics of instability growth. Recently, Meshkov et.al. have developed a novel technique for studying Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a cylindrically convergent geometry. Their experiments utilized low-strength gelatin rings which are imploded by a detonating gas mixture of oxygen and acetylene. Since the gelatin itself has sufficient strength to resist significant deformation by gravity, no membranes are needed to define the ring shape. This experimental technique is attractive because it offers a high degree of control over the interfacial geometry and over the material`s strength and rigidity, which can be varied by adjusting the gelatin concentration. Finally, since both the gelatin and the explosive product gases are transparent, optical diagnostics can be used.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of cylindrical and hemispherical jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Edwards, Thomas; Tully, Brett; Doyle, Hugo; Hawker, Nicholas; First Light Fusion Ltd. Team

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the formation of jets in cylindrical and spherical cavities, when impacted by shocks at extreme pressures. As the shock pressure increases the effects of material strength lessen in proportion. Beyond a certain magnitude the behaviour is referred to as "hydrodynamic". In this domain both cylindrical and spherical cavities involute to form jets, which go on to strike the leeward cavity wall, compressing the cavity contents to high pressures and temperatures. In this study, the jet formation process is isolated by cutting hemispherical and half-cylindrical cavities from the rear side of PMMA and copper blocks. This allows direct measurement of the jet speed and shape using high speed imaging, providing data against which numerical models may be compared. Shock waves at pressures of up to 30 GPa are formed in the targets by the impact of projectiles from a two-stage light gas gun, at velocities of up to 7 km/s. Numerically, the jet formation process is modelled using our in-house front-tracking code. This code uses Lagrangian hypersurfaces to model the interfaces between different media, with an underlying Eulerian mesh used to model the bulk flow. Detailed comparisons between numerical and experimental results are presented.

  12. Electromagnetic field and cylindrical compact objects in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem ul Haq

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of different fluid parameters particularly electromagnetic field and f(R) corrections on the evolution of cylindrical compact object. We have explored the modified field equations, kinematical quantities and dynamical equations. An expression for the mass function has been found in comparison with the Misner-Sharp formalism in modified gravity, after which different mass-radius diagrams are drawn. The coupled dynamical transport equation have been formulated to discuss the role of thermoinertial effects on the inertial mass density of the cylindrical relativistic interior. Finally, we have presented a framework, according to which all possible solutions of the metric f(R)-Maxwell field equations coupled with static fluid can be written through set of scalar functions. It is found that modified gravity induced by Lagrangians f(R) = αR2, f(R) = αR2 - βR and f(R)=α R^2-β R/1+γ R are likely to host more massive cylindrical compact objects with smaller radii as compared to general relativity.

  13. The Athena Astrophysical MHD Code in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, M. A.; Ostriker, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a method for implementing cylindrical coordinates in the Athena MHD code (Skinner & Ostriker 2010). The extension has been designed to alter the existing Cartesian-coordinates code (Stone et al. 2008) as minimally and transparently as possible. The numerical equations in cylindrical coordinates are formulated to maintain consistency with constrained transport, a central feature of the Athena algorithm, while making use of previously implemented code modules such as the eigensystems and Riemann solvers. Angular-momentum transport, which is critical in astrophysical disk systems dominated by rotation, is treated carefully. We describe modifications for cylindrical coordinates of the higher-order spatial reconstruction and characteristic evolution steps as well as the finite-volume and constrained transport updates. Finally, we have developed a test suite of standard and novel problems in one-, two-, and three-dimensions designed to validate our algorithms and implementation and to be of use to other code developers. The code is suitable for use in a wide variety of astrophysical applications and is freely available for download on the web.

  14. Cylindrical effects in weakly nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Ma, Wen-Fang; Wang, Xu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the interface between two variable density fluids in the cylindrical geometry is explicitly investigated by the formal perturbation method up to the second order. Two styles of RTI, convergent (i.e., gravity pointing inward) and divergent (i.e., gravity pointing outwards) configurations, compared with RTI in Cartesian geometry, are taken into account. Our explicit results show that the interface function in the cylindrical geometry consists of two parts: oscillatory part similar to the result of the Cartesian geometry, and non-oscillatory one contributing nothing to the result of the Cartesian geometry. The velocity resulting only from the non-oscillatory term is followed with interest in this paper. It is found that both the convergent and the divergent configurations have the same zeroth-order velocity, whose magnitude increases with the Atwood number, while decreases with the initial radius of the interface or mode number. The occurrence of non-oscillation terms is an essential character of the RTI in the cylindrical geometry different from Cartesian one. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 10835003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274026), the Scientific Research Foundation of Mianyang Normal University, China (Grant Nos. QD2014A009 and 2014A02), and the National High-Tech ICF Committee.

  15. Microfluidic step-emulsification in a cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indrajit; Leshansky, Alexander M.

    2016-11-01

    The model microfluidic device for high-throughput droplet generation in a confined cylindrical geometry is investigated numerically. The device comprises of core-annular pressure-driven flow of two immiscible viscous liquids through a cylindrical capillary connected co-axially to a tube of a larger diameter through a sudden expansion, mimicking the microfluidic step-emulsifier (1). To study this problem, the numerical simulations of axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations have been carried out using an interface capturing procedure based on coupled level set and volume-of-fluid (CLSVOF) methods. The accuracy of the numerical method was favorably tested vs. the predictions of the linear stability analysis of core-annular two-phase flow in a cylindrical capillary. Three distinct flow regimes can be identified: the dripping (D) instability near the entrance to the capillary, the step- (S) and the balloon- (B) emulsification at the step-like expansion. Based on the simulation results we present the phase diagram quantifying transitions between various regimes in plane of the capillary number and the flow-rate ratio. MICROFLUSA EU H2020 project.

  16. Fabrication of hierarchical structures for stable superhydrophobicity on metallic planar and cylindrical inner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiuqing; Wang, Li; Lv, Danhui; Wang, Quandai; Li, Liang; He, Ning; Lu, Bingheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the construction of stable superhydrophobicity on metallic wetting surfaces has gained increasing attention due to its potential wide applications. In this paper, we propose an economic fabricating method, which not only is suitable for metallic planar surfaces, but also could be applied onto cylindrical inner surfaces. It mainly involves two steps: etching micro-concaves by a movable mask electrochemical micromachining (EMM) technique and fabricating nanopillars of ZnO by a hydrothermal method. Then the influences of surface morphology on the static and dynamic behaviors of water droplets are investigated. The energy loss during impact on the surfaces is quantified in terms of the restitution coefficient for droplets bouncing off the surfaces. For hierarchical structures with excellent superhydrophobicity (contact angle ≈180° and sliding angle ≤1°), the droplet bounces off the surface several times, superior to the droplet's response on single nanopillars (contact angle ≈165.8° and sliding angle ≈6.29°) where droplet bounces off only for limited a number of times, and even far better than the dynamics of a liquid droplet impinging on microstructures (contact angle ≈132.1° and sliding angle >90°) where droplet does not rebound and remains pinned. The highest elasticity is obtained on the hierarchical surface, where the restitution coefficient can be as large as 0.94. The fabricating method is then applied onto the cylindrical inner surface and the wetting behavior is confirmed to be consistent with the planar surface. This method, which can be generalized to any kind of solid electroconductive metal or other surfaces with different shapes, could find wide practical applications in self-cleaning surfaces, chemical industry, microfluidic devices, mechanical engineering and aviation.

  17. Sub-aperture stitching test of a cylindrical mirror with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuai; Chen, Shanyong; Shi, Feng; Lu, Jinfeng

    2016-09-01

    Cylindrical mirrors are key optics of high-end equipment of national defense and scientific research such as high energy laser weapons, synchrotron radiation system, etc. However, its surface error test technology develops slowly. As a result, its optical processing quality can not meet the requirements, and the developing of the associated equipment is hindered. Computer Generated-Hologram (CGH) is commonly utilized as null for testing cylindrical optics. However, since the fabrication process of CGH with large aperture is not sophisticated yet, the null test of cylindrical optics with large aperture is limited by the aperture of the CGH. Hence CGH null test combined with sub-aperture stitching method is proposed to break the limit of the aperture of CGH for testing cylindrical optics, and the design of CGH for testing cylindrical surfaces is analyzed. Besides, the misalignment aberration of cylindrical surfaces is different from that of the rotational symmetric surfaces since the special shape of cylindrical surfaces, and the existing stitching algorithm of rotational symmetric surfaces can not meet the requirements of stitching cylindrical surfaces. We therefore analyze the misalignment aberrations of cylindrical surfaces, and study the stitching algorithm for measuring cylindrical optics with large aperture. Finally we test a cylindrical mirror with large aperture to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  18. 47 CFR 1.1622 - Preferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... franchise area, nor will the diversity preference be available to applicants whose proposed transmitter site... diversity preference be available to applicants whose proposed transmitter site is located within...

  19. 25 CFR 170.619 - Do tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Do tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR... Agreements Under Isdeaa § 170.619 Do tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR Program funding? Tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR Program funding as shown in the following table:...

  20. Preference pulses induced by reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki; Silberberg, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Eight rats responded on concurrent Variable-Ratio 20 Extinction schedules for food reinforcement. The assignment of variable-ratio reinforcement to a left or right lever varied randomly following each reinforcer, and was cued by illumination of a stimulus light above that lever. Postreinforcement preference levels decreased substantially and reliably over time when the lever that just delivered reinforcement was now in extinction; however, if that lever was once again associated with variable ratio, this decrease in same-lever preference tended to be small, and for some subjects, not in evidence. The changes in preference level to the extinction lever were well described by a modified version of Killeen, Hanson, and Osborne's (1978) induction model. Consistent with this model's attribution of preference change to induction, we attribute preference change in this report to a brief period of reinforcer-induced arousal that energizes responding to the lever that delivered the last reinforcer. After a few seconds, this induced responding diminishes, and the operant responding that remains comes under the control of the stimulus light cuing the lever providing variable-ratio reinforcement.

  1. Student selection and preference types.

    PubMed

    Gaskey, N J

    1982-02-01

    The use of paper and pencil tests for the selection of candidates and to identify individual differences should be approached cautiously because the interpretations of the tests can be very subjective. Although personal preferences do tend to become more stable as we grow older, they may vary from one day to the next. No one is an absolute extrovert or introvert; we all have tendencies toward one or the other depending on the particular situation and the mitigating circumstances. The preference type indicator is not recommended for use in selecting candidates for entrance into a nurse anesthesia program; but, rather, to make members of the department aware of the similarities and differences among people. It is helpful in making individuals aware of the other person's preferences. It is also useful in making them aware of the need to examine their own areas of weakness and to improve them before attempting to change someone else.

  2. Minimum weight design of ring and stringer stiffeners for axially compressed cylindrical shells with and without internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Results of analytical study to determine desirable ring and stringer stiffener parameters and proportions for axially compressed stiffened isotropic cylinders with and without internal pressure are presented. This investigation examines the panel and general instability buckling modes of a stiffened cylindrical shell and from this determines desirable stiffener parameters and proportions. Classical buckling equations are used which retain the important effects of the stiffeners. The results determined by using the simpler classical buckling equations are then spot checked and verified using buckling equations which considered discrete ring stiffeners and nonlinear prebuckling deformations. For both rings and stringers, T-shaped stiffeners are preferable and the effects to stiffener shape are much more pronounced at low or zero values of the internal pressure parameter. Simple analytical expressions are developed and presented which express the stiffener area parameter, the ratio of stiffener area and elastics to shell wall area and elastic modulus, in terms of the cylinder geometry and internal pressure parameter.

  3. [Ovipositional preference of Grapholitha molesta].

    PubMed

    Gong, Qing-Tao; Li, Su-Hong; Zhang, Kun-Peng; Wu, Hai-Bin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xue-Ping; Sun, Rui-Hong

    2014-09-01

    In order to gain better understanding of the oviposition preference of Grapholitha molesta, we studied the ovipositional preference on different host fruit leaves, different parts of peach bran- ches and different varieties of peach in simulated outdoor conditions. The adult ovipositional preference on the host fruit leaves was in descending order, i. e. peach > cherry > apple > plum > pear > crabapple > apricot, and 33.5% of eggs were laid on the peach leaves with the average number of egg on one peach leaf being 8.3. There were differences in egg distribution on both sides of the leaves in different hosts. The number of egg laid on the positive surface was more than on the reverse surface of apple and crabapple leaves, and vice versus for peach, plum, pear and apricot leaves, and 3.3 times more eggs were laid on the reverse surface of peach leaves than on the positive surface. The egg distribution had no significant difference on both sides of cherry leaves. The adult ovipositional preference on peach branches was in descending order of leaf > stipule > petiole > branch. The leaves were the major ovipositonal places with 88.7% of total eggs on. 72.5% of eggs were laid on the 10 leaves near the top unexpanded leaflets, and the maximum number was on the 3rd leaf accounting for 9.3%, while only 1.1% of eggs were laid on the peach leaves after 25th. The ovipositional preference on different peach fruits was in descending order of nectarine > flat peach > prunus persica. The density and characteristics of the hair on host fruits and leaves were the primary factors affecting the ovipositional preference.

  4. The value of customer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Herig, C.; Houston, A.

    1996-05-01

    Customer preference (CP), or green pricing, may be the financial hedge for electric supply industry integration of photovoltaics. CP is currently defined as a voluntary contribution for energy generated with renewable resources. Several utilities have examined the CP financing of renewables through experimental or implemented programs and market research. This paper first expands the concept of customer preference to include both voluntary and involuntary customer contributions. It then categorizes the features of existing and proposed CP programs. The connections between these features and market research and marketing strategies for new product development from a competitive industry are analyzed.

  5. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  6. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  7. Preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sobel, H J

    1979-09-01

    This study investigated preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy among a sample of 40 SES class III and IV adult females and 67 college freshmen who had never been actual therapy patients. A scaled survey assessed general preference, preference given an imagined long-standing depressive disorder, preference given an imagined specific phobia, and preference for the therapist-patient relationship. Three audio tapes were designed, each describing one of the modalities. High inter-rater reliability and agreement were determined by three independent judges. Results showed that young females had a general preference for gestalt therapy. Young and old females, but not young males, significantly preferred behavioural therapy for a specific phobia. Under forced-choice conditions the group as a whole significantly preferred gestalt therapy. No differences were found for the relationship or preference given a depressive disorder. Preference was hypothesized as a cognitive structure with potential use in therapist-client matching.

  8. Training Implications of Work Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margerison, C. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    An important factor in job choice, both at the start of and during one's career, is one's psychological makeup, which must be taken into account in training and development programs. The authors relate the Jungian introvert-extrovert, judgment-perception theories to work and management, presenting data from a management work preferences sampling.…

  9. Bad Arguments Defending Racial Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Professor Cohen describes the arduous path to the passage of Proposition 2 in Michigan in 2006. In considering the reasons for its victory, he shows how claims (sometimes well-intended) "for" preferences rest on truly bad arguments. (Contains 8 footnotes.)

  10. Compatibility Effects and Preference Reversals,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-21

    SEPTEMBER 1983 ysis," Journal of Risk and Insurance , March Mowen, John C and Gentry, James W., "Inves- 1980, 47, 111-32. tigation of the Preference...Corn- C., "An Experimental Study of Insurance plexity and Choice Inconsistency Among Decisions," Journal of Risk and Insurance , Gambles," Organizational

  11. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  12. Liquid inflow to initially empty cylindrical tanks in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the characteristics of liquid inflow to initially empty cylindrical tanks in a low gravity environment. The acceleration was varied so that Bond numbers based on the inlet radius varied from 0.059 to 2.80. The liquid entered the tank as a jet that grew to a maximum height and then decreased in height with respect to the bottom of the tank, with the liquid from the jet collecting in the bottom of the tank. The maximum jet heights were correlated in terms of the Weber number and the Bond number.

  13. Apparatus for scanning the surface of a cylindrical body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B.; Woodbury, R. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A laser scanning system for providing a two-dimensional display of a cylindrical surface, such as to display striae of a fired bullet is described. The cylinder is scanned along its axis by vibrating one mirror in the laser beam path, and is scanned in a direction normal to its axis by vibrating a second mirror in a direction normal to the first or by rotating the bullet. Scan control signals are adjusted in phase to produce a synchronized display of a video signal obtained from detection of scattered light from the surface thus scanned by a laser beam.

  14. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence - Cylindrical, non-dissipative model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Vahala, G.

    1979-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is treated in the presence of cylindrical boundaries which are perfectly conducting and rigidly smooth. The model treated is non-dissipative and two-dimensional, the variation of all quantities in the axial direction being ignored. Equilibrium Gibbs ensemble predictions are explored assuming the constraint of constant axial current (appropriate to tokamak operation). No small-amplitude approximations are made. The expectation value of the turbulent kinetic energy is found to approach zero for the state of maximum mean-square vector potential to energy ratio. These are the only states for which large velocity fluctuations are not expected.

  15. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under axial compression.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budiansky, B.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The infinitely long cylindrical shell under axial compression with axisymmetric sinusoidal imperfections is considered. The bifurcation problem is formulated exactly, and a complete family of buckling modes is identified. Koiter's (1963) upper bound pertains to the critical stress associated with one restricted set of modes, and the critical stress for a set of long wavelength modes reproduces some numerical results obtained by Almroth (1966). The initial postbuckling analysis is also formulated exactly. An exact analytical solution is obtained for the limiting case of modes with infinitely long wavelengths, and numerical analysis is used to solve the equations for the other cases. An appendix gives the details of the analysis.

  16. Three-Dimensional Prints with Pinned Cylindrical Lens Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shin; Shimizu, Keishi

    2013-09-01

    An application of pinned cylindrical lens arrays (CLAs) reported in Opt. Rev. 19 (2012) 287 to three-dimensional prints is presented for the first time. This lens fabrication method features the easy control of the pitch and radius of curvature of the lens arrays by taking advantage of the pinning effect that the partition walls created on a polymeric substrate by scratching with a cutter blade prevent the ultraviolet curable polymer dispensed between the walls from spreading. It is demonstrated in this paper that a three-dimensional print was realized successfully with the pinned CLA fabricated with our method.

  17. Bifurcation of solutions of a field-reversed cylindrical model

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, L.; Fontan, C.F.; Gratton, F.T.

    1986-07-01

    It is shown that the self-consistent solutions of Vlasov steady states for the double delta distribution model of cylindrical field-reversed configurations, generated by large ion orbits, have bifurcations within a definite interval of values for the total number of ions. The conjugate states have the same number of particles and the same radius of confinement but different azimuthal canonical momentum, orbit patterns, and magnetic fields. It is also shown that the states with a lower canonical momentum have a smaller energy content.

  18. A higher order theory of laminated composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Murthy, A. V.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new higher order theory has been proposed for the analysis of composite cylindrical shells. The formulation allows for arbitrary variation of inplane displacements. Governing equations are presented in the form of a hierarchy of sets of partial differential equations. Each set describes the shell behavior to a certain degree of approximation. The natural frequencies of simply-supported isotropic and laminated shells and stresses in a ring loaded composite shell have been determined to various orders of approximation and compared with three dimensional solutions. These numerical studies indicate the improvements achievable in estimating the natural frequencies and the interlaminar shear stresses in laminated composite cylinders.

  19. WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, W.A.

    1999-02-17

    1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

  20. Preliminary analysis techniques for ring and stringer stiffened cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report outlines methods of analysis for the buckling of thin-walled circumferentially and longitudinally stiffened cylindrical shells. Methods of analysis for the various failure modes are presented in one cohesive package. Where applicable, more than one method of analysis for a failure mode is presented along with standard practices. The results of this report are primarily intended for use in launch vehicle design in the elastic range. A Microsoft Excel worksheet with accompanying macros has been developed to automate the analysis procedures.

  1. Polar POLICRYPS diffractive structures generate cylindrical vector beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto Umeton, Cesare; Paladugu, Sathyanarayana; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-11-16

    Local shaping of the polarization state of a light beam is appealing for a number of applications. This can be achieved by employing devices containing birefringent materials. In this article, we present one such enables converting a uniformly circularly polarized beam into a cylindrical vector beam (CVB). This device has been fabricated by exploiting the POLICRYPS (POlymer-LIquid CRYstals-Polymer-Slices) photocuring technique. It is a liquid-crystal-based optical diffraction grating featuring polar symmetry of the director alignment. We have characterized the resulting CVB profile and polarization for the cases of left and right circularly polarized incoming beams.

  2. Cylindrical plasmas generated by an annular beam of ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. M.; Allen, J. E.

    2015-07-15

    We investigate a cylindrical plasma system with ionization, by an annular beam of ultraviolet light, taking place only in the cylinder's outer region. In the steady state, both the outer and inner regions contain a plasma, with that in the inner region being uniform and field-free. At the interface between the two regions, there is an infinitesimal jump in ion density, the magnitude approaching zero in the quasi-neutral (λ{sub D} → 0) limit. The system offers the possibility of producing a uniform stationary plasma in the laboratory, hitherto obtained only with thermally produced alkali plasmas.

  3. 3D impurity inspection of cylindrical transparent containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Mikkel; Bjerge, Kim; Ahrendt, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for automatically detecting and three-dimensionally positioning particles based on sequences of 2D images of rotating cylindrical transparent containers. The method can be used in the manufacturing industry by distinguishing between particles residing inside or outside a closed container. A foreign particle on the inside is a cause of rejection, whereas a particle on the outside might represent harmless dirt. The proposed method detects, tracks and positions particles and classifies containers accordingly as either rejected or accepted. Experimental results have shown an accuracy of 85% on a test set of 20 containers and an average execution time per container of 1 s.

  4. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced fluid flow have been investigated in the present study. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called ''tulip'' -shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. With a laser-Doppler anemometer the instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured together with pressure records.

  5. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced flow have been investigated. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called tulip-shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. The instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured, together with pressure records, with an LDV. An analogy to the experiments of Markstein (1964), is shown, and the explanations of several authors for the 'tulip' formation are given.

  6. Controlling the Plasma Flow in the Miniaturized Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

    2008-03-04

    A substantial narrowmg of the plume of the cylindrical RaIl thruster (CRT) was observed upon the enhancement of the electron emission from the hollow cathode discharge, which implies the possibility for the thruster efficiency increase due to the ion beam focusing. It is demonstrated that the miniaturized CRT can be operated in the non-self-sustained regime, with the discharge current limited by the cathode electron emission. The thruster operation in this mode greatly expands the range of the plasma and discharge parameters normally accessible for the CRT.

  7. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  8. Application of cylindrical Langmuir probes to streaming plasma diagnostics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Koopman, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of cylindrical probes in a high velocity collisionless plasma flow have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The plasma was generated by a focused laser pulse incident on a metallic target in vacuum. An analysis, developed from a stationary plasma analog to the flowing case, demonstrated a failure of plasma shielding of probe potential in the electron attracting region. Modifications of relatively simple previous treatments were found to be valid for computing electron current to a probe. The electron characteristics derived from the present analysis agree well with experimental results. The ion and electron portions of the characteristics are consistent with each other and with independent diagnostic measurements.

  9. Buckling of circular cylindrical shells under dynamically applied axial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulk, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was made of the buckling characteristics of perfect and imperfect circular cylindrical shells subjected to dynamic axial loading. Experimental data included dynamic buckling loads (124 data points), high speed photographs of buckling mode shapes and observations of the dynamic stability of shells subjected to rapidly applied sub-critical loads. A mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamic behavior of perfect and imperfect shells. This model was based on the Donnell-Von Karman compatibility and equilibrium equations and had a wall deflection function incorporating five separate modes of deflection. Close agreement between theory and experiment was found for both dynamic buckling strength and buckling mode shapes.

  10. Finite-amplitude waves in cylindrical lined ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    A second-order uniformly valid expansion is obtained for nonlinear waves propagating in a cylindrical duct lined with a point-reacting acoustic material that consists of a porous sheet followed by honey-comb cavities and backed by the impervious walls of the duct. The effect of the liner is taken into account by coupling the waves in the duct with those in the liner. As in the two-dimensional case, the nonlinearity increases the attenuation rate at all frequencies except in narrow bandwidths around the resonant frequencies, irrespective of the geometrical dimensions of the liner or the acoustic properties of the porous sheet.

  11. Chemically doped double-walled carbon nanotubes: cylindrical molecular capacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gugang; Bandow, S; Margine, E R; Nisoli, C; Kolmogorov, A N; Crespi, Vincent H; Gupta, R; Sumanasekera, G U; Iijima, S; Eklund, P C

    2003-06-27

    A double-walled carbon nanotube is used to study the radial charge distribution on the positive inner electrode of a cylindrical molecular capacitor. The outer electrode is a shell of bromine anions. Resonant Raman scattering from phonons on each carbon shell reveals the radial charge distribution. A self-consistent tight-binding model confirms the observed molecular Faraday cage effect, i.e., most of the charge resides on the outer wall, even when this wall was originally semiconducting and the inner wall was metallic.

  12. Chemically Doped Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Cylindrical Molecular Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gugang; Bandow, S.; Margine, E. R.; Nisoli, C.; Kolmogorov, A. N.; Crespi, Vincent H.; Gupta, R.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Iijima, S.; Eklund, P. C.

    2003-06-01

    A double-walled carbon nanotube is used to study the radial charge distribution on the positive inner electrode of a cylindrical molecular capacitor. The outer electrode is a shell of bromine anions. Resonant Raman scattering from phonons on each carbon shell reveals the radial charge distribution. A self-consistent tight-binding model confirms the observed molecular Faraday cage effect, i.e., most of the charge resides on the outer wall, even when this wall was originally semiconducting and the inner wall was metallic.

  13. Optical trapping of nanotubes with cylindrical vector beams.

    PubMed

    Donato, M G; Vasi, S; Sayed, R; Jones, P H; Bonaccorso, F; Ferrari, A C; Gucciardi, P G; Maragò, O M

    2012-08-15

    We use laser beams with radial and azimuthal polarization to optically trap carbon nanotubes. We measure force constants and trap parameters as a function of power showing improved axial trapping efficiency with respect to linearly polarized beams. The analysis of the thermal fluctuations highlights a significant change in the optical trapping potential when using cylindrical vector beams. This enables the use of polarization states to shape optical traps according to the particle geometry, as well as paving the way to nanoprobe-based photonic force microscopy with increased performance compared to a standard linearly polarized configuration.

  14. On the optimal pretensioning of cylindrical and spherical pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkarov, A.L.; Drozdov, A.D.

    1995-11-01

    Filament winding of pressure vessels and pipes is always realized with some pretensioning, and some external loads may be applied. It is important to determine such an optimal preload regime that ensures the maximum load-carrying capacity of the vessel subject to internal pressure. In the present study, the optimal preload distribution is analyzed in the filament winding fabrication of the cylindrical or spherical pressure vessels that are treated as growing elastic solids subjected to aging. In the case of cylindrical vessels, the dependence of the optimal preload intensity versus the polar radius is obtained for both nonaging and aging material of the fibers. In the case of spherical pressure vessels, the optimal regime of internal pressure applied during the winding process is obtained. The optimal loading of a spherical vessel at both infinitesimal and finite strains is analyzed. The new solutions obtained and the recommendations formulated are of a special practical importance for the optimal design and fabrication of the composite pressure vessels and pipes.

  15. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm(-2). By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  16. Cylindrical boiloff calorimeters for testing of thermal insulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Johnson, W. L.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Coffman, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Cryostats have been developed and standardized for laboratory testing of thermal insulation systems in a cylindrical configuration. Boiloff calorimetry is the measurement principle for determining the effective thermal conductivity (ke) and heat flux (q) of a test specimen at a fixed environmental condition (boundary temperatures, cold vacuum pressure, and residual gas composition). Through its heat of vaporization, liquid nitrogen serves as the energy meter, but the design is adaptable for various cryogens. The main instrument, Cryostat-100, is thermally guarded and directly measures absolute thermal performance. A cold mass assembly and all fluid and instrumentation feedthroughs are suspended from a lid of the vacuum canister; and a custom lifting mechanism allows the assembly and specimen to be manipulated easily. Each of three chambers is filled and vented through a single feedthrough for minimum overall heat leakage. The cold mass design precludes direct, solid-conduction heat transfer (other than through the vessel's outer wall itself) from one liquid volume to another, which is critical for achieving very low heat measurements. The cryostat system design details and test methods are discussed, as well as results for select thermal insulation materials. Additional cylindrical boiloff calorimeters and progress toward a liquid hydrogen apparatus are also discussed.

  17. Investigation of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for breast hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Tseng, Li-Te; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2006-02-07

    This paper investigates the feasibility of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for producing uniform heating from the central to the superficial portions of the breast or localized heating within the breast at a specific location. The proposed system consists of plane ultrasound transducer(s) mounted on a scanned cylindrical support. The breast was immersed in water and surrounded by this system during the treatment. The control parameters considered are the size of the transducer, the ultrasound frequency, the scan angle and the shifting distance between the axes of the breast and the system. Three-dimensional acoustical and thermal models were used to calculate the temperature distribution. Non-perfused phantom experiments were performed to verify the simulation results. Simulation results indicate that high frequency ultrasound could be used for the superficial heating, and the scan angle of the transducer could be varied to obtain an appropriate high temperature region to cover the desired treatment region. Low frequency ultrasound could be used for deep heating and the high temperature region could be moved by shifting the system. In addition, a combination of low and high frequency ultrasound could result in a portion treatment from the central to the superficial breast or an entire breast treatment. Good agreement was obtained between non-perfused experiments and simulation results. The findings of this study can be used to determine the effects of the control parameters of this system, as well as to select the optimal parameters for a specific treatment.

  18. Employing a cylindrical single crystal in gas-surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christine; Shan, Junjun; Liu, Ying; Berg, Otto; Kleijn, Aart W; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2012-03-21

    We describe the use of a polished, hollow cylindrical nickel single crystal to study effects of step edges on adsorption and desorption of gas phase molecules. The crystal is held in an ultra-high vacuum apparatus by a crystal holder that provides axial rotation about a [100] direction, and a crystal temperature range of 89 to 1100 K. A microchannel plate-based low energy electron diffraction/retarding field Auger electron spectrometer (AES) apparatus identifies surface structures present on the outer surface of the cylinder, while a separate double pass cylindrical mirror analyzer AES verifies surface cleanliness. A supersonic molecular beam, skimmed by a rectangular slot, impinges molecules on a narrow longitudinal strip of the surface. Here, we use the King and Wells technique to demonstrate how surface structure influences the dissociation probability of deuterium at various kinetic energies. Finally, we introduce spatially-resolved temperature programmed desorption from areas exposed to the supersonic molecular beam to show how surface structures influence desorption features.

  19. X-ray Spectroscopy of Directly Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, D.; Hooper, C.; Delamater, N.; Barnes, C.; Oertel, J.; Pollak, G.; Tubbs, D.; Watt, R.; Boehly, T.; Bradley, D.; Jaanimagi, P.; Knauer, J.

    1998-11-01

    X-ray spectra from a chlorinated polystyrene marker layer in a series of directly driven cylindrical implosions are presented and analyzed. The 4μm thick, 500μm long C_8H_6Cl2 (1.42g/cc) annular spectroscopic tracer layer is centrally located on the interior surface of the 20μm thick, 2250μm long polystyrene (1.044g/cc) 860μ m inner diameter cylindrical shell. The shell is filled with polystyrene foam (60mg/cc).(Barnes, C. W., et al.) 1998, to be published in Rev. Sci. Instrum., Tubbs, D. L., et al. 1998, to be published in Lasers and Particle Beams The implosions are driven by 50 beams of the OMEGA Laser facility. The temperature and density sensitive K-shell Cl spectra are recorded by a time-resolved spectrograph, and compared to calculated spectra in order to infer the evolution of electron temperature and density in the marker layer.(This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36)

  20. Shock interaction behind a pair of cylindrical obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Mazumdar, Raoul; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The body of work focuses on two-dimensional numerical simulations of shock interaction with a pair of cylindrical obstacles, varying the obstacle separation and incident shock strength. With the shock waves propagating parallel to the center-line between the two cylindrical obstacles, the shock strengths simulated vary from a Mach of 1.4 to a Mach of 2.4, against a wide range of obstacle separation distance to their diameters. These cases are simulated via a software package called Overture, which is used to solve the inviscid Euler equations of gas dynamics on overlapping grids with adaptive mesh refinement. The goal of these cases is to find a so-called ``safe'' region for obstacle spacing and varying shock Mach numbers, such that the pressure in the ``safe'' region is reduced downstream of the obstacles. The benefits apply to both building and armor design for the purpose of shock wave mitigation to keep humans and equipment safe. The results obtained from the simulations confirm that the length of the ``safe'' region and the degree of shock wave attenuation depend on the ratio of obstacle separation distance to obstacle diameter. The influence of various Mach number is also discussed.

  1. Tunable cylindrical shell as an element in acoustic metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Titovich, Alexey S; Norris, Andrew N

    2014-10-01

    Elastic cylindrical shells are fitted with an internal mechanism which is optimized so that, in the quasi-static regime, the combined system exhibits prescribed effective acoustic properties. The mechanism consists of a central mass supported by an axisymmetric distribution of elastic stiffeners. By appropriate selection of the mass and stiffness of the internal mechanism, the shell's effective acoustic properties (bulk modulus and density) can be tuned as desired. Subsonic flexural waves excited in the shell by the attachment of stiffeners are suppressed by including a sufficiently large number of such stiffeners. The effectiveness of the proposed metamaterial is demonstrated by matching the properties of a thin aluminum shell with a polymer insert to those of water. The scattering cross section in water is nearly zero over a broad range of frequencies at the lower end of the spectrum. By arranging the tuned shells in an array the resulting acoustic metamaterial is capable of steering waves. As an example, a cylindrical-to-plane wave lens is designed by varying the bulk modulus in the array according to the conformal mapping of a unit circle to a square.

  2. Acoustic mode coupling of two facing, shallow cylindrical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Philip; Ekmekci, Alis

    2016-11-01

    Cavity mode excitation by grazing flows is a well-documented source for noise generation. Similarly to their rectangular equivalents, single cylindrical cavities have been shown to exhibit velocity dependent self-sustaining feedback mechanisms that produce significant tonal noise. The present work investigates the effect of cavity mode coupling on the tonal noise generation for two facing, shallow cylindrical cavities. This geometric arrangement may occur for constrained flows, such as those within ducts, silencers or between aircraft landing gear wheels. For the latter configuration, the present study has observed that the tonal frequency dependence upon the freestream Mach number, associated with the single cavity feedback mechanism, no longer holds true. Instead, two simultaneously present and distinct large amplitude tones that are independent (in frequency) of speed, propagate to the far field. These two, fixed frequency tones are attributable to the first order transverse mode, and the first order transverse and azimuthal modes for the two combined cavities and the volume between them. Altering either the cavity aspect ratio or the inter-cavity spacing thus changes the acoustic resonant volume and translates the centre frequencies of the observed tones correspondingly. The authors would like to thank Bombardier and Messier-Bugatti-Dowty for their continued support.

  3. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1989-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  4. An evaluation of active noise control in a cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.; Abler, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    The physical mechanisms governing the use of active noise control in an extended volume of a cylindrical shell are discussed. Measured data was compared with computer results from a previously derived analytical model based on an infinite shell theory. For both the analytical model and experiment, the radiation of the external monopoles is coupled to the internal acoustic field through the radial displacement of the thin, elastic cylindrical shell. An active noise control system was implemented in the cylinder using a fixed array of discrete monopole sources, all of which lie in the plane of the exterior noise sources. Good agreement between measurement and prediction was obtained for both internal pressure response and overall noise reduction. Attenuations in the source plane greater than 15 dB were recorded along with a uniformly quieted noise environment over the entire length of the experimental model. Results indicate that for extended axial forcing distributions or very low shell damping, axial arrays of control sources may be required. Finally, the Nyquist criteria for the number of azimuthal control sources is shown to provide for effective control over the full cylinder cross section.

  5. Micro-photonic cylindrical waveguide based protein biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padigi, Sudhaprasanna Kumar; Asante, Kofi; Sekhar Reddy Kovvuri, Vijay; Kiran Kondama Reddy, Ravi; La Rosa, Andres; Prasad, Shalini

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a rapidly prototyped optical cylindrical micro-waveguide based biosensor. This device works on the principle of variation to the light intensity and path of coupled input light due to the binding of protein bio-molecules onto the micro-waveguide surface as a method of physical transduction. The variation to the coupled light intensity and path is dependent on the nature of the bio-molecule and the density of the bio-molecules. This technique has been used to identify protein biomarkers for inflammation and thrombosis, namely myeloperoxidase (MPO) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The detection limit that has been demonstrated is pg ml-1. The detection speed is of the order of seconds from the time of injection of the bio-molecule. The optical signature that is obtained to identify a protein bio-molecule is entirely dependent on the nature of adsorption of the bio-molecule on to the cylindrical cavity surfaces. This in turn is dependent on the protein conformation and the surface charge of the bio-molecules. Hence a specific protein bio-molecule generates a unique optical identifier based on the nature of binding/adsorption to the cavity surface. This physical phenomenon is exploited to identify individual proteins. This technique is a demonstration of detection of nano-scale protein bio-molecules using the optical biosensor technique with unprecedented sensitivity.

  6. Vibration of in-vacuo elliptic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Jeffrey E.; Hayek, Sabih I.

    2003-10-01

    The equations of motion for the vibration of elliptic cylindrical shells of constant thickness were derived using a Galerkin approach. The elastic strain energy density used in this derivation has seven independent kinematic variables: three displacements, two thickness-shear, and two thickness-stretch. The resulting seven coupled algebraic equations are symmetric and positive definite. The shell has a constant thickness, h, finite length, L, and is simply supported at its ends, (z=0,L), where z is the axial coordinate. The elliptic cross-section is defined by the shape parameter, a, and the half-length of the major axis, l. The modal solutions are expanded in a doubly infinite series of comparison functions in terms of circular functions in the angular and axial coordinates. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes were obtained by the Galerkin method. Numerical results were obtained for several h/l and L/l ratios, and various shape parameters, including the limiting case of a simply supported cylindrical shell (a=100). [Work supported by ONR and the Navy/ASEE Summer Faculty Program.

  7. Implosion of Cylindrical Cavities via Short Duration Impulsive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Higgins, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    An apparatus has been developed to study the collapse of a cylindrical cavity in gelatin subjected to a symmetric impact-driven impulsive loading. A gas-driven annular projectile is accelerated to approximately 50 m/s, at which point it impacts a gelatin casting confined by curved steel surfaces that allow a transition from an annular geometry to a cylindrically imploding motion. The implosion is visualized by a high-speed camera through a window which forms the top confining wall of the implosion cavity. The initial size of the cavity is such that the gelatin wall is two to five times thicker than the impacting projectile. Thus, during impact the compression wave which travels towards the cavity is closely followed by a rarefaction resulting from the free surface reflection of the compression wave in the projectile. As the compression wave in the gelatin reaches the inner surface, it will also reflect as a rarefaction wave. The interaction between the rarefaction waves from the gelatin and projectile free surfaces leads to large tensile stresses resulting in the spallation of a relatively thin shell. The study focuses on the effect of impact parameters on the thickness and uniformity of the imploding shell formed by the cavitation in the imploding gelatin cylinder.

  8. High-speed cylindrical collapse of two perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Ahmad, Zahid

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, the study of the gravitational collapse of cylindrically distributed two perfect fluid system has been carried out. It is assumed that the collapsing speeds of the two fluids are very large. We explore this condition by using the high-speed approximation scheme. There arise two cases, i.e., bounded and vanishing of the ratios of the pressures with densities of two fluids given by c s , d s . It is shown that the high-speed approximation scheme breaks down by non-zero pressures p 1, p 2 when c s , d s are bounded below by some positive constants. The failure of the high-speed approximation scheme at some particular time of the gravitational collapse suggests the uncertainty on the evolution at and after this time. In the bounded case, the naked singularity formation seems to be impossible for the cylindrical two perfect fluids. For the vanishing case, if a linear equation of state is used, the high-speed collapse does not break down by the effects of the pressures and consequently a naked singularity forms. This work provides the generalisation of the results already given by Nakao and Morisawa (Prog Theor Phys 113:73, 2005) for the perfect fluid.

  9. On Sector Magnets or Transverse Electromagnetic Fields in Cylindrical Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkin, Timofey

    2016-03-10

    The Laplace's equations for the scalar and vector potentials describing electric or magnetic fields in cylindrical coordinates with translational invariance along azimuthal coordinate are considered. The series of special functions which, when expanded in power series in radial and vertical coordinates, in lowest order replicate the harmonic homogeneous polynomials of two variables are found. These functions are based on radial harmonics found by Edwin~M.~McMillan in his more-than-40-years "forgotten" article, which will be discussed. In addition to McMillan's harmonics, second family of adjoint radial harmonics is introduced, in order to provide symmetric description between electric and magnetic fields and to describe fields and potentials in terms of same special functions. Formulas to relate any transverse fields specified by the coefficients in the power series expansion in radial or vertical planes in cylindrical coordinates with the set of new functions are provided. This result is no doubt important for potential theory while also critical for theoretical studies, design and proper modeling of sector dipoles, combined function dipoles and any general sector element for accelerator physics. All results are presented in connection with these problems.

  10. Cylindrical diffractive lenses recorded on PVA/AA photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Navarro-Fuster, V.; Francés, J.; Neipp, C.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2016-04-01

    Photopolymers are optical recording materials appealing for many different applications such as holography, data storage, interconnectors, solar concentrations, or wave-guides fabrication. Recently the capacity of photopolymers to record diffractive optical elements (DOE's) has been investigated. Different authors have reported proposes to record DOE like fork gratings, photonics structures, lenses, sinusoidal, blazed or fork gratings. In these experiments there are different experimental set-ups and different photopolymers. In this work due to the improvement in the spatial light modulation technology together with the photopolymer science we propose a recording experimental system of DOE using a Liquid Cristal based on Silicon (LCoS) display as a master to store complex DOE like cylindrical lenses. This technology permits us an accurate control of the phase and the amplitude of the recording beam, with a very small pixel size. The main advantage of this display is that permit us to modify the DOE automatically, we use the software of the LCoS to send the voltage to each pixel In this work we use a photopolymer composed by acrylamide (AA) as polymerizable monomer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). We use a coverplated and index matched photopolymer to avoid the influence of the thickness variation on the transmitted light. In order to reproduce the material behaviour during polymerization, we have designed our model to simulate cylindrical lenses and used Fresnel propagation to simulate the light propagation through the DOE and analyze the focal plane and the properties of the recorded lenses.

  11. Simulated, Theoretical and Experimental Shock Trajectories in Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzleiter, R.; Atchison, W.; Bowers, R.; Guzik, J.

    2002-07-01

    The current work compares computations and similarity relations for convergent shocks with experimental data from cylindrical implosions on the Shiva Star capacitor bank at AFRL (Air Force Research Laboratory). The experiment consisted of a 1 mm thick cylindrical aluminum liner that is magnetically imploded onto a central target. The central target contains an inner Lucite cylinder surrounded by an outer Sn layer. The target was designed using the Eulerian hydrodynamics code RAGE in 2- and 3D. One-dimensional models of the liner driver utilizing the RAVEN MHD code set the initial liner/target interaction parameters for the RAGE simulations. Shock breakout from the Sn/Lucite interface and subsequent propagation within the Lucite are measured to provide experimental data for code validation. Radial convergence is examined through comparisons with similarity solutions. Comparison of experimentally measured timing data and simulated shock trajectories will be discussed. Further efforts compare equation-of-state effects by utilizing an analytic Grueneisen EOS instead of the original SESAME tables.

  12. Experimental study on vibrations of a nonwoven fabric cylindrical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, M.; Kawahara, T.; Michiue, S.; Shintani, Y.

    2011-11-01

    Unexpected vibrations on a cylindrical filter made of nonwoven fabrics were clarified experimentally. Two types of filter with length L=1.8 m and 3.7 m, both 45 cm in diameter and 1.08 mm in thickness, were used. This is a new type of aeroelastic vibration phenomenon because the filter is a closed cylindrical vessel. In addition, the flow velocity of inner air was very slow and inner air flowed out slowly from the filter surface. The velocity distribution of air flow from a fan duct as well as the frequency and amplitude of the filter vibration were measured for two types of filter. By setting up a roll core panel at the outlet of the fan duct, we could rectify the outflow and suppressed the vibration of the shorter filter with L=1.8 m. However, this method was not adequate for the longer filter with L=3.7 m, and we could suppress the vibration by shielding the inner surface of the filter at the top region.

  13. Cylindrical acoustical holography applied to full-scale jet noise.

    PubMed

    Wall, Alan T; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Krueger, David W; James, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Near-field acoustical holography methods are used to predict sound radiation from an engine installed on a high-performance military fighter aircraft. Cylindrical holography techniques are an efficient approach to measure the large and complex sound fields produced by full-scale jets. It is shown that a ground-based, one-dimensional array of microphones can be used in conjunction with a cylindrical wave function field representation to provide a holographic reconstruction of the radiated sound field at low frequencies. In the current work, partial field decomposition methods and numerical extrapolation of data beyond the boundaries of the hologram aperture are required prior to holographic projection. Predicted jet noise source distributions and directionality are shown for four frequencies between 63 and 250 Hz. It is shown that the source distribution narrows and moves upstream, and that radiation directionality shifts toward the forward direction, with increasing frequency. A double-lobe feature of full-scale jet radiation is also demonstrated.

  14. Spherical/cylindrical laser scanner for geometric reverse engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Vincent H.; Samaan, Medhat

    2004-04-01

    Laser scanners are often used in geometric reverse engineering to generate a CAD drawing out of an existing physical part. This often requires careful path planning to ensure the correct stand-off distance of the sensor, to prevent any collisions of the sensor with the target object and to prevent any scan occlusions in the resulting data. A dedicated system was constructed to collect data using a 3-axis cylindrical/prismatic device. The benefit of this scanning system is the ability to scan completely around the target object, including the bottom of the object. A stripe-type laser diode is used along with a CCD camera. The target object sits on a transparent plexi-glass table, which can be rotated 360 degrees. Both the laser and the CCD are mounted on an arm, such that they can be traversed along a linear path, as well as being rotated 360° around the table. This permits the device to scan in either spherical or cylindrical paths with 360° rotation around the target object. This system allows for the quick scanning of any object while minimizing the number of occlusions in the resulting scan data.

  15. The magnetic field of a permanent hollow cylindrical magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Felix A.; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the rational version of M AXWELL's equations according to T RUESDELL and T OUPIN or KOVETZ, cf. (Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000; Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Bd. III/1, Springer, Berlin, pp 226-793; appendix, pp 794-858, 2000), we present, for stationary processes, a closed-form solution for the magnetic flux density of a hollow cylindrical magnet. Its magnetization is constant in axial direction. We consider M AXWELL's equations in regular and singular points that are obtained by rational electrodynamics, adapted to stationary processes. The magnetic flux density is calculated analytically by means of a vector potential. We obtain a solution in terms of complete elliptic integrals. Therefore, numerical evaluation can be performed in a computationally efficient manner. The solution is written in dimensionless form and can easily be applied to cylinders of arbitrary shape. The relation between the magnetic flux density and the magnetic field is linear, and an explicit relation for the field is presented. With a slight modification the result can be used to obtain the field of a solid cylindrical magnet. The mathematical structure of the solution and, in particular, singularities are discussed.

  16. Observation of Compressible Plasma Mix in Cylindrically Convergent Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Tubbs, David L.; Dunne, A. M.; Rothman, Steven R.; Youngs, David L.

    2000-10-01

    An understanding of hydrodynamic mix in convergent geometry will be of key importance in the development of a robust ignition/burn capability on NIF, LMJ and future pulsed power machines. We have made use of the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester to investigate directly the mix evolution in a convergent geometry, compressible plasma regime. The experiments comprise a plastic cylindrical shell imploded by direct laser irradiation. The cylindrical shell surrounds a lower density plastic foam which provides sufficient back pressure to allow the implosion to stagnate at a sufficiently high radius to permit quantitative radiographic diagnosis of the interface evolution near turnaround. The susceptibility to mix of the shell-foam interface is varied by choosing different density material for the inner shell surface (thus varying the Atwood number). This allows the study of shock-induced Richtmyer-Meshkov growth during the coasting phase, and Rayleigh-Taylor growth during the stagnation phase. The experimental results will be described along with calculational predictions using various radiation hydrodynamics codes and turbulent mix models.

  17. Gas Temperature Effects on Electrical Breakdown in Cylindrical Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han; Jung, She

    2002-11-01

    One of the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma is in the corona discharge system, for the potential reduction of NOx and SOx gas emissions from diesel engines. However, the conventional corona discharge system for the emission control application requires a high electrical voltage (typically 45 kV or higher), making its high voltage modulator heavy and bulky with insulating material. We, therefore, investigate the influence of the gas temperature on the electrical breakdown properties in the cylindrical electrode system. A theoretical model of the electrical breakdown in a cylindrical electrode system is briefly summarized, by making use of Paschen¡¯s law. The breakdown voltage increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the aspect ratio a/b increases from 0.01 to unity, where a and b are radii of the inner and outer electrodes, respectively. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical predictions. The breakdown voltage V in a high gas temperature Tg is given by V = (Tr/Tg)V0, where V0 is the breakdown voltage at the room temperature Tr. Obviously, the breakdown voltage decreases as the gas temperature Tg increases. The experimental data agree well with the theoretical values. It is, therefore, concluded that the breakdown voltage is inversely proportional to the gas temperature Tg as predicted from the theoretical analysis.

  18. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-01

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  19. Finite deformations of an electroelastic circular cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Andrey; Ogden, Ray W.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the theory of nonlinear electroelasticity is used to examine deformations of a pressurized thick-walled circular cylindrical tube of soft dielectric material with closed ends and compliant electrodes on its curved boundaries. Expressions for the dependence of the pressure and reduced axial load on the deformation and a potential difference between, or uniform surface charge distributions on, the electrodes are obtained in respect of a general isotropic electroelastic energy function. To illustrate the behaviour of the tube, specific forms of energy functions accounting for different mechanical properties coupled with a deformation independent quadratic dependence on the electric field are used for numerical purposes, for a given potential difference and separately for a given charge distribution. Numerical dependences of the non-dimensional pressure and reduced axial load on the deformation are obtained for the considered energy functions. Results are then given for the thin-walled approximation as a limiting case of a thick-walled cylindrical tube without restriction on the energy function. The theory described herein provides a general basis for the detailed analysis of the electroelastic response of tubular dielectric elastomer actuators, which is illustrated for a fixed axial load in the absence of internal pressure and fixed internal pressure in the absence of an applied axial load.

  20. DNA barcoding to identify leaf preference of leafcutting bees

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutting bees (Megachile: Megachilidae) cut leaves from various trees, shrubs, wildflowers and grasses to partition and encase brood cells in hollow plant stems, decaying logs or in the ground. The identification of preferred plant species via morphological characters of the leaf fragments is challenging and direct observation of bees cutting leaves from certain plant species are difficult. As such, data are poor on leaf preference of leafcutting bees. In this study, I use DNA barcoding of the rcbL and ITS2 regions to identify and compare leaf preference of three Megachile bee species widespread in Toronto, Canada. Nests were opened and one leaf piece from one cell per nest of the native M. pugnata Say (N=45 leaf pieces), and the introduced M. rotundata Fabricius (N=64) and M. centuncularis (L.) (N=65) were analysed. From 174 individual DNA sequences, 54 plant species were identified. Preference by M. rotundata was most diverse (36 leaf species, H′=3.08, phylogenetic diversity (pd)=2.97), followed by M. centuncularis (23 species, H′=2.38, pd=1.51) then M. pugnata (18 species, H′=1.87, pd=1.22). Cluster analysis revealed significant overlap in leaf choice of M. rotundata and M. centuncularis. There was no significant preference for native leaves, and only M. centuncularis showed preference for leaves of woody plants over perennials. Interestingly, antimicrobial properties were present in all but six plants collected; all these were exotic plants and none were collected by the native bee, M. pugnata. These missing details in interpreting what bees need offers valuable information for conservation by accounting for necessary (and potentially limiting) nesting materials. PMID:27069650

  1. Unique features of cylindrical type solar-module contrasted with plane or conventional type ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Hirohisa; Hiraki, Akio; Maeda, Masakatsu; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2012-08-01

    Due to their shape and construction, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 [CIGS] cylindrical photovoltaic [PV] panels have unique features that planar or conventional PV panels do not have. For example, a) they capture sunlight over an angular range of 360°, b) they are self-ballasting (no roof penetrations, no attachments required) and c) they are high-reliability hermetically sealed cylindrical packages. In field tests in Japan, cylindrical PV panels have proven their durability against typhoons, and also their excellent electrical properties. Finally, as a new application of cylindrical PV panels, we suggest the new concept of fusion or combination of PV generation and agriculture.

  2. Assortative mating without assortative preference

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Cheng, Siwei; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Assortative mating—marriage of a man and a woman with similar social characteristics—is a commonly observed phenomenon. In the existing literature in both sociology and economics, this phenomenon has mainly been attributed to individuals’ conscious preferences for assortative mating. In this paper, we show that patterns of assortative mating may arise from another structural source even if individuals do not have assortative preferences or possess complementary attributes: dynamic processes of marriages in a closed system. For a given cohort of youth in a finite population, as the percentage of married persons increases, unmarried persons who newly enter marriage are systematically different from those who married earlier, giving rise to the phenomenon of assortative mating. We use microsimulation methods to illustrate this dynamic process, using first the conventional deterministic Gale–Shapley model, then a probabilistic Gale–Shapley model, and then two versions of the encounter mating model. PMID:25918366

  3. Assortative mating without assortative preference.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Cheng, Siwei; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-05-12

    Assortative mating--marriage of a man and a woman with similar social characteristics--is a commonly observed phenomenon. In the existing literature in both sociology and economics, this phenomenon has mainly been attributed to individuals' conscious preferences for assortative mating. In this paper, we show that patterns of assortative mating may arise from another structural source even if individuals do not have assortative preferences or possess complementary attributes: dynamic processes of marriages in a closed system. For a given cohort of youth in a finite population, as the percentage of married persons increases, unmarried persons who newly enter marriage are systematically different from those who married earlier, giving rise to the phenomenon of assortative mating. We use microsimulation methods to illustrate this dynamic process, using first the conventional deterministic Gale-Shapley model, then a probabilistic Gale-Shapley model, and then two versions of the encounter mating model.

  4. Visual aesthetics and human preference.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephen E; Schloss, Karen B; Sammartino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Human aesthetic preference in the visual domain is reviewed from definitional, methodological, empirical, and theoretical perspectives. Aesthetic science is distinguished from the perception of art and from philosophical treatments of aesthetics. The strengths and weaknesses of important behavioral techniques are presented and discussed, including two-alternative forced-choice, rank order, subjective rating, production/adjustment, indirect, and other tasks. Major findings are reviewed about preferences for colors (single colors, color combinations, and color harmony), spatial structure (low-level spatial properties, shape properties, and spatial composition within a frame), and individual differences in both color and spatial structure. Major theoretical accounts of aesthetic response are outlined and evaluated, including explanations in terms of mere exposure effects, arousal dynamics, categorical prototypes, ecological factors, perceptual and conceptual fluency, and the interaction of multiple components. The results of the review support the conclusion that aesthetic response can be studied rigorously and meaningfully within the framework of scientific psychology.

  5. Global optimization method for combined spherical-cylindrical wrapping in musculoskeletal upper limb modelling.

    PubMed

    Audenaert, A; Audenaert, E

    2008-10-01

    In musculoskeletal modelling, many muscles cannot be represented as straight lines from origin to insertion because the bony and musculotendinous morphology of neighboring structures causes them to wrap. The majority of these passive structures can be adequately described as simple geometric shapes such as spheres and cylinders. Techniques for describing smooth muscle paths around multiple obstacles have been developed for modelling use. Until now obstacle-set methods have combined the path of single structures. This does not analytically define the shortest smooth path around multiple objects. When a sphere is included in a multiple-object wrapping algorithm, muscle paths around that sphere are restricted to a bundle of planes containing the sphere center. This assumed restriction can compromise the iterative process for finding the true shortest muscle path that satisfies all restrictions of a smooth path. This can cause model instability. The new method involves the determination of the shortest smooth muscle path in a spherical and cylindrical wrapping algorithm. A typical example is musculoskeletal modelling of the upper limb, where the muscle fibers have to wrap over this combination of obstacles.

  6. Heat transfer during quenching of modified and unmodified gravity die-cast A357 cylindrical bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. N.; Hemanna, P.

    2006-06-01

    Heat transfer during quenching of chill-cast modified and unmodified A357 Al-Si alloy was examined using a computer-aided cooling curve analysis. Water at 60 °C and a vegetable oil (palm oil) were used as quench media. The measured temperatures inside cylindrical probes of the A357 alloy were used as inputs in an inverse heat-conduction model to estimate heat flux transients at the probe/quenchant interface and the surface temperature of the probe in contact with the quench medium. It was observed that modified alloy probes yielded higher cooling rates and heat flux transients. The investigation clearly showed that the heat transfer during quenching depends on the casting history. The increase in the cooling rate and peak heat flux was attributed to the increase in the thermal conductivity of the material on modification melt treatment owing to the change in silicon morphology. Fine and fibrous silicon particles in modified A357 probes increase the conductance of the probe resulting in higher heat transfer rates. This was confirmed by measuring the electrical conductivity of modified samples, which were found to be higher than those of unmodified samples. The ultrasound velocity in the probes decreased on modification.

  7. Cylindrical Spirals in Skeletal Muscles Originate From the Longitudinal Sarcoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Luo, Yue-Bei; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yan, Chuan-Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical spirals (CSs) are rare but distinct subsarcolemmal accumulations in skeletal muscle fibers. To date, CSs have been reported in only 16 patients with a variety of neuromuscular conditions. The origin and composition of CSs are unknown, although there are some morphologic similarities between CSs and tubular aggregates (TAs). To clarify the nature of CSs, we characterized the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and other intracellular membrane system proteins in CSs of muscle biopsies from 2 adult Chinese siblings. Immunohistochemical studies revealed subsarcolemmal immunoreactivity for sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2þ-ATPase 1 (SERCA 1) in the longitudinal SR, but no immunoreactivity for calsequestrin in the terminal cisternae or type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) in the junctional SR. Muscles biopsied from 2 patients with TAs showed immunoreactivity not only for SERCA1 but also for other SR proteins, including calsequestrin and RYR1. CSs exhibited no immunoreactivity for the Golgi apparatus marker GM130, the nuclear membrane emerin, desmin, the autophagosome marker LC3, the lysosomal membrane marker LAMP2, dystrophin, or myosin. Our results suggest CSs may originate only from the longitudinal SR, whereas TAs are composed of both the junctional and longitudinal SR. Immunochemical staining with antibodies against calsequestrin and RYR1 help to distinguish these 2 pathological alterations.

  8. Stabilizing Surfactant Templated Cylindrical Mesopores in Polymer and Carbon Films through Composite Formation with Silica Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lingyan; Feng, Dan; Lee, Hae-Jeong; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Quanyan; Zhao, Dongyuan; Vogt, Bryan D.

    2010-10-22

    A facile approach to maintain the periodic mesostructure of cylindrical pores in polymer-resin and carbon films after thermal template removal is explored through the reactive coassembly of resol (carbon precursor) and tetraethylorthosilicate (silica precursor) with triblock copolymer Pluronic F127. Without silica, a low porosity, disordered film is formed after pyrolysis despite the presence of an ordered mesostructure prior to template removal. However for silica concentration greater than 25 wt %, pyrolysis at 350 C yields a mesoporous silica-polymer film with well-defined pore mesostructure. These films remain well ordered upon carbonization at 800 C. In addition to the mesostructural stability, the addition of silica to the matrix impacts other morphological characteristics. For example, the average pore size and porosity of the films increase from 3.2 to 7.5 nm and 12 to 45%, respectively, as the concentration of silica in the wall matrix increases from 0 to 32 wt %. The improved thermal stability of the ordered mesostructure with the addition of silica to the matrix is attributed to the reinforcement of the mechanical properties leading to resistance to stress induced collapse of the mesostructure during template removal.

  9. Topography-Correlated Confocal Raman Microscopy with Cylindrical Vector Beams for Probing Nanoscale Structural Order.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Broch, Katharina; Scholz, Reinhard; Schreiber, Frank; Meixner, Alfred J; Zhang, Dai

    2014-04-03

    Cylindrical vector beams, such as radially or azimuthally polarized doughnut beams, are combined with topography studies of pentacene thin films, allowing us to correlate Raman spectroscopy with intermolecular interactions depending on the particular pentacene polymorph. Polarization-dependent Raman spectra of the C-H bending vibrations are resolved layer by layer within a thin film of ∼20 nm thickness. The variation of the Raman peak positions indicates changes in the molecular orientation and in the local environment at different heights of the pentacene film. With the assistance of a theoretical model based on harmonic oscillator and perturbation theory, our method reveals the local structural order and the polymorph at different locations within the same pentacene thin film, depending mainly on its thickness. In good agreement with the crystallographic structures reported in the literature, our observations demonstrate that the first few monolayers grown in a structure are closer to the thin-film phase, but for larger film thicknesses, the morphology evolves toward the crystal-bulk phase with a larger tilting angle of the pentacene molecules against the substrate normal.

  10. Review: Thermal preference in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Michael E.; Wang, George; Garrity, Paul A.; Huey, Raymond B.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental temperature strongly affects physiology of ectotherms. Small ectotherms, like Drosophila, cannot endogenously regulate body temperature so must rely on behavior to maintain body temperature within a physiologically permissive range. Here we review what is known about Drosophila thermal preference. Work on thermal behavior in this group is particularly exciting because it provides the opportunity to connect genes to neuromolecular mechanisms to behavior to fitness in the wild. PMID:20161211

  11. A Theory of Preference Reversals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    has been .%..’... Preference Reversals 35 called "probability equivalence" ( Johnson and Schkade, 1984). In this method, a subject is shown a sure gain...and Schoemaker, 19821 Hershey and Schosmaker, 19831 Johnson and Schkade, 1984). While Expression 2hoory has not been applied to these assessment...Bass. Johnson , I. J., a Schkade, D. A. (1984). Anchoring, adjustment and bias in utility assessments. Unpublished manuscript, Carnegie-Mellon

  12. Preferred and actual relative height among homosexual male partners vary with preferred dominance and sex role.

    PubMed

    Valentova, Jaroslava Varella; Stulp, Gert; Třebický, Vít; Havlíček, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown repeatedly that human stature influences mate preferences and mate choice in heterosexuals. In general, it has been shown that tall men and average height women are most preferred by the opposite sex, and that both sexes prefer to be in a relationship where the man is taller than the woman. However, little is known about such partner preferences in homosexual individuals. Based on an online survey of a large sample of non-heterosexual men (N = 541), we found that the majority of men prefer a partner slightly taller than themselves. However, these preferences were dependent on the participant's own height, such that taller men preferred shorter partners, whereas shorter men preferred taller partners. We also examined whether height preferences predicted the preference for dominance and the adoption of particular sexual roles within a couple. Although a large proportion of men preferred to be in an egalitarian relationship with respect to preferred dominance (although not with respect to preferred sexual role), men that preferred a more dominant and more "active" sexual role preferred shorter partners, whereas those that preferred a more submissive and more "passive" sexual role preferred taller partners. Our results indicate that preferences for relative height in homosexual men are modulated by own height, preferred dominance and sex role, and do not simply resemble those of heterosexual women or men.

  13. Preferred and Actual Relative Height among Homosexual Male Partners Vary with Preferred Dominance and Sex Role

    PubMed Central

    Valentova, Jaroslava Varella; Stulp, Gert; Třebický, Vít; Havlíček, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown repeatedly that human stature influences mate preferences and mate choice in heterosexuals. In general, it has been shown that tall men and average height women are most preferred by the opposite sex, and that both sexes prefer to be in a relationship where the man is taller than the woman. However, little is known about such partner preferences in homosexual individuals. Based on an online survey of a large sample of non-heterosexual men (N = 541), we found that the majority of men prefer a partner slightly taller than themselves. However, these preferences were dependent on the participant’s own height, such that taller men preferred shorter partners, whereas shorter men preferred taller partners. We also examined whether height preferences predicted the preference for dominance and the adoption of particular sexual roles within a couple. Although a large proportion of men preferred to be in an egalitarian relationship with respect to preferred dominance (although not with respect to preferred sexual role), men that preferred a more dominant and more “active” sexual role preferred shorter partners, whereas those that preferred a more submissive and more “passive” sexual role preferred taller partners. Our results indicate that preferences for relative height in homosexual men are modulated by own height, preferred dominance and sex role, and do not simply resemble those of heterosexual women or men. PMID:24466136

  14. Analysis of feeding preference experiments.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C H; Renaud, P E

    1989-03-01

    Published studies of consumer feeding preferences using foods that experience autogenic change in mass, numbers, area, etc., on the time scale of a feeding trial fail to employ appropriate statistical analyses to incorporate controls for those food changes occurring in the absence of the consumer. The studies that run controls typically use them to calculate a constant "correction factor", which is subtracted prior to formal data analysis. This procedure constitutes a non-rigorous suppression of variance that overstates the statistical significance of observed differences. The appropriate statistical analysis for preference tests with two foods is usually a simple t-test performed on the between-food differences in loss of mass (or numbers, area, etc.) comparing the results of experimentals with consumers to controls without consumers. Application of this recommended test procedure to an actual data set illustrates how low replication in controls, which is typical of most studies of feeding preference, inhibits detection of an apparently large influence of previous mechanical damage (simulated grazing) in reducing the attractiveness of a brown alga to a sea urchin.

  15. Vole preference of bilberry along gradients of simulated moose density and site productivity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Simen; Andreassen, Harry P; Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Danell, Kjell; Skarpe, Christina

    2011-12-01

    Browsing by large herbivores might either increase or decrease preference for the plant by other herbivores, depending on the plant response. Using a cafeteria test, we studied the preference by root voles (Microtus oeconomus [Pallas, 1776]) for bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) previously subjected to 4 levels of simulated moose (Alces alces [Linnaeus, 1758]) density. The different levels of moose density were simulated at population densities relevant for Fennoscandian conditions, in exclosures situated along a site productivity gradient. We expected: (i) voles to prefer bilberry from high productivity sites over low productivity sites; (ii) voles to prefer browsed bilberry, if plants allocate resources to compensatory growth or to avoid browsed bilberry if plants allocate resources to defense; (iii) these effects to increase with increasing simulated moose density; and (iv) the concentration of plant chemicals and the plant morphology to explain vole preference. Specifically, we predicted that voles would prefer: (i) plants with high nitrogen content; (ii) plants with low content of defensive substances; and (iii) tall plants with long shoots. Voles preferred bilberry from the high productivity sites compared to the low productivity sites. We also found an interaction between site productivity and simulated moose density, where voles preferred unbrowsed plants at low productivity sites and intermediate levels of browsing at high productivity sites. There was no effect of plant chemistry or morphology on vole preference. We conclude that moose browsing impacts the food preference of voles. With the current high densities of moose in Fennoscandia, this could potentially influence vole food selection and population dynamics over large geographical areas.

  16. PREFERRED RETINAL LOCUS IN MACULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SANTOS, RODRIGO A. V.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; BARILE, GAETANO R.; SEIPLE, WILLIAM

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the location and fixation stability of preferred retinal locations (PRLs) in patients with macular disease, and the relationship among areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence, the PRL and visual sensitivity. Methods Fifteen patients (15 eyes) were studied. Seven had Stargardt disease, 1 bull’s eye maculopathy, 5 age-related macular degeneration, 1 Best disease, and 1 pattern dystrophy. All tested eyes had areas of abnormal fundus autofluorescence. The PRL was evaluated with fundus photography and the Nidek microperimeter. Visual field sensitivity was measured with the Nidek microperimeter. Results Of the 15 eyes, 4 had foveal and 11 had eccentric fixation. Eccentric PRLs were above the atrophic lesion and their stability did not depend on the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. Visual sensitivity was markedly decreased in locations corresponding to hypofluorescent areas. Sensitivity was not decreased in hyperfluorescent areas corresponding to flecks but was decreased if hyperfluorescence was in the form of dense annuli. Conclusion Eccentric PRLs were in the superior retina in regions of normal fundus autofluorescence. Fixation stability was not correlated with the degree of eccentricity from the fovea. To assess the outcomes of treatment trials it is important to use methods that relate retinal morphology to visual function. PMID:18628727

  17. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-15

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  18. Using knowledge maintenance for preference assessment.

    PubMed

    Jain, N L; Kahn, M G

    1995-01-01

    Most real-life decisions require the decision maker to make trade-offs in order to fulfill multiple conflicting objectives. This is especially true in medical decision making while selecting the optimal therapy plan from among competing therapy plans for a patient. Multi-attribute utility theory provides a framework to specify these trade-offs for optimal decision making based on the preferences of the decision maker. However traditional preference-assessment techniques are difficult to implement and rarely elicit the true preferences of the decision maker. We describe a new preference-assessment method based on the concept of knowledge maintenance where the preference model is changed each time it makes an incorrect recommendation. The method is implemented in a decision-theoretic system to evaluate competing three-dimensional radiation treatment plans. The preference-assessment method leads to preference models which perform better than preference models elicited using traditional assessment techniques.

  19. Using knowledge maintenance for preference assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N. L.; Kahn, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    Most real-life decisions require the decision maker to make trade-offs in order to fulfill multiple conflicting objectives. This is especially true in medical decision making while selecting the optimal therapy plan from among competing therapy plans for a patient. Multi-attribute utility theory provides a framework to specify these trade-offs for optimal decision making based on the preferences of the decision maker. However traditional preference-assessment techniques are difficult to implement and rarely elicit the true preferences of the decision maker. We describe a new preference-assessment method based on the concept of knowledge maintenance where the preference model is changed each time it makes an incorrect recommendation. The method is implemented in a decision-theoretic system to evaluate competing three-dimensional radiation treatment plans. The preference-assessment method leads to preference models which perform better than preference models elicited using traditional assessment techniques. PMID:8563281

  20. Kaluza-Klein magnetized cylindrical wormhole and its gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Sedigheh; Riazi, Nematollah

    2016-10-01

    A new exact vacuum solution in five dimensions, which describes a magnetized cylindrical wormhole in 3+1 dimensions is presented. The magnetic field lines are stretched along the wormhole throat and are concentrated near to it. We study the motion of neutral and charged test particles under the influence of the magnetized wormhole. The effective potential for a neutral test particle around and across the magnetized wormhole has a repulsive character. The gravitational lensing for the magnetized wormhole for various lens parameters are calculated and compared. The total magnetic flux on either side of the wormhole is obtained. We present analytic expressions which show regions in which the null energy condition is violated.

  1. On the question of instabilities upstream of cylindrical bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, M. V.

    1979-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the unsteady vortical phenomena in perturbed stagnation regions of cylindrical bodies, a critical review of the theoretical and experimental evidence was made. Current theory is revealed to be incomplete, incorrect, or inapplicable to the phenomena observed experimentally. The formalistic approach via the principle of exchange of instabilities should most likely be replaced by a forced-disturbance approach. Also, many false conclusions were reached by ignoring that treatment of the base and perturbed flows in Hiemenz coordinate eta is asymptotic in nature. Almost surely the techniques of matched asymptotic expansions are expected to be used to capture correctly the diffusive and vorticity amplifying processes of the disturbances regarding the mean-flow boundary layer and outer potential field as eta and y/diameter approach infinity. The serious uncertainties in the experiments are discussed in detail.

  2. Stability of the cylindrical shell of variable curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marguerre, Karl

    1951-01-01

    This report is a first attempt to devise a calculation method for representing the buckling behavior of cylindrical shells of variable curvature. The problem occurs, for instance, in dimensioning wing noses, the stability of which is decisively influenced by the variability of curvature. The calculation is made possible by simplifying the stability equations (permissible for the shell of small curvature) and by assuming that the curvature 1/R as a function of the arc lengths can be represented by a very few Fourier terms. The formulas for the special case of an ellipse-like half oval with an axis ratio 1/3 ?= e ?= 1 under compression in longitudinal direction,shear, and a combination of shear and compression were evaluated. However, the results can also be applied approximately to an unsymmetrical oval-shell segment under compression, shear, and bending so that the numerical values contained in the diagrams 10 to 12 represent directly dimensioning data for the wing nose.

  3. Hydrodynamic analysis of laser-driven cylindrical implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramis, R.

    2013-08-15

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to study laser-driven cylindrical implosions in the context of experiments (F. Perez et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 124035 (2009)) carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the framework of the HiPER project. The analysis is carried out by using the 3D version of the hydrocode MULTI (R. Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475-505 (1988)). The influence of the main laser parameters on implosion performance and symmetry is consistently studied and compared with the results of 2D analysis. Furthermore, the effects of uncertainties in laser irradiation (pointing, focusing, power balance, and time jitter) on implosion performance (average peak density and temperature) are studied by means of statistical analysis.

  4. Low cost cylindrical converter for measuring lead efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, G. L.; Nakata, L.; Britt, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost cylindrical thermionic converter has been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a NASA-JPL program to directly measure converter lead efficiencies using various electrode materials and surfaces. Efficiency measurements are made using input emitter heater power, output power at the leads, and calculated values of the parasitic losses that would not be present in the application configuration. This information can be used to predict the performance characteristics of the advanced converters currently under development. A series of five converters has been tested. Both structured and smooth molybdenum collectors have been used. Emitters included smooth molybdenum, smooth rhenium, and microstructured rhenium. Cesium pressure families of current-voltage curves are presented for emitter temperatures of 1600, 1700, and 1800 K, along with measured efficiencies as a function of converter current densities for each temperature.

  5. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  6. A cylindrical shell with an arbitrarily oriented crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The general problem of a shallow shell with constant curvatures is considered. It is assumed that the shell contains an arbitrarily oriented through crack and the material is specially orthotropic. The nonsymmetric problem is solved for arbitrary self equilibrating crack surface tractions, which, added to an appropriate solution for an uncracked shell, would give the result for a cracked shell under most general loading conditions. The problem is reduced to a system of five singular integral equations in a set of unknown functions representing relative displacements and rotations on the crack surfaces. The stress state around the crack tip is asymptotically analyzed and it is shown that the results are identical to those obtained from the two dimensional in plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. The numerical results are given for a cylindrical shell containing an arbitrarily oriented through crack. Some sample results showing the effect of the Poisson's ratio and the material orthotropy are also presented.

  7. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  8. Nonobvious features of dynamics of circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leizerovich, G. S.; Taranukha, N. A.

    2008-04-01

    In the framework of the nonlinear theory of flexible shallow shells, we study free bending vibrations of a thin-walled circular cylindrical shell hinged at the end faces. The finite-dimensional shell model assumes that the excitation of large-amplitude bending vibrations inevitably results in the appearance of radial vibrations of the shell. The modal equations are obtained by the Bubnov-Galerkin method. The periodic solutions are found by the Krylov-Bogolyubov method. We show that if the tangential boundary conditions are satisfied "in the mean," then, for a shell of finite length, significant errors arise in determining its nonlinear dynamic characteristics. We prove that small initial irregularities split the bending frequency spectrum, the basic frequency being smaller than in the case of an ideal shell.

  9. Response of long shallow cylindrical panels to radial line loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Hyer, M. W.; Carper, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The large displacement static response of shallow orthotropic panels subjected to lateral loading is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The panels are circular cylindrical open shells which are also thin and long. The straight edges are simply supported at a fixed distance apart, and the curved edges are free. The lateral load is a spatially uniform line load acting along the generator direction of the cylinder, and is directed radially inward toward the center of curvature. The load induces a circumferential thrust, and the panel can, and does, snap-through to an inverted configuration at the buckling load. The effect of load position on the response is also examined. The test panels discussed in the paper are /(90/0)3/S graphite-epoxy laminates. Nominal dimensions are a radius of 60 in., a thickness of 0.060 in., and an arc length of 12 in. Very good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved.

  10. Scaling Instability in Buckling of Axially Compressed Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovsky, Yury; Harutyunyan, Davit

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we continue the development of mathematically rigorous theory of "near-flip" buckling of slender bodies of arbitrary geometry, based on hyperelasticity. In order to showcase the capabilities of this theory, we apply it to buckling of axially compressed circular cylindrical shells. The theory confirms the classical formula for the buckling load, whereby the perfect structure buckles at the stress that scales as the first power of shell's thickness. However, in the case of imperfections of load, the theory predicts scaling instability of the buckling stress. Depending on the type of load imperfections, buckling may occur at stresses that scale as thickness to the power 1.5 or 1.25, corresponding to the lower and upper ends, respectively, of the historically accumulated experimental data.

  11. Large Deformation Behavior of Long Shallow Cylindrical Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, Douglas M.; Hyer, Michael W.; Johnson, Eric R.

    1991-01-01

    An exact solution is presented for the large deformation response of a simply supported orthotropic cylindrical panel subjected to a uniform line load along a cylinder generator. The cross section of the cylinder is circular and deformations up to the fully snapped through position are investigated. The orthotropic axes are parallel to the generator and circumferential directions. The governing equations are derived using laminated plate theory, nonlinear strain-displacement relations, and applying variational principles. The response is investigated for the case of a panel loaded exactly at midspan and for a panel with the load offset from midspan. The mathematical formulation is one dimensional in the circumferential coordinate. Solutions are obtained in closed-form. An experimental apparatus was designed to load the panels. Experimental results of displacement controlled tests performed on graphite-epoxy curved panels are compared with analytical predictions.

  12. The cylindrical magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for viscous fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.; Forbes, L. K.

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers a cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor instability, in which a heavy fluid surrounds a light fluid, and gravity is directed radially inwards. A massive object is located at the centre of the light fluid, and it behaves like a line dipole both for fluid flow and magnetic field strength. The initially circular interface between the two conducting fluids evolves into plumes, dependent on the magnetic and fluid dipole strengths and the nature of the initial disturbance to the interface. A spectral method is presented to solve the time-dependent interface shapes, and results are presented and discussed. Bipolar solutions are possible, and these are of particular relevance to astrophysics. The solutions obtained resemble structures of some HII regions and nebulae.

  13. Evaluation of hybrid composite materials in cylindrical specimen geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1976-01-01

    Static and fatigue properties of three composite materials and hybrids were examined. The materials investigated were graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, PRD-49 (Kevlar 49)/epoxy, and hybrids in angle-ply configurations. A new type of edgeless cylindrical specimen was developed. It is a flattened tube with two flat sides connected by curved sections and it is handled much like the standard flat coupon. Special specimen fabrication, tabbing, and tab region reinforcing techniques were developed. Axial modulus, Poisson's ratio, strength, and ultimate strain were obtained under static loading from flattened tube specimens of nine laminate configurations. In the case of graphite/epoxy the tubular specimens appeared to yield somewhat higher strength and ultimate strain values than flat specimens. Tensile fatigue tests were conducted with all nine types of specimens and S-N curves obtained. Specimens surviving 10 million cycles of tensile loading were subsequently tested statically to failure to determine residual properties.

  14. Kinetic models of sub-ion cylindrical magnetic hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shustov, P. I.; Artemyev, A. V.; Vasko, I. Y.; Yushkov, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic holes are magnetoplasma structures very similar to the classical θ-pinch. They are widely observed in the space plasma and identified by the substantial magnetic field depressions on scales from magnetohydrodynamic range to electron scales. In this paper, we develop the kinetic models of cylindrically symmetric magnetic holes with sub-ion scales using two types of charged particle distribution functions (both current-carrying and background plasma populations are included). We demonstrate that developed magnetic holes have configurations very similar to those revealed in the recent spacecraft observations in the Earth magnetosphere: both localized electron currents and strong radial electric fields are found at the magnetic hole boundary. We demonstrate that for realistic plasma parameters, the inclusion of ion currents into the model produces magnetic holes with double-scale magnetic field profile. We find that the magnetic hole depth (amplitude of the magnetic field depression) depends on the magnetic hole typical radius. Possible applications of developed models are discussed.

  15. Cylindrical Micro Ultrasonic Motor Utilizing Bulk Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takeshi; Kurosawa, Minoru; Higuchi, Toshiro

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasonic motors are expected to be used as microactuatorsbecause of their high torque, low speed and simple construction. Wehave already reported cylindrical-shaped micro ultrasonic motors whichutilized a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. In this paper, wediscuss a micro ultrasonic motor composed of bulk PZT. The statortransducer had dimensions of 2.4 mm in diameter and 10 mmlength. The maximum revolution speed was 650 rpm and the maximumoutput torque was 0.22 mNm with the condition of 100 Vp-pinput voltage. The driving frequency was 85 kHz. The comparisonbetween the bulk PZT stator transducer and the previous PZT thin filmtransducer was considered. From this consideration, the e31piezoelectric factor was determined to be the main factor fordifferent output torques. The bulk PZT motor wasapplied to robot hands which was a simple procedure. A two axes hands application was successfully operated with a step motion and carried up to a 10 g load.

  16. TECHNICAL NOTE Rolling dielectric elastomer actuator with bulged cylindrical shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potz, Marco; Artusi, Matteo; Soleimani, Maryam; Menon, Carlo; Cocuzza, Silvio; Debei, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    This note presents preliminary investigations on the design and development of a rolling dielectric elastomer actuator (rDEA) with a bulged cylindrical shape. The actuator is based on an inflated silicone-based hollow cylinder consisting of a series of dielectric elastomer actuator sectors. The electrical activation of the sectors changes the shape of the rDEA; the induced geometrical change causes a variation of the position of the rDEA's centre of gravity and a consequent initiation of rolling of the rDEA. This paper presents a simplified parametric analytical model which is used to simulate the quasi-static behaviour of the rDEA. A testing procedure is used to assess the potential rolling performance of the rDEA prototypes.

  17. Transverse shear effect in a circumferentially cracked cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the paper are to solve the problem of a circumferentially-cracked cylindrical shell by taking into account the effect of transverse shear, and to obtain the stress intensity factors for the bending moment as well as the membrane force as the external load. The formulation of the problem is given for a specially orthotropic material within the framework of a linearized shallow shell theory. The particular theory used permits the consideration of all five boundary conditions as to moment and stress resultants on the crack surface. The effect of Poisson's ratio on the stress intensity factors and the nature of the out-of-plane displacement along the edges of the crack, i.e., bulging, are also studied.

  18. Au cylindrical nanocup: A geometrically, tunable optical nanoresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovylina, M.; Alayo, N.; Conde-Rubio, A.; Borrisé, X.; Hibbard, G.; Labarta, A.; Batlle, X.; Pérez-Murano, F.

    2015-07-01

    The optical response of Au cylindrical metallic nanostructures (nanocups) with very thin walls is studied by means of finite difference time domain simulations. The simulations predict that, by changing the geometry of the nanocups, they behave as tunable optical nanoresonators with strong near-field enhancement. This opens up the possibility to use them simultaneously as container and field enhancer. Nanocups have been produced by an on-purpose designed fabrication route that combines nanoimprint lithography, definition of an intermediate hard mask, and metal lift-off. The fabrication route offers a manifold of supplementary advantages: thorough control of geometrical parameters; versatility of compositional design, including multishell nanocups; precise positioning of nanocups over the substrate; and low-cost and fast manufacturing of large areas of desirable density without loss of resolution, all processes being compatible with high throughput, low cost production, thus enabling future commercial applications.

  19. Modulational Instability of Cylindrical and Spherical NLS Equations. Statistical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Grecu, A. T.; Grecu, D.; Visinescu, Anca; De Nicola, S.; Fedele, R.

    2010-01-21

    The modulational (Benjamin-Feir) instability for cylindrical and spherical NLS equations (c/s NLS equations) is studied using a statistical approach (SAMI). A kinetic equation for a two-point correlation function is written and analyzed using the Wigner-Moyal transform. The linear stability of the Fourier transform of the two-point correlation function is studied and an implicit integral form for the dispersion relation is found. This is solved for different expressions of the initial spectrum (delta-spectrum, Lorentzian, Gaussian), and in the case of a Lorentzian spectrum the total growth of the instability is calculated. The similarities and differences with the usual one-dimensional NLS equation are emphasized.

  20. Gyrokinetic treatment of GAE modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, D.

    2006-11-30

    Global Alfven eigenmodes (GAEs) are investigated in cylindrical geometry both analytically and numerically. These modes are of particular importance in low-shear magnetic configurations, such as modern stellarators. Analytical treatment starts from the linearised equations of gyrokinetics and yields a generalized dispersion relation for GAE with FLR and kinetic effects taken into account, which is demonstrated to reduce to the well-known MHD counterpart in the appropriate limit. An eigenvalue code is developed to solve the dispersion relation, which is used to investigate the kinetic analogs of GAE modes in various regimes with different beta. On the other hand, GAE modes are simulated with global linear particle-in-cell (PIC) electromagnetic gyrokinetic code following self-consistent time evolution of electromagnetic fields and plasma. GAE modes are observed and their damping rate agrees with predictions made by the eigenvalue code.

  1. Magnified imaging based on non-Hermitian nonlocal cylindrical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoia, Silvio; Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A.; Monticone, Francesco; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alà, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We show that a cylindrical lensing system composed of two metasurfaces with suitably tailored non-Hermitian (i.e., with distributed gain and loss) and nonlocal (i.e., spatially dispersive) properties can perform magnified imaging with reduced aberrations. More specifically, we analytically derive the idealized surface-impedance values that are required for "perfect" magnification and imaging and elucidate the role and implications of non-Hermiticity and nonlocality in terms of spatial resolution and practical implementation. For a basic demonstration, we explore some proof-of-principle quasilocal and multilayered implementations and independently validate the outcomes via full-wave numerical simulations. We also show that the metasurface frequency-dispersion laws can be chosen so as to ensure unconditional stability with respect to arbitrary temporal excitations. These results, which extend previous studies on planar configurations, may open intriguing venues in the design of metastructures for field imaging and processing.

  2. Mode-selectable ultrasonic transducer for cylindrical ferromagnetic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkyu; Lee, Hocheol; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2003-07-01

    Ultrasonic inspection techniques using magnetostrictive transducers have received much attention in recent years as non-contact, non-destructive means of inspecting ferromagnetic materials. By the selection of a desired mode and thus the rejection of the unwanted modes among propagating waves in a waveguide, different types of flaws existing in a cylindrical ferromagnetic waveguide can be effectively detected. However, desired mode selection methods have not been fully developed yet. The purpose of this research is to present a mangetostrictive sensor based technique for the selection of either the bending or longitudinal waves alone in a ferromagnetic waveguide. To achieve this goal, new bias magnet configurations, particularly for bending mode selection are suggested. Several experimental results are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the suggested magnetostrictive sensors.

  3. Characterization of Periodic Cylindrical Subsurface Defects by Pulsed Flash Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikić, Goran; Tomić, Ljubiša; Damnjanović, Vesna; Milanović, Bojan

    2015-03-01

    A characterization of cylindrical periodic subsurface defects of different sizes by means of pulsed thermography is presented in the paper. To ensure a uniform thermal flux distribution, the test samples were heated in lab conditions using two photographic flashes. Surface temperature was intentionally recorded at an angle to the normal of the sample surface. Recorded temperatures were compared with simulated temperatures and the differences in temperature peak values and temperature peak positions were noted. The thermal image was transformed based on known positions of four noncollinear points, in order to cancel out errors resulting from image recording at an angle. The uniformity of surface heating and the effect of the positions of the defects on the results were tested by means of a simulation model. The positions did not affect defect characterization. It was also found that in spite of nonuniform heating, if the reference points were selected properly, the difference in temperature contrast was negligible.

  4. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  5. Vibration of cylindrical shells of bimodulus composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bert, C. W.; Kumar, M.

    1982-03-01

    A theory is formulated for the small amplitude free vibration of thick, circular cylindrical shells laminated of bimodulus composite materials, which have different elastic properties depending upon whether the fiber-direction strain is tensile or compressive. The theory used is the dynamic, shear deformable (moderately thick shell) analog of the Sanders best first approximation thin shell theory. By means of tracers, the analysis can be reduced to that of various simpler shell theories, namely Love's first approximation, and Donnell's shallow shell theory. As an example of the application of the theory, a closed form solution is presented for a freely supported panel or complete shell. To validate the analysis, numerical results are compared with existing results for various special cases. Also, the effects of the various shell theories, thickness shear flexibility, and bimodulus action are investigated.

  6. Attenuation correction factors for cylindrical, disc and box geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Poi, Sanhita; Mhatre, Amol; Goswami, A.; Gathibandhe, M.

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, attenuation correction factors have been experimentally determined for samples having cylindrical, disc and box geometry and compared with the attenuation correction factors calculated by Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) method [ C. Agarwal, S. Poi, A. Goswami, M. Gathibandhe, R.A. Agrawal, Nucl. Instr. and. Meth. A 597 (2008) 198] and with the near-field and far-field formulations available in literature. It has been observed that the near-field formulae, although said to be applicable at close sample-detector geometry, does not work at very close sample-detector configuration. The advantage of the HMC method is that it is found to be valid for all sample-detector geometries.

  7. Attitude motion of a non-attitude-controlled cylindrical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, two non-attitude-controlled satellites were each placed in a low earth orbit by the Scout Launch Vehicle. The satellites were cylindrical in shape and contained reservoirs of hydrazine fuel. Three-axis magnetometer measurements, telemetered in real time, were used to derive the attitude motion of each satellite. Algorithms are generated to deduce possible orientations (and magnitudes) of each vehicle's angular momentum for each telemetry contact. To resolve ambiguities at each contact, a force model was derived to simulate the significant long-term effects of magnetic, gravity gradient, and aerodynamic torques on the angular momentum of the vehicles. The histories of the orientation and magnitude of the angular momentum are illustrated.

  8. Cylindrically symmetric cosmological model of the universe in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Vadrevu, Samhita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have constructed the cosmological models of the universe in a cylindrically symmetric space time in two classes of f(R,T) gravity (Harko et al. in Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011). We have discussed two cases: one in the linear form and the other in the quadratic form of R. The matter is considered to be in the form of perfect fluid. It is observed that in the first case, the pressure and energy density remain the same, which reduces to a Zeldovich fluid. In the second case we have studied the quadratic function of f(R,T) gravity in the form f(R)=λ(R+R2) and f(T)=λ T. In the second case the pressure is in the negative domain and the energy density is in the positive domain, which confirms that the equation of state parameter is negative. The physical properties of the constructed models are studied.

  9. Light detonation wave in a cylindrical Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupaliev, U.; Sysoev, N. N.; Shuteev, S. A.; Elenskii, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    A secondary compression wave previously observed by other researchers in a cylindrical Z-pinch has been identified in this work as a light detonation wave. It appears on the inner surface of a discharge chamber under the action of the intense ultraviolet radiation from a plasma pinch at the stage of its maximum compression. The condition of the light detonation wave has been determined experimentally. The dependence of its Mach number on a generalized dimensionless variable has been determined taking into account the conservation laws for the light detonation wave including the pressure of the gas, expenses on the formation of the surface plasma, and the energy of ionization of the gas involved in the wave. An analogy with the laser-supported detonation wave created by intense laser radiation has been revealed. The indicated dependence is within the error of measurement in agreement with the experimental data for light detonation waves created by both methods.

  10. Coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somiya, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Thermal noise of a mirror is one of the limiting noise sources in the high-precision measurement such as gravitational-wave detection, and the modeling of thermal noise has been developed and refined over a decade. In this paper, we present a derivation of coating thermal noise of a finite-size cylindrical mirror based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The result agrees to a previous result with an infinite-size mirror in the limit of large thickness, and also agrees to an independent result based on the modal-expansion method with a thin-mirror approximation. Our study will play an important role not only to accurately estimate the thermal-noise level of gravitational-wave detectors but also to help in analyzing thermal noise in quantum-measurement experiments with lighter mirrors.

  11. Noise radiated from a rotating submerged elastic cylindrical thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspall, Jayme J.; Yoda, Minami; Rogers, Peter H.

    2002-11-01

    Although the aeroacoustics of high Reynolds number boundary layers is reasonably well understood, less is known about the hydroacoustics of such flows, and the effect of fluid loading. The noise generated by the turbulent boundary layer around an elastic, thin-walled and cylindrical shell rotating in quiescent water was studied in the Georgia Tech. Underwater Acoustic Tank for Reynolds numbers up to 200000. The steel shell, which is filled with air, has a diameter D of 0.625 m, a wall thickness of 0.004D, and an aspect ratio of unity; the tank dimensions are 19D by 12D by 11D. Extraneous noise sources (e.g., bearing and motor vibration) were isolated from the net signal to estimate flow noise. Radiated noise power was calculated from hydrophone data under a diffuse field assumption. To our knowledge, these results are unique in both their structural acoustics and fluid mechanics scaling.

  12. Thermorefractive noise of finite-sized cylindrical test masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinert, D.; Gurkovsky, A. G.; Nawrodt, R.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Yamamoto, K.

    2011-09-01

    We present an analytical solution for the effect of thermorefractive noise considering finite-sized cylindrical test masses. For crystalline materials at low temperatures, the effect of finite dimensions becomes important. The calculations are independently performed using the Fluctuation-Dissipation-Theorem and Langevin’s approach. Our results are applied to the input test mass of the current and future cryogenic gravitational wave detectors CLIO, LCGT, and ET and are compared to the respective standard quantum limit. For a substrate temperature of 10 K, we find that the thermorefractive noise amplitude of the silicon input test mass in ET is only a factor of 2 below the standard quantum limit for frequencies above 500 Hz. Thus, thermorefractive noise of the input test mass could become a severe limitation if one uses techniques to beat the standard quantum limit like, e.g., squeezing. In contrast, the effect of thermorefractive noise of the input test mass is negligible for CLIO and LCGT.

  13. Static solutions of Einstein's equations with cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, C. S.; Fulling, S. A.

    2011-11-01

    In analogy with the standard derivation of the Schwarzschild solution, we find all static, cylindrically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations for vacuum. These include not only the well-known cone solution, which is locally flat, but others in which the metric coefficients are powers of the radial coordinate and the spacetime is curved. These solutions appear in the literature, but in different forms, corresponding to different definitions of the radial coordinate. Because all the vacuum solutions are singular on the axis, we attempt to match them to 'interior' solutions with nonvanishing energy density and pressure. In addition to the well-known 'cosmic string' solution joining on to the cone, we find some numerical solutions that join on to the other exterior solutions.

  14. Global modes of flute instability of a rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, E. A.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of rotation on the flute instability of a cylindrical gravitating plasma in a straight inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. The dispersion relation and integral expression for the instability growth rate of eigenmodes are derived. It is shown that, in the framework of the given problem, rotation is a destabilizing factor, and the corresponding theorem is proved for the general case. For a linear radial profile of the rotation frequency, the structure of eigenmodes is calculated. The growth rate of these modes is shown to increase with increasing rotation velocity and azimuthal mode number. It is found that plasma rotation in the eigenmode localization region leads to the displacement of perturbation from the rotation region, which results in a decrease in the instability growth rate. The absence of eigenmodes (i.e., exponential instability of the system) for certain profiles of the density and rotation frequency is demonstrated.

  15. Bubbly flow velocity measurements near a heated cylindrical conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.; Hassan, Y.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply recent advances and improvements in the digital pulsed laser velocimetry (DPLV) technique to the analysis of two-phase bubbly flow about a cylindrical conductor emitting a constant heat flux within a transparent rectangular enclosure. Pulsed laser velocimetry is a rapidly advancing fluid flow visualization technique that determines full-field instantaneous velocity vectors of a quantitative nature such that the flow field remains undisturbed by the measurement. The DPLV method offers several significant advantages over more traditional fluid velocity measurement techniques such as hot wire/film anemometry and laser Doppler anemometry because reliable instantaneous velocity data may be acquired over substantial flow areas in a single experiment.

  16. First and Second Sound in Cylindrically Trapped Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bertaina, G.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the propagation of density and temperature waves in a cylindrically trapped gas with radial harmonic confinement. Starting from two-fluid hydrodynamic theory we derive effective 1D equations for the chemical potential and the temperature which explicitly account for the effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity. Differently from quantum fluids confined by rigid walls, the harmonic confinement allows for the propagation of both first and second sound in the long wavelength limit. We provide quantitative predictions for the two sound velocities of a superfluid Fermi gas at unitarity. For shorter wavelengths we discover a new surprising class of excitations continuously spread over a finite interval of frequencies. This results in a nondissipative damping in the response function which is analytically calculated in the limiting case of a classical ideal gas.

  17. Analog model for thermoviscous propagation in a cylindrical tube.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen C; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Warren, Daniel M

    2014-02-01

    Modeling acoustic propagation in tubes including the effects of thermoviscous losses at the tube walls is important in applications such as thermoacoustics, hearing aids, and wind musical instruments. Frequency dependent impedances for a tube transmission line model in terms of the so-called thermal and viscous functions are well established, and form the basis for frequency domain analysis of systems that include tubes. However, frequency domain models cannot be used for systems in which significant nonlinearities are important, as is the case with the pressure-flow relationship through the reed in a woodwind instrument. This paper describes a cylindrical tube model based on a continued fraction expansion of the thermal and viscous functions. The model can be represented as an analog circuit model which allows its use in time domain system modeling. This model avoids problems with fractional derivatives in the time domain.

  18. Discrete helical modes in imploding and exploding cylindrical, magnetized liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Campbell, P. C.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Discrete helical modes have been experimentally observed from implosion to explosion in cylindrical, axially magnetized ultrathin foils (Bz = 0.2 - 2.0 T) using visible self-emission and laser shadowgraphy. The striation angle of the helices, ϕ, was found to increase during the implosion and decrease during the explosion, despite the large azimuthal magnetic field (>40 T). These helical striations are interpreted as discrete, non-axisymmetric eigenmodes that persist from implosion to explosion, obeying the simple relation ϕ = m/kR, where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius, respectively. Experimentally, we found that (a) there is only one, or at the most two, dominant unstable eigenmode, (b) there does not appear to be a sharp threshold on the axial magnetic field for the emergence of the non-axisymmetric helical modes, and (c) higher axial magnetic fields yield higher azimuthal modes.

  19. Theoretical model for a thin cylindrical film optical fiber fluorosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    The analytical treatment of power efficiency (P(eff) is undertaken for the case of a positively guiding optical fiber with a thin-film source distributed in the core-cladding interface. The approach adopts the exact solution of the cylindrical optical fiber with an infinite cladding to account for differences between the indices of refraction of the core and the cladding. The excitation of low-loss leaky modes by the cladding is ignored, and only the injection by the evanescent field is considered. The formulas permit the analysis of the power-injection efficiency of fibers with arbitrary differences in indices of refraction. P(eff) does not always increase with V number, but rather varies slightly with wavelength and fiber-core radius and varies significantly with the difference in the indices of refraction. The theoretical results of the work are of interest for designing an atomic-O chemical sensor based on evanescent-wave coupling.

  20. High-speed velocimetry inside imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Daniel; Lemke, Ray; Dalton, Devon; Harding, Eric; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew; Blue, Brent; Walker, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic planar compression is conceptually simple but difficult to maintain at extreme pressure (>5 Mbar). Higher pressures are attainable with imploding cylindrical liners, using Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) to track the liner interior. PDV measures Doppler shift directly--1 GHz of beat frequency for every 1 km/s of velocity--requiring a special ``leapfrog'' approach for liners traveling in excess of 20 km/s. Single-point and multi-point PDV measurements have been performed in aluminum, beryllium, and tantalum liners under ramp compression, and the technique can readily applied to other implosion experiments. Combined with electrical current diagnostics, these measurements test thermodynamic equations of state at pressures up to 10 MBar and beyond. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  1. Rotating solitary wave at the wall of a cylindrical container.

    PubMed

    Amaouche, Mustapha; Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Vatistas, Georgios H

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical modeling of a rotating solitary surface wave that was observed during water drainage from a cylindrical reservoir, when shallow water conditions were reached. It represents an improvement of our previous study, where the radial flow perturbation was neglected. This assumption led to the classical planar Korteweg-de Vries equation for the wall wave profile, which did not account for the rotational character of the base flow. The present formulation is based on a less restricting condition and consequently corrects the last shortcoming. Now the influence of the background flow appears in the wave characteristics. The theory provides a better physical depiction of the unique experiment by predicting fairly well the wave profile at least in the first half of its lifetime and estimating the speed of the observed wave with good accuracy.

  2. Cylindrical Lens-Array Antenna for Wideband Electronic Scanning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Radome 3-21 Report No. 6546j vi WOW oft ma~ - I. Figure 3-14. Line-Feed And Housing Structure Wi thout Radome 3-20 -Zr -W -N .- .’ o - K -w .. - c - K ...I -7: 7 T Fr I~ ~ 7 .4 C 1I-7. 1,1 IF 7I1- -20 - o -----H Ii K 1 2 71 - ~ .~K14.L K ~j~jtK T ’,-. < 1 ’ IL .,, .,. I4 2 4 0 ANGL (DEGREES Fiur A-8...RD- f156 085 CYLINDRICAL LENS-RRAY ANEENNA FOR WIDEBAND ELECTRONIC 112SCAN ING(U) HAZELTINE CORP GREENL WN NY NEWAN ET AL. MAR 85 6546 F19628-80-C

  3. Performance of a Low-Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Raitses, Yevgeny; Smirnov, Artem; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent mission studies have shown that a Hall thruster which operates at relatively constant thrust efficiency (45-55%) over a broad power range (300W - 3kW) is enabling for deep space science missions when compared with slate-of-the-art ion thrusters. While conventional (annular) Hall thrusters can operate at high thrust efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad power envelope down to 0 (100 W) while maintaining relatively high efficiency. In this note we report the measured performance (I(sub sp), thrust and efficiency) of a cylindrical Hall thruster operating at 0 (100 W) input power.

  4. Radiation of cylindrical duct acoustic modes with flow mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savkar, S. D.; Edelfelt, I. H.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations for the radiation of spinning acoustic modes, with or without a centerbody, and with or without flow temperature and velocity discontinuity, are presented. Solutions to the appropriate convected wave equations devised around Fourier transforms and Wiener-Hopf technique are presented. The decomposition of the asymmetric kernel, resulting from a flow and temperature mismatch, is carried out in part exactly and partially using the so-called Carrier-Koiter approximation procedure. The resulting solutions offer a good approximation to the radiation of both symmetric and asymmetric modes through a flow discontinuity represented as a plug flow jet issuing from a cylindrical duct. Besides the Koiter approximation, the major limitation on the calculation program is the difficulty of calculating the high order Bessel functions with sufficient accuracy.

  5. Note: Continuous synthesis of uniform vertical graphene on cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Cui, Shumao; Yu, Kehan; Lu, Ganhua; Mao, Shun; Chen, Junhong

    2011-08-01

    This note describes a new reactor design for continuous synthesis of vertically oriented graphene (VG) sheets on cylindrical wire substrates using an atmospheric plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Through combining a U-shaped reactor design with "dynamic mode" synthesis featuring simultaneous rotational and axial movements of the metallic wire substrate, the new setup can enable continuous synthesis of VG sheets on the wire surface with remarkable uniformity in both circumferential and axial directions. In contrast, synthesis of VG at "static mode" with a fixed substrate can only lead to non-uniform growth of VG sheets on the wire surface. Potential applications of the resulting uniform-VG-coated metallic wire could include field emitters, field-ionization-based neutral atom detectors, and indoor corona discharges.

  6. Trapping volume control in optical tweezers using cylindrical vector beams.

    PubMed

    Skelton, S E; Sergides, M; Saija, R; Iatì, M A; Maragó, O M; Jones, P H

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of an investigation into the optical trapping of spherical microparticles using laser beams with a spatially inhomogeneous polarization direction [cylindrical vector beams (CVBs)]. We perform three-dimensional tracking of the Brownian fluctuations in the position of a trapped particle and extract the trap spring constants. We characterize the trap geometry by the aspect ratio of spring constants in the directions transverse and parallel to the beam propagation direction and evaluate this figure of merit as a function of polarization angle. We show that the additional degree of freedom present in CVBs allows us to control the optical trap strength and geometry by adjusting only the polarization of the trapping beam. Experimental results are compared with a theoretical model of optical trapping using CVBs derived from electromagnetic scattering theory in the T-matrix framework.

  7. CYBPET: a cylindrical PET system for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, A.; Thompson, C. J.; Sarkar, S.; Raisali, G.; Pani, R.; Davilu, H.; Sardari, D.

    2005-06-01

    We propose a Cylindrical Breast PET (CYBPET) system for breast imaging with patients in the prone position. An individual pendulous breast is covered by thin plastic to provide reduced pressure fixation and surrounded by the crystals inside the CYBPET ring. Each breast is imaged separately. The rest of the body is shielded properly to minimize the contribution of scattered photons from the other breast and the rest of the body. To compare the CYBPET with whole-body PET (WB-PET) the simulations of CYBPET and a WB-PET (GE-Advance) for a 10 mm tumor inside the breast with a lesion to background (breast) activity concentration of 6 to 1 were made. The noise effective count rate (NECR) of CYBPET is about twice that of WB-PET at activity concentrations less than 3.1 μCi/cc. The spatial resolution of CYBPET is better by 25% than the WB-PET.

  8. Integral cylindrical cyclone and loopseal assembly for CFB combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Alliston, M.G.; Wu, S.; Sinn, B.T.; Lato, K.

    1995-12-31

    The cyclone solids separator has been one of the main features characteristically associated with many Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor designs. Most designs incorporating the cyclone coflector also include a pressure sealing device through which the solids collected by the cyclone are returned to the combustor. The cyclone and the loopseal have typically been two separate components, and various designs have arisen for each component comprising refractory, water-cooled, or steam cooled equipment. The two obvious advantages of the use of water-cooled or steam-, cooled equipment are the reduction of refractory requirements and the conversion of these components into boiler-useful devices. The creation of these devices from tube and header assemblies has followed more-or-less artful paths, the directions of which have generally been based upon the goal of maintaining the specific geometric forms that had previously been used for CFB cyclones and loopseals. The assembly described in this paper was instead developed based upon the goals of (a) ease of manufacturing, (b) elimination of problematic components, (c) maximizing the boiler-usefulness of the surfaces created, and (d) adding potential process benefits. The resulting embodiment of these goals was a cylindrical vessel in which the upper portion forms the solids separator and the lower section is divided into chambers to form the loopseal. This report describes the details of the Integral Cylindrical Cyclone and Loopseal (ICCL), and also describes its performance as demonstrated in a CFB cold flow model incorporating the new apparatus. The commercial application of the ICCL in a 1.2 MM lb steam/hr CFB boiler as well as its potential application in reheat CFB units are also discussed.

  9. Tempo Preferences of Different Age Music Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measures the effect of four levels of tempo on the self-reported preferences of six different age-groups for traditional jazz music listening examples. Stated that listener age exerted a strong influence on overall preference scores. Reported an analysis of variance showing that there is a significant preference for increasingly faster tempo at…

  10. 76 FR 53631 - BioPreferred Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... biobased preferred procurement program (one part of the BioPreferred Program) is available on the Internet... reference Amend: to: And adding in its place: Sec. 2904.2, definition of ``Biobased part 2902 part 3201. content''. Sec. 2904.2, definition of part 2902 part 3201. ``BioPreferred Product''. Sec....

  11. 43 CFR 4110.2 - Grazing preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grazing preference. 4110.2 Section 4110.2..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) GRAZING ADMINISTRATION-EXCLUSIVE OF ALASKA Qualifications and Preference § 4110.2 Grazing preference....

  12. Generalization of a Modified Food Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Leann Lipps

    1981-01-01

    Assesses preschool children's preferences for eight snack foods and tests procedures to modify preferences for certain foods by having children sort foods according to self-determined categories. Enhanced preferences for target foods generalized to other foods in the same category only for children using semantic sorting categories. (Author/DB)

  13. Intergenerational transfer of time and risk preferences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heather; van der Pol, Marjon

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in individual time and risk preferences. Little is known about how these preferences are formed. It is hypothesised that parents may transmit their preferences to their offspring. This paper examines the correlation in offspring and parental time and risk preferences using data from an annual household survey in Australia (the HILDA survey). Both time and risk preferences are examined and we explored whether the correlation in time and risk preferences varies across the distribution of preferences and across the across the four parent–child dyads (mother/daughter, mother/son, father/daughter, father/son). The results show that there is a significant relationship between parents and their young adult offspring risk and time preference measures. The correlation varies across the distribution of time preferences. The correlation was largest for longer planning horizons. Risk averse parents are more likely to have risk averse children. Except for the father/daughter dyad risk seeking parents are more likely to have risk seeking offspring. Some gender differences were found. The association in parental and offspring time preference was larger for mothers than fathers. Daughters are more likely to be influenced by their mother’s risk preferences, however, sons are equally influenced by both parents. The results of this study suggest that the transmission in preferences is more nuanced than previously thought and parental gender may be important. PMID:26412913

  14. Measurement of Client Preferences for Therapist Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richert, Alphons J.

    While past research has found conflicting results on the place for client role preferences in psychotherapy, none of this research has examined the client role preferences in an actual client population seeking outpatient therapy. This study involved the development of a measure of client role preferences which attempted to survey a wider range of…

  15. Employer Preferences for Resumes and Cover Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schullery, Nancy M.; Ickes, Linda; Schullery, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of employers' preferences for resume style, resume delivery method, and cover letters. Employers still widely prefer the standard chronological resume, with only 3% desiring a scannable resume. The vast majority of employers prefer electronic delivery, either by email (46%) or at the company's Web site…

  16. Subject Preference Regarding Three Psychotherapy Orientations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollis, Thomas G.

    Research has shown that therapy preference affects both the quality of the initial therapy session and treatment outcome. To determine personality characteristics which would affect subjects' preference of therapeutic orientation and to obtain qualitative information about subjects' therapy preferences, 203 community college students indicated…

  17. Intergenerational transfer of time and risk preferences.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heather; van der Pol, Marjon

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing interest in individual time and risk preferences. Little is known about how these preferences are formed. It is hypothesised that parents may transmit their preferences to their offspring. This paper examines the correlation in offspring and parental time and risk preferences using data from an annual household survey in Australia (the HILDA survey). Both time and risk preferences are examined and we explored whether the correlation in time and risk preferences varies across the distribution of preferences and across the across the four parent-child dyads (mother/daughter, mother/son, father/daughter, father/son). The results show that there is a significant relationship between parents and their young adult offspring risk and time preference measures. The correlation varies across the distribution of time preferences. The correlation was largest for longer planning horizons. Risk averse parents are more likely to have risk averse children. Except for the father/daughter dyad risk seeking parents are more likely to have risk seeking offspring. Some gender differences were found. The association in parental and offspring time preference was larger for mothers than fathers. Daughters are more likely to be influenced by their mother's risk preferences, however, sons are equally influenced by both parents. The results of this study suggest that the transmission in preferences is more nuanced than previously thought and parental gender may be important.

  18. Vision and the End of Racial Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Are we facing the end of racial preferences in America? Mr. Clegg thinks we probably are, and examines the role demographics, law, attraction, and vision may play in their demise. What makes preferences still attractive to so many people? Do most Americans share a vision that includes the continued use of racial preferences? Mr. Clegg offers a…

  19. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  20. Parameters critical to the morphology of fluidization craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegal, B. S.; Gold, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study further the role of fluidization on the moon, a laboratory investigation was undertaken on two particulate material size fractions to determine the effect of variables, such as, duration of gas streaming, gas pressure, and 'regolith' thickness on the morphology of fluidization craters. A 3.175-mm cylindrical vent was used to simulate a gas streaming conduit. Details of the fluidization chamber are discussed together with questions of experimental control, aspects of nomenclature, crater measurements, and the effect of variables.

  1. Acquisition of Morphological Variation: The Case of the English Definite Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, William D.; Healy, Alice F.; McDonnel, Samantha; Healy, Charlotte A.

    2009-01-01

    Morphological systems have been pivotal in exploring cognitive mechanisms of language use and acquisition. Adult English definite article form preference seems to depend non-deterministically on multiple factors. A corpus study of adult spontaneous speech revealed similar patterns of variability. In an experiment, article variant preferences of…

  2. Dental Continuing Education Preference Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    the 63A9Ds and 34.9% for the 63A00s, selected Comprehensive Dentistry as their specialty preference. For the 63A9Ds, orthodontics , periodontics, and...prosthodontics were the next most frequently selected specialties. For the 63A00s, it was orthodontics , prosthodontics, and endodontics. Nearly 10% of...Vital Pulp Therapy 1 2 3 4 (20) 17) Basic Clinical Oral Pathology / Medicine 1 2 3 4 (21) 18) Esthetics and Prosthodontics 1 2 3 4 (22) 19) Minor Tooth

  3. Preferred Attachment in Affiliation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelis, Mindaugas; Götze, Friedrich

    2014-08-01

    Vertices of an affiliation network are linked to attributes and two vertices are declared adjacent whenever they share a common attribute. For example, two customers of an internet shop (or video-sharing website) are called adjacent if they have purchased (or downloaded) the same or similar items. Assuming that each newly arrived customer is linked preferentially to already popular items we obtain a preferred attachment affiliation network that evolves in time. We show that the fraction of customers having neighbours scales as for large . Here is the ratio between the two intensities: intensity of the flow of customers and that of the newly arriving items.

  4. A study of cylindrical Hall thruster for low power space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch; K.M. Ertmer; C.A. Burlingame

    2000-07-27

    A 9 cm cylindrical thruster with a ceramic channel exhibited performance comparable to the state-of-the-art Hall thrusters at low and moderate power levels. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations. Preliminary experiments on a 2 cm cylindrical thruster suggest the possibility of a high performance micro Hall thruster.

  5. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Fetherston, Robert P. , Shamim, Muhammad M. , Conrad, John R.

    1997-12-02

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  6. High Speed Cylindrical Roller Bearing Analysis, SKF Computer Program CYBEAN. Volume 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1978-01-01

    The CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis) program was created to detail radially loaded, aligned and misaligned Cylindrical roller bearing performance under a variety of operating conditions. The models and associated mathematics used within CYBEAN are described. The user is referred to the material for formulation assumptions and algorithm detail.

  7. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gowdy, Robert H.; Edmonds, B. Douglas

    2007-04-15

    New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.

  8. Cylindrical gravitational waves in expanding universes: Models for waves from compact sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdy, Robert H.; Edmonds, B. Douglas

    2007-04-01

    New boundary conditions are imposed on the familiar cylindrical gravitational wave vacuum spacetimes. The new spacetime family represents cylindrical waves in a flat expanding (Kasner) universe. Space sections are flat and nonconical where the waves have not reached and wave amplitudes fall off more rapidly than they do in Einstein-Rosen solutions, permitting a more regular null inifinity.

  9. Measurement of cylindrical Rayleigh surface waves using line-focused PVDF transducers and defocusing measurement method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-I; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2014-08-01

    Line-focused PVDF transducers and defocusing measurement method are applied in this work to determine the dispersion curve of the Rayleigh-like surface waves propagating along the circumferential direction of a solid cylinder. Conventional waveform processing method has been modified to cope with the non-linear relationship between phase angle of wave interference and defocusing distance induced by a cylindrically curved surface. A cross correlation method is proposed to accurately extract the cylindrical Rayleigh wave velocity from measured data. Experiments have been carried out on one stainless steel and one glass cylinders. The experimentally obtained dispersion curves are in very good agreement with their theoretical counterparts. Variation of cylindrical Rayleigh wave velocity due to the cylindrical curvature is quantitatively verified using this new method. Other potential applications of this measurement method for cylindrical samples will be addressed.

  10. Radius and Orientation Measurement for Cylindrical Objects by a Light Section Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youdong; Liu, Chongxu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient method based on a light section sensor is presented for measuring cylindrical objects’ radii and orientations in a robotic application. By this method, the cylindrical objects can be measured under some special conditions, such as when the cylindrical objects are welded with others, or in the presence of interferences. Firstly, the measurement data are roughly identified and accurately screened to effectively recognize ellipses. Secondly, the data are smoothed and homogenized to eliminate the effect of laser line loss or jump and reduce the influence of the inhomogeneity of measurement data on the ellipse fitting to a minimum. Finally, the ellipse fitting is carried out to obtain the radii and orientations of the cylindrical objects. Measuring experiments and results demonstrate the effective of the proposed radius and orientation measurement method for cylindrical object. PMID:27886090

  11. Coupling into and scattering from cylindrical structures covered periodically with metallic patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Circular cylindrical structures covered periodically with metallic patches are considered. After an analogy to planar periodic surfaces is shown, formulations are presented for calculating induced currents on the curved surface. The equations are solved and results calculated for the specific case of periodic strips on the cylindrical surface. For a cylindrical structure a two-dimensional periodicity exists, as in a planar structure, while a spherical structure allows only a rotational periodicity. When the cylindrical structure is excited by the characteristic harmonic of the system, the spectral response of the transmitted field exhibits resonances that depend on the surface periodicity, as is known for planar structures. Since the cylindrical structure contains finite closed regions, the effects of resonances internal to the structure are seen and give additional information as compared to planar structures.

  12. Systems and methods for cylindrical hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages

    DOEpatents

    Diamant, Kevin David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel Joseph

    2014-05-13

    Systems and methods may be provided for cylindrical Hall thrusters with independently controllable ionization and acceleration stages. The systems and methods may include a cylindrical channel having a center axial direction, a gas inlet for directing ionizable gas to an ionization section of the cylindrical channel, an ionization device that ionizes at least a portion of the ionizable gas within the ionization section to generate ionized gas, and an acceleration device distinct from the ionization device. The acceleration device may provide an axial electric field for an acceleration section of the cylindrical channel to accelerate the ionized gas through the acceleration section, where the axial electric field has an axial direction in relation to the center axial direction. The ionization section and the acceleration section of the cylindrical channel may be substantially non-overlapping.

  13. A novel vibration mode testing method for cylindrical resonators based on microphones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongmeng; Wu, Yulie; Wu, Xuezhong; Xi, Xiang; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-16

    Non-contact testing is an important method for the study of the vibrating characteristic of cylindrical resonators. For the vibratory cylinder gyroscope excited by piezo-electric electrodes, mode testing of the cylindrical resonator is difficult. In this paper, a novel vibration testing method for cylindrical resonators is proposed. This method uses a MEMS microphone, which has the characteristics of small size and accurate directivity, to measure the vibration of the cylindrical resonator. A testing system was established, then the system was used to measure the vibration mode of the resonator. The experimental results show that the orientation resolution of the node of the vibration mode is better than 0.1°. This method also has the advantages of low cost and easy operation. It can be used in vibration testing and provide accurate results, which is important for the study of the vibration mode and thermal stability of vibratory cylindrical gyroscopes.

  14. Geometric effect on photonic nanojet generated by dielectric microcylinders with non-cylindrical cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Lin, Fan-Chih

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally report the geometric effect on photonic nanojet generated by dielectric microcylinders with non-cylindrical cross-sections. The non-cylindrical cross-sections include truncated microcylinders and elliptical microcylinders. The truncated microcylinder is formed with the cutting thickness. The elliptical microcylinder is defined by ratio of minor to major axes. The specific spatial electromagnetic fields for microcylinders with different non-cylindrical cross-sections are studied by using finite-difference time-domain calculation. The direct imaging of photonic nanojets for microcylinders with different non-cylindrical cross-sections are performed with a scanning optical microscope system. The field distribution and location of photonic nanojet depending on the various spatial shapes are experimentally demonstrated. The photonic nanojet with long focal length and low divergence could be used to scan over a target to obtain a large area image when the non-cylindrical micro-media are coupled with a conventional optical microscope.

  15. Color preference in red–green dichromats

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro, Leticia; Moreira, Humberto; Lillo, Julio; Franklin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Around 2% of males have red–green dichromacy, which is a genetic disorder of color vision where one type of cone photoreceptor is missing. Here we investigate the color preferences of dichromats. We aim (i) to establish whether the systematic and reliable color preferences of normal trichromatic observers (e.g., preference maximum at blue, minimum at yellow-green) are affected by dichromacy and (ii) to test theories of color preference with a dichromatic sample. Dichromat and normal trichromat observers named and rated how much they liked saturated, light, dark, and focal colors twice. Trichromats had the expected pattern of preference. Dichromats had a reliable pattern of preference that was different to trichromats, with a preference maximum rather than minimum at yellow and a much weaker preference for blue than trichromats. Color preference was more affected in observers who lacked the cone type sensitive to long wavelengths (protanopes) than in those who lacked the cone type sensitive to medium wavelengths (deuteranopes). Trichromats’ preferences were summarized effectively in terms of cone-contrast between color and background, and yellow-blue cone-contrast could account for dichromats’ pattern of preference, with some evidence for residual red–green activity in deuteranopes’ preference. Dichromats’ color naming also could account for their color preferences, with colors named more accurately and quickly being more preferred. This relationship between color naming and preference also was present for trichromat males but not females. Overall, the findings provide novel evidence on how dichromats experience color, advance the understanding of why humans like some colors more than others, and have implications for general theories of aesthetics. PMID:26170287

  16. Color preference in red-green dichromats.

    PubMed

    Álvaro, Leticia; Moreira, Humberto; Lillo, Julio; Franklin, Anna

    2015-07-28

    Around 2% of males have red-green dichromacy, which is a genetic disorder of color vision where one type of cone photoreceptor is missing. Here we investigate the color preferences of dichromats. We aim (i) to establish whether the systematic and reliable color preferences of normal trichromatic observers (e.g., preference maximum at blue, minimum at yellow-green) are affected by dichromacy and (ii) to test theories of color preference with a dichromatic sample. Dichromat and normal trichromat observers named and rated how much they liked saturated, light, dark, and focal colors twice. Trichromats had the expected pattern of preference. Dichromats had a reliable pattern of preference that was different to trichromats, with a preference maximum rather than minimum at yellow and a much weaker preference for blue than trichromats. Color preference was more affected in observers who lacked the cone type sensitive to long wavelengths (protanopes) than in those who lacked the cone type sensitive to medium wavelengths (deuteranopes). Trichromats' preferences were summarized effectively in terms of cone-contrast between color and background, and yellow-blue cone-contrast could account for dichromats' pattern of preference, with some evidence for residual red-green activity in deuteranopes' preference. Dichromats' color naming also could account for their color preferences, with colors named more accurately and quickly being more preferred. This relationship between color naming and preference also was present for trichromat males but not females. Overall, the findings provide novel evidence on how dichromats experience color, advance the understanding of why humans like some colors more than others, and have implications for general theories of aesthetics.

  17. Patient Preferences and Expectations for Care

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Gibson-Chambers, Jennifer; Tosteson, Tor; Tosteson, Anna; Hu, Serena S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational cohort. Objective To describe the baseline characteristics of patients with a diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation who had different treatment preferences and the relationship of specific expectations with those preferences. Summary of Background Data Data were gathered from the observational cohort of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Patients in the observational cohort met eligibility requirements identical to those of the randomized cohort, but declined randomization, receiving instead the treatment of their choice. Methods Baseline preference and expectation data were acquired at the time of enrollment of the patient, before exposure to the informed consent process. Univariate analyses were performed using a t test for continuous variables and χ2 for categorical variables. Multivariate analyses were also performed with ANCOVA for continuous variables and logistic regression for categorical variables. Multiple logistic regression models were developed in a forward stepwise fashion using blocks of variables. Results More patients preferred operative care: 67% preferred surgery, 28% preferred nonoperative treatment, and 6% were unsure; 53% of those preferring surgery stated a definite preference, whereas only 18% of those preferring nonoperative care had a definite preference. Patients preferring surgery were younger, had lower levels of education, and higher levels of unemployment/disability. This group also reported higher pain, worse physical and mental functioning, more back pain related disability, a longer duration of symptoms, and more opiate use. Gender, race, comorbidities, and use of other therapies did not differ significantly across preference groups. Patients’ expectations regarding improvement with nonoperative care was the strongest predictor of preference. Conclusion Patient expectations, particularly regarding the benefit of nonoperative treatment, are the primary determinant of

  18. Preference of the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus for different macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Cuihong; Zeng, Fangui; Wang, Shuqi; Li, Yuanyou

    2014-06-01

    The decomposition of a large amount of unexploited macroalgal resource along the coast of China often results in heavy environmental pollution. In order to pave a way of using macroalgae as the dietary ingredient of rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus, one of a few farmed herbivorous marine teleosts in China, its preference (feeding selectivity) for different macroalgae was determined in this study. Seven seaweed species abundantly inhabiting the coast of east Guangdong Province were exposed simultaneously to rabbitfish juveniles in laboratory (multiple-choice feeding) with their content and absolute intake assayed. It was found that the most preferred algae were Ulva prolifera, Gracilaria lemaneiformis and Chaetomorpha linum, less preferred algae were U. pertusa and Porphyra haitanensis, and least preferred ones were Sargassum fusiforme and Corallina sessilis. Such an order did not change when one to four relatively preferred seaweeds were removed. The preferred seaweeds were richer in protein and soluble sugar thus higher in energy than the least preferred. In addition, this fish was found to favor filamentous and flat algae rather than calcified ones. Accordingly, the richness of nutrients and morphological characteristics determined the preference of S. canaliculatus for tested macroalgae.

  19. Assessing preference and reinforcer effectiveness in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vicars, Sara M; Miguel, Caio F; Sobie, Jennifer L

    2014-03-01

    The paired-stimulus (PS) preference assessment has been shown to be effective in assessing preference with animal subjects, including dogs; however, evaluations on whether preferred stimuli would also function as reinforcers are lacking. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the use of the PS preference assessment as a predictor of reinforcer effectiveness in eight dogs. The assessment was followed by concurrent and progressive ratio schedules to evaluate the reinforcer efficacy of food items. Results showed that the preference assessment predicted reinforcer efficacy for all subjects. Benefits of using this assessment with dogs are discussed.

  20. Single-molecule tracking study of the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) films

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Dol Raj; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Elwell-Cuddy, Trevor; Higgins, Daniel A.; Ito, Takashi

    2016-11-04

    Understanding the properties of solvent-swollen block copolymer (BCP) microdomains is important for better solvent-based control of microdomain morphology, orientation, and permeability. In this study, single-molecule tracking (SMT) was explored to assess the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) films. PS-b-PEO films comprising shear-elongated cylindrical PEO microdomains were prepared by sandwiching its benzene or tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution between two glass substrates. In this paper, SMT measurements were performed at different drying times to investigate the effects of solvent evaporation on the microdomain properties. SMT data showed one-dimensional (1D) motions of single fluorescent molecules (sulforhodamine B) based on their diffusion within the cylindrical microdomains. Microdomain permeability and transverse width were assessed from the single-molecule diffusion coefficients (DSMT) and transverse variance of the 1D trajectories (σδ2), respectively. The DSMT and σδ2 values from individual 1D trajectories were widely distributed with no evidence of correlation on a single molecule basis, possibly because the individual microdomains in a film were swollen to different extents. On average, microdomain permeability (D) and effective radius (r) gradually decreased within the first 3 days of drying due to solvent evaporation, and changed negligibly thereafter. PS-b-PEO films prepared from THF solutions exhibited larger changes in D and r as compared with those from benzene solutions due to the better swelling of the PEO microdomains by THF. Importantly, changes in D were more prominent than those in r, suggesting that the permeability of the PEO microdomains is very susceptible to the presence of solvent. Finally, these results reveal the unique capability of SMT to assess the

  1. Single-molecule tracking study of the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) films

    DOE PAGES

    Sapkota, Dol Raj; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Elwell-Cuddy, Trevor; ...

    2016-11-04

    Understanding the properties of solvent-swollen block copolymer (BCP) microdomains is important for better solvent-based control of microdomain morphology, orientation, and permeability. In this study, single-molecule tracking (SMT) was explored to assess the permeability and transverse width of individual cylindrical microdomains in solvent-swollen polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) films. PS-b-PEO films comprising shear-elongated cylindrical PEO microdomains were prepared by sandwiching its benzene or tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution between two glass substrates. In this paper, SMT measurements were performed at different drying times to investigate the effects of solvent evaporation on the microdomain properties. SMT data showed one-dimensional (1D) motions of single fluorescent molecules (sulforhodaminemore » B) based on their diffusion within the cylindrical microdomains. Microdomain permeability and transverse width were assessed from the single-molecule diffusion coefficients (DSMT) and transverse variance of the 1D trajectories (σδ2), respectively. The DSMT and σδ2 values from individual 1D trajectories were widely distributed with no evidence of correlation on a single molecule basis, possibly because the individual microdomains in a film were swollen to different extents. On average, microdomain permeability (D) and effective radius (r) gradually decreased within the first 3 days of drying due to solvent evaporation, and changed negligibly thereafter. PS-b-PEO films prepared from THF solutions exhibited larger changes in D and r as compared with those from benzene solutions due to the better swelling of the PEO microdomains by THF. Importantly, changes in D were more prominent than those in r, suggesting that the permeability of the PEO microdomains is very susceptible to the presence of solvent. Finally, these results reveal the unique capability of SMT to assess the properties of individual cylindrical microdomains in a solvent

  2. Game theory, conditional preferences, and social influence.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Wynn C; Felin, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Neoclassical noncooperative game theory is based on a simple, yet powerful synthesis of mathematical and logical concepts: unconditional and immutable preference orderings and individual rationality. Although this structure has proven useful for characterizing competitive multi-player behavior, its applicability to scenarios involving complex social relationships is problematic. In this paper we directly address this limitation by the introduction of a conditional preference structure that permits players to modulate their preference orderings as functions of the preferences of other players. Embedding this expanded preference structure in a formal and graphical framework provides a systematic approach for characterizing a complex society. The result is an influence network that allows conditional preferences to propagate through the community, resulting in an emergent social model which characterizes all of the social relationships that exist and which leads to solution concepts that account for both group and individual interests. The Ultimatum game is presented as an example of how social influence can be modeled with conditional preferences.

  3. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, David M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J.; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., ‘brain types’). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed. PMID:26200656

  4. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., 'brain types'). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed.

  5. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardi, Demian M; Guo, Hao-Bo; Gu, Baohua; Parks, Jerry M; Summers, Anne; Miller, S; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  6. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2004-01-01

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle

  7. Observing of tree trunks and other cylindrical objects using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezova, Jana; Lambot, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Trees are a part of our everyday life, hence it is important to prevent their collapse to protect people and urban infrastructures. It is also important to characterize tree wood properties for usages in construction. In order to investigate internal parts of tree trunks non-invasively, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), or in this case, ultra-wideband microwave radar as a general tool, appears to be a very promising technology. Nevertheless, tree trunk tomography using microwave radar is a complicated task due to the circular shape of the trunk and the very complex (heterogeneous and anisotropic) internal structures of the trunk. Microwave sensing of tree trunks is also complicated due to the electromagnetic properties of living wood, which strongly depend on water content, density and temperature of wood. The objective of this study is to describe tree trunk radar cross sections including specific features originating from the particular circumferential data acquisition geometry. In that respect, three experiments were performed: (1) numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain software, namely, gprMax 2D, (2) measurements on a simplified laboratory trunk model including plastic and cardboard pipes, sand and air, and (3) measurements over a real tree trunk. The analysis was further deepened by considering: (1) common zero-offset reflection imaging, (2) imaging with a planar perfect electrical conductor (PEC) at the opposite side of the trunk, and (3) imaging with a PEC arc at the opposite side of the trunk. Furthermore, the shape of the reflection curve of a cylindrical target was analytically derived based on the straight-ray propagation approximation. Subsequently, the total internal reflection (TIR) phenomenon occurring in cylindrical objects was observed and analytically described. Both the straight-ray reflection curve and TIR were well observed on the simulated and laboratory radar data. A comparison between all experiments and radar

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Mixing in Stratified Cylindrical Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2004-04-15

    We study the linear stability of an arbitrary number N of cylindrical concentric shells undergoing a radial implosion or explosion.We derive the evolution equation for the perturbation {eta}{sub i} at interface i; it is coupled to the two adjacent interfaces via {eta}{sub i{+-}1}. For N=2, where there is only one interface, we verify Bell's conjecture as to the form of the evolution equation for arbitrary {rho}{sub 1} and {rho}{sub 2}, the fluid densities on either side of the interface. We obtain several analytic solutions for the N=2 and 3 cases. We discuss freeze-out, a phenomenon that can occur in all three geometries (planar, cylindrical, or spherical), and ''critical modes'' that are stable for any implosion or explosion history and occur only in cylindrical or spherical geometries. We present numerical simulations of possible gelatin-ring experiments illustrating perturbation feedthrough from one interface to another. We also develop a simple model for the evolution of turbulent mix in cylindrical geometry and define a geometrical factor G as the ratio h{sub cylindrical}/h{sub planar} between cylindrical and planar mixing layers. We find that G is a decreasing function of R/R{sub o}, implying that in our model h{sub cylindrical} evolves faster (slower) than h{sub planar} during an implosion (explosion).

  9. Three dimensional sound transmission through poroelastic cylindrical shells in the presence of subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebitooti, R.; Daneshjou, K.; Kornokar, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an extension of the full method to investigate sound transmission through poroelastic cylindrical shell. The "extended full method" is presented based on Biot theory with considering the 3-D wave propagation in a cylindrical shell. Contrary to previous methods, it could be applicable for both poroelastic cylindrical shells and double-walled cylindrical shells lined with poroelastic materials with an excellent accuracy. In the extended full method, the well-known Helmholtz decomposition is used to obtain the displacement fields, solid stresses and the fluid pressure. In order to verify the results of the poroelastic cylindrical shell the porosity goes into zero with eliminating the fluid phase of the poroelastic material. Thus, the results are compared with those of TLs for isotropic shell with high accuracy. The results also indicate that enhancing the porosity of the poroelastic cylindrical shells efficiently leads into decreasing the TL. It is also designated that with doubling the thickness of the poroelastic shell, the TL is improved about 6 dB in a broad-band frequency. Also, the present method is investigated for the case of a double-walled cylindrical shell composed of isotropic skins and poroelastic core. The first-order shear deformation theory is applied to modeling the isotropic shells. The results indicate that presented method is more accurate than simplified method, particularly in the case of small radius cylindrical shells. Moreover, the results indicate that with increasing the radius of the shell, the double-walled cylindrical shell behaves in a same trend as a double-walled flat plate.

  10. Cylindrical effects on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for arbitrary Atwood numbers in weakly nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. H.; He, X. T.; Yu, C. P.

    2012-07-15

    When an incident shock collides with a corrugated interface separating two fluids of different densities, the interface is prone to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Based on the formal perturbation expansion method as well as the potential flow theory, we present a simple method to investigate the cylindrical effects in weakly nonlinear RMI with the transmitted and reflected cylindrical shocks by considering the nonlinear corrections up to fourth order. The cylindrical results associated with the material interface show that the interface expression consists of two parts: the result in the planar system and that from the cylindrical effects. In the limit of the cylindrical radius tending to infinity, the cylindrical results can be reduced to those in the planar system. Our explicit results show that the cylindrical effects exert an inward velocity on the whole perturbed interface, regardless of bubbles or spikes of the interface. On the one hand, outgoing bubbles are constrained and ingoing spikes are accelerated for different Atwood numbers (A) and mode numbers k'. On the other hand, for ingoing bubbles, when |A|k'{sup 3/2} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, bubbles are considerably accelerated especially at the small |A| and k'; otherwise, bubbles are decelerated. For outgoing spikes, when |A|k' Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, spikes are dramatically accelerated especially at large |A| and k'; otherwise, spikes are decelerated. Furthermore, the cylindrical effects have a significant influence on the amplitudes of the ingoing spike and bubble for large k'. Thus, it should be included in applications where the cylindrical effects play a role, such as inertial confinement fusion ignition target design.

  11. Strain localization in glassy polymers under cylindrical confinement.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Amit; Riggleman, Robert A

    2014-06-14

    Although the origin of ductility in crystalline materials is well understood through the motion of dislocations and defects, a similar framework for understanding deformation in amorphous materials remains elusive. In particular, the difference in the mechanical response for small-molecule amorphous solids, such as organic glasses that are typically brittle, and polymer glasses, which are frequently very tough, has not been systematically explored. Here, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanical response of model glassy polymers confined to a nanoscopic pillar under tensile deformation. We vary the chain length, cooling rate for forming the glass, and the deformation rate and investigate the changes in the mechanical response. We find that samples that are cooled at a slower rate and deformed at a slower rate are more prone to localization of the strain response, or shear banding. Interestingly, this effect is independent of chain length over the range of parameters we have investigated so far, and we believe this is the first direct observation of shear banding in deformed polymer glasses under cylindrical confinement. Finally, by using the isoconfigurational ensemble approach, we provide evidence that the location where the shear band forms is due to structural features that are frozen in place during sample preparation.

  12. Stability of thermal convection in a rotating cylindrical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The rotation and an axial gradient of temperature drive the meridional circulation of a fluid filling a sealed cylindrical container. This numerical study explains why the flow remains stable up to the Grashof number Gr around 1011; Gr characterizes the circulation strength. The shear-layer instability, occurring in a rotating pipe for small values of the Prandtl number Pr [M. A. Herrada and V. N. Shtern, "Stability of centrifugal convection in a rotating pipe," Phys. Fluids 27, 064106 (2015)], is suppressed here even for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio being ten. The cold end disk enhances the fluid circulation near the sidewall and diminishes it near the axis. The inflection point in the radial profile of axial velocity shifts to the sidewall vicinity where the stable centrifugal stratification and the no-slip condition prevent the disturbance growth. The cases Pr = 0, 0.015 (mercury), 0.7 (air), and 5.8 (water) are particularly analyzed. At Pr > 0, the stable density stratification develops and helps to suppress the disturbances. The obtained results are of fundamental interest and might be important for the development of efficient heat exchangers.

  13. Characterizing the kinetics of suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Ou, Xueheng; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Polarization has promising potential to retrieve the information of the steady samples, such as tissues. However, for the fast changing sample such as the suspended algae in the water, the kinetics of the particles also influence the scattered polarization. The present paper will show our recent results to extract the information about the kinetics of the suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements. The sample is the aqueous suspension of the glass fibers stirred by a magnetic stirrer. We measure the scattered polarization of the fibers by use of a simultaneous polarization measurement system and obtain the time series of two orthogonal polarization components. By use of correlation analysis, we obtain the time parameters from the auto-correlation functions of the polarization components, and observe the changes with the stirring speeds. Results show that these time parameters indicate the immigration of the fibers. After discussion, we find that they may further characterize the kinetics, including the translation and rotation, of the glass fibers in the fluid field.

  14. Nonlinear asymmetric tearing mode evolution in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Qian; Ferraro, N.; Gates, David A.; Jardin, Stephen C.; White, R. B.

    2016-10-27

    The growth of a tearing mode is described by reduced MHD equations. For a cylindrical equilibrium, tearing mode growth is governed by the modified Rutherford equation, i.e., the nonlinear Δ'(w). For a low beta plasma without external heating, Δ'(w) can be approximately described by two terms, Δ'ql(w), Δ'A(w). In this work, we present a simple method to calculate the quasilinear stability index Δ'ql rigorously, for poloidal mode number m ≥ 2. Δ'ql is derived by solving the outer equation through the Frobenius method. Δ'ql is composed of four terms proportional to: constant Δ'0, w, wlnw, and w2. Δ'A is proportional to the asymmetry of island that is roughly proportional to w. The sum of Δ'ql and Δ'A is consistent with the more accurate expression calculated perturbatively. The reduced MHD equations are also solved numerically through a 3D MHD code M3D-C1. The analytical expression of the perturbed helical flux and the saturated island width agree with the simulation results. Lastly, it is also confirmed by the simulation that the Δ'A has to be considered in calculating island saturation.

  15. Nonlinear asymmetric tearing mode evolution in cylindrical geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Teng, Qian; Ferraro, N.; Gates, David A.; ...

    2016-10-27

    The growth of a tearing mode is described by reduced MHD equations. For a cylindrical equilibrium, tearing mode growth is governed by the modified Rutherford equation, i.e., the nonlinear Δ'(w). For a low beta plasma without external heating, Δ'(w) can be approximately described by two terms, Δ'ql(w), Δ'A(w). In this work, we present a simple method to calculate the quasilinear stability index Δ'ql rigorously, for poloidal mode number m ≥ 2. Δ'ql is derived by solving the outer equation through the Frobenius method. Δ'ql is composed of four terms proportional to: constant Δ'0, w, wlnw, and w2. Δ'A is proportionalmore » to the asymmetry of island that is roughly proportional to w. The sum of Δ'ql and Δ'A is consistent with the more accurate expression calculated perturbatively. The reduced MHD equations are also solved numerically through a 3D MHD code M3D-C1. The analytical expression of the perturbed helical flux and the saturated island width agree with the simulation results. Lastly, it is also confirmed by the simulation that the Δ'A has to be considered in calculating island saturation.« less

  16. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-15

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  17. Melting transition of Lennard-Jones fluid in cylindrical pores.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan K; Singh, Jayant K

    2014-05-28

    Three-stage pseudo-supercritical transformation path and multiple-histogram reweighting technique are employed for the determination of solid-liquid coexistence of the Lennard-Jones (12-6) fluid, in a structureless cylindrical pore of radius, R, ranging from 4 to 20 molecular diameters. The Gibbs free energy difference is evaluated using thermodynamic integration method by connecting solid and liquid phases under confinement via one or more intermediate states without any first order phase transition among them. The thermodynamic melting temperature, Tm, is found to oscillate for pore size, R < 8, which is in agreement with the behavior observed for the melting temperature in slit pores. However, Tm for almost all pore sizes is less than the bulk case, which is contrary to the behavior seen for the slit pore. The oscillation in Tm decays at around pore radius R = 8, and beyond that shift in the melting temperature with respect to the bulk case is in line with the prediction of the Gibbs-Thomson equation.

  18. Melting transition of Lennard-Jones fluid in cylindrical pores

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Chandan K.; Singh, Jayant K.

    2014-05-28

    Three-stage pseudo-supercritical transformation path and multiple-histogram reweighting technique are employed for the determination of solid-liquid coexistence of the Lennard-Jones (12-6) fluid, in a structureless cylindrical pore of radius, R, ranging from 4 to 20 molecular diameters. The Gibbs free energy difference is evaluated using thermodynamic integration method by connecting solid and liquid phases under confinement via one or more intermediate states without any first order phase transition among them. The thermodynamic melting temperature, T{sub m}, is found to oscillate for pore size, R < 8, which is in agreement with the behavior observed for the melting temperature in slit pores. However, T{sub m} for almost all pore sizes is less than the bulk case, which is contrary to the behavior seen for the slit pore. The oscillation in T{sub m} decays at around pore radius R = 8, and beyond that shift in the melting temperature with respect to the bulk case is in line with the prediction of the Gibbs-Thomson equation.

  19. Nonstationary Stokes System in Cylindrical Domains Under Boundary Slip Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaja¸czkowski, Wojciech M.

    2017-03-01

    Existence and uniqueness of solutions to the nonstationary Stokes system in a cylindrical domain {Ωsubset{R}^3} and under boundary slip conditions are proved in anisotropic Sobolev spaces. Assuming that the external force belong to {L_r(Ω×(0,T))} and initial velocity to {W_r^{2-2/r}(Ω)} there exists a solution such that velocity belongs to {W_r^{2,1}(Ω×(0,T))} and gradient of pressure to {L_r(Ω×(0,T))}, {rin(1,∞)}, {T > 0}. Thanks to the slip boundary conditions and a partition of unity the Stokes system is transformed to the Poisson equation for pressure and the heat equation for velocity. The existence of solutions to these equations is proved by applying local considerations. In this case we have to consider neighborhoods near the edges which by local mapping can be transformed to dihedral angle {π/2}. Hence solvability of the problem bases on construction local Green functions (near an interior point, near a point of a smooth part of the boundary, near a point of the edge) and their appropriate estimates. The technique presented in this paper can also work in other functional spaces: Sobolev-Slobodetskii, Besov, Nikolskii, Hölder and so on.

  20. Induced hydraulic pumping via integrated submicrometer cylindrical glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Yobas, Levent

    2014-08-01

    Here, we report on a micropump that generates hydraulic pressure owing to a mismatch in EOF rates of microchannels and submicrometer cylindrical glass capillaries integrated on silicon. The electrical conductance of such capillaries in the dilute limit departs from bulk linear behavior as well as from the surface-charge-governed saturation in nanoslits that is well described by the assumption of a constant surface charge density. The capillaries show rather a gradual decrease in conduction at low salt concentrations, which can be explained more aptly by a variable surface charge density that accounts for chemical equilibrium of the surface. The micropump uses a traditional cross-junction structure with ten identical capillaries integrated in parallel on a side arm and each with a 750 nm diameter and 3 mm length. For an applied voltage of 700 V, a hydraulic pressure up to 5 kPa is generated with a corresponding flow velocity nearly 3 mm/s in a straight field-free branch 20 μm wide, 10 μm deep, and 10 mm long. The micropump utility has been demonstrated in an open tubular LC of three fluorescently labeled amino acids in just less than 20 s with minimal plate height values between 3 and 7 μm. The submicrometer capillaries are self-enclosed and produced through a unique process that does not require high-resolution advanced lithography or wafer-bonding techniques to define their highly controlled precise structures.

  1. Optoacoustic sensing for target detection inside cylindrical catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Guo, Xiaoyu; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Optoacoustic sensing is a hybrid technique that combines the advantages of high sensing depth of ultrasound with contrast of optical absorption. In this study a miniature optoacoustic probe that can characterize the target properties located at the distal end of a catheter is investigated. The probe includes an optical fiber to illuminate the target with the pulsed laser light and a hydrophone to detect the generated optoacoustic signal. The probe is designed for the forwardsensing and therefore the acoustic signal propagates along the tube before being detected. Due to the circular geometry, the waves inside the tube are highly complex. A three dimensional numerical simulation is performed to model the optoacoustic wave generation and propagation inside the water filled cylindrical tubes. The effect of the boundary condition, tube diameter and target size on the detected signal is systematically evaluated. A prototype of the probe is made and tested for detecting an absorbing target inside a 2mm diameter tube submerged in water. The preliminary experimental results corresponding to the simulation is acquired. Although many different medical applications for this miniature probe may exist, our main focus is on detecting the occlusion inside the ventricular shunts. These catheters are used to divert the excess cerebrospinal fluid to the absorption site and regulate inter cranial pressure of hydrocephalous patients. Unfortunately the malfunction rate of these catheters due to blockage is very high. This sensing tool could locate the occluding tissue non-invasively and can potentially characterize the occlusion composites by scanning at different wavelengths of the light.

  2. Internal resonance of axially moving laminated circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan Qing; Liang, Li; Guo, Xing Hui

    2013-11-01

    The nonlinear vibrations of a thin, elastic, laminated composite circular cylindrical shell, moving in axial direction and having an internal resonance, are investigated in this study. Nonlinearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell theory, with consideration of the effect of viscous structure damping. Differently from conventional Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell equations, an improved nonlinear model without employing Airy stress function is developed to study the nonlinear dynamics of thin shells. The system is discretized by Galerkin's method while a model involving four degrees of freedom, allowing for the traveling wave response of the shell, is adopted. The method of harmonic balance is applied to study the nonlinear dynamic responses of the multi-degrees-of-freedom system. When the structure is excited close to a resonant frequency, very intricate frequency-response curves are obtained, which show strong modal interactions and one-to-one-to-one-to-one internal resonance phenomenon. The effects of different parameters on the complex dynamic response are investigated in this study. The stability of steady-state solutions is also analyzed in detail.

  3. Jamming of Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Barr, Nicholas; Weible, Seth; Friedl, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel. With a grain height less than the grain diameter, these grains resemble aspirin tablets, poker chips, or coins. Unidisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. Channel widths are chosen so that no combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College

  4. Jamming of Monodisperse Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Nicholas; Baxter, G. William

    2014-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel under the influence of gravity. These grains have an aspect-ratio less than two (H/D < 2) and resemble aspirin tablets, 35mm film canisters, poker chips, or coins. Monodisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. No combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  5. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  6. Acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burroughs, C. B.; Hayek, S. I.; Hallander, J. E.; Bostian, D. A.

    1984-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic radiation from single and double ribbed circular cylindrical shells were made on the NUSC Transducer Calibration Platform (TCP) in Lake Seneca, NY. Six different types of mechanical drives were used at each of three locations inside the inner shell. Measurements of the shell vibration and acoustic radiation were made with and without outer shells installed around the inner shell structure. For two types of drives, measurements were made with a pressure release layer installed between the inner and outer shell surfaces. Acoustic radiation measurements were made as a function of frequency from 20 to 5,000 Hz and as a function of observation direction at several frequencies for each shell and drive measurement configuration. Measured acoustic radiation data as a function of frequency have been processed. Analysis of the processed data is presented and discussed. It is shown that the location of the drive had a significant effect on the acoustic radiation. The outer shell reduced the acoustic radiation at shell resonant frequencies, but had little effect on other frequencies. The pressure release layer in the double shell had little effect on the acoustic radiation.

  7. Nonlinear asymmetric tearing mode evolution in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Q.; Ferraro, N.; Gates, D. A.; Jardin, S. C.; White, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The growth of a tearing mode is described by reduced MHD equations. For a cylindrical equilibrium, tearing mode growth is governed by the modified Rutherford equation, i.e., the nonlinear Δ'(w ) . For a low beta plasma without external heating, Δ'(w ) can be approximately described by two terms, Δ'ql(w ), ΔA'(w ) [White et al., Phys. Fluids 20, 800 (1977); Phys. Plasmas 22, 022514 (2015)]. In this work, we present a simple method to calculate the quasilinear stability index Δql' rigorously, for poloidal mode number m ≥2 . Δql' is derived by solving the outer equation through the Frobenius method. Δ'ql is composed of four terms proportional to: constant Δ'0 , w, w ln w , and w2. ΔA' is proportional to the asymmetry of island that is roughly proportional to w. The sum of Δql' and ΔA' is consistent with the more accurate expression calculated perturbatively [Arcis et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052305 (2006)]. The reduced MHD equations are also solved numerically through a 3D MHD code M3D-C1 [Jardin et al., Comput. Sci. Discovery 5, 014002 (2012)]. The analytical expression of the perturbed helical flux and the saturated island width agree with the simulation results. It is also confirmed by the simulation that the ΔA' has to be considered in calculating island saturation.

  8. A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2011-07-01

    A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer was proposed in this paper. The proposed stator contains a cylinder and a bending vibration transducer. The two combining sites between the cylinder and the transducer locate at the adjacent wave loops of bending vibration of the transducer and have a distance that equal to the half wave length of bending standing wave excited in the cylinder. Thus, the bending mode of the cylinder can be excited by the bending vibration of the transducer. Two circular cone type rotors are pressed in contact to the end rims of the teeth, and the preload between the rotors and stator is accomplished by a spring and nut system. The working principle of the proposed motor was analyzed. The motion trajectories of teeth were deduced. The stator was designed and analyzed with FEM. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is no-load speed of 165rpm and maximum torque of 0.45Nm at an exciting voltage of 200V(rms).

  9. Novel cylindrical illuminator tip for ultraviolet light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Haw, Thomas E.; Gregory, Kenton W.; Casperson, Lee W.

    1993-06-01

    The design, processing, and sequential testing of a novel cylindrical diffusing optical fiber tip for ultraviolet light delivery is described. This device has been shown to uniformly (+/- 15%) illuminate angioplasty balloons, 20 mm in length, that are used in an experimental photochemotherapeutic treatment of swine intimal hyperplasia. Our experiments show that uniform diffusing tips of < 400 micron diameter can be reliably constructed for this and other interstitial applications. Modeling results indicate that this design is scalable to smaller diameters. The diffusing tips are made by stripping the protective buffer and etching away the cladding over a length of 20 mm from the fiber tip and replacing it with a thin layer of optical epoxy mixed with Al2O3 powder. To improve the uniformity and ease of fabrication, we have evaluated a new device configuration where the tip is etched into a modified conical shape, and the distal end face is polished and then coated with an optically opaque epoxy. This is shown to uniformly scatter approximately 70% of the light launched into the fiber without forward transmission.

  10. Formation of a cylindrical bridge in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Daniel; Schmidt, Laura E.; Reichl, Elizabeth; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2007-11-01

    In nature, the shape transition associated with the division of a mother cell into two daughter cells proceeds via a variety of routes. In the cylinder-thinning route, which has been observed in Dictyostelium and most animal cells, the mother cell first forms a broad bridge-like region, also known as a furrow, between two daughter cells. The furrow then rapidly evolves into a cylindrical bridge, which thins and eventually severs the mother cell into two. The fundamental mechanism underlying this division route is not understood. Recent experiments on Dictyostelium found that, while the cylinder-thinning route persists even when key actin cross-linking proteins are missing, it is disrupted by the removal of force-generating myosin-II proteins. Other measurements revealed that mutant cells lacking myosin-II have a much more uniform tension over the cell surface than wild-type cells. This suggests that tension variation may be important. Here we use a fluid model, previously shown to reproduce the thinning dynamics [Zhang & Robinson, PNAS 102, 7186 (2005)], to test this idea. Consistent with the experiments, the model shows that the cylinder formation process occurs regardless of the exact viscoelastic properties of the cell. In contrast to the experiments, a tension variation in the model hinders, rather then expedites, the cylinder formation.

  11. TEACHING PHYSICS: Pin-hole water flow from cylindrical bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murilo Castro de Oliveira, Paulo; Delfino, Antonio; Vieira Costa, Eden; Faria Leite, Carlos Alberto

    2000-03-01

    We performed an experiment on elementary hydrodynamics. The basic system is a cylindrical bottle from which water flows through a pin-hole located at the bottom of its lateral surface. We measured the speed of the water leaving the pin-hole, as a function of both the time and the current level of water still inside the bottle. The experimental results are compared with the theory. The theoretical treatment is a very simple one based on mass and energy conservation, corresponding to a widespread exercise usually adopted in university basic disciplines of physics. We extended the previous experiment to another similar system using two identical bottles with equivalent pin-holes. The water flowing from the first bottle feeds the second one located below it. The same concepts of mass and energy conservation now lead to a non-trivial differential equation for the lowest bottle dynamics. We solved this equation both numerically and analytically, comparing the results with the experimental data.

  12. Analysis of light scattered by turbid media in cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R Hans; Liemert, André; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2014-07-22

    The angle dependence of the transmitted light through a cylindrical turbid sample (latex suspension, developing milk gel, draining/coarsening milk, and protein foams) in a standard light scattering setup was analyzed in terms of the transport mean free path length or scattering length l* (a measure for the turbidity) and the absorption length labs. By variation of the concentration of an absorbing dye, the independence of l* and labs was demonstrated. The resulting value of the specific extinction coefficient of the dye was found to be in fair agreement with direct spectroscopic determination and practically identical in milk and latex suspensions. The validity of this technique for obtaining l* was demonstrated by monitoring the acid-induced gelation of milk. The possibility to simultaneously determine l* and labs was used to follow the time development of a draining and coarsening protein foam which contained an absorbing dye. It was shown that labs can be used as a measure for the volume fraction of air in the foam. This method of monitoring the transmission of multiple light scattering provides an easy way to determine l* and, specifically for foams, quantitative data dominated by the bulk of the foam.

  13. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  14. Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath Cylindrical PMMA Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Burning rates, visible flame thickness, visible flame standoff distance, temperature profiles in the solid and gas, and radiative loss from the system were measured. A transition from the blowoff side of the flammability map to the quenching side of the flammability map is observed at approximately 6-7/ sec, as determined by curvefits to the non-monotonic trends in peak temperatures, solid and gas-phase temperature gradients, and non-dimensional standoff distances. A surface energy balance reveals that the fraction of heat transfer from the flame that is lost to in-depth conduction and surface radiation increases with decreasing stretch until quenching extinction is observed. This is primarily due to decreased heat transfer from the flame, while the magnitude of the losses remains the same. A unique local extinction flamelet phenomena and associated pre-extinction oscillations are observed at very low stretch. An ultimate quenching extinction limit is found at low stretch with sufficiently high induced heat losses.

  15. On the thermoelectric magnetic field of spherical and cylindrical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter B.; Nayfeh, Adnan H.

    2000-05-01

    It was recently discovered that inclusions and other types of inhomogeneities can be nondestructively detected by thermoelectric measurements in an entirely noncontact way by using high-sensitivity superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers to sense the weak thermoelectric currents around the affected region when the specimen is subjected to directional heating or cooling. In this article we present theoretical models capable of predicting the magnetic field produced by thermoelectric currents around spherical and cylindrical inclusions under external thermal excitation. We investigated how the magnetic signal to be detected depends on (i) the relevant physical properties of the host and the inclusion, (ii) the size of the inclusion, (iii) the depth of the inclusion below the surface of the specimen, (iv) the polarization of the magnetometer, (v) the lift-off distance of the magnetometer from the specimen, and the (vi) direction and (vii) strength of the external heating or cooling applied to the specimen. The analytical models presented are numerically evaluated to illustrate the strength and polarization of the magnetic field for different lift-off distances and inclusion depths.

  16. Free Vibrations Of Delaminated Composite Cylindrical Shell Roofs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, A. Kumar; Chakraborty, Dipankar; Karmakar, Amit

    Recently laminated composites are widely used in civil engineering, which may suffer from delamination damage resulting from improper fabrication and overloading at service. A review of literature that exists on composite shells reveals that the research reports on delaminated shells are very few in number. Hence the present endeavor is to work on delaminated simply supported cylindrical shell with different extents of delaminations. An eight noded isoparametric element with five degrees of freedom per node is used together with Sander's strain displacement relationships and multipoint constraint equations to satisfy the compatibility of displacements and rotations along the cracked edges. The study reveals that there is a consistent decrease in the fundamental frequency value as the area of the delamination damage increases. Further the fundamental frequency of angle ply shells undergo relatively more prominent decrease compared to that of cross ply shells. It seems that delamination damage brings about greater reduction in frequency values as the number of layers increases for angle ply shells, especially for symmetric ones.

  17. Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements in an ion thruster plume

    SciTech Connect

    Semak, V.V.; Keefer, D.

    1995-12-31

    Cylindrical Langmuir probe measurements have been made in the exhaust plume of a 15 cm diameter three-grid ion thruster. Xenon gas was used as a propellant. The experiments were performed in a large vacuum chamber with background pressure values of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} Torr. A 250 {micro}m diameter tungsten probe 2.78 mm long was used in the experiments. The data collected for radial and axial scans were analyzed to provide measurements of electron temperature, plasma potential and electron density. It was found that, unlike the case of a stationary plasma, the electron saturation current is only several times higher than ion current. Small errors in the determination of the ion current component of the characteristic curve can result in significant overestimation of electron temperature. A method of data analysis was developed which includes an estimation of the collected ion current. This method is compared with a numerical particle simulation model for calculation of the ion current component.

  18. Comparative Fatigue Lives of Rubber and PVC Wiper Cylindrical Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Savage, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Three coating materials for rotating cylindrical-coated wiping rollers were fatigue tested in 2 Intaglio printing presses. The coatings were a hard, cross-linked, plasticized PVC thermoset (P-series); a plasticized PVC (A-series); and a hard, nitryl rubber (R-series). Both 2- and 3-parameter Weibull analyses as well as a cost-benefit analysis were performed. The mean value of life for the R-series coating is 24 and 9 times longer than the P- and A-series coatings, respectively. Both the cost and replacement rate for the R-series coating was significantly less than those for the P- and A-series coatings. At a very high probability of survival the R-series coating is approximately 2 and 6 times the lives of the P- and A-series, respectively, before the first failure occurs. Where all coatings are run to failure, using the mean (life) time between removal (MTBR) for each coating to calculate the number of replacements and costs provides qualitatively similar results to those using a Weibull analysis.

  19. Sound Transmission through Two Concentric Cylindrical Sandwich Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yvette Y.; Silcox, Richard J.; Robinson, Jay H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper solves the problem of sound transmission through a system of two infinite concentric cylindrical sandwich shells. The shells are surrounded by external and internal fluid media and there is fluid (air) in the annular space between them. An oblique plane sound wave is incident upon the surface of the outer shell. A uniform flow is moving with a constant velocity in the external fluid medium. Classical thin shell theory is applied to the inner shell and first-order shear deformation theory is applied to the outer shell. A closed form for transmission loss is derived based on modal analysis. Investigations have been made for the impedance of both shells and the transmission loss through the shells from the exterior into the interior. Results are compared for double sandwich shells and single sandwich shells. This study shows that: (1) the impedance of the inner shell is much smaller than that of the outer shell so that the transmission loss is almost the same in both the annular space and the interior cavity of the shells; (2) the two concentric sandwich shells can produce an appreciable increase of transmission loss over single sandwich shells especially in the high frequency range; and (3) design guidelines may be derived with respect to the noise reduction requirement and the pressure in the annular space at a mid-frequency range.

  20. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  1. Dipole radiation from a cylindrical hole in the earth.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Basilio, Lorena I.

    2005-08-01

    This report examines the problem of an antenna radiating from a cylindrical hole in the earth and the subsequent far-zone field produced in the upper air half space. The approach used for this analysis was to first examine propagation characteristics along the hole for surrounding geologic material properties. Three cases of sand with various levels of moisture content were considered as the surrounding material to the hole. For the hole diameters and sand cases examined, the radiation through the earth medium was found to be the dominant contribution to the radiation transmitted through to the upper half-space. In the analysis presented, the radiation from a vertical and a horizontal dipole source within the hole is used to determine a closed-form expression for the radiation in the earth medium which represents a modified element factor for the source and hole combination. As the final step, the well-known results for a dipole below a half space, in conjunction with the use of Snell's law to transform the modified element factor to the upper half space, determine closed-form expressions for the far-zone radiated fields in the air region above the earth.

  2. Free vibration analysis of skewed open circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Selvakumar; Singh, Anand V.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical study is presented for the free vibration of skewed open circular cylindrical deep shells. The formulation considers first-order shear deformation theory of shells and includes rotary inertia and shear deformation so that thin-to-moderately thick shells can be analyzed. A set of grid points, the number of which depends upon the orders of the polynomials chosen for the displacement and rotation components, on the middle surface of the shell is defined first. For a particular displacement component, the field functions are derived corresponding to each node from the above-mentioned set of points and are used in the Rayleigh-Ritz method to calculate frequencies and mode shapes. Convergence study with reference to the order of the polynomials used for the displacement fields was performed first. Numerical results obtained from the present method are compared with those from the finite element method and very good agreement is observed. Additional results are presented and discussed in this paper for skewed panels clamped at the curved edges and free at the straight parallel edges.

  3. Experimental observation of discrete helical modes in imploding cylindrical liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Zhang, P.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Campbell, P. C.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2016-10-01

    The 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver at the University of Michigan was used to implode ultrathin (400 nm thick) cylindrical aluminum liners1 that were pre-embedded with externally applied, axial magnetic fields of Bz = 0.2 - 2.0 T. Using 12-frame laser shadowgraphy and visible self-emission, helical striations were found that increased in pitch angle during the implosion and decreased in angle during the later time explosion, despite the relatively large, peak azimuthal magnetic field exceeding 40 T. The results are interpreted as a discrete, non-axisymmetric eigenmode of a helical instability that persists from implosion to explosion. The helical pitch angle φ was found to obey the simple relation φ = m / kR , where m, k, and R are the azimuthal mode number, axial wavenumber, and radius of the helical instability. Analytic growth rates2 for experimental parameters are presented, and show that early in the current pulse, axisymmetric modes (m = 0) are completely stabilized while non-axisymmetric modes (m > 1) are found to be unstable. This research was supported by DOE Award DE-SC0012328, Sandia National Laboratories, and the NSF. The fast framing camera was supported by AFOSR Grant #FA9550-15-1-0419.

  4. Global stability of the ballooning mode in a cylindrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Ballooning disturbances in a finite-pressure plasma in a curvilinear magnetic field are described by the system of coupled equations for the Alfvén and slow magnetosonic modes. In contrast to most previous works that locally analyzed the stability of small-scale disturbances using the dispersion relationship, a global analysis outside a WKB approximation but within a simple cylindrical geometry, when magnetic field lines are circles with constant curvature, is performed in the present work. This model is relatively simple; nevertheless, it has the singularities necessary for the formation of the ballooning mode: field curvature and non-uniform thermal plasma pressure. If the disturbance finite radial extent is taken into account, the instability threshold increases as compared to a WKB approximation. The simplified model used in this work made it possible to consider the pattern of unstable disturbances at arbitrary values of the azimuthal wavenumber ( k y ). Azimuthally large-scale disturbances can also be unstable, although the increment increases with decreasing azimuthal scale and reaches saturation when the scales are of the order of the pressure nonuniformity dimension.

  5. Cylindrical waves at the interface of viscous immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Farsoiya, Palas Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We conduct Navier-Stokes simulations of cylindrical, axisymmetric standing gravity waves at the interface of radially unbounded, immiscible viscous fluids. The fluid motion generated by these oscillations are studied. Results from the numerical solutions are compared to the analytical solution of an integro-differential equation representing the amplitude of motion of the interface. Standing waves are initiated at the interface as zeroth order Bessel's mode at rest i.e. h (r , 0) =H0 1 + ɛJ0 (kr) where H0 is the undisturbed fluid depth in the simulation, chosen to be large enough for deep water approximation to hold. For small initial amplitudes (compared to 2 πk-1), we obtain good agreement with the analytical solution at early times. As we increase initial amplitude, the time period of the first oscillation is found to increase. Diffusion of vorticity from the interface is studied as a function of initial amplitude. We compare our results to the analytical solution obtained from the corresponding planar problem (Prosperetti, 1981). We will discuss these results in the framework of the viscous Cauchy-Poisson (initial-value) problem between two fluids, and also compare our results to the viscous, single fluid case (Miles, 1968). We thank IRCC, IIT Bombay for financial support.

  6. Thermal Behavior of Cylindrical Buckling Restrained Braces at Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Elnaz; Tahir, Mahmood Md.; Yasreen, Airil

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this investigation was to analyze sequentially coupled nonlinear thermal stress, using a three-dimensional model. It was meant to shed light on the behavior of Buckling Restraint Brace (BRB) elements with circular cross section, at elevated temperature. Such bracing systems were comprised of a cylindrical steel core encased in a strong concrete-filled steel hollow casing. A debonding agent was rubbed on the core's surface to avoid shear stress transition to the restraining system. The numerical model was verified by the analytical solutions developed by the other researchers. Performance of BRB system under seismic loading at ambient temperature has been well documented. However, its performance in case of fire has yet to be explored. This study showed that the failure of brace may be attributed to material strength reduction and high compressive forces, both due to temperature rise. Furthermore, limiting temperatures in the linear behavior of steel casing and concrete in BRB element for both numerical and analytical simulations were about 196°C and 225°C, respectively. Finally it is concluded that the performance of BRB at elevated temperatures was the same as that seen at room temperature; that is, the steel core yields prior to the restraining system. PMID:24526915

  7. Nonlinear damping calculation in cylindrical gear dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2012-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamic problem posed by cylindrical gear systems has been extensively covered in the literature. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of the mechanisms involved in damping generation remains to be investigated and described. The main objective of this study is to contribute to this task. Overall, damping is assumed to consist of three sources: surrounding element contribution, hysteresis of the teeth, and oil squeeze damping. The first two contributions are considered to be commensurate with the supported load; for its part however, squeeze damping is formulated using expressions developed from the Reynolds equation. A lubricated impact analysis between the teeth is introduced in this study for the minimum film thickness calculation during contact losses. The dynamic transmission error (DTE) obtained from the final model showed close agreement with experimental measurements available in the literature. The nonlinear damping ratio calculated at different mesh frequencies and torque amplitudes presented average values between 5.3 percent and 8 percent, which is comparable to the constant 8 percent ratio used in published numerical simulations of an equivalent gear pair. A close analysis of the oil squeeze damping evidenced the inverse relationship between this damping effect and the applied load.

  8. Optical and spectral tunability of multilayer spherical and cylindrical nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshfar, Nader; Bazyari, Khashayar

    2014-08-01

    This theoretical work presents a comparative study of the optical properties and spectral tunability of hybrid multilayer spherical and cylindrical nanoshells based on the quasi-static approximation of classical electrodynamics. The interband transitions have been considered using the Drude-Lorentz model for the complex dielectric function of metallic layers because the optical properties of metals arise from both the optical excitation of interband transitions and the free-electron response. A general formula for N-ayer concentric nanoshells is arranged, and numerical calculations are performed for the four-layer nanoshells as an example. We have analyzed in detail different configurations of nanoshells such as dielectric-metal-dielectric-metal with dielectric core, metal-dielectric-metal-dielectric with metal core and semiconductor-metal-dielectric-metal with semiconductor core because composition of nanoshells have dramatic influence on their optical properties. The absorbance spectrum behavior of the shell thicknesses, surrounding medium, shape and composition of each layer of the nanoshell is numerically investigated.

  9. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    PubMed

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  10. Effect of Roller Profile on Cylindrical Roller Bearing Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, Joseph V.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Peters, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    Four roller profiles used in cylindrical roller bearing design and manufacture were analyzed using both a closed form solution and finite element analysis (FEA) for stress and life. The roller profiles analyzed were flat, tapered end, aerospace, and fully crowned loaded against a flat raceway. Four rolling-element bearing life models were chosen for this analysis and compared. These were those of Weibull, Lundberg and Palmgren, Ioannides and Harris, and Zaretsky. The flat roller profile without edge loading has the longest predicted life. However, edge loading can reduce life by as much as 98 percent. The end tapered profile produced the highest lives but not significantly different than the aerospace profile. The fully crowned profile produces the lowest lives. The resultant predicted life at each stress condition not only depends on the life equation used but also on the Weibull slope assumed. For Weibull slopes of 1.5 and 2, both Lundberg-Palmgren and Iaonnides-Harris equations predict lower lives than the ANSI/ABMAJISO standards. Based upon the Hertz stresses for line contact, the accepted load-life exponent of 10/3 results in a maximum Hertz stress-life exponent equal to 6.6. This value is inconsistent with that experienced in the field.

  11. Theory of a cylindrical probe in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Rubinstein, J.

    1976-01-01

    A theory is presented for a cylindrical electrostatic probe in a collisionless plasma in the case where the probe axis is inclined at an angle to a uniform magnetic field. The theory is applicable to electron collection, and under more restrictive conditions, to ion collection. For a probe at space potential, the theory is exact in the limit where probe radius is much less than Debye length. At attracting probe potentials, the theory yields an upper bound and an adiabatic limit for current collection. At repelling probe potentials, it provides a lower bound. The theory is valid if the ratios of probe radius to Debye length and probe radius to mean gyroradius are not simultaneously large enough to produce extrema in the probe sheath potential. The numerical current calculations are based on the approximation that particle orbits are helices near the probe, together with the use of kinetic theory to relate velocity distributions near the probe to those far from it. Probe characteristics are presented for inclination angles from 0 to 90 deg and for probe-radius mean-gyroradius ratios from 0.1 to infinity. For an angle of 0 deg, the end-effect current is calculated separately.

  12. Stress Analysis of Composite Cylindrical Shells with an Elliptical Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.; Nemeth, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    A special-purpose, semi-analytical solution method for determining the stress and deformation fields in a thin laminated-composite cylindrical shell with an elliptical cutout is presented. The analysis includes the effects of cutout size, shape, and orientation; non-uniform wall thickness; oval-cross-section eccentricity; and loading conditions. The loading conditions include uniform tension, uniform torsion, and pure bending. The analysis approach is based on the principle of stationary potential energy and uses Lagrange multipliers to relax the kinematic admissibility requirements on the displacement representations through the use of idealized elastic edge restraints. Specifying appropriate stiffness values for the elastic extensional and rotational edge restraints (springs) allows the imposition of the kinematic boundary conditions in an indirect manner, which enables the use of a broader set of functions for representing the displacement fields. Selected results of parametric studies are presented for several geometric parameters that demonstrate that analysis approach is a powerful means for developing design criteria for laminated-composite shells.

  13. Stress Analysis of Composite Cylindrical Shells With an Elliptical Cutout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, M. P.; Oterkus, E.; Madenci, E.

    2005-01-01

    A special-purpose, semi-analytical solution method for determining the stress and deformation fields in a thin laminated-composite cylindrical shell with an elliptical cutout is presented. The analysis includes the effects of cutout size, shape, and orientation; nonuniform wall thickness; oval-cross-section eccentricity; and loading conditions. The loading conditions include uniform tension, uniform torsion, and pure bending. The analysis approach is based on the principle of stationary potential energy and uses Lagrange multipliers to relax the kinematic admissibility requirements on the displacement representations through the use of idealized elastic edge restraints. Specifying appropriate stiffness values for the elastic extensional and rotational edge restraints (springs) allows the imposition of the kinematic boundary conditions in an indirect manner, which enables the use of a broader set of functions for representing the displacement fields. Selected results of parametric studies are presented for several geometric parameters that demonstrate that analysis approach is a powerful means for developing design criteria for laminated-composite shells.

  14. Oblique Shock Interaction with a Laminar Cylindrical Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    We present an experimental study of a planar shock interaction with an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface, where the angle α between the plane of the shock and the axis of the cylinder can be zero (planar normal interaction) or non-zero (oblique interaction). The interface is formed by injecting a laminar jet of a heavy gas mixture (sulfure hexafluoride, acetone, nitrogen) into quiescent air. The jet is stabilized by an annular co-flow of air to minimize diffusion. Interaction between the pressure gradient (shock front) and density gradients leads to vorticity deposition, and during the subsequent evolution, the flow undergoes mixing (injected material - air) and eventually transitions to turbulence. Several parameters affect this evolution, including the angle α, the Atwood number (density ratio), and the Mach number of the shock. For quantitative and qualitative characterization of the influence of these parameters, we use flow visualization in two planes that relies on planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in acetone, which forms a part of the injected material. This research is supported by NNSA Grant DE-NA000220.

  15. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  16. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  17. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, D.; Navarro, M. C.; Herrero, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  18. Oblique shock interaction with a laminar cylindrical jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    We present an experimental study of planar shock interaction with an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface, where the angle α between the plane of the shock and the axis of the cylinder can be zero (planar normal interaction) or non-zero (oblique interaction). The interface is formed by injecting a laminar jet of a heavy gas mixture (sulfur hexafluoride, acetone, nitrogen) into quiescent air. The jet is stabilized by an annular co-flow of air to minimize diffusion. Interaction between the pressure gradient (shock front) and density gradient leads to vorticity deposition, and during the subsequent evolution, the flow undergoes mixing (injected material - air) and eventually transitions to turbulence. Several parameters affect this evolution, including the angle α, the Atwood number (density ratio), and the Mach number of the shock. For quantitative and qualitative characterization of the influence of these parameters, we use flow visualization in two planes that relies on planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in acetone, which forms part of the injected material.

  19. A fiber-optic hydrophone with a cylindrical Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Hu, Yongming; Ni, Ming; Meng, Zhou; Luo, Hong

    2007-11-01

    A passive homodyne Michelson interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with a single-hole cylindrical Helmholtz resonator has been manufactured. To validate the theoretical results that the fluid coefficient of viscosity has great influence on the maximum sensitivity at the resonant frequency, the acoustic sensitivity frequency response of the fiber-optic hydrophone has been measured in a standing-wave tank filled with castor oil. The viscosity coefficient of castor oil will change with the variation of the temperature. Experimental Results show that the fiber-optic hydrophone frequency responses of different temperature have identical form except that the maximum sensitivities are different. The acoustic sensitivities of low frequency are about -159dB re 1rad/μPa. While the maximum sensitivities near the measured resonant frequency of 800Hz go down with the fall of the temperature, i.e. with the increase of the viscosity coefficient, which is agree with the theoretical conclusions. This fiber-optic hydrophone is a prototype device for a class of sensors that used to eliminate aliasing in the future sonar systems.

  20. Slip velocity and velocity inversion in a cylindrical Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrak

    2009-03-01

    Velocity inversion in a nanoscale cylindrical Couette flow is investigated with the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. With general slip boundary conditions in the NS equation, the flow can be classified into five distinct profiles. The condition of velocity inversion is explored in the whole space of four dimensionless variables of beta , slip velocity ratio u('), radius ratio a('), and angular velocity ratio omega('). MD computer simulations are performed to estimate the constitutive coefficient of the slip velocities at the walls. The flow is generated by a rotating inner wall and a stationary outer wall in conformity with the theoretical result. By varying an attraction parameter in the Lennard-Jones potential, the slip velocities can be easily controlled. The theoretical predictions are compared with the simulation results. We find that in the intermediate range of the attraction parameter the two results are quite comparable to some extent, but at both extreme values of the attraction parameter, they are quite different.