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Sample records for pregabalin reduces neuropathic

  1. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  2. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  3. [Case of acute exacerbation of neuropathic cancer pain rapidly relieved by simultaneous oral intake of immediate release oxycodone and pregabalin].

    PubMed

    Baba, Mika; Gomwo, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Cancer pain consists of continuous pain lasting almost all day and transient exacerbation of pain called breakthrough pain. Breakthrough pain is classified as somatic pain and visceral pain, neuropathic pain according to the character of pain. Although the immediate release opioid is used as the first treatment of choice to breakthrough pain, the effect is not enough when it shows the character of neuropathic pain. Pregabalin has become the first medicine for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and it sometimes reveals prompt analgesic effect based on its pharmacological profile. It has also been reported that pregabalin used with oxycodine reveals analgesic effect with smaller dosage than pregabalin alone. We experienced a young patient with lung cancer suffering from sudden exacerbation of symptomatic sciatica, whose pain was markedly reduced within 30 minutes by taking immediate release oxycodone 5 mg and pregabalin 75 mg simultaneously. Conclusions : Pregabalin with immediate release oxycodone simultaneously may be able to improve acute exacerbation of neuropathic cancer pain rapidly.

  4. Pregabalin in Neuropathic Pain: Evidences and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Singh, Nirmal; Singh Jaggi, Amteshwar

    2014-01-01

    Pregabalin is an antagonist of voltage gated Ca2+ channels and specifically binds to alpha-2-delta subunit to produce antiepileptic and analgesic actions. It successfully alleviates the symptoms of various types of neuropathic pain and presents itself as a first line therapeutic agent with remarkable safety and efficacy. Preclinical studies in various animal models of neuropathic pain have shown its effectiveness in treating the symptoms like allodynia and hyperalgesia. Clinical studies in different age groups and in different types of neuropathic pain (peripheral diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain) have projected it as the most effective agent either as monotherapy or in combined regimens in terms of cost effectiveness, tolerability and overall improvement in neuropathic pain states. Preclinical studies employing pregabalin in different neuropathic pain models have explored various molecular targets and the signaling systems including Ca2+ channel-mediated neurotransmitter release, activation of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), potassium channels and inhibition of pathways involving inflammatory mediators. The present review summarizes the important aspects of pregabalin as analgesic in preclinical and clinical studies as well as focuses on the possible mechanisms. PMID:24533015

  5. [Pregabalin: new therapeutic contributions of calcium channel alpha2delta protein ligands on epilepsy and neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Horga de la Parte, J F; Horga, A

    To review and update the contributions of a new class of drugs, named calcium channel alpha2delta protein ligands, on the treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain. A novel class of anticonvulsants are ligands for the auxiliary-associated protein alpha2delta subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system. Gabapentin and pregabalin are members of this group. Pregabalin is a higher-potency and higher-effective analogue of gabapentin that act as a potent ligand for this site. The anticonvulsant action of pregabalin is probably due to its ability to reduce neurotransmitter release from activated epileptogenic neurons, without demonstrated effects on GABAergic receptors or mechanisms. In well-done clinical trials, pregabalin 150-600 mg/day has been shown to be highly effective and well tolerated as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial seizures. In several randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oral pregabalin 150-600 mg/day was superior to placebo in relieving neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Pregabalin demonstrates in humans an extensive and rapid absorption and a highly predictable and linear pharmacokinetics, a profile that makes it easy to use in clinical practice. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar but not identical to that of gabapentin, and pregabalin shows possible advantages. Pregabalin and calcium channel alpha2delta protein ligands showed relevant advances on epilepsy and neuropathic pain treatment. In peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, if the criteria for efficacy are based on both pain relief and quality of life measures, pregabalin/gabapentin are suggested as choice treatment.

  6. The influence of thiamin on the efficacy of pregabalin in rats with spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Ma, Song-He; Xia, Ling-Jie

    2016-08-01

    The thiamin is often used in the treatment of neuropathy, and pregabalin is often used to treat neuropathic pain. Our study examined the influence of thiamin on the efficacy of pregabalin in a rat model of spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain. Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into six groups. The neuropathic pain-relieving properties were measured by plantar test, cold plate test, and hot plate test after administration of pregabalin (i.v) and/or thiamin (i.p) in SNL rats 14 days after operation. In the therapy period, pregabalin, or thiamin alone all produced antinociceptive effects in rats with neuropathic pain. And combination treatment of thiamin and pregabalin resulted in an enhanced pain relief compared to the administration of pregabalin or thiamin alone. Combination of thiamin and pregabalin produces an additive antinociceptive effect in neuropathic pain rats, this drug combination may offer a beneficial treatment option for neuropathic pain.

  7. Sustained-release pregabalin with methylcobalamin in neuropathic pain: an Indian real-life experience

    PubMed Central

    Dongre, Yasmin U; Swami, Onkar C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathic pain is intense in nature and difficult to manage. Thus, the primary goal is maximum relief from pain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of sustained-release pregabalin and methylcobalamin in reducing neuropathic pain in Indian patients, in the real-life situation. Methods This was a multicenter, prospective, open-labeled, single-arm, observational, 14-day study. Patients received fixed dose combination of 75 or 150 mg sustained-release pregabalin combined with 1500 mcg immediate release methylcobalamin, depending on the clinical requirement. Data was collected for pain reduction and other positive and negative symptoms associated with neuropathy, including hyperesthesia, paresthesia, numbness/tingling, burning sensation, muscle weakness, sleep disturbances, and impairment of movement. Pain intensity was measured on a ten-point visual analog scale (VAS) (0 represented “no pain,” and 10 represented “worst pain ever”). The safety of the drug was also evaluated throughout the study duration. Data was analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. Results The overall reduction in mean VAS score over 14 days was 72.3%. The reduction in mean VAS score was significant as early as the first week. Both positive and negative symptoms of peripheral neuropathy were significantly improved in >50% patients within the 2 weeks. Giddiness (4.7%), followed by sedation (3.6%), dizziness (2.9%), drowsiness (2.3%), and nausea (2.3%) were the most commonly observed adverse effects. The overall efficacy and tolerability was rated as good to excellent by >95% of the investigators and patients. Conclusion Fixed dose combination of sustained-release pregabalin and methylcobalamin significantly reduced neuropathic pain, with significant improvement in both the positive and negative symptoms associated with neuropathy, in Indian patients and was well tolerated. PMID:23761981

  8. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Mélanie; Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Results Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Conclusions We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. PMID:27030724

  10. Ultra-Low Doses of Naltrexone Enhance the Antiallodynic Effect of Pregabalin or Gabapentin in Neuropathic Rats.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Farias, Jorge B; Caram-Salas, Nadia L; Salinas-Abarca, Ana B; Ocampo, Jorge; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2017-09-03

    Preclinical Research Treatment of neuropathic pain is an area of largely unmet medical need. Pregabalin and gabapentin are anticonvulsants widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, these drugs are only effective in 50-60% of the treated patients. In addition, both drugs have substantial side effects. Several studies have reported that ultralow doses of opioid receptor antagonists can induce analgesia and enhance the analgesic effect of opioids in rodents and humans. The objective of the present study was to assess the antiallodynic synergistic interaction between gabapentinoids and naltrexone in rats. Oral administration of pregabalin (ED50  = 2.79 ± 0.16 mg/kg) or gabapentin (ED50  = 21.04 ± 2.87 mg/kg) as well as intrathecal naltrexone (ED50  = 0.11 ± 0.02 ng) reduced in a dose-dependent manner tactile allodynia in rats. Maximal antiallodynic effects (∼100%) were reached with 30 mg/kg of pregabalin, 300 mg/kg of gabapentin or 0.5 ng of naltrexone. Co-administration of pregabalin or gabapentin and naltrexone in a fixed-dose ratio (1:1) remarkably reduced spinal nerve ligation-induced tactile allodynia showing a synergistic interaction. The data indicate that combinations of pregabalin or gabapentin and ultra-low doses of naltrexone are able to reduce tactile allodynia in neuropathic rats with lower doses that those used when drugs are given individually and with an improved side effects profile. Drug Dev Res, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Antinociceptive and hypnotic activities of pregabalin in a neuropathic pain-like model in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Xiao; Yin, Dou; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ya-Dong; Qu, Wei-Min; Han, Wu-Jian; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the antinociceptive and hypnotic effects of pregabalin, we established a neuropathic pain-like model in mice using partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL), and examined thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, electroencephalogram, rota-rod testing, and c-Fos expression in the anterior cingulate cortex. Gabapentin was used as a reference drug in the study. Pregabalin administered i.g. at 12.5 and 25mg/kg prolonged the duration of thermal latencies by 1.4- and 1.6-fold and increased the mechanical threshold by 2.2- and 3.1-fold 3h after administration, respectively, but did not affect motor coordination in PSNL mice, compared with vehicle control. Pregabalin (12.5 and 25mg/kg) given at 6:30 increased the amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep in a 4-h period by 1.3- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in PSNL mice. However, pregabalin (25mg/kg) given at 20:30 did not alter the sleep pattern in normal mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of anterior cingulate cortex by 2.1-fold, which could be reversed by pregabalin. These results indicate that pregabalin is an effective treatment for both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice.

  12. Pregabalin

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. Pregabalin is in a class of medications called ... you are taking pregabalin for the treatment of epilepsy, mental illness, or other conditions. A small number ...

  13. Costs and health resources utilization following switching to pregabalin in individuals with gabapentin-refractory neuropathic pain: a post hoc analysis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ana; Saldaña, María T; Pérez, Concepción; Masramón, Xavier; Rejas, Javier

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the changes in pain severity and associated costs resulting from resource utilization and reduced productivity in patients with gabapentin-refractory peripheral neuropathic pain who switched to pregabalin therapy in primary care settings in Spain. This is a post hoc analysis of a 12-week, multicentre, noninterventional cost-of-illness study. Patients were included in the study if they were over 18 years of age and had a diagnosis of chronic, treatment-refractory peripheral neuropathic pain. The analysis included all pregabalin-naïve patients who had previously shown an inadequate response to gabapentin and switched to pregabalin. Severity of pain before and after treatment with pregabalin, alone or as an add-on therapy, was assessed using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and its related visual analogue scale (VA). Healthcare resource utilization, productivity (including lost-workday equivalents [LWDE]), and related costs were assessed at baseline and after pregabalin treatment. A total of 174 patients switched to pregabalin had significant and clinically relevant reductions in pain severity (mean [SD] change on SF-MPQ VA scale, -31.9 [22.1]; P < 0.05 vs. baseline; effect size, 1.87). Reduction in pain was similar with both pregabalin monotherapy and add-on therapy. Significant reductions in healthcare resource utilization (concomitant drug use [in pregabalin add-on group], ancillary tests, and unscheduled medical visits) were observed at the end of trial. Additionally, there were substantial improvements in productivity, including a reduction in the number of LWDE following pregabalin treatment (-18.9 [26.0]; P < 0.0001). These changes correlated with substantial reductions in both direct (-652.9 ± 1622.4 €; P < 0.0001) and indirect healthcare costs (-851.6 [1259.6] €; P < 0.0001). The cost of care in patients with gabapentin-refractory peripheral neuropathic pain appeared to be significantly reduced after switching to

  14. Effectiveness of low-dose pregabalin in three patients with Lewy body disease and central neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Katsuyuki; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Ozaki, Norio

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with Lewy body disease complain of pain, and their pain may be associated with this disease. Recently, pain has become a focus of attention in Parkinson's disease, but there is little information regarding pain in patients who have dementia with Lewy bodies. We used pregabalin to treat three Lewy body disease patients with chronic pain that may have been related to degeneration of central neurons. All three patients responded well to pregabalin at 25-50 mg/day. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of pregabalin showing efficacy for central neuropathic pain in Parkinson's disease or Lewy body disease.

  15. Pregabalin action at a model synapse: binding to presynaptic calcium channel alpha2-delta subunit reduces neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Indu; Taylor, Charles P

    2006-12-28

    Pregabalin, ((S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, also known as (S)-3-isobutyl GABA, Lyricatrade mark) is approved for treatment of certain types of peripheral neuropathic pain and as an adjunctive therapy for partial seizures of epilepsy both the EU and the USA and also for generalized anxiety disorder in the EU. Though pregabalin binds selectively to the alpha(2)-delta (alpha(2)-delta) auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, the cellular details of pregabalin action are unclear. The high density of alpha(2)-delta in skeletal muscle fibers raises the question of whether pregabalin alters excitation-contraction coupling. We used the mouse soleus neuromuscular junction from mice containing an artificially mutated alpha(2)-delta Type 1 protein (R217A) as a model to examine the effect of pregabalin. Pregabalin reduced nerve-evoked muscle contractions by 16% at a clinically relevant concentration of 10 muM in wildtype mice. When acetylcholine receptors were blocked with curare, pregabalin had no effect on contraction from direct stimulation of muscle, suggesting a lack of drug effects on contraction coupling. Our data are consistent with pregabalin having no effect on striated muscle L-type calcium channel function. However, in mice expressing mutant (R217A) alpha(2)-delta Type 1, there was no significant effect of pregabalin on nerve-evoked muscle contraction. We propose that pregabalin reduces presynaptic neurotransmitter release without altering postsynaptic receptors or contraction coupling and that these effects require high affinity binding to alpha(2)-delta Type 1 auxiliary subunit of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels.

  16. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  17. Activation of Antioxidative Functions by Radon Inhalation Enhances the Mitigation Effects of Pregabalin on Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Horie, Shunsuke; Etani, Reo; Kanzaki, Norie; Sasaoka, Kaori; Kobashi, Yusuke; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-01-01

    Radon inhalation brings pain relief for chronic constriction injury- (CCI-) induced neuropathic pain in mice due to the activation of antioxidative functions, which is different from the mechanism of the pregabalin effect. In this study, we assessed whether a combination of radon inhalation and pregabalin administration is more effective against neuropathic pain than radon or pregabalin only. Mice were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 1,000 Bq/m(3) for 24 hours and pregabalin administration after CCI surgery. In mice treated with pregabalin at a dose of 3 mg/kg weight, the 50% paw withdrawal threshold of mice treated with pregabalin or radon and pregabalin was significantly increased, suggesting pain relief. The therapeutic effects of radon inhalation or the combined effects of radon and pregabalin (3 mg/kg weight) were almost equivalent to treatment with pregabalin at a dose of 1.4 mg/kg weight or 4.1 mg/kg weight, respectively. Radon inhalation and the combination of radon and pregabalin increased antioxidant associated substances in the paw. The antioxidant substances increased much more in radon inhalation than in pregabalin administration. These findings suggested that the activation of antioxidative functions by radon inhalation enhances the pain relief of pregabalin and that this combined effect is probably an additive effect.

  18. Activation of Antioxidative Functions by Radon Inhalation Enhances the Mitigation Effects of Pregabalin on Chronic Constriction Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shunsuke; Etani, Reo; Kanzaki, Norie; Sasaoka, Kaori; Kobashi, Yusuke; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-01-01

    Radon inhalation brings pain relief for chronic constriction injury- (CCI-) induced neuropathic pain in mice due to the activation of antioxidative functions, which is different from the mechanism of the pregabalin effect. In this study, we assessed whether a combination of radon inhalation and pregabalin administration is more effective against neuropathic pain than radon or pregabalin only. Mice were treated with inhaled radon at a concentration of 1,000 Bq/m3 for 24 hours and pregabalin administration after CCI surgery. In mice treated with pregabalin at a dose of 3 mg/kg weight, the 50% paw withdrawal threshold of mice treated with pregabalin or radon and pregabalin was significantly increased, suggesting pain relief. The therapeutic effects of radon inhalation or the combined effects of radon and pregabalin (3 mg/kg weight) were almost equivalent to treatment with pregabalin at a dose of 1.4 mg/kg weight or 4.1 mg/kg weight, respectively. Radon inhalation and the combination of radon and pregabalin increased antioxidant associated substances in the paw. The antioxidant substances increased much more in radon inhalation than in pregabalin administration. These findings suggested that the activation of antioxidative functions by radon inhalation enhances the pain relief of pregabalin and that this combined effect is probably an additive effect. PMID:26798431

  19. Pregabalin versus gabapentin in the management of peripheral neuropathic pain associated with post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy: a cost effectiveness analysis for the Greek healthcare setting.

    PubMed

    Athanasakis, Kostas; Petrakis, Ioannis; Karampli, Eleftheria; Vitsou, Elli; Lyras, Leonidas; Kyriopoulos, John

    2013-06-04

    The anticonvulsants pregabalin and gabapentin are both indicated for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. The decision on which treatment provides the best alternative, should take into account all aspects of costs and outcomes associated with the two therapeutic options. The objective of this study was to examine the cost - effectiveness of the two agents in the management of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy or post - herpetic neuralgia, under the third party payer perspective in Greece. The analysis was based on a dynamic simulation model which estimated and compared the costs and outcomes of pregabalin and gabapentin in a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 patients suffering from painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) or Post-Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN). In the model, each patient was randomly allocated an average pretreatment pain score, measured using an eleven-point visual analogue scale (0 - 10) and was "run through" the model, simulating their daily pain intensity and allowing for stochastic calculation of outcomes, taking into account medical interventions and the effectiveness of each treatment. Pregabalin demonstrated a reduction in days with moderate to severe pain when compared to gabapentin. During the 12 weeks the pregabalin arm demonstrated a 0.1178 (SE 0.0002) QALY gain, which proved to be 0.0063 (SE 0.0003) higher than that in the gabapentin arm. The mean medication cost per patient was higher for the pregabalin arm when compared to the gabapentin arm (i.e. €134.40) over the 12 week treatment period. However, this higher cost was partially offset by the reduced direct medical costs (i.e. the cost of specialist visits, the cost of diagnostic tests and the other applied interventions). Comparing costs with respective outcomes, the ICERs for pregabalin versus gabapentin were €13 (95%CI: 8 - 18) per additional day with no or mild pain and €19,320 (95%CI: 11,743 - 26,755) per QALY gained. Neuropathic pain carries a great disease

  20. Pregabalin versus gabapentin in the management of peripheral neuropathic pain associated with post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy: a cost effectiveness analysis for the Greek healthcare setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The anticonvulsants pregabalin and gabapentin are both indicated for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. The decision on which treatment provides the best alternative, should take into account all aspects of costs and outcomes associated with the two therapeutic options. The objective of this study was to examine the cost – effectiveness of the two agents in the management of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy or post – herpetic neuralgia, under the third party payer perspective in Greece. Methods The analysis was based on a dynamic simulation model which estimated and compared the costs and outcomes of pregabalin and gabapentin in a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 patients suffering from painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) or Post-Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN). In the model, each patient was randomly allocated an average pretreatment pain score, measured using an eleven-point visual analogue scale (0 – 10) and was “run through” the model, simulating their daily pain intensity and allowing for stochastic calculation of outcomes, taking into account medical interventions and the effectiveness of each treatment. Results Pregabalin demonstrated a reduction in days with moderate to severe pain when compared to gabapentin. During the 12 weeks the pregabalin arm demonstrated a 0.1178 (SE 0.0002) QALY gain, which proved to be 0.0063 (SE 0.0003) higher than that in the gabapentin arm. The mean medication cost per patient was higher for the pregabalin arm when compared to the gabapentin arm (i.e. €134.40) over the 12 week treatment period. However, this higher cost was partially offset by the reduced direct medical costs (i.e. the cost of specialist visits, the cost of diagnostic tests and the other applied interventions). Comparing costs with respective outcomes, the ICERs for pregabalin versus gabapentin were €13 (95%CI: 8 – 18) per additional day with no or mild pain and €19,320 (95%CI: 11,743 – 26,755) per QALY gained

  1. Pharmacovigilance in hospice/palliative care: net effect of pregabalin for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Christine; Quinn, Stephen J; Agar, Meera; Chye, Richard; Clark, Katherine; Doogue, Matthew; Fazekas, Belinda; Lee, Jessica; Lovell, Melanie R; Rowett, Debra; Spruyt, Odette; Currow, David C

    2016-09-01

    Real-world effectiveness of many medications has been poorly researched, including in hospice/palliative care. Directly extrapolating findings from other clinical settings may not yield robust clinical advice. Pharmacovigilance studies provide an opportunity to understand better the net impact of medications. The study aimed to examine immediate and short-term benefits and harms of pregabalin in routine practice for neuropathic pain in hospice/palliative care. A consecutive cohort of 155 patients from 62 centres in 5 countries was started on pregabalin and studied prospectively. Data were collected at three time points: baseline; day 7 (immediate, short-term harms); ad hoc reports of any harms ≤21 days; and day 21 (short-term benefits). Median dose for 155 patients at day 21 was 150 mg/24 h. Benefits were reported by 61 patients (39%), of whom 11 (7%) experienced complete pain resolution. Harms were reported by 51 (35%) patients at or before 7 days, the most frequent of which were somnolence, fatigue, cognitive disturbance and dizziness. 10 patients (6%) ceased pregabalin due to harms, but 82 patients (53%) were being treated at 21 days. In regression modelling, people with worse baseline pain derived more benefit (OR=8.5 (95% CI 2.5 to 28.68). Pregabalin delivered benefit to many patients, with 4 of 10 experiencing pain reductions by 21 days. Harms, occurring in 1 in 3 patients, may be difficult to detect in clinical practice, as they mostly involve worsening of symptoms prevalent at baseline. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Efficacy and safety of pregabalin in patients with neuropathic cancer pain undergoing morphine therapy.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhi; Jiang, Zongbin; Zhong, Jincai

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of pregabalin (PGB)-morphine combination for the treatment of neuropathic cancer pain (NCP). In this double-blind, randomized, placebo (PL)-controlled crossover study, 40 cancer patients with severe NCP were randomized into two groups (20 per group): PGB-PL and PL-PGB. Patients in the PGB-PL group received PGB plus oral morphine in phase I, and PL plus oral morphine in phase II. The treatment sequence for the PL-PGB group was PL plus oral morphine in phase I, and PGB plus oral morphine in phase II. These 2-week treatment periods were separated by a 1-week washout period. The primary outcome measure was the decrements in morphine dose; secondary outcomes included quantitative assessments of sleep (rated according to the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale), the Constipation Assessment Scale and adverse effects. The mean minimal effective dose of morphine was 184.4 ± 69.9 mg/day in the period of PGB treatments, which was significantly lower than that of PL-controls (228.7 ± 66.9 mg/day; P < 0.001) and baseline (247.5 ± 80.0 mg/day; P < 0.001). Compared with PL, PGB resulted in a significant sleep improvement as measured by sleep disturbance, sleep quantity, and sleep problems index (P < 0.001), as well as a Constipation Assessment Scale reduction (P < 0.001). PGB resulted in a higher frequency of dry mouth and somnolence than PL (P < 0.05). PGB enhances the efficacy of oral morphine and reduces dose-related adverse reactions. The PGB-morphine combination is an effective approach to controlling NCP. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Neuronal hyperexcitability in the ventral posterior thalamus of neuropathic rats: modality selective effects of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain represents a substantial clinical challenge; understanding the underlying neural mechanisms and back-translation of therapeutics could aid targeting of treatments more effectively. The ventral posterior thalamus (VP) is the major termination site for the spinothalamic tract and relays nociceptive activity to the somatosensory cortex; however, under neuropathic conditions, it is unclear how hyperexcitability of spinal neurons converges onto thalamic relays. This study aimed to identify neural substrates of hypersensitivity and the influence of pregabalin on central processing. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from VP wide dynamic range (WDR) and nociceptive-specific (NS) neurons in anesthetized spinal nerve-ligated (SNL), sham-operated, and naive rats. In neuropathic rats, WDR neurons had elevated evoked responses to low- and high-intensity punctate mechanical stimuli, dynamic brushing, and innocuous and noxious cooling, but less so to heat stimulation, of the receptive field. NS neurons in SNL rats also displayed increased responses to noxious punctate mechanical stimulation, dynamic brushing, noxious cooling, and noxious heat. Additionally, WDR, but not NS, neurons in SNL rats exhibited substantially higher rates of spontaneous firing, which may correlate with ongoing pain. The ratio of WDR-to-NS neurons was comparable between SNL and naive/sham groups, suggesting relatively few NS neurons gain sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli leading to a “WDR phenotype.” After neuropathy was induced, the proportion of cold-sensitive WDR and NS neurons increased, supporting the suggestion that changes in frequency-dependent firing and population coding underlie cold hypersensitivity. In SNL rats, pregabalin inhibited mechanical and heat responses but not cold-evoked or elevated spontaneous activity. PMID:27098028

  4. Use of gabapentin and pregabalin for pruritus and neuropathic pain associated with major burn injury: A retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Isha; Amin, Ami; Rosenberg, Marta; Rosenberg, Laura; Meyer, Walter J

    2017-08-16

    Pruritis after burn is one of the most common chronic complaints in burn survivors. Pruritus is often indistinguishable from neuropathic pain. There is a paucity of studies reporting the use of gabapentin and pregabalin to treat both pruritus and neuropathic pain. The purpose of this current study is to explore and document the effect of gabapentin and pregabalin in children and adolescent burn survivors. A retrospective review of charts and pharmacy records of gabapentin and pregabalin dispensed to control pruritus and/or pain was conducted for burn survivors up to 20 years of age. Data collected included medication doses, age and weight of patients, presence of neuropathic pain and pruritus, reported response to medication, and side effects of these medications. 136 individuals who received gabapentin, pregabalin, or both medications are included in the study. 112 received only gabapentin, none received only pregabalin, and 24 received both. All results are documented in mean±standard deviation (s.d.) dose/kg/day. 104 individuals experienced pruritus exclusively, two experienced neuropathic pain exclusively, and 30 experienced both. Use of medications was considered effective if the individuals reported pruritus or pain relief from the medication. The medication was considered safe if the individuals did not experience adverse side effects warranting discontinuation of the drugs. Medications were continued with dose adjustments if an individual reported minor side effects such as sedation or hyperactivity. The average effective dose mg/kg/day for gabapentin and pregabalin was calculated for each of the three age groups (≤5years, 6-12 years, and >12years). The average effective dose of gabapentin was 23.9±10.3mg/kg/day for children ≤5years, 27.0±15.3mg/kg/day for children 6-12 years, and 34.1±15.7mg/kg/day for children >12years. The average effective dose of pregabalin was 6.5±3.5mg/kg/day for children 6-12 years and 4.7±1.6mg/kg/day for children >12

  5. Real-life efficacy of pregabalin for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain in daily clinical practice in Denmark: the NEP-TUNE study

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Michael E; Poulsen, Peter Bo; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Habicht, Andreas; Strand, Mette; Bach, Flemming W

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to provide evidence regarding the real-life efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (NeP) in Denmark. Methods In this prospective, observational, noninterventional study, pregabalin (Lyrica®) was prescribed following usual clinical practice. Compared with baseline, the primary study end points after 3 months of observation were changes in 1) the average level of pain during the past week, 2) the worst level of pain during the past week, and 3) the least level of pain during the past week. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to perform paired analyses, and a multivariate regression analysis investigated factors driving change in pain. Results A total of 86 of the 128 patients included were regarded as efficacy evaluable (those completing 3 months of pregabalin treatment). Patients (59 years) were long-time sufferers of peripheral NeP, and 38% of them had comorbidities. The majority had previously been treated with tricyclic antidepressants or gabapentin. The average dose of pregabalin was 81.5 mg/d at baseline and 240 mg/d after 3 months. A clinically and statistically significant improvement of 2.2 points in the average level of pain intensity was found after 3 months. The higher the pain intensity at baseline, the higher was the reduction of the pain score. Positive results were also found for pain-related sleep interference, patients’ global impression of change, quality of life, and work and productivity impairment. Twenty-one patients reported 28 adverse events. Conclusion This real-life study indicates that for some patients (two-thirds), addition of pregabalin for peripheral NeP helps to reduce their pain intensity significantly. PMID:27284265

  6. Pregabalin as mono- or add-on therapy for patients with refractory chronic neuropathic pain: a post-marketing prescription-event monitoring study.

    PubMed

    Lampl, Christian; Schweiger, Christine; Haider, Bernhard; Lechner, Anita

    2010-08-01

    This observational study examined the outcome of two different therapeutic strategies in the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain by including pregabalin (PGB) as mono- or add-on therapy in one of two treatment options. Patients with a pain score of > or =4, refractory to usual care for neuropathic pain for at least 6 months, were allocated consecutively to one of two treatment strategies according to the decision of the physician: complete switch to a flexible-dosage, monotherapeutic or add-on therapy with pregabalin (PGB group), or change established doses and combinations of pre-existing mono- or combination therapy without pregabalin (non-PGB group). After 4 weeks (primary endpoint) a significant improvement in pain reduction was documented in both intention-to treat (ITT) analysis (PGB group, n = 85: mean pain score reduction of 3.53, SD 2.03, p < 0.001; non-PGB group, n = 102; mean pain score reduction of 2.83, SD 2.23, p < 0.001) and per-protocol (PP) analysis (PGB group, n = 79: mean pain score reduction 3.53 vs. 2.83, p < 0.05; non-PGB group, n = 81; 3.5 vs. 2.9, p < 0.05) compared to baseline. Comparison of the results observed in the two groups shows that patients in the PGB group achieved significantly greater pain reduction. These results demonstrate that PGB administered twice daily is superior to treatment regimes without PGB in reducing pain and pain-related interference in quality of life.

  7. An open-label, long-term study examining the safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Kenji; Koga, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studies of pregabalin for the treatment of central neuropathic pain have been limited to double-blind trials of 4–17 weeks in duration. The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term safety and tolerability of pregabalin in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain. The efficacy of pregabalin was also assessed as a secondary measure. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, multicenter, open-label trial of pregabalin (150–600 mg/day) in Japanese patients with central neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or cerebral stroke. Results A total of 103 patients received pregabalin (post-stroke =60; spinal cord injury =38; and multiple sclerosis =5). A majority of patients (87.4%) experienced one or more treatment-related adverse events, most commonly somnolence, weight gain, dizziness, or peripheral edema. The adverse event profile was similar to that seen in other indications of pregabalin. Most treatment-related adverse events were mild (89.1%) or moderate (9.2%) in intensity. Pregabalin treatment improved total score, sensory pain, affective pain, visual analog scale (VAS), and present pain intensity scores on the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and ten-item modified Brief Pain Inventory (mBPI-10) total score at endpoint compared with baseline. Improvements in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 total scores were evident in all patient subpopulations. Mean changes from baseline in SF-MPQ VAS and mBPI-10 scores at endpoint were −20.1 and −1.4, respectively. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that pregabalin is generally well tolerated and provides sustained efficacy over a 53-week treatment period in patients with chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:25114584

  8. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Sessle, Barry J; Coderre, Terence J

    2013-05-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analyzed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH of IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.

  9. Systemic pregabalin attenuates facial hypersensitivity and noxious stimulus-evoked release of glutamate in medullary dorsal horn in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Varathan, Vidya; Miyamoto, Makiko; Chiang, C.Y.; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Sessle, Barry J.; Coderre, Terence J.

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in treating many neuropathic pain conditions. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pregabalin suppresses facial mechanical hypersensitivity and evoked glutamate release in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH) in a rodent model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Nociceptive mechanical sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively, and then post-operatively 1 h following pregabalin or vehicle (saline) treatment on post-operative days 2 and 5 following infraorbital nerve transection (IONX). In addition, an in vivo microdialysis probe was inserted into the exposed medulla post-operatively and dialysate samples were collected. Glutamate release was then evoked by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp, and the effects of pregabalin or vehicle were examined on the MDH glutamate release. Glutamate concentrations in the dialysated samples were determined by HPLC, and data analysed by ANOVA. IONX animals (but not control animals) showed facial mechanical hypersensitivity for several days post-operatively. In addition, tooth pulp stimulation with MO evoked a transient release of glutamate in the MDH in IONX animals. Compared to vehicle, administration of pregabalin significantly attenuated the facial mechanical hypersensitivity as well as the MO-evoked glutamate release in MDH. This study provides evidence in support of recent findings pointing to the usefulness of pregabalin in the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain.1 PMID:23454190

  10. Pregabalin in patients with central neuropathic pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a flexible-dose regimen.

    PubMed

    Vranken, J H; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Kruis, M R; van der Vegt, M H; Hollmann, M W; Heesen, M

    2008-05-01

    The effective treatment of patients suffering from central neuropathic pain remains a clinical challenge, despite a standard pharmacological approach in combination with anticonvulsants and antidepressants. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the effects of pregabalin on pain relief, tolerability, health status, and quality of life in patients with central neuropathic pain caused by brain or spinal cord injuries. At baseline and 4 weeks after the start of treatment subjects were evaluated with standard measures of efficacy: pain intensity measured by visual analog scale, health status (Pain Disability Index and EQ-5D) and quality of life (SF-36). Forty patients received escalating doses of either pregabalin (150, 300, and 600mg/day) or matching placebo capsules. In both groups, patients started with 1 capsule per day (either 150mg of pregabalin or placebo). If pain relief was insufficient, patients were titrated to a higher dose. There was a statistically significant decrease in mean pain score at endpoint for pregabalin treatment, compared with placebo (P=0.016). Follow-up observation showed no significant difference in Pain Disability Index scores between the two groups. The pregabalin group, however, showed a statistically significant improvement for the EQ-5D. Pregabalin treatment led to a significant improvement in the bodily pain domain of the SF36. In the other domains, more favorable scores were reported without reaching statistical significance. Pregabalin, in a flexible-dose regime, produced clinically significant reductions in pain, as well as improvements in health status in patients suffering from severe central neuropathic pain.

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin using a flexible, optimized dose schedule in Korean patients with peripheral neuropathic pain: a 10-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Eon; Lee, Doo Ik; Lee, Sang Chul; Song, Sun Ok; Yoon, Duck Mi; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Hae Kyu; Lee, Youn Woo; Kim, Chan; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2010-12-01

    Clinical trials from various countries have reported the efficacy of pregabalin for reducing peripheral neuropathic pain. This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin in Korean patients with neuropathic pain. This was a Phase III, 10-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with neuropathic pain (diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, or posttraumatic neuropathic pain) were enrolled and randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to pregabalin (150-600 mg/d) or matching placebo. Randomization was performed using a proprietary telerandomization system. The primary end point was the difference in week 8 least squares (LS) mean Daily Pain Rating Scale (DPRS) score (rated once daily from 0 ["no pain"] to 10 ["worst possible pain"]) between pregabalin and placebo, calculated using the average of the last 7 available DPRS scores. Secondary efficacy measures included the following: the proportion of responders whose DPRS scores were reduced by ≥ 30% or ≥ 50% versus baseline, the Daily Sleep Interference Scale (DSIS; 11-point scale, scored daily), the Euro Quality of Life assessment (EQ-5D; 2 items scored separately), the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Sleep Scale (12 items each scored separately), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; 2 items scored from 0 to 21), the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) and the Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC; each scored on a 7-point scale), and tolerability assessments. Adverse events and vital signs were monitored throughout the study with laboratory measurements, physical examinations, neurologic examinations, and 12-lead ECG tests. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA or Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The treatment groups (n = 162 pregabalin; n = 78 placebo) were well matched at baseline (pregabalin: 51.2% [83/162] female; mean [SD] age, 59.7 [10.8] years; weight, 63.6 [9.3] kg

  12. Effect of Concomitant Pain Medications on Response to Pregabalin in Patients with Postherpetic Neuralgia or Spinal Cord Injury-Related Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Schug, Stephan A; Parsons, Bruce; Almas, Mary; Whalen, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NeP) often receive combination therapy with multiple agents in the hopes of improving both pain and any comorbidities that may be present. While pregabalin is often recommended as a first-line treatment of NeP, few studies have examined the effects of concomitant medications on the efficacy of pregabalin. To examine the effects of concomitant medications on the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of NeP. Data were derived from 7 randomized placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin (150, 300, 600, and flexible 150 - 600 mg/d) for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and 2 randomized placebo-controlled trials for the treatment of NeP due to spinal cord injury (SCI-NeP). On each day, patients rated the severity of their pain and pain-related sleep interference (PRSI) over the previous 24 hours on a scale from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating greater severity. Patients were also continually monitored for the occurrence of adverse events. A pooled retrospective analyses of data from randomized clinical trials. Changes from baseline in mean weekly pain and PRSI scores were compared between patients who received concomitant NeP medications and patients who did not receive concomitant NeP medications. Results of these comparisons are presented separately for the PHN (through 4, 8, and 12 weeks) and SCI-NeP (through 12 weeks) cohorts. Common adverse events are also presented for each treatment group. Pregabalin significantly improved both pain and PRSI scores relative to placebo at most dose levels and time points examined. Notably, little difference was observed in the extent of therapeutic response to pregabalin between patients who received concomitant NeP medications and patients who did not receive concomitant NeP medications. Additionally, the profile of treatment-emergent adverse events appeared to be largely unaffected by the use of concomitant NeP medications in the pooled patient population. Our analysis

  13. Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; Taylor, Charles P; Smith, Stephen J

    2006-08-01

    Pregabalin [S-[+]-3-isobutylGABA or (S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, Lyrica] is an anticonvulsant and analgesic medication that is both structurally and pharmacologically related to gabapentin (Neurontin; Pfizer Inc., New York, NY). Previous studies have shown that pregabalin reduces the release of neurotransmitters in several in vitro preparations, although the molecular details of these effects are less clear. The present study was performed using living cultured rat hippocampal neurons with the synaptic vesicle fluorescent dye probe FM4-64 to determine details of the action of pregabalin to reduce neurotransmitter release. Our results indicate that pregabalin treatment, at concentrations that are therapeutically relevant, slightly but significantly reduces the emptying of neurotransmitter vesicles from presynaptic sites in living neurons. Dye release is reduced in both glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-immunoreactive and GAD-negative (presumed glutamatergic) synaptic terminals. Furthermore, both calcium-dependent release and hyperosmotic (calcium-independent) dye release are reduced by pregabalin. The effects of pregabalin on dye release are masked in the presence of l-isoleucine, consistent with the fact that both of these compounds have a high binding affinity to the calcium channel alpha(2)-delta protein. The effect of pregabalin is not apparent in the presence of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid], suggesting that pregabalin action depends on NMDA receptor activation. Finally, the action of pregabalin on dye release is most apparent before and early during a train of electrical stimuli when vesicle release preferentially involves the readily releasable pool.

  14. Randomised Phase II Trial (NCT00637975) Evaluating Activity and Toxicity of Two Different Escalating Strategies for Pregabalin and Oxycodone Combination Therapy for Neuropathic Pain in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garassino, Marina Chiara; Piva, Sheila; La Verde, Nicla; Spagnoletti, Ilaria; Iorno, Vittorio; Carbone, Claudia; Febbraro, Antonio; Bianchi, Anna; Bramati, Annalisa; Moretti, Anna; Ganzinelli, Monica; Marabese, Mirko; Gentili, Marta; Torri, Valter; Farina, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Neuropathic pain is commonly associated with cancer. Current treatments include combination opioid and adjuvant therapies, but no guidelines are available for dose escalation strategies. This phase II study compared the efficacy and tolerability of two dose escalation strategies for oxycodone and pregabalin combination therapy. Methods Patients (N = 75) with oncological neuropathic pain, previously untreated with pregabalin, were recruited in 5 Italian institutions between 2007 and 2010. Patients were randomised to two different dose escalation strategies (arm A; N = 38) oxycodone at a fixed dose with increasing pregabalin doses; (arm B; N = 37) pregabalin at a fixed dose with increasing oxycodone doses. Patients were evaluated from daily diaries and follow-ups at 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after beginning treatment with a numerical rating scale (NRS), neuropathic pain scale (SDN), and well-being scale (ESAS). The primary endpoint was a ≥1/3 reduction in pain (NRS); secondary endpoints included the time to analgesia and adverse effects. The study had a 90% probability of detecting the best strategy for a true difference of at least 15%. Results More patients in arm A (76%) than arm B (64%) achieved ≥1/3 overall pain reduction even after controlling for baseline factors (gender, baseline pain). Group A reported fewer side effects than group B; constipation 52.8% vs. 66.7%; nausea: 27.8% vs. 44.4%; drowsiness: 44.4% vs. 55.6%; confusion: 16.7% vs. 27.8%; itching: 8.3% vs. 19.4%. Conclusions Both strategies effectively controlled neuropathic pain, but according to the adopted selection design arm A is preferable to arm B for pain control. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637975 PMID:23577077

  15. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%). Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001) and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (P<0.05). Greater functional improvements were generally achieved at higher levels of clinically significant pain reduction. Pregabalin resulted in shifts

  16. Preoperative pregabalin prolongs duration of spinal anesthesia and reduces early postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, MiHye; Jeon, Younghoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The administration of oral pregabalin preoperatively has been reported to reduce acute postoperative pain. However, no clinical study to date has yet fully investigated whether or not pregabalin premedication affects sensory and motor blocks using spinal anesthesia and its effect upon early postoperative pain management. This prospective, randomized, and double-blind clinical study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a single dose of pregabalin in terms of spinal blockade duration and its potential opioid-sparing effect during the first 24 hours subsequent to urogenital surgery. Methods: Forty-four patients scheduled for urogenital surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group C (no premedication; orally administered placebo 2 hours before surgery) and group P (orally administered 150 mg pregabalin 2 hours before surgery). Results: The duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in group P patients when compared with that in group C patients, and the pain scores at postoperative 6 and 24 hours were significantly lower in group P patients. Requests for analgesics during the first postoperative 24 hours were lower among group P patients. Conclusion: Premedication with a single dose of 150 mg pregabalin before surgery promoted the efficacy of intrathecal bupivacaine and improved postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing urogenital surgery under spinal anesthesia. PMID:27603398

  17. Effectiveness of duloxetine compared with pregabalin and gabapentin in diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: results from a German observational study.

    PubMed

    Happich, Michael; Schneider, Edith; Boess, Frank G; Wilhelm, Stefan; Schacht, Alexander; Birklein, Frank; Ziegler, Dan

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of duloxetine (DLX) and the anticonvulsants pregabalin (PGB) and gabapentin (GBP) for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) in routine clinical care. Data from a 6-month, noninterventional study involving 2575 patients in whom treatment of DPNP was initiated with or changed to DLX, PGB, or GBP (n=1523) were analyzed post hoc; patients treated with other medications or combinations were excluded from this analysis. Propensity scoring was used to compare patient groups, assessing Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Clinical and Patient Global Impression (CGI/PGI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF 12). Mean median daily dosage over 6 months was 53.9 mg for DLX (N=931), 173.5 mg for PGB (N=248), and 727.8 mg for GBP (N=351). BPI average pain severity (last observation carried forward, mean [SD]) decreased by 2.3 [2.30] points for DLX patients, and by 1.9 [2.22] in PGB, and 1.1 [2.15] in GBP patients. This difference remained statistically significant (DLX vs. PGB: P=0.029; DLX vs. GBP: P<0.001) after adjustment by propensity scores. Similar findings were also seen for the BPI interference score, CGI and PGI, the HADS anxiety score, the HADS depression score. When compared with DLX, the low doses of PGB and GBP used in this noninterventional study might have contributed to the lower effectiveness found for both anticonvulsants in the treatment of patients with DPNP.

  18. The efficacy and safety of pregabalin in the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas R; Cloutier, Christian; Leon, Teresa; Murphy, T Kevin; Phillips, Kem

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of pregabalin in patients with chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy. This randomized, controlled, withdrawal trial included five phases: screening (4-18 days); run-in (4-10 days) to screen out placebo responders; single-blind (28 days) to identify pregabalin responders; double-blind to randomize responders to pregabalin or placebo (35 days); and final study medication taper (7 days). The primary endpoint was time to loss of response (LOR) during the double-blind phase (1-point increase in pain, discontinuation, or rescue-medication use). In the single-blind phase, 58% of patients had 30% pain reduction. In the double-blind phase, pregabalin (n=110) and placebo (n=107) groups did not differ significantly in time to LOR. Adverse events caused the discontinuation of 9.9% and 5.6% of pregabalin-treated and placebo-treated patients, respectively. Most patients with chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy responded to pregabalin therapy; however, time to LOR did not significantly differ between pregabalin and placebo. Considering the results of all phases of the study, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from it, suggesting a need for further work to understand the clinical potential of pregabalin treatment for lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  19. Pregabalin treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain: a review of safety data from randomized controlled trials conducted in Japan and in the west.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Setsuro; Satoh, Jo; Arakawa, Akio; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    Two well-studied conditions of peripheral neuropathic pain are postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Several pregabalin trials for peripheral neuropathic pain have been conducted in the West, but limited data are available for Japan. As ethnicity may influence health risks, differences may be evident in safety data from pregabalin trials in Japan and in the West. The objectives of this review were to compare large pooled safety data from randomized controlled trials evaluating pregabalin for the treatment of PHN or DPN in the West with data from two (one PHN, N = 371; one DPN, N = 314) similar trials in Japan. Longer-term safety data from Japanese open-label extension studies were also reviewed in these neuropathic pain populations. Published and unpublished Pfizer-supported pregabalin trials were identified and sourced from internal Pfizer records. A PubMed search to check for inclusiveness was conducted on 2 November 2011 using the following criteria: 'diabetic peripheral neuropathy' OR 'postherpetic neuralgia' OR 'neuropathic pain' AND 'pregabalin', with limits set for clinical and randomized controlled trials published in English. Five PHN trials (N = 1250) and nine DPN trials (N = 2554) were identified as suitable for inclusion based on methodological comparability. Descriptive safety data from the original trials were reviewed and the most commonly reported adverse events (AEs; dizziness, somnolence, peripheral oedema and weight gain) were identified to be of primary interest. The majority of AEs were of mild to moderate severity in Japanese and Western populations. The most commonly reported AE data (all-causality) with pregabalin (regardless of dose) in Japan (dizziness: PHN = 31.1%; DPN = 24.6%, and somnolence: PHN = 28.6%; DPN = 25.7%) were compared with pooled data from the Western trials (dizziness: PHN = 24.9%; DPN = 23.0%, and somnolence: PHN = 15.1%; DPN = 13

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pregabalin for treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with accompanying lower limb pain (neuropathic component) in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Ataru; Akazawa, Manabu; Murata, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Sadosky, Alesia; Ebata, Nozomi; Willke, Richard; Fujii, Koichi; Doherty, Jim; Kobayashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of pregabalin for the treatment of chronic low back pain with accompanying neuropathic pain (CLBP-NeP) from the health care payer and societal perspectives. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pregabalin versus usual care for treatment of CLBP-NeP was evaluated over a 12-month time horizon using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), derived from the five-dimension, five-level EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire, was the measure of effectiveness. Medical costs and productivity losses were both calculated. Expected costs and outcomes were estimated via cohort simulation using a state-transition model, which mimics pain state transitions among mild, moderate, and severe pain. Distributions of pain severity were obtained from an 8-week noninterventional study. Health care resource consumption for estimation of direct medical costs for pain severity levels was derived from a physician survey. The ICER per additional QALY gained was calculated and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the robustness of the assumptions across a range of values. Results Direct medical costs and hospitalization costs were both lower in the pregabalin arm compared with usual care. The estimated ICERs in the base case scenarios were approximately ¥2,025,000 and ¥1,435,000 per QALY gained with pregabalin from the payer and societal perspectives, respectively; the latter included indirect costs related to lost productivity. Sensitivity analyses using alternate values for postsurgical pain scores (0 and 5), initial pain severity levels (either all moderate or all severe), and the actual EQ-5D-5L scores from the noninterventional study showed robustness of results, with ICERs that were similar to the base case. Development of a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve showed high probability (≥75%) of pregabalin being cost-effective. Conclusion Using data and assumptions from routine clinical

  1. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of pregabalin treatment on pain, pain-related sleep interference and general well-being in patients with neuropathic pain: a non-interventional, multicentre, post-marketing study.

    PubMed

    Anastassiou, Emmanouil; Iatrou, Christos A; Vlaikidis, Nikolaos; Vafiadou, Marianthi; Stamatiou, Georgia; Plesia, Eleni; Lyras, Leonidas; Vadalouca, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Numerous controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The objectives of the present study were to assess the impact of pregabalin under real-world conditions on pain, pain-related sleep interference and general well-being, and to assess the tolerability and safety of pregabalin in patients diagnosed with neuropathic pain of central or peripheral origin. This was a non-interventional, multicentre study in which pregabalin was administered for 8 weeks, at the therapeutic dosages of 150-600 mg/day, to patients with a diagnosis of neuropathic pain. Pain intensity and pain-related sleep interference were measured using 11-point numerical rating scales, while well-being was assessed by documenting how often emotions associated with anxiety or depression were felt over the past week. Patient and Clinician Global Impression of Change (PGIC and CGIC) were assessed at the final visit. In the 668 patients included in the full analysis set, there were significant (p < 0.0001) reductions in mean pain and pain-related sleep interference scores of 4.16 and 4.02, respectively. Indicators of general well-being showed improvement from baseline to final visit. The majority of patients were rated as 'much improved' (43.7% and 36.7%) or 'very much improved' (24.0% and 26.2%) on CGIC and PGIC scores, respectively. Discontinuation because of lack of efficacy occurred in 0.7% of 691 patients in the safety analysis set while discontinuation because of adverse events occurred in 5.1% of this population; 76.4% continued treatment after the study ended. Significant reductions in pain and pain-related sleep interference, combined with reductions in feelings of anxiety and depression, suggest that pregabalin under real-world conditions improves the overall health and well-being of patients with neuropathic pain.

  3. Analgesic efficacy of tramadol, pregabalin and ibuprofen in menthol-evoked cold hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Altis, Kosta; Schmidtko, Achim; Angioni, Carlo; Kuczka, Karina; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lötsch, Jörn; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2009-12-15

    We investigated the analgesic efficacy of single doses of ibuprofen, tramadol and pregabalin in menthol-evoked cold pain in a randomized, placebo-controlled four-way cross-over study in 20 healthy volunteers. Tramadol 100mg significantly reduced menthol-evoked cold hyperalgesia. Effects of ibuprofen 600mg and pregabalin 100mg were not significant. Analgesic effects of tramadol were associated with minor side effects, particularly fatigue and nausea. Minor side effects also accompanied analgesic effects of pregabalin and ibuprofen in subjects responding to these drugs, mostly fatigue, dizziness and difficulties to concentrate for pregabalin and gastric upset for ibuprofen. Five out of 18 subjects had a 50% reduction of cold hyperalgesia with tramadol, three of these additionally responded to pregabalin, and two with all three drugs. The numbers needed to treat (NNT >or= 50% for tramadol 4.5, for pregabalin 9) largely agree with the reported efficacy of tramadol and of moderate dosages of pregabalin in patients with peripheral or central neuropathic pain suggesting that menthol-evoked cold pain hypersensitivity may represent a valid model for neuropathic pain, particularly cold allodynia.

  4. [Perioperative gabapentin and pregabalin in cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim K; Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Som, Anirban

    Sternotomy for cardiac surgeries causes significant postoperative pain and when not properly managed may cause significant morbidity. As neuropathic pain is a significant component here, gabapentin and pregabalin may be effective in these patients and may reduce postoperative opioid consumption. The purpose of this systematic review was to find out efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin in acute postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Published prospective human randomized clinical trials, which compared preoperative and/or postoperative gabapentin/pregabalin with placebo or no treatment for postoperative pain management after cardiac surgery has been included in this review. Four RCTs each for gabapentin and pregabalin have been included in this systematic review. Three gabapentin and two pregabalin studies reported decrease in opioid consumption in cardiac surgical patients while one gabapentin and two pregabalin studies did not. Three RCTs each for gabapentin and pregabalin reported lower pain scores both during activity and rest. The drugs are not associated with any significant complications. Despite lower pain scores in the postoperative period, there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of gabapentin and pregabalin to reduce opioid consumption in the cardiac surgical patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Ocimum gratissimum Essential Oil and Its Isolated Compounds (Eugenol and Myrcene) Reduce Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Paula-Freire, Lyvia Izaura Gomes; Molska, Graziella Rigueira; Andersen, Monica Levy; Carlini, Elisaldo Luiz de Araújo

    2016-02-01

    Ocimum gratissimum is used in popular medicine to treat painful diseases. The antihypernociceptive properties of O. gratissimum essential oil and two of its active components (eugenol and myrcene) were tested in a model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. In tests to determine chronic antinociception, adult male C57BL/6 J mice were treated orally with corn oil (control group), O. gratissimum essential oil at doses of 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg or eugenol or myrcene at doses of 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg for 14 days after surgery. Pregabalin (20 mg/kg) was used as a standard in this study. The treatment with 20 and 40 mg/kg of O. gratissimum essential oil and at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg of the active components were able to promote antihypernociception in both mechanical (von Frey) and thermal (hot plate) tests. The treatment with the essential oil of the plant or eugenol was effective in reducing the levels of interleukin-1β in the sciatic nerve. Our findings demonstrate that O. gratissimum essential oil and its isolated active components possess antihypernociceptive activity in neuropathic pain models. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Predictive Modeling of Response to Pregabalin for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain Using 6-Week Observational Data: A Spectrum of Modern Analytics Applications.

    PubMed

    Emir, Birol; Johnson, Kjell; Kuhn, Max; Parsons, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    This post hoc analysis used 11 predictive models of data from a large observational study in Germany to evaluate potential predictors of achieving at least 50% pain reduction by week 6 after treatment initiation (50% pain response) with pregabalin (150-600 mg/d) in patients with neuropathic pain (NeP). The potential predictors evaluated included baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, such as patient-reported pain severity (0 [no pain] to 10 [worst possible pain]) and pain-related sleep disturbance scores (0 [sleep not impaired] to 10 [severely impaired sleep]) that were collected during clinic visits (baseline and weeks 1, 3, and 6). Baseline characteristics were also evaluated combined with pain change at week 1 or weeks 1 and 3 as potential predictors of end-of-treatment 50% pain response. The 11 predictive models were linear, nonlinear, and tree based, and all predictors in the training dataset were ranked according to their variable importance and normalized to 100%. The training dataset comprised 9187 patients, and the testing dataset had 6114 patients. To adjust for the high imbalance in the responder distribution (75% of patients were 50% responders), which can skew the parameter tuning process, the training set was balanced into sets of 1000 responders and 1000 nonresponders. The predictive modeling approaches that were used produced consistent results. Baseline characteristics alone had fair predictive value (accuracy range, 0.61-0.72; κ range, 0.17-0.30). Baseline predictors combined with pain change at week 1 had moderate predictive value (accuracy, 0.73-0.81; κ range, 0.37-0.49). Baseline predictors with pain change at weeks 1 and 3 had substantial predictive value (accuracy, 0.83-0.89; κ range, 0.54-0.71). When variable importance across the models was estimated, the best predictor of 50% responder status was pain change at week 3 (average importance 100.0%), followed by pain change at week 1 (48.1%), baseline pain score (14

  7. Trial of Pregabalin for Acute and Chronic Sciatica.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Stephanie; Maher, Christopher G; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Koes, Bart W; Hancock, Mark J; Harris, Ian; Day, Richard O; Billot, Laurent; Pik, Justin; Jan, Stephen; Lin, C-W Christine

    2017-03-23

    Background Sciatica can be disabling, and evidence regarding medical treatments is limited. Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of some types of neuropathic pain. This study examined whether pregabalin may reduce the intensity of sciatica. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pregabalin in patients with sciatica. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either pregabalin at a dose of 150 mg per day that was adjusted to a maximum dose of 600 mg per day or matching placebo for up to 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the leg-pain intensity score on a 10-point scale (with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the worst possible pain) at week 8; the leg-pain intensity score was also evaluated at week 52, a secondary time point for the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the extent of disability, back-pain intensity, and quality-of-life measures at prespecified time points over the course of 1 year. Results A total of 209 patients underwent randomization, of whom 108 received pregabalin and 101 received placebo; after randomization, 2 patients in the pregabalin group were determined to be ineligible and were excluded from the analyses. At week 8, the mean unadjusted leg-pain intensity score was 3.7 in the pregabalin group and 3.1 in the placebo group (adjusted mean difference, 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.2 to 1.2; P=0.19). At week 52, the mean unadjusted leg-pain intensity score was 3.4 in the pregabalin group and 3.0 in the placebo group (adjusted mean difference, 0.3; 95% CI, -0.5 to 1.0; P=0.46). No significant between-group differences were observed with respect to any secondary outcome at either week 8 or week 52. A total of 227 adverse events were reported in the pregabalin group and 124 in the placebo group. Dizziness was more common in the pregabalin group than in the placebo group. Conclusions Treatment with pregabalin did not significantly reduce the intensity of leg pain associated with sciatica and did

  8. Pregabalin and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for postherpetic neuralgia treatment.

    PubMed

    Barbarisi, Manlio; Pace, Maria Caterina; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Maisto, Massimo; Mazzariello, Luigi; Pota, Vincenzo; Aurilio, Caterina

    2010-09-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is responsible for one of the most common types of neuropathic pain, described as a burning pain that shakes, hits, and tightens and includes allodynia and paresthesia. To evaluate the efficacy of Pregabalin when used during transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with PHN and to analyze any changes in physical activity and sleep quality. Patients aged 50 to 80 years were included in this randomized study. We enrolled 15 male (average age 65+/-8.6 y) and 15 female patients (average age 64+/-8.2 y). The male patients had a history of neuropathic pain lasting 15.6+/-8.8 months whereas the female patients had a history of neuropathic pain lasting about 14.9+/-8.6 months. We began with 1 week of patient screening followed by a week of Pregabalin titration. Then, we established the dose of Pregabalin for each patient to obtain visual analog scale (VAS) of less than 60 mm. The eligible patients were randomly divided into 2 groups receiving Pregabalin + TENS or Pregabalin+TENS placebo for the following 4 weeks. Patients underwent 8 outpatient visits during which they completed VAS, SF-McGill Pain Questionnaire, and sleep interference questionnaire. The resulting data showed that Pregabalin administration associated with TENS reduced pain in patients with PHN. At the end of the treatment, all the observed groups presented a reduction of mean VAS. The group treated with Pregabalin 300 (P300)+TENS had a reduction of pain of 30% and the group treated with Pregabalin 600 (P600)+TENS had a reduction of pain of 40%. The comparison between group P300+TENS versus group P300+TENS placebo showed a statistically significant reduction of VAS (P300+TENS 25+/-0.67 vs. P300+TENS placebo 39+/-1.19 P<0.02). Moreover, the comparison between group P600+TENS versus group P600+TENS placebo has shown a statistically significant reduction of VAS (P600+TENS 23+/-0.78 vs. P600+TENS placebo 32+/-0.81 P<0.02). At the end of the study, all groups

  9. Safety and efficacy of pregabalin in patients with central post-stroke pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong S; Bashford, Guy; Murphy, T Kevin; Martin, Andrew; Dror, Vardit; Cheung, Raymond

    2011-05-01

    Pregabalin has demonstrated efficacy in several forms of neuropathic pain, but its long-term efficacy in central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is unproven. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of pregabalin versus placebo in patients with CPSP. A 13-week, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel group study of 150 to 600 mg/day pregabalin was conducted in patients aged ≥18 years with CPSP. The primary efficacy endpoint was the mean pain score on the Daily Pain Rating Scale over the last 7 days on study drug up to week 12 or early termination visit. Secondary endpoints included other pain parameters and patient-reported sleep and health-related quality-of-life measures. A total of 219 patients were treated (pregabalin n=110; placebo n=109). A mean pain score at baseline of 6.5 in the pregabalin group and 6.3 in the placebo group reduced at endpoint to 4.9 in the pregabalin group and 5.0 in the placebo group (LS mean difference=-0.2; 95% CI=-0.7, 0.4; P=0.578). Treatment with pregabalin resulted in significant improvements, compared with placebo, on secondary endpoints including MOS-sleep, HADS-A anxiety, and clinician global impression of change (CGIC) P<0.05. Adverse events were more frequent with pregabalin than with placebo and caused discontinuation in 9 (8.2%) of pregabalin patients versus 4 (3.7%) of placebo patients. Although pain reductions at endpoint did not differ significantly between pregabalin and placebo, improvements in sleep, anxiety, and CGIC suggest some utility of pregabalin in the management of CPSP.

  10. Duloxetine and pregabalin: high-dose monotherapy or their combination? The "COMBO-DN study"--a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Wilhelm, Stefan; Lledo, Alberto; Schacht, Alexander; Tölle, Thomas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Skljarevski, Vladimir; Freynhagen, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    This multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group study in diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain addressed whether, in patients not responding to standard doses of duloxetine or pregabalin, combining both medications is superior to increasing each drug to its maximum recommended dose. For initial 8-week therapy, either 60 mg/day duloxetine (groups 1, 2) or 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 3, 4) was given. Thereafter, in the 8-week combination/high-dose therapy period, only nonresponders received 120 mg/day duloxetine (group 1), a combination of 60 mg/day duloxetine and 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 2, 3), or 600 mg/day pregabalin (group 4). Primary outcome (Brief Pain Inventory Modified Short Form [BPI-MSF] 24-hour average pain change after combination/high-dose therapy) was analyzed comparing combination (groups 2, 3 pooled) with high-dose monotherapy (groups 1, 4 pooled). Secondary end points included response rates, BPI-MSF severity items, and comparison of duloxetine and pregabalin in BPI-MSF average pain. Eight hundred four patients were evaluated for initial therapy and 339 for combination/high-dose therapy. There were no significant differences between combination and high-dose monotherapy regarding BPI-MSF average pain (mean change: combination: -2.35; high-dose monotherapy: -2.16; P = 0.370) and most secondary end points, which, however, consistently favoured combination therapy. Fifty-percent response rates were 52.1% for combination and 39.3% for high-dose monotherapy (P = 0.068). In exploratory analyses of the initial 8-week therapy uncorrected for multiple comparisons, 60 mg/day duloxetine was found superior to 300 mg/day pregabalin (P < 0.001). Both drugs and their combination were well tolerated. Although not significantly superior to high-dose monotherapy, combination therapy was considered to be effective, safe, and well tolerated.

  11. Pharmacology meets vesicular trafficking at a central nervous system synapse: pregabalin effects on synaptic vesicle cycling in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Holz, Ronald W

    2006-08-01

    The contribution by Micheva et al. in this issue of Molecular Pharmacology adds to our understanding of the action of pregabalin, a drug used for treatment of partial seizures and neuropathic pain. The authors examine the effects of pregabalin on presynaptic function of cultured hippocampal neurons using a powerful technique to follow the trafficking of synaptic vesicles in individual boutons. The study revealed that pregabalin reduces the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles in an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent manner.

  12. Role of Pregabalin in Management of Pruritus: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Foroutan, Nazanin; Nikvarz, Naemeh

    Pruritus can be one of the distressing symptoms of many dermatologic, systemic, neurologic or psychiatric disorders. In each case, the origin of itch is in the skin and/or the nervous system. Involvement of the nervous system causes neurogenic, psychogenic or neuropathic itch. Itch sensation is transferred to the central nervous system via unmyelinated C-type nerve fibers, and many mediators and receptors engage in the its induction and transmission. Also it has been demonstrated that there are similarities and interactions between neurotransmitters and pathways of pain and itch sensation. Hence, effective drugs in reducing the neuropathic pain such as pregabalin have been studied and used in the management of different itchy conditions.  In this narrative review we considered the available published papers dealing with the antipruritic effects of pregabalin. Results of studies conducted in uremic patients show that pregabalin is an effective option in reducing uremic pruritus especially in those who have not responded to antihistamines and topical moisturizers. Data about the effects of pregabalin on other itchy conditions are very limited; however results of the available studies show beneficial effects of this drug in burn patients with more than 5% involvement of the total body surface area, in prurigo nodularis, and in chronic and idiopathic itch. One considerable issue is that the therapeutic effects of pregabalin on uremic pruritus and post burn itch may appear more rapidly than its effects in the other conditions (1-2 weeks vs > 4 weeks). The most reported adverse effects of pregabalin are sedation, dizziness and drowsiness. Whether pregablin can be unequivocally considered as an effective and reasonable choice in the management of pruritus with different causes is a question that should be answered through large scale randomized controlled studies.

  13. Gabapentin and pregabalin ameliorate mechanical hypersensitivity after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Mitsuo; Ono, Koto; Honda, Motoko; Ono, Hideki

    2009-05-01

    The antiepileptic drugs gabapentin and pregabalin exhibit well-established analgesic effects in patients with several neuropathic conditions. In the present study, we examined their effects on mechanical hypersensitivity in mice subjected to weight-drop spinal cord injury. Hindlimb motor function and mechanical hypersensitivity were evaluated using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and the von Frey test, respectively, for 4 weeks after spinal cord injury. Despite gradual recovery of hindlimb motor function after spinal cord injury, mice exhibited continuous development of mechanical hypersensitivity. Gabapentin (30 and 100 mg/kg) and pregabalin (10 and 30 mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally on the 28th day after spinal cord injury, reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that gabapentin and pregabalin could be useful therapeutic tools for patients with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

  14. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  15. Pregabalin and Simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Michele B.; Choy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether a case of rhabdomyolysis was a probable adverse reaction associated with pregabalin (Lyrica) and simvastatin (Zocor). Pregabalin is not recognized as a cause of rhabdomyolysis, but statins are known to cause it. Patient Summary: A 70-year-old man with a history of fibromyalgia, type-2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic back pain presented to the emergency department with altered mental status, limb weakness, twitching, and slurred speech. He was taking multiple pain and neuropathic medications and had recently started taking lisinopril (e.g., Zestril) and simvastatin. His pregabalin dose was also increased from 50 mg to 100 mg three times daily. On admission, serum creatinine (SCr) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were 1.5 mg/dL (normal, 0.7–1.5 mg/dL) and 1,391 units/L (normal, 30–170 units/L), respectively. Metformin (Glucophage) was discontinued, and insulin was started. He was alert and oriented. The review of symptoms was normal except for leg weakness. He had no seizure activity. Simvastatin was discontinued, and the patient was aggressively hydrated. The following day, the SCr level was 1.6 mg/dL and the CPK level was 14,191 units/L. Pregabalin was then discontinued. The rhabdomyolysis resulted from simvastatin and perhaps also pregabalin. The Naranjo Causality Algorithm indicates a probable relationship between rhabdomyolysis and combined therapy. Three days later, the patient had significantly improved, and CPK began to decline. His discharge plan included all prior medications except simvastatin and pregabalin. Conclusion: It is not well known that pregabalin can cause rhabdomyolysis, and there is only one published report on pregabalin-induced hepatotoxicity. When different therapies are combined, the risk of rhabdomyolysis may be increased. The cause of rhabdomyolysis in our patient might be related to decreased renal elimination of both pregabalin and simvastatin (e.g., renal tubular

  16. Pregabalin for chronic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Aboumarzouk, Omar M; Nelson, Richard L

    2012-08-15

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a condition that is detrimental to the quality of life of men. Evidence suggests that it may have a neuropathic origin and therefore medications such as pregabalin might have a role in the controlling of symptoms. The primary objective was to compare pregabalin to other modalities of pain relief to alleviate men's symptoms of CP/CPPS.The secondary objective was to assess the safety and effectiveness of pregabalin to improve various individual symptoms consistent with CP/CPPS. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2012), EMBASE (1980 to May 2012), CINAHL, clinicaltrials.gov, Google Scholar, and reference lists of articles and abstracts from conference proceedings, without language restriction for pregabalin treatment of Class III prostatitis and CP/CPPS. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing pregabalin to placebo or other types of analgesics for the management of patients with CP/CPPS were included. Patients with known causes of pain/discomfort were excluded. Only one RCT was included. The trial compared pregabalin to placebo for patients who had CP/CPPS. For men who responded clinically (≥ 6-point improvement), there was no difference between the pregabalin (103/218; 47.2%) and placebo (38/106; 35.8%) arms (risk ratio (RR) 1.32; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.76). There was less pain with a higher point improvement in the pregabalin group compared to the placebo group (4.2 points versus 1.7 points, respectively; mean difference (MD) -2.3 points; 95% CI -4.0 to -0.7 points).Though 59% (191/324) of the patients developed side effects, no serious effects were experienced. There were significantly more neurologic side effects in the pregabalin group compared to the placebo group (38.5% (84/218) versus 22.6% (24/106), respectively; RR 1.7; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.51), and less pain in the pregabalin group than in the placebo group (17.4% (38/218) versus 33.3% (35

  17. A Cost-Consequences analysis of the effect of Pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral Neuropathic Pain in routine medical practice in Primary Care settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain (NeP) is a common symptom of a group of a variety of conditions, including diabetic neuropathy, trigeminal neuralgia, or postherpetic neuralgia. Prevalence of NeP has been estimated to range between 5-7.5%, and produces up to 25% of pain clinics consultations. Due to its severity, chronic evolution, and associated co-morbidities, NeP has an important individual and social impact. The objective was to analyze the effect of pregabalin (PGB) on pain alleviation and longitudinal health and non-health resources utilization and derived costs in peripheral refractory NeP in routine medical practice in primary care settings (PCS) in Spain. Methods Subjects from PCS were older than 18 years, with peripheral NeP (diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia or trigeminal neuralgia), refractory to at least one previous analgesic, and included in a prospective, real world, and 12-week two-visit cost-of-illness study. Measurement of resources utilization included both direct healthcare and indirect expenditures. Pain severity was measured by the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ). Results One-thousand-three-hundred-fifty-four PGB-naive patients [58.8% women, 59.5 (12.7) years old] were found eligible for this secondary analysis: 598 (44%) switched from previous therapy to PGB given in monotherapy (PGBm), 589 (44%) received PGB as add-on therapy (PGB add-on), and 167 (12%) patients changed previous treatments to others different than PGB (non-PGB). Reductions of pain severity were higher in both PGBm and PGB add-on groups (54% and 51%, respectively) than in non-PGB group (34%), p < 0.001. Incremental drug costs, particularly in PGB subgroups [€34.6 (80.3), €160.7 (123.9) and €154.5 (133.0), for non-PGB, PGBm and PGBadd-on, respectively (p < 0.001)], were off-set by higher significant reductions in all other components of health costs yielding to a greater total cost reductions: -€1,045.3 (1,989.6),-€1,312.9 (1,543.0), and -€1

  18. Adding pregabalin to a multimodal analgesic regimen does not reduce pain scores following cosmetic surgery: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Luis Enrique; Clarke, Hance; Valdes, Paola A; Mira, Mauricio; Duque, Lorena; Mitsakakis, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    Multimodal analgesia increases the chance of successful discharge and pain control after surgery, and pregabalin is being promoted as an effective analgesic, based on placebo-controlled studies. We investigated whether adding pregabalin improved pain control and reduced opioid requests when it was added to a multimodal analgesic regimen for cosmetic surgery. One hundred and ten women who underwent same-day cosmetic surgery were randomized to receive oral pregabalin, 75 mg q12 h for five consecutive days starting the night before surgery, or identical placebos. Participants, outcomes assessors, and the statistician were blinded. The primary outcome was postoperative numerical movement-evoked pain scores at 2, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after surgery. The secondary outcomes included pain scores at rest; incidence of moderate to severe pain; and analgesic and antiemetic requirements; as well as the incidence of nausea, vomiting, and somnolence. Based on 99 patients who completed the study, we found no difference between the groups in the primary outcome; 72 h after surgery, movement-evoked median pain scores were <4/10 in both groups. We found no differences in opioid requirements (p = 0.95) or anti-inflammatory requirements (p = 0.45), and no difference in opioid-related adverse events. Perioperative pregabalin 75 mg twice a day does not increase benefit when it is added to an already multimodal analgesic regimen for patients undergoing cosmetic surgery. Several factors could explain our findings, including the possibility of publication bias in the current literature.

  19. Pregabalin reduces postoperative opioid consumption and pain for 1 week after hospital discharge, but does not affect function at 6 weeks or 3 months after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H; Pagé, G M; McCartney, C J L; Huang, A; Stratford, P; Andrion, J; Kennedy, D; Awad, I T; Gollish, J; Kay, J; Katz, J

    2015-12-01

    This study examined whether a perioperative regimen of pregabalin added to celecoxib improved pain scores and functional outcomes postdischarge up to 3 months after total hip arthroplasty (primary outcome) and acute postoperative pain and adverse effects (secondary outcomes). One hundred and eighty-four patients were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Two hours before receiving a spinal anaesthetic and undergoing surgery, patients received celecoxib 400 mg p.o. and were randomly assigned to receive either pregabalin 150 mg p.o. or placebo p.o. After surgery, patients received pregabalin 75 mg or placebo twice daily in hospital and for 7 days after discharge. Patients also received celecoxib 200 mg every 12 h for 72 h and morphine i.v. patient-controlled analgesia for 24 h. Pain and function were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3 months after surgery. There was no difference between groups in physical function or incidence and intensity of chronic pain 3 months after total hip arthroplasty. The pregabalin group used less morphine [mean (sd): 39.85 (28.1) mg] than the placebo group [54.01 (31.2) mg] in the first 24 h after surgery (P<0.01). Pain scores were significantly lower in the pregabalin group vs the placebo group on days 1-7 after hospital discharge, and the pregabalin group required less adjunctive opioid medication (Percocet) 1 week after hospital discharge (P<0.05). Perioperative administration of pregabalin did not improve pain or physical function at 6 weeks or 3 months after total hip arthroplasty. Perioperative administration of pregabalin decreased opioid consumption in hospital and reduced daily pain scores and adjunct opioid consumption for 1 week after discharge. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Time to onset of neuropathic pain reduction: A retrospective analysis of data from nine controlled trials of pregabalin for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Griesing, Teresa; Emir, Birol; Young, James P

    2010-01-01

    These retrospective analyses of daily mean pain scores from nine placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin at 150, 300, or 600 mg/day (pregabalin, n = 1205; placebo, n = 772) examined time to significant reduction of pain during the first 2 weeks of treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Time to onset of reduction in pain-defined as the first day for which patients treated with pregabalin had significant reductions (P < 0.05) in mean pain score compared with the placebo group for that day and the subsequent day-was calculated for all treatment groups demonstrating statistically significant reduction in pain at trial end point. The time to a 1-point or greater improvement in mean pain score was measured for each patient who was a responder at end point (30% or greater improvement in mean pain score). In seven of the nine trials (representing 11 of 14 pregabalin arms), significant reduction in pain was achieved at end point. The time to onset for reduction in pain was treatment Day 1 or 2 in nine of these successful treatment arms. Individual responder analysis confirmed that responders in the pregabalin groups reported a 1-point or greater pain reduction earlier than responders in placebo groups (P < 0.0001). However, this analysis is not a direct estimate of the likelihood that an individual patient would experience noticeable pain relief by the end of the second day. Overall, for patients who will respond to pregabalin, statistically significant and sustained reduction of pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and posttherapeutic neuralgia occurs early, usually by the end of 2 days of pregabalin treatment.

  1. Pregabalin's abuse potential: a mini review focusing on the pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Papazisis, Georgios; Tzachanis, Dimitrios

    2014-08-01

    Pregabalin, an analogue of the gamma-aminobutyric acid mammalian neurotransmitter and its structurally related compound gabapentin are known as α2δ ligands. They might act as inhibitory modulators of neuronal excitability that reduce ectopic neuronal activation of hyperexcited neurons while normal activation remains unchanged. However, the interaction with Ca²⁺ channel α2δ subunit is not sufficient to account for the broad clinical spectrum of pregabalin effects including the abuse potential. Pregabalin is approved for the treatment of partial epilepsy; generalized anxiety disorder; peripheral and central neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Its prescribing is rapidly increasing and total sales of the drug worldwide reached 4.6 billion US$ in 2012. Since entering widespread clinical use, reports of pregabalin abuse appeared more often, usually involving individuals with a history of abuse of other medications. The purpose of this mini review is to present available published data signaling pregabalin's abuse liability reflecting on the pharmacological characteristics that might enable this agent to trigger addictive behaviors.

  2. Pregabalin in Chronic Post–thoracotomy Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Atul; Nar, Amandeep Singh; Bawa, Ashvind; Kaur, Gurinder; Bawa, Sayesha; Mishra, Seema

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic post–thoracotomy pain (CPP) has very high incidence and therefore it needs attention. Usually, it is burning, dysaesthetic and aching in nature and it displays many features of neuropathic pain. No one technique of thoracotomy has been shown to reduce the incidence of chronic post thoracotomy pain. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in patients with chronic post–thoracotomy pain. Methods: This prospective, randomized study was conducted on 50 consenting patients who underwent posterolateral thoracotomy. 25 patients were given pregabalin for 21 days (Group A). Another 25 were given diclofenac sodium (Group B) on demand and they escaped treatment. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scoring was performed on days 0, 1 and 7, then follow up was done at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. The data was analyzed by using t-test and Chi- square test for various variables. Results: The pain VAS scores in Group A were significantly low at all observation points except on day 0, day 1 and day 7 post-operatively, when the difference in pain scores in both the groups were comparable. The overall pain scores of Group A were comparable at day 0, day 1 and at day 7 as compared to those of Group B (p>0.9). Pain was significantly low at three weeks (p<0.05). Pain scores of Group A were significantly low at 6 weeks,12 weeks and 24 weeks as compared to those of Group B (p<0.001) and the difference was statistically significant. No significant adverse reactions were observed during study period. Conclusion: Pregabalin is a safe and an effective adjuvant which is used for reducing the chronic post thoracotomy pain, which has no side effects and a high patient compliance. These results should be supported with multidisciplinary studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-ups. PMID:24086867

  3. Randomized Double-Blind Trial of Pregabalin Versus Placebo in Conjunction With Palliative Radiotherapy for Cancer-Induced Bone Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Peter J.; Colvin, Lesley A.; Fleetwood-Walker, Susan M.; Adamson, Douglas; Byrne, Anthony; Murray, Gordon D.; Laird, Barry J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) affects one third of patients with cancer. Radiotherapy remains the gold-standard treatment; however, laboratory and clinical work suggest that pregabalin may be useful in treating CIBP. The aim of this study was to examine pregabalin in patients with CIBP receiving radiotherapy. Patients and Methods A multicenter, double-blind randomized trial of pregabalin versus placebo was conducted. Eligible patients were age ≥ 18 years, had radiologically proven bone metastases, were scheduled to receive radiotherapy, and had pain scores ≥ 4 of 10 (on 0-to-10 numeric rating scale). Before radiotherapy, baseline assessments were completed, followed by random assignment. Doses of pregabalin and placebo were increased over 4 weeks. The primary end point was treatment response, defined as a reduction of ≥ 2 points in worst pain by week 4, accompanied by a stable or reduced opioid dose, compared with baseline. Secondary end points assessed average pain, interference of pain with activity, breakthrough pain, mood, quality of life, and adverse events. Results A total of 233 patients were randomly assigned: 117 to placebo and 116 to pregabalin. The most common cancers were prostate (n = 88; 38%), breast (n = 77; 33%), and lung (n = 42; 18%). In the pregabalin arm, 45 patients (38.8%) achieved the primary end point, compared with 47 (40.2%) in the placebo arm (adjusted odds ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.81; P = .816). There were no statistically significant differences in average pain, pain interference, or quality of life between arms. There were differences in mood (P = .031) and breakthrough pain duration (P = .037) between arms. Outcomes were compared at 4 weeks. Conclusion Our findings do not support the role of pregabalin in patients with CIBP receiving radiotherapy. The role of pregabalin in CIBP with a clinical neuropathic pain component is unknown. PMID:26644535

  4. Randomized Double-Blind Trial of Pregabalin Versus Placebo in Conjunction With Palliative Radiotherapy for Cancer-Induced Bone Pain.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Marie; Hoskin, Peter J; Colvin, Lesley A; Fleetwood-Walker, Susan M; Adamson, Douglas; Byrne, Anthony; Murray, Gordon D; Laird, Barry J A

    2016-02-20

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) affects one third of patients with cancer. Radiotherapy remains the gold-standard treatment; however, laboratory and clinical work suggest that pregabalin may be useful in treating CIBP. The aim of this study was to examine pregabalin in patients with CIBP receiving radiotherapy. A multicenter, double-blind randomized trial of pregabalin versus placebo was conducted. Eligible patients were age ≥ 18 years, had radiologically proven bone metastases, were scheduled to receive radiotherapy, and had pain scores ≥ 4 of 10 (on 0-to-10 numeric rating scale). Before radiotherapy, baseline assessments were completed, followed by random assignment. Doses of pregabalin and placebo were increased over 4 weeks. The primary end point was treatment response, defined as a reduction of ≥ 2 points in worst pain by week 4, accompanied by a stable or reduced opioid dose, compared with baseline. Secondary end points assessed average pain, interference of pain with activity, breakthrough pain, mood, quality of life, and adverse events. A total of 233 patients were randomly assigned: 117 to placebo and 116 to pregabalin. The most common cancers were prostate (n = 88; 38%), breast (n = 77; 33%), and lung (n = 42; 18%). In the pregabalin arm, 45 patients (38.8%) achieved the primary end point, compared with 47 (40.2%) in the placebo arm (adjusted odds ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.81; P = .816). There were no statistically significant differences in average pain, pain interference, or quality of life between arms. There were differences in mood (P = .031) and breakthrough pain duration (P = .037) between arms. Outcomes were compared at 4 weeks. Our findings do not support the role of pregabalin in patients with CIBP receiving radiotherapy. The role of pregabalin in CIBP with a clinical neuropathic pain component is unknown. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. The effects of pregabalin and the glial attenuator minocycline on the response to intradermal capsaicin in patients with unilateral sciatica.

    PubMed

    Sumracki, Nicole M; Hutchinson, Mark R; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond B; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unilateral sciatica have heightened responses to intradermal capsaicin compared to pain-free volunteers. No studies have investigated whether this pain model can screen for novel anti-neuropathic agents in patients with pre-existing neuropathic pain syndromes. This study compared the effects of pregabalin (300 mg) and the tetracycline antibiotic and glial attenuator minocycline (400 mg) on capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral sciatica on both their affected and unaffected leg. Eighteen patients with unilateral sciatica completed this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over study. Participants received a 10 µg dose of capsaicin into the middle section of their calf on both their affected and unaffected leg, separated by an interval of 75 min. Capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Minocycline tended to reduce pre-capsaicin injection values of hyperalgesia in the affected leg by 28% (95% CI 0% to 56%). The area under the effect time curves for capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were not affected by either treatment compared to placebo. Significant limb differences were observed for flare (AUC) (-38% in affected leg, 95% CI for difference -19% to -52%). Both hand dominance and sex were significant covariates of response to capsaicin. It cannot be concluded that minocycline is unsuitable for further evaluation as an anti-neuropathic pain drug as pregabalin, our positive control, failed to reduce capsaicin-induced neuropathic pain. However, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of minocycline observed pre-capsaicin injection is promising pilot information to support ongoing research into glial-mediated treatments for neuropathic pain. The differences in flare response between limbs may represent a useful biomarker to further investigate

  6. A Case Report of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Induced by Pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youn Joo; Lee, Dong-Young; Kim, Hae Won; Park, Hyun Sun

    2016-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the most common cause of euvolemic hyponatremia, and many medications have been associated with SIADH. Pregabalin is a drug used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, though common adverse effects include central nervous system disturbance, peripheral edema, and weight gain. However, hyponatremia caused by pregabalin has been rarely reported. Here we report a patient with pregabalin-induced hyponatremia who met the criteria for SIADH; after discontinuation of the drug, his condition rapidly improved. This case can help clinicians diagnose and treat new-onset hyponatremia in patients who recently initiated pregabalin therapy. PMID:28275386

  7. A Case Report of Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Induced by Pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youn Joo; Lee, Dong-Young; Kim, Hae Won; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Beom

    2016-12-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the most common cause of euvolemic hyponatremia, and many medications have been associated with SIADH. Pregabalin is a drug used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, though common adverse effects include central nervous system disturbance, peripheral edema, and weight gain. However, hyponatremia caused by pregabalin has been rarely reported. Here we report a patient with pregabalin-induced hyponatremia who met the criteria for SIADH; after discontinuation of the drug, his condition rapidly improved. This case can help clinicians diagnose and treat new-onset hyponatremia in patients who recently initiated pregabalin therapy.

  8. Efficacy of Pregabalin as Premedication for Post-Operative Analgesia in Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Geetha Chamanhalli; Vig, Saurabh; Bevanaguddaiah, Yatish; Anadaswamy, Tejesh C

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin, a structural analogue of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), is shown to be effective in treatment of several types of neuropathic pain, incisional injury, and inflammatory injury. Objectives The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two doses (75 mg or 150 mg) of pregabalin with the administration of a placebo for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. Patients and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 135 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. The patients were divided in three groups of 45 patients each: group 0, placebo; group 1, 75 mg pregabalin; and group 2, 150 mg pregabalin; each treatment of which was administered one hour before surgery. The Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) was used for pre-operative assessment and the visual analog scale (VAS) was used to determine pain at rest and for cough on the first post-operative day. The time for the requirement of rescue analgesics on the first post-operative day was also assessed. Results The RSS scores were significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the controls (P < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores for pain both at rest and on cough were significantly reduced in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Rescue analgesic consumption decreased significantly in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). The time at which rescue analgesia was administered (first dose) was 4.45 hours in group 0, 10.86 hours in group 1, and 16.82 hours in group 2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Pregabalin administered as premedication provided significant postoperative pain relief and decreased the requirement of other parenteral analgesics. Pregabalin doses of 150 mg had a better analgesic profile, but the advantages of their use may be limited by side effects such as dizziness. Thus, it is concluded that pregabalin doses of 75 mg may be the optimal pre-emptive dose. PMID:27642577

  9. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects of pregabalin alone and in combination with oxycodone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zacny, James P; Paice, Judith A; Coalson, Dennis W

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug indicated for neuropathic disorders and fibromyalgia. Some chronic pain patients suffering from these disorders take both this drug and an opioid for pain relief. Pregabalin is a scheduled drug under the Controlled Substances Act. The subjective effects of this drug have not been well-characterized, and the extent to which it alters the subjective effects of opioids has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 16 healthy volunteers were administered (in separate sessions) capsules containing placebo, 75 mg pregabalin, 150 mg pregabalin, 10 mg oxycodone, and 75 mg pregabalin combined with 10 mg oxycodone. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the five sessions. Pregabalin produced dose-related increases in some subjective effects and decreased respiration rate, but did not impact on psychomotor performance. Abuse liability-related subjective effects such as drug liking and desire to take the drug again were not increased by either pregabalin dose. Oxycodone produced increases in several subjective effects, including ratings of drug liking. When 75 mg pregabalin was combined with oxycodone some subjective effects were altered relative to placebo, in contrast to when each drug was tested alone. Liking of oxycodone was not increased by 75 mg pregabalin. However, recent studies have suggested that this drug is abused, and we would recommend that further psychopharmacological studies with pregabalin are warranted, including a study assessing its abuse liability across a range of doses in sedative abusers.

  10. Subjective, Psychomotor, and Physiological Effects of Pregabalin Alone and in Combination With Oxycodone in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zacny, James P.; Paice, Judith A.; Coalson, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug indicated for neuropathic disorders and fibromyalgia. Some chronic pain patients suffering from these disorders take both this drug and an opioid for pain relief. Pregabalin is a scheduled drug under the Controlled Substance Act. The subjective effects of this drug have not been well-characterized, and the extent to which it alters the subjective effects of opioids has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 16 healthy volunteers were administered (in separate sessions) capsules containing placebo, 75 mg pregabalin, 150 mg pregabalin, 10 mg oxycodone, and 75 mg pregabalin combined with 10 mg oxycodone. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the five sessions. Pregabalin produced dose-related increases in some subjective effects and decreased respiration rate, but did not impact on psychomotor performance. Abuse liability-related subjective effects such as drug liking and desire to take the drug again were not increased by either pregabalin dose. Oxycodone produced increases in several subjective effects, including ratings of drug liking. When 75 mg pregabalin was combined with oxycodone some subjective effects were altered relative to placebo, in contrast to when each drug was tested alone. Liking of oxycodone was not increased by 75 mg pregabalin. However, recent studies have suggested that this drug is abused, and we would recommend that further psychopharmacological studies with pregabalin are warranted, including a study assessing its abuse liability across a range of doses in sedative abusers. PMID:22085697

  11. Micronized palmitoylethanolamide reduces the symptoms of neuropathic pain in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Schifilliti, Chiara; Cucinotta, Lelio; Fedele, Viviana; Ingegnosi, Carmela; Luca, Salvatore; Leotta, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of micronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-m) treatment in reducing the painful symptoms experienced by diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PEA-m, a fatty acid amide of the N-acylethanolamine family, was administered (300 mg twice daily) to 30 diabetic patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. Before treatment start, after 30 and 60 days the following parameters were assessed: painful symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument; intensity of symptoms characteristic of diabetic neuropathic pain by the Total Symptom Score; and intensity of different subcategories of neuropathic pain by the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and blood chemistry tests to evaluate metabolic control and safety were also performed. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) indicated a highly significant reduction in pain severity (P < 0.0001) and related symptoms (P < 0.0001) evaluated by Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument, Total Symptom Score, and Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and urine analyses did not reveal any alterations associated with PEA-m treatment, and no serious adverse events were reported. These results suggest that PEA-m could be considered as a promising and well-tolerated new treatment for symptomatology experienced by diabetic patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy.

  12. Micronized Palmitoylethanolamide Reduces the Symptoms of Neuropathic Pain in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schifilliti, Chiara; Cucinotta, Lelio; Fedele, Viviana; Ingegnosi, Carmela; Luca, Salvatore; Leotta, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of micronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-m) treatment in reducing the painful symptoms experienced by diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. PEA-m, a fatty acid amide of the N-acylethanolamine family, was administered (300 mg twice daily) to 30 diabetic patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. Before treatment start, after 30 and 60 days the following parameters were assessed: painful symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument; intensity of symptoms characteristic of diabetic neuropathic pain by the Total Symptom Score; and intensity of different subcategories of neuropathic pain by the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and blood chemistry tests to evaluate metabolic control and safety were also performed. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) indicated a highly significant reduction in pain severity (P < 0.0001) and related symptoms (P < 0.0001) evaluated by Michigan Neuropathy Screening instrument, Total Symptom Score, and Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory. Hematological and urine analyses did not reveal any alterations associated with PEA-m treatment, and no serious adverse events were reported. These results suggest that PEA-m could be considered as a promising and well-tolerated new treatment for symptomatology experienced by diabetic patients suffering from peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24804094

  13. A2delta ligands gabapentin and pregabalin: future implications in daily clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tzellos, T G; Papazisis, G; Toulis, K A; Sardeli, Ch; Kouvelas, D

    2010-04-01

    Gabapentin (GP) and pregabalin (PB) are structurally related compounds and their predominant mechanism of action is the inhibition of calcium currents via high-voltage-activated channels containing the a2d-1 subunit. A2delta ligands are approved for the treatment of pain of diabetic neuropathy and post-herpetic neuralgia in adults and as adjunctive therapy of partial seizures in children. Recently, pregabalin has been approved for treatment of anxiety disorders in Europe. Besides their already approved indications both drugs are promising treatment options for a number of different serious and debilitating diseases, as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain of spinal cord injury, hot flushes, and essential tremor. In the present review, the unique mechanism of action of the above drugs is critically analyzed and evidence for their future use is provided. Gabapentin and pregabalin can be treatment options for these disorders, however, a clear comparison between the two drugs can not be performed, since there is no direct comparison study. The most common side effects are dizziness and somnolence which are also the most frequent reasons for withdrawal. Recommendations for future studies should include assessment of ideal titration period for GP and PB to reduce incidence of somnolence and dizziness and increase tolerability, cost-effectiveness and dose-response analysis of PB and GP and direct comparison of the two drugs.

  14. A single trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwi-Young; Suh, Hye Rim; Han, Hee Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a devastating chronic condition and is often induced in the upper limb following nerve injury or damage. Various drugs or surgical methods have been used to manage neuropathic pain; however, these are frequently accompanied by undesirable side effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a safe and non-invasive intervention that has been used to alleviate different types of pain in the clinic, but it is unclear whether TENS can improve chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limb. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single trial of TENS on chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury. Male rats weighing 200-250 g received median nerve-ligation of the right forearm, while the control group received only skin-incision without nerve-ligation. Neuropathic pain-behaviors, including mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia, were measured for 4 weeks. After the development of chronic neuropathic pain, TENS (100 Hz, 200 µs, sub-motor threshold) or placebo-TENS (sham stimulation) was applied for 20 min to the ipsilateral or contralateral side. Neuropathic pain behavior was assessed before and after intervention. Median nerve-ligation significantly induced and maintained neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side. TENS application to the ipsilateral side effectively attenuated the three forms of chronic neuropathic pain in the ipsilateral side compared to sham-treated rats (peripheral and central effects), while TENS application to contralateral side only reduced mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral side (central effect). Our findings demonstrate that TENS can alleviate chronic neuropathic pain following median nerve injury.

  15. Pregabalin modulation of spinal and brainstem visceral nociceptive processing

    PubMed Central

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2011-01-01

    Brainstem and spinal mechanisms mediating visceral nociception are investigated here using electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry techniques in a model of acute visceral pain. Colorectal distension (CRD) produced graded visceromotor responses (VMR) in normal rats, and these were facilitated by intracolonic mustard oil (MO) that generated acute visceral hyperalgesia. The neuropathic pain drug pregabalin (PGB) is thought to have state-dependent effects in attenuating neuropathic, but not acute somatic pain, likely by impairing calcium-channel trafficking. We found that systemic PGB produced antinociceptive effects on CRD-evoked VMRs in naïve rats lacking pathophysiology and in MO-pretreated rats. Systemic PGB also significantly reduced Fos labelling in lumbosacral spinal cords of rats given noxious repetitive CRD; however, PGB did not alter this measure of neural activity in the brainstem. Differential brainstem processing of noxious somatic and visceral stimuli may underlie the unique lack of state-dependent actions of PGB in this visceral pain model. Single-unit recordings in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) verify that brainstem processing of somatic and visceral stimuli differs. The effects of CRD on RVM cells classed as ON, OFF, or NEUTRAL were independent of their somatic responses, with surprising changes in RVM cell activity to innocuous visceral stimulation. PGB also markedly reduced the visceral responses of RVM ON-cells to noxious CRD. These results illustrate clear differences in the central processing of visceral and somatic stimuli, yet a common role for descending modulation by brainstem activity in mediating evoked pain measures. PMID:21778018

  16. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy.

  17. Botulinum toxin type A reduces hyperalgesia and TRPV1 expression in rats with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lizu; Cheng, Jianguo; Zhuang, Yu; Qu, Wenchun; Muir, Jeffery; Liang, Haowen; Zhang, Deren

    2013-02-01

    We aim to determine the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) on the thresholds of pain and the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats with neuropathic pain induced by selective ventral root transection (VRT). Neuropathic pain was induced by transection of the lumbar 5 ventral root in male Sprague-Dawley rats. BTX-A or saline was administered to the plantar surface by subcutaneous injection. SB366791 (an inhibitor of TRPV1) was administered intraperitoneally. Behavioral tests were conducted preoperatively and at predefined postoperative days. The expression of TRPV1 was detected and quantified by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting at postoperative days 3, 7, 14, and 21. TRPV1 expression increased significantly in the L4 ∼5 dorsal root ganglia 7 days after L5 VRT compared with the sham-operated control (P < 0.05). This increase persisted for at least 21 days. The thresholds of foot withdrawal to mechanical and thermal stimulation decreased significantly as well. Subcutaneous injection of BTX-A significantly and dose-dependently reduced the expression of TRPV1 (P < 0.05) and partially reversed the pain thresholds. Upregulation of TRPV1 expression in the DRG is an important mechanism of neuropathic pain induced by the VRT. The analgesic effect of BTX-A is most likely mediated through reduction of TRPV1 expression in the nociceptors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Prurigo nodularis--pregabalin can be considered for more severe symptoms].

    PubMed

    Asplund, Monika; Calling, Susanna; Spirén, Anna; Svedman, Cecilia

    2015-12-15

    Prurigo nodularis is a pruritic condition characterized by skin noduli. Different treatment options have been used with limited success. Pregabalin is a drug licensed for treatment of neuropathic pain in adults. As prurigo nodularis involves suffering for the patients and is difficult to treat, the aim of this case report is to report the effect of pregabalin treatment in seven patients with prurigo nodularis, treated in the dermatology clinic in Malmö, Sweden. Four patients experienced good effect of pregabalin, though two patients had a transient effect. Side effects of pregabalin have been reported. This case report indicates that pregabalin is a treatment option for therapy-resistant prurigo nodularis; even though one must be aware of that the effect may not be permanent and that there are side effects. The aim must be to use the drug for a limited time, taking the patient to a remission state, where the vicious itch-scratch cycle can be inhibited.

  19. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  20. Pioglitazone rapidly reduces neuropathic pain through astrocyte and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Ryan B.; Donahue, Renee R.; Morgenweck, Jenny; Grace, Peter M.; Sutton, Amanda; Watkins, Linda R.; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated administration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists reduces neuropathic pain-like behavior and associated changes in glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. As PPARγ is a nuclear receptor, sustained changes in gene expression are widely believed to be the mechanism of pain reduction. However, we recently reported that a single intrathecal injection of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, reduced hyperalgesia within 30 minutes, a time frame that is typically less than that required for genomic mechanisms. To determine the very rapid anti-hyperalgesic actions of PPARγ activation we administered pioglitazone to rats with spared nerve injury (SNI) and evaluated hyperalgesia. Pioglitazone inhibited hyperalgesia within 5 min of injection, consistent with a non-genomic mechanism. Systemic or intrathecal administration of GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist, inhibited the anti-hyperalgesic actions of intraperitoneal or intrathecal pioglitazone, suggesting a spinal PPARγ-dependent mechanism. To further address the contribution of non-genomic mechanisms, we blocked new protein synthesis in the spinal cord with anisomycin. When co-administered intrathecally, anisomycin did not change pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia at an early 7.5 min timepoint, further supporting a rapid non-genomic mechanism. At later timepoints anisomycin reduced pioglitazone anti-hyperalgesia, suggesting a delayed recruitment of genomic mechanisms. Pioglitazone reduction of SNI-induced increases in GFAP expression occurred more rapidly than expected, within 60 min. We are the first to show that activation of spinal PPARγ rapidly reduces neuropathic pain independent from canonical genomic activity. We conclude that acute pioglitazone inhibits neuropathic pain in part by reducing astrocyte activation, and via both genomic and non-genomic PPARγ mechanisms. PMID:25599238

  1. Five Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome in Whom an Antidepressant (Serotonin-Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor) Was Not Effective, but Pregabalin Markedly Relieved Pain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Nagashima, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Umemura, Eri; Tachibana, Masako; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Yuka; Arao, Munetaka; Ozaki, Norio; Kurita, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) causes idiopathic pain or a burning sensation in clinically normal oral mucosa. Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic disease with an unknown etiology. Burning mouth syndrome is also idiopathic, and a consensus regarding diagnosis/treatment has not been reached yet. Recent studies have supported the suggestion that BMS is a neuropathic pain disorder in which both the peripheral and central nervous systems are involved. Tricyclic antidepressants (nortriptyline and amitriptyline), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine and milnacipran), and antiepileptic drugs, potential-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit ligands (gabapentine and pregabalin), are currently recommended as the first-choice drugs for neuropathic pain. In this study, we report 5 patients with BMS in whom there was no response to SNRI (milnacipran or duloxetine), or administration was discontinued because of adverse reactions, but in whom pregabalin therapy markedly reduced or led to the disappearance of pain in a short period. Pregabalin, whose mechanism of action differs from that of SNRIs, may become a treatment option for BMS patients who are not responsive to or are resistant to SNRIs.

  2. Combined inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase and cyclooxygenases synergistically reduces neuropathic pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Molly S; Leishman, Emma; Banks, Matthew L; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Bradshaw, Heather B; Kinsey, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain is commonly treated with GABA analogues, steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs inhibit one or more COX isozymes but chronic COX inhibition paradoxically increases gastrointestinal inflammation and risk of unwanted cardiovascular events. The cannabinoids also have analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and reduce neuropathic pain in animal models. The present study investigated the analgesic effects of inhibiting both monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and COX enzymes, using low doses of both inhibitors. Experimental Approach Mice subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI) were tested for mechanical and cold allodynia after administration of the MAGL inhibitor, JZL184, or the non-selective COX inhibitor diclofenac. Then, both drugs were co-administered at fixed dose proportions of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1, based on their ED50 values. PGs, endocannabinoids and related lipids were quantified in lumbar spinal cord. Key Results Combining low doses of JZL184 and diclofenac synergistically attenuated mechanical allodynia and additively reduced cold allodynia. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, but not the CB2 receptor antagonist, SR144528, blocked the analgesic effects of the JZL184 and diclofenac combination on mechanical allodynia, implying that CB1 receptors were primarily responsible for the anti-allodynia. Diclofenac alone and with JZL184 significantly reduced PGE2 and PGF2α in lumbar spinal cord tissue, whereas JZL184 alone caused significant increases in the endocannabinoid metabolite, N-arachidonoyl glycine. Conclusions and Implications Combining COX and MAGL inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing neuropathic pain with minimal side effects. PMID:25393148

  3. Ketamine reduces the induced spinal p38 MAPK and pro-inflammatory cytokines in a neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, So-Young; Yeom, Jae Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropathic rats created by spinal nerve ligation are known to show higher levels of p38, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase p44/42 (ERK 1/2) of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The authors of this study aimed to understand the effect of ketamine on p38 MAPK and inflammatory responses, as well as its effect on the development of neuropathic pain. Methods The neuropathic rats were prepared by Chung's method with Sprague-Dawley rats. The research was carried out on three groups, a sham-operated group, a neuropathic pain and normal saline (NP + NS) group, and a neuropathic pain and ketamine (NP + Keta) group. The normal saline or ketamine was infused into the neuropathic rats through a mini-osmotic pump implanted in the subcutaneous space. After a week, the quantities of phospho-p38, p38 MAPK and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured and compared through western blots and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results In comparison to the control group, the NP + NS group showed a significant increase of phospho-p38 and p38 MAPK, as well as of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1). However, in the NP + Keta group, phospho-p38, p38 MAPK and TNFα and, ICAM1 were reduced in comparison to the NP + NS group. The paw withdrawal threshold test also showed the trend of recovery from the mechanical allodynia in the NP + Keta group. Conclusions In the development of neuropathic pain, p38 MAPK and inflammatory responses are significantly related, and the use of ketamine reduces p38 MAPK and proinflammatory cytokines. Thus, the adequate use of ketamine could be effective for the prevention and treatment of neuropathic pain following peripheral injury. PMID:24567814

  4. Pregabalin suppresses calcium-mediated proteolysis and improves stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Son, Tae Gen; Mughal, Mohamed R; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    Pregabalin, a Ca(2+) channel α(2)δ-subunit antagonist with analgesic and antiepileptic activity, reduced neuronal loss and improved functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke. Pregabalin administration (5-10mg/kg, i.p.) 30-90 min after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion reduced infarct volume, neuronal death in the ischemic penumbra and neurological deficits at 24h post-stroke. Pregabalin significantly decreased the amount of Ca(2+)/calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis in the cerebral cortex measured at 6h post-stroke. Together with the extensive clinical experience with pregabalin for other neurological indications, our findings suggest the potential for a therapeutic benefit of pregabalin in stroke patients.

  5. Improvement in pain severity category in clinical trials of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Bruce; Argoff, Charles E; Clair, Andrew; Emir, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI). Approval was based on clinical trial data demonstrating statistically significant differences in pain scores versus placebo. However, statistically significant pain relief may not always equate to clinically meaningful pain relief. To further characterize the clinical benefit of pregabalin, this analysis examined shifts in pain severity categories in patients with FM, DPN/PHN (pooled in this analysis), and SCI treated with pregabalin. Methods Data were pooled from 23 placebo-controlled trials in patients with FM (1,623 treated with pregabalin, 937 placebo), DPN/PHN (2,867 pregabalin, 1,532 placebo), or SCI (181 pregabalin, 175 placebo). Pain scores were assessed on an 11-point numeric rating scale and categorized as mild (0 to <4), moderate (4 to <7), or severe (7 to 10). Only patients with mean score ≥4 at baseline were randomized to treatment. The percentage of patients shifting pain category from baseline to endpoint for pregabalin and placebo was analyzed using a modified ridit transformation with the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel procedure. Results A higher proportion of patients shifted to a less severe pain category at endpoint with pregabalin compared with placebo. With flexible-dose pregabalin, the percentage of patients improving from: severe to mild (pregabalin versus placebo) was 15.8 versus 13.4 in FM patients, 36.0 versus 16.6 in DPN/PHN patients, 14.3 versus 7.7 in SCI patients; severe to moderate was 28.7 versus 28.2 in FM patients, 32.5 versus 28.2 in DPN/PHN patients, 35.7 versus 28.2 in SCI patients; and moderate to mild was 38.3 versus 26.4 in FM patients, 59.5 versus 41.4 in DPN/PHN patients, 38.6 versus 27.2 in SCI patients. Conclusion Compared with placebo, pregabalin is more often associated with clinically

  6. Gabapentin and pregabalin for the treatment of chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuki M; Sharma, Divya; Schonfeld, Ariel R; Kwatra, Shawn G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic pruritus is a distressing symptom that is often refractory to treatment. Patients frequently fail topical therapies and oral over-the-counter antihistamines, prompting the clinician to consider alternative therapies such as neuroactive agents. Herein, the use of gabapentin and pregabalin, 2 medications well known for treating neuropathic pain and epilepsy that are occasionally used for relieving chronic pruritus is explored. The findings from original sources published to date to evaluate the use of gabapentin and pregabalin as antipruritic agents are explored. They are found to be promising alternative treatments for the relief of several forms of chronic pruritus, particularly uremic pruritus and neuropathic or neurogenic itch, in patients who fail conservative therapies.

  7. Pregabalin for the Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Emily; Brown, Jamie N

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). A search of the MEDLINE database (1956-February 2016) and EMBASE (1957-February 2016) was conducted, using the terms pregabalin and restless legs syndrome In addition, a manual review of the references cited in each publication identified from the database search was conducted to identify relevant articles. All English-language, peer-reviewed publications were evaluated for relevance. From an initial review of 285 articles, 5 clinical trials were included in the final analysis. Pregabalin is an analog of γ-aminobutyric acid that exhibits antinociceptive and anticonvulsant activity by binding to voltage-gated calcium channels in the central nervous system. Studies of pregabalin have demonstrated efficacy through significant reductions in mean International RLS Scale scores and wake after sleep onset scores, and it had a lower rate of augmentation than pramipexole treatment. Study durations ranged from 6 to 52 weeks, with doses ranging from 150 to 600 mg daily. The most common adverse effects associated with pregabalin use in all studies included dizziness and somnolence. Clinical evidence suggests that pregabalin may improve symptoms of RLS and reduce disturbances in sleep, resulting in improvements in quality of life for patients affected by the disease. Pregabalin is considered to be relatively safe and poses a minimal risk of augmentation unlike current recommended first-line treatments for RLS. Thus, evidence suggests that pregabalin is a reasonable therapeutic option for the treatment of RLS. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Process and formulation variables of pregabalin microspheres prepared by w/o/o double emulsion solvent diffusion method and their clinical application by animal modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Ebru; Comoglu, Tansel; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge; Dogan, Murat; Comoglu, Selcuk; Dogan, Aysegul; Basci, Nursabah

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug used for neuropathic pain and as an adjunct therapy for partial seizures with or without secondary generalization in adults. In conventional therapy recommended dose for pregabalin is 75 mg twice daily or 50 mg three times a day, with maximum dosage of 600 mg/d. To achieve maximum therapeutic effect with a low risk of adverse effects and to reduce often drug dosing, modified release preparations; such as microspheres might be helpful. However, most of the microencapsulation techniques have been used for lipophilic drugs, since hydrophilic drugs like pregabalin, showed low-loading efficiency and rapid dissolution of compounds into the aqueous continous phase. The purpose of this study was to improve loading efficiency of a water-soluble drug and modulate release profiles, and to test the efficiency of the prepared microspheres with the help of animal modeling studies. Pregabalin is a water soluble drug, and it was encapsulated within anionic acrylic resin (Eudragit S 100) microspheres by water in oil in oil (w/o/o) double emulsion solvent diffusion method. Dichloromethane and corn oil were chosen primary and secondary oil phases, respectively. The presence of internal water phase was necessary to form stable emulsion droplets and it accelerated the hardening of microspheres. Tween 80 and Span 80 were used as surfactants to stabilize the water and corn oil phases, respectively. The optimum concentration of Tween 80 was 0.25% (v/v) and Span 80 was 0.02% (v/v). The volume of the continous phase was affected the size of the microspheres. As the volume of the continous phase increased, the size of microspheres decreased. All microsphere formulations were evaluated with the help of in vitro characterization parameters. Microsphere formulations (P1-P5) exhibited entrapment efficiency ranged between 57.00 ± 0.72 and 69.70 ± 0.49%; yield ranged between 80.95 ± 1.21 and 93.05 ± 1.42%; and mean particle size were

  9. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster versus pregabalin in post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic polyneuropathy: an open-label, non-inferiority two-stage RCT study.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Mayoral, Victor; Leijon, Göran; Binder, Andreas; Steigerwald, Ilona; Serpell, Michael

    2009-07-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster with pregabalin in patients with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) or painful diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). This was a two-stage adaptive, randomized, open-label, multicentre, non-inferiority study. Data are reported from the initial 4-week comparative phase, in which adults with PHN or painful DPN received either topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster applied to the most painful skin area or twice-daily pregabalin capsules titrated to effect according to the Summary of Product Characteristics. The primary endpoint was response rate at 4 weeks, defined as reduction averaged over the last three days from baseline of > or = 2 points or an absolute value of < or = 4 points on the 11-point Numerical Rating Scale (NRS-3). Secondary endpoints included 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores; change in allodynia severity rating; quality of life (QoL) parameters EQ-5D, CGIC, and PGIC; patient satisfaction with treatment; and evaluation of safety (laboratory parameters, vital signs, physical examinations, adverse events [AEs], drug-related AEs [DRAEs], and withdrawal due to AEs). Ninety-six patients with PHN and 204 with painful DPN were analysed (full analysis set, FAS). Overall, 66.4% of patients treated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster and 61.5% receiving pregabalin were considered responders (corresponding numbers for the per protocol set, PPS: 65.3% vs. 62.0%). In PHN more patients responded to 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment than to pregabalin (PPS: 62.2% vs. 46.5%), while response was comparable for patients with painful DPN (PPS: 66.7% vs 69.1%). 30% and 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores were greater with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster than with pregabalin. Both treatments reduced allodynia severity. 5% lidocaine medicated plaster showed greater improvements in QoL based on EQ-5D in both PHN and DPN. PGIC and CGIC scores indicated greater improvement for 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treated

  10. The Effects of Pregabalin and the Glial Attenuator Minocycline on the Response to Intradermal Capsaicin in Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Sumracki, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond B.; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral sciatica have heightened responses to intradermal capsaicin compared to pain-free volunteers. No studies have investigated whether this pain model can screen for novel anti-neuropathic agents in patients with pre-existing neuropathic pain syndromes. Aim This study compared the effects of pregabalin (300 mg) and the tetracycline antibiotic and glial attenuator minocycline (400 mg) on capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral sciatica on both their affected and unaffected leg. Methods/Results Eighteen patients with unilateral sciatica completed this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over study. Participants received a 10 µg dose of capsaicin into the middle section of their calf on both their affected and unaffected leg, separated by an interval of 75 min. Capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Minocycline tended to reduce pre-capsaicin injection values of hyperalgesia in the affected leg by 28% (95% CI 0% to 56%). The area under the effect time curves for capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were not affected by either treatment compared to placebo. Significant limb differences were observed for flare (AUC) (−38% in affected leg, 95% CI for difference −19% to −52%). Both hand dominance and sex were significant covariates of response to capsaicin. Conclusions It cannot be concluded that minocycline is unsuitable for further evaluation as an anti-neuropathic pain drug as pregabalin, our positive control, failed to reduce capsaicin-induced neuropathic pain. However, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of minocycline observed pre-capsaicin injection is promising pilot information to support ongoing research into glial-mediated treatments for neuropathic pain. The differences in flare response between limbs may

  11. Targeting CYP2J to reduce paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Angioni, Carlo; Park, Chul-Kyu; Meyer Dos Santos, Sascha; Jordan, Holger; Kuzikov, Maria; Liu, Di; Zinn, Sebastian; Hohman, Stephan W.; Schreiber, Yannick; Zimmer, Béla; Schmidt, Mike; Lu, Ruirui; Suo, Jing; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Schäfer, Stephan M. G.; Hofmann, Martine; Yekkirala, Ajay S.; de Bruin, Natasja; Parnham, Michael J.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Ji, Ru-Rong; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain (CIPNP) is a severe dose- and therapy-limiting side effect of widely used cytostatics that is particularly difficult to treat. Here, we report increased expression of the cytochrome-P450-epoxygenase CYP2J6 and increased concentrations of its linoleic acid metabolite 9,10-EpOME (9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acid) in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of paclitaxel-treated mice as a model of CIPNP. The lipid sensitizes TRPV1 ion channels in primary sensory neurons and causes increased frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in spinal cord nociceptive neurons, increased CGRP release from sciatic nerves and DRGs, and a reduction in mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity. In a drug repurposing screen targeting CYP2J2, the human ortholog of murine CYP2J6, we identified telmisartan, a widely used angiotensin II receptor antagonist, as a potent inhibitor. In a translational approach, administration of telmisartan reduces EpOME concentrations in DRGs and in plasma and reverses mechanical hypersensitivity in paclitaxel-treated mice. We therefore suggest inhibition of CYP2J isoforms with telmisartan as a treatment option for paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:27791151

  12. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor.

  13. Pregabalin modulation of spinal and brainstem visceral nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2011-10-01

    Brainstem and spinal mechanisms mediating visceral nociception are investigated here using electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry techniques in a model of acute visceral pain. Colorectal distension (CRD) produced graded visceromotor responses (VMR) in normal rats, and these were facilitated by intracolonic mustard oil (MO) that generated acute visceral hyperalgesia. The neuropathic pain drug pregabalin (PGB) is thought to have state-dependent effects in attenuating neuropathic, but not acute somatic pain, likely by impairing calcium-channel trafficking. We found that systemic PGB produced antinociceptive effects on CRD-evoked VMRs in naïve rats lacking pathophysiology and in MO-pretreated rats. Systemic PGB also significantly reduced Fos labelling in lumbosacral spinal cords of rats given noxious repetitive CRD; however, PGB did not alter this measure of neural activity in the brainstem. Differential brainstem processing of noxious somatic and visceral stimuli may underlie the unique lack of state-dependent actions of PGB in this visceral pain model. Single-unit recordings in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) verify that brainstem processing of somatic and visceral stimuli differs. The effects of CRD on RVM cells classed as ON, OFF, or NEUTRAL were independent of their somatic responses, with surprising changes in RVM cell activity to innocuous visceral stimulation. PGB also markedly reduced the visceral responses of RVM ON-cells to noxious CRD. These results illustrate clear differences in the central processing of visceral and somatic stimuli, yet a common role for descending modulation by brainstem activity in mediating evoked pain measures. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Peripheral sensory neuron injury contributes to neuropathic pain in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I-Ching; Chung, Chen-Yen; Liao, Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS)-induced neuropathic pain deteriorates quality of life in patients but is often refractory to treatment. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, animals develop neuropathy and inflammation-induced tissue acidosis, which suggests the involvement of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Also, peripheral neuropathy is reported in MS patients. However, the involvement of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in MS neuropathic pain remains elusive. This study investigated the contribution of ASICs and peripheral neuropathy in MS-induced neuropathic pain. Elicited pain levels were as high in Asic1a−/−, Asic2−/− and Asic3−/− mice as wild-type mice even though only Asic1a−/− mice showed reduced EAE disease severity, which indicates that pain in EAE was independent of disease severity. We thus adopted an EAE model without pertussis toxin (EAEnp) to restrain activated immunity in the periphery and evaluate the PNS contribution to pain. Both EAE and EAEnp mice showed similar pain behaviors and peripheral neuropathy in nerve fibers and DRG neurons. Moreover, pregabalin significantly reduced neuropathic pain in both EAE and EAEnp mice. Our findings highlight the essential role of the PNS in neuropathic pain in EAE and pave the way for future development of analgesics without side effects in the CNS. PMID:28181561

  15. [Efficacy and safety of pregabalin for oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nihei, Satoru; Sato, Junya; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Itabashi, Tetsuya; Kudo, Kenzo; Takahashi, Katsuo

    2013-09-01

    This study included patients who were prescribed pregabalin, vitamin B12, amitriptyline, clonazepam, or carbamazepine to improve oxaliplatin(L-OHP)- or paclitaxel(PTX)-induced peripheral neuropathy at Iwate Medical University Hospital between April 2011 and July 2012. The efficacy and safety of pregabalin was evaluated by comparing 27 patients with L-OHP-induced peripheral neuropathy and 28 with PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy prescribed pregabalin(pregabalin group) with 20 patients with L-OHP-induced peripheral neuropathy and 25 with PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy prescribed other drugs(non-pregabalin group). Response was defined as a decrease in neuropathy of at least 1 grade from baseline. The response rates were 40.7% and 10.0% for L-OHP-induced peripheral neuropathy patients and 28.6% and 12.0% for PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy patients in the pregabalin and non-pregabalin groups, respectively. The severity of peripheral neuropathy before and after the administration of pregabalin differed significantly[L-OHP, 1.33±0.48(mean±SD) vs. 1.00±0.78 and PTX, 1.46±0.69 vs. 1.21±0.88]. In 28-37% of patients, pregabalin was associated with adverse events, with drowsiness and dizziness being frequently observed. In conclusion, pregabalin was efficacious in reducing the severity of L-OHP- and PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  16. Neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2011-06-01

    Chronic itch can be caused by dysfunctions of itch-sensing neurons that produce sensory hallucinations of pruritogenic stimuli. The cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown. All neurological disease categories have been implicated, and neurological causes should be considered for patients with otherwise-unexplained itch. The same neurological illnesses that cause neuropathic pain can also or instead cause itch. These include shingles (particularly of the head or neck), small-fiber polyneuropathies, radiculopathies (eg, notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritis), and diverse lesions of the trigeminal nerve, root, and central tracts. Central nervous system lesions affecting sensory pathways, including strokes, multiple sclerosis, and cavernous hemangiomas, can cause central itch. Neuropathic itch is a potent trigger of reflex and volitional scratching although this provides only fleeting relief. Rare patients whose lesion causes sensory loss as well as neuropathic itch can scratch deeply enough to cause painless self-injury. The most common location is on the face (trigeminal trophic syndrome). Treating neuropathic itch is difficult; antihistamines, corticosteroids, and most pain medications are largely ineffective. Current treatment recommendations include local or systemic administration of inhibitors of neuronal excitability (especially local anesthetics) and barriers to reduce scratching.

  17. Neuropathic Itch

    PubMed Central

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2011-01-01

    Chronic itch can be caused by dysfunctions of itch-sensing neurons that produce sensory hallucinations of pruritogenic stimuli. The cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown. All neurological disease categories have been implicated and neurological causes should be considered for patients with otherwise-unexplained itch. The same neurological illnesses that cause neuropathic pain can also or instead cause itch. These include shingles (particularly of the head or neck), small-fiber polyneuropathies, radiculopathies (e.g., notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritis) and diverse lesions of the trigeminal nerve, root, and central tracts. Central nervous system lesions affecting sensory pathways, including strokes, multiple sclerosis, and cavernous hemangiomas can cause central itch. Neuropathic itch is a potent trigger of reflex and volitional scratching although this provides only fleeting relief. Rare patients whose lesion causes sensory loss as well as neuropathic itch can scratch deeply enough to cause painless self-injury. The most common location is on the face (trigeminal trophic syndrome). Treating neuropathic itch is difficult; antihistamines, corticosteroids, and most pain medications are largely ineffective. Current treatment recommendations include local or systemic administration of inhibitors of neuronal excitability (especially local anesthetics) and barriers to reduce scratching. PMID:21767768

  18. Topical combinations aimed at treating microvascular dysfunction reduce allodynia in rat models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ragavendran, J. Vaigunda; Laferrière, André; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J.; Padi, Satyanarayana S.V.; Zhang, Ji; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that various chronic pain syndromes exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvasculature dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle or nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in animal models of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) and neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α2-adrenergic (α2A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors combined with either phosphodiesterase (PDE) or phosphatidic acid (PA) inhibitors would effectively reduce allodynia in these animal models of chronic pain. Single topical agents produced significant dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects in rats with chronic post-ischemia pain, and the anti-allodynic dose-response curves of PDE and PA inhibitors were shifted 2.5–10 fold leftward when combined with non-analgesic doses of α2A receptor agonists or NO donors. Topical combinations also produced significant anti-allodynic effects in rats with sciatic nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. These effects were shown to be produced by a local action, lasted up to 6 h after acute treatment, and did not produce tolerance over 15 days of chronic daily dosing. The present results support the hypothesis that allodynia in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain is effectively relieved by topical combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors. This suggests that topical treatments aimed at improving microvascular function may reduce allodynia in patients with CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. Perspective This article presents the synergistic anti-allodynic effects of combinations of α2A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. The data suggest effective clinical treatment of chronic neuropathic pain may be achieved by therapies that alleviate microvascular dysfunction in affected areas

  19. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats.

    PubMed

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-04-18

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain.

  20. The selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist E-52862 attenuates neuropathic pain of different aetiology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gris, Georgia; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Aubel, Bertrand; Darbaky, Yassine; Deseure, Kristof; Vela, José Miguel; Merlos, Manuel; Zamanillo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    E-52862 is a selective σ1R antagonist currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for neuropathic pain and represents a potential first-in-class analgesic. Here, we investigated the effect of single and repeated administration of E-52862 on different pain-related behaviours in several neuropathic pain models in rats: mechanical allodynia in cephalic (trigeminal) neuropathic pain following chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (IoN), mechanical hyperalgesia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, and cold allodynia in oxaliplatin (OX)-induced polyneuropathy. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced after IoN surgery or STZ administration was reduced by acute treatment with E-52862 and morphine, but not by pregabalin. In the OX model, single administration of E-52862 reversed the hypersensitivity to cold stimuli similarly to 100 mg/kg of gabapentin. Interestingly, repeated E-52862 administration twice daily over 7 days did not induce pharmacodynamic tolerance but an increased antinociceptive effect in all three models. Additionally, as shown in the STZ and OX models, repeated daily treatment with E-52862 attenuated baseline pain behaviours, which supports a sustained modifying effect on underlying pain-generating mechanisms. These preclinical findings support a role for σ1R in neuropathic pain and extend the potential for the use of selective σ1R antagonists (e.g., E-52862) to the chronic treatment of cephalic and extra-cephalic neuropathic pain. PMID:27087602

  1. 1997 William J. Stickel Bronze Award. Comparison of strategies for reducing pressure at the site of neuropathic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fleischli, J G; Lavery, L A; Vela, S A; Ashry, H; Lavery, D C

    1997-10-01

    Few scientific data are available on the effectiveness of commonly used modalities for reducing pressure at the site of neuropathic ulcers in persons with diabetes mellitus. The authors' aim was to compare the effectiveness of total contact casts, half-shoes, rigid-soled postoperative shoes, accommodative dressings made of felt and polyethylene foam, and removable walking casts in reducing peak plantar foot pressures at the site of neuropathic ulcerations in diabetics. Using an in-shoe pressure-measurement system, data from 32 midgait steps were collected for each treatment. There was a consistent pattern in the devices' effectiveness in reducing foot pressures at ulcer sites under the great toe and ball of the foot. Removable walking casts were as effective as or more effective than total contact casts. Half-shoes were consistently the third most effective modality, followed by accommodative dressings and rigid-soled postoperative shoes.

  2. PPARγ activation blocks development and reduces established neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Morgenweck, J.; Griggs, R.B.; Donahue, R.R.; Zadina, J.E.; Taylor, B.K.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is emerging as a new pharmacotherapeutic target for chronic pain. When oral (3–30 mg/kg/day in chow for 7 wk) or twice-daily intraperitoneal (1–10 mg/kg/day for 2 wk) administration began before spared nerve injury (SNI), pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, dose-dependently prevented multiple behavioral signs of somatosensory hypersensitivity. The highest dose of intraperitoneal pioglitazone did not produce ataxia or reductions in transient mechanical and heat nociception, indicating that inhibitory effects on hypersensitivity were not secondary to adverse drug-induced behaviors or antinociception. Inhibitory effects on hypersensitivity persisted at least one week beyond cessation of pioglitazone administration, suggestive of long-lasting effects on gene expression. Blockade of PPARγ with GW9662, an irreversible and selective PPARγ antagonist, dose-dependently reduced the inhibitory effect of pioglitazone on hypersensitivity, indicating a PPARγ-dependent action. Remarkably, a single preemptive injection of pioglitazone 15 min before SNI attenuated hypersensitivity for at least 2 weeks; this was enhanced with a second injection delivered 12 hr after SNI. Pioglitazone injections beginning after SNI also reduced hypersensitivity, albeit to a lesser degree than preemptive treatment. Intraperitoneal pioglitazone significantly reduced the nerve injury-induced up-regulation of cd11b, GFAP, and p-p38 in the dorsal horn, indicating a mechanism of action involving spinal microglia and/or astrocyte activation. Oral pioglitazone significantly reduced touch stimulus-evoked phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK) in lamina I-II, indicating a mechanism of action involving inhibition of central sensitization. We conclude that pioglitazone reduces spinal glial and stimulus-evoked p-ERK activation and that PPARγ activation blocks the development of and reduces established neuropathic pain. PMID:23415633

  3. Virtual reality-augmented neurorehabilitation improves motor function and reduces neuropathic pain in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Michael; Bohli, Dominik; Kiper, Daniel; Pyk, Pawel; Spillmann, Jeremy; Meilick, Bruno; Curt, Armin; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Eng, Kynan

    2013-10-01

    Neurorehabilitation interventions to improve lower limb function and neuropathic pain have had limited success in people with chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). We hypothesized that intense virtual reality (VR)-augmented training of observed and executed leg movements would improve limb function and neuropathic pain. Patients used a VR system with a first-person view of virtual lower limbs, controlled via movement sensors fitted to the patient's own shoes. Four tasks were used to deliver intensive training of individual muscles (tibialis anterior, quadriceps, leg ad-/abductors). The tasks engaged motivation through feedback of task success. Fourteen chronic iSCI patients were treated over 4 weeks in 16 to 20 sessions of 45 minutes. Outcome measures were 10 Meter Walking Test, Berg Balance Scale, Lower Extremity Motor Score, Spinal Cord Independence Measure, Locomotion and Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), obtained at the start and at 4 to 6 weeks before intervention. In addition to positive changes reported by the patients (Patients' Global Impression of Change), measures of walking capacity, balance, and strength revealed improvements in lower limb function. Intensity and unpleasantness of neuropathic pain in half of the affected participants were reduced on the NPS test. Overall findings remained stable 12 to 16 weeks after termination of the training. In a pretest/posttest, uncontrolled design, VR-augmented training was associated with improvements in motor function and neuropathic pain in persons with chronic iSCI, several of which reached the level of a minimal clinically important change. A controlled trial is needed to compare this intervention to active training alone or in combination.

  4. Adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages reduces neuropathic pain via opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Pannell, Maria; Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Keye, Jacqueline; Batra, Arvind; Siegmund, Britta; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-07

    During the inflammation which occurs following nerve damage, macrophages are recruited to the site of injury. Phenotypic diversity is a hallmark of the macrophage lineage and includes pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 populations. Our aim in this study was to investigate the ability of polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages to secrete opioid peptides and to examine their relative contribution to the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mouse bone marrow-derived cells were cultured as unstimulated M0 macrophages or were stimulated into an M1 phenotype using lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ or into an M2 phenotype using interleukin-4. The macrophage phenotypes were verified using flow cytometry for surface marker analysis and cytokine bead array for cytokine profile assessment. Opioid peptide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay. As a model of neuropathic pain, a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve was employed. Polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages (5 × 10(5) cells) were injected perineurally twice, on days 14 and 15 following CCI or sham surgery. Mechanical and heat sensitivity were measured using the von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. To track the injected macrophages, we also transferred fluorescently stained polarized cells and analyzed the surface marker profile of endogenous and injected cells in the nerves ex vivo. Compared to M0 and M1 cells, M2 macrophages contained and released higher amounts of opioid peptides, including Met-enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-17), and β-endorphin. M2 cells transferred perineurally at the nerve injury site reduced mechanical, but not heat hypersensitivity following the second injection. The analgesic effect was reversed by the perineurally applied opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide. M2 cells did not affect sensitivity following sham surgery. Neither M0 nor M1 cells altered mechanical and heat sensitivity in CCI or sham-operated animals. Tracing the

  5. Pregabalin prescriptions in the United Kingdom: a drug utilisation study of The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database.

    PubMed

    Asomaning, K; Abramsky, S; Liu, Q; Zhou, X; Sobel, R E; Watt, S

    2016-05-01

    In Europe, pregabalin is approved for treatment of neuropathic pain, general anxiety disorder (GAD) and as adjunctive therapy for epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to assess utilisation of pregabalin in the UK, including patients with a recorded history of substance abuse, from a large general practice database. This observational drug utilisation study (DUS) analysed pregabalin prescription data from the UK Health Improvement Network primary care database between September 2004 and July 2009. Patient demographics, diagnoses (by READ codes) and pregabalin dosing data were collected. Diagnosis codes were used as proxy for approved indication for pregabalin. A cohort of 18,951 patients was prescribed pregabalin; dosing information was available for 13,480 (71.1%). Median age of patients was 58 years, and majority were female (60.1%). Median (interquartile range) prescribed average daily dose (ADD) of pregabalin for all patients was 150.0 (162.5) mg/day; this was highest in patients with epilepsy (191.9 mg/day), followed by neuropathic pain (158.0 mg/day) and GAD (150.0 mg/day). Only 1.0% (136/13,480) of patients were prescribed an ADD of pregabalin over the maximum approved dose of 600 mg/day. Of these, 18.4% (25/136) of patients had a history of substance abuse compared with 14.0% (1884/13,480) in the full population. Data from this DUS indicated that the majority of pregabalin prescribing in the UK was consistent with product labelling. The proportion of patients with prescribed ADD > 600 mg/day was small and with a similar proportion with a history of substance abuse as in the full population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Neurosteroids are reduced in diabetic neuropathy and may be associated with the development of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Humble, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral and central sensitisation are implicated in the development of neuropathic pain. Hypersensitivity of pain pathway neurons has been described in animal models of diabetic neuropathy, which is postulated to be related to an imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory signals within the spinal cord. GABAergic neurons within the pain pathway are vital for the transmission of painful stimuli to higher centres. A developmental change in the rate of exponential decay of GABAergic synaptic events has been observed in other types of neurons and this may be associated with fluctuations in endogenous neurosteroid tone.  Methods: The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used on slices of neural tissue. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from wild type mice between the ages of 6 and 80 days in the spinal cord, the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus and the cerebral cortex. Recordings were also obtained from mice with diabetic neuropathy (ob/ob and db/db) between the ages of 60 and 80 days. Behavioural experiments were performed to examine mechanical and thermal nociception. Results: Electrophysiological recordings from cortical pain pathway neurons from mature type-2 diabetic mice revealed that the endogenous neurosteroid tone is reduced compared to control. However, selected neurosteroid compounds had a more pronounced effect on the GABA A receptors of these diabetic mice. ob/ob mice exhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which was reduced by neurosteroids applied exogenously. Conclusions: The reduced endogenous neurosteroid tone in ob/ob mice may be linked to their hypersensitivity. Neurosteroids may exert analgesic effects in pathological pain states by attempting to restore the physiological GABAergic inhibitory tone. PMID:28357038

  7. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; McComb, Geoffrey W.; Verge, Valerie M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3. PMID:18601922

  8. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (P<0.05). In contrast, the application of TENS at 1 week (TENS-1w) or 2 weeks (TENS-2w) after injury was ineffective in reducing hyperalgesia (mechanical and thermal) or activation of microglia and astrocytes. Early TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (P<0.05), the expression levels of protein kinase C (PKC-γ), and phosphorylated anti-phospho-cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons (P<0.05), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased the expression levels of opioid receptors (P<0.05). The results suggested that the application of early TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible.

  9. Infant nerve injury induces delayed microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype, and exercise reduces delayed neuropathic pain by modulating microglial activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingrui; Chen, Yongmei; Fu, Bao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Mazhong

    2017-05-04

    Neuropathic pain is absent in infants and emergent years after injury. Adult spinal cord microglia play a key role in initiating neuropathic pain, and modulation of microglia is a potential target for treating neuropathic pain. In this study, we evaluated the role of microglia after infant peripheral nerve injury and the effect of exercise on the delayed-onset neuropathic pain. Rat pups received spared nerve injury, and behavior tests were performed to evaluate their pain threshold. qPCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were used for M1 and M2 marker expression analysis. In contrast to the microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype observed in the adult spinal cord, in infant nerve injury, microglial polarization immediately shifted to the M2 phenotype. In adolescence, microglia polarized to the M1 phenotype, which was concomitant with the emergence of neuropathic pain. Exercise shifted spinal cord microglia polarization to the M2 phenotype and reduced neuropathic pain. In addition, IL-10 increased and TNF-α decreased after exercise, and intrathecal injection of the IL-10 antibody reduced the exercise-induced analgesia. Our study found that infant nerve injury induced delayed spinal cord microglia polarization to the M1 phenotype and that exercise was effective in the treatment of delayed adolescent neuropathic pain via the modulation of microglial polarization. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Pregabalin - A Nationwide Pharmacoepidemiological Drug Utilization Study with Focus on Abuse Potential.

    PubMed

    Schjerning, O; Pottegård, A; Damkier, P; Rosenzweig, M; Nielsen, J

    2016-07-01

    Pregabalin is currently approved for the treatment of epilepsy, generalized anxiety disorder and neuropathic pain with a licensed dosage range of 150 mg to 600 mg/day. Growing concern about the abuse potential of pregabalin is partly based on reports of pregabalin being used in dosages that exceed the approved therapeutic range. To identify predictors of pregabalin use above recommended dosage, we conducted a pharmacoepidemological drug utilization study using the Danish nationwide registers. We deployed 4 measures of abuse: high use (≥600 mg/day) or very high use (≥1 200 mg/day) over a 6- or 12-month period, respectively. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify patient and treatment characteristics that were associated with either abuse marker. Out of 42 520 pregabalin users 4 090 (9.6%) were treated with more than 600 mg/day for 6 months and 2 765 (6.5%) for more than 12 months. Male gender and prescription of antipsychotics and benzodiazepines were associated with increased risk of use of above the recommended dosage. Use of pregabalin above recommended dosages was rare but abuse may occur in susceptible patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Forebrain GABAergic neuron precursors integrate into adult spinal cord and reduce injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bráz, JM; Sharif-Naeini, R; Vogt, D; Kriegstein, A; Alvarez-Buylla, A; Rubenstein, JL; Basbaum, AI

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain. Because symptoms are often unresponsive to conventional methods of pain treatment, new therapeutic approaches are essential. Here, we describe a strategy that not only ameliorates symptoms of neuropathic pain, but is also potentially disease modifying. We show that transplantation of immature telencephalic GABAergic interneurons from the mouse medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) into the adult mouse spinal cord completely reverses the mechanical hypersensitivity produced by peripheral nerve injury. Underlying this improvement is a remarkable integration of the MGE transplants into the host spinal cord circuitry, in which the transplanted cells make functional connections with both primary afferent and spinal cord neurons. By contrast, MGE transplants were not effective against inflammatory pain. Our findings suggest that MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons overcome the spinal cord hyperexcitability that is a hallmark of nerve-injury induced neuropathic pain. PMID:22632725

  12. Is early postoperative administration of pregabalin beneficial for patients with lung cancer?—randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuntaro; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Kamohara, Ryotaro; Hatachi, Go; Doi, Ryoichiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-thoracotomy pain is an obstacle for lung-cancer patients even after introduction of less invasive surgical procedures. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate if early postoperative administration of pregabalin is beneficial for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We conducted a randomized open control trial. Patients with NSCLC were allocated randomly to epidural and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use for analgesia (control group) or pregabalin use (pregabalin group). Primary endpoint was the frequency of additional administration of a NSAID. Secondary endpoints were intensity of ongoing pain, frequency of neuropathic pain, and pain catastrophizing. Results Seventy-two patients were registered and allocated. Thirty-four cases in the control group and 33 in the pregabalin group were assessed. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), type of surgical procedure, type of lymph-node dissection, operation time, bleeding, duration of chest-tube insertion, and postoperative hospital stay between the two groups was not significantly different. Frequency of additional NSAID use between the control group (2±4 suppositories) and pregabalin group (2±3 suppositories) was not significantly different (P=0.62). Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for the intensity of ongoing pain, frequency of neuropathic pain, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) between each group were not significantly different at any time until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions Early postoperative administration of pregabalin is not beneficial for patients with NSCLC. PMID:28149551

  13. Salvinorin A reduces neuropathic nociception in the insular cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Coffeen, U; Canseco-Alba, A; Simón-Arceo, K; Almanza, A; Mercado, F; León-Olea, M; Pellicer, F

    2017-10-04

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most important challenges in public health. The search for novel treatments is important for an adequate relief without adverse effects. In this sense salvinorin A (SA), the main diterpene of the medicinal plant Salvia divinorum is an important antinociceptive compound, which acts as a potent agonist of kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We evaluated nociceptive responses in a neuropathic pain model induced by the sciatic nerve ligature (SNL) in the right hind paw, after the microinjection of SA, Salvinorin B (SB), KOR and CB1 antagonists directly in the insular cortex (IC) in male wistar rats. We found a potent antinociceptive effect with the administration of SA. Moreover, this effect was blocked by the administration of a KOR antagonist as well as the administration of a CB1 antagonist. Salvinorin A has a potent antinociceptive effect when is administered centrally in the IC by the interaction with KOR and CB1 receptors. We show evidence on the effectiveness of the administration of salvinorin A in the IC in a rodent model of neuropathic pain. These results support the use of novel compounds like SA as a therapeutic alternative for neuropathic pain relief. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  14. Chronic pregabalin treatment decreases excitability of dentate gyrus and accelerates maturation of adult-born granule cells.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Augusto Abel; Coll, Lucia; Schinder, Alejandro F; Uchitel, Osvaldo Daniel; Piriz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Pregabalin (PGB) is extensively prescribed to treat neurological and neuropsychiatrical conditions such as neuropathic pain, anxiety disorders, and epilepsy. Although PGB is known to bind selectively to the α2δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, there is little understanding about how it exerts its therapeutic effects. In this article, we analyzed the effects of an in vivo chronic treatment with PGB over the physiology of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs) using ex vivo electrophysiological and morphological analysis in adult mice. We found that PGB decreases neuronal excitability of DGGCs. In addition, PGB accelerates maturation of adult-born DGGCs, an effect that would modify dentate gyrus plasticity. Together, these findings suggest that PGB reduces activity in the dentate gyrus and modulates overall network plasticity, which might contribute to its therapeutic effects. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13783.

  15. Genetic deletion of synapsin II reduces neuropathic pain due to reduced glutamate but increased GABA in the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Schmidtko, Achim; Luo, Ceng; Gao, Wei; Geisslinger, Gerd; Kuner, Rohini; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2008-10-31

    The synaptic vesicle protein synapsin II is specifically expressed in synaptic terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and regulates transmitter release in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Here, we assessed its role in nerve injury-evoked molecular and behavioral adaptations in models of peripheral neuropathic pain using mice genetically lacking synapsin II. Deficiency of synapsin II resulted in reduced mechanical and cold allodynia in two models of peripheral neuropathic pain. This was associated with decreased glutamate release in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord upon sciatic nerve injury or capsaicin application onto the sciatic nerve and reduced calcium signals in spinal cord slices upon persistent activation of primary afferents. In addition, the expression of the vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, was strongly reduced in synapsin II knockout mice in the spinal cord. Conversely, synapsin II knockout mice showed a stronger and longer-lasting increase of GABA in lamina II of the dorsal horn after nerve injury than wild type mice. These results suggest that synapsin II is involved in the regulation of glutamate and GABA release in the spinal cord after nerve injury, and that a imbalance between glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission contributes to the manifestation of neuropathic pain.

  16. Lateral Hypothalamic Stimulation Reduces Hyperalgesia Through Spinally Descending Orexin-A Neurons in Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wardach, Jacob; Wagner, Monica; Jeong, Younhee; Holden, Janean E

    2016-03-01

    No evidence to date shows that lateral hypothalamic (LH) stimulation produces orexin-A-mediated antinociception in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in a model of neuropathic pain. We conducted experiments to examine the effect of orexin-A-mediated LH stimulation in female rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) on thermal hyperalgesia. Rats receiving carbachol into the LH demonstrated antinociception on both the left CCI and right nonligated paws (p < .05). Rats were given carbachol in the LH followed by intrathecal injection of the orexin-1 (OX1) receptor antagonist SB-334867, which blocked LH-induced antinociception compared with control groups (p < .05) in the left paw, but not in the right paw. These findings support the hypothesis that LH stimulation produces antinociception in rats with thermal hyperalgesia from neuropathic pain via an orexin-A connection between the LH and the SCDH. Identification of this pathway may lead to studies using orexins to manage clinical pain.

  17. Intrathecal NGF administration reduces reactive astrocytosis and changes neurotrophin receptors expression pattern in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Cavaliere, Carlo; Bianco, Maria Rosaria; De Simone, Antonietta; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Sellitti, Stefania; Alberghina, Lilia; Papa, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), an essential peptide for sensory neurons, seems to have opposite effects when administered peripherally or directly to the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of 7-days intrathecal (i.t.) infusion of NGF on neuronal and glial spinal markers relevant to neuropathic behavior induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Allodynic and hyperalgesic behaviors were investigated by Von Frey and thermal Plantar tests, respectively. NGF-treated animals showed reduced allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, compared to control animals. We evaluated on lumbar spinal cord the expression of microglial (ED-1), astrocytic (GFAP and S-100beta), and C- and Adelta-fibers (SubP, IB-4 and Cb) markers. I.t. NGF treatment reduced reactive astrocytosis and the density of SubP, IB4 and Cb positive fibers in the dorsal horn of injured animals. Morphometric parameters of proximal sciatic nerve stump fibers and cells in DRG were also analyzed in CCI rats: myelin thickness was reduced and DRG neurons and satellite cells appeared hypertrophic. I.t. NGF treatment showed a beneficial effect in reversing these molecular and morphological alterations. Finally, we analyzed by immunohistochemistry the expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors TrkA, pTrkA, TrkB and p75(NTR). Substantial alterations in neurotrophin receptors expression were observed in the spinal cord of CCI and NGF-treated animals. Our results indicate that i.t. NGF administration reverses the neuro-glial morphomolecular changes occurring in neuropathic animals paralleled by alterations in neurotrophin receptors ratio, and suggest that NGF is effective in restoring homeostatic conditions in the spinal cord and maintaining analgesia in neuropathic pain.

  18. Efficacy and safety of 5% lidocaine (lignocaine) medicated plaster in comparison with pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic polyneuropathy: interim analysis from an open-label, two-stage adaptive, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Mayoral, Victor; Leijon, Göran; Binder, Andreas; Steigerwald, Ilona; Serpell, Michael

    2009-01-01

    high pain intensity scores. The pre-planned primary study endpoint was the rate of treatment responders, defined as completing patients experiencing a reduction from baseline of > or = 2 points or an absolute value of < or = 4 points on the 11-item numerical rating scale of recalled average pain intensity over the last 3 days (NRS-3), after 4 weeks of treatment. Secondary endpoints included > or = 30% and > or = 50% reductions in NRS-3 scores, changes in neuropathic pain symptom inventory (NPSI) scores and allodynia severity ratings. Overall, 65.3% of patients treated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster and 62.0% receiving pregabalin responded to treatment with respect to the primary endpoint. A higher proportion of PHN patients responded to plaster treatment compared with pregabalin (63.0% vs 37.5%), whereas in the larger DPN group treatments were comparable. Both treatments improved NPSI scores and reduced allodynia severity. Patients administering lidocaine plaster experienced fewer drug-related adverse events (3.9% vs 39.2%) and there were substantially fewer discontinuations due to drug-related adverse events (1.3% vs 20.3%). After 4 weeks, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment was associated with similar levels of analgesia in patients with PHN or DPN but substantially fewer frequent adverse events than pregabalin.

  19. Management of Neuropathic Pain Associated with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ellen M; Rekand, Tiina

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an injury to the spinal cord that leads to varying degrees of motor and/or sensory deficits and paralysis. Chronic pain of both neuropathic and nociceptive type is common and contributes to reduced quality of life. The aim of the review is to provide current clinical understanding as well as discuss and evaluate efficacy of pharmacological interventions demonstrated in the clinical studies. The review was based on literature search in PubMed and Medline with words "neuropathic pain" and "spinal cord injury". The review included clinical studies and not experimental data nor case reports. A limited number of randomized and placebo-controlled studies concerning treatment options of neuropathic pain after SCI were identified. Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant and the antiepileptic drugs, gabapentin and pregabalin, are most studied with demonstrated efficacy, and considered to be the primary choice. Opioids have demonstrated conflicting results in the clinical studies. In addition, administration route used in the studies as well as reported side effects restrict everyday use of opioids as well as ketamine and lidocaine. Topical applications of capsaicin or lidocaine as well as intradermal injections of Botulinum toxin are new treatment modalities that are so far not studied on SCI population and need further studies. Non-pharmacological approaches may have additional effect on neuropathic pain. Management of pain should always be preceded by thorough clinical assessment of the type of pain. Patients need a follow-up to evaluate individual effect of applied measures. However, the applied management does not necessarily achieve satisfactory pain reduction. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the effect of both established and novel management options.

  20. Reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation inhibitors reduce mechanical sensitivity in a chronic neuropathic pain model of spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Shayne N; Johnson, Kathia M; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2014-11-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a common consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), develops over time and negatively impacts quality of life, often leading to substance abuse and suicide. Recent evidence has demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in contributing to neuropathic pain in SCI animal models. This investigation examines four compounds that reduce ROS and the downstream lipid peroxidation products, apocynin, 4-oxo-tempo, U-83836E, and tirilazad, and tests if these compounds can reduce nocioceptive behaviors in chronic SCI animals. Apocynin and 4-oxo-tempo significantly reduced abnormal mechanical hypersensitivity measured in forelimbs and hindlimbs in a model of chronic SCI-induced neuropathic pain. Thus, compounds that inhibit ROS or lipid peroxidation products can be used to ameliorate chronic neuropathic pain. We propose that the application of compounds that inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related downstream molecules will also reduce the behavioral measures of chronic neuropathic pain. Injury or trauma to nervous tissue leads to increased concentrations of ROS in the surviving tissue. Further damage from ROS molecules to dorsal lamina neurons leads to membrane excitability, the physiological correlate of chronic pain. Chronic pain is difficult to treat with current analgesics and this research will provide a novel therapy for this disease.

  1. Effect of pregabalin on contextual memory deficits and inflammatory state-related protein expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna; Malikowska, Natalia; Podkowa, Adrian; Lipkowska, Anna; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia due to defects in insulin secretion or its action. Complications from long-term diabetes consist of numerous biochemical, molecular, and functional tissue alterations, including inflammation, oxidative stress, and neuropathic pain. There is also a link between diabetes mellitus and vascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Hence, it is important to treat diabetic complications using drugs which do not aggravate symptoms induced by the disease itself. Pregabalin is widely used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain, but little is known about its impact on cognition or inflammation-related proteins in diabetic patients. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of intraperitoneal (ip) pregabalin on contextual memory and the expression of inflammatory state-related proteins in the brains of diabetic, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice. STZ (200 mg/kg, ip) was used to induce diabetes mellitus. To assess the impact of pregabalin (10 mg/kg) on contextual memory, a passive avoidance task was applied. Locomotor and exploratory activities in pregabalin-treated diabetic mice were assessed by using activity cages. Using Western blot analysis, the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cytosolic prostaglandin E synthase (cPGES), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-ĸB) p50 and p65, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), as well as glucose transporter type-4 (GLUT4) was assessed in mouse brains after pregabalin treatment. Pregabalin did not aggravate STZ-induced learning deficits in vivo or influence animals' locomotor activity. We observed significantly lower expression of COX-2, cPGES, and NF-κB p50 subunit, and higher expression of AhR and Nrf2 in the brains of pregabalin-treated mice in comparison to STZ-treated controls, which suggested immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of pregabalin. Antioxidant properties of pregabalin in the brains of

  2. Comparison of oral absorption models for pregabalin: usefulness of transit compartment model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Taegon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and partial seizure in adults. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model to describe the absorption characteristics of pregabalin given fasted or after meals. Data from five healthy subject PK studies (n=88) of single- or multiple-dose pregabalin (150 mg) were used. Pregabalin was administered twice daily, without meals or 30 min after a meal (regular or high-fat diet) in the morning and 30 min or 4 h after a meal (regular diet) in the evening. Serial plasma samples were collected up to 24 h after the last dose for PK analysis. Because the peak concentrations were not properly modeled by a conventional first-order absorption model, Erlang frequency distribution, Weibull-type absorption, and transit compartment models were tested on a two-compartment linear PK model using a nonlinear mixed-effects method (NONMEM; version 7.3). The transit compartment model best described the absorption characteristics of pregabalin regardless of meal status. We conclude that the absorption model should be carefully chosen based on the principle of model development and validation and not by following a conventional first-order absorption model for its popularity and simplicity, especially when the PK dataset includes densely sampled absorption-phase data.

  3. Efficacy of Pregabalin in the Treatment of Radicular Pain: Results of a Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Khalid M.; M. Nelson, Ariana; J. Avram, Michael; Lee Robak, Sabrina; T. Benzon, Honorio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin is commonly used to treat patients with various neuropathic pain syndromes. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin in patients with lumbar or cervical radicular pain. Patients and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted in 39 patients with lumbar and cervical radicular pain, who received 3 weeks of either pregabalin (n = 10) or placebo (n = 9) treatment. Baseline pain and disability were evaluated before the treatment and were re-evaluated, along with overall patient satisfaction, after the 3 weeks of treatment. Results: Data on 19 of the 39 patients recruited were available for analysis. No statistically significant differences in the pain, disability, and patient satisfaction scores were found between the groups. When the individual patient scores were assessed, the placebo treatment was found to be efficacious in 4 of the 9 patients and pregabalin was effective in 2 of the 10 patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.350). Conclusions: The present data do not suggest that pregabalin is more efficacious than placebo in the treatment of lumbar and cervical radicular pain. However, the small sample size of this study may have affected the ability to detect such a difference. PMID:26478867

  4. Comparison of oral absorption models for pregabalin: usefulness of transit compartment model

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Taegon; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jongtae; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and partial seizure in adults. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model to describe the absorption characteristics of pregabalin given fasted or after meals. Data from five healthy subject PK studies (n=88) of single- or multiple-dose pregabalin (150 mg) were used. Pregabalin was administered twice daily, without meals or 30 min after a meal (regular or high-fat diet) in the morning and 30 min or 4 h after a meal (regular diet) in the evening. Serial plasma samples were collected up to 24 h after the last dose for PK analysis. Because the peak concentrations were not properly modeled by a conventional first-order absorption model, Erlang frequency distribution, Weibull-type absorption, and transit compartment models were tested on a two-compartment linear PK model using a nonlinear mixed-effects method (NONMEM; version 7.3). The transit compartment model best described the absorption characteristics of pregabalin regardless of meal status. We conclude that the absorption model should be carefully chosen based on the principle of model development and validation and not by following a conventional first-order absorption model for its popularity and simplicity, especially when the PK dataset includes densely sampled absorption-phase data. PMID:27994441

  5. Exogenous induction of HO-1 alleviates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal glial activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Di; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yang, Tian; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine can produce painful peripheral neuropathy for which is still lack of effective treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was shown to mediate the resolution of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of HO-1 in the modulation of vincristine-induced pain and the mechanisms implicated. Injection of vincristine induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. The expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein was increased in 2 weeks in the spinal cord. Immunostaining showed that HO-1 was mainly expressed in neurons of spinal cord dorsal horn in naïve animals, but induced in astrocytes and microglia after vincristine injection. Intraperitoneal injection of HO-1 inducer increased HO-1 expression in the spinal cord and attenuated vincristine-induced pain. Persistent induction of HO-1 by intraspinal injection of HO-1-expressing lentivirus alleviated vincristine-induced pain for more than 2 weeks. Furthermore, vincristine induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38), and production of TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the spinal cord, which were all reduced by intrathecal injection of HO-1 inducer. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that induction of HO-1 attenuates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain via inhibition of glia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. This suggests that exogenously induced HO-1 may have potential as therapy in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

  6. Intrathecal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces the Reactive Oxygen Species and Pain Behavior in Neuropathic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, En Ji; Ko, Young Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain induced by spinal or peripheral nerve injury is very resistant to common pain killers, nerve block, and other pain management approaches. Recently, several studies using stem cells suggested a new way to control the neuropatic pain. In this study, we used the spinal nerve L5 ligation (SNL) model to investigate whether intrathecal rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were able to decrease pain behavior, as well as the relationship between rMSCs and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Methods Neuropathic pain of the left hind paw was induced by unilateral SNL in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group). Mechanical sensitivity was assessed using Von Frey filaments at 3, 7, 10, 12, 14, 17, and 24 days post-ligation. rMSCs (10 µl, 1 × 105) or phosphate buffer saline (PBS, 10 µl) was injected intrathecally at 7 days post-ligation. Dihydroethidium (DHE), an oxidative fluorescent dye, was used to detect ROS at 24 days post-ligation. Results Tight ligation of the L5 spinal nerve induced allodynia in the left hind paw after 3 days post-ligation. ROS expression was increased significantly (P < 0.05) in spinal dorsal horn of L5. Intrathecal rMSCs significantly (P < 0.01) alleviated the allodynia at 10 days after intrathecal injection (17 days post-ligation). Intrathecal rMSCs administration significantly (P < 0.05) reduced ROS expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Conclusions These results suggest that rMSCs may modulate neuropathic pain generation through ROS expression after spinal nerve ligation. PMID:25031809

  7. A study comparing the actions of gabapentin and pregabalin on the electrophysiological properties of cultured DRG neurones from neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, David; Evans, Rhian M; Barkworth, Louise; Martin, Duncan J; Scott, Roderick H

    2004-01-01

    intracellular application of a (Rp)-analogue of cAMP. Conclusions Pregabalin reduces excitatory properties of cultured DRG neurones by modulating voltage-activated Ca2+ and K+ channels. The pharmacological activity of pregabalin is similar but not identical to that of gabapentin. The actions of pregabalin may involve both extracellular and intracellular drug target sites and modulation of a variety of neuronal conductances, by direct interactions, and through intracellular signalling involving protein kinase A. PMID:15294026

  8. Preoperative use of pregabalin for acute pain in spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-liang; Huang, Shuang; Song, Jiang; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Zhong-shu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for pain management following spine surgery. Methods: In September 2016, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. RCTs of patients prepared for spine surgery that compared pregabalin with placebo were retrieved. The primary endpoint was the VAS score with rest or mobilization at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours and cumulative morphine consumption at 24 hours and 48 hours. The secondary outcomes were complications of nausea, sedation, dizziness, headache, and visual disturbances. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity between studies, data were aggregated for random-effects models when necessary. Results: Ten clinical studies with 535 patients (pregabalin group = 294, control group = 241) were included in the meta-analysis. Pregabalin was associated with reduced pain scores at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, corresponding to a reduction of 1.91 points (95% CI, –4.07 to 0.24 point) at 12 hours, 2.66 points (95% CI, –4.51 to –0.81 point) at 24 hours, and 4.33 points (95% confidence interval, –6.38 to –2.99 point) at 48 hours on a 100-point numeric rating scale. There was no significant difference between VAS scores with mobilization at 12 hours, 24 hours, or 48 hours. Similarly, pregabalin was associated with a reduction in cumulative morphine consumption at 24 hours (–7.07, 95% CI –9.84, –4.30) and 48 hours (–6.52, 95% CI –7.78, –5.25, P = 0.000). Furthermore, pregabalin can reduce the occurrence of nausea (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41, 0.79, P = 0.001, number needed to treat = 8.4). There were no significant differences in the occurrence of sedation, dizziness, headache, or visual disturbances. Conclusions: Preoperative use of pregabalin was

  9. The effect of pregabalin on sensorimotor gating in 'low' gating humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Dean T; Stein, Murray B; Paulus, Martin P; Geyer, Mark A; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2012-09-01

    Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and anxiolytic compound that binds to α2-δ auxiliary subunit Types 1 and 2 of voltage-gated calcium channels, has been shown to reduce excitatory neurotransmission partially through modulation of glutamatergic signaling. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating impacted by disruption of the glutamatergic system and is reduced in schizophrenia patients. Dysregulation of the glutamatergic system has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Here we tested the hypothesis that pregabalin may ameliorate PPI in a model of deficient gating in humans and mice. In study 1, 14 healthy human subjects participated in a within subjects, cross-over study with placebo, 50 mg or 200 mg pregabalin treatment prior to undergoing a PPI task. In study 2, 24 C57BL/6 mice underwent a similar procedure with vehicle, 30 and 100 mg/kg dose treatments. In both studies, subjects were assigned to a "Low" or "High" gating group using a median split procedure based on their PPI performance during placebo/vehicle. Drug effects were then examined across these groups. In humans, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI performance in the "low gating" group. In mice, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI in the low gating group but reduced PPI in the high gating group. Across species, pregabalin treatment improves PPI in subjects with low gating. These data support further exploration of pregabalin as a potential treatment for disorders characterized by sensorimotor gating deficits and glutamatergic hypersignaling, such as schizophrenia.

  10. A randomized double-blind, placebo-, and active-controlled study of T-type calcium channel blocker ABT-639 in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Dan; Duan, W. Rachel; An, Guohua; Thomas, James W.; Nothaft, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels represent a novel target for neuropathic pain modulation. Preclinical studies with ABT-639, a peripherally acting highly selective T-type Cav3.2 calcium channel blocker, showed dose-dependent reduction of pain in multiple pain models. ABT-639 also demonstrated an acceptable safety profile at single- and multiple-dose levels evaluated in a clinical phase 1 study in healthy volunteers. The primary objective of this phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and active-controlled study was to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of ABT-639 with placebo in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain. Pregabalin, an approved treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, was included as a positive control. A total of 194 patients were randomized and treated for 6 weeks; 62 patients received ABT-639 (100 mg twice daily), 70 patients received pregabalin (150 mg twice daily), and 62 patients received placebo. When assessing the mean changes from baseline in patient-recorded pain scores at the end of week 6, there was no significant difference observed for ABT-639 compared with placebo (−2.28 vs −2.36; P = 0.582). Pregabalin treatment resulted in a transient improvement in pain compared with placebo, which did not persist throughout the study. There were no significant safety issues identified with ABT-639. A majority of adverse events were considered mild to moderate in intensity. In conclusion, treatment with the highly selective T-type Cav3.2 calcium channel blocker ABT-639 100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks showed no safety signals that would preclude further investigation but did not reduce neuropathic pain in patients with diabetes (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01345045). PMID:26067585

  11. Ameliorative potential of Vernonia cinerea on chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Venkata R K; Shanmugam, Palanichamy; Krishnan, Uma M; Muthuraman, Arunachalam

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the ameliorative potential of ethanolic extract of whole plant of Vernonia cinerea in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats. Behavioral parameters such as a hot plate, acetone drop, paw pressure, Von Frey hair and tail immersion tests were performed to assess the degree of thermal, chemical and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. Biochemical changes in sciatic nerve tissue were ruled out by estimating thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and total calcium levels. Ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea and pregabalin were administered for 14 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. CCI of sciatic nerve has been shown to induce significant changes in behavioral, biochemical and histopathological assessments when compared to the sham control group. Vernonia cinerea attenuated in a dose dependent manner the above pathological changes induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve, which is similar to attenuation of the pregabalin pretreated group. The ameliorating effect of ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea against CCI of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain may be due to the presence of flavonoids and this effect is attributed to anti-oxidative, neuroprotective and calcium channel modulator actions of these compounds.

  12. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of pregabaline].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Pregabaline, a second generation antiepileptic, is marketed in France since 2005. It is also indicated in the treatment of painful neuropathy and in generalized anxious disorder. Its pharmacokinetic profile: low metabolism and no binding to plasma proteins, is not in favour of the necessity of a TDM. But other studies would be necessary to concluded more definitively. Pregabalin however, required a dosage adjustment in case of renal insufficiency. The values of the plasma concentrations found after various doses are in agreement in the different studies, without that we can define a therapeutic range. For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of TDM was estimated in: remaining to estimate.

  13. Developmental Toxicity Studies with Pregabalin in Rats: Significance of Alterations in Skull Bone Morphology.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Henck, Judith W; Bailey, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Pregabalin was administered to pregnant Wistar rats during organogenesis to evaluate potential developmental toxicity. In an embryo-fetal development study, compared with controls, fetuses from pregabalin-treated rats exhibited increased incidence of jugal fused to maxilla (pregabalin 1250 and 2500 mg/kg) and fusion of the nasal sutures (pregabalin 2500 mg/kg). The alterations in skull development occurred in the presence of maternal toxicity (reduced body weight gain) and developmental toxicity (reduced fetal body weight and increased skeletal variations), and were initially classified as malformations. Subsequent investigative studies in pregnant rats treated with pregabalin during organogenesis confirmed the advanced jugal fused to maxilla, and fusion of the nasal sutures at cesarean section (gestation day/postmating day [PMD] 21) in pregabalin-treated groups. In a study designed to evaluate progression of skull development, advanced jugal fused to maxilla and fusion of the nasal sutures was observed on PMD 20-25 and PMD 21-23, respectively (birth occurs approximately on PMD 22). On postnatal day (PND) 21, complete jugal fused to maxilla was observed in the majority of control and 2500 mg/kg offspring. No treatment-related differences in the incidence of skull bone fusions occurred on PND 21, indicating no permanent adverse outcome. Based on the results of the investigative studies, and a review of historical data and scientific literature, the advanced skull bone fusions were reclassified as anatomic variations. Pregabalin was not teratogenic in rats under the conditions of these studies.

  14. Neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, M; Scadding, J

    2001-10-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves triggers a cascade of events in axotomized sensory neurones that are generally believed to be responsible for the generation of neuropathic pain. Recent data in animal models show that alterations in the properties of undamaged neurones that project into a damaged nerve can also play an important role. These new findings could explain some of the enigmatic clinical signs and symptoms of pain following nerve injury such as the spread of symptoms into areas not affected by the primary lesion. The basis by which uninjured nerves could be affected is a reduced supply of neurotrophic factors, an abnormal interaction in the Remak bundles of partially denervated Schwann cells and unmyelinated axons, or the byproducts of Wallerian degeneration.

  15. Pregabalin can decrease acute pain and postoperative nausea and vomiting in hysterectomy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Xia, Min; Shan, Nan; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Dong-Lin; Shao, Jiang-He; Ma, Hui-Wen; Wang, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Whether the preoperative administration of pregabalin plays a beneficial role in controlling acute pain after hysterectomy is unknown. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the efficacy and safety of the preoperative use of pregabalin to treat acute postoperative pain following hysterectomy. In April 2017, a systematic computer-based search was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Google databases. RCTs comparing pregabalin with placebo in patients undergoing hysterectomy were retrieved. The primary endpoint was the visual analog scale (VAS) score with rest or mobilization at 2 h, 4 and 24 hours and cumulative morphine consumption at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours. The secondary outcomes were complications of nausea, vomiting, sedation, and dizziness. After tests for publication bias and heterogeneity among studies were performed, the data were aggregated for random-effects models when necessary. Ten clinical studies with 1207 patients (pregabalin = 760, control = 447) were finally included in this meta-analysis. Preoperative administration of pregabalin was associated with a significant reduction of VAS with rest or mobilization at 2, 4, and 24 hours after hysterectomy. Further, the preoperative administration of pregabalin was associated with a reduction in total morphine consumption at 2, 4, 24, and 48 hours after hysterectomy. The occurrence of morphine-related complications (nausea and vomiting) was also reduced in the pregabalin group. However, the preoperative administration of pregabalin was associated with an increase in the occurrence of dizziness. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of sedation. The preoperative use of pregabalin reduced postoperative pain, total morphine consumption, and morphine-related complications following hysterectomy. The doses of pregabalin were different, and large heterogeneity was the limitation of

  16. A pharmacological treatment algorithm for localized neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Massimo; Baron, Ralf; Hans, Guy; Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Mayoral Rojals, Victor; Mick, Gerard; Serpell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is difficult to manage, often proving refractory to existing treatments. In more than half of cases, it is localized and affects a specific, clearly circumscribed area of the body (localized neuropathic pain, or LNP). A recently developed screening tool enables patients with probable neuropathic pain/LNP to be identified quickly and easily. In view of the conflicting current treatment recommendations, an advisory board of pain specialists met in June 2015 to develop a complementary treatment guidance algorithm, for use in the primary care setting and by non-pain specialists. The starting point of the algorithm is a diagnosis of LNP and there was consensus that first-line treatment should be a topical analgesic agent, because the benefit/risk ratios are far better than for systemic agents. Topical application offers site-specific delivery, a lower total systemic dose and avoidance of first-pass metabolism, reducing the risk of adverse events and drug/drug interactions. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster has most evidence supporting its use in LNP, producing effective analgesia and reducing the associated area of allodynia, but other topical agents include capsaicin, clonidine and botulinum toxin type A. Treatment should be commenced with the topical agent of choice, and the patient re-assessed after an appropriate period. Where the response is good the topical agent is continued, with a re-evaluation after 3-6 months. A systemic agent (e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, venlafaxine) is added if there is only a partial response, or substituted if there is no response, and the patient re-assessed after a month. If there is poor or no response to the systemic agent the patient should be switched to an alternative one and, if this also proves ineffective, referred to a pain specialist.

  17. Chronic Neuropathic Pain in Mice Reduces μ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated G-protein Activity in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Michelle R.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Selley, Dana E.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition that is often difficult to treat using conventional pharmacological interventions and the exact mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of this type of chronic pain have yet to be fully elucidated. The present studies examined the effect of chronic nerve injury on μ-opioid receptors and receptor-mediated G-protein activity within the supraspinal brain regions involved in pain processing of mice. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) reduced paw withdrawal latency, which was maximal at 10 days post-injury. [d-Ala2,(N-Me)Phe4, Gly5-OH] enkephalin (DAMGO)-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was then conducted at this time point in membranes prepared from the rostral ACC (rACC), thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) of CCI and sham-operated mice. Results showed reduced DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the thalamus and PAG of CCI mice, with no change in the rACC. In thalamus, this reduction was due to decreased maximal stimulation by DAMGO, with no difference in EC50 values. In PAG, however, DAMGO Emax values did not significantly differ between groups, possibly due to the small magnitude of the main effect. [3H]Naloxone binding in membranes of the thalamus showed no significant differences in Bmax values between CCI and sham-operated mice, indicating that the difference in G-protein activation did not result from differences in μ-opioid receptor levels. These results suggest that CCI induced a region-specific adaptation of μ-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activity, with apparent desensitization of the μ-opioid receptor in the thalamus and PAG and could have implications for treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21762883

  18. Pregabalin for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: an update

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil; Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Nowak, Magda; Rafiq, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    A previous review summarized what was then known about the potential role of pregabalin in the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): this review provides an update on its pharmacological properties and presumed mechanism of action, the liability for abuse, and efficacy and tolerability in patients with GAD. Pregabalin has a similar molecular structure to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) but its mechanism of action does not appear to be mediated through effects on GABA. Instead, its anxiolytic effects may arise through high-affinity binding to the alpha-2-delta sub-unit of the P/Q type voltage-gated calcium channel in “over-excited” presynaptic neurons, thereby reducing the release of excitatory neurotransmitters such as glutamate. The findings of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses together indicate that pregabalin is efficacious in both acute treatment and relapse prevention in GAD, with some evidence of an early onset of effect, and broad efficacy in reducing the severity of psychological and physical symptoms of anxiety. It also has efficacy as an augmenting agent after non-response to antidepressant treatment in GAD. Continuing vigilance is needed in assessing its potential abuse liability but the tolerability profile of pregabalin may confer some advantages over other pharmacological treatments in the short term for treatment in patients with GAD. PMID:23836974

  19. Neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L; Dworkin, Robert H; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2017-02-16

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7-10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain.

  20. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  1. Pregabalin Suppresses Spinal Neuronal Hyperexcitability and Visceral Hypersensitivity in the Absence of Peripheral Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Kirsty; Sikandar, Shafaq; Bauer, Claudia S.; Dolphin, Annette C.; Porreca, Frank; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Opioid induced hyperalgesia is recognised in the laboratory and the clinic, generating central hyperexcitability in the absence of peripheral pathology. We investigated pregabalin, indicated for neuropathic pain, and ondansetron, a drug that disrupts descending serotonergic processing in the central nervous system, on spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model of opioid induced hyperalgesia. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (180-200 g) were implanted with morphine (90μg · μl−1 · hr−1) or saline (0.9% w/v) filled osmotic mini-pumps. On days 7-10 in isoflurane anaesthetized animals we evaluated the effects of (a) systemic pregabalin on spinal neuronal and visceromotor responses and (b) spinal ondansetron on dorsal horn neuronal responses. The messenger RNA levels of α2δ-1, 5HT3A and mu-opioid receptor in the dorsal root ganglia of all animals were analysed. Results In morphine-treated animals the evoked spinal neuronal responses were enhanced to a sub-set of thermal and mechanical stimuli. This activity was attenuated by pregabalin (by at least 71%) and ondansetron (37%), and the visceromotor response to a sub-set of colorectal distension pressures was attenuated by pregabalin (52.8%) (n = 8 for all measures, P < 0.05). Messenger RNA levels were unchanged. Conclusions The inhibitory action of pregabalin in opioid induced hyperalgesia animals is not neuropathy-dependent nor reliant on up-regulation of the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage gated calcium channels, mechanisms proposed essential for pregabalin’s efficacy in neuropathy. In opioid induced hyperalgesia, which extends to colonic distension, a serotonergic facilitatory system may be upregulated creating an environment that’s permissive for pregabalin-mediated analgesia without peripheral pathology. PMID:21602662

  2. Pregabalin Attenuates Excitotoxicity in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Lai, Ming-Chi; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes can exacerbate seizures and worsen seizure-related brain damage. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the standard antiepileptic drug pregabalin (PGB) protects against pilocarpine-induced seizures and excitotoxicity in diabetes. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into either a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes group or a normal saline (NS) group. Both groups were further divided into subgroups that were treated intravenously with either PGB (15 mg/kg) or a vehicle; all groups were treated with subcutaneous pilocarpine (60 mg/kg) to induce seizures. To evaluate spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), PGB-pretreated rats were fed rat chow containing oral PGB (450 mg) for 28 consecutive days; vehicle-pretreated rats were fed regular chow. SRS frequency was monitored for 2 weeks from post-status epilepticus day 15. We evaluated both acute neuronal loss and chronic mossy fiber sprouting in the CA3 area. In addition, we performed patch clamp recordings to study evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 neurons for both vehicle-treated rats with SRS. Finally, we used an RNA interference knockdown method for Kir6.2 in a hippocampal cell line to evaluate PGB's effects in the presence of high-dose ATP. We found that compared to vehicle-treated rats, PGB-treated rats showed less severe acute seizure activity, reduced acute neuronal loss, and chronic mossy fiber sprouting. In the vehicle-treated STZ rats, eEPSC amplitude was significantly lower after PGB administration, but glibenclamide reversed this effect. The RNA interference study confirmed that PGB could counteract the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP)-closing effect of high-dose ATP. By opening KATP, PGB protects against neuronal excitotoxicity, and is therefore a potential antiepileptogenic in diabetes. These findings might help develop a clinical algorithm for treating patients with epilepsy and comorbid metabolic disorders. PMID:23785408

  3. Pregabalin attenuates excitotoxicity in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Lai, Ming-Chi; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Huang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes can exacerbate seizures and worsen seizure-related brain damage. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the standard antiepileptic drug pregabalin (PGB) protects against pilocarpine-induced seizures and excitotoxicity in diabetes. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into either a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes group or a normal saline (NS) group. Both groups were further divided into subgroups that were treated intravenously with either PGB (15 mg/kg) or a vehicle; all groups were treated with subcutaneous pilocarpine (60 mg/kg) to induce seizures. To evaluate spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), PGB-pretreated rats were fed rat chow containing oral PGB (450 mg) for 28 consecutive days; vehicle-pretreated rats were fed regular chow. SRS frequency was monitored for 2 weeks from post-status epilepticus day 15. We evaluated both acute neuronal loss and chronic mossy fiber sprouting in the CA3 area. In addition, we performed patch clamp recordings to study evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 neurons for both vehicle-treated rats with SRS. Finally, we used an RNA interference knockdown method for Kir6.2 in a hippocampal cell line to evaluate PGB's effects in the presence of high-dose ATP. We found that compared to vehicle-treated rats, PGB-treated rats showed less severe acute seizure activity, reduced acute neuronal loss, and chronic mossy fiber sprouting. In the vehicle-treated STZ rats, eEPSC amplitude was significantly lower after PGB administration, but glibenclamide reversed this effect. The RNA interference study confirmed that PGB could counteract the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP)-closing effect of high-dose ATP. By opening KATP, PGB protects against neuronal excitotoxicity, and is therefore a potential antiepileptogenic in diabetes. These findings might help develop a clinical algorithm for treating patients with epilepsy and comorbid metabolic disorders.

  4. The efficacy of pregabalin in patients with moderate and severe pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bruce; Li, Chunming

    2016-05-01

    Objective To compare the therapeutic response to pregabalin in patients with moderate or severe painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN). Research design and methods Data were pooled from 11 placebo-controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin flexible or fixed dose (150, 300 or 600 mg/day) in pDPN patients with mean baseline pain scores of ≥4 to <7 (moderate) or ≥7 to ≤10 (severe). Last observation carried forward imputation was used. Study number/ClinicalTrials.gov identifier 1008-014/-, 1008-029/-, 1008-040/-, 1008-131/-, 1008-149/-, 1008-000-155/-, A0081030/NCT00156078, A0081060/NCT00159679, A0081071/NCT00143156, A0081081/NCT00301223, A0081163/NCT00553475. Main outcome measures Pregabalin-mediated change in pain, pain-related sleep interference (PRSI) and patient global impression of change (PGIC) were compared versus placebo and between moderate and severe pain cohorts. Adverse events (AEs) were reported. Results At baseline, 1816 patients had moderate pain (pregabalin, n = 1189) and 1119 patients had severe pain (pregabalin, n = 720). Pregabalin significantly reduced pain scores at endpoint compared with placebo when patients of all pain levels were combined (all doses; p < 0.05). In the moderate and severe pain cohorts, pregabalin treatment (300, 600 mg/day or flexible) significantly reduced mean pain scores at endpoint compared with placebo (p < 0.01). Pain reduction was greatest in patients with severe baseline pain compared with moderate baseline pain (pregabalin 300, 600 mg/day or flexible; p < 0.0001). Pregabalin improved PRSI and PGIC in the moderate and severe cohorts compared with placebo. The greatest improvement in PRSI also occurred in the severe cohort. Treatment-emergent AEs, most commonly dizziness, somnolence and peripheral edema, occurred more frequently in patients treated with pregabalin compared with placebo. Conclusions Pregabalin was effective in pDPN patients with both moderate and severe

  5. A Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor-Positive Allosteric Modulator Reduces Neuropathic Pain in the Mouse with No Psychoactive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Baillie, Gemma L; Kinsey, Steven; Crowe, Molly; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Owens, Robert A; Damaj, Imad M; Poklis, Justin; Wiley, Jenny L; Zanda, Matteo; Zanato, Chiara; Greig, Iain R; Lichtman, Aron H; Ross, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The CB1 receptor represents a promising target for the treatment of several disorders including pain-related disease states. However, therapeutic applications of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other CB1 orthosteric receptor agonists remain limited because of psychoactive side effects. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) offer an alternative approach to enhance CB1 receptor function for therapeutic gain with the promise of reduced side effects. Here we describe the development of the novel synthetic CB1 PAM, 6-methyl-3-(2-nitro-1-(thiophen-2-yl)ethyl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole (ZCZ011), which augments the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological actions of the CB1 orthosteric agonists CP55,940 and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA). ZCZ011 potentiated binding of [3H]CP55,940 to the CB1 receptor as well as enhancing AEA-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in mouse brain membranes and β-arrestin recruitment and ERK phosphorylation in hCB1 cells. In the whole animal, ZCZ011 is brain penetrant, increased the potency of these orthosteric agonists in mouse behavioral assays indicative of cannabimimetic activity, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy, locomotor activity, and in the drug discrimination paradigm. Administration of ZCZ011 alone was devoid of activity in these assays and did not produce a conditioned place preference or aversion, but elicited CB1 receptor-mediated antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction nerve injury model of neuropathic pain and carrageenan model of inflammatory pain. These data suggest that ZCZ011 acts as a CB1 PAM and provide the first proof of principle that CB1 PAMs offer a promising strategy to treat neuropathic and inflammatory pain with minimal or no cannabimimetic side effects. PMID:26052038

  6. Pregabalin for the Prevention of Oxaliplatin‐Induced Painful Neuropathy: A Randomized, Double‐Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen Teixeira, Manoel; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Ferreira, Karine S.L.; Braz Mileno, Paula; Scisci, Nathalia; Zandonai, Alexandra; Teixeira, William G.J.; Saragiotto, Daniel F.; Silva, Valquíria; Raicher, Irina; Cury, Rubens Gisbert; Macarenco, Ricardo; Otto Heise, Carlos; Wilson Iervolino Brotto, Mario; Andrade de Mello, Alberto; Zini Megale, Marcelo; Henrique Curti Dourado, Luiz; Mendes Bahia, Luciana; Lilian Rodrigues, Antonia; Parravano, Daniella; Tizue Fukushima, Julia; Lefaucheur, Jean‐Pascal; Bouhassira, Didier; Sobroza, Evandro; Riechelmann, Rachel P.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Valério da Silva, Fernanda; Chile, Thais; Dale, Camila S.; Nebuloni, Daniela; Senna, Luiz; Brentani, Helena; Pagano, Rosana L.; de Souza, Ângela M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. Pregabalin is a medication that can decrease neuronal hyperexcitability, relieve neuropathic pain, and reach stable plasma levels after a titration period of only a few days.Its use during oxaliplatin infusions was not able to decrease the incidence of chronic, oxalipaltin‐related neuropathic pain, compared with placebo. Background. Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving oxaliplatin (OXA) develop acute and chronic painful oxaliplatin‐induced peripheral neuropathy (OXAIPN). Acute and chronic OXA‐related neuropathies have different pathophysiological bases, but both lead to a common phenomenon: central sensitization (CS) of nociceptive neuronal networks, leading to increased sensitivity (hyperlgesia, allodynia) in the somatosensory system, the common ground of chronic neuropathic pain. Because CS is related to increased risk of painful OXAIPN, we hypothesized that preemptive use of the anti‐hyperalgesic drug pregabaline (known to decrease CS) during OXA infusions would decrease the incidence of chronic OXAIPN. Methods. Pain‐free, chemotherapy‐naïve CRC patients receiving at least one cycle of modified‐FLOX [5‐FU(500 mg/m2)+leucovorin(20 mg/m2)/week for] 6 weeks+oxaliplatin(85 mg/m2) at weeks 1‐3‐5 every 8 weeks] were randomized (1:1) into the study. Patients received either pregabalin or placebo for 3 days before and 3 days after each OXA infusion and were followed for up to 6 months. Clinical assessments were performed at baseline, at the end of chemotherapy, and after the follow‐up period. The main outcome was average pain at the last visit assessed by the visual analogic scale (0–10) item of the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Secondary endpoints were presence of neuropathic pain according to the Douleur Neuropathique‐4 (DN‐4), pain dimensions (short‐ form McGill Pain Questionnaire [MPQ]), Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI), and changes in nerve conduction studies (NCS) and side effect profile

  7. Pregabalin in the treatment of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following overfilling of endodontic sealer.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ezpeleta, Oscar; Martín, Pablo J; López-López, José; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2014-04-01

    A case of orofacial pain and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paraesthesia after extrusion of endodontic sealer within the mandibular canal treated with prednisone and pregabalin is described. A 36-year-old woman underwent root canal treatment of the mandibular second right premolar tooth. Post-operative panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of radiopaque canal sealer in the mandibular canal. Damage to IAN consecutive to extrusion of endodontic sealer was diagnosed. Non-surgical management was decided, including: 1 mg/kg/day prednisone 2 times/day, once-daily regimen, and 150 mg/day pregabalin, two doses per day, monitoring the progress with periodic follow-up visits. Six weeks after the incident the signs and symptoms were gone. The complete resolution of paraesthesia and the control of pain achieved suggest that a non-surgical approach, combining prednisone and the GABA analogue pregabalin, is a good option in the management of the IAN damage subsequent to endodontic sealer extrusion. Key words:Endodontics, inferior alveolar nerve, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain, paraesthesia, pregabalin.

  8. New treatment options in the management of fibromyalgia: role of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common, chronic pain disorder with unknown etiology, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and tenderness, and accompanied by several other symptoms such as sleep disturbance, fatigue, and mood disorders. Pregabalin is the first drug approved for the treatment of FM. Pregabalin has analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic activity and has earlier demonstrated efficacy in the management of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and as adjuvant therapy for adult patients with partial onset seizures. Pregabalin, a lipophilic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog, is α2δ-1 ligand that binds to, and modulates, voltage-gated calcium channels. This modulation is characterized by a reduction of the excessive neurotransmitter release that is observed in certain neurological and psychotic disorders. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that pregabalin has been effective in pain management, improving sleep quality and fatigue, as well as in several domains of health related quality of life. Because of mild to moderate adverse effects it can be considered a well-tolerated therapy for FM. PMID:19337459

  9. Pregabalin in the treatment of inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia following overfilling of endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Ezpeleta, Oscar; Martín, Pablo J.; López-López, José; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    A case of orofacial pain and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) paraesthesia after extrusion of endodontic sealer within the mandibular canal treated with prednisone and pregabalin is described. A 36-year-old woman underwent root canal treatment of the mandibular second right premolar tooth. Post-operative panoramic radiograph revealed the presence of radiopaque canal sealer in the mandibular canal. Damage to IAN consecutive to extrusion of endodontic sealer was diagnosed. Non-surgical management was decided, including: 1 mg/kg/day prednisone 2 times/day, once-daily regimen, and 150 mg/day pregabalin, two doses per day, monitoring the progress with periodic follow-up visits. Six weeks after the incident the signs and symptoms were gone. The complete resolution of paraesthesia and the control of pain achieved suggest that a non-surgical approach, combining prednisone and the GABA analogue pregabalin, is a good option in the management of the IAN damage subsequent to endodontic sealer extrusion. Key words:Endodontics, inferior alveolar nerve, neuropathic pain, orofacial pain, paraesthesia, pregabalin. PMID:24790724

  10. [Therapeutic advances in pharmaceutical treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Attal, N

    2011-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. Recommended first-line treatments include tricyclic antidepressants and alpha2delta agonists pregabalin and gabapentin for multiple neuropathic conditions, the antidepressants duloxetine and venlafaxine in diabetic painful neuropathies and lidocaine patches for postherapetic neuralgia. Therapeutic prospects include focal therapy with sustained analgesic efficacy (capsaicin patches, botulinum toxin), treatments acting on new targets (i.e., cytokine inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate inhibitors, TRPV1 antagonists). The methodology of clinical trials also tends to take better into account the symptomatic profiles of patients, which should contribute to better prediction or responders to treatment.

  11. Neuropathic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Brenaut, Emilie; Le Garrec, Raphaële; Abasq, Claire; Genestet, Steeve; Marcorelles, Pascale; Zagnoli, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    Pruritus, also known as itch, is a very common, unpleasant sensation that elicits an urge to scratch. Its origin is not always in the skin, and neuropathic itch that is caused by neuronal or glial damage is common, but poorly understood by both dermatologists and neurologists. Although pruritus has not been considered as serious a symptom as pain, it is difficult to treat and--if chronic--can severely impair quality of life. Neuropathic itch is often associated with other clinical symptoms, most commonly neuropathic pain, and hypersensitization to stimuli is present in both pruritus and pain of neuropathic origin. The shared aetiology can aid in finding suitable treatment for itch in some cases, but more detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of itch, along with standardized, well-controlled trials, is needed. Pruritus research is an emerging but currently very active field, and our understanding of this sensation is rapidly increasing. Here, we review new discoveries regarding the role of the nervous system and the contribution of different pathways in pruritus, discuss the different aetiologies of neuropathic itch, and outline currently available and potential strategies for managing neuropathic pruritus.

  12. Pilot trial: pregabalin on colonic sensorimotor functions in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iturrino, Johanna; Camilleri, Michael; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2014-02-01

    In prior studies, pregabalin reduced rectal or colonic pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy adults, suggesting reduction of afferent function. To assess effects of pregabalin on colonic compliance, sensory and motor functions in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. In a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, we tested oral pregabalin, 200mg, in 18 patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. With a barostatically controlled polyethylene balloon in the left colon, we assessed sensation thresholds and colonic compliance using ascending method of limits, sensation ratings over 4 levels of distension, fasting and postprandial colonic tone and phasic motility. Analysis of covariance (adjusted for the corresponding pre-drug response) was used to compare placebo and pregabalin. After 45% participants completed studies, we conducted an interim analysis to assess the conditional power to detect pre-specified treatment effects given the observed variation and treatment group differences based on the planned sample size for the trial. Pregabalin did not significantly affect colonic compliance, sensation thresholds, sensation ratings, fasting or postprandial tone or motility index. The study was stopped for futility to detect an effect on visceral pain with the planned design and sample size. Pregabalin, 200mg, might not reduce distension-related colonic pain in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful treatment by adding duloxetine to pregabalin for peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Motoyasu; Iida, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Shigemi; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Noritaka; Miyamoto, Maki

    2013-11-01

    Although paclitaxel is a commonly used anticancer drug, peripheral neuropathy may develop as a side effect. Worsening of the symptoms with time may cause patients who receive paclitaxel to give up their chemotherapy. Duloxetine, a serotonin- and norepinephrine-reuptake inhibitor, has been used to treat peripheral neuropathic pain. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with gastric cancer, who underwent gastrectomy and then received 8 cycles of chemotherapy involving weekly administrations of paclitaxel. Under this paclitaxel treatment, he complained of severe peripheral neuropathy, leading to a diminished quality of life. Following treatment with a combination of duloxetine and pregabalin, a remission of his symptoms was achieved. Duloxetine plus pregabalin therapy may be useful for the peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel.

  14. Pregabalin versus pramipexole: effects on sleep disturbance in restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Patrick, Jeffrey; DuBrava, Sarah; Becker, Philip M; Lankford, Alan; Chen, Crystal; Miceli, Jeffrey; Knapp, Lloyd; Allen, Richard P

    2014-04-01

    To compare pregabalin versus placebo and pramipexole for reducing restless legs syndrome (RLS)-related sleep disturbance. Randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial. Twenty-three US sleep centers. Eighty-five individuals with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS and associated sleep disturbance. Participants were randomized across 6 treatment sequences comprising three 4-week periods on pregabalin 300 mg/day (n = 75), pramipexole 0.5 mg/day (n = 76), or placebo (n = 73). Polysomnography was conducted over 2 nights at the end of each period. Primary (wake after sleep onset [WASO], pregabalin vs placebo) and key secondary endpoints were analyzed for statistical significance, with descriptive statistics for other endpoints. Pregabalin improved sleep maintenance, demonstrated by reductions in WASO (-27.1 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; -26.9 vs pramipexole) and number of awakenings after sleep onset (-2.7 vs placebo; -7.9 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]) by polysomnography, and an increase in subjective total sleep time (30.8 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; 26.8 vs pramipexole). Pregabalin also increased slow wave sleep duration (20.9 min vs placebo; 32.1 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]). Reduction in periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI) with pregabalin was similar to pramipexole and greater than placebo (-3.7 PLMA/h [P < 0.0001]), although reduction in total PLM in sleep was less than for pramipexole. This study demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective measures of sleep maintenance and sleep architecture with pregabalin compared with placebo and pramipexole. Effects of pregabalin on periodic limb movement arousal index were comparable to pramipexole. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00991276; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00991276.

  15. The potential of pregabalin in neurology, psychiatry and addiction: a qualitative overview.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Lupi, Matteo; Sarchione, Fabiola; Santacroce, Rita; Salone, Anatolia; De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Cavuto, Marilde; Signorelli, Maria; Aguglia, Eugenio; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug that binds to the α₂δ (alpha2delta) subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel in central nervous system (CNS). Pregabalin decreases the release of neurotransmitters, including glutamate, norepinephrine, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Purpose of this paper is to offer a qualitative overview of the studies currently available in literature about this drug, examining the effectiveness of pregabalin in its various fields of application. Our analysis, conducted on a final selection of 349 scientific papers, shows that pregabalin may help to reduce pain in diabetic neuropathy, in post-herpetic neuralgia and in some patients affected by fibromyalgia. It is also effective for the treatment of diverse types of seizures and has similar efficacy to benzodiazepines and venlafaxine in anxiety disorder. Moreover, pregabalin may be a therapeutic agent for the treatment of alcohol abuse, in both withdrawal phase and relapse prevention. Possible implications in the treatment of benzodiazepines dependence are emerging, but a potential abuse or misuse of the drug has also been reported. Range of dosage may fluctuate considerably, from 75 mg to 600 mg per day. Further studies are needed to completely understand pregabalin mechanism of action in the different diseases.

  16. Analgesia induced by the epigenetic drug, L-acetylcarnitine, outlasts the end of treatment in mouse models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Notartomaso, Serena; Mascio, Giada; Bernabucci, Matteo; Zappulla, Cristina; Scarselli, Pamela; Cannella, Milena; Imbriglio, Tiziana; Gradini, Roberto; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2017-01-01

    Background L-acetylcarnitine, a drug marketed for the treatment of chronic pain, causes analgesia by epigenetically up-regulating type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors in the spinal cord. Because the epigenetic mechanisms are typically long-lasting, we hypothesized that analgesia could outlast the duration of L-acetylcarnitine treatment in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Results A seven-day treatment with L-acetylcarnitine (100 mg/kg, once a day, i.p.) produced an antiallodynic effect in the complete Freund adjuvant mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain. L-Acetylcarnitine-induced analgesia persisted for at least 14 days after drug withdrawal. In contrast, the analgesic effect of pregabalin, amitryptiline, ceftriaxone, and N-acetylcysteine disappeared seven days after drug withdrawal. L-acetylcarnitine treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal region of the spinal cord. This effect also persisted for two weeks after drug withdrawal and was associated with increased levels of acetylated histone H3 bound to the Grm2 gene promoter in the dorsal root ganglia. A long-lasting analgesic effect of L-acetylcarnitine was also observed in mice subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. In these animals, a 14-day treatment with pregabalin, amitryptiline, tramadol, or L-acetylcarnitine produced a significant antiallodynic effect, with pregabalin displaying the greatest efficacy. In mice treated with pregabalin, tramadol or L-acetylcarnitine the analgesic effect was still visible 15 days after the end of drug treatment. However, only in mice treated with L-acetylcarnitine analgesia persisted 37 days after drug withdrawal. This effect was associated with an increase in mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord. Conclusions Our findings suggest that L-acetylcarnitine has the unique property to cause a long-lasting analgesic effect that might reduce relapses in patients suffering from

  17. Analgesia induced by the epigenetic drug, L-acetylcarnitine, outlasts the end of treatment in mouse models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Notartomaso, Serena; Mascio, Giada; Bernabucci, Matteo; Zappulla, Cristina; Scarselli, Pamela; Cannella, Milena; Imbriglio, Tiziana; Gradini, Roberto; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bruno, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Background L-acetylcarnitine, a drug marketed for the treatment of chronic pain, causes analgesia by epigenetically up-regulating type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors in the spinal cord. Because the epigenetic mechanisms are typically long-lasting, we hypothesized that analgesia could outlast the duration of L-acetylcarnitine treatment in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Results A seven-day treatment with L-acetylcarnitine (100 mg/kg, once a day, i.p.) produced an antiallodynic effect in the complete Freund adjuvant mouse model of chronic inflammatory pain. L-Acetylcarnitine-induced analgesia persisted for at least 14 days after drug withdrawal. In contrast, the analgesic effect of pregabalin, amitryptiline, ceftriaxone, and N-acetylcysteine disappeared seven days after drug withdrawal. L-acetylcarnitine treatment enhanced mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal region of the spinal cord. This effect also persisted for two weeks after drug withdrawal and was associated with increased levels of acetylated histone H3 bound to the Grm2 gene promoter in the dorsal root ganglia. A long-lasting analgesic effect of L-acetylcarnitine was also observed in mice subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. In these animals, a 14-day treatment with pregabalin, amitryptiline, tramadol, or L-acetylcarnitine produced a significant antiallodynic effect, with pregabalin displaying the greatest efficacy. In mice treated with pregabalin, tramadol or L-acetylcarnitine the analgesic effect was still visible 15 days after the end of drug treatment. However, only in mice treated with L-acetylcarnitine analgesia persisted 37 days after drug withdrawal. This effect was associated with an increase in mGlu2/3 receptor protein levels in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord. Conclusions Our findings suggest that L-acetylcarnitine has the unique property to cause a long-lasting analgesic effect that might reduce relapses in patients suffering from

  18. Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, X; Sun, P; Novick, D; Andrews, J; Sun, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009). Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year. Results Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs) had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years), percentage of women (87%–88%), and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis). In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%). The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05), any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05), and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05). From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort experienced decreases in certain utilization rates, whereas the pregabalin cohort had increases (percentage of patients with a fibromyalgia

  19. Imipramine and pregabalin combination for painful polyneuropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holbech, Jakob V; Bach, Flemming W; Finnerup, Nanna B; Brøsen, Kim; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-05-01

    Monotherapy with first-line drugs for neuropathic pain often fails to provide sufficient pain relief or has unacceptable side effects because of the need for high doses. The aim of this trial was to test whether the combination of imipramine and pregabalin in moderate doses would relieve pain more effectively than monotherapy with either of the drugs. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, multicenter trial consisting of four 5-week treatment periods in patients with painful polyneuropathy. Treatment arms were imipramine 75 mg/d vs pregabalin 300 mg/d vs combination therapy vs placebo. Patients with polyneuropathy and symptoms for more than 6 months, age 20 to 85 years, pain intensity ≥4 on a 0- to 10-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and pain at least 4 days a week were included in the trial. A total of 262 patients were screened for participation, 73 patients were randomized, and 69 patients were included in the data analysis. The effect on average pain in comparison with placebo was: combination (-1.67 NRS points, P < 0.001), imipramine (-1.08 NRS points, P < 0.001), and pregabalin (-0.48 NRS points, P = 0.03). The combination therapy had significantly lower pain scores than both monotherapies: combination vs imipramine (P = 0.009), combination vs pregabalin (P < 0.001). During combination therapy, the dropout rate was higher and the patients reported a higher rate and severity of side effects. Combination of moderate doses of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and pregabalin could be considered as an alternative to high-dosage monotherapy. However, the trial also emphasized that balance between efficacy and safety is an issue.

  20. Effect of the α2δ ligand, pregabalin, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Iturrino, Johanna; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Pregabalin, an α2δ ligand, is used clinically to treat somatic pain. A prior study suggested that pregabalin reduces distension-induced pain while increasing rectal compliance. We aimed to quantify effects of pregabalin on colonic sensory and motor functions and assess relationships between sensory effects and colonic compliance. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of a single oral administration of 75 or 200 mg of pregabalin in 62 healthy adults (aged 18–75 yr). Subjects underwent left colon intubation. We assessed “stress-arousal symptoms”, compliance, sensation thresholds, sensation ratings averaged over four levels of distension, fasting and postprandial colonic tone, and phasic motility index (MI). Analysis of covariance (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and corresponding predrug response) and proportional hazard models were used. There were no clinically important differences among treatment groups for demographics, predrug compliance, tone, MI, and sensation. Treatment was associated with reduced energy and increased drowsiness but no change in tension or relaxation. Sensation ratings averaged over the four distension levels were lower for gas sensation [overall effect P = 0.14, P = 0.05 (pregabalin 200 mg vs. placebo)] and for pain sensation [overall effect P = 0.12, P = 0.04 (pregabalin 200 mg vs. placebo)]. The magnitude of the effect of 200 mg of pregabalin relative to placebo is on average a 25% reduction of both gas and pain sensation ratings. Pregabalin did not significantly affect colonic compliance, sensation thresholds, colonic fasting tone, and MI. Thus 200 mg of pregabalin reduces gas and pain sensation and should be tested in patients with colonic pain. PMID:21596994

  1. Aloperine attenuated neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury via anti-oxidation activity and suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ya-Qiong; Jin, Shao-Ju; Liu, Ning; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Ma, Lin; Du, Juan; Zhou, Ru; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Aloperine has anti-nociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced CCI. • Aloperine reduces ROS in neuropathic pain mice. • Aloperine down-regulates the expression of NF-κB and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain mice. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether aloperine (ALO) has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury, whether ALO reduces ROS against neuropathic pain, and what are the mechanisms involved in ALO attenuated neuropathic pain. Methods: Mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal thermal hyperalgesia were estimated by behavior methods such as Von Frey filaments, cold-plate, radiant heat, paw pressure and tail immersion on one day before surgery and days 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after surgery, respectively. In addition, T-AOC, GSH-PX, T-AOC and MDA in the spinal cord (L4/5) were measured to evaluate anti-oxidation activity of ALO on neuropathic pain. Expressions of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) in the spinal cord (L4/5) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results: Administration of ALO (80 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold, paw pressure, paw withdrawal latencies, tail-curling latencies, T-AOC, GSH-PX and T-SOD concentration, reduced the numbers of paw lifts and MDA concentration compared to CCI group. ALO attenuated CCI induced up-regulation of expressions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β at the dose of 80 mg/kg (i.p.). Pregabalin produced similar effects serving as positive control at the dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.). Conclusion: ALO has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effects of ALO against neuropathic pain is related to reduction of ROS, via suppression of NF-κB pathway.

  2. The effect of pregabalin on sensorimotor gating in ‘low’ gating humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, Dean T.; Stein, Murray B.; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.; Risbrough, Victoria B.

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and anxiolytic compound that binds to α2-δ auxiliary subunit Types 1 and 2 of voltage-gated calcium channels, has been shown to reduce excitatory neurotransmission partially through modulation of glutamatergic signaling. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating impacted by disruption of the glutamatergic system and is reduced in schizophrenia patients. Dysregulation of the glutamatergic system has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Here we tested the hypothesis that pregabalin may ameliorate PPI in a model of deficient gating in humans and mice. In study 1, 14 healthy human subjects participated in a within subjects, cross-over study with placebo, 50 mg or 200 mg pregabalin treatment prior to undergoing a PPI task. In study 2, 24 C57BL/6 mice underwent a similar procedure with vehicle, 30 and 100 mg/kg dose treatments. In both studies, subjects were assigned to a “Low” or “High” gating group using a median split procedure based on their PPI performance during placebo/vehicle. Drug effects were then examined across these groups. In humans, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI performance in the “low gating” group. In mice, pregabalin treatment significantly increased PPI in the low gating group but reduced PPI in the high gating group. Across species, pregabalin treatment improves PPI in subjects with low gating. These data support further exploration of pregabalin as a potential treatment for disorders characterized by sensorimotor gating deficits and glutamatergic hypersignaling, such as schizophrenia. PMID:22575075

  3. Controlling the activation of the Bv8/prokineticin system reduces neuroinflammation and abolishes thermal and tactile hyperalgesia in neuropathic animals

    PubMed Central

    Maftei, D; Marconi, V; Florenzano, F; Giancotti, L A; Castelli, M; Moretti, S; Borsani, E; Rodella, L F; Balboni, G; Luongo, L; Maione, S; Sacerdote, P; Negri, L; Lattanzi, R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chemokines are involved in neuroinflammation and contribute to chronic pain processing. The new chemokine prokineticin 2 (PROK2) and its receptors (PKR1 and PKR2) have a role in inflammatory pain and immunomodulation. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of PROK2 and its receptors in neuropathic pain. Experimental Approach Effects of single, intrathecal, perineural and s.c. injections of the PKR antagonist PC1, or of 1 week s.c. treatment, on thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia was evaluated in mice with chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve (CCI). Expression and localization of PROK2 and of its receptors at peripheral and central level was evaluated 10 days after CCI, following treatment for 1 week with saline or PC1. IL-1β and IL-10 levels, along with glia activation, were evaluated. Key Results Subcutaneous, intrathecal and perineural PC1 acutely abolished the CCI-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. At 10 days after CCI, PROK2 and its receptor PKR2 were up-regulated in nociceptors, in Schwann cells and in activated astrocytes of the spinal cord. Therapeutic treatment with PC1 (s.c., 1 week) alleviated established thermal hyperalgesia and allodynia, reduced the injury-induced overexpression of PROK2, significantly blunted nerve injury-induced microgliosis and astrocyte activation in the spinal cord and restored the physiological levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in periphery and in spinal cord. Conclusion and Implications The prokineticin system contributes to pain modulation via neuron–glia interaction. Sustained inhibition of the prokineticin system, at peripheral or central levels, blocked both pain symptoms and some events underlying disease progression. PMID:24902717

  4. Evaluation of anticonvulsants for possible use in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Waszkielewicz, A M; Gunia, A; Słoczyńska, K; Marona, H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a kind of pain related with functional abnormality of neurons. Despite large progress in pharmacotherapy, neuropathic pain is still considered an unmet need. Nowadays, there are few drugs registered for this condition, such as pregabalin, gabapentin, duloxetine, carbamazepine, and lidocaine. Among them, pregabalin, gabapentin and carbamazepine are well known antiepileptic drugs. Among the group of new antiepileptic drugs, which are addressed to 1% of human world population suffering from seizures, it turned out that 30% of the seizures resistant to pharmacotherapy has not enough market to justify the costs of drug development. Therefore, it is already a phenomenon that researchers turn their projects toward a larger market, related with possible similar mechanism. Anticonvulsant mechanism of action is in the first place among primary indications for drugs revealing potential analgesic activity. Therefore, many drug candidates for epilepsy, still in preclinical stage, are being evaluated for activity in neuropathic pain. This review is focusing on antiepileptic drugs, which are evaluated for their analgesic activity in major tests related with neuropathic pain. Relation between structure, mechanism of action and result in tests such as the Chung model (spinal nerve ligation SNL), the Bennett model (chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve CCI) and other tests are considered. The first examples are carbamazepine, gabapentin, and lacosamide as drugs well established in epilepsy market as well as drug candidates such as valnoctamide, and other valproic acid derivatives, novel biphenyl pyrazole derivatives, etc. Moreover, clinical efficacy related with listed animal models has been discussed.

  5. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  6. Pregabalin versus sertraline in generalized anxiety disorder. An open label study.

    PubMed

    Cvjetkovic-Bosnjak, M; Soldatovic-Stajic, B; Babovic, S S; Boskovic, K; Jovicevic, M

    2015-01-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a chronic mental illness with a prevalence of 5-7% in the general population. t GAD is characterized by extreme persistent worry, mostly about minor problems, involving pathological fear with high occurrences of vegetative disturbance. GAD leads to functional impairment and a significantly reduced patient's quality of life. According to the guidelines of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP), the first-line treatments for GAD are Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), Selective serotonin- and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and pregabalin, an atypical anxiolytic. In this study, both efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin were evaluated and compared with efficacy and tolerability of sertraline, an SSRI antidepressant. 107 patients both male and female, aged 20-60 were included in the study. All patients were hospitalized outward at the Psychiatric Clinic. Patients fulfilled criteria for GAD, according to ICD-X and DSM-IV. Each patient was randomly assigned to 4 weeks of treatment with pregabalin (n=47) or sertraline (n=60). Patients treated with sertraline were previously treated with SSRIs and SNRIs without remission, according to the latest National Clinical Guideline issued by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence for treating GAD (NICE). The primary analysis was the change in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA), a total score from baseline to endpoint. The second indicator of efficacy was the change in the HAMA psychic (emotional) and somatic (physical) scores, weekly, till endpoint. Global clinical assessment was conducted by using the Clinical Global Impression change rating (CGI). Both pregabalin and sertraline showed good results in treating symptoms of Generalized Anxious Disorder. The onset of action was shorter in treatment with pregabalin compared to the treatment with sertraline. In the patients treated with sertraline, the anxiolytic

  7. Pregabalin- and topiramate-mediated regulation of cognitive and motor impulsivity in DBA/2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Francisco; Pérez-Ortiz, José M; Manzanares, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Impulsivity is a core symptom in many neuropsychiatric disorders. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of topiramate and pregabalin on the modulation of different impulsivity dimensions in DBA/2 mice. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of acute and chronic administration of pregabalin (10, 20 and 40 mg·kg−1) and topiramate (12.5, 25 and 50 mg·kg−1) were evaluated in the light–dark box (LDB), hole board test (HBT) and delayed reinforcement task (DRT). α2A-Adrenoceptor, D2-receptor and TH gene expression were evaluated by real-time PCR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), accumbens (ACC) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), respectively. KEY RESULTS Acute pregabalin administration showed a clear anxiolytic-like effect (LDB) but did not modify novelty-seeking behaviour (HBT). In contrast, topiramate produced an anxiolytic effect only at the highest dose, whereas it reduced novelty seeking at all doses tested. In the DRT, acute pregabalin had no effect, whereas topiramate only reduced motor impulsivity. Chronically, pregabalin significantly increased motor impulsivity and topiramate diminished cognitive impulsivity. Pregabalin decreased α2A-adrenoceptor and D2-receptor gene expression in the PFC and ACC, respectively, and increased TH in the VTA. In contrast, chronic administration of topiramate increased α2A-adrenoceptor and D2-receptor gene expression in the PFC and ACC, respectively, and also increased TH in the VTA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that the usefulness of pregabalin in impulsivity-related disorders is related to its anxiolytic properties, whereas topiramate modulates impulsivity. These differences could be linked to their opposite effects on α2A-adrenoceptor and D2-receptor gene expression in the PFC and ACC, respectively. PMID:22489711

  8. Examining the Time to Improvement of Sleep Interference With Pregabalin in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Knapp, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to be a safe, effective treatment for neuropathic pain associated with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), with average time to reduction in pain of 2 days. Pain-related sleep interference is commonly reported in both painful DPN and PHN. These post hoc analyses examined the time to improvement in sleep with pregabalin in patients with painful DPN or PHN, measured by reduction in daily sleep interference (DSI) scores on an 11-point numeric rating scale. A total of 4527 patients from 16 placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for treatment of painful DPN or PHN were included in the analysis. In these trials, there were a total of 16 pregabalin treatment arms for painful DPN (75-600 mg/d), 10 for PHN (150-600 mg/d), and 3 for painful DPN/PHN (150-600 mg/d). Time to improvement in DSI scores was calculated for all treatment arms that demonstrated statistically significant reductions in DSI scores during the first 14 days of treatment compared with placebo (23 of 29; 79.3%) and was defined as the first day DSI scores for that day and the following day were significantly lower than placebo (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) time to improvement in DSI scores was 1.6 (1.3) days. Sustained improvement (≥1-point improvement in mean DSI score) was seen significantly earlier for pregabalin DSI responders than patients receiving placebo. These findings demonstrate that statistically significant and sustained improvement in sleep occurs rapidly (within 1 day for some patients) in response to treatment with pregabalin.

  9. Reduced Glutamatergic Currents and Dendritic Branching of Layer 5 Pyramidal Cells Contribute to Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Crystle J.; Huang, Mei; Meltzer, Herbert; Martina, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that neuropathic pain is associated with major reorganization in multiple brain areas. In line with the strong emotional salience of chronic pain, involvement of the limbic system appears particularly important. Within the past few years, it has become clear that the functional deactivation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for both the cognitive/emotional and the sensory components of pain. However, at the cellular level, details of this deactivation remain in large part unclear. Here we show that 1 week after a peripheral neuropathic injury (Spared Nerve Injury model) pyramidal cells in layer 5 (L5) of the rat medial PFC show responses to excitatory glutamatergic inputs that are reduced by about 50%, as well as reduced frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents. Additionally, these cells have reduced membrane capacitance and increased input resistance. All these findings are consistent with decreased dendritic length, thus we performed a detailed morphological analysis on a subset of the recorded neurons. We found that the apical dendrites proximal to the soma (excluding the tuft) are shorter and less complex in SNI animals, in agreement with the reduced capacitance and glutamatergic input. Finally, we used in vivo microdialysis to compare the basal concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PFC of sham and SNI rats and found that ambient glutamate is decreased in SNI rats. Taken together, these data show that impaired glutamatergic transmission contributes to the functional deactivation of the mPFC in neuropathic pain. Additionally, the reduced branching of apical dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons may underlay the gray matter reduction in chronic pain. PMID:27252623

  10. Pregabalin in the treatment of herpetic neuralgia: results of a multicenter Chinese study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lishuang; Li, Xingang; Zhang, Guozhuan; Sun, Yingjiao; Yu, Hui; Jiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, impact on quality of life, and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of acute herpetic neuralgia (AHN) and subacute herpetic neuralgia (SHN). Multicenter, parallel-group, single-blind, 4-week, randomized clinical trial. Conducted in the department of pain clinic of participating hospitals. Three hundred patients with AHN or SHN (of which 239 completed the study). Patients were treated with oxycodone (A group) or combination of oxycodone and pregabalin (B group). Patients with AHN belonged to A1 group and B1 group. Patients with SHN belonged to A2 group and B2 group. Pain intensity was rated on an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS). Other outcomes included mean daily oxycodone doses, quality of life, and adverse effects. Pregabalin-treated patients had greater NRS decrement: 74% in B1 (vs 58% in A1; P < 0.05); 69% in B2 (vs 53% in A2; P < 0.05). Significant improvement in quality of life was observed in all groups, and pregabalin-treated patients improved more, with 72.7% in B1 (vs 63.7% in A1; P < 0.05) and 74.5% in B2 (vs 59.6% in A2; P < 0.05). The maximum tolerated dose of oxycodone for pregabalin-treated patients was lower. Pregabalin had acceptable tolerability. Both combination therapy with oxycodone plus pregabalin and oxycodone monotherapy were effective and safe for herpetic neuralgia. In addition, subjects on combination therapy showed shortened time to pain relief, reduced pain intensity, and greater improvement than oxycodone alone. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Silicon-Containing GABA Derivatives, Silagaba Compounds, as Orally Effective Agents for Treating Neuropathic Pain without Central-Nervous-System-Related Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from neuronal damage. Pregabalin, the (S)-isomer of 3-isobutyl-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is widely used to treat neuropathic pain, despite the occurrence of central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects such as dizziness and somnolence. Here we describe the pharmacology of novel GABA derivatives containing silicon–carbon bonds, silagaba compounds. Silagaba131, 132, and 161 showed pregabalin-like analgesic activities in animal models of neuropathic pain, but in contrast to pregabalin they did not impair neuromuscular coordination in rotarod tests. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that brain exposure to silagaba compounds was lower than that to pregabalin. Surprisingly, despite their potent analgesic action in vivo, silagaba compounds showed only weak binding to α2-δ protein. These compounds may be useful to study mechanisms of neuropathic pain. Our results also indicate that silagaba132 and 161 are candidates for orally effective treatment of neuropathic pain without CNS-related side effects. PMID:24738473

  12. Novel Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) Derivative as a New Therapeutic Strategy for Reducing Neuropathic Pain after Chronic Constriction Nerve Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25855977

  13. Novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) derivative as a new therapeutic strategy for reducing neuropathic pain after chronic constriction nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Xifró, Xavier; Vidal-Sancho, Laura; Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Turrado, Carlos; Alberch, Jordi; Puig, Teresa; Verdú, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI). First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi). We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p.) during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain.

  14. Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Xavier; Wattiez, Anne S; Becamel, Carine; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Bockaert, Joel; Eschalier, Alain; Marin, Philippe; Courteix, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are one of the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Despite the influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in pain modulation, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less effective than tricyclic antidepressants. Here, we show, in diabetic neuropathic rats, an alteration of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors, which are known to mediate SSRI-induced analgesia. 5-HT2A receptor density was not changed in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, whereas postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), one of the PSD-95/disc large suppressor/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain containing proteins interacting with these receptors, was upregulated. Intrathecal injection of a cell-penetrating peptidyl mimetic of the 5-HT2A receptor C-terminus, which disrupts 5-HT2A receptor–PDZ protein interactions, induced an antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic rats, which results from activation of 5-HT2A receptors by endogenous 5-HT. The peptide also enhanced antihyperalgesia induced by the SSRI fluoxetine. Its effects likely resulted from an increase in receptor responsiveness, because it revealed functional 5-HT2A receptor-operated Ca2+ responses in neurons, an effect mimicked by knockdown of PSD-95. Hence, 5-HT2A receptor/PDZ protein interactions might contribute to the resistance to SSRI-induced analgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy. Disruption of these interactions might be a valuable strategy to design novel treatments for neuropathic pain and to increase the effectiveness of SSRIs. PMID:20531396

  15. UPREGULATION OF FATTY ACID AMIDE HYDROLASE (FAAH) IN THE DORSAL PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY IS ASSOCIATED WITH NEUROPATHIC PAIN AND REDUCED HEART RATE IN RATS.

    PubMed

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L; Hopp, Francis A; Hogan, Quinn H

    2017-02-01

    Nerve damage can induce a heightened pain response to noxious stimulation, which is termed hyperalgesia. Pain itself acts as a stressor, initiating autonomic and sensory effects through the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) to induce both sympathoexcitation and analgesia, which prior studies have shown to be affected by endocannabinoid signaling. The present study addressed the hypothesis that neuropathic pain disrupts autonomic and analgesic regulation by endocannabinoid signaling in the dPAG. Endocannabinoid contents, transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components, and catabolic enzyme activity were analyzed in the dPAG of rats at 21 days after painful nerve injury. The responses to two nerve injury models were similar, with two-thirds of animals developing hyperalgesia that was maintained throughout the post injury period, while no sustained change in sensory function was observed in the remaining rats. Anandamide content was lower in the dPAG of rats that developed sustained hyperalgesia and activity of the catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) was higher. Intensity of hyperalgesia was correlated to transcript levels of FAAH and negatively correlated to heart rate and sympatho-vagal balance. These data suggest that maladaptive endocannabinoid signaling in the dPAG after nerve injury could contribute to chronic neuropathic pain and associated autonomic dysregulation. This study demonstrates that reduced anandamide content and upregulation of FAAH in the dPAG are associated with hyperalgesia and reduced heart rate sustained weeks after nerve injury. These data provide support for the evaluation of FAAH inhibitors for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain.

  16. Ameliorative potential of Alstonia scholaris (Linn.) R. Br. against chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Hasandeep; Arora, Rohit; Arora, Saroj; Singh, Balbir

    2017-01-19

    Alstonia scholaris commonly known as 'Saptaparni' is an Indian traditional medicinal plant used in Ayurveda. It is commonly used to treat various disorders like asthma, bronchitis, diarrhea, dysentery and malaria. In folklore medicine the milky juice of the plant is applied on wounds and ulcers to treat pain, ear ache and also in rheumatic pains. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of A. scholaris R. Br. in chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve (CCI) induced neuropathic pain in rats. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve. The behavioral parameters like mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia were assessed on the 14(th) day. Tissue parameters like total protein, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase, total calcium and TNF-α were assessed to check biochemical changes. Chloroform and methanol extract of A. scholaris leaves (100 and 200 mg/kg) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, as positive control) were administered orally for 14 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. CCI resulted in significant development of mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia along with alteration in the biochemical changes. Administration of methanol extract at 200 mg/kg significantly attenuated the CCI induced change in nociceptive threshold and biochemical changes which was comparable to that of pregabalin. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the bioactive methanol extract revealed the presence of different types of flavonoids such as gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, ellagic acid and kaempferol, in which kaempferol was observed to be in higher concentration. Methanol extract (200 mg/kg) of A. scholaris showed the ameliorative effect in CCI induced neuropathic pain which may be due to the presence of kaempferol and attributed to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties.

  17. Antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain: a study on mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Üçel, Umut İrfan; Can, Özgür Devrim; Demir Özkay, Ümide; Öztürk, Yusuf

    2015-06-05

    This study used various experimental pain methods to investigate the effects of subacute mianserin administration on diabetes-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The effect of mianserin on hyperalgesia occurring in connection with peripheral diabetic neuropathy was examined using the Randall-Selitto (mechanical nociceptive stimulus), Hargreaves (thermal nociceptive stimulus), and cold-plate (4°C, thermal nociceptive stimulus) tests. The dynamic plantar aesthesiometer, which measures the threshold values for mechanical stimuli, was used for allodynia studies. Thermal allodynia was evaluated with the warm-plate (38°C) test. At 30 and 45 mg/kg, mianserin effectively improved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia occurring in connection with diabetic neuropathy. Subacute administration of mianserin also reduced diabetes-associated mechanical and thermal allodynia. The ability of mianserin to reduce diabetic neuropathic pain was comparable to that of pregabalin (10mg/kg). The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mianserin were reversed with α-methyl-para-tyrosine methyl ester (AMPT, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis), phentolamine (a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist), propranolol (a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist), and naloxone (a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist) administrations. The same effects were not reversed, however, by para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA; an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis). These results suggest that the beneficial effect of mianserin on diabetic neuropathic pain is mediated through an increase in catecholamine levels in the synaptic cleft as well as through interactions with both subtypes of adrenoceptors and opioid receptors. Considering that mianserin exhibits simultaneous antidepressant and antinociceptive effects, this drug could provide a good alternative for treating the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy and the mood disorders caused directly by diabetes.

  18. Pregabalin Versus Pramipexole: Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Patrick, Jeffrey; DuBrava, Sarah; Becker, Philip M.; Lankford, Alan; Chen, Crystal; Miceli, Jeffrey; Knapp, Lloyd; Allen, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare pregabalin versus placebo and pramipexole for reducing restless legs syndrome (RLS)-related sleep disturbance. Design: Randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial. Setting: Twenty-three US sleep centers. Participants: Eighty-five individuals with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS and associated sleep disturbance. Interventions: Participants were randomized across 6 treatment sequences comprising three 4-week periods on pregabalin 300 mg/day (n = 75), pramipexole 0.5 mg/day (n = 76), or placebo (n = 73). Measurements and Results: Polysomnography was conducted over 2 nights at the end of each period. Primary (wake after sleep onset [WASO], pregabalin vs placebo) and key secondary endpoints were analyzed for statistical significance, with descriptive statistics for other endpoints. Pregabalin improved sleep maintenance, demonstrated by reductions in WASO (-27.1 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; -26.9 vs pramipexole) and number of awakenings after sleep onset (-2.7 vs placebo; -7.9 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]) by polysomnography, and an increase in subjective total sleep time (30.8 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; 26.8 vs pramipexole). Pregabalin also increased slow wave sleep duration (20.9 min vs placebo; 32.1 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]). Reduction in periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI) with pregabalin was similar to pramipexole and greater than placebo (-3.7 PLMA/h [P < 0.0001]), although reduction in total PLM in sleep was less than for pramipexole. Conclusions: This study demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective measures of sleep maintenance and sleep architecture with pregabalin compared with placebo and pramipexole. Effects of pregabalin on periodic limb movement arousal index were comparable to pramipexole. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00991276; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00991276 Citation: Garcia-Borreguero D; Patrick J; DuBrava S; Becker PM; Lankford A; Chen C; Miceli J; Knapp L; Allen

  19. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  20. Relationship between pain relief and improvements in patient function/quality of life in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy or postherpetic neuralgia treated with pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron; Emir, Birol; Cheung, Raymond; Whalen, Ed

    2013-05-01

    In patients with chronic pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), pregabalin treatment results in pain relief and improved patient function/quality of life (QoL). Few studies, however, have examined the exact relationship between pain relief and improvements in patient function/QoL. It is unclear, for example, whether pregabalin has a direct independent effect on patient function/QoL or whether improvements in function/QoL are an indirect consequent of pain relief. To determine whether improvements in function/QoL in response to pregabalin treatment are related to the extent of pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain due to DPN or PHN and to determine whether pregabalin has a direct independent effect on patient function/QoL that is distinct from its effects on pain. Data from 11 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for the treatment of DPN or PHN were pooled for this analysis. Changes in patient function/QoL scores were plotted according to the extent of pain relief to assess whether greater levels of pain relief were associated with greater improvement in function/QoL. A novel mediation analysis was used to asses to what extent the effects of pregabalin on function/QoL scores are a direct treatment effect as opposed to an indirect effect mediated through improvements in pain or sleep. Moderate-to-substantial pain relief (a ≥30% decrease in pain) in response to pregabalin treatment was associated with significant (P < 0.05) improvements in 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores (used to assess patient function/QoL). In many patients, greatest improvement in SF-36 scores was reported by patients achieving ≥50% decrease in pain. Analysis of Patient Global Impression of Change scores revealed a similar trend, where >80% of patients who achieved substantial pain relief also reported their status as much or very much improved. A substantial direct pregabalin treatment effect was

  1. Pregabalin for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder with inadequate treatment response to antidepressants and severe depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Olivares, José M; Álvarez, Enrique; Carrasco, José L; Pérez Páramo, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin in patients with resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and severe depressive symptoms, we carried out a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter, prospective, and observational 6-month study. We included patients who were at least 18 years old, fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria for GAD, showed inadequate responses to previous courses of antidepressant treatment, had Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale scores of at least 35, had not received pregabalin previously, and were prescribed pregabalin upon entry into this study. We included 1815 patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for GAD, and 133 (7.3%) fulfilled the selection criteria for these analyses. Ninety-seven percent of the patients received pregabalin (mean dose: 222 mg/day) in combination with other psychotropics. The Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score was reduced by a mean of 20.3 points (95% confidence interval, 22.1-18.4) (57.2% reduction) at month 6. Pregabalin also ameliorated comorbid depressive symptoms, with a reduction in the mean score of the Montgomery-Asberg Rating Scale of 22.3 points (95% confidence interval, 24.2-20.4) (56.6% reduction). Our results suggest that pregabalin, as part of a combination regimen with antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines, might be effective for the treatment of patients with GAD who have shown inadequate response to previous antidepressants and have severe depressive symptoms.

  2. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score), quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life). We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%), remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001), but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p<0.001). Full compliance (minimum wear 7 hours a day 7 days per week) was reported by 40% of participants and 76% of participants reported a minimum wear of 5 hours a day 5 days per week. There was no difference in patient perception between insoles. Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole

  3. Gabapentin and pregabalin: abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    In Europe, in mid-2011, about 30 cases of dependence, abuse or withdrawal symptoms attributed to pregabalin had been reported to Swedish and French pharmacovigilance centres and the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). About 20 cases of gabapentin addiction were published in detail. The most frequently reported disorders were withdrawal symptoms. More than half of the patients were hospitalised for withdrawal. Cases of excessive increases in the doses of gabapentin or pregabalin, unauthorised routes of administration, and combination with other substances were also reported. Some patients had no known history of substance abuse. In practice, it is better to avoid exposing patients to these risks when the expected benefits are not properly documented. Healthcare professionals should take care to prevent and detect addiction to pregabalin or gabapentin. When necessary, assistance with tapering off the medication should be offered.

  4. Postdural puncture headache and pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Zencirci, Beyazit

    2010-01-01

    Background: Even if carried out under optimal conditions, postdural puncture headache is still a frustrating and unpleasant complication in spinal anesthesia. This syndrome has an estimated incidence from less than 1% to about 5% of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, even in the highest risk subset, the young, female, and pregnant population. Case presentation: In our two female cases, headaches started following spinal anesthesia on the 11th and 14th hours, respectively. No response was obtained from patients diagnosed with postdural puncture headache with classical treatments such as bed rest, hydration, oral analgesic, and caffeine combination as well as intravenous theophylline application. The treatment of oral pregablin, commonly used for cases that rejected epidural blood patch, caused a significant decrease in headache severity. Later, the two cases whose headaches were completely resolved were discharged from the hospital on the post-operative 7th day. Conclusion: Postdural puncture headache is one of the most common complications of spinal anesthesia. Cerebral spinal fluid leakage into the epidural space has been proposed as the main mechanism responsible for this syndrome. Multiple methods of treatment have been applied with wide-ranging results. We detected that oral pregabalin application caused a significant decrease in the difficult and severe postdural puncture headaches of both our cases who did not respond to conventional treatments. PMID:21197305

  5. Effect of Oral Pregabalin as Preemptive Analgesic in Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgeries under Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Bon; Nelamangala, Kiran; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conquering postoperative pain which has significant impact on the surgery outcome can be challenging for the clinicians. Pregabalin is a GABA analogue used for various neuropathic pain syndromes. Very few studies are there with the use of pregabalin as a preemptive analgesic for orthopedic surgeries. Aim To compare pregabalin 150 mg with placebo for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia and to assess any side effects. Materials and Methods A randomized double blinded prospective study was undertaken. Ninety patients with ASA physical status I, II, aged between 18–50 years were enrolled in the study. One hour prior to spinal anaesthesia Group C - received colour matched empty capsules, Group P – received 150mg of oral pregabalin. Spinal anaesthesia was administered in sitting position in L3-L4 space with Inj. Bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) at a dose of 0.3mg/kg body weight with 20 mg being the maximum dose using 25 gauge spinal needle. Rescue analgesia was provided with using Inj. Diclofenac 1.5 mg/kg intramuscular. Results Time for rescue analgesia (VAS score >3) was significantly increased in Group P than in Group C. The total dose of diclofenac required in the 24 hour postoperative period was significantly lower in Group P than in Group C. The sedation scores and patient satisfaction scores were also more in Group P than in Group C. Conclusion Preemptive pregabalin in an oral dose of 150 mg offers good postoperative analgesia in lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia. PMID:27630927

  6. Effect of Oral Pregabalin as Preemptive Analgesic in Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgeries under Spinal Anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Bon; Talikoti, Anand Tippanna; Nelamangala, Kiran; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2016-07-01

    Conquering postoperative pain which has significant impact on the surgery outcome can be challenging for the clinicians. Pregabalin is a GABA analogue used for various neuropathic pain syndromes. Very few studies are there with the use of pregabalin as a preemptive analgesic for orthopedic surgeries. To compare pregabalin 150 mg with placebo for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia and to assess any side effects. A randomized double blinded prospective study was undertaken. Ninety patients with ASA physical status I, II, aged between 18-50 years were enrolled in the study. One hour prior to spinal anaesthesia Group C - received colour matched empty capsules, Group P - received 150mg of oral pregabalin. Spinal anaesthesia was administered in sitting position in L3-L4 space with Inj. Bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) at a dose of 0.3mg/kg body weight with 20 mg being the maximum dose using 25 gauge spinal needle. Rescue analgesia was provided with using Inj. Diclofenac 1.5 mg/kg intramuscular. Time for rescue analgesia (VAS score >3) was significantly increased in Group P than in Group C. The total dose of diclofenac required in the 24 hour postoperative period was significantly lower in Group P than in Group C. The sedation scores and patient satisfaction scores were also more in Group P than in Group C. Preemptive pregabalin in an oral dose of 150 mg offers good postoperative analgesia in lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia.

  7. The endocannabinoid system and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Rafael; Baños, Josep Eladi; Cabañero, David

    2016-02-01

    The research of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain represents a major current priority. Important drawbacks to advance in the development of these therapies are the limited translational value of the animal models now available and the elucidation of the complex neuronal and immune pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain. One of the neurotransmitter systems participating in neuropathic pain control that has recently raised a particular interest is the endocannabinoid system. This system is highly expressed in neurons and immune cells, and it plays a crucial role in the development of neuropathic pain. Preclinical studies have provided important findings, revealing the potential interest of the endocannabinoid system for the treatment of neuropathic pain. These studies have reported the analgesic effects of cannabinoid agonists in multiple neuropathic pain models, and they have identified specific targets within this system to develop more effective and safe analgesic compounds. However, further studies using more relevant neuropathic pain animal models are required to confirm these interesting results. Several clinical studies suggest that cannabinoids significantly reduced neuropathic pain, although most of these trials fail the required standards of quality. The different pain patient populations included in the systematic reviews also make it difficult to get adequate conclusions. Therefore, additional clinical trials that consider an adequate number of patients, the use active treatments as controls, and longer duration of administration are required to have an adequate profile of the effectiveness and safety of cannabinoids in neuropathic pain.

  8. Comparative Efficacy of Newer Antidepressants in Combination with Pregabalin for Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Controlled, Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Ramzy, Eiad A

    2017-01-01

    This controlled, randomized study investigated the hypothesis that the combined use of pregabalin plus paroxetine for fibromyalgia management would be associated with comparable Somatic Symptoms Scale-8 (SSS-8) and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESDS) scores, but higher tolerability than the combined use of pregabalin plus either amitriptyline or venlafaxine. After institutional ethics committee approval, 75 female subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia and in receipt of pregabalin (75 mg/day) were randomly allocated to concurrently receive amitriptyline (25 mg/day; n = 24), venlafaxine (75 mg/day; n = 25), or paroxetine (25 mg/day; n = 26). All patients were assessed bimonthly for 6 consecutive months for changes in SSS-8 and CESDS scores, life satisfaction, mood, sleep quality, fatigue, medication tolerability, and adverse events. Compared with pregabalin plus amitriptyline or venlafaxine, the combined use of pregabalin plus paroxetine in fibromyalgia patients resulted in significantly lower SSS-8 and CESDS scores from 18 (P < 0.05) and 10 weeks (P < 0.001) after the initiation of study medications, respectively; higher medication tolerability (P < 0.001); improved life satisfaction, mood, and sleep quality at most observation times (P < 0.05); and fewer instances of dry mouth and elevated blood pressure (P < 0.02). Medication termination due to poor tolerability was observed most frequently in the venlafaxine group (P < 0.05), while drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, abnormal taste, hunger, hallucination, urination problems, and sexual dysfunction were observed most frequently in the amitriptyline group (P < 0.02). The combined use of pregabalin plus paroxetine offers an effective method with increased tolerability to reduce the somatic and depressive symptoms of fibromyalgia and to enhance the quality of life in affected individuals. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  9. Effect of pregabalin on cerebral outcome after cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Ma, Qing; Zhang, Zhiquan; Podgoreanu, Mihai V; Mackensen, G Burkhard

    2014-07-01

    Activation of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels and release of glutamate play a central role in neuronal necrosis after cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Pregabalin binds to the α2-δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in reduced glutamate release. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of pregabalin on cerebral outcome after cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest through an established rat model allowing long-term survival. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive intraperitoneal injection of 30 mg/kg of pregabalin or an equal amount of normal saline 1 hour before cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 10, each). Rats were cooled to a pericranial temperature of 18°C and underwent deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for 60 minutes. Neurologic performance was assessed at postoperative days 3, 7, and 12. Cognitive performance (Morris water maze) was assessed daily from postoperative day 3 to 12 when histologic assessment was performed. Neurologic scores were significantly better in the pregabalin group than in the control group at all time points of measurements. Morris water maze latencies were not statistically different between the groups. The percentage of necrotic neurons in the cerebral cortex was significantly less in the pregabalin group compared with the control group (8.6% [interquartile range, 5.0-8.9] vs 13.6% [interquartile range, 6.9-18.6], P = .045), whereas no difference was observed in the hippocampus. Preemptive treatment with pregabalin conveyed a beneficial influence on functional and histologic cerebral outcome in rats undergoing 60 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest after cardiopulmonary bypass without any noticeable side effects. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative clinical study of gabapentin and pregabalin for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rajshree; Tripathi, Manoj; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in central sensitization by gabapentinoids that include gabapentin and pregabalin may reduce acute postoperative pain. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative analgesic benefit and efficacy in patients administered with oral gabapentin or pregabalin as premedication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized, prospective, and comparative study. Materials and Methods: In this study, recruited patients were randomly allocated in three groups. Groups A, B, and C received 2 capsules of B complex, 3 capsules of 300 mg gabapentin each, and 2 capsules of 75 mg pregabalin, respectively, each in 30 patients of each group, 1 h before induction of anesthesia. Postoperative efficacy among these three groups was compared with respect to increase in duration of analgesia, reduction in postoperative pain scores, total postoperative requirements of analgesics and side effects. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation were calculated. Test of analysis between two groups was done by t-test and among three groups by analysis of variance, and then P value was calculated. Results: Pregabalin and gabapentin group had lower visual analog scale (VAS) score (P < 0.05), prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic (4.67 ± 14.79 vs. 158 ± 13.10 vs. 343.16 ± 9.69) min, and less opioid consumption (169.87 ± 20.32 vs. 116.13 ± 14.08 vs. 64.67 ± 16.69) mg compared to placebo group. Between the gabapentinoids, pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Conclusion: It is concluded in this study that pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Both gabapentinoids had better postoperative analgesic profile than placebo. PMID:27212747

  11. Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; River, Yaron; Shifrin, Ala; Krivoy, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are an effective treatment for various forms of neuropathic pain of peripheral origin, although they rarely provide complete pain relief. Multiple multicentre randomised controlled trials have shown clear efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. Theses drugs can be rapidly titrated and are well tolerated. Topiramate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are alternatives for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, but should be titrated slowly. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia; however, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine are potential alternatives. There is an apparent need for large-scale randomised controlled trials on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain in general, and in cancer-related neuropathic pain and neuropathic pain of central origin in particular. Trials with long-term follow-up are required to establish the long-term efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain. There is only limited scientific evidence to support the idea that drug combinations are likely to be more efficacious and safer than each drug alone; further studies are warranted in this area.

  12. Bioequivalence assessment of two pregabalin capsules in healthy Mediterranean Arab volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Kittana, Naim; Mousa, Ayman; Ghazal, Nadia; Bustami, Rana

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain has always been challenging, not only from the pharmaco-therapeutic/toxicological point of view, but also due to the unpredictable pharmacokinetic (PK) variations among different generic formulations of the same drug, which require further dose optimization. This progressive work aims to evaluate the bioequivalence (BE) of a generic product of 150 mg pregabalin capsule (antineuropathic drug) vs. the reference brand drug Lyrica®. An LC-MS/MS bioanalytical method was developed and validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in order to be used for the analysis of pregabalin in plasma. BE of capsules was tested by comparison against the reference brand capsules in accordance with the requirements of the declarations of Helsinki, the current Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guidelines and the ICH. The resulting data were compared against corresponding pregabalin data published on other human races. The relationship between concentration and peak area ratio was found to be linear within the range 0.096 - 6.068 µg/mL for pregabalin. The correlation coefficient (r) was equal to 0.9983. Statistical comparison of the main PK parameters showed no significant difference between test and reference. The mean Cmax values for test and reference were 4.290 and 4.164 µg/mL, and the mean AUC0-last values were 24.275 h×µg/mL and 23.674 h×µg/mL, respectively. The 90% CIs of geometric mean ratios (test/reference) for pregabalin were 100.34 - 104.78%, 100.34 - 104.70%, and 95.65 - 110.96% for AUC0-last, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively, thus fall within the international specified BE limit (80 - 125%). Both products were well tolerated by all the volunteers and there were no significant differences on physical examination or in vital signs and laboratory tests between groups. All volunteers completed the study and were

  13. Maraviroc reduces neuropathic pain through polarization of microglia and astroglia - Evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Klaudia; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Mika, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that CCR5 and its ligands are important regulators for the development of neuropathic pain and that their modulation can have some beneficial properties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of maraviroc (MVC, a CCR5 antagonist) on glial polarization markers and intracellular signaling pathways in the spinal cord 7 days after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve and in primary glial cultures after LPS stimulation. Our results demonstrated that chronic intrathecal administration of MVC diminished neuropathic pain symptoms and nociceptive threshold ∼60 min after drug administration on days 3 and 7 post-CCI. MVC downregulated the levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins in the spinal cord and upregulated STAT3 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Additionally, using Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that MVC effectively diminished "classical" activation markers: IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6 and NOS2 in the spinal cord. In contrast, MVC upregulated "alternative" antinociceptive activation markers: IL-1RA, IL-18BP and IL-10 in the spinal cord. In parallel, MVC downregulated the levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins and upregulated STAT3 in microglial and astroglial cell cultures. Similarly, MVC reduced pronociceptive (IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, NOS2) and enhanced the antinociceptive (IL-1RA, IL-18BP, IL-10) factors after LPS stimulation. Our studies provide new evidence that MVC attenuates neuropathy symptoms, promotes spinal glial "alternative" polarization and restores the balance between pro- and antinociceptive factors. Our results suggest the modulation of CCR5 by MVC as a novel therapeutic approach for neuropathy.

  14. Tramadol reduces anxiety-related and depression-associated behaviors presumably induced by pain in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Caspani, Ombretta; Reitz, Marie-Céline; Ceci, Angelo; Kremer, Andreas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-09-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities of neuropathic pain (NP). Pharmacological preclinical studies on NP have given abundant information on the effects of drugs on reflex measures of stimulus-evoked pain. However, few preclinical studies focus on relief of comorbidities evoked by NP. In this study, we investigated the effects of tramadol on nociceptive reflex, depression-associated and anxiety-related behaviors in a NP model in rats. We used chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve as an animal model of neuropathic pain. We performed electronic von Frey tests (evF) to measure mechanical sensitivity, elevated plus maze tests (EPM) to record anxiety-related behaviors and forced swimming tests (FST) to evaluate depression-associated behaviors. In the evF, CCI rats showed a decrease of 82% of the paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) compared to sham (P<0.001). Tramadol increased the PWT by 336% in CCI rats (P<0.001) and by 16% in sham (P<0.05). On the EPM, CCI rats spent 45% less time than sham on the open arms of the maze (P<0.05). Tramadol increased the time spent on the open arms of CCI rats by 67% (P<0.05) and had no significant effect on sham. During the FST, CCI rats showed 28% longer immobility than sham (P<0.01). Tramadol reduced the immobility time in CCI rats by 22% (P<0.001), while having no effect on sham. Tramadol reversed the changes in mechanical sensitivity as well as anxiety-related and depression-associated behaviors that are caused by injury of the sciatic nerve with only minor effects in the absence of injury. These data suggest that tramadol relieves chronic pain and its indirect consequences and comorbidities, and that this study also is a model for pharmacological studies seeking to investigate the effect of drugs on the major disabling symptoms of NP.

  15. Swing time ratio, a new parameter of gait disturbance, for the evaluation of the severity of neuropathic pain in a rat model of partial sciatic nerve ligation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kenshiro; Orito, Kensuke; Amagai, Yosuke; Jang, Hyosun; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic weight bearing tests are used to evaluate the chronic pain severity in animal models of nociceptive pain (such as osteoarthritis); however, common tests frequently fail to collect the characteristics of neuropathic pain such as allodynia, because surgical intervention which is sometimes required to establish the models causes both nociceptive and neuropathic pain. In this study, we used rats with partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) as the neuropathic and chronic pain model. To assess the severity of pain by gait disturbance, we applied automatic analysis on walking function using the GAIT® system. The system employs a novel index of abnormal step cycles, the swing time ratio (STR), of laboratory animals. Data were compared to those obtained with conventional tests, including a von Frey test and a hot plate test. Finally, we analyzed recovery of walking function after single or repeated administration of pregabalin. By using rats with PSL, we confirmed that results obtained by the GAIT® system were comparable to those obtained by both von Frey tests and hot plate tests. Single administration of pregabalin transiently improved STR, on the other hand, repeated pregabalin treatment showed lasting STR recovery. STR is sensitive to claudication of rats with PSL, providing a new scale to evaluate neuropathic pain in addition to conventional tests. Moreover, STR analysis enables us to evaluate walking function of animal models after neuropathic injury, which is quite important to judge the effectiveness of new treatments and analgesics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome responsive to pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, FH; Liu, W; Geigel, E; Castaneda, S; Rossi, EM; Schnacky, K

    2015-01-01

    Report three cases of painful legs and moving toes (PLMT) syndrome responsive to pregabalin along with a review of its literature. Three patients with PLMT syndrome improved with pregabalin. The first and third patient reported improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and quality of sleep sustained over time. The second and third patient had near complete remission of toe movements, but pregabalin was discontinued in the second patient due to aggravation of leg edema. PLMT is a rare and debilitating disorder characterized by lower limb pain and involuntary toes or feet movements. Its pathophysiology remains unknown and its therapy refractory to most drugs, except for pregabalin, as shown in this case series. PLMT is a rare and incapacitating syndrome due to the lack of an effective pain therapy. We report three patients with PLMT who favorable responded to pregabalin. We propose pregabalin be considered in the management of PLMT. PMID:25766346

  17. Determining the Toxicological Significance of Pregabalin in Fatalities.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon P; Burke, Timothy; Smith, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Pregabalin has become more widely prescribed and abused in recent years but is still not always included in laboratory analysis. An LC-MS-MS method has been developed and applied to measure pregabalin in 93 postmortem cases, including drug-related deaths, alternative causes of death, and fatalities where pregabalin was likely to have contributed to death. Other drugs or alcohol was detected, and the most common drug types (in decreasing frequency) were antidepressants, opioids, benzodiazepines, opiates, alcohol, antipsychotics, cocaine, cardiac drugs, amphetamines, cannabis, anticonvulsants, and antihistamines. New psychoactive substances (methoxphenidine and synthetic cannabinoids) were only found in two cases. The results provide further data to assist in evaluating the significance of postmortem pregabalin concentrations and a toxicologically significant concentration of 25 mg/L is proposed. Pregabalin, especially with concomitant use of other CNS depressant drugs, presents a significant toxicological risk and existing laboratory protocols should be reviewed for their suitability to detect pregabalin. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Impact of a Novel Cost-Saving Pharmacy Program on Pregabalin Use and Health Care Costs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carolyn; Odell, Kevin; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Bancroft, Tim; Halpern, Rachel; Sadosky, Alesia

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacy cost-saving programs often aim to reduce costs for members and payers by encouraging use of lower-tier or generic medications and lower-cost sales channels. In 2010, a national U.S. health plan began a novel pharmacy program directed at reducing pharmacy expenditures for targeted medications, including pregabalin. The program provided multiple options to avoid higher cost sharing: use mail order pharmacy or switch to a lower-cost alternative medication via mail order or retail. Members who did not choose any option eventually paid the full retail cost of pregabalin. To evaluate the impact of the pharmacy program on pregabalin and alternative medication use, health care costs, and health care utilization. This retrospective analysis of claims data included adult commercial health plan members with a retail claim for pregabalin in the first 13 months of the pharmacy program (identification [ID] period: February 1, 2010-February 28, 2011). Members whose benefit plan included the pharmacy program were assigned to the program cohort; all others were assigned to the nonprogram cohort. The program cohort index date was the first retail pregabalin claim during the ID period and after the program start; the nonprogram cohort index date was the first retail pregabalin claim during the ID period. All members were continuously enrolled for 12 months pre- and post-index and had at least 1 inpatient claim or ≥ 2 ambulatory visit claims for a pregabalin-indicated condition. Cohorts were propensity score matched (PSM) 1:1 with logistic regression on demographic and pre-index characteristics, including mail order and pregabalin use, comorbidity, health care costs, and health care utilization. Pregabalin, gabapentin and other alternative medication use, health care costs, and health care utilization were measured. The program cohort was also divided into 2 groups: members who changed to gabapentin post-index and those who did not. A difference-in-differences (Di

  19. Dose-related neuropathic and anti-neuropathic effects of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shrutya; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-06-01

    The present study explores the role of simvastatin in vincristine-induced neuropathic pain, which was induced by administering vincristine (100 µg/kg i.p.) for 10 days (two 5 day cycles with 2 days pause). Pain was assessed by determining mechanical hyperalgesia, mechanical dynamic allodynia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. Biochemically, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured along with serum cholesterol levels. Simvastatin (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days after administration of vincristine. Simvastatin (7.5 and 15 mg/kg) reversed vincristine-induced neuropathic pain and attenuated vincristine-induced increase in MPO, without altering cholesterol levels. Simvastatin at higher dose (30 mg/kg) did not alter neuropathic pain despite decreasing MPO levels. Furthermore, administration of simvastatin (30 mg/kg i.p.) in vincristine treated rats as well as it's per se administration in normal rats reduced cholesterol levels. Per se administration of simvastatin in normal rats produced neuropathic pain. It is concluded that simvastatin attenuates neuropathic pain only at lower doses with no reduction in cholesterol levels and anti-inflammatory effects may possibly reverse neuropathic pain. However, despite reducing inflammation, simvastatin did not confer beneficial effects at higher doses at which there is reduction in cholesterol levels, suggesting the critical role of cholesterol in neuropathic pain induction.

  20. Population pharmacokinetic model of the pregabalin-sildenafil interaction in rats: application of simulation to preclinical PK-PD study design.

    PubMed

    Bender, Gregor; Gosset, James; Florian, Jeff; Tan, Keith; Field, Mark; Marshall, Scott; DeJongh, Joost; Bies, Robert; Danhof, Meindert

    2009-10-01

    Preliminary evidence has suggested a synergistic interaction between pregabalin and sildenafil for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The focus of this study was to determine the influence of sildenafil on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of pregabalin with the objective of informing the design of a quantitative pharmacodynamic (PD) study. The pharmacokinetics were determined in rats following 2-hr intravenous infusions of pregabalin at doses of 4 mg/kg/hr and 10 mg/kg/hr with and without a sildenafil bolus (2.2 mg) and steady state infusion (12 mg/kg/hr for 6 h). This PK model was utilized in a preclinical trial simulation with the aim of selecting the optimal sampling strategy to characterize the PK-PD profile in a future study. Eight logistically feasible PK sampling strategies were simulated in NONMEM and examined through trial simulation techniques. A two-compartment population PK model best described pregabalin pharmacokinetics. Significant model covariates included either a binary effect of sildenafil administration (30.2% decrease in clearance) or a concentration-dependent effect due to sildenafil's active metabolite. Analysis of simulations indicated that three post-PD samples had the best cost/benefit ratio by providing a significant increase in the precision (and minor improvement in bias) of both PK and PD parameters compared with no PK sampling.

  1. Anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure assay in α2δ1 (R217A) and α2δ2 (R279A) mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Lotarski, Susan; Hain, Heather; Peterson, Jason; Galvin, Stacey; Strenkowski, Bryan; Donevan, Sean; Offord, James

    2014-07-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to have anticonvulsant, analgesic, and anxiolytic activity in animal models. Pregabalin binds with high affinity to the α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. In order to better understand the relative contribution that binding to either the α2δ1 or α2δ2 subunits confers on the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin, we characterized the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in different wild-type (WT) and mutant mouse strains. Two targeted mouse mutants have been made in which either the α2δ1 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 217; R217A) or the α2δ2 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 279; R279A). These mutations in α2δ1 or α2δ2 render the subunits relatively insensitive to pregabalin binding. The anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin was assessed in these different mouse lines using the maximal electroshock-induced seizure (MES) model. Pregabalin reduced the percentage of seizures and increased the latency to seizure in the MES model in two parental mouse strains used to construct the mutants. Pregabalin also reduced the percentage of seizures and increased latency to seizure similarly in the α2δ2 (R279A) and WT littermate control mice. In contrast, pregabalin's anticonvulsant efficacy was significantly reduced in α2δ1 (R217A) mutants compared with WT littermate control mice. Phenytoin showed anticonvulsant activity across all WT and mutant mice. These data show that the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the MES model requires binding to the α2δ1 subunit.

  2. Efficacy of pregabalin in depressive symptoms associated with generalized anxiety disorder: a pooled analysis of 6 studies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Baldwin, David S; Baldinetti, Francesca; Mandel, Francine

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports comorbidity of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) or dysthymia, and its association with significant disability. As pregabalin, a new alpha(2)-delta anxiolytic treatment for GAD, unlike most other licensed treatments for GAD has not undergone investigation in patients with MDD, we examined its efficacy in depressive symptoms associated with GAD, through a post-hoc analysis of the existing clinical trial database. The results provide consistent evidence that in patients with GAD pregabalin reduced associated symptoms of depression. This was seen in the 150 mg/day, 300-450 mg/day and 600 mg/day dosing groups. Even in subjects with more prominent depressive symptoms, pregabalin remained effective for both sub-syndromal depression and GAD symptoms, with pregabalin 300-450 mg/day demonstrating the most beneficial response. In conclusion, pregabalin, an alternative treatment option for GAD with a novel mechanism of action, also demonstrated efficacy in treating depressive symptoms typically encountered in GAD patients.

  3. Profiles of pregabalin and gabapentin abuse by postmortem toxicology.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Vuori, Erkki; Kalso, Eija; Gergov, Merja; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2014-08-01

    Pregabalin (PRG) and gabapentin (GBP) are used in the treatment of neuropathic pain and epilepsy, and PRG also in generalized anxiety disorder. There is increasing evidence that PRG possesses considerable abuse potential. PRG may have a higher addiction potential than GBP due to its rapid absorption and faster onset of action. Our objective is to estimate the proportion of all PRG- and GBP-related fatalities attributable to PRG and GBP abuse. We investigated all medico-legal death cases in Finland in which PRG or GBP was found in postmortem toxicology during 2010-2011. PRG was found in 316 cases and GBP in 43 cases. Drug abuse was associated with 48.1% of the PRG and 18.6% of the GBP findings. PRG poisoning accounted for 10.1% of all PRG cases and GBP poisoning for 4.7% of all GBP cases. In the drug abuser cases, PRG poisoning represented 19.1%, and GBP poisoning 12.5%. The median blood concentration of PRG was 15 mg/L in the abuser group and 5.8 mg/L in the other cases. For GBP, these concentrations were 12 mg/L and 8.3mg/L, respectively. In the PRG abuser group, 91.4% of cases showed concomitant opioid use, while in the rest of these cases neither alcohol nor opioids were detected, but other central nervous system acting drugs were found in each abuser case. In the GBP abuser group, 87.5% of cases showed concomitant opioid use. PRG abuse with high doses is increasingly common and can be fatal when combined with opioids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antidepressants and gabapentinoids in neuropathic pain: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2016-12-03

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is generally chronic and challenging to treat. The recommended pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes the use of some antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (amitriptyline…) or serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors (duloxetine…), and/or anticonvulsants such as the gabapentinoids gabapentin or pregabalin. Antidepressant drugs are not acute analgesics but require a chronic treatment to relieve neuropathic pain, which suggests the recruitment of secondary downstream mechanisms as well as long-term molecular and neuronal plasticity. Noradrenaline is a major actor for the action of antidepressant drugs in a neuropathic pain context. Mechanistic hypotheses have implied the recruitment of noradrenergic descending pathways as well as the peripheral recruitment of noradrenaline from sympathetic fibers sprouting into dorsal root ganglia; and importance of both α2 and β2 adrenoceptors have been reported. These monoamine re-uptake inhibitors may also indirectly act as anti-proinflammatory cytokine drugs; and their therapeutic action requires the opioid system, particularly the mu (MOP) and/or delta (DOP) opioid receptors. Gabapentinoids, which target the voltage-dependent calcium channels α2δ-1 subunit, inhibit calcium currents, thus decreasing the excitatory transmitter release and spinal sensitization. Gabapentinoids also activate the descending noradrenergic pain inhibitory system coupled to spinal α2 adrenoceptors. Gabapentinoid treatment may also indirectly impact on neuroimmune actors, like proinflammatory cytokines. These drugs are effective against neuropathic pain both with acute administration at high dose and with repeated administration. This review focuses on mechanistic knowledge concerning chronic antidepressant treatment and gabapentinoid treatment in a neuropathic pain context. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by

  5. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  6. Bioequivalence of two formulations of pregabalin 150-mg capsules under fasting conditions in healthy male subjects
.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun A; Lee, SeungHwan; Yim, Sung-Vin; Kim, Bo-Hyung

    2017-02-01

    Pregabalin binds to the α2δ auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, which are widely distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems and modulate calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release. Pregabalin is indicated for the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain, partial seizures with or without secondary generalization, and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to assess the bioequivalence of two different formulations of pregabalin 150-mg capsules in healthy Korean male subjects under fasting conditions. This bioequivalence study was based on an open-label, single-dose, randomized, 2-period, 2-sequence crossover design with a washout period of 7 days. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation were collected up to 24 hours postdose. Plasma concentrations of pregabalin were determined using a validated LC-MS/MS method. PK parameters were determined using noncompartmental analysis. Bioequivalence was assumed if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the test/reference ratios of log-transformed Cmax and AUClast values met the bioequivalence criteria specified by Korean regulatory guidelines (90% CI 0.8 - 1.25). The extent of exposure in terms of AUClast amounted to 26,018.3 - 3,580.8 µg×h/L for the test formulation and 25,680.2 ± 3,083.6 µg×h/L for the reference formulation. Cmax reached values of 4,782.7 ± 1,124.2 µg/L and 4,654.0 ± 911.4 µg/L for the test product and reference product, respectively. The geometric mean ratio and 90% CIs of the test product to the reference product were 1.0132 (0.9862 - 1.0351) for AUClast and 1.0153 (0.9351 - 1.1044) for Cmax, which were well within the range necessary to establish bioequivalence (90% CI 0.8 - 1.25). The bioequivalence between test and reference formulations under fasting conditions was confirmed both in terms of the rate and

  7. Comparative study of the efficacy of limaprost and pregabalin as single agents and in combination for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kim, Jin Hyok; Park, Ye Soo; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jae Hyup; Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Although the simultaneous management of neuronal ischemia-related pain and compression-demyelination-related neuropathic pain is considered optimal in treating lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), the effect of combination therapy with pregabalin and limaprost has not been elucidated. This study aimed to compare the effects of limaprost and pregabalin individually and in combination for the treatment of LSS. This is a prospective, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial. The sample consists of patients with LSS. The baseline-adjusted Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) scores for leg pain, the European Quality of Life-5 dimensions (EQ-5D), and initial claudication distance (ICD). The present study (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01888536) was a prospective, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized controlled trial designed to determine the efficacy of limaprost in alleviating leg pain, improving disability, and increasing walking distance in persons with degenerative LSS in three different treatment groups: limaprost alone, pregabalin alone, and combined limaprost and pregabalin through 1:1:1 allocation. The primary outcome was the baseline-adjusted ODI score at 8 weeks after treatment. The non-inferior margin of the ODI was set at δ=10 points. The baseline-adjusted ODI score (primary outcome) at 8 weeks after treatment in the limaprost group was not inferior to those in the pregabalin and limaprost+pregabalin groups. The overall changes of the baseline-adjusted ODI scores, VAS scores for leg pain, the EQ-5D, and ICD during the follow-up assessments over an 8-week period (secondary end point) were not different among the three groups. The baseline-adjusted ODI scores and VAS scores for leg pain decreasedsignificantly over time after treatment in all three groups. The baseline-adjusted EQ-5D score and ICD also increased significantly over time after treatment in all three groups. The efficacy of limaprost for lumbar spinal

  8. Severe Vincristine-induced Neuropathic Pain in a CYP3A5 Nonexpressor With Reduced CYP3A4/5 Activity: Case Study.

    PubMed

    Bosilkovska, Marija; Ing Lorenzini, Kuntheavy; Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao S; Desmeules, Jules; Daali, Youssef; Escher, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent vincristine-induced adverse effect. Vincristine is a substrate of P-glycoprotein and is metabolized by the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 3A5 and 3A4 isoforms, with CYP3A5 contributing to 75% of the intrinsic clearance of vincristine. Alterations in the function of these proteins may lead to an increase in vincristine toxicity. CYP3A5 nonexpressor status has been associated with vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. The severity of neuropathy has been reported to be inversely correlated to vincristine metabolite concentrations. Recently, the presence of a mutation in the CEP72 gene, which encodes for a protein involved in microtubule formation, has also been associated with vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. However, a clear correlation between genetic polymorphisms and vincristine toxicity has not been established. Here we report the case of a 21-year old patient in whom severe neuropathic pain developed after vincristine treatment. The patient was a CYP3A5 nonexpressor and presented with reduced CYP3A4/5 functional activity, a likely reason for the occurrence of the adverse event, as genotyping showed that his status was wild type for the ABCB1 and CEP72 genes. CYP phenotype and genotype may explain the occurrence of severe neuropathy in some patients treated with vincristine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Standardized Aqueous Tribulus terristris (nerunjil) extract attenuates hyperalgesia in experimentally induced diabetic neuropathic pain model: role of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Ranjithkumar, Ravichandran; Prathab Balaji, S; Balaji, Bhaskar; Ramesh, R V; Ramanathan, Muthiah

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate standardized aqueous Tribulus terristris (nerunjil) extract on the pain threshold response in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model in rats. After a single injection of STZ (40 mg/kg; i.p.), Wistar male rats were tested by the thermal and chemical-induced pain models. Diabetic rats exhibited significant hyperalgesia, and these rats were left untreated for the first four weeks. Thereafter, treatment was initiated and continued up to week-8. All the rats except the vehicle-treated group received insulin 5 IU/kg/day to maintain plasma glucose levels. Treatment with nerunjil (100 and 300 mg/kg; p.o.) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated the nociception in behavioural models. Nerunjil also inhibited the tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 beta levels. The effect of nerunjil (300 mg/kg) is comparable to the standard drug Pregabalin (100 mg/kg). Nerunjil increased the superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and decreased the lipid peroxide levels in dose-dependent manner. Insulin alone-treated rats failed to attenuate hyperalgesic response. In comparison to insulin alone-treated rats, nerunjil exhibited significant increase in the pain threshold response. It could be concluded that in controlled diabetic states, nerunjil attenuated the neuropathic pain through modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine release.

  10. Efficacy of Pregabalin in Acute Postoperative Pain Under Different Surgical Categories

    PubMed Central

    Lam, David M.H.; Choi, Siu-Wai; Wong, Stanley S.C.; Irwin, Michael G.; Cheung, Chi-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy of pregabalin in acute postsurgical pain has been demonstrated in numerous studies; however, the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of using pregabalin in various surgical procedures remain uncertain. We aim to assess the postsurgical analgesic efficacy and adverse events after pregabalin administration under different surgical categories using a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. A search of the literature was performed between August 2014 to April 2015, using PubMed, Ovid via EMBASE, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov with no limitation on publication year or language. Studies considered for inclusion were randomized controlled trials, reporting on relevant outcomes (2-, 24-hour pain scores, or 24 hour morphine-equivalent consumption) with treatment with perioperative pregabalin. Seventy-four studies were included. Pregabalin reduced pain scores at 2 hours in all categories: cardiothoracic (Hedge's g and 95%CI, −0.442 [−0.752 to −0.132], P = 0.005), ENT (Hedge g and 95%CI, −0.684 [−1.051 to −0.316], P < 0.0001), gynecologic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.792 [−1.235 to −0.350], P < 0.0001), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Hedge g, 95%CI, –0.600 [–0.989 to –0.210], P = 0.003), orthopedic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.507 [−0.812 to −0.202], P = 0.001), spine (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.972 [−1.537 to −0.407], P = 0.001), and miscellaneous procedures (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.976 [−2.654 to −1.297], P < 0.0001). Pregabalin reduced 24-hour morphine consumption in gynecologic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.085 [−1.582 to −0.441], P = 0.001), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Hedge g, 95%CI, –0.886 [–1.652 to –0.120], P = 0.023), orthopedic (Hedge g, 95%CI, −0.720 [−1.118 to −0.323], P < 0.0001), spine (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.016 [−1.732 to −0.300], P = 0.005), and miscellaneous procedures (Hedge g, 95%CI, −1.329 [−2.286 to −0.372], P = 0

  11. Long-term efficacy of pregabalin in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Feltner, Douglas; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Kavoussi, Richard; Brock, Jerri; Baldinetti, Francesca; Pande, Atul C

    2008-01-01

    A multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin in preventing relapse of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) after response to short-term treatment. Outpatients (n=624) with GAD for > or =1 year received open-label pregabalin (450 mg/day) for 8 weeks and, if a clinical response was observed, were randomized to receive either pregabalin (450 mg/day; n=168) or placebo (n=170) for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy parameter was time to relapse. Among responders to open-label acute treatment with pregabalin, time to relapse of GAD was significantly longer for patients treated with pregabalin compared with placebo (P<0.0001). Fifty per cent of the placebo group had relapsed by day 23, and at study endpoint, 65% had relapsed. In the pregabalin group, only 42% had relapsed by study end. Total attrition during double-blind treatment was somewhat higher on pregabalin compared with placebo (21.4 vs. 15.3%); attrition owing to adverse events (AEs) was also somewhat higher on pregabalin (6.0 vs. 2.4%). AEs were relatively low in the double-blind phase; only three AEs occurred with an incidence of more than 5% on pregabalin and placebo, respectively: infection (14.9 vs. 11.2%), headache (10.1 vs. 11.2%), and somnolence (6.0 vs. 0%). No safety concerns were identified with long-term treatment. The study indicates that pregabalin is an effective treatment for the prevention of relapse in patients with GAD.

  12. Neuropathic Pain After Breast Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-31

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  13. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  14. Effect of pregabalin augmentation in treatment of patients with combat-related chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baniasadi, Mehdi; Hosseini, Golkoo; Fayyazi Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei Ardani, Amir; Mostafavi Toroghi, Hesam

    2014-11-01

    It has been suggested that the anticonvulsant drug pregabalin may be useful in some anxiety disorders. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pregabalin augmentation of standard treatment (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sodium valproate) for patients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This doubleblind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at Ibn-E-Sina Psychiatric Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) in 2013. Thirty-seven male patients diagnosed with combat-related PTSD based on DSM-IV-TR criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: 18 patients, the case group, received pregabalin (300 mg/day) while 19 patients, the control group, received placebo for 6 weeks. Assessments were done at baseline and at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after the onset of treatment, using the PTSD Check List-Military Version (PCL-M), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Spitzer Quality of Life Index. Pregabalin was just significantly effective in improving PCL-M scores (p=0.045) in comparison to placebo. Although depression and anxiety scores diminished significantly in both groups (p=0.001 and 0.0001, respectively), comparison of the efficacy of pregabalin and placebo did not show significant differences in depression, anxiety, and quality of life scores (p=0.614, 0.144, and 0.076, respectively). Pregabalin effectively reduced the severity of PTSD symptoms but it was not effective in improving the severity of depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Further investigations are required to confirm or refute these findings.

  15. Recommendations for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain: an overview and literature update.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; O'Connor, Alec B; Audette, Joseph; Baron, Ralf; Gourlay, Geoffrey K; Haanpää, Maija L; Kent, Joel L; Krane, Elliot J; Lebel, Alyssa A; Levy, Robert M; Mackey, Sean C; Mayer, John; Miaskowski, Christine; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Schmader, Kenneth E; Stacey, Brett; Stanos, Steven; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C; Walco, Gary A; Wells, Christopher D

    2010-03-01

    The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group of the International Association for the Study of Pain recently sponsored the development of evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain. Tricyclic antidepressants, dual reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine, calcium channel alpha(2)-delta ligands (ie, gabapentin and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine were recommended as first-line treatment options on the basis of the results of randomized clinical trials. Opioid analgesics and tramadol were recommended as second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in certain clinical circumstances. Results of several recent clinical trials have become available since the development of these guidelines. These studies have examined botulinum toxin, high-concentration capsaicin patch, lacosamide, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and combination therapies in various neuropathic pain conditions. The increasing number of negative clinical trials of pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain and ambiguities in the interpretation of these negative trials must also be considered in developing treatment guidelines. The objectives of the current article are to review the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain and to provide a brief overview of these recent studies.

  16. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mcmonnies, Charles W

    Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptive symptoms. Neuropathic symptoms may explain the incommensurate relation between signs and symptoms in some dry eye syndromes although absence of signs of a dry eye syndrome may also be a consequence of inappropriate methods used when examining for them. Involvement of neuropathic mechanisms may also help explain dry eye symptoms which occur in association with reduced corneal sensitivity. This review includes a discussion of the potential for ocular symptoms involving neuropathic mechanisms to contribute to psychosocial problems such as depression, stress, anxiety and sleep disorders as well as for these types of psychosocial problems to contribute to neuropathic mechanisms and dry eye syndromes. Failure to consider the possibility that neuropathic mechanisms can contribute to dry eye syndromes may reduce accuracy of diagnosis and the suitability of treatment provided. Dry eye symptoms in the absence of commensurate evidence of tear dysfunction, and unsatisfactory response to tear dysfunction therapies should prompt consideration of neuropathic mechanisms being involved. Symptoms which persist after local anaesthetic instillation are more likely to be neuropathic in origin. Reducing inflammation may help limit any associated neuroplastic hypersensitivity.

  17. Complete atrioventricular block due to overdose of pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Enbiya; Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Emet, Mucahit; Uzkeser, Mustafa

    2012-11-01

    Pregabalin, a synthetic derivate of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, shows antiepileptic, analgesic, anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, and sleep-modulating activities. The major advantage of pregabalin is its relative reliability, easy use, high tolerance, and lack of negative interaction with other drugs. A 65-year-old woman with medical histories of diabetes mellitus, lumbar spondylosis, diabetic nephropathy, chronic renal failure, and anemia of chronic disease was admitted with the complaint of dizziness and syncope. She had been taking pregabalin 300 mg daily for 8 months. Electrocardiogram revealed complete atrioventricular (AV) block and right bundle-brunch block with a heart rate of 39 per minute. Her creatinine was 1.8 mg/dL, and creatinine clearance was 50 mL/min. Pregabalin treatment was discontinued. Four days later, the complete AV block resolved spontaneously to Mobitz type II block and to sinus rhythm with right bundle-brunch block on the seventh day. To our knowledge, this is the first case of complete AV block associated with pregabalin. We believe that AV block occurred as a result of pregabalin's effect on L-type Ca++ channels in the heart. Pregabalin's different effects on electrocardiogram and on the heart in different individuals may have an association with the patterns of distribution of the L-type calcium channels in myocardium.

  18. Neuropathic and psychogenic itch.

    PubMed

    Yosipovitch, Gil; Samuel, Lena S

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic and psychogenic itch are two entities that have not been well studied. Neuropathic itch is related to pathology located at any point along the afferent pathway of the nervous system. It could be related to damage to the peripheral nervous system, such as in postherpetic neuropathy, brachioradial pruritus, notalgia paresthetica, and in central nervous system damage as a result of spinal cord tumors and demyelinization diseases such as multiple sclerosis. It has many clinical features similar to neuropathic pain. Patients complain of itch, which coincides with burning sensation, aching, and stinging. Psychogenic itch is related to psychologic abnormalities e.g., itch in obsessive compulsive disorders, depression, and delusions of parasitosis. Although no controlled studies have been conducted for treatment of neuropathic and psychogenic itch, medications that are part of the treatment armentarium for neuropathic pain, depression, and anxiety seem to be effective.

  19. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  20. Comparative study between 2 different doses of pregabalin and lidocaine on pain following propofol injection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunkyung; Kim, Donggyeong; Jeon, Younghoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Propofol, an intravenous anesthetic, often causes pain on injection, which can be very distressful to patients. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin on pain following propofol injection, compared with lidocaine. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, prospective trial, 120 patients were randomized into 3 groups of 40 each; who received oral placebo and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group L, n = 40), oral pregabalin 75 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group LP, n = 40), and oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group HP, n = 40) as pretreatment, followed by administration of 1% propofol 0.5 mg/kg. Pain intensity was measured on a 4-point scale (0 = no, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe pain). Any side effects associated with pretreatment substances were recorded during the first 24 hours after surgery. Results: A total of 120 patients completed this trial. Demographic data were similar between groups. The incidence of pain following propofol injection was significantly reduced in group HP (50%) and group L (55%) compared with group LP (92.5%) (P < 0.05, respectively). The incidences of moderate pain in group HP (12.5%) and group L (15%) were significantly decreased compared with group LP (37.5%; both, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the incidence of side effects such as headache and dizziness between groups. Conclusion: Pretreatment with oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion equally reduced pain from propofol injection. PMID:28002316

  1. Comparison of pregabalin with pramipexole for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard P; Chen, Crystal; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Polo, Olli; DuBrava, Sarah; Miceli, Jeffrey; Knapp, Lloyd; Winkelman, John W

    2014-02-13

    Dopaminergic medications relieve symptoms of the restless legs syndrome (RLS) but have the potential to cause iatrogenic worsening (augmentation) of RLS with long-term treatment. Pregabalin may be an effective alternative. In this 52-week, randomized, double-blind trial, we assessed efficacy and augmentation in patients with RLS who were treated with pregabalin as compared with placebo and pramipexole. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 52 weeks of treatment with pregabalin at a dose of 300 mg per day or pramipexole at a dose of 0.25 mg or 0.5 mg per day or 12 weeks of placebo followed by 40 weeks of randomly assigned active treatment. The primary analyses involved a comparison of pregabalin and placebo over a period of 12 weeks with use of the International RLS (IRLS) Study Group Rating Scale (on which the score ranges from 0 to 40, with a higher score indicating more severe symptoms), the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement scale (which was used to assess the proportion of patients with symptoms that were "very much improved" or "much improved"), and a comparison of rates of augmentation with pregabalin and pramipexole over a period of 40 or 52 weeks of treatment. A total of 719 participants received daily treatment, 182 with 300 mg of pregabalin, 178 with 0.25 mg of pramipexole, 180 with 0.5 mg of pramipexole, and 179 with placebo. Over a period of 12 weeks, the improvement (reduction) in mean scores on the IRLS scale was greater, by 4.5 points, among participants receiving pregabalin than among those receiving placebo (P<0.001), and the proportion of patients with symptoms that were very much improved or much improved was also greater with pregabalin than with placebo (71.4% vs. 46.8%, P<0.001). The rate of augmentation over a period of 40 or 52 weeks was significantly lower with pregabalin than with pramipexole at a dose of 0.5 mg (2.1% vs. 7.7%, P=0.001) but not at a dose of 0.25 mg (2.1% vs. 5.3%, P=0.08). There were six cases of suicidal

  2. Expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 is reduced in ischemic but not neuropathic ulcers from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Menghini, R; Uccioli, L; Vainieri, E; Pecchioli, C; Casagrande, V; Stoehr, R; Cardellini, M; Porzio, O; Rizza, S; Federici, M

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration remains one of the most common and most serious consequences of diabetes. Persistently high levels of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) contribute to wound chronicity. Our aim was to assess the concentrations of MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in neuropathic and ischemic diabetic foot ulcers by analyzing biopsy samples. In this study, biopsies were taken from 35 diabetic foot ulcers of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and distinguished in neuropathic (n = 14) or ischemic (n = 21). Zymography assay was utilized for the analysis of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity. TACE activity was evaluated by a specific fluorimetric assay. mRNA levels of MMPs as well as TIMPs were detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The activity of MMP9 and A Disintegrin and A MetalloProtease Domain 17/TNF-Alpha Converting Enzyme (ADAM17/TACE) was significantly increased in ischemic compared to neuropathic biopsies. No differences were detected between both groups for the mRNA levels of MMPs as well as of ADAMs. However, TIMP3 mRNA expression was decreased in ischemic samples. The combination of increased activity of MMP9 and ADAM17/TACE with decreased concentrations of TIMP-3 mRNA expression in ischemic diabetic foot ulcers compared to neuropathic samples suggests that the increased proteolytic environment may represent a causative factor in the ulcer progression. New treatment strategies for healing diabetic foot ulcers could be directed toward increasing levels of TIMP3.

  3. Niflumic acid, a TRPV1 channel modulator, ameliorates stavudine-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Lovish; Bansal, Yashika; Singh, Raghunath; Saroj, Priyanka; Sodhi, Rupinder Kaur; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-12-01

    TRP channels have been discovered as a specialized group of somatosensory neurons involved in the detection of noxious stimuli. Desensitization of TRPV1 located on dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia exhibits analgesic effect and makes it potential therapeutic target for treatment of neuropathic pain. With this background, the present study was aimed to investigate the protective effect of niflumic acid, a TRPV1 modulator, on stavudine (STV)-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Stavudine (50 mg/kg) was administered intravenously via tail vein in rats to induce neuropathic pain. Various behavioral tests were performed to access neuropathic pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia) on 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days. Electrophysiology (motor nerve conduction velocity; MNCV) and biochemical estimations were conducted after 28th day. Niflumic acid (10, 15, and 20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally and evaluated against behavioral, electrophysiological (MNCV), and biochemical alterations in stavudine-treated rats. Pregabalin (30 mg/kg) was taken as reference standard and administered intraperitoneally. Four weeks after stavudine injection, rats developed behavioral, electrophysiological (MNCV), and biochemical (oxidative, nitrosative stress, and inflammatory cytokines, TRPV1) alterations. Niflumic acid restored core and associated symptoms of peripheral neuropathy by suppressing oxidative-nitrosative stress, inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and TRPV1 level in stavudine-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Pharmacological efficacy of niflumic acid (20 mg/kg) was equivalent to pregabalin (30 mg/kg). In conclusion, niflumic acid attenuates STV-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical alterations by manipulating TRP channel activity in two manners: (1) direct antagonistic action against TRPV1 channels and (2) indirect inhibition of TRP channels by blocking oxidative and inflammatory surge. Therefore, NA can be developed as a potential pharmacotherapeutic

  4. Palmitoylethanolamide reduces formalin-induced neuropathic-like behaviour through spinal glial/microglial phenotypical changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Guida, Francesca; Boccella, Serena; Bellini, Giulia; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; de Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino

    2013-02-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous cannabinoid-like compound in the central nervous system, which can modulate several functions in different pathological states, such as inflammation and pain response. We have here investigated the effect of PEA (5-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia 3 and 7 days following peripheral injection of formalin. Formalin induced a significant decrease of thermal and mechanical threshold in the injected and contralateral paw. PEA chronic treatment (once per day) significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, in vivo electrophysiological analysis revealed a significant increase of the duration and frequency, and a rapid decrease in the onset of evoked activity of the spinal nociceptive neurons 7 days after formalin. PEA normalized the electrophysiological parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we investigated PEA effect on the glial/microglial phenotypical changes associated with spinal neuronal sensitization. We found that formalin induced a significant microglia and glia activation normalized by PEA, together with increased expression of glial interleukin 10. Finally, primary microglial cell cultures, conditioned with PEA or vehicle, where transplanted in naive and formalin-treated mice, and nociceptive neurons were recorded. We observed that only PEA-conditioned cells normalized the activity of sensitized nociceptive neurons. In conclusion these data confirm the potent anti-inflammatory and anti-allodynic effect of PEA, and highlight a possible targeted microglial/glial effect of this drug in the spinal cord.

  5. Pregabalin add-on treatment in patients with partial seizures: a novel evaluation of flexible-dose and fixed-dose treatment in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Elger, Christian E; Brodie, Martin J; Anhut, Henning; Lee, Caroline M; Barrett, Jeannette A

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate pregabalin as add-on therapy for patients with partial seizures administered as fixed dose or as flexible dose adjusted to optimal seizure reduction and tolerability. Patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (98.8% between 1 and 3 AEDs; 1.2% on more than 3 AEDs) and experiencing > or =4 partial seizures during the 6-week baseline period and no 4-week seizure-free interval were randomized (1:2:2) to placebo (n = 73), pregabalin fixed dose (600 mg/day BID; n = 137), or pregabalin flexible dose (n = 131; 150 and 300 mg/day for 2 weeks each; 450 and 600 mg/day for 4 weeks each, BID) for 12 weeks. Dosage could be adjusted based on tolerability and maintained when a 4-week seizure-free period was achieved. Primary efficacy parameter was reduction in seizure frequency from baseline. Both pregabalin regimens significantly reduced seizure frequency compared with placebo, by 35.4%, for flexible dose (p = 0.0091) and 49.3% for fixed dose (p = 0.0001) versus 10.6% for placebo, and the fixed-dose group was superior to the flexible-dose group (p = 0.0337). Most adverse events were mild or moderate. Discontinuation rates due to adverse events were 6.8% (placebo), 12.2% (pregabalin flexible dose), and 32.8% (pregabalin fixed dose). Patients receiving pregabalin fixed dose discontinued due to adverse event earlier than other groups. Pregabalin administered twice daily, either as fixed (600 mg/day), or as flexible (150-600 mg/day) dose, was highly effective and generally well-tolerated as add-on therapy for partial seizures with or without secondary generalization. Lower incidence of adverse events and discontinuations were achieved in patients receiving pregabalin when dosing was individualized to optimize efficacy and tolerability.

  6. Pregabalin: its efficacy, safety and tolerability profile in generalized anxiety.

    PubMed

    Owen, Richard T

    2007-09-01

    Pregabalin is a structural analogue of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of the key inhibitory neurotransmitters in the brain. Its mode of action is believed to be mediated by the alpha-2-delta-1 subunit protein of voltage-gated calcium channels to bring about its anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects. Pregabalin has linear pharmacokinetics, undergoes minimal metabolism and is excreted largely unchanged. It has a mean elimination half-life of 6.3 hours. Pregabalin's anxiolytic activity in generalized anxiety disorder has been demonstrated in seven acute randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of four to eight weeks duration, and in one six-month relapse-prevention study at doses of 150-600 mg/day using twice-daily or three-times-daily regimes. The magnitude of pregabalin's anxiolytic effects was similar to that of alprazolam, lorazepam or venlafaxine. However, pregabalin had a more consistent effect on psychic and somatic anxiety factors than the active comparators. Its speed of onset was apparent within one week - similar to the benzodiazepines, but faster than that of venlafaxine. Moreover, pregabalin's anxiolytic effect was apparent in patients with moderate or severe baseline anxiety and high or low baseline severity of sub-syndromic depression. A long-term, 26-week, open-label study showed that pregabalin's anxiolytic effects were maintained, although the fixed-dose design may have contributed to a high attrition rate. Pregabalin showed less cognitive and psychomotor impairment than alprazolam, and it showed different effects on sleep architecture to the latter in terms of REM sleep latency and slow wave stage 3/4 sleep. The most frequently reported adverse events were dizziness and somnolence, although tolerance to these developed within a few weeks. Withdrawal symptoms during a one-week taper phase were mild and were similar after both acute and chronic administration. Prous Science.

  7. Orofacial neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jennifer; Erol, Ferhat; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Kanda, Hirosato

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by chemotherapy drugs such as oxaliplatin is a dose-limiting side effect in cancer treatment. The mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are not fully understood. KCNQ2 channels are low-threshold voltage-gated K+ channels that play a role in controlling neuronal excitability. Downregulation of KCNQ2 channels has been proposed to be an underlying mechanism of sensory hypersensitivity that leads to neuropathic pain. However, it is currently unknown whether KCNQ channels may be downregulated by chemotherapy drugs in trigeminal ganglion neurons to contribute to the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced orofacial neuropathic pain. In the present study, mechanical sensitivity in orofacial regions is measured using the operant behavioral test in rats treated with oxaliplatin. Operant behaviors in these animals show the gradual development of orofacial neuropathic pain that manifests with orofacial mechanical allodynia. Immunostaining shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity in small-sized V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons in controls, and the numbers of KCNQ2 immunoreactivity positive V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons are significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. Immunostaining is also performed in brainstem and shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity at the trigeminal afferent central terminals innervating the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc) in controls, but the KCNQ2 immunoreactivity intensity is significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. We further show with the operant behavioral test that oxaliplatin-induced orofacial mechanical allodynia can be alleviated by the KCNQ2 potentiator retigabine. Taken together, these findings suggest that KCNQ2 downregulation may be a cause of oxaliplatin-induced orofacial neuropathic pain and KCNQ2 potentiators may be useful for alleviating the neuropathic pain. PMID:28741430

  8. Cost effectiveness of a lidocaine 5% medicated plaster compared with pregabalin for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia in the UK: a Markov model analysis.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Mark; Liedgens, Hiltrud; Nuijten, Mark

    2010-01-01

    for pregabalin (year of costing 2009). Costs for 1 month without pain and intolerable adverse events (AEs) (modified TWIST analysis) were pound 126 for the lidocaine plaster relative to pregabalin. The average patient treated with the lidocaine plaster experienced 0.321 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over the 6-month period modelled compared with 0.254 QALYs for pregabalin. Quality-of-life benefits were attributed to the favourable AE profile of the lidocaine plaster. Subsequently, the lidocaine plaster cost pound 2925 per QALY gained relative to pregabalin. However, patient level longitudinal data have shown that the actual clinical usage of the lidocaine plaster is 1.1 plasters per day. If this more realistic assumption is used in the model, the total cost for a 6-month treatment period was pound 756 for the lidocaine plaster, which dominated treatment with pregabalin. Scenario analyses and sensitivity analyses had minimal impact on the results, confirming the robustness of the study. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the lidocaine plaster remained well below pound 35,000 per QALY gained in all analyses. This analysis showed that the lidocaine 5% medicated plaster is a cost-effective method for obtaining sustained relief of localized neuropathic pain associated with PHN compared with pregabalin in a UK setting, in terms of both the cost per QALY gained and the cost per additional month without symptoms, when used for patients who do not experience sufficient pain relief from standard analgesics.

  9. DDD-028: a potent potential non-opioid, non-cannabinoid analgesic for neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Parthasarathi; Tracey, Heather; Chen, Zhoumou; Bandyopadhyaya, Acintya; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Rajagopalan, Desikan R; Salvemini, Daniela; McPhee, Ian; Viswanadha, Srikant; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2014-07-15

    DDD-028 (4), a novel pentacyclic pyridoindolobenzazepine derivative was evaluated in vitro for receptor binding affinity and in vivo for analgesic activity using rodent models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. DDD-028 does not bind to opioid, cannabinoid, dopamine, or histamine receptors. DDD-028 is very active even at the low oral dose of 1-5 mg/kg in both neuropathic, (spinal nerve ligation and chronic constriction injury) and inflammatory (Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced) models of pain. DDD-028 appears to be about 6-fold more potent than pregabalin and indomethacin. Visual observation of all the animals used in these studies indicated that DDD-028 is well tolerated without any sedation. Thus, DDD-028 seems to be a promising candidate for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain without the possible side effects or abuse potential associated with opioid or cannabinoid activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Common neuropathic itch syndromes.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2012-03-01

    Patients with chronic itch are diagnosed and treated by dermatologists. However, itch is a neural sensation and some forms of chronic itch are the presenting symptoms of neurological diseases. Dermatologists need some familiarity with the most common neuropathic itch syndromes to initiate diagnostic testing and to know when to refer to a neurologist. This review summarizes current knowledge, admittedly incomplete, on neuropathic itch caused by diseases of the brain, spinal cord, cranial or spinal nerve-roots, and peripheral nerves.

  11. Abuse and Misuse of Pregabalin and Gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Evoy, Kirk E; Morrison, Megan D; Saklad, Stephen R

    2017-03-01

    Gabapentinoid (pregabalin and gabapentin) abuse is increasingly being reported. To assess the extent of gabapentinoid abuse, characteristics of typical abusers, patterns of abuse, and potential harms in order to bring this trend to providers' attention. A systematic review of MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and US FDA data, indexed through 28 July 2016, utilizing the following searches: pregabalin OR gabapentin OR gabapentinoid AND one of the following: abuse, misuse, overdose, or substance-related disorders[MESH], was conducted. Additional studies were identified through review of references. English-language epidemiological studies, clinical studies, and case reports/series of gabapentinoid abuse/misuse/overdose were included. The authors reached consensus regarding study inclusion after full-text review. The body of literature was assessed for bias qualitatively. Fifty-nine studies were included in this systematic review (24 epidemiological, three clinical abuse liability, 16 abuse/misuse/dependence case reports/series, 17 acute overdose case reports/series-one included both an epidemiological study and case series and was included in both counts). Analysis of these studies indicates increasing numbers of patients are self-administering higher than recommended doses to achieve euphoric highs. In the general population, a 1.6% prevalence of gabapentinoid abuse was observed, whereas prevalence ranged from 3% to 68% among opioid abusers. An international adverse event database identified 11,940 reports of gabapentinoid abuse from 2004-2015, with >75% reported since 2012. Risk factors include a history of substance abuse, particularly opioids, and psychiatric co-morbidities. While effects of excessively high doses are generally non-lethal, gabapentinoids are increasingly being identified in post-mortem toxicology analyses. Evidence suggests gabapentinoids possess potential for abuse, particularly in individuals with a history of opioid abuse, and

  12. A Randomised, Placebo-controlled Trial of the Effects of Preoperative Pregabalin on Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption following Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shorten, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pregabalin has been shown to have analgesic effect in acute pain models. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy a single dose of pregabalin, would have on morphine consumption following lumbar discectomy. Methods With ethical approval a randomized, placebo-controlled prospective trial was undertaken in 32 patients (ASA I-II, 18-65 years) with radicular low back pain for > 3 months undergoing elective lumbar discectomy. Patients received either oral pregabalin 300 mg (PG Group) or placebo (C Group) one hour before surgery. Pain intensity, the accumulative morphine consumption and adverse effects were recorded for 24 hours following surgery. Functional, psychological and quantitative sensory testing were also assessed. Results Fourteen patients out of the 32 recruited were randomized to receive pregabalin. Morphine consumption was reduced (absolute difference of 42.3%) between groups with medium effect size. (Mann-Whitney; U = 52.5, z-score= 2.84, P = 0.004, r = 0.14). This was not associated with a significant difference in the incidence of adverse effects between the two groups. The median pain intensity (VAS) on movement was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions A single pre-operative dose of pregabalin (300 mg) did not result in a reduction in pain intensity compared to placebo in this patient cohort but the significant reduction in morphine consumption suggests that a fixed peri-operative dosing regime warrants investigation. PMID:21390175

  13. Gabapentin and pregabalin, but not morphine and amitriptyline, block both static and dynamic components of mechanical allodynia induced by streptozocin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Field, M J; McCleary, S; Hughes, J; Singh, L

    1999-03-01

    A single injection of streptozocin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) led to the development of static and dynamic allodynia in the rat. The two responses were detected, respectively, by application of pressure using von Frey hairs or lightly stroking the hind paw with a cotton bud. Static allodynia was present in the majority of the animals within 10 days following streptozocin. In contrast, dynamic allodynia took almost twice as long to develop and was only present in approximately 60% of rats. Morphine (1-3 mg/kg, s.c.) and amitriptyline (0.25-2.0 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently blocked static allodynia. However, neither of the compounds was effective against dynamic allodynia. In contrast, gabapentin (10-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and the related compound pregabalin (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.) dose-dependently blocked both types of allodynia. However, the corresponding R-enantiomer (10-100 mg/kg, p.o.) of pregabalin, was found to be inactive. The intrathecal administration of gabapentin dose-dependently (1-100 microg/animal) blocked both static and dynamic allodynia. In contrast, administration of similar doses of gabapentin into the hind paw failed to block these responses. It is suggested that in this model of neuropathic pain dynamic allodynia is mediated by A beta-fibres and the static type involves small diameter nociceptive fibres. These data suggest that gabapentin and pregabalin possess a superior antiallodynic profile than morphine and amitriptyline, and may represent a novel class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Pregabalin on Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Aşcı, Sanem; Demirci, Serpil; Aşcı, Halil; Doğuç, Duygu Kumbul; Onaran, İbrahim

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of disability in adults. Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury causes cerebral edema, hemorrhage, and neuronal death. In post-ischemic reperfusion, free radical production causes brain tissue damage by oxidative stress. Pregabalin, an antiepileptic agent was shown to have antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of pregabalin on ischemia and reperfusion in rat brain injury. Animal experimentation. Male Wistar rats weighing (250-300 g) were randomly divided into six groups, each consisting of 6 rats: control (C), pregabalin (P), ischemia (I), pregabalin + ischemia (PI), ischemia + reperfusion (IR) and ischemia + reperfusion + pregabalin (PIR). Rats were initially pre-treated with 50 mg/kg/d pregabalin orally for two days. Then, animals that applied ischemia in I, PI, IR and PIR groups were exposed to carotid clamping for 30 minutes and 20 minutes reperfusion was performed in the relevant reperfusion groups. NR2B receptor levels were significantly lower in the PIR group in comparison to the IR group. In the PIR group, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level had statistically significant decrease compared with IR group. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels were also significantly increased in the PIR group compared with I, IR and control groups. In the PI and PIR groups, catalase (CAT) levels were also significantly increased compared with I and IR groups (p=0.03 and p=0.07, respectively). Pregabalin may protect the damage of oxidative stress after ischemia + reperfusion. This result would illuminate clinical studies in the future.

  15. Neuroprotective Effects of Pregabalin on Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aşcı, Sanem; Demirci, Serpil; Aşcı, Halil; Doğuç, Duygu Kumbul; Onaran, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of disability in adults. Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury causes cerebral edema, hemorrhage, and neuronal death. Aims: In post-ischemic reperfusion, free radical production causes brain tissue damage by oxidative stress. Pregabalin, an antiepileptic agent was shown to have antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of pregabalin on ischemia and reperfusion in rat brain injury. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Male Wistar rats weighing (250–300 g) were randomly divided into six groups, each consisting of 6 rats: control (C), pregabalin (P), ischemia (I), pregabalin + ischemia (PI), ischemia + reperfusion (IR) and ischemia + reperfusion + pregabalin (PIR). Rats were initially pre-treated with 50 mg/kg/d pregabalin orally for two days. Then, animals that applied ischemia in I, PI, IR and PIR groups were exposed to carotid clamping for 30 minutes and 20 minutes reperfusion was performed in the relevant reperfusion groups. Results: NR2B receptor levels were significantly lower in the PIR group in comparison to the IR group. In the PIR group, Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) level had statistically significant decrease compared with IR group. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) levels were also significantly increased in the PIR group compared with I, IR and control groups. In the PI and PIR groups, catalase (CAT) levels were also significantly increased compared with I and IR groups (p=0.03 and p=0.07, respectively). Conclusion: Pregabalin may protect the damage of oxidative stress after ischemia + reperfusion. This result would illuminate clinical studies in the future. PMID:27403394

  16. Structural and Functional Small Fiber Abnormalities in the Neuropathic Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Benson, Adam; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define the neuropathology, clinical phenotype, autonomic physiology and differentiating features in individuals with neuropathic and non-neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Methods Twenty-four subjects with POTS and 10 healthy control subjects had skin biopsy analysis of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD), quantitative sensory testing (QST) and autonomic testing. Subjects completed quality of life, fatigue and disability questionnaires. Subjects were divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS, defined by abnormal IENFD and abnormal small fiber and sudomotor function. Results Nine of 24 subjects had neuropathic POTS and had significantly lower resting and tilted heart rates; reduced parasympathetic function; and lower phase 4 valsalva maneuver overshoot compared with those with non-neuropathic POTS (P<0.05). Neuropathic POTS subjects also had less anxiety and depression and greater overall self-perceived health-related quality of life scores than non-neuropathic POTS subjects. A sub-group of POTS patients (cholinergic POTS) had abnormal proximal sudomotor function and symptoms that suggest gastrointestinal and genitourinary parasympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Conclusions and Relevance POTS subtypes may be distinguished using small fiber and autonomic structural and functional criteria. Patients with non-neuropathic POTS have greater anxiety, greater depression and lower health-related quality of life scores compared to those with neuropathic POTS. These findings suggest different pathophysiological processes underlie the postural tachycardia in neuropathic and non-neuropathic POTS patients. The findings have implications for the therapeutic interventions to treat this disorder. PMID:24386408

  17. Prevention of NKCC1 phosphorylation avoids downregulation of KCC2 in central sensory pathways and reduces neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Cobianchi, Stefano; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury is characterized by loss of inhibition in both peripheral and central pain pathways. In the adult nervous system, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) and neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) (KCC2) cotransporters are involved in setting the strength and polarity of GABAergic/glycinergic transmission. After nerve injury, the balance between these cotransporters changes, leading to a decrease in the inhibitory tone. However, the role that NKCC1 and KCC2 play in pain-processing brain areas is unknown. Our goal was to study the effects of peripheral nerve injury on NKCC1 and KCC2 expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus, and primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. After sciatic nerve section and suture in adult rats, assessment of mechanical and thermal pain thresholds showed evidence of hyperalgesia during the following 2 months. We also found an increase in NKCC1 expression in the DRG and a downregulation of KCC2 in spinal cord after injury, accompanied by later decrease of KCC2 levels in higher projection areas (VPL and S1) from 2 weeks postinjury, correlating with neuropathic pain signs. Administration of bumetanide (30 mg/kg) during 2 weeks following sciatic nerve lesion prevented the previously observed changes in the spinothalamic tract projecting areas and the appearance of hyperalgesia. In conclusion, the present results indicate that changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 in DRG, spinal cord, and central pain areas may contribute to development of neuropathic pain.

  18. Minocycline reduces the injury-induced expression of prodynorphin and pronociceptin in the dorsal root ganglion in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mika, J; Rojewska, E; Makuch, W; Przewlocka, B

    2010-02-17

    A role of neuropeptides in neuropathic pain development has been implicated; however, the neuroimmune interactions that are involved in the underlying mechanisms may be more important than previously thought. To examine a potential role of relations between glia cells and neuropeptides in neuropathic pain, we performed competitive reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from the dorsal lumbar spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after chronic constriction injury (CCI) in the rat sciatic nerve. The RT-PCR results indicated that complement component 1, q subcomponent (C1q) mRNA expression was higher than glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the spinal cord 3 and 7 days post-CCI, suggesting that spinal microglia and perivascular macrophages are more activated than astrocytes. In parallel, we observed a strong upregulation of prodynorphin mRNA in the spinal cord after CCI, with no changes in the expression of proenkephalin or pronociceptin. Conversely, the expression of GFAP mRNA in the DRG was higher than C1q, which suggests that the satellite cells are activated shortly after injury, followed by the macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrating the DRG. In the DRG, we also observed a very strong upregulation of prodynorphin (1387%) as well as pronociceptin (122%) and a downregulation of proenkephalin (47%) mRNAs. Interestingly, preemptive and repeated i.p. injection of minocycline reversed the activation of microglia/macrophages in the spinal cord and the trafficking of peripheral immune cells into the DRG, and markedly diminished the upregulation of prodynorphin and pronociceptin in the DRG. We thus provide novel findings that inhibition of C1q-positive cells by minocycline can diminish injury-induced neuropeptide changes in the DRG. This suggests that immune cells-derived pronociceptive factors may influence opioid peptide expression. Therefore, the injury-induced activation of microglia and leukocytes and the subsequent

  19. Characterisation of a peripheral neuropathic component of the rat monoiodoacetate model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Matthew; Rahman, Wahida; Hobbs, Carl; Dickenson, Anthony H; Bennett, David L H

    2012-01-01

    Joint degeneration observed in the rat monoiodoacetate (MIA) model of osteoarthritis shares many histological features with the clinical condition. The accompanying pain phenotype has seen the model widely used to investigate the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis pain, and for preclinical screening of analgesic compounds. We have investigated the pathophysiological sequellae of MIA used at low (1 mg) or high (2 mg) dose. Intra-articular 2 mg MIA induced expression of ATF-3, a sensitive marker for peripheral neuron stress/injury, in small and large diameter DRG cell profiles principally at levels L4 and 5 (levels predominated by neurones innervating the hindpaw) rather than L3. At the 7 day timepoint, ATF-3 signal was significantly smaller in 1 mg MIA treated animals than in the 2 mg treated group. 2 mg, but not 1 mg, intra-articular MIA was also associated with a significant reduction in intra-epidermal nerve fibre density in plantar hindpaw skin, and produced spinal cord dorsal and ventral horn microgliosis. The 2 mg treatment evoked mechanical pain-related hypersensitivity of the hindpaw that was significantly greater than the 1 mg treatment. MIA treatment produced weight bearing asymmetry and cold hypersensitivity which was similar at both doses. Additionally, while pregabalin significantly reduced deep dorsal horn evoked neuronal responses in animals treated with 2 mg MIA, this effect was much reduced or absent in the 1 mg or sham treated groups. These data demonstrate that intra-articular 2 mg MIA not only produces joint degeneration, but also evokes significant axonal injury to DRG cells including those innervating targets outside of the knee joint such as hindpaw skin. This significant neuropathic component needs to be taken into account when interpreting studies using this model, particularly at doses greater than 1 mg MIA.

  20. Development and evaluation of in situ gel of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Jyotsana R; Adokar, Bhushan R; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Background: Pregabalin (PRG), an analog of gamma-aminobutyric acid, reduces the release of many neurotransmitters, including glutamate, and noradrenaline. It is used for the treatment of epilepsy; simple and complex partial convulsion. The present research work aims to ensure a high drug absorption by retarding the advancement of PRG formulation through the gastrointestinal tract. The work aims to design a controlled release PRG formulation which is administered as liquid and further gels in the stomach and floats in gastric juice. Materials and Methods: In situ gelling formulations were prepared using sodium alginate, calcium chloride, sodium citrate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K100M, and sodium bicarbonate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for solution viscosity, drug content, in vitro gelling studies, gel strength, and in vitro drug release. The final formulation was optimized using a 32 full factorial design. Results: The formulation containing 2.5% w/v sodium alginate and 0.2% w/v calcium chloride were considered optimum since it showed minimum floating lag time (18 s), optimum viscosity (287.3 cps), and gel strength (4087.17 dyne/cm2). The optimized formulation follows Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model with n value 0.3767 representing Fickian diffusion mechanism of drug release. Conclusion: Floating in situ gelling system of PRG can be formulated using sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium chloride as a complexing agent to control the drug release for about 12 h for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26682193

  1. Neuropathic pain phenotyping as a predictor of treatment response in painful diabetic neuropathy: data from the randomized, double-blind, COMBO-DN study.

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, Didier; Wilhelm, Stefan; Schacht, Alexander; Perrot, Serge; Kosek, Eva; Cruccu, Giorgio; Freynhagen, Rainer; Tesfaye, Solomon; Lledó, Alberto; Choy, Ernest; Marchettini, Paolo; Micó, Juan Antonio; Spaeth, Michael; Skljarevski, Vladimir; Tölle, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Sensory profiles are heterogeneous in neuropathic pain disorders, and subgroups of patients respond differently to treatment. To further explore this, patients in the COMBO-DN study were prospectively assessed by the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) at baseline, after initial 8-week therapy with either duloxetine or pregabalin, and after subsequent 8-week combination/high-dose therapy. Exploratory post hoc cluster analyses were performed to identify and characterize potential subgroups through their scores in the NPSI items. In patients not responding to initial 60 mg/d duloxetine, adding 300 mg/d pregabalin for combination treatment was particularly effective regarding the dimensions pressing pain and evoked pain, whereas maximizing the duloxetine dose to 120 mg/d appeared more beneficial regarding paresthesia/dysesthesia. In contrast, adding 60 mg/d duloxetine to 300 mg/d pregabalin in case of nonresponse to initial pregabalin led to numerically higher decreases in all NPSI dimensions/items compared to maximizing the pregabalin dose to 600 mg/d. Cluster analysis revealed 3 patient clusters (defined by baseline scores for the 10 NPSI sensory items) with different pain profiles, not only in terms of overall pain severity, but also across NPSI items. Mean Brief Pain Inventory average pain improved in all clusters during combination/high-dose therapy. However, in patients with severe pain, the treatment effect showed a trend in favor of high-dose monotherapy, whereas combination therapy appeared to be more beneficial in patients with moderate and mild pain (not significant). These complementary exploratory analyses further endorse the idea that sensory phenotyping might lead to a more stratified treatment and potentially to personalized pain therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Gait instability revealing a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion associated to pregabalin].

    PubMed

    Haddad, F; Jammal, M; Chehwane, D; Abi Saleh, R; Koussa, S

    2012-11-01

    Pregabalin, a molecule with similar structure of GABA neurotransmitter, initially developed as an antiepileptic, is now commonly used in the treatment of painful peripheral neuropathies. We report an 82-year-old man who presented with confusion, urinary incontinence and gait instability. He was receiving pregabalin for a left L5 radicular pain. Laboratory tests at admission revealed a profound hyponatremia (117 mmol/L) that was corrected by fluid restriction and pregabalin withdrawal. According to the patient and laboratory outcome, we established the diagnosis of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion due to pregabalin. The test of Naranjo demonstrated a probable imputability of pregabalin.

  3. Duloxetine and 8-OH-DPAT, but not fluoxetine, reduce depression-like behaviour in an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Doods, Henri; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ceci, Angelo

    2016-04-21

    The current study assessed whether antidepressant and/or antinociceptive drugs, duloxetine, fluoxetine as well as (±)-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), are able to reverse depression-like behaviour in animals with chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats was selected as neuropathic pain model. Mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery by "electronic algometer" and forced swimming test (FST), which measured the time of immobility, and active behaviours climbing and swimming. The selective noradrenergic and serotonergic uptake blocker duloxetine (20mg/kg) and the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) significantly reversed both mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour in CCI animals. Duloxetine significantly reversed depression-like behaviour in CCI rats by increasing the time of climbing and swimming, while 8-OH-DPAT attenuated depression-like behaviour mainly by increasing the time of swimming. However, the selective serotonergic uptake blocker fluoxetine (20mg/kg) failed to attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour, possibly due to confounding pro-nociceptive actions at 5-HT3 receptors. These data suggest to target noradrenergic and 5-HT1A receptors for treatment of chronic pain and its comorbidity depression.

  4. Changing general medical practices in the management of neuropathic pain

    PubMed

    Poucher, Mathieu; Cherrier, Claude; Poucher, Anne-Christelle; Di Patrizio, Paolo

    2016-10-19

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine current practices in the Lorraine region in the treatment of neuropathic pain and to assess the challenges faced by general practitioners (GPs). Methods: We conducted a qualitative study by the focus group technique, by constituting a balanced panel of GPs to meet diversification requirements. The number of focus groups was defined to obtain data saturation. The lead author of this study acted as an observer, while a facilitator was responsible for moderating the debate. Analysis of transcripts was performed in two ways: firstly, several readings of the transcripts to highlight the main ideas emerging from these discussions, and secondly, integration of verbatim transcripts in NVivo 10 software to allow complementary computer analysis. Results: The GPs interviewed reported that they prescribed Clonazepam (Rivotril®), Carbamazepine (Tegretol®) and Amitriptyline (Laroxyl®) less often than ten years ago, and Gabapentin (Neurontin®), Pregabalin (Lyrica®), Venlafaxin (Effexor®) and Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) more often than ten years ago. They reported many difficulties in the daily management of these patients, especially concerning the psychological or psychiatric components associated with this pain, comorbidities, iatrogenic effects, the inefficacy of the available molecules, the difficulties of access to a specialist (including pain centres), acceptance of treatment by patients, limiting requirements (restrictive marketing authorisations, withdrawal of certain products…). Conclusion: The treatment of neuropathic pain raises a number of difficulties for GPs, but changes in prescribing habits reflect a constant adaptation of clinical practices.

  5. Concerns about pregabalin: further experience with its potential of causing addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Gahr, Maximilian; Franke, Beate; Freudenmann, Roland W; Kölle, Markus A; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin (PRG) is approved for the treatment of neuropathic pain, partial seizures, and generalized anxiety disorder in many countries. Supported by case reports and a few studies there is an ongoing debate on PRG's potential to cause addictive behaviors. Considering that PRG is currently under investigation for the treatment of benzodiazepine dependence and withdrawal as well as relapse prevention in alcohol dependence, assessment of PRG's abuse and dependence potential is indispensable. We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient with borderline personality disorder and past alcohol abuse who developed PRG abuse. The patient took up to 800 mg PRG per day, initially administered to treat unspecific anxiety, and experienced euphoric feelings after PRG intake. In the further course, she increased the daily PRG dosage and consulted other physicians to receive additional PRG prescriptions. During reduction of PRG, the patient developed a moderate withdrawal syndrome with vegetative symptoms. Because of the early detection of the developing PRG abuse (4 months after first application of PRG), the development of PRG dependence was prevented. This case illustrates the possibility of PRG to trigger the development of addictive behaviors and should encourage physicians to be very careful when administering PRG to patients with current or past substance-related disorders.

  6. Injury to skeletal muscle of mice following acute and sub-acute pregabalin exposure

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Mohammad; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Saberi, Zahra; Etemad, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Pregabalin (PGB) is a new antiepileptic drug that has received FDA approval for patient who suffers from central neuropathic pain, partial seizures, generalized anxiety disorder, fibromyalgia and sleep disorders. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible adverse effects of PGB on the muscular system of mice. Materials and Methods: To evaluate the effect of PGB on skeletal muscle, the animals were exposed to a single dose of 1, 2 or 5 g /kg or daily doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg for 21 days, intraperitoneally (IP). Twaenty-four hr after the last drug administration, all animals were sacrificed. The level of fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin I and CK-MM activity were evaluated in blood as an indicator of muscle injury. Skeletal muscle pathological findings were also reported as scores ranging from 1 to 3 based on the observed lesion. Results: In the acute and sub-acute toxicity assay IP injection of PGB significantly increased the activity and levels of CK-MM and fsTnI compared to the control group. Sub-acute exposure to PGB caused damages that include muscle atrophy, infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. Conclusion: PGB administration especially in long term care causes muscle atrophy with infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. The fsTnI and CK-MM are reliable markers in PGB-related muscle injury. The exact mechanisms behind the muscular damage are unclear and necessitate further investigations. PMID:28392896

  7. Switching from long-term benzodiazepine therapy to pregabalin in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Sallie J; Mandel, Francine S; Schweizer, Edward

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pregabalin in facilitating taper off chronic benzodiazepines, outpatients (N = 106) with a lifetime diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (current diagnosis could be subthreshold) who had been treated with a benzodiazepine for 8-52 weeks were stabilized for 2-4 weeks on alprazolam in the range of 1-4 mg/day. Patients were then randomized to 12 weeks of double-blind treatment with either pregabalin 300-600 mg/day or placebo while undergoing a gradual benzodiazepine taper at a rate of 25% per week, followed by a 6-week benzodiazepine-free phase during which they continued double-blind study treatment. Outcome measures included ability to remain benzodiazepine-free (primary) as well as changes in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM)-A and Physician Withdrawal Checklist (PWC). At endpoint, a non-significant higher proportion of patients remained benzodiazepine-free receiving pregabalin compared with placebo (51.4% vs 37.0%). Treatment with pregabalin was associated with significantly greater endpoint reduction in the HAM-A total score versus placebo (-2.5 vs +1.3; p < 0.001), and lower endpoint mean PWC scores (6.5 vs 10.3; p = 0.012). Thirty patients (53%) in the pregabalin group and 19 patients (37%) in the placebo group completed the study, reducing the power to detect a significant difference on the primary outcome. The results on the anxiety and withdrawal severity measures suggest that switching to pregabalin may be a safe and effective method for discontinuing long-term benzodiazepine therapy.

  8. Effects of pregabalin in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youg Won; Song, Mei Ling

    2014-05-15

    Long-term use of hypnotics runs the risk of dependency, and subjects usually experience difficulties in withdrawal. The objective of this study was to investigate the success of withdrawal using pregabalin and its efficacy on sleep in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia. We enrolled patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia who were 18 years or older. The starting dosage of pregabalin was 75 mg/day and was increased up to as much as 300 mg/day, depending on the individual patient's condition, while tapering off hypnotics. After 4 weeks of titration, the final dosage amount was maintained for at least another 4 weeks. Sleep and clinical variables were evaluated at baseline and after treatment, using the Korean versions of various sleep questionnaires as well as polysomnography. Forty subjects were enrolled, with a mean age of 52.0 ± 8.5 years, of whom 28 (70.0%) were women. Twenty-one (52.5%) subjects successfully withdrew from hypnotics. The duration of withdrawal was 42.1 ± 16.0 days (range: 27.0∼84.0). The mean pregabalin dose was 121.4 ± 69.0 mg/day (range: 75.0∼300.0). After pregabalin treatment, there was a significant improvement in the total score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (15.0 ± 2.1, 8.9 ± 3.0, p < 0.001), and insomnia severity index (20.9 ± 4.3, 9.6 ± 4.4, p < 0.001); however, most of the sleep variables of the PSG showed no differences. The main adverse effects of pregabalin were nausea and dizziness. Our results showed pregabalin may be a promising candidate for withdrawal from hypnotics and improved sleep in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia.

  9. Pregabalin treatment of three cases with brachioradial pruritus.

    PubMed

    Atış, Güldehan; Bilir Kaya, Başak

    2017-02-06

    Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) is a rare type of chronic pruritus that usually localized at the dorsolateral part of the forearms. Itching, burning, or pain are common symptoms at the involved areas. The etiological factors are still unknown but sun exposure and/or cervical spine lesions seem to be trigerring or precipiting factors. Neuropathogenic mechanism plays role in etiopathogenesis of BRP, therefore, antiepileptic drugs such as gabapentin, oxcarbazepine. and pregabalin are suggested medications for BRP. Herein, we report three cases with BRP successfully treated with pregabaline.

  10. Neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Raicher, Irina; Stump, Patrick Raymond Nicolas Andre Ghislain; Baccarelli, Rosemari; Marciano, Lucia H S C; Ura, Somei; Virmond, Marcos C L; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nerve impairment is a key clinical aspect of leprosy and may present the distribution of mononeuropathy or multiple nerve trunks, small cutaneous nerve fibers, and free nerve endings. The clinical range of leprosy is determined by individual cell-mediated immune response to infection that also may play a role in different types of pain syndromes in leprosy. Previous studies reported a high prevalence of neuropathic pain in leprosy. In an Ethiopian study with 48 patients, pure nociceptive pain was experienced by 43% of patients and pure neuropathic pain (NeP) by 11% of patients. In an Indian study, 21.8% of leprosy patients had pain with neuropathic characteristics. These rates underlie the need to develop tools for the early diagnosis and detection of infection and its complications, such as nerve damage and pain. In a larger sample with leprosy-associated NeP (n = 90), we have applied the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questions (DN4) and found sensitivity = 97.1% and specificity = 57.9%. The high sensitivity of this tool in leprosy patients suggests that it could be a valuable tool to screen for neuropathic pain in this population and could be used as part of health care programs aimed at detecting, treating, and rehabilitating leprosy in endemic areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of pregabalin on post operative morphine consumption and pain after abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy: a randomized, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Ittichaikulthol, Wichai; Virankabutra, Tanit; Kunopart, Mutita; Khamhom, Wachirapol; Putarawuthichai, Pipat; Rungphet, Suyawej

    2009-10-01

    Achieving post operative pain management is difficult with the use of only opioids analgesia. Multimodal pain management is a method to improve post operative analgesia with minimal side effects. Pregabalin has an analgesic and opioids sparing effects in post operative analgesia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of premedication with pregabalin 300 mg compared with lorazepam 0.5 mg on post operative morphine consumption in women undergoing abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy. Eighty ASA I-III, aged 18-65 year patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy were randomized to receive either lorazepam 0.5 mg or pregabalin 300 mg 1 hr before surgery. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (3-5 mg/kg) and atracurium (0.6 mg/kg) and maintained with sevoflurane with a fresh gas flow of 2 L/min (50% N2O in O2) and morphine 0.1-0.2 mg/kg. All patients received patient-controlled analgesia with morphine with a 1 mg incremental dose, 5-min lockout interval, and 4-hr limit of 40 mg post operative. Patients were studied at 0, 1, 4, 12 and 24 hours post operatively for verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS), morphine consumption, satisfaction score and side effects. The VNRS scores of the pregabalin group were significantly lower than the control group at 1, 4, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. The total morphine consumption at 24 hours post operatively of pregabalin group (7.11 +/- 5.57) was significantly lower than the control group (21.18 +/- 7.12) (p < 0.01). There were no differences between groups in somnolence and dizziness (p = 0.93) and nausea-vomiting (p = 0.11). The satisfaction score was higher in the pregabalin group. A 300 mg pregabalin administered 1 hr preoperatively before abdominal hysterectomy with/without salphingo-oophorectomy significantly reduced morphine consumption, VNRS pain score and improved satisfaction score at 24 hr post operatively without any significant

  12. Holistic approach to treatment of intractable central neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ashley R; Tegeler, Charles; Burdette, Jonathan; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-05-01

    Central neuropathic itch can be a lifelong debilitating condition and treatment challenge. We report a patient with a traumatic brain injury with severe intractable pruritus who failed extensive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment but responded to a holistic approach using healing touch. We discuss the complexity of this type of neuropathic itch and present a holistic approach as an adjunct to therapy in reducing itch intensity. This case presentation along with the literature discussed suggests a therapeutic strategy for the management of complicated central neuropathic itch.

  13. Preoperative pregabalin or gabapentin for acute and chronic postoperative pain among patients undergoing breast cancer surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ajit S; Khan, James S; Dhaliwal, Jasneet; Busse, Jason W; Choi, Stephen; Devereaux, P J; Clarke, Hance

    2017-10-01

    Breast cancer surgery is associated with acute and chronic pain. We sought to systematically evaluate the effects of gabapentin and pregabalin on postoperative pain among patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Web of Science, and ProQuest from the inception of each database to November 2015. We included studies enrolling adult patients undergoing breast cancer surgery who were randomly assigned to preoperative gabapentin or pregabalin versus placebo or active control and assessed acute (≤24 h) or chronic (≥2 months) pain. We conducted meta-analyses when possible and rated the quality of evidence (QoE) by using the GRADE approach. Twelve studies were eligible for review, of which eight evaluated gabapentin (n = 516) and four pregabalin (n = 209). Gabapentin reduced pain scores in the recovery room (mean difference [MD] -1.68 on a 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), 95% CI -2.59 to -0.77; minimally important difference is 1 point; relative risk [RR] for mild pain (<4/10) 1.71, 95% CI 1.33-2.02; moderate QoE) and 24 h postoperatively (MD -0.52, 95% CI -1.02 to -0.01; RR for mild pain 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.13; very low QoE). Pregabalin reduced pain and morphine consumption in the recovery room (MD -6.71 mg, 95% CI -10.73 to -2.70; low QoE). No significant difference was observed in pain score at 24 h (MD -0.38, 95%, CI -0.96 to 0.21; moderate QoE). Neither drug reduced the rate of chronic postoperative pain. Gabapentin and pregabalin seem to reduce opioid consumption in the recovery room. Gabapentin, but not pregabalin, reduces pain at 24 h after breast cancer surgery. Neither drug affects the development of chronic postoperative pain. Gabapentin and pregabalin administered perioperatively in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery improve acute postoperative pain as indicated by the reduction in opioid consumption. Further data are needed on reducing chronic postoperative pain. Copyright © 2017 British Association

  14. [Non pharmacologic treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Guastella, Virginie; Mick, Gérard; Laurent, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Nondrug treatments of neuropathic pain should always begin at the same time as pharmacologic treatment. There are three types of nondrug treatment for neuropathic pain: physical, surgical, and "psychocorporal" and psychotherapeutic treatment. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a simple physical treatment that strengthens local inhibitory controls and is indicated in focal neuropathic pain when upstream stimulation is possible for a superficial sensitive nerve trunk. Destructive surgery is represented today by "DREZotomy", destruction of nociceptive fibers and their dorsal root entry zones. It is indicated essentially in intractable pain due to plexus avulsion. Functional surgery is implanted electric stimulation--either spinal or central (encephalic)--of structures that exert inhibitory control on the pain pathways. Spinal stimulation is performed at the level of the posterior spinal cord and is indicated essentially in segmental mononeuropathies refractory to drug treatment. Central stimulation is performed at the motor cortex and is indicated for refractory central pain. "Psychocorporal" techniques (relaxation, sophrology, hypnosis) are useful to reduce anxiety and neurovegetative hypertonicity, both factors that aggravate neuropathic pain.

  15. Early treatment with UR13870, a novel inhibitor of p38α mitogenous activated protein kinase, prevents hyperreflexia and anxiety behaviors, in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Galan-Arriero, Iriana; Avila-Martin, Gerardo; Ferrer-Donato, Agueda; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Piazza, Stefano; Taylor, Julian

    2015-09-14

    Microglia cell activation plays a role in the development of neuropathic pain partly due to the activation of the p38α MAPK signaling pathway after nerve injury. In this study we assessed the effect of UR13870, a p38α MAPK inhibitor, in the "spared nerve injury" (SNI) model, to study its effects on modulation of spinal microglial activation and to test behavioral hyperreflexia responses and cerebral-mediated pain behavior. The effect of daily administration of UR13870 (10mg/kg p.o.) and Pregabalin (50mg/kg p.o.) on reflex hypersensitivity to mechanical and cold test stimuli and on affective related pain responses measured with the place escape avoidance paradigm and the open field-induced anxiety test, were evaluated after SNI in Sprague Dawley rats. Microglial reactivity in the ipsilateral lumbar laminae I/II dorsal horn was evaluated with OX-42 immunohistochemistry. UR13870 treatment significantly decreased hindlimb hyperreflexia to both mechanical and cold stimuli after SNI without loss of general motor function, in addition to a reduction in pain-related anxiety behavior at day 21 after SNI, accompanied by normalization of OX-42 immunoreactivity within the ipsilateral lumbar dorsal horn. Pregabalin treatment only reduced mechanical hyperreflexia and affected general motor function. Oral administration of the p38α MAPK inhibitor, UR13870, mediates antinociception to both mechanical and cold stimuli, and significantly restored inner-zone exploration in the open field test, accompanied by normalization in dorsal horn microglial activation in the SNI model.

  16. Effects of Pregabalin in Patients with Hypnotic-Dependent Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Youg Won; Song, Mei Ling

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Long-term use of hypnotics runs the risk of dependency, and subjects usually experience difficulties in withdrawal. The objective of this study was to investigate the success of withdrawal using pregabalin and its efficacy on sleep in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia. Methods: We enrolled patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia who were 18 years or older. The starting dosage of pregabalin was 75 mg/day and was increased up to as much as 300 mg/day, depending on the individual patient's condition, while tapering off hypnotics. After 4 weeks of titration, the final dosage amount was maintained for at least another 4 weeks. Sleep and clinical variables were evaluated at baseline and after treatment, using the Korean versions of various sleep questionnaires as well as polysomnography. Results: Forty subjects were enrolled, with a mean age of 52.0 ± 8.5 years, of whom 28 (70.0%) were women. Twenty-one (52.5%) subjects successfully withdrew from hypnotics. The duration of withdrawal was 42.1 ± 16.0 days (range: 27.0∼84.0). The mean pregabalin dose was 121.4 ± 69.0 mg/day (range: 75.0∼300.0). After pregabalin treatment, there was a significant improvement in the total score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (15.0 ± 2.1, 8.9 ± 3.0, p < 0.001), and insomnia severity index (20.9 ± 4.3, 9.6 ± 4.4, p < 0.001); however, most of the sleep variables of the PSG showed no differences. The main adverse effects of pregabalin were nausea and dizziness. Conclusions: Our results showed pregabalin may be a promising candidate for withdrawal from hypnotics and improved sleep in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia. Citation: Cho YW, Song ML. Effects of pregabalin in patients with hypnotic-dependent insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):545-550. PMID:24812540

  17. A cost-utility analysis of pregabalin versus venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive anxiety and worry about several events and activities. The estimated 1-year prevalence for adults is around 2% and the lifetime prevalence could reach more than 6%. The disease is associated with reduced quality of life, being comparable to that of major depressive disorder and to chronic illnesses such as diabetes and arthritis, and high consumption of health care resources. Methods A previously published patient-level simulation cost-utility model was adapted to the Portuguese context in order to evaluate clinical and economic consequences of using pregabalin in place of venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The model predicts the evolution of 1,000 patients with generalized anxiety disorder, simulating their pathway in weekly cycles over one year treatment. This is done by setting a pre-treatment Hamilton Anxiety Scale score and projecting the weekly impact of the pharmacotherapy on this score. The model uses clinical data from an 8-week flexible dose direct comparison clinical trial between the two drugs; utility values based on a Spanish study; and Portuguese economic data, being the resource consumption obtained via an expert panel. Results Pregabalin patients benefited from 0.738 quality adjusted life years while those on venlafaxine XR achieved 0.712. Moreover, the number of weeks with no or minimal anxiety symptoms was estimated to be 12.9 for pregabalin and only 3.8 for venlafaxine XR. Those clinical gains were achieved at the expense of an extra 715€ per patient, implying an incremental cost per quality adjusted life year of 27,199€ and an incremental cost per week with no or minimal symptoms of 79€. Sensitivity analysis shows that results are robust to main assumptions. Conclusions Assuming a threshold of 30,000€ per quality adjusted life year, pregabalin is cost-effective in comparison with venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety

  18. A cost-utility analysis of pregabalin versus venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Silva Miguel, Luís; Silva Miguel, Nuno; Inês, Mónica

    2013-04-12

    Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by excessive anxiety and worry about several events and activities. The estimated 1-year prevalence for adults is around 2% and the lifetime prevalence could reach more than 6%. The disease is associated with reduced quality of life, being comparable to that of major depressive disorder and to chronic illnesses such as diabetes and arthritis, and high consumption of health care resources. A previously published patient-level simulation cost-utility model was adapted to the Portuguese context in order to evaluate clinical and economic consequences of using pregabalin in place of venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The model predicts the evolution of 1,000 patients with generalized anxiety disorder, simulating their pathway in weekly cycles over one year treatment. This is done by setting a pre-treatment Hamilton Anxiety Scale score and projecting the weekly impact of the pharmacotherapy on this score. The model uses clinical data from an 8-week flexible dose direct comparison clinical trial between the two drugs; utility values based on a Spanish study; and Portuguese economic data, being the resource consumption obtained via an expert panel. Pregabalin patients benefited from 0.738 quality adjusted life years while those on venlafaxine XR achieved 0.712. Moreover, the number of weeks with no or minimal anxiety symptoms was estimated to be 12.9 for pregabalin and only 3.8 for venlafaxine XR. Those clinical gains were achieved at the expense of an extra 715€ per patient, implying an incremental cost per quality adjusted life year of 27,199€ and an incremental cost per week with no or minimal symptoms of 79€. Sensitivity analysis shows that results are robust to main assumptions. Assuming a threshold of 30,000€ per quality adjusted life year, pregabalin is cost-effective in comparison with venlafaxine XR in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in Portugal.

  19. New therapy for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the worst painful symptoms in clinic. It contains nerve-injured neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, chronic inflammatory pain, cancer pain, and postherpes pain, and is characterized by a tactile allodynia and hyperalgesia. Neuropathic pain, especially the nerve-injured neuropathy, the diabetic neuropathy, and the cancer pain, is opioid resistant pain. Since the downregulation of mu-opioid receptors is observed in dorsal spinal cord, morphine and fentanyl could not provide marked antihyperalgesic/antiallodynic effects in the course neuropathic pain states. The downregulation of mu-opioid receptors is suggested to be mediated through the activation of NMDA receptors. Moreover, at the neuropathic pain states, the increased expression of voltage-dependent Na+ channels and Ca2+ channels are observed. Based on the above information concerned with the pathophysiology of neural changes in neuropathic pain states, new drug treatments for neuropathic pain, using ketamine, methadone, and gabapentin, have been developed. These drugs show remarkable effectiveness against hyperalgesia and allodynia during neuropathic pain states. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor agonist, which has different pharmacological profiles with morphine. The remarkable effectiveness of oxycodone for neuropathic pain provides the possibility that mu-opioid receptor agonists, which have different pharmacological profile with morphine, can be used for the management of neuropathic pain.

  20. Ocular neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Perry; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    As the biological alarm of impending or actual tissue damage, pain is essential for our survival. However, when it is initiated and/or sustained by dysfunctional elements in the nociceptive system, it is itself a disease known as neuropathic pain. While the critical nociceptive system provides a number of protective functions, it is unique in its central role of monitoring, preserving and restoring the optical tear film in the face of evaporative attrition without which our vision would be non-functional. Meeting this existential need resulted in the evolution of the highly complex, powerful and sensitive dry eye alarm system integrated in the peripheral and central trigeminal sensory network. The clinical consequences of corneal damage to these nociceptive pathways are determined by the type and location of its pathological elements and can range from the spectrum known as dry eye disease to the centalised oculofacial neuropathic pain syndrome characterised by a striking disparity between the high intensity of symptoms and paucity of external signs. These changes parallel those observed in somatic neuropathic pain. When seen through the neuroscience lens, diseases responsible for inadequately explained chronic eye pain (including those described as dry eye) can take on new meanings that may clarify long-standing enigmas and point to new approaches for developing preventive, symptomatic and disease-modifying interventions for these currently refractory disorders. PMID:25943558

  1. Effect of pregabalin administration upon reperfusion in a rat model of hyperglycemic stroke: Mechanistic insights associated with high-mobility group box 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young; Jun, Ji-Hae; Shin, Eun-Jung; Kwak, Young-Lan; Shin, Jeon-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, which reduces the efficacy of treatments and worsens clinical outcomes, is common in stroke. Ability of pregabalin to reduce neuroexcitotoxicity may provide protection against stroke, even under hyperglycemia. We investigated its protective effect against hyperglycemic stroke and its possible molecular mechanisms. Male Wistar rats administered dextrose to cause hyperglycemia, underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion for 1 h and subsequent reperfusion. Rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 30 mg/kg pregabalin or an equal amount of normal saline at the onset of reperfusion (n = 16 per group). At 24 h after reperfusion, neurological deficit, infarct volume, and apoptotic cell count were assessed. Western blot analysis was performed to determine protein expression of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), phosphorylated nuclear factor-kappa B (p-NF-κB), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), phosphorylated inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-iNOS, p-eNOS), Bcl-2, Bax, Cytochrome C, and caspase-3 in the brain. Pregabalin-treated rats showed significantly improved neurological function (31% decrease in score), reduced infarct size (by 33%), fewer apoptotic cells (by 63%), and lower expression levels of HMGB1, TLR4, p-NF-κB, IL-1β, and TNF- α, compared with control rats. Decreased p-iNOS and increased p-eNOS expressions were also observed. Expression of Bax, Cytochrome C, and cleaved caspase-3/caspase3 was significantly downregulated, while Bcl-2 expression was increased by pregabalin treatment. Pregabalin administration upon reperfusion decreased neuronal death and improved neurological function in hyperglycemic stroke rats. Cogent mechanisms would include attenuation of HMGB1/TLR-4-mediated inflammation and favorable modulation of the NOS. PMID:28152042

  2. The reliability and validity of a modified total neuropathy score-reduced and neuropathic pain severity items when used to measure chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients receiving taxanes and platinums.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ellen M Lavoie; Cohen, Jeffrey A; Pett, Marjorie A; Beck, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy signs and symptoms has been hampered because of the lack of simple, reliable, and valid measures. The study objective was to examine the internal consistency and interrater reliability as well as the structural validity of a 5-component total neuropathy score-reduced (TNSr) variant and a chemotherapy-induced neuropathy-specific Neuropathic Pain Scale. One hundred seventeen outpatients receiving taxanes or platinums were assessed by a consistent nurse practitioner using the 2 instruments. Ten subjects participated in interrater reliability testing. Mean scores and SDs for individual items were low. The strength item was deleted because of low interitem correlations and a floor effect. The reflex item was deleted because of low interitem correlations and its negative influence on Cronbach alpha. Pin sensibility was deleted because of low factor loadings. The TNSr-short form and the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy-specific Neuropathic Pain Scale formed 2 distinct factors, providing evidence of structural validity. Cronbach alpha's for the 2 instruments were .80 and .96, respectively. The TNSr interrater reliability results suggested acceptable rater concordance, but minor revisions could further improve scoring precision. Clinimetric evidence supports the use of 2 new instruments when monitoring taxane- and platinum-related neuropathy and pain. Further instrument modifications are recommended, followed by additional testing in diverse populations. With these new instruments, nurses can more easily incorporate prospective neuropathy assessment into daily clinical practice. The outcome will be improved symptom awareness by oncology clinicians and patients, leading to fewer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy-related devastating effects on functionality and quality of life.

  3. Pregabalin-induced hyperprolactinemia in a patient with fibromyalgia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Taraktas, Aslihan; Mesci, Nilgun; Ozturk, Gulcan; Kulcu, Duygu Geler; Aydog, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities have been proposed for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), a common rheumatic disease. Pregabalin is suggested as a first-step medication for FMS in the newest guidelines. Drowsiness, dizziness, and peripheral edema are well-known side effects of pregabalin; however, mastalgia is rarely seen. Presently described is a case of FMS in a patient who developed mastalgia and hyperprolactinemia (HPL) while taking pregabalin. PMID:28275758

  4. Effect of pre-emptive pregabalin on pain management in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xi

    2017-08-01

    Pre-emptive pregabalin might be beneficial to the patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the effect of pregabalin on pain management of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of pregabalin versus placebo on laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was pain scores Meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Six RCTs involving 434 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, pregabalin intervention was found to significantly reduce the pain scores (Std. mean difference = -0.57; 95% CI = -0.85 to -0.29; P < 0.0001) and postoperative fentanyl consumption (Std. mean difference = -1.74; 95% CI = -2.31 to -1.16; P < 0.00001), improve Ramsay Sedation score (Std. mean difference = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.46 to 1.60; P = 0.0004), but demonstrated no influence on nausea and vomiting (RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.57 to 1.19; P = 0.30), as well as headache (RR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.55 to 1.64; P = 0.86). Compared to control intervention, pregabalin intervention was found to significantly reduce the pain scores and postoperative fentanyl consumption, and improve Ramsay Sedation score in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but had no influence on nausea and vomiting, as well as headache. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. [Management of neuropathic bladder in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, A; Patti, F; Reggio, A

    2004-05-01

    It is estimated that almost 70% of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from urinary symptoms, with devastant impact on Quality of Life (QoL). The major aims of management should be to ameliorate the patients quality of life and to prevent the frequent complications of bladder dysfunction such as infention and renal damage. Therapy can usually eliminate or reduce the symptoms of neuropathic bladder. In the following pages is discussed the complex management of urinary symptoms in MS patients.

  6. (S)-lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; Chew, Lindsey A; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yue; Yeon, Seul Ki; Telemi, Edwin; Meroueh, Seeneen; Park, Ki Duk; Shrinivasan, Raghuraman; Gilbraith, Kerry B; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Patwardhan, Amol; Vanderah, Todd W; Khanna, May; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions which regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block. Peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-lacosamide [(S)-LCM], the inactive enantiomer of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug (R)-lacosamide [(R)-LCM, Vimpat]. We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5, a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-lacosamide inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that uses subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-lacosamide decreased the dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to mustard oil, and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of postoperative pain, and 2 models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain, which works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations.

  7. Neuropathic cancer pain: What we are dealing with? How to manage it?

    PubMed Central

    Esin, Ece; Yalcin, Suayib

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a serious health problem, and imposes a great burden on the lives of patients and their families. Pain can be associated with delay in treatment, denial of treatment, or failure of treatment. If the pain is not treated properly it may impair the quality of life. Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP) is one of the most complex phenomena among cancer pain syndromes. NCP may result from direct damage to nerves due to acute diagnostic/therapeutic interventions. Chronic NCP is the result of treatment complications or malignancy itself. Although the reason for pain is different in NCP and noncancer neuropathic pain, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are similar. Data regarding neuropathic pain are primarily obtained from neuropathic pain studies. Evidence pertaining to NCP is limited. NCP due to chemotherapeutic toxicity is a major problem for physicians. In the past two decades, there have been efforts to standardize NCP treatment in order to provide better medical service. Opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain treatment; however, a new group of therapeutics called coanalgesic drugs has been introduced to pain treatment. These coanalgesics include gabapentinoids (gabapentin, pregabalin), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine, and venlafaxine), corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, and cannabinoids. Pain can be encountered throughout every step of cancer treatment, and thus all practicing oncologists must be capable of assessing pain, know the possible underlying pathophysiology, and manage it appropriately. The purpose of this review is to discuss neuropathic pain and NCP in detail, the relevance of this topic, clinical features, possible pathology, and treatments of NCP. PMID:24790459

  8. Neuropathic itch: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Astrid; Ständer, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pruritus (CP) is a frequent symptom in the general population; in 8% of all patients, it has a neuropathic origin. CP is of neuropathic origin when nerve fiber damage is responsible for the symptom. The damage can be caused by compression or degeneration of the nerve fibers in the skin or extracutaneous in peripheral nerves or the central nervous system. There are significant differences in the pathogenesis and in the clinical presentation of neuropathic CP. Localized neuropathic CP such as brachioradial pruritus or notalgia paresthetica are due to a circumscribed nerve compression and are often limited on the corresponding dermatome. In contrast, generalized neuropathic CP, as in small fiber neuropathies, may be associated with a systemic or metabolic underlying disease. It is not always easy to establish the diagnosis because a variety of diseases can be responsible for this type of CP. The present study shows an overview of possible diseases, diagnostic tools, and the relevant therapy strategies.

  9. Antinociceptive effects of fucoidan in rat models of vincristine-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanyin; Zhao, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Guoping; Xu, Ming-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs commonly induce peripheral neuropathic pain, which limit their clinic use. In the present study, the effect of fucoidan on the development of vincristine‑induced neuropathic pain was evaluated and the underlying mechanism was examined. A neuropathy model was established in Sprague‑Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of vincristine sulfate 50 µg/kg once a day for 10 consecutive days. Fucoidan (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg) were injected for 14 consecutive days. Behavioral assessments were then performed and the expression of GABAB receptor was determined. The results showed that a single treatment with fucoidan did not prevent the induction of vincristine‑induced mechanical or cold allodynia. However, repeated fucoidan administration attenuated vincristine‑induced mechanical and cold allodynia in a dose‑dependent manner. Additionally, the analgesic effects of fucoidan contributed to an upregulation in the expression of GABAB receptor in the spinal cord. Furthermore, all the effects of fucoidan against vincristine‑induced neuropathy were reversed by saclofen, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. These results suggested that the antinociceptive effects of fucoidan may be through activation of GABAB receptor, and fucoidan may be a promising drug for the treatment of chemotherapeutic drug-induced neuropathic pain.

  10. Discovery of Potent Antiallodynic Agents for Neuropathic Pain Targeting P2X3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yeo Ok; Lin, Hai; Cho, Joong-Heui; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, So-Deok; Bae, Jinsu; Kang, Koon Mook; Kim, Yoon-Gyoon; Pae, Ae Nim; Ko, Hyojin; Park, Chul-Seung; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2017-04-06

    Antagonism of the P2X3 receptor is one of the potential therapeutic strategies for the management of neuropathic pain because P2X3 receptors are predominantly localized on small to medium diameter C- and Aδ-fiber primary afferent neurons, which are related to the pain-sensing system. In this study, 5-hydroxy pyridine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro biological activities by two-electrode voltage clamp assay at hP2X3 receptors. Among the novel hP2X3 receptor antagonists, intrathecal treatment of compound 29 showed parallel efficacy with pregabalin (calcium channel modulator) and higher efficacy than AF353 (P2X3 receptor antagonist) in the evaluation of its antiallodynic effects in spinal nerve ligation rats. However, because compound 29 was inactive by intraperitoneal administration in neuropathic pain animal models due to low cell permeability, the corresponding methyl ester analogue, 28, which could be converted to compound 29 in vivo, was investigated as a prodrug concept. Intravenous injection of compound 28 resulted in potent antiallodynic effects, with ED50 values of 2.62 and 2.93 mg/kg in spinal nerve ligation and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy rats, respectively, indicating that new drug development targeting the P2X3 receptor could be promising for neuropathic pain, a disease with high unmet medical needs.

  11. Pregabalin abuse and dependence in Germany: results from a database query.

    PubMed

    Gahr, Maximilian; Freudenmann, Roland W; Hiemke, Christoph; Kölle, Makus A; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Pregabalin (PRG) is approved for the treatment of neuropathic pain, partial seizures and generalised anxiety disorder in many countries and currently under study for other indications. Supported by case reports and the results of a limited number of studies there is an ongoing debate on the potential of PRG to cause addictive behaviours. However, currently available evidence on this issue is sparse, and any definitive assessment of PRG's potential for abuse and dependence is not yet in sight. The aim of our study was to identify the number of cases of PRG abuse or dependence reported to the database of a German medical regulatory body and to obtain insights into further usage-specific parameters. We conducted a query of the entire database of the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) regarding reports of PRG abuse or dependence and analysed these cases on the basis of several parameters. A total of 55 reports of PRG abuse or dependence were identified (mean age 36 years, 64 % of reports involved males). The first reports were submitted to BfArM in 2008, and the reporting frequency has increased up to the present. Mean daily PRG dosage was 1424 mg. Current or previous polytoxicomania was present in 40 and 42 % of cases, respectively. Psychiatric diagnoses other than substance-related disorders were reported in 13 (24 %) cases. In about one-third of the patients withdrawal syndromes subsequent to discontinuation of PRG were reported. Cases of PRG abuse or dependence have been reported to the BfArM since 2008, with a marked increase of such reports in subsequent years. Male sex and a history of polytoxicomania may be possible risk factors for the development of addictive behaviours related to PRG.

  12. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of

  13. Use of pregabalin for nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Christa B; Doreswamy, Meghana; Husain, Aatif M

    2013-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of pregabalin (PGB) in treatment of frequent nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) and nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) in critically ill patients. In this retrospective study, 21 patients were identified as having received pregabalin for the treatment of NCS as determined by continuous electroencephalographic monitoring. The patients were considered to be responders if their seizures were terminated within 24h of initiation of PGB without the addition of another antiepileptic agent. Of the 21 patients who received PGB for treatment of NCS or NCSE, 11 (52%) were responders. PGB was administered via a nasogastric tube or orally and was the 2nd to 4th agent used. The average initial dose and total daily dose of PGB was similar in the responders and non-responders (342mg vs. 360mg, respectively). PGB was more effective in aborting NCS (9 patients, 82%) than NCSE (2 patients, 18%). Of the 9 brain tumor patients, PGB resulted in seizure cessation in 67% (6 patients). In contrast, all patients with hypoxic injury (4) did not respond to PGB. The responders were noted to have better clinical outcome (64% vs. 9% discharged home). Most of the patients tolerated the medication without any significant short term adverse effects, except two patients who were noted to have dizziness and sedation. Pregabalin may be safe option for add-on treatment for nonconvulsive seizures in critically ill patients when conventional therapy fails. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of S 38093, an antagonist/inverse agonist of histamine H3 receptors, in models of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaumette, T; Chapuy, E; Berrocoso, E; Llorca-Torralba, M; Bravo, L; Mico, J A; Chalus, M; Eschalier, A; Ardid, D; Marchand, F; Sors, A

    2017-09-06

    Histamine H3 receptors are mainly expressed on CNS neurons, particularly along the nociceptive pathways. The potential involvement of these receptors in pain processing has been suggested using H3 receptor inverse agonists. The antinociceptive effect of S 38093, a novel inverse agonist of H3 receptors, has been evaluated in several neuropathic pain models in rat and compared with those of gabapentin and pregabalin. While S 38093 did not change vocalization thresholds to paw pressure in healthy rats, it exhibited a significant antihyperalgesic effect in the Streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ) neuropathy model after acute and chronic administration and, in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model only after chronic administration, submitted to the paw-pressure test. Acute S 38093 administration at all doses tested displayed a significant cold antiallodynic effect in a model of acute or repeated administration of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy submitted to cold tail immersion, cold allodynia being the main side effect of oxaliplatin in patients. The effect of S 38093 increased following chronic administration (i.e. twice a day during 5 days) in the CCI and STZ models except in the oxaliplatin models where its effect was already maximal from the first administration The kinetics and size of effect of S 38093 were similar to gabapentin and/or pregabalin. Finally, the antinociceptive effect of S 38093 could be partially mediated by α2 adrenoreceptors desensitization in the locus coeruleus. These results highlight the interest of S 38093 to relieve neuropathic pain and warrant clinical trials especially in chemotherapeutic agent-induced neuropathic pain. S 38093, a new H3 antagonist/inverse agonist, displays antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect in neuropathic pain, especially in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy after chronic administration. This effect of S 38093 in neuropathic pain could be partly mediated by α2 receptors desensitization in the locus coeruleus

  15. Neuropathic pain and reactive gliosis are reversed by dialdehydic compound in neuropathic pain rat models.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Maria Rosaria; Cirillo, Giovanni; Petrosino, Valentina; Marcello, Lorenza; Soleti, Antonio; Merizzi, Giulia; Cavaliere, Carlo; Papa, Michele

    2012-11-14

    The role of the purinergic system in the modulation of pain mechanisms suggests that it might be promising target for treating neuropathic pain. In this study we evaluated the effects of two different dialdehydic compounds: a modified stable adenosine (2-[1-(6-amminopurin-9-il)-2-osso-etossi]prop-2-enale, named MED1101), and oxidized ATP (Ox-ATP), in two different neuropathic pain rat models: the sciatic spared nerve injury (SNI) and paclitaxel evoked painful peripheral neuropathy (pPPN). Neuropathic animals were divided in groups as follows: (a) treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) MED1101 or Ox-ATP for 21 days; (b) receiving vehicle (VEH) and (c) control (CTR) rats. The allodynic and hyperalgesic behavior was investigated by Von Frey filament test and thermal Plantar test, respectively. We evaluated by immunocytochemistry the astrocytic (GFAP) and microglial (Iba1) response on lumbar spinal cord sections. In either experimental models and using either substances, treated animals showed reduced allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia paralleled by a significant reduction of glial reaction in the spinal cord. These data prompt to hypothesize a potential role of dialdehydes as analgesic agent in chronic neuropathic pain and a possible role as anti-gliotic molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The neuropathic diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rathur, Haris M; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic foot problems are common throughout the world, and result in major medical, social and economic consequences for the patients, their families, and society. Foot ulcers are likely to be of neuropathic origin and, therefore, are eminently preventable. Individuals with the greatest risk of ulceration can easily be identified by careful clinical examination of their feet: education and frequent follow-up is indicated for these patients. When infection complicates a foot ulcer, the combination can be limb-threatening, or life-threatening. Infection is defined clinically, but wound cultures assist in identification of causative pathogens. Tissue specimens are strongly preferred to wound swabs for wound cultures. Antimicrobial therapy should be guided by culture results, and although such therapy may cure the infection, it does not heal the wound. Alleviation of the mechanical load on ulcers (offloading) should always be a part of treatment. Plantar neuropathic ulcers typically heal in 6 weeks with nonremovable casts, because pressure at the ulcer site is mitigated and compliance is enforced. The success of other approaches to offloading similarly depends on the patient's adherence to the strategy used for pressure relief.

  17. In vitro study of the neuropathic potential of the organophosphorus compounds fenamiphos and profenofos: Comparison with mipafox and paraoxon.

    PubMed

    Emerick, Guilherme L; Fernandes, Laís S; de Paula, Eloísa Silva; Barbosa, Fernando; dos Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2015-08-01

    Organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is a central-peripheral distal axonopathy that develops 8-14 days after poisoning by a neuropathic organophosphorus compound (OP). Several OPs that caused OPIDN were withdrawn from the agricultural market due to induction of serious delayed effects. Therefore, the development of in vitro screenings able to differentiate neuropathic from non-neuropathic OPs is of crucial importance. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in the neurotoxic effects of mipafox (neuropathic OP) and paraoxon (non-neuropathic OP) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, using the inhibition and aging of neuropathy target esterase (NTE), inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), activation of calpain, neurite outgrowth, cytotoxicity and intracellular calcium as indicators. Additionally, the potential of fenamiphos and profenofos to cause acute and/or delayed effects was also evaluated. Mipafox had the lowest IC50 and induced the highest percentage of aging of NTE among the OPs evaluated. Only mipafox was able to cause calpain activation after 24 h of incubation. Concentrations of mipafox and fenamiphos which inhibited at least 70% of NTE were also able to reduce neurite outgrowth. Cytotoxicity was higher in non-neuropathic than in neuropathic OPs while the intracellular calcium levels were higher in neuropathic than in non-neuropathic OPs. In conclusion, the SH-SY5Y cellular model was selective to differentiate neuropathic from non-neuropathic OPs; fenamiphos, but not profenofos presented results compatible with the induction of OPIDN.

  18. The Role of NMDARs Ligands on Antinociceptive Effects of Pregabalin in the Tail Flick Test

    PubMed Central

    Meymandi, Manzumeh-Shamsi; Keyhanfar, Fariborz; Yazdanpanah, Omid; Heravi, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregabalin as a new anticonvulsant has been used in different pain treatments. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ligands in antinociceptive effect of pregabalin in mice using tail flick. Materials and Methods: NMDA (15 and 30 mg/kg) as an agonist or MK801 (0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg) as an antagonist were injected intraperitoneally either alone or 15 minutes before antinociceptive dose of pregabalin (100 mg/kg). Then the latency times and %MPE were measured in the tail flick assay during 75 minutes. Results: NMDA and MK801 had no effects alone. NMDA pretreatment significantly decreased the latency times of pregabalin till 75th minutes. In NMDA pretreated groups, %MPE30 unlike %MPE75 decreased significantly compared to those of pregabalin. MK801 delayed the latency times in pretreated groups, but %MPE30 and %MPE75 did not change significantly compared to pregabalin alone. Conclusions: Our findings support the role of NMDARs in pregabalin antinociception, because the NMDAR agonist, unlike the antagonist, decreased the antinociceptive effect of pregabalin, even if tail flick is not an adequate pain assessment method in this regard. PMID:26587404

  19. Anticytokine therapy in neuropathic pain management.

    PubMed

    Schäfers, Maria; Sommer, Claudia

    2007-11-01

    Cytokine activation or dysregulation is implied in a variety of painful disease states. Numerous experimental studies provide evidence that proinflammatory cytokines induce or facilitate neuropathic pain. Cytokine levels are rapidly and markedly upregulated in the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and in particular regions of the brain, after peripheral nerve injuries. Direct receptor-mediated actions on afferent nerve fibers as well as cytokine effects involving further mediators have been reported. Whereas direct application of exogenous proinflammatory cytokines induces pain, blockade of these cytokines or application of anti-inflammatory cytokines reduces pain behavior in most experimental paradigms. Cytokine measurements may identify patients at risk of developing chronic pain associated with their neuropathic conditions, as in the examples of peripheral neuropathies and postherpetic neuralgia. Anticytokine agents currently on the market are effective for the treatment of mostly inflammatory pain conditions, and are starting to be introduced for neuropathic pain states; however, their use is limited by potential life-threatening complications. Owing to the pleiotropy and redundancy of the cytokine system, the successful approach may not be inhibition of one particular cytokine but strategies shifting the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in properly selected patients. Agents that specifically target downstream signaling molecules may provide hope for safer and more specific therapies.

  20. Memantine (Namenda) for neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Mailien; Rasheed, Atif; Moradimehr, Abdolali; Baumrucker, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in the palliative care population; unless adequately treated, the pain can lead to chronic anxiety, depression, and social impairment. Many treatments have been proposed for neuropathic pain; however, it remains underdiagnosed, under-treated, and often requires long-term therapy with risk of adverse effects. Memantine (Namenda), an N-Methyl, D-aspartate receptor inhibitor currently marketed for the treatment of dementia, has been proposed as a medication for the treatment of neuropathic pain for its mechanism, safety, lack of serious adverse effects, and relatively rapid onset of action. However, clinical trials have not been promising so far and its routine use in neuropathic pain is not currently recommended.

  1. Pregabalin role in inhibition of morphine analgesic tolerance and physical dependency in rats.

    PubMed

    Hasanein, Parisa; Shakeri, Saeed

    2014-11-05

    Pregabalin is recently proposed as analgesic or adjuvant in pain management. While previous preclinical investigations have evaluated pregabalin-opioid interactions, the effect of pregabalin on opioid tolerance and dependency has not yet been studied. Here we evaluated the effects of different doses of pregabalin (50, 100 and 200mg/kg, s.c.) on morphine-induced tolerance and dependency in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were rendered tolerant to analgesic effect of morphine by injection of morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.) twice daily for 7 days. To develop morphine dependence, rats were given escalating doses of morphine. To determine the effect of pregabalin on the development of morphine tolerance and dependence, different doses of pregabalin were administrated before morphine. The tail-flick and naloxone precipitation withdrawal tests were used to evaluate the degree of tolerance and dependence, respectively. Chronic morphine-injected rats showed significant decrements in the percentage maximum possible effect (%MPE) of morphine on the days 5 and 7 (32.5%±3.5, 21.5%±4, respectively) compared to the first day (100%) which showed morphine tolerance. Pregabalin 200mg/kg completely prevented the development of morphine tolerance. In addition, concomitant treatment of morphine with pregabalin attenuated almost all of the naloxone-induced withdrawal signs which include weight loss, jumping, penis licking, teeth chattering, wet dog shakes, rearing, standing, sniffing, face grooming and paw tremor. These data show that pregabaline has a potential anti-tolerant/anti-dependence property against chronic usage of morphine. Therefore, pregabalin appears to be a promising candidate for the treatment of opioid addiction after confirming by future clinical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  3. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-11-01

    Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine.

  4. Disease mechanisms in neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andreas; Koroschetz, Jana; Baron, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    Itch, also known as pruritus, is an unpleasant cutaneous sensation that provokes the desire to scratch. Itch is a common symptom of inflammatory skin disorders, but it can also occur in neurological diseases associated with injury to nervous tissue, in the absence of any skin disease and without any notable physiological stimuli in the periphery. This 'neuropathic' type of itch occurs either in combination with neuropathic pain or independently and is thought to be underdiagnosed. In this Review, we describe the physiological characteristics of specific neuronal systems in the PNS and CNS that transmit and process pruriceptive information, and we consider pathological changes that occur in these systems after nerve lesions. We then introduce a classification system for itch and highlight the similarities and differences between neuropathic itch and neuropathic pain. A summary of neuropathic syndromes in the PNS and CNS that are associated with itch is presented. Finally, we propose appropriate treatment strategies for neuropathic itch, in view of the fact that this condition has different mechanisms of itch generation to other types of itch and consequently requires different therapies.

  5. Conversion from thrice- to twice-daily pregabalin dosing for pain: Economic and clinical outcomes in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Okolo, Chike; Malmstrom, Robert; Duncan, Karsten; Lopez, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Results of a study analyzing economic and clinical outcomes one year after conversion from thrice- to twice-daily pregabalin dosing for pain are presented. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two Veterans Affairs facilities. The analyzed population included all patients receiving pregabalin for pain whose dosing was converted from thrice- to twice-daily pregabalin dosing during a one-year period. The primary endpoint was the economic impact of the conversion. Secondary endpoints included reversion to thrice-daily pregabalin dosing, pregabalin discontinuation, addition of medications for pain, and unscheduled neuropathy-related visits. Among the 57 patients included in the data analysis, 41 continued to take pregabalin twice daily, 10 had pregabalin discontinued, and 6 had dosing reverted to thrice daily. The mean age of patients and the distribution of add-on pain medications did not differ significantly between patients whose pregabalin dosing frequency remained at twice daily and patients whose frequency reverted to thrice daily. The costs associated with pregabalin therapy differed significantly between the preconversion and postconversion periods. A savings of $115,867 was realized from this conversion for both facilities combined over the course of one year. In patients receiving pregabalin for pain, conversion from thrice- to twice-daily pregabalin dosing-while maintaining the same daily dose-resulted in substantial cost savings while having little effect on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Orthotic management of the neuropathic foot: an interdisciplinary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher; Major, Matthew J; Kuffel, Charles; Hines, Kevin; Cole, Pamela

    2015-02-01

    Clinical management of the patient with neuropathic foot is becoming commonplace in orthotic clinics worldwide. The presentations that can result from neuropathic foot are diverse, requiring clinicians to understand the pathomechanics of ulceration, infection, and Charcot joint arthropathy to provide effective interventions. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to provide a review of the literature regarding clinical concepts associated with orthotic management of neuropathic foot. Literature review and clinical case study. Relevant literature were reviewed and summarized, and a clinical case study synthesizing reviewed concepts was presented. Given the multifactorial nature of the neuropathic foot, treatments must be multifaceted and patient-specific to effectively address the underlying disease processes. While systemic issues such as peripheral arterial disease are treated by physicians, local issues such as foot deformity are managed by orthotists. Orthotic interventions commonly include custom footwear to reduce the risk of ulceration through creation of a protective environment or targeted plantar offloading. Patient and caregiver education to encourage management compliance is equally as important to ensure successful treatment. Patients with neuropathic foot benefit from an interdisciplinary care approach which engages physicians, wound care practitioners, and orthotists to treat and manage systemic and local problems. Addressing this pathology through interdisciplinary care may positively affect the patient's health status while lowering associated healthcare costs through improved treatment efficacy. The commonality of neuropathic foot and associated complications including ulceration, infection, and Charcot joint arthropathy requires that the patient care team have a fundamental understanding of these pathologies and common treatment modalities. We review orthotic treatment modalities to assist clinicians with the management of patients with

  7. Translational investigation and treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain develops from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. Translational investigations of neuropathic pain by using different animal models reveal that peripheral sensitization, spinal and cortical plasticity may play critical roles in neuropathic pain. Furthermore, descending facilitatory or excitatory modulation may also act to enhance chronic pain. Current clinical therapy for neuropathic pain includes the use of pharmacological and nonpharmacological (psychological, physical, and surgical treatment) methods. However, there is substantial need to better medicine for treating neuropathic pain. Future translational researchers and clinicians will greatly facilitate the development of novel drugs for treating chronic pain including neuropathic pain. PMID:22400804

  8. Multi-Modal Preemptive Analgesia With Pregabalin, Acetaminophen, Naproxen, and Dextromethorphan in Radical Neck Dissection Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Mojtaba; Beig Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Tavakoli, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia may be considered as a method not only to alleviate postoperative pain but also to decrease analgesic consumption. Different regimens are suggested, but there is currently no standard. Objectives The aim was to measure the efficacy of preemptive analgesia with pregabalin, acetaminophen, naproxen, and dextromethorphan in radical neck dissection surgery for reducing the intensity of pain and morphine consumption. Patients and Methods This study was conducted as a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Eighty adult patients (18 to 60 years of age) under the American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II undergoing elective radical neck dissection were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups of 40 with a simple randomization method. The case group received a combination of 15 mg/kg acetaminophen, 2.5 mg/kg pregabalin, 7 mg/kg naproxen, and 0.3 mg/kg dextromethorphan administered orally one hour prior to surgery. Postoperative pain was assessed with the universal pain assessment tool (UPAT) at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Subjects received morphine based on postoperative pain control protocol. Total administered morphine doses were noted. Results Postoperative pain rates at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery were significantly lower for the case group than the control group (P values = 0.014, 0.003, 0.00, 0.00, and 0.00, respectively). Total morphine doses for the preemptive analgesia group were 45% lower than those of the other group. Side effects were similar for both groups. Conclusions A single preoperative oral dose of pregabalin, acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and naproxen one hour before surgery is an effective method for reducing postoperative pain and morphine consumption in patients undergoing radical neck dissection. PMID:27843771

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain and to evaluate the adverse events and Ontario-specific economic profile of this technology. Clinical Need SCS is a reversible pain therapy that uses low-voltage electrical pulses to manage chronic, intractable neuropathic pain of the trunk or limbs. Neuropathic pain begins or is caused by damage or dysfunction to the nervous system and can be difficult to manage. The prevalence of neuropathic pain has been estimated at about 1.5% of the population in the United States and 1% of the population in the United Kingdom. These prevalence rates are generalizable to Canada. Neuropathic pain is extremely difficult to manage. People with symptoms that persist for at least 6 months or who have symptoms that last longer than expected for tissue healing or resolution of an underlying disease are considered to have chronic pain. Chronic pain is an emotional, social, and economic burden for those living with it. Depression, reduced quality of life (QOL), absenteeism from work, and a lower household income are positively correlated with chronic pain. Although the actual number is unknown, a proportion of people with chronic neuropathic pain fail to obtain pain relief from pharmacological therapies despite adequate and reasonable efforts to use them. These people are said to have intractable neuropathic pain, and they are the target population for SCS. The most common indication for SCS in North America is chronic intractable neuropathic pain due to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), a term that describes persistent leg or back and leg pain in patients who have had back or spine surgery. Neuropathic pain due to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which can develop in the distal aspect of a limb a minor injury, is another common indication. To a lesser extent, chronic intractable

  10. Repeated Administration of Amitriptyline in Neuropathic Pain: Modulation of the Noradrenergic Descending Inhibitory System.

    PubMed

    Hiroki, Tadanao; Suto, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru; Obata, Hideaki

    2017-10-01

    The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine, and gabapentinoids are first-line drugs for treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesic effect of these drugs relates to brainstem-spinal descending noradrenergic systems. However, amitriptyline utilizes a variety of mechanisms for analgesia in neuropathic pain, and it is unclear which mechanism is most important. In the present study, we investigated the role of descending noradrenergic systems in the analgesic effect of these drugs for treatment of neuropathic pain. We also examined whether amitriptyline modifies the descending noradrenergic systems. Seven days after L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), rats received N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4, 50 mg/kg) to degenerate noradrenergic fibers. The rats then received 5 daily intraperitoneal injections of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), pregabalin (10 mg/kg), or gabapentin (50 mg/kg) from 21 days after SNL surgery. Paw withdrawal thresholds were determined to assess the effect of the drugs on hyperalgesia after SNL. To determine whether 5 daily injections of amitriptyline activated noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) and spinal cord with or without DSP-4 treatment, we performed immunohistochemistry using antibodies for c-Fos and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH). Five daily injections of amitriptyline, duloxetine, pregabalin, and gabapentin exerted antihyperalgesic effects in SNL rats (P < .001; estimated treatment effect of amitriptyline [99% confidence interval]: 59.9 [35.1-84.7] g). The antihyperalgesic effects of duloxetine, pregabalin, and gabapentin were reversed by pretreatment with DSP-4 (P < .001, respectively). However, antihyperalgesia was still observed after treatment of amitriptyline in SNL rats with DSP-4 pretreatment (P < .001, 59.7 [30.0-89.3] g), and this analgesic effect was not reversed by the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (30

  11. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Bhusal, Santosh; Diomampo, Sherilyn; Magrey, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. PMID:26937205

  12. Cognitive effects of pregabalin in healthy volunteers: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Martin; Storzbach, Daniel; Munoz, Sonia

    2010-03-02

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can be associated with neurotoxic side effects including cognitive dysfunction, a problem of considerable importance given the usual long-term course of treatment. Pregabalin is a relatively new AED widely used for the treatment of seizures and some types of chronic pain including fibromyalgia. We measured the cognitive effects of 12 weeks of pregabalin in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two healthy volunteers were randomized in a double-blind parallel study to receive pregabalin or placebo (1:1). Pregabalin was titrated over 8 weeks to 600 mg/d. At baseline, and after 12 weeks of treatment, all subjects underwent cognitive testing. Test-retest changes in all cognitive and subjective measures were Z scored against test-retest regressions previously developed from 90 healthy volunteers. Z scores from the placebo and pregabalin groups were compared using Wilcoxon tests. Thirty subjects completed the study (94%). Three of 6 target cognitive measures (Digit Symbol, Stroop, Controlled Oral Word Association) revealed significant test-retest differences between the pregabalin and placebo groups, all showing negative effects with pregabalin (p < 0.05). These cognitive effects were paralleled by complaints on the Portland Neurotoxicity Scale, a subjective measure of neurotoxicity (p < 0.01). At conventional doses and titration, pregabalin induced mild negative cognitive effects and neurotoxicity complaints in healthy volunteers. These effects are one factor to be considered in the selection and monitoring of chronic AED therapy. Class of Evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that pregabalin 300 mg BID negatively impacts cognition on some tasks in healthy volunteers.

  13. Pregabalin Improves Pain Scores in Patients with Fibromyalgia Irrespective of Comorbid Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E; Emir, Birol; Whalen, Ed; Ortiz, Marie; Pauer, Lynne; Clair, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder with patients frequently suffering from comorbid conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Data on how FM patients with comorbid OA respond to recommended therapies (such as pregabalin) could help their treatment. This was a pooled exploratory analysis of three randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of pregabalin in FM patients to assess the impact of comorbid OA on the response to pregabalin. Patients were divided into those with and without comorbid OA. Difference in change in least squares (LS) mean pain score at endpoint (assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scale, controlled for baseline pain score) with pregabalin (300 mg/day and 450 mg/day) vs placebo was assessed. Changes in Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) responders and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) total score were also assessed. There were 1665 patients in the analysis set (558, placebo; 552, pregabalin 300 mg/day; 555, pregabalin 450 mg/day), including 296 with comorbid OA. Pregabalin 450 mg/day significantly improved the LS mean (95% confidence interval) difference in pain score vs placebo in patients with (0.99 [0.44, 1.55], P < 0.001), and without (0.64 [0.39, 0.89], P < 0.001) OA. Improvements with pregabalin 300 mg/day with (0.31 [-0.25, 0.86], P = 0.276) and without (0.51 [0.25, 0.76], P < 0.001) OA were not consistently significant. Improvements in PGIC and FIQ total score were observed in patients with and without comorbid OA. FM patients with or without comorbid OA respond to treatment with pregabalin 450mg/day with significant improvements in pain intensity scores. These data could provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating these patients. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pregabalin: a review of its use in adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2014-09-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica(®)), a well established anxiolytic agent, has been approved in the EU for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. It has a distinct mechanism of action relative to other anti-anxiety agents (α2δ binding at presynaptic voltage dependent calcium channels leading to inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission), a rapid onset of effect (typically ≤1 week) and broad spectrum activity against both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD. In long-term studies, pregabalin maintained improvements in anxiety symptoms that occurred in response to short-term treatment and delayed the time to relapse of GAD compared with placebo. Common comorbidities of GAD, such as insomnia, gastrointestinal symptoms and subsyndromal depression, have no effect on the anxiolytic efficacy of, and moreover are specifically improved by, pregabalin. Treatment with pregabalin is generally well tolerated; the drug has an adverse event profile that includes dizziness, somnolence and weight gain. The potential for abuse of pregabalin is low; the risk of withdrawal symptoms is generally low when the drug is discontinued gradually (over 1 week). Alongside selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), pregabalin is considered a first-line agent for the long-term treatment of GAD by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry. It should be stressed, however, that definitive head-to-head studies comparing pregabalin with SSRI/SNRIs, including in patients with GAD and co-morbid major depressive disorder, are currently lacking. Recently, a study of SSRI/SNRI augmentation with pregabalin yielded positive results, while another study of switching from long-term benzodiazepine therapy to pregabalin was inconclusive; further investigations on these topics are warranted.

  15. Comparative study between 2 different doses of pregabalin and lidocaine on pain following propofol injection: A double-blind, randomized clinical consort study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunkyung; Kim, Donggyeong; Jeon, Younghoon

    2016-12-01

    Propofol, an intravenous anesthetic, often causes pain on injection, which can be very distressful to patients. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin on pain following propofol injection, compared with lidocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, prospective trial, 120 patients were randomized into 3 groups of 40 each; who received oral placebo and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group L, n = 40), oral pregabalin 75 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group LP, n = 40), and oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group HP, n = 40) as pretreatment, followed by administration of 1% propofol 0.5 mg/kg. Pain intensity was measured on a 4-point scale (0 = no, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe pain). Any side effects associated with pretreatment substances were recorded during the first 24 hours after surgery. A total of 120 patients completed this trial. Demographic data were similar between groups. The incidence of pain following propofol injection was significantly reduced in group HP (50%) and group L (55%) compared with group LP (92.5%) (P < 0.05, respectively). The incidences of moderate pain in group HP (12.5%) and group L (15%) were significantly decreased compared with group LP (37.5%; both, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the incidence of side effects such as headache and dizziness between groups. Pretreatment with oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion equally reduced pain from propofol injection.

  16. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  17. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs. PMID:26785162

  18. Electroacupuncture Reduces the Effects of Acute Noxious Stimulation on the Electrical Activity of Pain-Related Neurons in the Hippocampus of Control and Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Chen, Renbo; Feng, Xiu-Mei; Yan, Yaxia; Lippe, Irmgard Th.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of acupuncture analgesia on the hippocampus, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor on pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal area CA1 of sham or chronic constrictive injury (CCI) rats. The animals were randomly divided into a control, a CCI, and a U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) group. In all experiments, we briefly (10-second duration) stimulated the sciatic nerve electrically and recorded the firing rates of PENs and PINs. The results showed that in both sham and CCI rats brief sciatic nerve stimulation significantly increased the electrical activity of PENs and markedly decreased the electrical activity of PINs. These effects were significantly greater in CCI rats compared to sham rats. EA treatment reduced the effects of the noxious stimulus on PENs and PINs in both sham and CCI rats. The effects of EA treatment could be inhibited by U0126 in sham-operated rats. The results suggest that EA reduces effects of acute sciatic nerve stimulation on PENs and PINs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of both sham and CCI rats and that the ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) signaling pathway is involved in the modulation of EA analgesia. PMID:27833763

  19. Gynecological Management of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; HELLMAN, Kevin; BACKONJA, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. While treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there a few critical and basic steps that can be performed on an office visit that offer the opportunity to significantly improve quality of life in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to physically map the pain site and identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists on how best to manage neuropathic pain, but generally a combination of surgical, manipulative or pharmacological methods should be considered. Experimental methods for more precisely characterizing the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain, but additional scientific evidence is needed to unanimously recommend these options. In the meantime, an approach adopted from guidelines of the International Association for Study of Pain tailored for gynecological pain is suggested. PMID:21777899

  20. High-intensity swimming exercise reduces neuropathic pain in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome type I: evidence for a role of the adenosinergic system.

    PubMed

    Martins, D F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Soldi, F; Stramosk, J; Piovezan, A P; Santos, A R S

    2013-03-27

    This study investigated the involvement of the adenosinergic system in antiallodynia induced by exercise in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I). Furthermore, we analyzed the role of the opioid receptors on exercise-induced analgesia. Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) mice, nonexercised and exercised, received intraperitoneal injections of caffeine (10mg/kg, a non selective adenosine receptor antagonist), 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.1mg/kg, a selective adenosine A receptor antagonist), ZM241385 (3mg/kg, a selective adenosine A receptor antagonist), adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3nonyl) adenine [(EHNA), 5mg/kg, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor] or naloxone (1mg/kg, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist). The results showed that high-intensity swimming exercise reduced mechanical allodynia in an animal model of CRPS-I in mice. The antiallodynic effect caused by exercise was reversed by pretreatment with caffeine, naloxone, DPCPX but it was not modified by ZM241385 treatment. In addition, treatment with EHNA, which suppresses the breakdown of adenosine to inosine, enhanced the pain-relieving effects of the high-intensity swimming exercise. This is the first report demonstrating that repeated sessions of high-intensity swimming exercise attenuate mechanical allodynia in an animal model of CRPS-I and that the mechanism involves endogenous adenosine and adenosine A receptors. This study supports the use of high-intensity exercise as an adjunct therapy for CRPS-I treatment.

  1. Ivabradine attenuates the anticonvulsant potency of lamotrigine, but not that of lacosamide, pregabalin and topiramate in the tonic-clonic seizure model in mice.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Katarzyna M; Załuska, Katarzyna; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Załuska-Patel, Karolina; Szczyrek, Michał; Drop, Bartłomiej; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szpringer, Monika; Żółkowska, Dorota; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J

    2017-07-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are involved not only in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability under physiological conditions, but also in seizure activity. To determine the influence of ivabradine (an HCN channel inhibitor) on the anticonvulsant potency of four novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: lacosamide, lamotrigine, pregabalin and topiramate) in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure (MES) model. Adult male albino Swiss mice were challenged with maximal electroconvulsions (electric current of 25mA delivered via auricular electrodes). Total brain concentrations of AEDs were measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography. Ivabradine (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the anticonvulsant potency of lamotrigine by elevating the ED50 value of the AED from 7.48 (6.15-9.11) to 10.07 (8.85-11.45) mg/kg (P<0.05) in the mouse MES model. In contrast, ivabradine (10mg/kg, i.p.) did not significantly affect the anticonvulsant potency of lacosamide, pregabalin or topiramate in the mouse MES model. Additionally, ivabradine had no impact on total brain concentrations of all the studied AEDs in mice. A special caution is advised when combining ivabradine with lamotrigine in epilepsy patients due to the possible pharmacodynamic reduction of the anticonvulsant action of the later drug. The combinations of ivabradine with lacosamide, pregabalin and topiramate seem to be pharmacodynamic and neutral from a preclinical viewpoint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuropathic changes in equine laminitis pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma; Viñuela-Fernandez, Ignacio; Eager, Rachel A; Delaney, Ada; Anderson, Heather; Patel, Anisha; Robertson, Darren C; Allchorne, Andrew; Sirinathsinghji, Eva C; Milne, Elspeth M; MacIntyre, Neil; Shaw, Darren J; Waran, Natalie K; Mayhew, Joe; Fleetwood-Walker, Susan M

    2007-12-05

    Laminitis is a common debilitating disease in horses that involves painful disruption of the lamellar dermo-epidermal junction within the hoof. This condition is often refractory to conventional anti-inflammatory analgesia and results in unremitting pain, which in severe cases requires euthanasia. The mechanisms underlying pain in laminitis were investigated using quantification of behavioural pain indicators in conjunction with histological studies of peripheral nerves innervating the hoof. Laminitic horses displayed consistently altered or abnormal behaviours such as increased forelimb lifting and an increased proportion of time spent at the back of the box compared to normal horses. Electron micrographic analysis of the digital nerve of laminitic horses showed peripheral nerve morphology to be abnormal, as well as having reduced numbers of unmyelinated (43.2%) and myelinated fibers (34.6%) compared to normal horses. Sensory nerve cell bodies innervating the hoof, in cervical, C8 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), showed an upregulated expression of the neuronal injury marker, activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) in both large NF-200-immunopositive neurons and small neurons that were either peripherin- or IB4-positive. A significantly increased expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) was also observed in myelinated afferent neurons. These changes are similar to those reported in other neuropathic pain states and were not observed in the C4 DRG of laminitic horses, which is not associated with innervation of the forelimb. This study provides novel evidence for a neuropathic component to the chronic pain state associated with equine laminitis, indicating that anti-neuropathic analgesic treatment may well have a role in the management of this condition.

  3. In vivo imaging reveals that pregabalin inhibits cortical spreading depression and propagation to subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Cain, Stuart M; Bohnet, Barry; LeDue, Jeffrey; Yung, Andrew C; Garcia, Esperanza; Tyson, John R; Alles, Sascha R A; Han, Huili; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Kozlowski, Piotr; MacVicar, Brian A; Snutch, Terrance P

    2017-02-28

    Migraine is characterized by severe headaches that can be preceded by an aura likely caused by cortical spreading depression (SD). The antiepileptic pregabalin (Lyrica) shows clinical promise for migraine therapy, although its efficacy and mechanism of action are unclear. As detected by diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in wild-type (WT) mice, the acute systemic administration of pregabalin increased the threshold for SD initiation in vivo. In familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice expressing human mutations (R192Q and S218L) in the CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channel subunit, pregabalin slowed the speed of SD propagation in vivo. Acute systemic administration of pregabalin in vivo also selectively prevented the migration of SD into subcortical striatal and hippocampal regions in the R192Q strain that exhibits a milder phenotype and gain of CaV2.1 channel function. At the cellular level, pregabalin inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission differentially in WT, R192Q, and S218L mice. The study describes a DW-MRI analysis method for tracking the progression of SD and provides support and a mechanism of action for pregabalin as a possible effective therapy in the treatment of migraine.

  4. A randomized, placebo-controlled study of pregabalin for postoperative pain intensity after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Fatih; Yağar, Seyhan; Özgök, Ayşegül; Koç, Mihrican; Güllapoğlu, Hayriye

    2012-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of two different doses (150 mg and 300 mg) of preoperative pregabalin on pain relief and total opioid consumption after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Training and research hospital. 90 adult, ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients. Patients were randomly assigned to three groups to receive orally one hour before surgery, a placebo (Group 1), pregabalin 150 mg (Group 2), or pregabalin 300 mg (Group 3). Patients were observed for pregabalin side effects, somnolence via Ramsay Sedation Scale, dizziness, confusion, and ataxia. In the operating room, heart rate and noninvasive systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured. Visual analog scale (VAS), Ramsay Sedation Scale, and Aldrete scores were also recorded on arrival at the Postanesthesia Care Unit (time 0), 15, 30, 60, 120 minutes and 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 24 hours after surgery. Additional doses of drugs (fentanyl and/or metoclopramide) were also recorded. Preemptive pregabalin decreased pain scores and postoperative fentanyl consumption in patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a dose-dependent manner. There were no differences between the groups in side effects. Preoperative pregabalin may be a useful analgesic for patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, as it lowers pain intensity and opiod consumption, and does not increase the frequency of side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effectiveness of Pregabalin for Post-Tonsillectomy Pain Control: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Seog; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Nam, In-Chul; Lee, Il-Hwan; Hwang, Jae-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Background Although various analgesics have been used, postoperative pain remains one of the most troublesome aspects of tonsillectomy for patients. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of premedication using pregabalin compared with placebo (diazepam) on postoperative pain control in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. Methods Forty-eight adult patients were randomly divided into a control group and a pregabalin group. Preoperatively, patients in the control group received 4 mg diazepam orally as placebo, whereas those in the pregabalin group received 300 mg pregabalin orally. All participants were provided with patient-controlled analgesia using fentanyl for 24 hours after surgery. Postoperative pain treatment included acetaminophen 650 mg three times daily for 8 postoperative days. The primary outcome measure was the total amount of patient-controlled fentanyl consumption after tonsillectomy. Secondary outcome measures were the number of injections of ketorolac tromethamine (each 30 mg) requested by patients, pain scores, overall satisfaction scores, drowsiness, nausea, dizziness, headache, and vomiting after the surgery. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The total amount of fentanyl demanded decreased significantly in the pregabalin group (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the number of ketorolac tromethamine injections, pain scores, overall satisfaction scores, drowsiness, nausea, dizziness, headache, and vomiting between the two groups. Conclusion Administration of 300 mg pregabalin prior to tonsillectomy decreases fentanyl consumption compared with that after 4 mg diazepam, without an increased incidence of adverse effects. Trial Registration KCT0001215 PMID:25706948

  6. In vivo imaging reveals that pregabalin inhibits cortical spreading depression and propagation to subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart M.; Bohnet, Barry; LeDue, Jeffrey; Yung, Andrew C.; Garcia, Esperanza; Tyson, John R.; Alles, Sascha R. A.; Han, Huili; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Kozlowski, Piotr; MacVicar, Brian A.; Snutch, Terrance P.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is characterized by severe headaches that can be preceded by an aura likely caused by cortical spreading depression (SD). The antiepileptic pregabalin (Lyrica) shows clinical promise for migraine therapy, although its efficacy and mechanism of action are unclear. As detected by diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in wild-type (WT) mice, the acute systemic administration of pregabalin increased the threshold for SD initiation in vivo. In familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice expressing human mutations (R192Q and S218L) in the CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channel subunit, pregabalin slowed the speed of SD propagation in vivo. Acute systemic administration of pregabalin in vivo also selectively prevented the migration of SD into subcortical striatal and hippocampal regions in the R192Q strain that exhibits a milder phenotype and gain of CaV2.1 channel function. At the cellular level, pregabalin inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission differentially in WT, R192Q, and S218L mice. The study describes a DW-MRI analysis method for tracking the progression of SD and provides support and a mechanism of action for pregabalin as a possible effective therapy in the treatment of migraine. PMID:28223480

  7. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pregabalin for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Caldiroli, Alice; Serati, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Pregabalin is an alternative compound to SSRIs and SNRIs for the first-line treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Areas covered: We describe the pharmacokinetic properties of pregabalin and their implications for the treatment of GAD. A search in the main database sources (Medline, ISI, Web of Knowledge and Medscape) was performed in order to obtain a comprehensive and balanced evaluation about the clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic properties of pregabalin in the treatment of GAD. The word "pregabalin" was associated with "pharmacokinetics", "interactions"', "GAD", "anxiety" and "tolerability". No restriction criteria were established in relation to methodology or publication year. Only English-language articles were selected. Expert opinion: Pregabalin is a safe and efficacious compound for GAD treatment. Short half-life (preventing persistence of side effects), absence of active metabolites and no interactions with CYP450 enzymatic system are all favorable pharmacokinetic properties for the treatment of GAD patients, including those with comorbid depressive symptoms or medical conditions. On the other hand, prescription of pregabalin should be handled with caution to minimize the incidence of renal impairment (especially in elderly patients), where a history of substance misuse or concomitant medications (e.g. anti-hypertensives or some antibiotics) are risk factors that can affect renal function.

  8. Pregabalin for the Treatment of Drug and Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Freynhagen, Rainer; Backonja, Miroslav; Schug, Stephan; Lyndon, Gavin; Parsons, Bruce; Watt, Stephen; Behar, Regina

    2016-12-01

    Treatments for physical dependence and associated withdrawal symptoms following the abrupt discontinuation of prescription drugs (such as opioids and benzodiazepines), nicotine, alcohol, and cannabinoids are available, but there is still a need for new and more effective therapies. This review examines evidence supporting the potential use of pregabalin, an α2δ voltage-gated calcium channel subunit ligand, for the treatment of physical dependence and associated withdrawal symptoms. A literature search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases up to and including 11 December 2015 was conducted. The search term used was '(dependence OR withdrawal) AND pregabalin'. No other date limits were set and no language restrictions were applied. Works cited in identified articles were cross-referenced and personal archives of references also searched. Articles were included based on the expert opinions of the authors. There is limited evidence supporting the role of pregabalin for the treatment of physical dependence and accompanying withdrawal symptoms associated with opioids, benzodiazepines, nicotine, cannabinoids, and alcohol, although data from randomized controlled studies are sparse. However, the current evidence is promising and provides a platform for future studies, including appropriate randomized, placebo- and/or comparator-controlled studies, to further explore the efficacy and safety of pregabalin for the treatment of withdrawal symptoms. Given the potential for pregabalin misuse or abuse, particularly in individuals with a previous history of substance abuse, clinicians should exercise caution when using pregabalin in this patient population.

  9. The effect of progesterone on expression and development of neuropathic pain in a rat model of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Javad; Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Mokhtari, Rasool; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathic pain results from lesions or diseases affecting the somatosensory system. The management of patients with chronic neuropathic pain remains a challenge. Several studies support the crucial role of neuroactive steroids in the modulation of pain. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of systemic administration of progesterone on expression and development of hyperalgesia and allodynia scores in chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rat. Progesterone at doses of 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg and its vehicle were injected intraperitoneally on days 1-13 after the surgery to study the effect of progesterone on development of neuropathic pain and only on 14th day post-surgery in order to assess its effect on expression of neuropathic pain.The chronic administration of progesterone significantly reduced the behavioral scores of cold- and mechano-allodynia and heat hyperalgesia but single dose of progesterone did not have any effect on behavioral scores of neuropathic pain. Our data indicate that the early chronic administration of progesterone prevents the development of neuropathic pain but its acute injection does not change the expression of neuropathic pain. These results suggest that progesterone could be considered as a new approach for management of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Does preoperative administration of gabapentin/pregabalin improve postoperative nasal surgery pain?

    PubMed

    Park, In Joon; Kim, Geunjeon; Ko, Gibeom; Lee, Yeon Ji; Hwang, Se Hwan

    2016-10-01

    Gabapentin and pregabalin has been shown to reduce postoperative pain effectively. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the role of preoperative gabapentinoids for attenuating postoperative pain after nasal surgery in patients via a meta-analysis of the literature. PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane Database. Literature was screened from inception to December 2015. Nine articles to compare the preoperative administered gabapentinoid (gabapentinoids groups) with a placebo or analgesics (control group) were included for analysis of the outcomes of interest, which included postoperative pain scores, analgesic intakes, or side effects, such as sedation, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, operative bleeding, dizziness, and headache, during a 24-hour postoperative period. The pain score reported by the physician and need for analgesics during the first 24 hours, postoperatively, in the gabapentinoids group significantly reduced compared with the control. Additionally, the gabapentinoids had no significant effect on the incidences of side effects except blurred vision compared with the control during the 24 hours postoperatively. In the subgroup analyses of these results according to operation type, these subgroups showed similar effects on reducing postoperative pain and adverse effects. Preoperative gabapentinoids could attenuate postoperative pain without significant adverse effects in patients who undergo nasal surgery. However, blurred vision may be a handicap that requires consideration for use and education for patients. Further clinical trials will be of help in supporting the results of this study. NA Laryngoscope, 126:2232-2241, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. MicroRNA-93 alleviates neuropathic pain through targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xue-Tao; Ji, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhiyu; Wu, Xingjun; Wang, Quan; Sun, Shujie; Lu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the exact role of miRNAs in regulating neuropathic pain remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential role of miR-93 in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction sciatic nerve injury (CCI). We found a significant decrease of miR-93 in the spinal cord of CCI rats compared with sham rats. Overexpression of miR-93 significantly alleviated neuropathic pain development and reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, including interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6 in CCI rats. By bioinformatic analysis and dual-luciferase reporter assay, we found that miR-93 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an important regulator of inflammation. Overexpression of miR-93 markedly suppressed the expression of STAT3 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of STAT3 significantly reversed the miR-93 overexpression-induced suppressive effects on neuropathic pain development and neuroinflammation. Taken together, our study suggests that miR-93 inhibits neuropathic pain development of CCI rats possibly through inhibiting STAT3-mediated neuroinflammation. Our findings indicate that miR-93 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for neuropathic pain intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MiR-150 alleviates neuropathic pain via inhibiting toll-like receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Ji, Li-Juan; Shi, Jing; Lu, Jing-Min; Huang, Qiang-Min

    2017-07-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as vital participators in the pathophysiological course of neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms of the functional roles of miRNAs in neuropathic pain are largely unknown. This study was designed to explore the potential role of miR-150 in regulating the process of neuropathic pain in a rat model established by chronic sciatic nerve injury (CCI). Overexpression of miR-150 greatly alleviated neuropathic pain development and reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, including COX-2, interleukin IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in CCI rats. By bioinformatic analysis, 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor (TLR5) was predicted to be a target of miR-150. TLR5 commonly serves as an important regulator of inflammation. Overexpression of miR-150 significantly suppressed the expression of TLR5 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, upregulation of TLR5 decreased the miR-150 expression and downregulation of TLR5 increased miR-150, respectively. Overexpression of TLR5 significantly reversed the miR-150-induced suppressive effects on neuropathic pain. In conclusion, our current study indicates that miR-150 may inhibit neuropathic pain development of CCI rats through inhibiting TLR5-mediated neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest that miR-150 may provide a novel therapeutic target for neuropathic pain treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Beyond neuropathic pain: gabapentin use in cancer pain and perioperative pain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Peter Z; Butler, Paul M; Kurowski, Donna; Perloff, Michael D

    2014-07-01

    Gabapentin (GBP), originally an antiepileptic drug, is more commonly used in the treatment of neuropathic pain. In recent years, GBP has been used as an adjunct or primary therapy in non-neuropathic pain, most commonly for the treatment of perioperative and cancer pain. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical evidence literature review of GBP's use in perioperative pain and cancer pain. Using PUBMED and OVID Medline databases, keyword searches for surgery and cancer in reference to GBP and pain were carried out. Nonblinded studies and case reports that did not present a unique finding were excluded. Studies that focused only on neuropathic pain were also excluded. An initial 142 references focusing on GBP's use in surgical pain and cancer pain were identified. Of these, 48 studies were quality of evidence at a level of II-2 or higher. Although efficacy varies, multiple well-designed clinical trials have demonstrated reduced pain and analgesic use with otolaryngology, orthopedic, mastectomy, and abdominal/pelvic surgical perioperative use of GBP, whereas there is limited or no efficacy for cardiothoracic surgery. Cancer pain studies have had greater design variability, often nonblinded, with pain benefit being mild to moderate, and more efficacious with partial neuropathic pain quality. Overall, GBP seems to have significant benefit in neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain associated with the perioperative period and cancer. Considering its favorable side effect profile, GBP represents a beneficial pain adjunctive therapy, beyond neuropathic symptoms.

  14. Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain in adults: systematic review, meta-analysis and updated NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Attal, Nadine; Haroutounian, Simon; McNicol, Ewan; Baron, Ralf; Dworkin, Robert H; Gilron, Ian; Haanpaa, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kamerman, Peter R; Lund, Karen; Moore, Andrew; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew SC; Rowbotham, Michael; Sena, Emily; Siddall, Philip; Smith, Blair H; Wallace, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. New treatments, clinical trials and standards of quality for assessing evidence justify an update of evidence-based recommendations for its pharmacological treatment. Methods The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain conducted a systematic review of randomised double-blind studies of oral and topical pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain, including unpublished trials (retrieved from clinicaltrials.gov and pharmaceutical websites). Meta-analysis used Numbers Needed to Treat (NNT) for 50 % pain relief as primary measure and assessed publication bias. Recommendations used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). Findings In total 229 studies were included. Analysis of publication bias suggested a 10% overstatement of treatment effects. Studies published in peer-review journals reported greater effects than online studies (R2=9·3%, p<0·01). Trial outcomes were generally modest even for effective drugs : in particular NNTs were 3·6 (95 % CI 3·0–4·4) for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), 6·4 (95 % CI 5·2–8·4) for serotonin- noradrenaline reuptake inbibitor (SNRI) antidepressants duloxetine and venlafaxine, 7·7 (95 % CI 6·5–9·4) for pregabalin and 6·3 (95 % CI 5·0–8·3) for gabapentin. NNTs were higher for gabapentin ER/enacarbil and capsaicin high concentration patches, lower for opioids and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and undetermined for lidocaine patches. Final quality of evidence was lower for lidocaine patches and BTX-A. Tolerability/safety and values/preferences were high for lidocaine patches and lower for opioids and TCAs. This permitted a strong GRADE recommendation for use and proposal as first line for TCAs, SNRIs, pregabalin, gabapentin and gabapentin ER/enacarbil in neuropathic pain, a weak recommendation for use and proposal as second line for lidocaine patches, capsaicin

  15. NOX4 is an early initiator of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Geis, Christian; Geuss, Eva; Sommer, Claudia; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain remains challenging as the etiology is heterogeneous and pathomechanisms are incompletely understood. One possible mechanism is oxidative stress due to unphysiological reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. The only know dedicated enzymatic source of ROS are NADPH oxidases of which the type 4 isoform (NOX4) has been suggested to be involved in the subacute and chronic phase of neuropathic pain. Here, we aim to translate this finding into a treatment strategy by examining the efficacy of the NOX1/4-specific inhibitor GKT136901 using the chronic constriction injury (CCI) mouse model of neuropathic pain. Unexpectedly, post-nerve lesion treatment using GKT136901 was ineffective to reduce pain-related behavior after CCI. We therefore re-investigated the role of NOX4 using an independent KO mouse model. Early after CCI we found an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, ROS formation and the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine in the lesioned nerve together with an upregulated Nox4 gene expression. In NOX4 KO mice, mechanical allodynia was markedly reduced from day 4 after nerve injury as were all ROS related and acute biomarkers. In addition, we observed a reduction in the CCI-induced upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia along with NOX4-deficiency. Thus, we conclude that NOX4 is involved in the development of neuropathic pain states by producing oxidative stress and subsequent cytokine dysregulation at the lesion site. This appears at very early stages immediately after nerve injury explaining ineffectiveness of post-acute pharmacological NOX inhibition. We suggest that future target validation of NOX4 should now focus on defining the possible therapeutic window in human neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploratory Polysomnographic Evaluation of Pregabalin on Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Sanne; Otte, Andreas; de Weerd, Al; van Erp, Gerard; Cohen, Adam; van Gerven, Joop

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of adjunctive pregabalin 300 mg/day versus placebo on polysomnographic (PSG) variables in patients with well controlled partial seizures and subjectively reported sleep disturbance. Methods: An exploratory, 4-week, double-blind, randomized study in patients with well controlled partial seizures on AED monotherapy and subjective sleep disturbance over the previous 6 months. Mean changes from baseline to endpoint in PSG and subjective sleep variables (MOS Sleep Scale, Groningen Sleep Questionnaire) in patients on adjunctive pregabalin 300 mg/day (n=8) were compared with patients on placebo (n=7). Results: Baseline PSGs showed sleep fragmentation. Mean sleep efficiency improved significantly in both treatment groups in the mean baseline to endpoint change; there was no significant between-group difference. Pregabalin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in number of awakenings (p = 0.02), and improvement in wake time after sleep onset approached significance (p = 0.055), suggesting improvement in sleep continuity that was not observed in the placebo group. Pregabalin was also associated with significant improvements in the MOS sleep disturbance and sleep quantity subscales compared with placebo (p ≤0.03). There were no changes in self-reported seizure control. Conclusions: This exploratory pilot study suggests that pregabalin may improve sleep continuity in patients with clinically relevant sleep disturbance. The effect on disturbed sleep appears independent of seizure control. The effects of pregabalin on disturbed sleep and seizures and their interrelationships warrant further study. Citation: de Haas S; Otte A; de Weerd A; van Erp G; Cohen A; van Gerven J. Exploratory polysomnographic evaluation of pregabalin on sleep disturbance in patients with epilepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(5):473-478. PMID:17803010

  17. The effects of pregabalin on psycho-motor abilities and cognitive processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Liliana, Mititelu-Tartau; Lacramioara, Ochiuz; Catalina Elena, Lupusoru; Andra Sabina, Neculai-Valeanu; Gabriela, Rusu; Gratiela, Popa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was the experimental research on the effects of pregabalin in two behavioural models in mice. The experiment was carried out with white Swiss mice treated intraperitoneally as follows: Group I (Control): distilled water 0.1 ml/10 g body weight; Group II (PGB 10): 10 mg/kbw pregabalin; Group III (PGB 20): 20 mg/kbw pregabalin. The psychomotor abilities of pregabalin were tested on a LE-8811 Actimeter device (Panlab), in order to investigate both global motor behaviour and number of escape attempts during an eight-minute interval session. The exploration of memory processes performance was assessed using the Y-maze model, based on the natural tendency of mice to explore new environment. Data were analyzed using SPSS 13.0 for Windows software. The experimental protocols were implemented according the guidelines of "Grigore T. Popa" University Committee for Research and Ethical Issues. The administration of pregabalin resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of mice horizontal and vertical movements, statistically significant compared to the Control group. The administration of both PGB10 and PGB20 induced no modifications of the spontaneous alternation percent; also, it did not influence the arm entries number compared to Control group in Y-maze test. The results reflect a significant dose-dependent diminution of number of escape attempts, exploratory and self-maintenance spontaneous behavior after pregabalin treatment, which could be correlated with an anxiolytic effect. Moreover, the study proved that pregabalin did not modify the animal cognitive processes performance or influence short-term memory of mice in the Y-maze test.

  18. Comparative study of clinical efficacy of amitriptyline and pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Achar, Arun; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bisai, Samiran; Biswas, Asish; Guharay, Tapobrata

    2012-01-01

    The most common complication of herpes zoster in immunocompetent patients is postherpetic neuralgia, which is very difficult to treat. Significant beneficial effects have been found for amitriptyline, gabapentin, pregabalin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, oxycodone, corticosteroid, topical capsaicin, tramadol, etc. The aim of this open randomized comparative study was to demonstrate clinical efficacy of amitriptyline and pregabalin. The study included 50 patients, 32 (64%) male and 18 (36%) female, randomized to receive either amitriptyline or pregabalin (n=25 each). Amitriptyline was administered in a dose of 25 mg once daily and pregabalin in a dose of 75 mg twice daily. Inclusion criteria were as follows: postherpetic neuralgia of more than 1 month duration; pain of at least moderate severity; and patient age 40 years or older and no pregnancy. Patients with a history of any serious diseases (renal, cardiac, hepatic or seizure) were excluded. Total treatment period spanned 8 weeks, with patient follow up visits at 2, 4 and 8 weeks to assess the degree of improvement in pain perception and any adverse reaction. Patients with four herpes zoster types were included in this study, of which thoracic type predominated (54%). Other types were cervical in 12 (24%), trigeminal in 8 (16%) and lumbosacral in 3 (6%) patients. Prodromal symptoms before herpes zoster were reported by 66% of study patients. Satisfactory improvements of pain perception at the end of 8 weeks (>75%) were noticed in pregabalin group, which was statistically significant (χ(2)2=10.08; P<0.05). Dry mouth was the commonest complication in amitriptyline group and dizziness in pregabalin group. More importantly, none of the patients stopped treatment due to adverse reaction. In conclusion, therapy with pregabalin is better compared to amitriptyline in postherpetic neuralgia patients. However, a similar study in a larger sample is required to validate the present findings.

  19. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouwense, Stefan AW; Olesen, Søren S; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs nonresponders) to placebo or pregabalin treatment. Methods This study was part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effects of pregabalin and placebo in chronic pancreatitis. Post hoc, patients were assigned to one of four groups, ie, responders and nonresponders to pregabalin (n=16; n=15) or placebo (n=12; n=17) treatment. Responders were defined as patients with >30% pain reduction after 3 weeks of treatment. We measured change in pain sensitivity before and after the treatment using electric pain detection thresholds (ePDT) in dermatomes C5 (generalized effects) and Ventral T10 (segmental effects). Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified via conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Results Sixty patients were analyzed in a per-protocol analysis. ePDT change in C5 was significant vs baseline and greater in pregabalin (1.3 mA) vs placebo responders (−0.1 mA; P=0.015). This was not so for ePDT in Ventral T10. CPM increased more in pregabalin (9%) vs placebo responders (−17%; P<0.001). CPM changed significantly vs baseline only for pregabalin responders (P=0.006). Conclusion This hypothesis-generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study. PMID:26203273

  20. Emerging Treatments for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Bruno L; Escudeiro, Gabriel; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a series of well-known conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. As such, Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), Alpha-lipoic-acid (ALA), cannabinoids, Clonidine, EMA401, Botulinum Toxin type A, and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be cited. Furthermore, new modalities in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, burst stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and many others have been showing exciting results. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. This article reviews the published literature on the treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded for the majority of the therapies previously mentioned.

  1. Recommendations for neuropathic pain treatment.

    PubMed

    Demarin, Vida; Basić-Kes, Vanja; Zavoreo, Iris; Bosnar-Puretić, Marijana; Rotim, Kresimir; Lupret, Velimir; Perić, Mladen; Ivanec, Zeljko; Fumić, Lidija; Lusić, Ivo; Aleksić-Shihabis, Anka; Kovac, Biserka; Ivanković, Mira; Skobić, Helena; Maslov, Boris; Bornstein, Natan; Niederkorn, Kurt; Sinanović, Osman; Rundek, Tanja

    2008-09-01

    Damage to the somatosensory nervous system poses a risk for the development of neuropathic pain. Such an injury to the nervous system results in a series of neurobiological events resulting in sensitization of both the peripheral and central nervous system. The symptoms include continuous background pain (often burning or crushing in nature) and spasmodic pain (shooting, stabbing or "electrical"). The diagnosis of neuropathic pain is based primarily on the history and physical examination finding. Although monotherapy is the ideal approach, rational polypharmacy is often pragmatically used. Several classes of drugs are moderately effective, but complete or near-complete relief is unlikely. Antidepressants and anticonvulsants are most commonly used. Opioid analgesics can provide some relief but are less effective than for nociceptive pain; adverse effects may prevent adequate analgesia. Topical drugs and a lidocaine-containing patch may be effective for peripheral syndromes. Sympathetic blockade is usually ineffective except for some patients with complex regional pain syndrome.

  2. Neuropathic pain in cancer patients treated with bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Expósito Vizcaíno, S; Casanova-Mollà, J; Escoda, L; Galán, S; Miró, J

    2016-07-27

    The neuropathic pain is the most habitual problem in the neuropathy induced by chemotherapy (NIQ) and the one that more interferes in the quality of life of the patients. His precocious detection turns out to be fundamental to reduce or to eliminate the problems that from this one stem. The aims of this study were: 1) determine the incident and NIQ's characteristics and neuropathic pain in patients with mieloma multiple (MM) treated with bortezomib, and 2) to evaluate the impact of the neuropathic pain in the activities of the daily life (AVD). All the patients diagnosed of MM candidates for treatment with bortezomib attended in the Hospital Joan XXIII during 2013, took part. The participants were interviewed individually and were reporting on the presence, the characteristics and the impact of the pain, as well as of the adverse effects of the bortezomib. There took part 22 persons, of which NIQ presented the half, being the degree 2 the predominant one. The most habitual location of the neuropathic pain was hands and feet; it was appearing in a spontaneous and progressive way deteriorating in rest and during the night, with predominance of positive symptoms. The impact of the pain was reflected in all the AVD. The principal limitation was the disability to enjoy the life. The peripheral neuropathy occupied the first place in order of subjective importance for the patient followed by the fatigue and the constipation. A proper assessment and early detection of neuropathic pain is critical to minimizing its impact on the quality of life of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Combination of pregabalin with duloxetine for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gilron, Ian; Chaparro, Luis E; Tu, Dongsheng; Holden, Ronald R; Milev, Roumen; Towheed, Tanveer; DuMerton-Shore, Deborah; Walker, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and associated with sleep disturbance, depression, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. Polypharmacy is commonly used, but supportive evidence is limited. Most fibromyalgia trials focus primarily on pain reduction with monotherapy. This trial compares a pregabalin-duloxetine combination to each monotherapy. Using a randomized, double-blind, 4-period crossover design, participants received maximally tolerated doses of placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and pregabalin-duloxetine combination-for 6 weeks. Primary outcome was daily pain (0-10); secondary outcomes included global pain relief, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36 survey, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), adverse events, and other measures. Of 41 participants randomized, 39 completed ≥2 treatments. Daily pain during placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and combination was 5.1, 5.0, 4.1, and 3.7, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and pregabalin). Participants (%) reporting ≥moderate global pain relief were 18%, 39%, 42%, and 68%, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores were 42.9, 37.4, 36.0, and 29.8, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). SF-36 scores were 50.2, 55.7, 56.0, and 61.2, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were 48.9, 35.2, 46.1, and 32.1, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and duloxetine). BDI-II scores were 11.9, 9.9, 10.7, and 8.9, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo). Moderate-severe drowsiness was more frequent during combination vs placebo. Combining pregabalin and duloxetine for fibromyalgia improves multiple clinical outcomes vs monotherapy. Continued research should compare this and other combinations to monotherapy

  4. The treatment of generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin, an atypical anxiolytic.

    PubMed

    Strawn, Jeffrey R; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    A constellation of pharmacologic treatments for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have been developed over the past five decades, although each has a number of potential drawbacks in clinical practice. This review addresses one potentially new pharmacologic treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, the gamma-aminobutyric acid analogue pregabalin. We review the mechanism of action, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of pregabalin as well as the results of 5 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Based entirely on data from these industry-sponsored (Pfizer), multi-site clinical trials in patients with GAD, pregabalin appears to be generally well tolerated and has rapid onset of action (approximately 1 week), comparable efficacy to benzodiazepines and lower discontinuation rates compared with other pharmacologic treatments. Thus in GAD, a disorder that is often suboptimally responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions - secondary to poor efficacy, tolerability, and/or side-effects - pregabalin may have a primary role in GAD patients, especially in those with certain psychiatric comorbidities or individuals who are on multi-drug regimens for medical comorbidities.

  5. An open trial of pregabalin as an acute and maintenance adjunctive treatment for outpatients with treatment resistant bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Linda C; Schaffer, Charles B; Miller, Amber R; Manley, Jillian L; Piekut, Jennifer A; Nordahl, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Pregabalin is a structural analog of GABA, similar to gabapentin. It does not have a FDA indication for any psychiatric disorder in the USA. There has been one case report of the successful use of pregabalin as an augmenting agent in a patient with Bipolar Disorder (BD). In the present open label study, not subsidized by the manufacturer, the investigators prospectively evaluated the acute and maintenance efficacy of pregabalin as an adjunctive medication for a group of treatment refractory outpatients with BD. Older adolescent and adult outpatients with any type of DSM-IV diagnosed BD, who were considered treatment nonresponders to multiple standard medications for BD, were treated with adjunctive pregabalin. The baseline mood state before initiation of pregabalin was compared to the mood state after an acute trial of pregabalin using the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Version Scale (CGI-BP). All acute responders were treated for a minimum of two months. Follow-up maintenance treatment data was obtained for the acute pregabalin responders for three years after the 18 month acute phase of the study. Fifty-eight total patients were treated adjunctively with pregabalin. Twenty-four (41%) were rated as acute responders. For the acute responders, pregabalin produced either a mood stabilizing effect, antidepressant effect or antimanic effect. Intolerable side-effects were the most common reason (79%) for a failed acute trial of pregabalin. None of the side effects resulted in serious medical complications. No patient abused pregabalin, and there were no adverse drug-drug interactions despite an average of 3.3 concurrent other psychiatric medications. The maintenance data revealed that 10 (42%) of the original 24 acute pregabalin responders were still taking pregabalin as an add-on medicine for an average of 45.2 months (range 42-48, SD: 2.35). This study has an open label observation design. The results of this preliminary open study suggest that pregabalin is a

  6. Blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1 ameliorates spinal GABAergic disinhibition and neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ruchi; Yan, Xisheng; Maixner, Dylan W.; Gao, Mei; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used for treating carcinomas. Patients receiving paclitaxel often develop neuropathic pain and have a reduced quality of life which hinders the use of this life-saving drug. In this study, we determined the role of GABA transporters in the genesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain using behavioral tests, electrophysiology, and biochemical techniques. We found that tonic GABA receptor activities in the spinal dorsal horn were reduced in rats with neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel. In normal controls, tonic GABA receptor activities were mainly controlled by the GABA transporter GAT-1 but not GAT-3. In the spinal dorsal horn, GAT-1 was expressed at presynaptic terminals and astrocytes while GAT-3 was only expressed in astrocytes. In rats with paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, the protein expression of GAT-1 was increased while GAT-3 was decreased. This was concurrently associated with an increase of global GABA uptake. The paclitaxel-induced attenuation of GABAergic tonic inhibition was ameliorated by blocking GAT-1 but not GAT-3 transporters. Paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain was significantly attenuated by the intrathecal injection of a GAT-1 inhibitor. These findings suggest that targeting GAT-1 transporters for reversing disinhibition in the spinal dorsal horn may be a useful approach for treating paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:25827582

  7. Symptom profiles differ in patients with neuropathic versus non-neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Jensen, Mark P; Gammaitoni, Arnold R; Olaleye, David O; Galer, Bradley S

    2007-02-01

    The distinction between neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain reflects partially distinct mechanisms and patterns of treatment response. It was therefore hypothesized that patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain have different profiles of symptoms and signs. To test this hypothesis, pain intensity, unpleasantness, quality, and spatial characteristics were examined in 618 patients with 1 of 3 peripheral neuropathic pain conditions (painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful idiopathic sensory polyneuropathy, or postherpetic neuralgia), osteoarthritis pain, or low back pain. These assessments were conducted before treatment had begun in clinical trials of lidocaine patch 5% administered alone or with stable dosages of other analgesics. Patients with osteoarthritis pain and low back pain did not differ in their profile of pain quality and spatial characteristics and were combined to form a group of patients with non-neuropathic pain. In univariate analyses, patients with peripheral neuropathic pain reported significantly more intense hot, cold, sensitive, itchy, and surface pain and significantly less intense dull and deep pain than patients with non-neuropathic pain. In a multivariate analysis, the overall pattern of pain quality and spatial characteristics differed significantly between patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain. In addition, specific pain quality and spatial characteristics improved the discrimination of patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain in a logistic regression model that adjusted for demographic covariates and overall pain intensity and unpleasantness. The results indicate that the distinction between neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain is reflected in different profiles of pain quality and spatial characteristics and suggest that the assessment of patterns of pain symptoms might contribute to the identification of distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms and the development of mechanism-based treatment

  8. Validating a human model for anxiety using startle potentiated by cue and context: the effects of alprazolam, pregabalin, and diphenhydramine

    PubMed Central

    Mol, N.; Kenemans, J. L.; Prinssen, E. P.; Niklson, I.; Xia-Chen, C.; Broeyer, F.; van Gerven, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fear-potentiated startle has been suggested as a translational model for evaluating efficacy of anxiolytic compounds in humans. Several known anxiolytic compounds have been tested as well as several putative anxiolytics. Because results of these studies have been equivocal, the aim of the present study was to examine another pharmacological permutation of the human potentiated startle model by comparing two anxiolytic agents to a non-anxiolytic sedative and placebo. Methods Twenty healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study with four sessions in which they received single doses of the anxiolytics alprazolam (1 mg) and pregabalin (200 mg), as well as diphenhydramine (50 mg) as a non-anxiolytic sedative control and placebo. The design included a cued shock condition that presumably evokes fear and an unpredictable shock context condition presumably evoking anxiety. Results None of the treatments reliably reduced either fear- or anxiety-potentiated startle. Alprazolam and diphenhydramine reduced overall baseline startle. Alprazolam was found to only affect contextual anxiety in a statistical significant way after two subjects who failed to show a contextual anxiety effect in the placebo condition were excluded from the analysis. Pregabalin did not significantly affect any of the physiological measures. Discussion The negative findings from this study are discussed in terms of methodological differences between designs and in variability of startle both between and within study participants. Conclusion Even though fear-potentiated startle may be used to translate preclinical evidence to human populations, methodological issues still hamper the application of this model to early screening of putative anxiolytic drugs. PMID:19415242

  9. Validating a human model for anxiety using startle potentiated by cue and context: the effects of alprazolam, pregabalin, and diphenhydramine.

    PubMed

    Baas, J M P; Mol, N; Kenemans, J L; Prinssen, E P; Niklson, I; Xia-Chen, C; Broeyer, F; van Gerven, J

    2009-07-01

    Fear-potentiated startle has been suggested as a translational model for evaluating efficacy of anxiolytic compounds in humans. Several known anxiolytic compounds have been tested as well as several putative anxiolytics. Because results of these studies have been equivocal, the aim of the present study was to examine another pharmacological permutation of the human potentiated startle model by comparing two anxiolytic agents to a non-anxiolytic sedative and placebo. Twenty healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study with four sessions in which they received single doses of the anxiolytics alprazolam (1 mg) and pregabalin (200 mg), as well as diphenhydramine (50 mg) as a non-anxiolytic sedative control and placebo. The design included a cued shock condition that presumably evokes fear and an unpredictable shock context condition presumably evoking anxiety. None of the treatments reliably reduced either fear- or anxiety-potentiated startle. Alprazolam and diphenhydramine reduced overall baseline startle. Alprazolam was found to only affect contextual anxiety in a statistical significant way after two subjects who failed to show a contextual anxiety effect in the placebo condition were excluded from the analysis. Pregabalin did not significantly affect any of the physiological measures. The negative findings from this study are discussed in terms of methodological differences between designs and in variability of startle both between and within study participants. Even though fear-potentiated startle may be used to translate preclinical evidence to human populations, methodological issues still hamper the application of this model to early screening of putative anxiolytic drugs.

  10. The novel reversible fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor ST4070 increases endocannabinoid brain levels and counteracts neuropathic pain in different animal models.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Antonio; Coccurello, Roberto; Rapino, Cinzia; Di Serio, Stefano; Di Tommaso, Monia; Vertechy, Mario; Vacca, Valentina; Battista, Natalia; Pavone, Flaminia; Maccarrone, Mauro; Borsini, Franco

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the enol carbamate 1-biphenyl-4-ylethenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate (ST4070), a novel reversible inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), was investigated for acute pain sensitivity and neuropathic pain in rats and mice. Brain enzymatic activity of FAAH and the endogenous levels of its substrates, anandamide (AEA; N-arachidonoylethanolamine), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), were measured in control and ST4070-treated mice. ST4070 (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) was orally administered to assess mechanical nociceptive thresholds and allodynia by using the Randall-Selitto and von Frey tests, respectively. Neuropathy was induced in rats by either the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine or streptozotocin-induced diabetes, whereas the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model was chosen to evaluate neuropathy in mice. ST4070 produced a significant increase of nociceptive threshold in rats and counteracted the decrease of nociceptive threshold in the three distinct models of neuropathic pain. In diabetic mice, ST4070 inhibited FAAH activity and increased the brain levels of AEA and PEA, without affecting that of 2-AG. The administration of ST4070 generated long-lasting pain relief compared with pregabalin and the FAAH inhibitors 1-oxo-1[5-(2-pyridyl)-2-yl]-7-phenylheptane (OL135) and cyclohexylcarbamic acid 3'-carbamoylbiphenyl-3-ylester (URB597) in CCI neuropathic mice. The antiallodynic effects of ST4070 were prevented by pretreatment with cannabinoid type 1 and cannabinoid type 2 receptor antagonists and by the selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α antagonist [(2S)-2-[[(1Z)-1-methyl-3-oxo-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1-propenyl]amino]-3-[4-[2-(5-methyl-2-phenyl-4-oxazolyl)ethoxy]phenyl]propyl]-carbamic acid ethyl ester (GW6471). The administration of ST4070 generated long-lasting neuropathic pain relief compared with pregabalin and the FAAH inhibitors OL135 and URB597. Taken together, the reversible FAAH

  11. Cost comparison of drug-drug and drug-condition interactions in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy treated with pregabalin versus duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephen S; Udall, Margarita; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Johnson, Barbara H; Shrady, George; Chu, Bong-Chul; Silverman, Stuart L

    2013-12-15

    The frequency and financial impact of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug-condition interactions (DCIs) in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine were compared. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large U.S. administrative claims database. Patients selected for study inclusion had a diagnosis of DPN and were newly initiated on either pregabalin or duloxetine between July 1, 2008, and October 1, 2010. Data on potential DDIs and DCIs were collected. Health care costs were measured as the sum of gross covered payments for all medical and prescription claims incurred during the six months after the index date. The study sample comprised 2499 pregabalin users and 1354 duloxetine users. Among pregabalin users, 48 (1.8%) had at least one potential pregabalin DCI; none had potential pregabalin DDIs. Among duloxetine users, 966 (71%) had at least one potential duloxetine DDI or DCI. The frequencies of potential DDIs and DCIs differed significantly between pregabalin and duloxetine users (p < 0.001). Potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs were associated with a significant increase in mean health care costs in duloxetine users (p = 0.002). Potential pregabalin DDIs and DCIs were not associated with additional health care costs in pregabalin users. Among patients with painful DPN treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine, the frequency of potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs was substantially higher than that of pregabalin. Potential DDIs and DCIs were associated with significantly increased health care costs in duloxetine users.

  12. Relationships among pain and depressive and anxiety symptoms in clinical trials of pregabalin in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Leon, Teresa; Whalen, Ed; Barrett, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, is characterized by widespread pain lasting for at least 3 months, with pain in at least 11 out of 18 tender points when palpated with digital pressure. The authors investigated the relationship between changes in pain and symptoms of anxiety and depression, using data from pregabalin clinical trials. Results from three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin monotherapy in fibromyalgia (8-14 weeks) were pooled, and baseline to end-point changes in pain and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores were analyzed. Path-analysis evaluated the association between improvements in anxiety and depression and pain relief. Baseline HADS scores indicated moderate-to-severe anxiety in 38% of patients and moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms in 27%. The improvement in pain was not related to baseline levels of anxiety or depression. The correlation between changes in pain and depressive or anxiety symptoms was low-to-moderate. Path-analysis showed that most of the pain relief observed with pregabalin treatment was a direct analgesic effect and was not explained by improvement in mood. Response to treatment of pain in the pregabalin trials did not depend on baseline levels of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and pregabalin improved pain in fibromyalgia patients with or without depressive or anxiety symptoms. Changes in the level of anxiety or depression had a low-to-moderate impact on pain reduction. Pain reduction with pregabalin treatment appeared to result mostly from a direct treatment effect, rather than an indirect effect mediated through improvement in anxiety or depressive symptoms.

  13. Adjunctive pregabalin in partial responders with major depressive disorder and residual anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Mario; Tedeschini, Enrico; Mistretta, Martino; Fehling, Kiki; Aceti, Franca; Ceccanti, Mauro; Fava, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    Anxiety symptoms in depression result often in treatment resistance, residual symptoms, and persistent functional impairment. To assess the effectiveness and safety of adjunctive pregabalin to antidepressants for residual anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify partial responders among patients with MDD with residual anxiety. Twenty such patients (age, 58.4 ± 11.2 years; 15 women; baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS], 17.1 ± 3.5) who received adjunctive pregabalin for residual anxiety were included. Antidepressants augmented were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 12), mirtazapine (n = 2), and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 6). Twenty patients received at least 4 weeks of pregabalin treatment after 8 weeks of antidepressant therapy. At week 1 (9 weeks after initiating treatment), pregabalin was prescribed at a mean ± SD dose of 71.2 ± 31.7 mg, and the mean maximum pregabalin dose prescribed was 156.2 ± 76.5 mg (range, 75-300 mg). At week 8, there were 13 responders (13/20 [65%]), and 7 of these 13 patients achieved remission (HDRS17 < 8). There were significant decreases in HDRS scores (13.5 ± 3.1 vs 9.1 ± 2.9, P < 0.000), and HDRS anxiety/somatization subscale scores (6.3 ± 2 to 3.6 ± 1.7, P < 0.000). Adverse effects included somnolence (n = 7), weight gain (n = 3), dizziness (n = 4), dry mouth (n = 6), edema (n = 3), blurred vision (n = 3), difficulty with concentration/attention (n = 8), headache (n = 6), and diarrhea (n = 5). The results suggest a possible augmentation role for pregabalin when used in conjunction with conventional antidepressants for residual anxiety in MDD.

  14. Pregabalin long-term treatment and assessment of discontinuation in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Iglesias-García, Celso; Schweizer, Edward; Wilson, Jacquelyn; DuBrava, Sarah; Prieto, Rita; Pitman, Verne W; Knapp, Lloyd

    2014-05-01

    Discontinuation effects following cessation of 12 and 24 wk of pregabalin treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were evaluated in a placebo- and lorazepam-controlled, randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial conducted in 16 countries. The study design consisted of two 12-wk treatment periods (periods 1 and 2), each followed by a 1-wk taper and two post-discontinuation assessments, one immediately following the taper and one 1-wk post-taper. Patients were assigned to receive an initially flexible dose of pregabalin 450-600 mg/d, pregabalin 150-300 mg/d, or lorazepam 3-4 mg/d for 6 wk; responders continued fixed-dose therapy for 6 additional weeks. Patients entering period 2 continued on the same fixed dose or switched to placebo. Discontinuation effects were evaluated with the Physician Withdrawal Checklist (PWC) and reported discontinuation-emergent signs and symptoms. Rebound anxiety was measured with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. GAD symptoms improved with all treatments and improvements were maintained over 12 and 24 wk. Low levels of discontinuation symptoms were evident in all treatment groups. For patients who received active treatment during both periods, mean (95% confidence interval) increases on the PWC from last visit on active treatment to the second post-discontinuation assessment were: pregabalin 450-600 mg/d: 2.8 (1.6-3.9), pregabalin 150-300 mg/d: 1.7 (0.7-2.8), lorazepam 3-4 mg/d: 2.2 (1.0-3.5). Rates of rebound anxiety were also low at both 12 and 24 wk (0-6%). This suggests that risk of discontinuation symptoms and rebound anxiety are low for pregabalin after 12 and 24 wk of treatment.

  15. Adherence of French GPs to Chronic Neuropathic Pain Clinical Guidelines: Results of a Cross-Sectional, Randomized, “e” Case-Vignette Survey

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Valéria; Attal, Nadine; Vanzo, Bertrand; Vicaut, Eric; Gautier, Jean Michel; Bouhassira, Didier; Lantéri-Minet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The French Pain Society published guidelines for neuropathic pain management in 2010. Our aim was to evaluate the compliance of GPs with these guidelines three years later. Methods We used “e” case vignette methodology for this non interventional study. A national panel of randomly selected GPs was included. We used eight “e” case-vignettes relating to chronic pain, differing in terms of the type of pain (neuropathic/non neuropathic), etiology (cancer, postoperative pain, low back pain with or without radicular pain, diabetes) and symptoms. GPs received two randomly selected consecutive “e” case vignettes (with/without neuropathic pain). We analyzed their ability to recognize neuropathic pain and to prescribe appropriate first-line treatment. Results From the 1265 GPs in the database, we recruited 443 (35.0%), 334 of whom logged onto the web site (26.4%) and 319 (25.2%) of whom completed the survey. Among these GPs, 170 (53.3%) were aware of the guidelines, 136 (42.6%) were able to follow them, and 110 (34.5%) used the DN4 diagnostic tool. Sensitivity for neuropathic pain recognition was 87.8% (CI: 84.2%; 91.4%). However, postoperative neuropathic pain was less well diagnosed (77.9%; CI: 69.6%; 86.2%) than diabetic pain (95.2%; CI: 90.0%; 100.0%), cancer pain (90.6%; CI: 83.5%; 97.8%) and typical radicular pain (90.7%; CI: 84.9%; 96.5%). When neuropathic pain was correctly recognized, the likelihood of appropriate first-line treatment prescription was 90.6% (CI: 87.4%; 93.8%). The treatments proposed were pregabaline (71.8%), gabapentine (43.9%), amiptriptylline (23.2%) and duloxetine (18.2%). However, ibuprofen (11%), acetaminophen-codeine (29.5%) and clonazepam (10%) were still prescribed. Conclusions The compliance of GPs with clinical practice guidelines appeared to be satisfactory, but differed between etiologies. PMID:24747826

  16. Intrathecal ziconotide for neuropathic pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Rauck, Richard L; Wallace, Mark S; Burton, Allen W; Kapural, Leonardo; North, James M

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a considerable burden that affects activities of daily living. The management of neuropathic pain can be challenging because of multiple etiologies and complex manifestations. Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal (IT) analgesic option for patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. The objective of this article is to review the published literature on ziconotide for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Relevant publications were identified through searches of all years of 6 databases, which included PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Search terms used were ziconotide, SNX-111, MVIIA, Prialt, and neuropathic pain. Publications were included if ziconotide was intrathecally administered (either alone or in combination with other IT agents) to treat neuropathic pain of any etiology and if pain assessment was an outcome measure. Data extracted included study design, IT drug doses, pain outcome measures, and adverse events (AEs). Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria: 5 were preclinical studies and 23 were clinical studies. In the preclinical studies, ziconotide demonstrated antiallodynic effects on neuropathic pain. Data from double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) trials indicated that patients with neuropathic pain reported a mean percent improvement in pain score with ziconotide monotherapy that ranged from 15.7% to 31.6%. A low starting dose and slow titration of ziconotide resulted in an improved safety profile in the aforementioned trials. Common AEs associated with ziconotide include nausea and/or vomiting, dizziness, confusion, urinary retention, and somnolence. Evidence from DBPC trials, open-label studies, case series, and case studies suggests that ziconotide, as either monotherapy or in combination with other IT drugs, is a potential therapeutic option for patients with refractory neuropathic pain. Additional studies are needed to establish the long-term efficacy and safety of ziconotide for neuropathic pain.

  17. Animal model of neuropathic tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, R. P.; Appalsamy, M.; Diedrich, A.; Davis, T. L.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    Clinically relevant autonomic dysfunction can result from either complete or partial loss of sympathetic outflow to effector organs. Reported animal models of autonomic neuropathy have aimed to achieve complete lesions of sympathetic nerves, but incomplete lesions might be more relevant to certain clinical entities. We hypothesized that loss of sympathetic innervation would result in a predicted decrease in arterial pressure and a compensatory increase in heart rate. Increased heart rate due to loss of sympathetic innervation is seemingly paradoxical, but it provides a mechanistic explanation for clinical autonomic syndromes such as neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. Partially dysautonomic animals were generated by selectively lesioning postganglionic sympathetic neurons with 150 mg/kg 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored using radiotelemetry. Systolic blood pressure decreased within hours postlesion (Delta>20 mm Hg). Within 4 days postlesion, heart rate rose and remained elevated above control levels. The severity of the lesion was determined functionally and pharmacologically by spectral analysis and responsiveness to tyramine. Low-frequency spectral power of systolic blood pressure was reduced postlesion and correlated with the diminished tyramine responsiveness (r=0.9572, P=0.0053). The tachycardia was abolished by treatment with the beta-antagonist propranolol, demonstrating that it was mediated by catecholamines acting on cardiac beta-receptors. Partial lesions of the autonomic nervous system have been hypothesized to underlie many disorders, including neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. This animal model may help us better understand the pathophysiology of autonomic dysfunction and lead to development of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Possible modulation of PPAR-γ cascade against depression caused by neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shanky; Deshmukh, Vishwajit Ravindra; Prasoon, Pranav

    2017-09-09

    Sciatic nerve ligation causes neuropathic pain with chronic constriction injury (CCI). However, there is no published report on the effect of pioglitazone as an antidepressant in the treatment of depression induced by neuropathic pain with CCI in rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pioglitazone as an antidepressant by targeting oxidative stress by the peripheral neuropathic pain model using the CCI of the sciatic nerve. Behavioral studies were carried out to measure thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia as markers of neuropathic pain and force swim test for depression. These were followed by estimation of biochemical parameters which include lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat brains as a measure of oxidative stress. We administered two intraperitoneal doses of pioglitazone (4.5 and 9.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to the treated group for 28 consecutive days from the day of injury and behavioral as well as biochemical evaluations were performed. The results suggested that the administration of pioglitazone significantly countered the neuropathic pain induced depression as interpreted through elevated pain threshold of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia followed by decreased immobility time in the 9.0 mg/kg dose group. It may be concluded that the oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and depression as evidenced by the behavioral studies and the changes in the levels of lipid peroxidase, nitrite, catalase, and glutathione and SOD.

  19. In vitro study of the neuropathic potential of the organophosphorus compounds trichlorfon and acephate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Laís S; Emerick, Guilherme L; dos Santos, Neife Aparecida G; de Paula, Eloísa Silva; Barbosa, Fernando; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2015-04-01

    Organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is a central and peripheral distal axonopathy characterized by ataxia and paralysis. Trichlorfon and acephate are two organophosphorus compounds (OPs) used worldwide as insecticide and which cause serious effects to non-target species. Despite that, the neuropathic potential of these OPs remains unclear. The present study addressed the neurotoxic effects and the neuropathic potential of trichlorfon and acephate in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, by evaluating inhibition and aging of neuropathy target esterase (NTE), inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), neurite outgrowth, cytotoxicity and intracellular calcium. Additionally, the effects observed were compared to those of two well-studied OPs: mipafox (known as neuropathic) and paraoxon (known as non-neuropathic). Trichlorfon and mipafox presented the lowest percentage of reactivation of inhibited NTE and the lowest ratio IC50 NTE/IC50 AChE. Moreover, they caused inhibition and aging of at least 70% of the activity of NTE at sub-lethal concentrations. All these effects have been associated with induction of OPIDN. When assayed at these concentrations, trichlorfon and mipafox reduced neurite outgrowth and increased intracellular calcium, events implicated in the development of OPIDN. Acephate caused effects similar to those caused by paraoxon (non-neuropathic OP) and was only able to inhibit 70% of NTE activity at lethal concentrations. These findings suggest that trichlorfon is potentially neuropathic, whereas acephate is not.

  20. TDM-based imipramine treatment in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Peter V; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H; Bach, Flemming W

    2004-08-01

    similar for patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to document if TDM improves pain relief; however, TDM reduces the risk for toxicity.

  1. Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Song, Kwang-Sup; Hong, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal surgery, the so-called failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), is a frequently observed troublesome disease entity. Although medications may be effective to some degree, many patients continue experiencing intolerable pain and functional disability. Only gabapentin has been proven effective in patients with FBSS. No relevant studies regarding manipulation or physiotherapy for FBSS have been published. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been widely investigated as a treatment option for chronic neuropathic pain, including FBSS. SCS was generally accepted to improve chronic back and leg pain, physical function, and sleep quality. Although the cost effectiveness of SCS has been proved in many studies, its routine application is limited considering that it is invasive and is associated with safety issues. Percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis has also shown good clinical outcomes; however, its effects persisted for only a short period. Because none of the current methods provide absolute superiority in terms of clinical outcomes, a multidisciplinary approach is required to manage this complex disease. Further studies concerning the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and cost effectiveness of FBSS are warranted to deepen our understanding of this condition. PMID:28874984

  2. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  3. Neuroprotective Effect of Matrine in Mouse Model of Vincristine-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Meng-Ting; Du, Juan; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Yao, Wan-Xia; Zhou, Ru; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine (VCR) can cause neuropathic pain, and there is still lack of ideal strategy to treat it. The current study was designed to investigate effect of matrine (MT) on VCR-induced neuropathic pain in animal model. VCR (75 μg/kg, i.p. for 10 consecutive days) was administered to induce painful neuropathy model in mice. MT (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and pregabalin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered for 11 consecutive days. Various tests were performed to assess the degree of pain at different days (1, 6, 11, 16, and 21). Von Frey hair, hot plate, cold-plate and paw pressure tests were conducted to assess the degree of mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw respectively. The electrophysiological and histopathological changes were also analyzed. Furthermore, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC),superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total calcium (TCA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10) were measured to investigate possible involvement of MT in inflammation and oxidative stress. Administration of MT attenuated the VCR-induced behavioral alterations as well as electrophysiological and histopathological changes in a dose dependent manner. Further, MT also attenuated the VCR-induced oxidative stress (MDA, T-AOC, GSH-Px, SOD and TCA) and inflammation (MPO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10). Taken together, MT ameliorated VCR-induced painful neuropathy, which might be attributed to neuroprotective effects by subsequent reduction in oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory actions.

  4. Posttraumatic and postsurgical neuropathic pain responsive to treatment with capsaicin 8% topical patch.

    PubMed

    Zis, Panagiotis; Apsokardos, Alexandros; Isaia, Christina; Sykioti, Panagiota; Vadalouca, Athina

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza) is mainly used to treat postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy. However, evidence of the efficacy of Qutenza in other forms of neuropathic pain is lacking. A 24-year old Libyan man, with no previous medical history, sustained multiple wounds in the right side of the chest and back after a bomb explosion. The patient experienced pain, which persisted in a wide location around the surgical intervention for a long time, beyond the usual course of natural healing of an acute pain and was different from that suffered preoperatively. The characteristics of the pain included burning, electric shock-like sensation, tingling, and numbness, and it was paroxysmal. The pain was associated with hyperalgesia and intense allodynia in a wide area, approximately of 1,100 cm2. Our initial treatment strategy included pregabalin, tramadol, and duloxetine. However, our patient's pain responded to treatment with capsaicin 8% patch when the initial treatments showed only minimal effectiveness regarding the intensity of pain. Interestingly, the most important finding was that capsaicin 8% patch showed a more than 80% reduction of the area of allodynia associated with the pain, when other treatments failed. Moreover, although recent data showed that in patients who respond to Qutenza, analgesia starts within a few days of treatment and lasts on average 5 months, our patient showed an initial response within 7 days of treatment but a longer duration of more than 18 months. Although further controlled studies are needed to explore the efficacy of the capsaicin 8% patch in patients who experience posttraumatic neuropathic pain, we encourage clinicians to try the capsaicin 8% patch when alternative treatments fail.

  5. Chronic Neuropathic Pain: It's about the Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Alshelh, Zeynab; Di Pietro, Flavia; Youssef, Andrew M; Reeves, Jenna M; Macey, Paul M; Vickers, E Russell; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-01-20

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain remain unclear. Evidence from human investigations suggests that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic burst firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. Additionally, experimental animal investigations show that neuropathic pain is associated with altered infra-slow (<0.1 Hz) frequency oscillations within the dorsal horn and somatosensory thalamus. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether, in humans, neuropathic pain was also associated with altered infra-slow oscillations within the ascending "pain" pathway. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that individuals with orofacial neuropathic pain have increased infra-slow oscillatory activity throughout the ascending pain pathway, including within the spinal trigeminal nucleus, somatosensory thalamus, thalamic reticular nucleus, and primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, these infra-slow oscillations were temporally coupled across these multiple sites and occurred at frequencies similar to calcium waves in activated astrocytes. The region encompassing the spinal trigeminal nucleus also displayed increased regional homogeneity, consistent with a local spread of neural activity by astrocyte activation. In contrast, no increase in oscillatory behavior within the ascending pain pathway occurred during acute noxious stimuli in healthy individuals. These data reveal increased oscillatory activity within the ascending pain pathway that likely underpins increased thalamocortical oscillatory activity, a self-sustaining thalamocortical dysrhythmia, and the constant perception of pain. Significance statement: Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic firing and thalamocortical dysrhythmia. The mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. In this study, we report in individuals with neuropathic pain increased oscillatory neural activity within the

  6. Neuropathic Pain in Children: Special Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Walco, Gary A.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Krane, Elliot J.; LeBel, Alyssa A.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is relatively uncommon in children. Although some syndromes closely resemble those found in adults, the incidence and course of the condition can vary substantially in children, depending on developmental status and contextual factors. There are some neuropathic pain syndromes that are rare and relatively unique to the pediatric population. This article discusses the array of neuropathic pain conditions in children and available treatment strategies. Data are limited by small numbers and few randomized controlled trials. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20194147

  7. Ranolazine attenuates behavioral signs of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gould, Harry J; Garrett, Colleen; Donahue, Renee R; Paul, Dennis; Diamond, Ivan; Taylor, Bradley K

    2009-12-01

    Ranolazine modulates the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV 1.5) and is approved by the FDA in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Ranolazine also targets neuronal (NaV 1.7, 1.8) isoforms that are implicated in neuropathic pain. Therefore, we determined the analgesic efficacy of ranolazine in a preclinical animal model of neuropathic pain. Both intraperitoneal and oral administration of ranolazine dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and cold allodynia associated with spared nerve injury, without producing ataxia or other behavioral side effects. These data warrant clinical investigation of the potential use of ranolazine in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  8. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Relationship Between Gabapentin and Pregabalin and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Burned Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    recent combat operations in Overseas Contingency Opera- tions, including Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan...stress disorder (PTSD) affects approximately 30% of burned Servicemembers returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom /Operation Enduring Freedom ...shares the same mechanisms of action as gabapentin.27 Gabapentin and pregabalin are effective choices for treating seizures and, like other

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptoms accompanying thrombocytopenia following pregabalin treatment for neuralgia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Qu, Caihong; Xie, Yang; Qin, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2014-12-01

    A 28-year-old female patient developed an increased temperature and neuropsychiatric symptoms after receiving 75 mg pregabalin therapy for neuralgia. She presented initially with pyrexia and dizziness, followed by disorganized speech within an acute confusional state. Her body temperature returned to normal after taking 60 mg loxoprofen sodium several hours later. However, the neuropsychiatric symptoms did not improve until the next morning. Routine blood tests showed decreased platelet counts (from 131 × 109/L to 85 × 109/L). The following day, a further dose of 75 mg pregabalin was administered because of its effective amelioration of the patient's neuralgia. One hour later, the same symptoms appeared as had previously including increased body temperature of 39.2 °C accompanied by a lower platelet count (73 × 109/L). Clinicians should be alert to the serious neuropsychiatric symptoms and thrombocytopenia associated with the use of pregabalin. Routine blood tests may be necessary upon initiation of pregabalin treatment.

  11. Curative effect research on curing intercostal neuralgia through paravertebral nerve block combined with pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Zhu, Xu; Wu, Xuejian

    2014-09-01

    This paper aimed to discuss the curative effect and safety of curing intercostal neuralgia through paravertebral nerve block combined with pregabalin. 90 cases of patients diagnosed as intercostal neuralgia were taken as research object. Random number method was used to divide the patients that is conforming to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria into 3 groups. 30 cases was in group A (oral lyrica), 30 cases was in group B (paravertebral block only) and 30 cases was in group C (paravertebral block combined with pregabalin). The clinical effect and safety of three groups was compared. The result showed that: visual analogue scale (VAS) and quality of sleep (QS) of three groups of patients after treatment all decreased obviously; group A had slow work, large amount of dosage and many adverse effects; group B had quick work, but the improvement on pain and sleep was not satisfactory; the curative effect of group C was higher than group A and B (p<0.05); 3 groups all had adverse effect, among which group C had the least adverse effect. It can be concluded that paravertebral nerve block combined with pregabalin for curing intercostal neuralgia was superior than single use of pregabalin or paravertebral block and that is worth to promote.

  12. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the suggestion of a neuropathic component to sickle cell disease (SCD) pain, there are minimal data on the systematic assessment of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD. Neuropathic pain is defined as pain primarily initiated by dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Procedure In a cross-sectional study, we used the painDETECT questionnaire, a one-page validated neuropathic pain screening tool, to determine the presence of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD and to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain, age, and gender. We hypothesized that 20% of patients with SCD will experience neuropathic pain and that neuropathic pain will be associated with older age and female gender. The completed painDETECT questionnaire yields a total score between 0–38 (≥19=definite neuropathic pain, 13–18=probable neuropathic pain, ≤12=no neuropathic pain). Scores ≥13 were designated as having evidence of neuropathic pain. Results A total of 56 patients participated. Median age was 20.3 years and 77% were female. We found 37% of patients had evidence of neuropathic pain. Age was positively correlated with total score [r=0.43; p=0.001] suggesting older patients experience more neuropathic pain. Females had higher mean total scores [13 vs 8.4; p=0.04]. Significantly more patients with neuropathic pain were taking hydroxyurea [90% vs 59%; p=0.015]. Despite 37% of patients experiencing neuropathic pain, only 5% were taking a neuropathic pain drug. Conclusions Neuropathic pain exists in SCD. Valid screening tools can identify patients that would benefit from existing and future neuropathic pain therapies and could determine the impact of these therapies. PMID:24167104

  13. Amitriptyline effectively relieves neuropathic pain following treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalso, E; Tasmuth, T; Neuvonen, P J

    1996-02-01

    The effectiveness of amitriptyline in relieving neuropathic pain following treatment of breast cancer was studied in 15 patients in a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. The dose was escalated from 25 mg to 100 mg per day in 4 weeks. The placebo and amitriptyline phases were separated by a 2-week wash-out period. Visual analogue and verbal rating scales were used for the assessment of pain intensity and pain relief. Other measures included the number of daily activities disturbed by the pain, the Finnish McGill Pain Questionnaire, adverse effects, anxiety, depression, pressure threshold and grip strength. Amitriptyline significantly relieved neuropathic pain both in the arm and around the breast scar. Eight out of 15 patients had a more than 50% decrease in the pain intensity ('good responders') with a median dose of 50 mg of amitriptyline. The 7 patients who had a less than 50% effect had drug concentrations equaling those of the good responders. The 'poor responders' reported significantly more adverse effects with amitriptyline and placebo than the good responders. It is concluded that amitriptyline effectively reduced neuropathic pain following treatment of breast cancer. However, the adverse effects of amitriptyline put most of the patients off from using the drug regularly.

  14. Topical phenytoin for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kopsky, David J; Keppel Hesselink, Jan M

    2017-01-01

    We developed and tested a new putative analgesic cream, based on the anticonvulsant phenytoin in patients suffering from treatment refractory neuropathic pain. The use of commercial topical analgesics is not widespread due to the facts that capsaicin creams or patches can give rise to side effects, such as burning, and analgesic patches (e.g., lidocaine 5% patches) have complex handling, especially for geriatric patients. Only in a few countries, compounded creams based on tricyclic antidepressants or other (co-)analgesics are available. Such topical analgesic creams, however, are easy to administer and have a low propensity for inducing side effects. We, therefore, developed a new topical cream based on 5% and 10% phenytoin and described three successfully treated patients suffering from neuropathic pain. All patients were refractory to a number of other analgesics. In all patients, phenytoin cream was effective in reducing pain completely, without any side effects, and the tolerability was excellent. The onset of action of the phenytoin creams was within 30 minutes. Phenytoin cream might become a new treatment modality of the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:28280381

  15. Methylprednisolone prevents the development of autotomy and neuropathic edema in rats, but has no effect on nociceptive thresholds.

    PubMed

    Kingery, W S; Castellote, J M; Maze, M

    1999-04-01

    Corticosteroids are probably an effective treatment for some types of neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndromes. This study examined the effects of systemic methylprednisolone (MP) on acute nociception and on pain behavior and hyperalgesia in normal and neuropathic rats. There was no dose-response to intraperitoneal MP (up to 12 mg/kg) for nociceptive thresholds to heat (Peltier) or mechanical (analgesy-meter and von Frey fibers) stimuli in normal rats. Chronic high dose MP (3 mg/kg per day for 21 days) also had no effect on acute nociceptive thresholds in normal rats. After sciatic nerve section in rats a saphenous nerve mediated hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli gradually developed over 21 days. High dose MP (3 mg/kg per day for 21 days) had no effect on this adjacent neuropathic hyperalgesia. When systemic MP was started immediately after bilateral sciatic and saphenous nerve transection there was a dose-dependent reduction in autotomy behavior. Substance P has been proposed as a mediator of neuropathic pain and edema. Single dose MP (12 mg/kg) slightly reduced the substance P mediated extravasation induced with electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve. Chronic MP (3.4 mg/kg per day for 28 days) severely reduced the neurogenic extravasation induced with saphenous nerve stimulation. Sciatic sectioned rats developed hindpaw edema between 7 and 14 days after surgery, and this neuropathic edema did not develop in rats chronically treated with MP (3.4 mg/kg per day). These results demonstrate that corticosteroids did not affect nociceptive thresholds in normal or neuropathic hyperalgesic rats. Chronic steroid treatment did prevent the development of autotomy and neuropathic edema, and completely blocked neurogenic extravasation, findings consistent with the hypothesis that primary afferent substance P release mediates autotomy pain behavior and neuropathic edema. This may be a relevant model for examining the effects of corticosteroids on

  16. Effect of Sildenafil on Neuropathic Pain and Hemodynamics in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan Ji; Choi, Jeong Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Yeo Ok

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 produces an antinociception through the increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and increasing cGMP levels enhance the release of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Furthermore, this phosphodiesterase 5 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the vasodilatation associated to cGMP. In this work, we examined the contribution of GABA receptors to the effect of sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, in a neuropathic pain rat, and assessed the hemodynamic effect of sildenafil in normal rats. Materials and Methods Neuropathic pain was induced by ligation of L5/6 spinal nerves in Sprague-Dawley male rats. After observing the effect of intravenous sildenafil on neuropathic pain, GABAA receptor antagonist (bicuculline) and GABAB receptor antagonist (saclofen) were administered prior to delivery of sildenafil to determine the role of GABA receptors in the activity of sildenafil. For hemodynamic measurements, catheters were inserted into the tail artery. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured over 60 min following administration of sildenafil. Results Intravenous sildenafil dose-dependently increased the withdrawal threshold to the von Frey filament application in the ligated paw. Intravenous bicuculline and saclofen reversed the antinociception of sildenafil. Intravenous sildenafil increased the magnitude of MAP reduction at the maximal dosage, but it did not affect HR response. Conclusion These results suggest that sildenafil is active in causing neuropathic pain. Both GABAA and GABAB receptors are involved in the antinociceptive effect of sildenafil. Additionally, intravenous sildenafil reduces MAP without affecting HR. PMID:20046518

  17. EZH2 regulates spinal neuroinflammation in rats with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2017-05-04

    Alteration in gene expression along the pain signaling pathway is a key mechanism contributing to the genesis of neuropathic pain. Accumulating studies have shown that epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in nociceptive process in the spinal dorsal horn. In this present study, we investigated the role of enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2), a subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2, in the spinal dorsal horn in the genesis of neuropathic pain in rats induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase, which catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 on K27 (H3K27), resulting in gene silencing. We found that levels of EZH2 and tri-methylated H3K27 (H3K27TM) in the spinal dorsal horn were increased in rats with neuropathic pain on day 3 and day 10 post nerve injuries. EZH2 was predominantly expressed in neurons in the spinal dorsal horn under normal conditions. The number of neurons with EZH2 expression was increased after nerve injury. More strikingly, nerve injury drastically increased the number of microglia with EZH2 expression by more than sevenfold. Intrathecal injection of the EZH2 inhibitor attenuated the development and maintenance of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with nerve injury. Such analgesic effects were concurrently associated with the reduced levels of EZH2, H3K27TM, Iba1, GFAP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with nerve injury. Our results highly suggest that targeting the EZH2 signaling pathway could be an effective approach for the management of neuropathic pain.

  18. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug-drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events.

  19. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. PMID:26929664

  20. Preventive Gabapentin versus Pregabalin to Decrease Postoperative Pain after Lumbar Microdiscectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Qadeer, Mohsin; Waqas, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Jawad; Enam, Syed Ather; Sharif, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare pregabalin and gabapentin for mean postoperative visual analog score (VAS) for pain in patients undergoing single-level lumbar microdiscectomy for intervertebral disc prolapse at a tertiary care hospital. Overview of Literature Pregabalin has a superior pharmacokinetic profile and analgesic effect at lower doses than gabapentin; however, analgesic efficacy must be established during the perioperative period after lumbar spine surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial was carried out at our institute from February to October 2011 on 78 patients, with 39 participants in each study group. Patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy were randomized to group A (gabapentin) or group B (pregabalin) and started on trial medicines one week before surgery. The VAS for pain was recorded at 24 hours and one week postoperatively. Results Both groups had similar baseline variables, with mean ages of 42 and 39 years in groups A and B, respectively, and a majority of male patients in each group. The mean VAS values for pain at 24 hours for gabapentin vs. pregabalin were comparable (1.97±0.84 vs. 1.6±0.87, respectively; p=0.087) as were the results at one week after surgery (0.27±0.45 vs. 0.3±0.46, respectively; p=0.79). None of the patients required additional analgesia postoperatively. After adjusting for age and sex, the VAS value for group B patients was 0.028 points lower than for group A patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.817, R2=0.018). Conclusions Pregabalin is equivalent to gabapentin for the relief of postoperative pain at a lower dose in patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy. Therefore, other factors, such as dose, frequency, cost, pharmacokinetics, and side effects of these medicines, should be taken into account whenever it is prescribed. PMID:28243376

  1. Dose-response of pregabalin for diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; McCarberg, Bill H; Clair, Andrew G; Whalen, Ed; Thomas, Neal; Jorga, Anamaria; Pauer, Lynne; Vissing, Richard; Park, Peter W

    2017-10-02

    The pregabalin dose-response for pain, Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC), and sleep quality measures in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN), postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and fibromyalgia (FM) is relevant for physicians treating these patients. This analysis aimed to demonstrate the dose-response of pregabalin for each indication and describe the onset (incidence), onset/continuation (prevalence), and resolution of adverse events (AEs) occurring during treatment. Data from 14 placebo-controlled, fixed-dose pregabalin trials in pDPN, PHN, and FM were pooled within each indication. Patients had mean baseline pain scores ≥6 on an 11-point numeric rating scale. A hyperbolic Emax dose-response model examined the dose-response of pregabalin for pain, PGIC, and sleep quality. Safety assessments included onset and prevalence of common AEs each week, and resolution in the first 2 months of treatment. In all indications, the likelihood of patients experiencing pain relief and improvements in PGIC and sleep quality increased in a dose-dependent manner with increasing doses. In all indications, new incidences of dizziness and somnolence were highest after 1 week of treatment, with few subsequent new reports at a given dose. Prevalence rates decreased steadily after 1 week of treatment. In FM, new onset weight gain emerged 6-8 weeks following treatment; prevalence rates generally increased then remained steady over time. With the exception of weight gain, many AEs resolved in month 1. The dose-response of pregabalin for pain, PGIC, and sleep quality was demonstrated, highlighting the benefit of achieving the maximum recommended dose of 300 mg/day for pDPN, 300-600 mg/day for PHN, and 300-450 mg/day for FM. Common AEs are generally seen within 1 week of starting treatment, with few subsequent new reports at a given dose. New onset weight gain occurs after 6 weeks of treatment, reinforcing the need for regular monitoring of weight.

  2. Systemic pregabalin attenuates sensorimotor responses and medullary glutamate release in inflammatory tooth pain model.

    PubMed

    Narita, N; Kumar, N; Cherkas, P S; Chiang, C Y; Dostrovsky, J O; Coderre, T J; Sessle, B J

    2012-08-30

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application of inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the tooth pulp induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0-1.2%), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial

  3. Systemic Pregabalin Attenuates Sensorimotor Responses and Medullary Glutamate Release in Inflammatory Tooth Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Noriyuki; Kumar, Naresh; Cherkas, Pavel S.; Chiang, Chen Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Coderre, Terence J.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) induces medullary glutamate release and central sensitization in the rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as well as nociceptive sensorimotor responses in craniofacial muscles in rats. There is recent evidence that anticonvulsant drugs such as pregabalin that influence glutamatergic neurotransmission are effective in several pain states. The aim of this study was to examine whether systemic administration of pregabalin attenuated glutamate release in the medulla as well as these nociceptive effects reflected in increased electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by MO application to the tooth pulp. Male adult rats were anesthetized with isofluorane (1.0~1.2 %), and jaw and tongue muscle EMG activities were recorded by needle electrodes inserted bilaterally into masseter and anterior digastric muscles and into the genioglossus muscle, and also the medullary release of glutamate was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. Pregabalin or vehicle control (isotonic saline) was administered 30 min before the pulpal application of MO or vehicle control (mineral oil). Application of mineral oil to the maxillary first molar tooth pulp produced no change in baseline EMG activity and glutamate release. However, application of MO to the pulp significantly increased both the medullary release of glutamate and EMG activity in the jaw and tongue muscles for several minutes. In contrast, pre-medication with pregabalin, but not vehicle control, significantly and dose-dependently attenuated the medullary glutamate release and EMG activity in these muscles after MO application to the tooth pulp (ANOVA, p<0.05). These results suggest that pregabalin may attenuate the medullary release of glutamate and associated nociceptive sensorimotor responses in this acute inflammatory pulpal pain model, and that it may prove useful for the treatment of orofacial inflammatory pain states

  4. Can pregabalin prevent paclitaxel-associated neuropathy?--An ACCRU pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Shivani S; Seisler, Drew; Soori, Gamini; Atherton, Pamela J; Pachman, Deirdre R; Lafky, Jacqueline; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel can cause an acute pain syndrome (P-APS), considered to be an acute form of neuropathy and chronic chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Anecdotal reports suggested that gabapentin may be helpful in the prevention of these toxicities. The purpose of this pilot study was to obtain data to support or refute the utility of pregabalin for the prevention of P-APS and CIPN. Patients scheduled to receive weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)/dose) were randomized 1:1 to receive pregabalin 75 mg or a placebo, twice daily, during the 12 weeks of chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC QLQ) CIPN20 questionnaire at baseline, prior to each dose of paclitaxel and monthly for 6 months post-treatment. Patients completed a post-paclitaxel questionnaire for 6 days after each dose of paclitaxel and an acute pain syndrome symptom questionnaire on day 8. The primary end point was to determine the effect of pregabalin on the maximum of the worst acute pain scores for the week following paclitaxel administration for cycle 1. Forty-six patients were randomly assigned to the treatment or placebo arm. There was no suggestion of a difference between the two study arms with regard to P-APS measures. While there was a suggestion that pregabalin decreased numbness, there was no suggestion that it decreased tingling, pain, or the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 subscale scores. There were no evident toxicity differences between the two study arms. The results of this pilot trial do not support that pregabalin is helpful for preventing P-APS or paclitaxel-associated CIPN.

  5. Neuropathic ulcers of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lang-Stevenson, A I; Sharrard, W J; Betts, R P; Duckworth, T

    1985-05-01

    We report a prospective study of the causes and treatment of 26 long-standing neuropathic ulcers of the foot in 21 patients. The most important causal factor, well illustrated by pressure studies, was the presence of a dynamic or static deformity leading to local areas of peak pressure on insensitive skin. All but one of the 26 ulcers had healed after an average of 10 weeks of treatment in a light, skin-tight plaster cast, with the prohibition of weight-bearing. Recurrent ulceration was prevented in all but one foot by early operation to correct the causative deformity; this was performed after the ulcer had healed and before allowing weight-bearing on the limb. Pressure studies after operation confirmed that pressure points had been relieved.

  6. Role of nucleus accumbens in neuropathic pain: linked multi-scale evidence in the rat transitioning to neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimo; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Marco; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury [SNI]). We observed interrelated changes: (1) In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28days (but not 5days) after SNI; (2) Contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28days after SNI; (3) In SNI (but not sham), covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5days and settled to a new state at 28days; and (4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior.

  7. Role of Nucleus Accumbens in Neuropathic Pain: Linked Multi-Scale Evidence in the Rat Transitioning to Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Pollema-Mays, Sarah Lynn; Centeno, Maria Virginia; Procissi, Daniel; Contini, Massimos; Baria, Alex Tomas; Martina, Macro; Apkarian, Apkar Vania

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent evidence implicating the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as causally involved in the transition to chronic pain in humans, underlying mechanisms of this involvement remain entirely unknown. Here we elucidate mechanisms of NAc reorganizational properties (longitudinally and cross-sectionally), in an animal model of neuropathic pain (spared nerve injury, SNI). We observed inter-related changes: 1) In resting-state fMRI, functional connectivity of the NAc to dorsal striatum and cortex was reduced 28 days (but not 5 days) after SNI; 2) contralateral to SNI injury, gene expression of NAc dopamine 1A, 2, and κ-opioid receptors decreased 28 days after SNI; 3) In SNI (but not sham) covariance of gene expression was upregulated at 5 days and settled to a new state at 28 days; and 4) NAc functional connectivity correlated with dopamine receptor gene expression and with tactile allodynia. Moreover, interruption of NAc activity (via lidocaine infusion) reversibly alleviated neuropathic pain in SNI animals. Together, these results demonstrate macroscopic (fMRI) and molecular reorganization of NAc and indicate that NAc neuronal activity is necessary for full expression of neuropathic pain-like behavior. PMID:24607959

  8. The surgical conservation of the neuropathic foot.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    Basic surgical principles applied when caring for neuropathic limbs can result in the maintenance or restoration of a useful ulcer-free limb. It is possible to help many patients with neuropathy to become ulcer-free and to remain ulcer-free and mobile, with surgical procedures. Recommended methods of management are briefly outlined. These include the débridement of the osteomyelitic, metatarsal head in order to save the adjacent toe, removal of bony irregularities that predispose to ulceration, and the use of wedge osteotomies and arthrodeses to improve the functional shape of the affected foot. The emphasis is on the removal of high pressure points from the weight-bearing surface and to increase the total area available for weight-bearing. Adequate rest and protection are essential, and include the use of splints or total contact plaster casts in all cases of ulceration of weight-bearing surfaces. All patients with reduced sensory perception should learn daily self-examination and care to reduce the chances of recurrent ulceration. Healing after surgical reconstruction will occur, and the healed tissues, if adequately cared for, will maintain their integrity for years. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 fig. 9 fig. 10 PMID:2549839

  9. The surgical conservation of the neuropathic foot.

    PubMed

    Warren, A G

    1989-07-01

    Basic surgical principles applied when caring for neuropathic limbs can result in the maintenance or restoration of a useful ulcer-free limb. It is possible to help many patients with neuropathy to become ulcer-free and to remain ulcer-free and mobile, with surgical procedures. Recommended methods of management are briefly outlined. These include the débridement of the osteomyelitic, metatarsal head in order to save the adjacent toe, removal of bony irregularities that predispose to ulceration, and the use of wedge osteotomies and arthrodeses to improve the functional shape of the affected foot. The emphasis is on the removal of high pressure points from the weight-bearing surface and to increase the total area available for weight-bearing. Adequate rest and protection are essential, and include the use of splints or total contact plaster casts in all cases of ulceration of weight-bearing surfaces. All patients with reduced sensory perception should learn daily self-examination and care to reduce the chances of recurrent ulceration. Healing after surgical reconstruction will occur, and the healed tissues, if adequately cared for, will maintain their integrity for years.

  10. Pregabalin augmentation of antidepressants in patients with accident-related posttraumatic stress disorder: an open label pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pae, Chi-Un; Marks, David M; Han, Changsu; Masand, Prakash S; Patkar, Ashwin A

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of pregabalin augmentation of antidepressant treatment in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Nine patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition criteria for PTSD who were on stable doses of antidepressants were treated open label with flexibly dosed pregabalin for 6 weeks. All patients were assessed with the Short PTSD Rating Interview, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Patient Global Impression-severity, Visual Analog Scale-pain, and Sheehan Disability Scale at baseline and weeks 2, 4, and 6. Significant reductions were observed in all effectiveness measures from week 4 to the end of the study. In particular, the numerical improvement of the Visual Analog Scale-pain score was most robust (-53.4%, P=0.007). Pregabalin augmentation was effective and well tolerated during the study. Our findings warrant adequately powered, placebo-controlled clinical trials to confirm the usefulness of pregabalin augmentation of antidepressants in patients with PTSD.

  11. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  12. Metabolite concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex predict high neuropathic pain impact after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Pattany, Pradip M.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Felix, Elizabeth R.; Perez, Salome; Cardenas, Diana D.; Martinez-Arizala, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pain is a common reason for reduced quality of life after a spinal cord injury (SCI). Biomarkers of neuropathic pain may facilitate translational research and the understanding of underlying mechanisms. Research suggests that pain and affective distress are anatomically and functionally integrated in the anterior cingulate cortex and can modulate sensory and affective aspects of pain. We hypothesized that severe neuropathic pain with a significant psychosocial impact would be associated with metabolite concentrations (obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) in the anterior cingulate cortex, indicating neuronal and/or glial dysfunction. Participants with SCI and severe, high-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-HPI; n = 16), SCI and moderate, low-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-LPI; n = 24), SCI without neuropathic pain (SCI-noNP; n = 14), and able-bodied, pain-free control subjects (A-B; n = 22) underwent a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Analyses revealed that the SCI-HPI group had significantly higher levels of myoinositol (Ins) (P < .000), creatine (P = .007), and choline (P = .014), and significantly lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate/Ins (P = .024) and glutamate-glutamine (Glx)/Ins (P = .003) ratios than the SCI-LPI group. The lower Glx/Ins ratio significantly discriminated between SCI-HPI and the A-B (P = .006) and SCI-noNP (P = .026) groups, displayed excellent test-retest reliability, and was significantly related to greater pain severity, interference, and affective distress. This suggests that the combination of lower glutamatergic metabolism and proliferation of glia and glial activation are underlying mechanisms contributing to the maintenance of severe neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact in chronic SCI. These findings indicate that the Glx/Ins ratio may be a useful biomarker for severe SCI-related neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact. PMID:23141478

  13. HIV Distal Neuropathic Pain Is Associated with Smaller Ventral Posterior Cingulate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Keltner, John R; Connolly, Colm G; Vaida, Florin; Jenkinson, Mark; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Akkari, Cherine; Schlein, Alexandra; Lee, Jisu; Wang, Dongzhe; Kim, Sung; Li, Han; Rennels, Austin; Miller, David J; Kesidis, George; Franklin, Donald R; Sanders, Chelsea; Corkran, Stephanie; Grant, Igor; Brown, Gregory G; Atkinson, J Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-03-01

    . Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neuropathy is one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of distal neuropathic pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage. A better understanding of brain structure in HIV distal neuropathic pain may help explain why some patients with HIV neuropathy report pain while the majority does not. Previously, we reported that more intense distal neuropathic pain was associated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volumes. The objective of this study was to determine which parts of the cortex are smaller. . HIV positive individuals with and without distal neuropathic pain enrolled in the multisite (N = 233) CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects (CHARTER) study underwent structural brain magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate regional brain volumes in these structural brain images. . Left ventral posterior cingulate cortex was smaller for HIV positive individuals with versus without distal neuropathic pain (peak P  = 0.017; peak t = 5.15; MNI coordinates x = -6, y = -54, z = 20). Regional brain volumes within cortical gray matter structures typically associated with pain processing were also smaller for HIV positive individuals having higher intensity ratings of distal neuropathic pain. . The posterior cingulate is thought to be involved in inhibiting the perception of painful stimuli. Mechanistically a smaller posterior cingulate cortex structure may be related to reduced anti-nociception contributing to increased distal neuropathic pain.

  14. Synergistic Interaction Between Dexmedetomidine and Ulinastatin Against Vincristine-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bilin; Zhang, Subo; Huang, Zhuxi; Huang, Jingxiu; Chen, Xiaodi; Zheng, Yaochao; Bai, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weian; Ouyang, Handong

    2017-07-08

    Antimicrotubulin chemotherapeutic agents such as vincristine (VCR), often induce peripheral neuropathic pain. It is usually permanent and seriously harmful to cancer patients' quality of life and can result in the hampering of clinical treatments. Currently, there is no definitive therapy, and many of the drugs approved for the treatment of other neuropathic pain have shown little or no analgesic effect. It is therefore vital to find new and novel therapeutic strategies for patients suffering from chemotherapeutic agent-induced neuropathic pain to improve patients' quality of life. This study shows that intrathecal injections of dexmedetomidine (DEX), or intraperitoneally administered ulinastatin (UTI) significantly reduces Sprague Dawley rats' mechanical allodynia induced by VCR via upregulation of interleukin-10 expression and activating the α2-adrenergic receptor in dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Moreover, when combined there is a synergistic interaction between DEX and UTI, which acts against VCR-induced neuropathic pain. This synergistic interaction between DEX and UTI may be partly attributed to a common analgesic pathway in which the upregulation of interleukin -10 plays an important role via activating α2-adrenergic receptor in rat dorsal root ganglion. The combined use of DEX and UTI does not affect the rat's blood pressure, heart rate, sedation, motor score, spatial learning, or memory function. All of these show that the combined use of DEX and UTI is an effective method in relieving VCR-induced neuropathic pain in rats. This article documents the synergistic interaction between 2 widely used drugs, DEX and UTI, against VCR-induced neuropathic pain. The results provide a potential target and novel drug administrated method for the clinical treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolite concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex predict high neuropathic pain impact after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Pattany, Pradip M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Felix, Elizabeth R; Perez, Salome; Cardenas, Diana D; Martinez-Arizala, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Persistent pain is a common reason for reduced quality of life after a spinal cord injury (SCI). Biomarkers of neuropathic pain may facilitate translational research and the understanding of underlying mechanisms. Research suggests that pain and affective distress are anatomically and functionally integrated in the anterior cingulate cortex and can modulate sensory and affective aspects of pain. We hypothesized that severe neuropathic pain with a significant psychosocial impact would be associated with metabolite concentrations (obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) in the anterior cingulate cortex, indicating neuronal and/or glial dysfunction. Participants with SCI and severe, high-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-HPI; n=16), SCI and moderate, low-impact neuropathic pain (SCI-LPI; n=24), SCI without neuropathic pain (SCI-noNP; n=14), and able-bodied, pain-free control subjects (A-B; n=22) underwent a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Analyses revealed that the SCI-HPI group had significantly higher levels of myoinositol (Ins) (P<.000), creatine (P=.007), and choline (P=.014), and significantly lower levels of N-acetyl aspartate/Ins (P=.024) and glutamate-glutamine (Glx)/Ins (P=.003) ratios than the SCI-LPI group. The lower Glx/Ins ratio significantly discriminated between SCI-HPI and the A-B (P=.006) and SCI-noNP (P=.026) groups, displayed excellent test-retest reliability, and was significantly related to greater pain severity, interference, and affective distress. This suggests that the combination of lower glutamatergic metabolism and proliferation of glia and glial activation are underlying mechanisms contributing to the maintenance of severe neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact in chronic SCI. These findings indicate that the Glx/Ins ratio may be a useful biomarker for severe SCI-related neuropathic pain with significant psychosocial impact.

  16. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiao-mei; Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Fang, Fang; Fang, Jun-fan; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Fang, Jian-qiao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA), mild manual acupuncture (mMA), and electroacupuncture (EA) group. Bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30) could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC. PMID:26770252

  17. Early improvement with pregabalin predicts endpoint response in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: an integrated and predictive data analysis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Lyndon, Gavin; Almas, Mary; Whalen, Ed; Prieto, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a common mental disorder, has several treatment options including pregabalin. Not all patients respond to treatment; quickly determining which patients will respond is an important treatment goal. Patient-level data were pooled from nine phase II and III randomized, double-blind, short-term, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for the treatment of GAD. Efficacy outcomes included the change from baseline in the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) total score and psychic and somatic subscales. Predictive modelling assessed baseline characteristics and early clinical responses to determine those predictive of clinical improvement at endpoint. A total of 2155 patients were included in the analysis (1447 pregabalin, 708 placebo). Pregabalin significantly improved the HAM-A total score compared with the placebo at endpoint, treatment difference (95% confidence interval), -2.61 (-3.21 to -2.01), P<0.0001. Pregabalin significantly improved HAM-A psychic and somatic scores compared with placebo, -1.52 (-1.85 to -1.18), P<0.0001, and -1.10 (-1.41 to -0.80), P<0.0001, respectively. Response to pregabalin in the first 1-2 weeks (≥20 or ≥30% improvement in HAM-A total, psychic or somatic score) was predictive of an endpoint greater than or equal to 50% improvement in the HAM-A total score. Pregabalin is an effective treatment option for patients with GAD. Patients with early response to pregabalin are more likely to respond significantly at endpoint.

  18. Prophylactic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain through activation of endogenous analgesic systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liting; Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2016-12-01

    Neuropathic pain impacts approximately 3-4.5% of the global population and remains an unresolved health problem. The management of neuropathic pain has two distinct goals-prevention of development and control of established neuropathic pain. We examined the impact of both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine on the development and maintenance of toxic neuropathic pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. We also investigated the involvement of endogenous analgesic (i.e., endogenous opioid and endocannabinoid) systems in the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in these two distinct phases of neuropathic pain. Chronic subcutaneous infusion of desipramine via osmotic pumps suppressed both the development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. However, only prophylactic desipramine treatment blocked the development of neuropathic pain throughout the three month observation interval; neuropathic pain did not return. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocked the antinociceptive effects of both prophylactic and therapeutic desipramine treatments throughout the entire timecourse of desipramine-induced antinociception. By contrast, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists partially attenuated the antinociceptive actions of desipramine in a manner that was restricted to the development phase of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain only. Paclitaxel decreased cell viability in TMD231 tumor cells in an MTT assay in vitro. Notably, desipramine (1nM-1μM) alone did not alter tumor cell viability and did not prevent the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel under identical conditions. The highest concentration of desipramine (10μM) reduced tumor cell viability alone and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Our study identifies a previously unrecognized preemptive analgesic strategy that prevents development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, and also dissects receptor mechanisms

  19. Topical capsaicin for chronic neuropathic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Derry, Sheena; Lloyd, Rosalind; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2009-10-07

    Topical creams with capsaicin are used to treat pain from a wide range of chronic conditions including neuropathic pain. Following application to the skin capsaicin causes enhanced sensitivity to noxious stimuli, followed by a period with reduced sensitivity and, after repeated applications, persistent desensitisation. There is uncertainty about the efficacy and tolerability of capsaicin for treating painful chronic neuropathies. To review the evidence from controlled trials on the efficacy and tolerability of topically applied capsaicin in chronic neuropathic pain in adults. Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Oxford Pain Relief Database, searched in May 2009. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled studies of at least six weeks' duration, using topical capsaicin to treat neuropathic pain. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and validity, and extracted data. Information was extracted on numbers of participants with pain relief (clinical improvement) after at least six weeks, and with local skin reactions, and used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) and harm (NNH). Details of definition of pain relief and specific adverse events were sought. Six studies (389 participants in total) compared regular application of low dose (0.075%) capsaicin cream with placebo cream; the NNT for any pain relief over six to eight weeks was 6.6 (4.1 to 17). Two studies (709 participants in total) compared a single application of high dose (8%) capsaicin patch with placebo patch; the NNT for >/= 30% pain relief over twelve weeks was 12 (6.4 to 70). Local skin reactions were more common with capsaicin, usually tolerable, and attenuated with time; the NNH for repeated low dose application was 2.5 (2.1 to 3.1). There were insufficient data to analyse either data set by condition or outcome definition. All studies satisfied minimum criteria for quality and validity, but maintenance of blinding remains a potential problem

  20. Tempol Ameliorates and Prevents Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Kee; Hwang, Seon-Hee; Abdi, Salahadin

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and prevent. Tempol decreases cellular superoxide radical levels and oxidative stress. The aims of our study were to investigate the analgesic and preventive effects of tempol on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rats and to identify the associated mechanisms of action. Neuropathic pain was induced with intraperitoneally injected paclitaxel on four alternate days in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Tempol was administered systemically as a single injection and a continuous infusion before or after the injection of paclitaxel. The mechanical threshold for allodynia, protein levels, and free radical levels were measured using von Frey filaments, Western blotting, and live cell imaging, respectively. After the rats developed neuropathic pain behavior, a single intraperitoneal injection and continuous infusion of tempol ameliorated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Systemic infusion of tempol in the early phase of the development of pain behavior prevented the development of paclitaxel-induced pain behavior. Paclitaxel increased the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C, phosphorylated nuclear factor κB, phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia; however, tempol decreased these levels. Paclitaxel also increased superoxide levels in a culture of primary dorsal root ganglion cells and tempol decreased these levels. In conclusion, tempol alleviates and prevents chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats by reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines and free radicals in dorsal root ganglia. PMID:28138318

  1. [Altered expression of transporter and analgesic of morphine in neuropathic pain mice].

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    It is known that morphine is less effective for patients with neuropathic pain, accounting for approximately 70% of cancer patients with severe pain. One of the causes of the decline is reported as a decreased function of the μ-opioid receptor, which binds to the active metabolites of morphine in the mesencephalic ventral tegmental area. However, the details of this mechanism are not understood. We hypothesized that a decrease in the concentration of morphine in the brain reduces its analgesic effect on neuropathic pain, and found that the analgesic effect of morphine was correlated with its concentration in the brain. We examined the reason for the decreased concentration of morphine in the brain in case of neuropathic pain. We discovered increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in the small intestine, increased expression and activity of UGT2B in the liver, and increased P-gp expression in the brain under conditions of neuropathic pain. In this symposium, we argue that low brain morphine concentration is considered one of the causes of lower sensitivity to morphine in neuropathic pain patients.

  2. A long noncoding RNA contributes to neuropathic pain by silencing Kcna2 in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiuli; Tang, Zongxiang; Zhang, Hongkang; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Liang, Lingli; Wang, Wei; Guan, Xiaowei; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Tiwari, Vinod; Gao, Yong-Jing; Hoffman, Paul N.; Cui, Hengmi; Li, Min; Dong, Xinzhong; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a refractory disease characterized by maladaptive changes in gene transcription and translation within the sensory pathway. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as new players in gene regulation, but how lncRNAs operate in the development of neuropathic pain is unclear. Here we identify a conserved lncRNA for Kcna2 (named Kcna2 antisense RNA) in first-order sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Peripheral nerve injury increases Kcna2 antisense RNA expression in injured DRG through activation of myeloid zinc finger protein 1, a transcription factor that binds to Kcna2 antisense RNA gene promoter. Mimicking this increase downregulates Kcna2, reduces total Kv current, increases excitability in DRG neurons, and produces neuropathic pain symptoms. Blocking this increase reverses nerve injury-induced downregulation of DRG Kcna2 and attenuates development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. These findings suggest native Kcna2 antisense RNA as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:23792947

  3. Maintaining efficacy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: role of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay; Russell, James W

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. Of all the symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy, pain has the largest impact on sleep and quality of life. In the past few years further medications have been added to the available therapies for neuropathic pain. One of these medications, duloxetine hydrochloride (duloxetine), is a balanced and potent selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Methods Medline was searched from January 2005 to September 2009 using the key words duloxetine and peripheral neuropathy for clinical trials limited to human research published in English and duloxetine and pharmacology in the nervous system. Results Duloxetine has been shown to effectively reduce diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain compared to placebo at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day with minimal to moderate side effects. This effect is seen with minimal effects on glycemic control and without any clinically relevant effects on lipid control, or cardiovascular parameters. In addition, its efficacy and tolerability is comparable to other medications commonly used in the management of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, duloxetine performs favorably both in terms of quality of life and in cost utility analyses. Discussion and conclusion This article reviewed the issues related to management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, the pharmacology and rationale for use of duloxetine, efficacy studies, and the safety and tolerability of treatment with duloxetine. Duloxetine is an acceptable initial or alternative treatment for patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:21437071

  4. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Central Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Widerström-Noga, Eva; Loeser, John D; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-06-27

    Central neuropathic pain, which is pain caused by a lesion or disease of the central somatosensory nervous system, is a serious consequence of spinal cord injury, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions affecting the central nervous system. A collaborative effort between the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks public-private partnership and the American Pain Society, the Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks-American Pain Society Pain Taxonomy (AAPT) initiative, invited a working group to develop diagnostic criteria for central neuropathic pain. The criteria for central neuropathic pain that were developed expand upon existing criteria for neuropathic pain and the International Classification of Diseases 11th Revision draft criteria to ensure consistency. This article focuses on central neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, but the AAPT framework can be extended to central pain due to other causes such as traumatic brain injury. The classification of central neuropathic pain is organized according to the AAPT multidimensional framework, specifically: 1) core diagnostic criteria, 2) common features, 3) common medical and psychiatric comorbidities, 4) neurobiological, psychosocial, and functional consequences, and 5) putative neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms, risk factors, and protective factors. The AAPT chronic central neuropathic pain taxonomy provides a classification for central pain associated with spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. The diagnostic criteria are organized according to the AAPT multidimensional framework, specifically: 1) core diagnostic criteria, 2) common features, 3) common medical and psychiatric comorbidities, 4) neurobiological, psychosocial, and functional consequences, and 5) putative neurobiological and psychosocial

  5. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a contributes to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 in primary afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Liang, Lingli; Gu, Xiyao; Li, Zhisong; Wu, Shaogen; Sun, Linlin; Atianjoh, Fidelis E.; Feng, Jian; Mo, Kai; Jia, Shushan; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Nestler, Eric J.; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Nerve injury induces changes in gene transcription in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. DNA methylation represses gene expression. Here, we report that peripheral nerve injury increases expression of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3a in the injured DRG neurons via the activation of the transcription factor octamer transcription factor 1. Blocking this increase prevents nerve injury-induced methylation of the voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channel subunit Kcna2 promoter region and rescues Kcna2 expression in the injured DRG and attenuates neuropathic pain. Conversely, in the absence of nerve injury, mimicking this increase reduces the Kcna2 promoter activity, diminishes Kcna2 expression, decreases Kv current, increases excitability in DRG neurons and leads to spinal cord central sensitization and neuropathic pain symptoms. These findings suggest that DNMT3a may contribute to neuropathic pain by repressing Kcna2 expression in the DRG. PMID:28270689

  6. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  7. Attenuation of neuropathic pain and neuroinflammatory responses by a pyranocoumarin derivative, anomalin in animal and cellular models.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman; Choi, Ran Joo; Lee, Joohee; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2016-03-05

    The present study investigated the neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties of a pyranocoumarin derivative (anomalin) in in vivo and in vitro models. An in vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic neuropathic pain model demonstrated that anomalin significantly suppressed neuropathic pain in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism of the anti-neuropathic pain activity of anomalin, sodium-nitroprusside (SNP)-induced neuroinflammation in neuro-2a (N2a) cells was further investigated in signaling pathways. The effects of anomalin against SNP-induced toxicity, nitrite production and related mRNA gene expression (iNOS and COX-2) were considerably reduced by anomalin in the SNP-induced N2a cells. In the molecular signaling pathway, anomalin effectively blocked the SNP-induced activation of the IKKα/β, IκBα, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. Furthermore, anomalin remarkably reduced the increase in the SNP-induced nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Additionally, the pro-inflammatory cytokines level was remarkably inhibited by anomalin in high glucose-induced DRG primary neurons and SNP-induced N2a cells. These findings indicate that anomalin has anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effects against STZ-induced diabetic type I neuropathic pain and SNP-induced in neuronal cell models via the inactivation of the NF-κB, Nrf2 and MAPK signaling pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain.

  9. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  10. [Prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic pain in elderly cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Custodio-Cabello, Sara; Khosravi-Shahi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic pain is difficult to estimate as most studies evaluating chronic pain do not differentiate neuropathic from nociceptive pain. There are only a few studies of neuropathic pain in the elderly, specifically in the oncology population. This article is a non-systematic review of the relevant evidence on the prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic cancer pain in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytokines in Neuropathic Pain and Associated Depression.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Fivelman, Brett; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Perera, Chamini J; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain occurs as a result of lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system and is present in a diverse set of peripheral and central pathologies such as nerve trauma, diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis. Debilitating symptoms including allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain have a substantial negative impact on patients' quality of life. The currently available therapeutic treatments are generally ineffective and characterised by poor response rates. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and cytokine signalling play a critical role in neuropathic pain. Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that certain pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in neuropathic pain conditions, and administration of these cytokines can elicit pain hypersensitivity in the absence of injury or disease. This phenomenon is also apparent in the 'sickness response', which encompasses a broad inflammatory response to disease and injury and involves a series of physiological and behavioural changes including pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, the 'sickness response' is also similar in nature to some of the defining characteristics of the depressed state of affective disorder. In this review, we explore links that may relate the co-existence of depression in neuropathic pain patients with the activity of cytokines and discuss the role of several key pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain.

  12. Sodium channel blockers in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Kalso, Eija

    2005-01-01

    Subtypes of tetrodotoxin resistant voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in the development of certain types of neuropathic pains. After nerve injury hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing develop at the site of injury and also in the dorsal root ganglion cell bodies. This hyperexcitability results at least partly from accumulation of sodium channels at the site of injury. The facts that these sodium channels seem to exist in peripheral nerves only and that they can be blocked at the resting state (use-dependent block) offer the possibility to develop drugs, which selectively block these damaged, overexcited nerves. At the moment no such drugs are available. However, some of the most potent drugs that are currently used to manage neuropathic pain e.g. amitriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants, also block these channels in addition to having several other mechanisms of action. Also most anticonvulsants that are used to alleviate neuropathic pain are sodium channel blockers. Lidocaine, the prototype drug, has been shown to be effective in peripheral neuropathic pain. Its use is limited by the fact that it cannot be administered orally. An oral local anesthetic type sodium channel blocker, mexiletine is an antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in neuropathic pain. However, effective doses may be difficult to achieve because of adverse effects.

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of pregabalin in patients with leg symptoms due to lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoto; Arai, Itaru; Kayama, Satoru; Ichiji, Kenji; Fukuda, Hironari; Kaga, Takahiro; Konno, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of pregabalin in patients with leg symptoms due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Study subjects were classified into two groups according to their pharmacotherapy: the pregabalin group, treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and pregabalin combination therapy, and the control group, treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug monotherapy. The two groups were compared in terms of the duration of pain after the onset of leg symptoms and the type of neurogenic intermittent claudication, whether radicular-, caudal-, or mixed-type. Numerical rating scale and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores were evaluated before and 3 months after treatment. After 3 months of treatment, there were significant differences in the numerical rating scale for radicular- and mixed-types, but not for caudal-type, between the two groups in the subjects with leg symptoms for greater than 3 months. There were significant differences between the two groups in Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores for mixed-type, but not for radicular- and caudal-types, in the subjects with leg symptoms for less than 3 months and for radicular- and mixed-types, but not for caudal-type, in the subjects with leg symptoms for greater than 3 months. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and pregabalin combination therapy may be more effective than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug monotherapy for the relief of leg symptoms due to lumbar spinal stenosis, preventing aggravation of subjective symptoms and improving quality of life for patients with radicular- and mixed-types in subjects with leg symptoms for greater than 3 months, although it may be necessary to consider alternative therapy for patients with caudal-type.

  14. Embryo-Fetal Developmental Toxicity Studies with Pregabalin in Mice and Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C

    2016-04-01

    Pregabalin was evaluated for potential developmental toxicity in mice and rabbits. Pregabalin was administered once daily by oral gavage to female albino mice (500, 1250, or 2500 mg/kg) and New Zealand White rabbits (250, 500, or 1250 mg/kg) during organogenesis (gestation day 6 through 15 [mice] or 6 through 20 [rabbits]). Fetuses were evaluated for viability, growth, and morphological development. Pregabalin administration to mice did not induce maternal or developmental toxicity at doses up to 2500 mg/kg, which was associated with a maternal plasma exposure (AUC0-24 ) of 3790 μg•hr/ml, ≥30 times the expected human exposure at the maximum recommended daily dose (MRD; 600 mg/day). In rabbits, treatment-related clinical signs occurred at all doses (AUC0-24 of 1397, 2023, and 4803 μg•hr/ml at 250, 500, and 1250 mg/kg, respectively). Maternal toxicity was evident at all doses and included ataxia, hypoactivity, and cool to touch. In addition, abortion and females euthanized moribund with total resorption occurred at 1250 mg/kg. There were no treatment-related malformations at any dose. At 1250 mg/kg, compared with study and historical controls, the percentage of fetuses with retarded ossification was significantly increased and the mean number of ossification sites was decreased, which correlated with decreased fetal and placental weights, consistent with in utero growth retardation. Therefore, the no-effect dose for developmental toxicity in rabbits was 500 mg/kg, which produced systemic exposure approximately 16-times human exposure at the MRD. These findings indicate that pregabalin, at the highest dose tested, was not teratogenic in mice or rabbits. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Spectrofluorimetric and Spectrophotometric Determination of Pregabalin in Capsules and Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Shaalan, Rasha Abdel-Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Three new, simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of the γ-amino-n-butyric acid derivative, pregabalin. Pregabalin as a primary amine reacts with fluorescamine to yield a fluorescent product (Method I), with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (Method II) and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (Method III) in aqueous alkaline buffered media to form colored products which could be measured spectrophotometrically. The optimum conditions for each reaction were ascertained and the methods were applied for the determination of pregabalin over the concentration range of 20-280 ng mL-1 and 1-7 μg mL-1 for spectrofluorimetry and spectrophotometry, respectively with good correlation (≥0.999). The limits of assays detection ranged from 9.6 × 10-4 μg mL-1 to 0.42 μg mL-1 for spectrofluorimetry and spectrophotometry, respectively. The suggested methods were applied to the determination of the drug in capsules. No interference could be observed from the additives listed to be in capsules. Furthermore, the spectrofluorimetric method was extended to the in-vitro determination of pregabalin in spiked urine, interference from endogenous amino acids could be eliminated through selective complexation with copper acetate; the percentage recovery was found to be 98% ± 1.42 (n=6). Co- administered drugs such as chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, diazepam, nitrazepam and lamotrigine did not interfere with the assay. The methods were validated with respect to linearity, accuracy, precision and robustness. The results obtained were determined to be in good agreement with those obtained using a previously reported method. PMID:23675201

  16. Effect of pregabalin on fear-based conditioned avoidance learning and spatial learning in a mouse model of scopolamine-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Podkowa, Adrian; Malikowska, Natalia; Trajer, Jędrzej

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive deficits are one of the frequent symptoms accompanying epilepsy or its treatment. In this study, the effect on cognition of intraperitoneally administered antiepileptic drug, pregabalin (10 mg/kg), was investigated in scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice in the passive avoidance task and Morris water maze task. The effect of scopolamine and pregabalin on animals' locomotor activity was also studied. In the retention phase of the passive avoidance task, pregabalin reversed memory deficits induced by scopolamine (p < 0.05). During the acquisition phase of the Morris water maze pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice performed the test with longer escape latencies than the vehicle-treated mice (significant at p < 0.05 on Day 5, and at p < 0.001 on Day 6). There were no differences in this parameter between the scopolamine-treated control group and pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice, which indicated that pregabalin had no influence on spatial learning in this task. During the probe trial a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in terms of the mean number of target crossings between vehicle-treated mice and pregabalin-treated memory-impaired mice but there was no difference between the scopolamine-treated control group and mice treated with pregabalin + scopolamine. Pregabalin did not influence locomotor activity increased by scopolamine. In passive avoidance task, pregabalin reversed learning deficits induced by scopolamine. In the Morris water maze, pregabalin did not influence spatial learning deficits induced by scopolamine. These results are relevant for epileptic patients treated with pregabalin and those who use it for other therapeutic indications (anxiety, pain).

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Pregabalin in the Treatment of Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Pain on Walking.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Cynthia; Stacey, Brett R; Tuchman, Michael; Burbridge, Claire; Li, Chunming; Parsons, Bruce; Pauer, Lynne; Scavone, Joseph M; Behar, Regina; Yurkewicz, Lorraine

    2015-11-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 2-period crossover study (two 6-week treatment periods separated by a 2-week washout period) evaluated the efficacy and safety of pregabalin (150 to 300 mg/d) for treatment of pain and pain on walking in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) who experienced pain while walking. Co-primary efficacy endpoints were: (1) mean pain score (last 7 daily pain diary scores, 0 to 10 numeric rating scale at end of each treatment period) and (2) DPN pain on walking (0 to 10 numeric rating scale immediately after walking 50 feet [15.2 m] on flat surface). Secondary endpoints included other pain parameters, patient-reported sleep, health-related quality of life, and safety measures. Two hundred three patients were treated (pregabalin, n=198; placebo, n=186), with no statistically significant treatment difference for pregabalin versus placebo in the co-primary efficacy endpoints, mean DPN pain (P=0.0656) and mean DPN pain on walking (P=0.412). A carryover effect was observed. Analysis of co-primary endpoints for period 1 showed significant treatment difference for DPN pain (P=0.034) and DPN pain on walking (P=0.001). Treatment with pregabalin resulted in significant improvements versus placebo on prespecified patient global impression of change (end of period 1; P=0.002), and sleep interference rating scale (end of period 2; P=0.011). Adverse events were more frequent with pregabalin than with placebo and caused discontinuation in 13 (6.6%) pregabalin patients versus 5 (2.7%) placebo patients. Failure to meet the co-primary objectives may be related to carryover effect from period 1 to period 2, lower pregabalin dose (150 to 300 mg/d), and/or placebo response in painful DPN.

  18. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods for the determination of pregabalin in bulk and pharmaceutical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önal, Armağan; Sagirli, Olcay

    2009-02-01

    Two new, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of the γ-amino- n-butyric acid derivative pregabalin (PGB) in bulk drug and capsule. Pregabalin, as a primary amine compound, reacts with 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazon (NBD-Cl) which is a highly sensitive fluorogenic and chromogenic reagent used in many investigations. According to this fact, spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric methods for the determination of pregabalin in capsules were developed for the first time. The relation between the absorbance at 460 nm and the concentration is rectilinear over the range 0.5-7.0 μg mL -1. The reaction product was also measured spectrofluorimetrically at 558 nm after excitation at 460 nm. The fluorescence intensity was directly proportional to the concentration over the range 40-400 ng mL -1. The method was applied successfully to the determination of this drug in pharmaceutical dosage form. The mean recovery for the commercial capsules was 99.93% and 99.96% for spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric study, respectively. The suggested procedures could be used for the determination of PGB in pure and capsules being sensitive, simple and selective.

  19. Modeling dropout from adverse event data: impact of dosing regimens across pregabalin trials in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lalovic, Bojan; Hutmacher, Matt; Frame, Bill; Miller, Raymond

    2011-05-01

    Dizziness represents a major determinant of dropout in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin. Titration (dose escalation) regimens based on clinical judgment were implemented to mitigate this adverse event and reduce patient dropout across clinical trials. Dropout is an important treatment failure endpoint, which can be analyzed using time-to-event models that incorporate daily dosing or other time-varying information. A parametric discrete-time dropout model with daily dizziness severity score as a covariate afforded a systematic, model-based assessment of titration dosing strategies, with model predictions evaluated against corresponding nonparametric estimates. A Gompertz hazard function adequately described the decreasing dropout hazard over time for individuals with severe or moderate dizziness and a lower, constant hazard for individuals reporting no dizziness or mild dizziness. Predictive performance of the model was adequate based on external validation with an independent trial and other goodness-of-fit criteria. Prospective simulations highlight the utility of this approach in reducing dropout based on examination of untested titration scenarios for future generalized anxiety disorder or other trials.

  20. Evidence for neuropathic processes in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Akio; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic cough is a very common symptom for which patients seek medical attention but can often be difficult to manage, because associated causes may remain elusive and treatment of any associated causes does not always provide adequate relief. Current antitussives have limited efficacy and undesirable side-effects. Patients with chronic cough typically describe sensory symptoms suggestive of upper airway and laryngeal neural dysfunction. They often report cough triggered by low-level physical and chemical stimuli supporting the recently emerging concept of 'cough hypersensitivity syndrome'. Chronic cough is a neuropathic condition that could be secondary to sensory nerve damage caused by inflammatory, infective and allergic factors. Mechanisms underlying peripheral and central augmentation of the afferent cough pathways have been identified. Successful treatment of chronic cough with agents used for treating neuropathic pain, such as gabapentin and amitriptyline, would also support this concept. Further research of neuropathic cough may lead to the discovery of more effective antitussives in the future.

  1. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-05

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies.

  2. Long-term response of neuropathic pain to intravenous immunoglobulin in relapsing diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tamburin, Stefano; Magrinelli, Francesca; Favaro, Flaviano; Briani, Chiara; Zanette, Giampietro

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN) is a rare painful peripheral neuropathic complication of diabetes mellitus. The clinical features of DLRPN include severe neuropathic pain, weakness, atrophy, and sensory loss in the lower limbs with asymmetrical distribution. Nerve ischemia due to inflammation and microvasculitis has been suggested as the pathophysiological mechanism for DLRPN. Analgesics and drugs for neuropathic pain often cannot achieve adequate pain control in DLRPN. Some reports suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may reduce pain in DLRPN, but the mechanisms of this effect are unclear. We report a patient with relapsing DLRPN who was followed up for 8 years and whose pain improved after IVIg on nine occasions. We measured serum cytokines before and after IVIg; serum tumor necrosis factor α was increased when the patient reported pain and normalized after IVIg in parallel with pain improvement. Our data extend the notion that some types of pain, including peripheral neuropathic pain, may respond to IVIg and give some clue on the mechanism of this therapeutic effect. They are also consistent with the suggested role of the immune system in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain and offer support to the hypothesis that cytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  3. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  4. Concise Review: Stem Cell Therapies for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fortino, Veronica R.; Pelaez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is heterogeneous in nature and has different causes. Different from and more burdensome than nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain more severely affects people's quality of life. Understanding the various mechanisms of the onset and progression of neuropathic pain is important in the development of an effective treatment. Research is being done to replace current pharmacological treatments with cellular therapies that will have longer lasting effects. Stem cells present an exciting potential therapy for neuropathic pain. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective effects of stem cells along with special emphasis on the current translational research using stem cells to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:23572051

  5. [Topical ambroxol for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A first clinical observation. German version].

    PubMed

    Kern, K-U; Weiser, T

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and available options are frequently not sufficient. The expectorant ambroxol also works as a strong local anesthetic and blocks sodium channels about 40 times more potently than lidocaine. Ambroxol preferentially inhibits the channel subtype Nav 1.8, which is expressed particularly in nociceptive C fibers. Due to the low toxicity, topical ambroxol seemed to represent a reasonable therapeutic attempt for treatment of neuropathic pain resistant to other standard options. Medical records of 7 patients with severe neuropathic pain, in whom many attempts at treatment with approved substances were not sufficient or possible, are reported retrospectively. Patients were then treated with topical ambroxol 20% cream applied in the area of neuropathic pain. Causes of neuropathic pain were postherpetic neuralgia (2-×), mononeuropathy multiplex, phantom pain, deafferentation pain, postoperative neuralgia and an unclear allodynia of the foot. Mean pain intensity was reported as 4-6/10 on a numeric rating scale (NRS) and maximum pain intensity as 6-10/10. Pain reduction following ambroxol cream was 2-8 points (NRS) within 15-30 min and lasted 3-8 h. Pain attacks were reduced in all 5 patients presenting this problem. Topical ambroxol achieved pain reduction in 4 patients with no improvement after lidocaine 5% and 1 patient with no response to capsaicin 8%. No adverse events or skin changes have been observed, and the longest treatment duration is currently 4 years. Ambroxol acts as a strong local anesthetic and preferentially inhibits the nociceptive-relevant sodium channel subtype Nav 1.8. For the first time, we report relevant pain reduction following topical Ambroxol 20% cream in patients with neuropathic pain. Regarding the advantageous profile with rare side effects, the clinical benefit for pain patients should be further investigated.

  6. Topical ambroxol for the treatment of neuropathic pain. An initial clinical observation.

    PubMed

    Kern, K-U; Weiser, T

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, and the available options are often inadequate. The expectorant ambroxol also acts as a strong local anaesthetic and blocks sodium channels about 40 times more potently than lidocaine. It preferentially inhibits the channel subtype Nav 1.8, which is expressed especially in nociceptive C-fibres. In view of the low toxicity of ambroxol, it seemed reasonable to try using it for the treatment of neuropathic pain that failed to respond to other standard options. The medical records of seven patients with severe neuropathic pain and pain reduction following topical ambroxol treatment are reported retrospectively. As standard therapies had not proved sufficient, a topical ambroxol 20% cream was repeatedly applied by the patients in the area of neuropathic pain. The reasons for neuropathic pain were postherpetic neuralgia (2 ×), mononeuropathy multiplex, phantom pain, deafferentation pain, postoperative neuralgia and foot neuropathy of unknown origin. The individual mean pain intensity reported was between 4 and 6/10 (NRS), maximum pain at 6-10/10 (NRS). The pain reduction achieved individually following ambroxol cream was 2-8 points (NRS) within 5-30 min and lasted for 3-8 h. Pain attacks were reduced in all five patients presenting with this problem. Four patients with no improvement after lidocaine 5% and one patient with no response to capsaicin 8% nevertheless experienced a pain reduction with topical ambroxol. No patient reported any side effects or skin changes during a treatment that has since been continued for up to 4 years. Ambroxol acts as a strong local anaesthetic and preferentially inhibits the nociceptively relevant sodium channel subtype Nav 1.8. For the first time, we report below on a relevant pain relief following topical ambroxol 20% cream in patients with neuropathic pain. In view of the positive side effect profile, the clinical benefit in patients with pain should be investigated further.

  7. A comparative bioavailability study of two formulations of pregabalin in healthy Chilean volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Luis; Sasso, Jaime; Tamayo, Evelyn; Catalán, Johanna; González, Juan Paplo; Escala, Mario; Varela, Nelson; León, Jorge; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Saavedra, Iván

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters between two brands of pregabalin in healthy Chilean volunteers. Methods A randomized, single-dose, two-period, two-sequence, crossover study design with a 2-week washout period was conducted in healthy Chilean males. Plasma samples were collected over a 12-hour period after administration of 150 mg pregabalin in each period. A validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography with positive ionization mass spectrometric detection method was used to analyze pregabalin concentration in plasma. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental method. Bioequivalence between the test and reference products was determined when the ratio for the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the difference in the means of the log-transformed area under the curve (AUC)0—t, AUC0—∞, and maximum concentration (Cmax) of the two products were within 0.80 and 1.25. Results The study was carried out on 22 healthy Chilean volunteers. The mean (SD) Cmax, AUC0—t and AUC0—∞ of the test formulation (Pregobin™) of pregabalin were 2.10 (0.56) μg/ml, 10.35 (2.00) μgxh/ml and 13.92 (2.74) μgxh/ml, respectively. The mean (SD) Cmax, AUC0—t and AUC0—∞ of the reference formulation (Lyrica™) of pregabalin were 2.15 (0.52) μg/ml, 10.31 (1.85) μgxh/ml and 13.78 (2.25) μgxh/ml, respectively. The parametric 90% CIs for Cmax, AUC0—t, and AUC0—∞ were 0.97–1.13, 1.01–1.04, and 0.98–1.02, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that both products are bioequivalent and can be used as interchangeable options in the clinical setting. PMID:23251735

  8. Pain in primary erythromelalgia--a neuropathic component?

    PubMed

    Orstavik, Kristin; Mørk, Cato; Kvernebo, Knut; Jørum, Ellen

    2004-08-01

    Erythromelalgia is a condition characterized by attacks of red, hot, painful extremities with relief of symptoms by cooling and aggravation by warmth. Although the main emphasis has been on pathophysiological mechanisms related to circulatory changes, recent reports have focused on an involvement of efferent small nerve fibers indicating a neuropathic component. Since the symptoms resemble those described in neuropathic pain, we wanted to investigate the possible affection of afferent nerve fibers. Twenty-five patients with primary erythromelalgia were examined by neurological testing, neurography and quantitative sensory testing. Thresholds for heat, cold, heat-pain and cold-pain detection were compared with those of a group of 29 healthy controls. The patients had significantly higher median heat (39.5 (36.1-40.8) and cold (29.3 (27.1-30.8)-detection thresholds at the dorsal aspects of their feet compared to the controls (37.0 (35.4-37.7) and 31.2 (30.3-31.5) respectively). These findings show an impaired small fiber function inside or close to the symptomatic area in this group of erythromelalgia patients. Seven patients had brush-evoked allodynia and fourteen had punctate hyperalgesia inside or close to the symptomatic areas in their feet. When comparing the individual results, there is a tendency to clustering of patients in two separate groups; reduced small fiber input/no hyperalgesia and normal thermal thresholds/hyperalgesia. Our results showing an affection of afferent small nerve fibers together with the nature of the symptoms, suggest that the pain experienced by erythromelalgia patients could have a neuropathic component.

  9. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of pregabalin in children with refractory partial seizures: a phase 1, randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Donald; Liu, Jing; Chew, Marci L; Bockbrader, Howard; Alvey, Christine W; Zegarac, Elizabeth; Pellock, John; Pitman, Verne W

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of pregabalin as adjunctive therapy in children with refractory partial seizures. This was a phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, escalating-dose, multiple-dose study comprising a 7-day, double-blind treatment period and a single-blind, single dose of pregabalin administered to all children on day 8. Children in four age cohorts (1-23 months, 2-6, 7-11, and 12-16 years) received one of four doses of pregabalin (2.5, 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg/day) or placebo. Safety and tolerability were assessed throughout the study. Steady-state and single-dose PK parameters on day 8 were analyzed using standard noncompartmental procedures. Sixty-five children received at least one dose of treatment. Four pregabalin-treated children discontinued treatment, three of whom received 15 mg/kg/day. Two children experienced serious adverse events, one of whom received pregabalin 15 mg/kg/day. During double-blind treatment, the most common adverse events reported in the pregabalin-treated population were somnolence (27.1%) and dizziness (12.5%). Steady-state pregabalin peak and total exposure in each age cohort appeared to increase linearly with dose. Apparent oral clearance (CL/F) was directly related to creatinine clearance, consistent with adults. CL/F normalized for body weight was 43% higher in patients weighing <30 kg. Steady-state and single-dose PK were consistent. Pregabalin at doses up to 10 mg/kg/day in children aged 1 month to 16 years, and at doses up to 15 mg/kg/day in those aged <6 years, demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability. For children weighing <30 kg, a dose increase of 40% (mg/kg dosing) is required to achieve comparable exposure with adults or children weighing ≥30 kg. These data will inform dose selection in phase 3 trials of the efficacy and safety of adjunctive pregabalin in children with refractory partial seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against