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Sample records for pregnant cynomolgus monkeys

  1. Evaluation of early fetal exposure to vaginally-administered metronidazole in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kary E; Newcomb, Deanna L; Moffat, Graeme J; Zalikowski, Julie; Chellman, Gary J; McNerney, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Given concern about potential embryo-fetal harm following seminal exposure to drugs with teratogenic potential, pharmaceutical companies use theoretical calculations to estimate seminal concentrations, maternal exposure, and distribution across the placenta to the embryo-fetal compartment for risk assessment. However, it is plausible that there are additional mechanisms whereby the conceptus is exposed. In order to determine if theoretical calculations are sufficiently conservative to predict embryo-fetal exposure from drugs in semen, pregnant cynomolgus monkeys were given a vaginal dose of metronidazole during the early fetal period and cesarean-sectioned. Maternal, fetal, and amniotic fluid samples were analyzed for metronidazole and 2-hydroxymetronidazole. Exposure to metronidazole and its metabolite were comparable in all matrices. These data demonstrated no preferential transfer mechanism to conceptus following intravaginal administration of a small molecule drug; and therefore, suggest that traditional modeling for embryo-fetal exposure to drugs in semen in support of risk assessment for pharmaceutical agents is sufficiently conservative. PMID:26524246

  2. Detection and quantification of male-specific fetal DNA in the serum of pregnant cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Lubna; Takano, Jun-Ichiro; Nagai, Yasushi; Otsuki, Junko; Sankai, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    Because of their developmental similarities to humans, nonhuman primates are often used as a model to study fetal development for potential clinical applications in humans. The detection of fetal DNA in maternal plasma or serum offers a source of fetal genetic material for prenatal diagnosis. However, no such data have been reported for cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), an important model in biomedical research. We have developed a specific, highly sensitive PCR system for detecting and quantifying male-specific fetal DNA in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys. We used multiplex quantitative real-time PCR to analyze cell-free DNA in maternal blood serum obtained from 46 pregnant monkeys at gestational weeks 5, 12, and 22. The presence of SRY gene and DYS14 Y chromosomal sequences was determined in 28 monkeys with male-bearing pregnancies. According to confirmation of fetal sex at birth, the probe and primers for detecting the Y chromosomal regions at each time point revealed 100% specificity of the PCR test and no false-positive or false-negative results. Increased levels of the SRY-specific sequences (mean, 4706 copies/mL serum DNA; range, 1731 to 12,625) and DYS14-specific sequences (mean, 54,814 copies/mL serum DNA; range, 4175-131,250 copies) were detected at week 22. The SRY- and DYS14-specific probes appear to be an effective combination of markers in a multiplex PCR system. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the detection of cell-free DNA in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:25730760

  3. POLIOMYELITIS IN THE CYNOMOLGUS MONKEY

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Harold K.; Silverberg, Rosalie J.; Dong, Luther

    1944-01-01

    1. Poliomyelitis virus suspensions were atomized so as to produce dry droplet nuclei which, suspended in air, were introduced into a special infecting chamber and inhaled by test animals, both rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. 2. Without olfactory blockade, 5 of 7 rhesus and 6 of 7 cynomolgus monkeys developed poliomyelitis of the CNS with entry through the olfactory nerves. 3. With olfactory blockade, 2 of 35 rhesus and 4 of 10 cynomolgus monkeys developed this form of the disease by routes proved by serial sections of the olfactory bulbs not to have been olfactory. 4. The neural pathways of infection from the mucous surfaces to the CNS in the 4 cynomolgus monkeys with blockade were shown in 2 instances to have been the afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve into the Gasserian ganglion and thence to its central connections in the pons-medulla; in another case this was the probable route. In one instance the pathway consisted of the sympathetic fibers of the nose or nasopharynx into the cervical sympathetic ganglia and thence into the uppermost levels of the thoracic cord. The routes in the 2 rhesus monkeys with non-olfactory takes were not accurately determined but in one there was suggestive evidence of entry through the trigeminal nerve. 5. Study of the peripheral ganglia in a number of exposed cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys, including several with no demonstrated involvement of the CNS, revealed lesions most constantly in the Gasserian ganglia; less so in the cervical sympathetics and still less so in the celiac. In 2 rhesus monkeys dying of other causes a few days after exposure, lesions were limited to the Gasserian ganglia. No evidence was found in any case of passage of infection from the celiac ganglia into the CNS. 6. The importance of the peripheral ganglia as intermediate stations in the centripetal passage of infection from the body surface is again emphasized. 7. Comparison of the present with a previous study suggests that infection by inhalation of

  4. Electroporation of cynomolgus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Masataka; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Mizutani, Ken-Ichi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2003-12-01

    Efficient genetic modification of primate embryonic stem (ES) cells is essential for the application for both basic and preclinical research. The transfection efficiency of primate ES cells is reportedly lower than that of mouse ES cells. Cynomolgus monkey ES cells provide a powerful model for understanding human development and disease. We evaluated electroporation as a method to introduce foreign genes into cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Our examination has allowed us to establish a protocol producing about 100 stably transfected clones from 10(7) cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Differences in efficiency, however, were observed for other ES cell lines. We compared the transcriptional activities of the PGK-1, CMV, and SV40 promoters in cynomolgus monkey ES cells generating efficient G418 selection. Although the PGK-1 and SV40 promoters efficiently drove neo gene expression, the CMV promoter was significantly less transcriptionally active in cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Using this electroporation method, we established fluorescent cynomolgus monkey ES cell lines. These cells may be useful tools for tracing grafted cells in transplantation studies using a variety of functional cells derived from cynomolgus monkey ES cells.

  5. Simian varicella virus reactivation in cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Mahalingam, Ravi Traina-Dorge, Vicki Wellish, Mary Lorino, Rebecca Sanford, Robert Ribka, Erin P. Alleman, Scott J. Brazeau, Elizabeth Gilden, Donald H.

    2007-11-10

    SVV infection of primates closely resembles VZV infection of humans. Like VZV, SVV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons. We used this model to study the effect of immunosuppression on varicella reactivation. Cynomolgus monkeys latently infected with SVV were irradiated and treated with tacrolimus and prednisone. Of four latently infected monkeys that were immunosuppressed and subjected to the stress of transportation and isolation, one developed zoster, and three others developed features of subclinical reactivation. Another non-immunosuppressed latently infected monkey that was subjected to the same stress of travel and isolation showed features of subclinical reactivation. Virus reactivation was confirmed not only by the occurrence of zoster in one monkey, but also by the presence of late SVV RNA in ganglia, and the detection of SVV DNA in non-ganglionic tissue, and SVV antigens in skin, ganglia and lung.

  6. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies.

  7. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies. PMID:26989299

  8. Fetal malformations and early embryonic gene expression response in cynomolgus monkeys maternally exposed to thalidomide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was performed to determine experimental conditions for thalidomide induction of fetal malformations and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying thalidomide teratogenicity in cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys were orally administered (±)-thalidomid...

  9. Characteristics of histologically confirmed endometriosis in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto-Kakiuchi, A.; Netsu, S.; Matsuo, S.; Hayashi, S.; Ito, T.; Okabayashi, S.; Yasmin, L.; Yuzawa, K.; Kondoh, O.; Kato, A.; Suzuki, M.; Konno, R.; Sankai, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the characteristics of spontaneous endometriosis in cynomolgus monkeys? SUMMARY ANSWER Spontaneous endometriosis in cynomolgus monkeys exhibited similar characteristics to the human disease. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY One previous report described the prevalence and the basic histopathology of spontaneous endometriosis in cynomolgus monkeys. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Endometriotic lesions that had been histologically confirmed in 8 female cynomolgus monkeys between 5 and 21 years old were subjected to study. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The monkeys died of, or were sacrificed because of, sickness consequent on endometriosis. Specimens were evaluated histopathologically with haematoxylin and eosin staining, iron staining and immunohistochemistry (CD10, CD31, α-SMA and PGP9.5), and by observing them under a microscope. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Endometriotic and stromal cells (CD10-positive) with haemorrhage and inflammation were observed. Smooth muscle metaplasia and nerve fibres were also noted in the endometriotic lesions. Endometriotic lesions in lymph nodes were incidentally found. LIMITATIONS AND REASONS FOR CAUTION Since laparoscopic analysis for monitoring the disease state was not set as a parameter of the current study, time course changes (progression) of the disease were not assessed. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Further investigation of spontaneous endometriosis in cynomolgus monkeys may contribute to better understanding of the disease pathobiology. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) No external funds were used for this study. A.N.K., S.M., S.H., T.I., O.K., A.K. and M.S. are full-time employees of Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. R.K. received lecture fees from Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., unrelated to the submitted work. S.N., S. O., L.Y., K.Y. and T.S. have nothing to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER N/A. PMID:27591226

  10. Scrub Typhus antibody in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Heisey, G B; Gan, E; Shirai, A; Groves, M G

    1981-06-01

    Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique, sera from 113 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), trapped in Peninsular Malaysia, were screened for the presence of antibody to six prototype strains of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi combined into three polyvalent groupings: I--Karp, TA716, and TA763; II--Gilliam; and III--TA678 and TH1817. Fifteen percent (17/113) of the monkeys had antibody titers greater than or equal to 1:50 to one or more of the antigenic groups. Although a titer greater than or equal to 1:150 is generally considered indicative or prior Rickettsia tsutsugamushi infection, we selected a less than 1:25 titer as a conservative standard to insure non-infected animals. Using this criterion, 62 (55%) of the 113 monkeys were accepted for use in scrub typhus studies. The high prevalence of antibody to scrub typhus in the semi-arboreal cynomolgus monkey is in marked contrast to the low prevalence reported in the strictly arboreal silvered leaf monkeys (Presbytis cristatus). The results of this study indicate that cynomolgus monkeys should be rigorously screened for evidence of prior infection before they are included in experimental scrub typhus studies.

  11. Species differences in intestinal metabolic activities of cytochrome P450 isoforms between cynomolgus monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Nishimuta, Haruka; Sato, Kimihiko; Mizuki, Yasuyuki; Yabuki, Masashi; Komuro, Setsuko

    2011-06-01

    The oral bioavailability of some drugs is markedly lower in cynomolgus monkeys than in humans. One of the reasons for the low bioavailability in cynomolgus monkeys may be the higher metabolic activity of intestinal CYP3A; however, the species differences in intestinal metabolic activities of other CYP isoforms between cynomolgus monkeys and humans are not well known. In the present study, we investigated the intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) values in pooled intestinal microsomes from cynomolgus monkeys and humans using 25 substrates of human CYP1A2, CYP2J2, CYP2C, and CYP2D6. As in humans, intestinal CL(int) values of human CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 substrates in cynomolgus monkeys were low. On the other hand, intestinal CL(int) values of human CYP2J2 and CYP2C substrates in cynomolgus monkeys were greatly higher than those in humans. Using immunoinhibitory antibodies and chemical inhibitors, we showed that the higher intestinal CL(int) values of the human CYP2J2 and CYP2C substrates in cynomolgus monkeys might be caused by monkey CYP4F and CYP2C subfamily members, respectively. In conclusion, there is a possibility that the greatly higher metabolic activity of CYP2C and CYP4F in cynomolgus monkey intestine is one of the causes of the species difference of intestinal first-pass metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans. PMID:21383522

  12. Efficient production of cynomolgus monkeys with a toolbox of enhanced assisted reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunhan; Li, Jiayu; Wang, Ge; Ke, Qiong; Qiu, Sien; Gao, Liang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhou, Yang; Xiang, Andy Peng; Huang, Qunshan; Feng, Guoping; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) in nonhuman primates is low due to no screening criterions for selecting sperm, oocyte, and embryo as well as its surrogate mothers. Here we analyzed 15 pairs of pregnant and non-pregnant cynomolgus monkeys, each pair of which received embryos from one batch of fertilized oocytes, and found ratio of endometrial to myometrial thicknesses in abdominal ultrasonic transverse section of uterus is a reliable indicator for selection of recipients for embryo transfer. We performed 305 ovarian stimulations in 128 female cynomolgus monkeys and found that ovarian stimulation can be performed in a whole year and repeated up to six times in the same monkey without deteriorating fertilization potential of eggs until a poor response to stimulation happened. Fertilization can be efficiently achieved with both conventional and piezo-driven intracytoplasmic sperm injection procedures. In semen collection, semen quality is higher with the penile robe electrical stimulus method compared with the rectal probe method. Moreover, caesarean section is an effective strategy for increasing baby survival rates of multiple pregnancies. These findings provide a practical guidance for the efficient use of ARTs, facilitating their use in genetic engineering of macaque monkeys for basic and translational neuroscience research. PMID:27173128

  13. Biologic Data of Cynomolgus Monkeys Maintained under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marilena Caterina; Badino, Paola; Ferrero, Giulio; Costa, Roberto; Cordero, Francesca; Steidler, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) is a well-known non-human primate species commonly used in non-clinical research. It is important to know basal clinical pathology parameters in order to have a reference for evaluating any potential treatment-induced effects, maintaining health status among animals and, if needed, evaluating correct substantiative therapies. In this study, data from 238 untreated cynomolgus monkeys (119 males and 119 females of juvenile age, 2.5 to 3.5 years) kept under laboratory conditions were used to build up a reference database of clinical pathology parameters. Twenty-two hematology markers, 24 clinical chemistry markers and two blood coagulation parameters were analyzed. Gender-related differences were evaluated using statistical analyses. To assess the possible effects of stress induced by housing or handling involved in treatment procedures, 78 animals (35 males and 35 females out of 238 juvenile monkeys and four adult males and four adult females) were used to evaluate cortisol, corticosterone and behavioral assessment over time. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric statistical test and machine learning approaches. Reference clinical pathology data obtained from untreated animals may be extremely useful for investigators employing cynomolgus monkeys as a test system for non-clinical safety studies. PMID:27280447

  14. Biologic Data of Cynomolgus Monkeys Maintained under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Marilena Caterina; Badino, Paola; Ferrero, Giulio; Costa, Roberto; Cordero, Francesca; Steidler, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) is a well-known non-human primate species commonly used in non-clinical research. It is important to know basal clinical pathology parameters in order to have a reference for evaluating any potential treatment-induced effects, maintaining health status among animals and, if needed, evaluating correct substantiative therapies. In this study, data from 238 untreated cynomolgus monkeys (119 males and 119 females of juvenile age, 2.5 to 3.5 years) kept under laboratory conditions were used to build up a reference database of clinical pathology parameters. Twenty-two hematology markers, 24 clinical chemistry markers and two blood coagulation parameters were analyzed. Gender-related differences were evaluated using statistical analyses. To assess the possible effects of stress induced by housing or handling involved in treatment procedures, 78 animals (35 males and 35 females out of 238 juvenile monkeys and four adult males and four adult females) were used to evaluate cortisol, corticosterone and behavioral assessment over time. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric statistical test and machine learning approaches. Reference clinical pathology data obtained from untreated animals may be extremely useful for investigators employing cynomolgus monkeys as a test system for non-clinical safety studies. PMID:27280447

  15. Milk Transfer and Toxicokinetics of Valproic Acid in Lactating Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hwa; Yu, Wook-Joon; Jeong, Eun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Studies on milk transfer of drugs in non-human primates (NHPs) are among the crucial components in the assessment of peri- and postnatal toxicity because of the similarity between NHPs and humans. To evaluate the milk transfer of valproic acid (VPA) in NHPs, the toxicokinetics of VPA, an antiepileptic drug, were studied in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys. VPA was administered once daily to pregnant cynomolgus monkeys at doses of 0, 30, 90, and 270 mg/kg by oral gavage from Day 100 of gestation (GD 100) to Day 31 of lactation (LD 31). Concentrations of VPA and its metabolite, 4-ene-VPA, in the maternal plasma on GD 100, GD 140, and LD 30, and concentrations of VPA and 4-ene-VPA in the offspring plasma and milk on LDs 30 and 31, respectively, were quantified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). After administration of a single oral dose of VPA to pregnant monkeys on GD 100, the concentrations of VPA and 4-ene-VPA were generally quantifiable in the plasma of all treatment groups up to 24 hr after administration, which showed that VPA was absorbed and that the monkeys were systemically exposed to VPA and 4-ene-VPA. After administration of multiple doses of VPA to the monkeys, VPA was detected in the pup’s plasma and in milk taken on LD 30 and LD 31, respectively, which showed that VPA was transferred via milk, and the pup was exposed to VPA. Further, the concentration of VPA in the milk increased with an increase in the dose. Extremely low concentrations of 4-ene VPA were detected in the milk and in the pup plasma. In conclusion, pregnant monkeys were exposed to VPA and 4-ene-VPA after oral administration of VPA at doses of 30, 90, and 270 mg/kg/day from GD 100 to LD 31. VPA was transferred via milk, and the VPA exposure to the pup increased with an increase in the dose of VPA. The metabolite, 4-ene VPA, was present in extremely low concentrations (< 0.5 μg/ml) in the milk and in the pup plasma. In this study, we established methods to

  16. Generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that express green fluorescent protein throughout the whole body

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Yasunari; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Matsushita, Jun; Azami, Takuya; Okahara, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hitoshi, Seiji; Itoh, Yasushi; Imamura, Takeshi; Nishimura, Masaki; Tooyama, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Erika; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are valuable for human disease modelling, because rodents poorly recapitulate some human diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease amongst others. Here, we report for the first time, the generation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic cynomolgus monkeys by lentivirus infection. Our data show that the use of a human cytomegalovirus immediate-early enhancer and chicken beta actin promoter (CAG) directed the ubiquitous expression of the transgene in cynomolgus monkeys. We also found that injection into mature oocytes before fertilization achieved homogenous expression of GFP in each tissue, including the amnion, and fibroblasts, whereas injection into fertilized oocytes generated a transgenic cynomolgus monkey with mosaic GFP expression. Thus, the injection timing was important to create transgenic cynomolgus monkeys that expressed GFP homogenously in each of the various tissues. The strategy established in this work will be useful for the generation of transgenic cynomolgus monkeys for transplantation studies as well as biomedical research. PMID:27109065

  17. Modeling depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Shively, Carol A

    2012-06-01

    Depressive disorders are prevalent, costly, and poorly understood. Male rodents in stress paradigms are most commonly used as animal models, despite the two-fold increased prevalence of depression in women and sex differences in response to stress. Although these models have provided valuable insights, new models are needed to move the field forward. Social stress-associated behavioral depression in adult female cynomolgus macaques closely resembles human depression in physiological, neurobiological, and behavioral characteristics, including reduced body mass, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis perturbations, autonomic dysfunction, increased cardiovascular disease risk, reduced hippocampal volume, altered serotonergic function, decreased activity levels, and increased mortality. In addition, behaviorally depressed monkeys also have low ovarian steroid concentrations, even though they continue to have menstrual cycles. Although this type of ovarian dysfunction has not been reported in depressed women and is difficult to identify, it may be the key to understanding the high prevalence of depression in women. Depressive behavior in female cynomolgus monkeys is naturally occurring and not induced by experimental manipulation. Different social environmental challenges, including isolation vs. subordination, may elicit the depression-like response in some animals and not others. Similarly, social subordination is stressful and depressive behavior is more common in socially subordinate monkeys. Yet, not all subordinates exhibit behavioral depression, suggesting individual differences in sensitivity to specific environmental stressors and enhanced risk of behavioral depression in some individuals. The behavior and neurobiology of subordinates is distinctly different than that of behaviorally depressed monkeys, which affords the opportunity to differentiate between stressed and depressed states. Thus, behaviorally depressed monkeys exhibit numerous physiological

  18. Granulomatous Nephritis Consistent with Malakoplakia in a Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Inomata, Akira; Sonoda, Jiro; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro; Nakano-Ito, Kyoko; Ohta, Etsuko; Seki, Yuki; Goto, Aya; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare form of chronic granulomatous inflammation in mammals, and usually affects the urinary tract in humans. In this report, we present a case of granulomatous nephritis consistent with malakoplakia in a 4-year-old male cynomolgus monkey. Gross examination showed that the kidney was markedly enlarged and adhered to the surrounding organs. Histology showed that there was diffuse interstitial infiltration of histiocytes with abundant foamy eosinophilic cytoplasm resembling von Hansemann cells, PAS-positive granular cytoplasm and occasional PAS- and iron-positive intracellular small inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy showed that these histiocytes contained abundant lysosomes and phagolysosomes but no obvious Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of granulomatous nephritis consistent with early malakoplakia was made. This is the first report in a monkey of a renal lesion consistent with malakoplakia. PMID:24526815

  19. Cynomolgus Monkey Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated By Using Allogeneic Genes.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that are potentially similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells can be artificially established by introduction into somatic cells of the transgenes POU5F1 (also known as Oct3/4), SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), iPS cells generated by using these four allogeneic transgenes should be an important resource for various types of biomedical research because the use of xenogeneic transgenes may cause complications. To establish such iPS cells, cynomolgus monkey somatic cells were infected with amphotropic retroviral vectors, which were derived from Plat-A cells, containing cDNA for the cynomolgus monkey genes POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. As a result, iPS cells could be established from somatic cells from fetal liver and newborn skin of cynomolgus monkeys, similarly to the case for mouse and human somatic cells. PMID:25410287

  20. Methotrexate for immunosuppression in life-supporting pig-to-cynomolgus monkey renal xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Emanuele; Cadrobbi, Roberto; Baldan, Nicola; Dedja, Arben; Calabrese, Fiorella; Castagnaro, Massimo; Fante, Fabio; Boldrin, Massimo; Iacopetti, Ilaria; Ravarotto, Licia; Carraro, Paolo; Bronte, Vincenzo; De Santo, Carmela; Busetto, Roberto; Plebani, Mario; Cancellotti, Francesco Maria; Rigotti, Paolo; Thiene, Gaetano; Ancona, Ermanno

    2003-11-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has been used successfully as an immunosuppressant in rodent xenotransplantation models, but the data generated so far with MTX in pig-to-baboon cardiac transplantation studies have been disappointing. The potential of this agent was consequently explored in a life-supporting pig-to-primate renal model using the cynomolgus monkey as the recipient species. Introductory in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies with MTX were conducted in three cynomolgus monkeys. Subsequently, 10 cynomolgus monkey recipients of a life-supporting kidney from human decay-accelerating factor transgenic pigs were administered MTX intravenously according to three different regimens. All the animals also received cyclosporine A and steroids. In addition, mycophenolate sodium (MPS) was administered post-operatively in two of the three groups of transplanted animals. At clinically relevant concentrations, MTX is able in vitro to inhibit the mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) in cynomolgus monkeys. After intravenous administration, moreover, exposure of cynomolgus monkeys to MTX appeared to be higher than had been previously reported in baboons. Graft function was observed in the transplanted animals, which survived from 0 to 41 days. All but two animals revealed acute humoral rejection in the explanted graft and developed diarrhea. Diarrhea was the cause of euthanasia in five cases. It was unrelated to the administration of MPS and associated with severe histopathological signs of enteritis. This study demonstrates that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles if MTX vary substantially between non-human primate species. In vitro, MTX has immunosuppressive properties in the cynomolgus monkey at clinically relevant concentrations. In vivo, MTX has a very narrow therapeutic window in cynomolgus monkeys, however, as it does in baboons. We conclude that MTX is scarcely effective as an immunosuppressant, be it for induction or maintenance, in pig-to-cynomolgus

  1. Age-related lesions in the cerebrum in middle-aged female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Rinya; Yang, Xiuying; Saski, Yuji; Iwashige, Shuichiro; Tanigawa, Yohei; Yoshikawa, Tsuyoshi; Nagaoka, Takaharu; Kamimura, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Horishi

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans is a progressive neurogenic disease that can be linked with such characteristic pathological findings in the cerebrum as senile plaques (SPs), neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and neuronal loss. In the present study, the authors investigated the age-related morphological changes in 12 middle-aged and 12 young cynomolgus monkeys. Low numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the hippocampal region in cynomolgus monkeys accompanied ageing, and there was a high number of microglial cells; however, no clearly neurotoxic abnormalities due to beta-amyloid were noted before the age of 20 years. The onset of SPs and CAA in the cerebrum in cynomolgus monkeys can occur before the age of 20 years. SPs were almost all categorized as diffuse plaques (DPs); they did not have amyloid cores and were unaccompanied by neuritic degeneration. In cynomolgus monkeys, SPs (DPs) occur before the appearance of CAA. From the above, it was concluded that cynomolgus monkeys showed pathological changes due to ageing similar to those related to Alzheimer's disease in humans, even before they were 20 years old.

  2. Cynomolgus monkey induced pluripotent stem cells established by using exogenous genes derived from the same monkey species.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro; Ono, Ryoichi; Shimada, Manami; Shibata, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Inada, Hiroyasu; Takada, Tatsuyuki; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells established by introduction of the transgenes POU5F1 (also known as Oct3/4), SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC have competence similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells. iPS cells generated from cynomolgus monkey somatic cells by using genes taken from the same species would be a particularly important resource, since various biomedical investigations, including studies on the safety and efficacy of drugs, medical technology development, and research resource development, have been performed using cynomolgus monkeys. In addition, the use of xenogeneic genes would cause complicating matters such as immune responses when they are expressed. In this study, therefore, we established iPS cells by infecting cells from the fetal liver and newborn skin with amphotropic retroviral vectors containing cDNAs for the cynomolgus monkey genes of POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Flat colonies consisting of cells with large nuclei, similar to those in other primate ES cell lines, appeared and were stably maintained. These cell lines had normal chromosome numbers, expressed pluripotency markers and formed teratomas. We thus generated cynomolgus monkey iPS cell lines without the introduction of ecotropic retroviral receptors or other additional transgenes by using the four allogeneic transgenes. This may enable detailed analysis of the mechanisms underlying the reprogramming. In conclusion, we showed that iPS cells could be derived from cynomolgus monkey somatic cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on iPS cell lines established from cynomolgus monkey somatic cells by using genes from the same species.

  3. Immune suppression in cynomolgus monkeys by XPro9523

    PubMed Central

    Bernett, Matthew J.; Chu, Seung Y.; Leung, Irene; Moore, Gregory L.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Pong, Erik; Chen, Hsing; Phung, Sheryl; Muchhal, Umesh S.; Horton, Holly M.; Lazar, Greg A.; Desjarlais, John R; Szymkowski, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The CTLA4-Ig fusion proteins abatacept and belatacept are clinically proven immunosuppressants used for rheumatoid arthritis and renal transplant, respectively. Given that both biologics are typically administered chronically by infusion, a need exists for a next-generation CTLA4-Ig with more convenient dosing. We used structure-based protein engineering to optimize the affinity of existing CTLA4-Ig therapeutics for the ligands CD80 and CD86, and for the neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn. From a rationally designed library, we identified four substitutions that enhanced binding to human CD80 and CD86. Coupled with two IgG1 Fc substitutions that enhanced binding to human FcRn, these changes comprise the novel CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, XPro9523. Compared with abatacept, XPro9523 demonstrated 5.9-fold, 23-fold, and 12-fold increased binding to CD80, CD86, and FcRn, respectively; compared with belatacept, CD80, CD86, and FcRn binding increased 1.5-fold, 7.7-fold, and 11-fold, respectively. XPro9523 and belatacept suppressed human T cell proliferation and IL-2 production more potently than abatacept. XPro9523 also suppressed inflammation in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis model. In cynomolgus monkeys, XPro9523 saturated CD80 and CD86 more effectively than abatacept and belatacept, potently inhibited IgM and IgG immunization responses, and demonstrated longer half-life. Pharmacokinetic modeling of its increased potency and persistence suggests that, in humans, XPro9523 may demonstrate superior efficacy and dosing convenience compared with abatacept and belatacept. PMID:23549103

  4. Reference values of hematology, biochemistry, and blood type in cynomolgus monkeys from cambodia origin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kangmoo; Chang, Jaejin; Lee, Min-Jae; Wang, Seungsu; In, Kimhong; Galano-tan, Wilhelm C; Jun, Sanghun; Cho, Kahee; Hwang, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys as nonhuman primates are valuable animal models because they have a high level of human gene homology. There are many reference values for hematology and biochemistry of Cynomolgus monkeys that are needed for proper clinical diagnosis and biomedical research conduct. The body weight information and blood type are also key success factors in allogeneic or xenogeneic models. Moreover, the biological parameters could be different according to the origin of the Cynomolgus monkey. However, there are limited references provided, especially of Cambodia origin. In this study, we measured average body weight of 2,518 Cynomolgus monkeys and analyzed hematology and serum biochemistry using 119 males, and determined blood types in 642 monkeys with Cambodia origin. The average body weight of male Cynomolgus monkeys were 2.56±0.345 kg and female group was 2.43±0.330 kg at the age from 2 to 3 years. The male group showed relatively sharp increased average body weight from the 3 to 4 age period compared to the female group. In hematology and biochemistry, it was found that most of the data was similar when compared to other references even though some results showed differences. The ABO blood type result showed that type A, B, AB, and O was approximately 15.6, 33.3, 44.2, and 6.9%, respectively. The main blood type in this facility was B and AB. These biological background references of Cambodia origin could be used to provide important information to researchers who are using them in their biomedical research. PMID:27051442

  5. Reference values of hematology, biochemistry, and blood type in cynomolgus monkeys from cambodia origin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kangmoo; Chang, Jaejin; Lee, Min-Jae; Wang, Seungsu; In, Kimhong; Galano-Tan, Wilhelm C; Jun, Sanghun; Cho, Kahee; Hwang, Yong-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Ju; Park, Wanje

    2016-03-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys as nonhuman primates are valuable animal models because they have a high level of human gene homology. There are many reference values for hematology and biochemistry of Cynomolgus monkeys that are needed for proper clinical diagnosis and biomedical research conduct. The body weight information and blood type are also key success factors in allogeneic or xenogeneic models. Moreover, the biological parameters could be different according to the origin of the Cynomolgus monkey. However, there are limited references provided, especially of Cambodia origin. In this study, we measured average body weight of 2,518 Cynomolgus monkeys and analyzed hematology and serum biochemistry using 119 males, and determined blood types in 642 monkeys with Cambodia origin. The average body weight of male Cynomolgus monkeys were 2.56±0.345 kg and female group was 2.43±0.330 kg at the age from 2 to 3 years. The male group showed relatively sharp increased average body weight from the 3 to 4 age period compared to the female group. In hematology and biochemistry, it was found that most of the data was similar when compared to other references even though some results showed differences. The ABO blood type result showed that type A, B, AB, and O was approximately 15.6, 33.3, 44.2, and 6.9%, respectively. The main blood type in this facility was B and AB. These biological background references of Cambodia origin could be used to provide important information to researchers who are using them in their biomedical research.

  6. Apolipoprotein A-I metabolism in cynomolgus monkey. Identification and characterization of beta-migrating pools

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, G.W.; Castle, C.K.

    1989-07-01

    Fresh plasma from control (C) and hypercholesterolemic (HC) cynomolgus monkeys was analyzed by agarose electrophoresis-immunoblotting with antibody to cynomolgus monkey apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. Two bands were evident on the autoradiogram: an alpha-migrating band (high density lipoprotein) and a beta-migrating band that comigrated exactly with cynomolgus monkey low density lipoprotein (LDL). The presence of beta-migrating apo A-I in the plasma of these monkeys was confirmed by Geon-Pevikon preparative electrophoresis, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and isotope dilution studies in which radiolabeled apo A-I was found to equilibrate also with alpha- and beta-migrating pools of apo A-I in the plasma. Subfractionation of C and HC plasma by agarose column chromatography (Bio-Gel A-0.5M and A-15M) followed by agarose electrophoresis-immunoblotting indicated that the beta-migrating apo A-I in C was relatively homogeneous and eluted with proteins of Mr approximately 50 kD (apo A-I(50 kD)), whereas two beta-migrating fractions were identified in HC, one that eluted with the 50-kD proteins, and the other that eluted in the LDL Mr range (apo A-I(LDL)). The apo A-I(LDL) was precipitated by antibody to cynomolgus monkey apo B. The apo A-I(50 kD) accounted for 5 +/- 1% (mean +/- SD) of the plasma apo A-I in C plasma, and 15 +/- 7% in HC plasma. No apo A-I(LDL) was detected in C plasma, but that fraction accounted for 9 +/- 7% of the apo A-I in HC plasma. These data establish the presence of multiple pools of apo A-I in the cynomolgus monkey, which must be taken into consideration in any comprehensive model of apo A-I metabolism in this species.

  7. Effects of different environmental enrichment devices on cage stereotypies and autoaggression in captive cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C E; Rupniak, N M; Iversen, S D

    1988-01-01

    Autoaggression and stereotypies in individually housed cynomolgus monkeys were compared in a standard primate cage and an enriched playpen environment. Stereotypy and autoaggression were markedly reduced in the playpen, but reappeared on return to the home cage. Some of the various activities available in the playpen but not others engaged the animals' attention. PMID:3230581

  8. Effects of different environmental enrichment devices on cage stereotypies and autoaggression in captive cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bryant, C E; Rupniak, N M; Iversen, S D

    1988-01-01

    Autoaggression and stereotypies in individually housed cynomolgus monkeys were compared in a standard primate cage and an enriched playpen environment. Stereotypy and autoaggression were markedly reduced in the playpen, but reappeared on return to the home cage. Some of the various activities available in the playpen but not others engaged the animals' attention.

  9. A review of background findings in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from three different geographical origins.

    PubMed

    Drevon-Gaillot, Elodie; Perron-Lepage, Marie-France; Clément, Christian; Burnett, Roger

    2006-11-01

    This review was performed to assess variations in background observations in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) originating from three breeding centres located in Mauritius, The Philippines and Vietnam. The data and tissue samples from 90 cynomolgus monkeys (approximately evenly distributed between the three sources) comprising the control groups from 11 regulatory toxicology studies were used for this investigation. Clinical data--age, body weight, organ weights, haematology and serum biochemistry--were analyzed. Samples of stomach, colon, kidney, heart, liver, spleen and lung were examined microscopically and graded to characterize the degree of lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration. The main microscopic origin-related variations concerned the digestive tract, where the lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration grade was significantly lower (p0.001) in cynomolgus monkeys from Mauritius when compared with those from Asia. Generally, only the antral mucosa of the stomach was infiltrated in cynomolgus monkeys from The Philippines, whereas both the fundic and antral regions were infiltrated in those from Vietnam. The digestive tract infiltration grade was strongly correlated with the mean white blood cell count in monkeys from all three sources. Spiral-shaped bacteria were observed in the stomach of monkeys from all three sources, but their presence did not correlate with the severity of the gastric infiltrate. Helicobacter heilmannii-type bacteria were almost always seen in the fundus, Helicobacter pylori-type bacteria were only occasionally seen in the antral region. The incidences of other microscopic findings, such as urothelial cytoplasmic inclusions or Balantidium coli in the caecum, also varied according to the source of the monkeys. Some variations in relative organ weights, haematology and serum biochemistry were also related to the origin of the monkeys, but these did not correlate with the microscopic findings. PMID:16984807

  10. Measurement of chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys using human-specific short tandem repeat-based assay.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Edip; Keary, Jodie M; Kurlander, Roger; Hale, Douglas A

    2005-01-27

    Preclinical testing of a mixed chimerism mediated organ transplant tolerance strategy, in a cynomolgus macaque model, would be facilitated by the establishment of a reliable technique for quantitative assessment of chimerism. Among various techniques used for measurement of chimerism in humans, microsatellite DNA profiling has been considered the most versatile one that can discriminate between two individuals. We adopted a commercially available short tandem repeat profiling methodology to cynomolgus monkeys using two human specific alleles, TPOX and CSF1PO. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify these alleles, and the analysis of the PCR products was performed by capillary electrophoresis. Of 54 cynomolgus macaques investigated, only one pair with the same ABO blood type demonstrated identity at both alleles. This implies that this technique should interfere minimally with the assignment of donor-recipient pairs based upon molecular tissue typing or mixed lymphocyte cultures.

  11. Depression and altered serum lipids in cynomolgus monkeys consuming a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Floyd H; Lee, Tammy C; Willard, Stephanie L; Ivester, Priscilla; Sergeant, Susan; Register, Thomas C; Shively, Carol A

    2011-08-01

    Research over the past 15 years has suggested a high comorbidity of depression and coronary heart disease (CHD). However the mechanisms responsible for this relationship are poorly understood. This study was designed to examine the relationships between depressive behaviors and concentrations of circulating lipids and lipid signaling molecules that may be common to both CHD and depression in a cohort of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) consuming a 'Western' diet, enriched with saturated fat and cholesterol. Socially-housed adult female cynomolgus monkeys (n=36) were fed the Western diet for 27 months and depressive behavior was recorded weekly. Body weight, body mass index and circulating cholesterol profiles were measured in all animals, and fatty acids (FA) and FA-based signaling molecules were measured in the 6 least and 6 most depressed monkeys. Monkeys consuming the Western diet exhibited a broad range of percent time spent in depressive behavior. The percent time spent depressed was positively correlated with total plasma and LDL cholesterol and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol. Despite being leaner, depressed monkeys had higher concentrations of monounsaturated fats (C16:1 and C17:1), a higher ω6/ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio and higher concentrations of omega-6 (ω6) PUFAs, particularly C18:2ω6 and C20:3ω6. FA ratios suggest that stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 activity was increased in depressed monkeys. Depressed female cynomolgus monkeys had elevated concentrations of serum lipids and lipid signaling molecules that are typically associated with obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease, which may account in part for the comorbidity of depression and CHD.

  12. The Complete Genome and Genetic Characteristics of SRV-4 Isolated from Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Zao, Chih-Ling; Armstrong, Karyn; Tomanek, Lisa; Cooke, Anthony; Berger, Ron; Estep, J. Scot; Marx, Preston A.; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Smith, David G.; Yee, JoAnn L.; Lerche, Nicholas W.

    2010-01-01

    At least 5 serotypes of exogenous simian retrovirus type D (SRV/D) have been found in nonhuman primates, but only SRV-1, 2 and 3 have been completely sequenced. SRV-4 was recovered once from cynomolgus macaques in California in 1984, but its genome sequences are unknown. Here we report the second identification of SRV-4 and its complete genome from infected cynomolgus macaques with Indochinese and Indonesian/Indochinese mixed ancestry. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that SRV-4 was distantly related to SRV-1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7. SRV/D-T, a new SRV/D recovered in 2005 from cynomolgus monkeys at Tsukuba Primate Center in Japan, clustered with the SRV-4 isolates from California and Texas and was shown to be another occurrence of SRV-4 infection. The repeated occurrence of SRV-4 in cynomolgus monkeys in different areas of the world and across 25 years suggests that this species is the natural host of SRV-4. PMID:20615522

  13. Differential Cellular Tropism of Lentivirus and Adeno-Associated Virus in the Brain of Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    An, Heeyoung; Cho, Doo-Wan; Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Young-Su

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers are using viruses to deliver genes of interest into the brains of laboratory animals. However, certain target brain cells are not easily infected by viruses. Moreover, the differential tropism of different viruses in monkey brain is not well established. We investigated the cellular tropism of lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) toward neuron and glia in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascularis). Lentivirus and AAV were injected into putamen of the monkey brain. One month after injection, monkeys were sacrificed, and then the presence of viral infection by expression of reporter fluorescence proteins was examined. Tissues were sectioned and stained with NeuN and GFAP antibodies for identifying neuronal cells or astrocytes, respectively, and viral reporter GFP-expressing cells were counted. We found that while lentivirus infected mostly astrocytes, AAV infected neurons at a higher rate than astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytes showed reactiveness when cells were infected by virus, likely due to virus-mediated neuroinflammation. The Sholl analysis was done to compare the hypertrophy of infected and uninfected astrocytes by virus. The lentivirus infected astrocytes showed negligible hypertrophy whereas AAV infected astrocytes showed significant changes in morphology, compared to uninfected astrocytes. In the brain of cynomolgus monkey, lentivirus shows tropism for astrocytes over neurons without much reactivity in astrocytes, whereas AAV shows tropism for neurons over glial cells with a significant reactivity in astrocytes. We conclude that AAV is best-suited for gene delivery to neurons, whereas lentivirus is the best choice for gene delivery to astrocytes in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:26924933

  14. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    CHU, Xun-Xun; Rizak, Joshua Dominic; YANG, Shang-Chuan; WANG, Jian-Hong; MA, Yuan-Ye; HU, Xin-Tian

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction—similar to humans—as well as much greater homology to

  15. A natural model of behavioral depression in postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chu, Xun-Xun; Dominic Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Hong; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2014-05-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a modified form of major depressive disorders (MDD) that can exert profound negative effects on both mothers and infants than MDD. Within the postpartum period, both mothers and infants are susceptible; but because PPD typically occurs for short durations and has moderate symptoms, there exists challenges in exploring and addressing the underlying cause of the depression. This fact highlights the need for relevant animal models. In the present study, postpartum adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) living in breeding groups were observed for typical depressive behavior. The huddle posture behavior was utilized as an indicator of behavioral depression postpartum (BDP) as it has been established as the core depressive-like behavior in primates. Monkeys were divided into two groups: A BDP group (n=6), which were found to spend more time huddling over the first two weeks postpartum than other individuals that formed a non-depression control group (n=4). The two groups were then further analyzed for locomotive activity, stressful events, hair cortisol levels and for maternal interactive behaviors. No differences were found between the BDP and control groups in locomotive activity, in the frequencies of stressful events experienced and in hair cortisol levels. These findings suggested that the postpartum depression witnessed in the monkeys was not related to external factors other than puerperium period. Interestingly, the BDP monkeys displayed an abnormal maternal relationship consisting of increased infant grooming. Taken together, these findings suggest that the adult female cynomolgus monkeys provide a natural model of behavioral postpartum depression that holds a number of advantages over commonly used rodent systems in PPD modeling. The cynomolgus monkeys have a highly-organized social hierarchy and reproductive characteristics without seasonal restriction-similar to humans-as well as much greater homology to humans

  16. Effect of new training technique on affinity of cynomolgus monkeys for animal care personnel.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Ai; Tachibana, Yuki; Takaura, Kaoru; Ochi, Takehiro; Koyama, Hironari

    2015-01-01

    To confirm our hypothesis that the sex and age of cynomolgus monkeys influences the effect of training, we employed a new training technique designed to increase the animal's affinity for animal care personnel. During 151 days of training, monkeys aged 2 to 10 years accepted each 3 raisins/3 times/day, and communicated with animal care personnel (5 times/day). Behavior was scored using integers between -1 and 5. Before training, 35 of the 61 monkeys refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (Score -1, 0 and 1). After training, 28 of these 35 monkeys (80%) accepted raisins offered directly by animal care personnel (>Score 2). The mean score of monkeys increased from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 4.3 ± 0.2. The minimum training period required for monkeys to reach Score 2 was longer for females than for males. After 151 days, 6 of the 31 females and 1 of the 30 males still refused raisins offered directly by animal care personnel. Beneficial effects of training were obtained in both young and adult monkeys. These results indicate that our new training technique markedly improves the affinity of monkeys for animal care personnel, and that these effects tend to vary by sex but not age. In addition, abnormal behavior and symptoms of monkeys were improved by this training.

  17. Reference values of clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) used in preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Kyu; Cho, Jae-Woo; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Park, Heejin; Han, Ji-Seok; Yang, Mi-Jin; Im, Wan-Jung; Park, Do-Yong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Han, Su-Cheol; Kim, Yong-Bum

    2016-06-01

    Nonhuman primates are increasingly used in biomedical research since they are highly homologous to humans compared to other rodent animals. However, there is limited reliable reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys, and in particular, only some coagulation and urinalysis parameters have been reported. Here, we reported the reference data of clinical chemical, hematological, blood coagulation, and urinalysis parameters in cynomolgus monkeys. The role of sex differences was analyzed and several parameters (including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cell, blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine kinase, gamma-glutamyl tranferase, and lactate dehydrogenase) significantly differed between male and female subjects. In addition, compared to previous study results, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase showed significant variation. Interstudy differences could be affected by several factors, including age, sex, geographic origin, presence/absence of anesthetics, fasting state, and the analytical methods used. Therefore, it is important to deliberate with the overall reference indices. In conclusion, the current study provides a comprehensive and updated reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys and provides improved assessment criteria for evaluating preclinical studies or biomedical research. PMID:27382375

  18. Sexual dimorphism of sulcal length asymmetry in the cerebrum of adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Imai, Noritaka; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    The present study aimed to quantitatively clarify the gross anatomical asymmetry and sexual dimorphism of the cerebral hemispheres of cynomolgus monkeys. While the fronto-occipital length of the right and left cerebral hemispheres was not different between sexes, a statistically significant rightward asymmetry was detected in the cerebral width at the perisylvian region in females, but not in males (narrower width of the left side in the females). An asymmetry quotient of the sulcal lengths revealed a rightward asymmetry in the inferior occipital sulcus and a leftward asymmetry in the central and intraparietal sulci in both sexes. However, the laterality of the lengths of other sulci was different for males and females. The arcuate sulcus was directed rightward in males but there was no rightward bias in females. Interestingly, the principle sulcus and lateral fissure were left-lateralized in the males, but right-lateralized in the females. The results suggest that lateralization patterns are regionally and sexually different in the cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys. The present results provide a reference for quantitatively evaluating the normality of the cerebral cortical morphology in cynomolgus monkeys.

  19. Reference values of clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) used in preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Kyu; Cho, Jae-Woo; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Park, Heejin; Han, Ji-Seok; Yang, Mi-Jin; Im, Wan-Jung; Park, Do-Yong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Han, Su-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are increasingly used in biomedical research since they are highly homologous to humans compared to other rodent animals. However, there is limited reliable reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys, and in particular, only some coagulation and urinalysis parameters have been reported. Here, we reported the reference data of clinical chemical, hematological, blood coagulation, and urinalysis parameters in cynomolgus monkeys. The role of sex differences was analyzed and several parameters (including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cell, blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine kinase, gamma-glutamyl tranferase, and lactate dehydrogenase) significantly differed between male and female subjects. In addition, compared to previous study results, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase showed significant variation. Interstudy differences could be affected by several factors, including age, sex, geographic origin, presence/absence of anesthetics, fasting state, and the analytical methods used. Therefore, it is important to deliberate with the overall reference indices. In conclusion, the current study provides a comprehensive and updated reference data of the clinical pathology parameters in cynomolgus monkeys and provides improved assessment criteria for evaluating preclinical studies or biomedical research. PMID:27382375

  20. Chronic lead exposure effects in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) testis.

    PubMed

    Foster, W G; Singh, A; McMahon, A; Rice, D C

    1998-01-01

    Although reproductive consequences of high circulating blood lead levels (> or = 60 micrograms/dL) have been reported, potential adverse effects of chronic lead exposure in males that result in low to moderate blood lead levels (10-25 and 26-60 micrograms/dL, respectively) are unknown. Effects of chronic lead exposure to testis ultrastructure were determined in the cynomolgus monkey after oral administration of lead acetate (1500 micrograms/kg BW/day) in a vehicle in the following groups: from birth to 10 years (lifetime), postnatal day 300 to 10 years (postinfancy), and postnatal day 0-400 (infancy); monkeys in the control group received only the vehicle (95% glycerol and 5% distilled water). At age 10 years, circulating lead concentrations in lifetime and postinfancy-dosed monkeys were approximately 35 micrograms/dL, and in control and infancy animals the concentrations were < 1.0 microgram/dL. Sertoli and spermatogenic cells of dosed monkeys from the infancy and lifetime groups revealed injuries. Chronic exposure to lead that results in moderate blood lead concentrations induced persistent ultrastructural alterations in the cynomolgus monkey testis. Results of this study on the primate, following extrapolation to humans, could influence further refining of the impact of environmental lead contamination concentrations vis-à-vis the health of children, adults, and aged human beings.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of methanol and formate in female cynomolgus monkeys exposed to methanol vapors.

    PubMed

    Medinsky, M A; Dorman, D C; Bond, J A; Moss, O R; Janszen, D B; Everitt, J I

    1997-06-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments contain mandates for reduced automotive emissions and add new requirements for the use of alternative fuels such as methanol to reduce certain automotive pollutants. Methanol is acutely toxic in humans at relatively low doses, and the potential for exposure to methanol will be increased if it is used in automotive fuel. Formate is the metabolite responsible for neurotoxic effects of acute methanol exposure. Since formate metabolism is dependent on folate, potentially sensitive folate-deficient subpopulations, such as pregnant women, may accumulate formate and be at higher risk from low-level methanol exposure. Our objective was to determine the pharmacokinetics of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in normal and folate-deficient monkeys after exposure to 14C-methanol vapors at environmentally relevant concentrations: below the threshold limit value (TLV), at the TLV of 200 parts per million (ppm), and above the TLV. Four normal adult female cynomolgus monkeys were individually anesthetized with isoflurane, and each was exposed by endotracheal intubation to 10, 45, 200, or 900 ppm 14C-methanol for 2 hours. Concentrations of the inhaled and exhaled 14C-methanol, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, exhaled 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2), and respiratory parameters were measured during exposure. After exposure, 14C-methanol and 14CO2 exhaled, 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate in blood were quantified. The amounts of exhaled 14C-methanol and 14CO2, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol and 14C-formate, and 14C-methanol and 14C-formate excreted in urine were linearly related to methanol exposure concentration. For all exposures, blood concentrations of 14C-methanol-derived formate were 10 to 1000 times lower than endogenous blood formate concentrations (100 to 200 mM) reported for monkeys and were several orders of magnitude lower than levels of formate known to be toxic. Since the

  2. Immunochemical detection of cytochrome P450 enzymes in liver microsomes of 27 cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Murayama, Norie; Nakanishi, Yasuharu; Zeldin, Darryl C; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2011-11-01

    The cynomolgus monkey is widely used as a primate model in preclinical studies because of its evolutionary closeness to humans. Despite their importance in drug metabolism, the content of each cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme has not been systematically determined in cynomolgus monkey livers. In this study, liver microsomes of 27 cynomolgus monkeys were analyzed by immunoblotting using selective P450 antibodies. The specificity of each antibody was confirmed by analyzing the cross-reactivity against 19 CYP1-3 subfamily enzymes using recombinant proteins. CYP2A, CYP2B6, CYP2C9/19, CYP2C76, CYP2D, CYP2E, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were detected in all 27 animals. In contrast, CYP1A, CYP1D, and CYP2J were below detectable levels in all liver samples. The average content of each P450 showed that among the P450s analyzed CYP3A (3A4 and 3A5) was the most abundant (40% of total immunoquantified P450), followed by CYP2A (25%), CYP2C (14%), CYP2B6 (13%), CYP2E1 (11%), and CYP2D (3%). No apparent sex differences were found for any P450. Interanimal variations ranged from 2.6-fold (CYP3A) to 11-fold (CYP2C9/19), and most P450s (CYP2A, CYP2D, CYP2E, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5) varied 3- to 4-fold. To examine the correlations of P450 content with enzyme activities, metabolic assays were performed in 27 cynomolgus monkey livers using 7-ethoxyresorufin, coumarin, pentoxyresorufin, flurbiprofen, bufuralol, dextromethorphan, and midazolam. CYP2D and CYP3A4 contents were significantly correlated with typical reactions of human CYP2D (bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation and dextromethorphan O-deethylation) and CYP3A (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation and 4-hydroxylation). The results presented in this study provide useful information for drug metabolism studies using cynomolgus monkeys.

  3. Postnatal change in sulcal length asymmetry in cerebrum of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Fukunishi, Katsuhiro; Noritaka, Imai; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Yoshihiro, Fukui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the timing of the onset of adult-type sulcal length asymmetry during postnatal development of the male cynomolgus monkey cerebrum. The monkey brain has already reached adult size by 3 months of age, although the body weight only represents 1/8 of the adult body weight by that time. The fronto-occipital length and the cerebral width also reached adult levels by that postnatal age with no left/right bias. Consistently, lengths of the major primary sulci reached adult levels by 3 months of age, and then decreased slightly in sexually mature monkeys (4-6.5 years of age). Asymmetry quotient analysis showed that sulcal length asymmetry patterns gradually changed during postnatal development. The male adult pattern of sulcal length asymmetry was acquired after 24 months of age. In particular, age-dependent rightward lateralization of the arcuate sulcal length was revealed during cerebral maturation by three-way ANOVA. The results suggest that the regional difference in cerebral maturation from adolescence to young adulthood modifies the sulcal morphology with characteristic asymmetric patterns in male cynomolgus monkeys.

  4. Normal Anatomy, Histology, and Spontaneous Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of the Cynomolgus Monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chamanza, Ronnie; Taylor, Ian; Gregori, Michela; Hill, Colin; Swan, Mark; Goodchild, Joel; Goodchild, Kane; Schofield, Jane; Aldous, Mark; Mowat, Vasanthi

    2016-07-01

    The evaluation of inhalation studies in monkeys is often hampered by the scarcity of published information on the relevant nasal anatomy and pathology. We examined nasal cavities of 114 control cynomolgus monkeys from 11 inhalation studies evaluated 2008 to 2013, in order to characterize and document the anatomic features and spontaneous pathology. Compared to other laboratory animals, the cynomolgus monkey has a relatively simple nose with 2 unbranched, dorsoventrally stacked turbinates, large maxillary sinuses, and a nasal septum that continues into the nasopharynx. The vomeronasal organ is absent, but nasopalatine ducts are present. Microscopically, the nasal epithelium is thicker than that in rodents, and the respiratory (RE) and transitional epithelium (TE) rest on a thick basal lamina. Generally, squamous epithelia and TE line the vestibule, RE, the main chamber and nasopharynx, olfactory epithelium, a small caudodorsal region, while TE is observed intermittently along the passages. Relatively high incidences of spontaneous pathology findings, some resembling induced lesions, were observed and included inflammation, luminal exudate, scabs, squamous and respiratory metaplasia or hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia/metaplasia, and olfactory degeneration. Regions of epithelial transition were the most affected. This information is considered helpful in the histopathology evaluation and interpretation of inhalation studies in monkeys.

  5. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  6. Occurrence of multinucleated hepatocytes in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) from different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Novilla, M N; Jackson, M K; Reim, D A; Jacobson, S B; Nagata, R A

    2014-11-01

    Multinucleated hepatocytes (MNHs) have been occasionally reported in macaques, as well as chimpanzees and gorillas, as an incidental finding. However, information is sparse on variations in incidence in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). A survey was conducted to assess the occurrence of MNHs in the liver of stock (nonstudy) animals from SNBL SRC (Alice, TX) and SNBL USA (Everett, WA) submitted for diagnostic purposes. A total of 215 cynomolgus monkeys originally from Cambodia (61), China (5), Indonesia (125), and Mauritius (24) were used for this investigation. From each animal, usually 2 liver samples were processed for histopathology with 2 sections in each slide. An MNH was defined as a hepatocyte with 3 or more nuclei. A threshold of 3 MNHs was selected for the Multinucleated Hepatocyte Grading System: 0 = not remarkable (≤3 MNHs counted from 2-4 liver sections), minimal = 4 to 15 MNHs, mild = 16 to 30 MNHs, moderate = 31 to 59 MNHs, and severe ≥60 MNHs. The incidence of MNHs was 60 of 86 (70%) in males and 72 of 129 (56%) in females for a total overall incidence of 132 of 215 animals (61%). Affected hepatocytes were frequently observed close to the capsule and generally had 3 to 8 nuclei per hepatocyte but as many as 15 occurred in a single cell. Awareness of the incidence of MNHs in cynomolgus monkeys is important for potential use as background data in preclinical safety and toxicity evaluation studies.

  7. Myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in Cynomolgus monkey model and its relationship to pharmacokinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aiming; Xie Shuilin; Sun He; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Wei Xiaoxiong; Dai Renke

    2009-03-15

    Fibrate drugs are PPAR{alpha} agonists prescribed for the treatment of dyslipidemia. Severe myotoxicity has been reportedly associated with their use albeit at a low frequency, especially for gemfibrozil. Few studies have investigated the mechanism of fibrate-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Considering the apparent species-related differences in PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced hepatotoxicity, we studied the myotoxicity of gemfibrozil in a Cynomolgus monkey model and explored the relationship between myotoxicity and pharmacokinetics. Six Cynomolgus monkeys were dosed with gemfibrozil twice daily at 600 mg/kg/day for the first two periods (P1 and P2, 8 days and 9 days respectively) and 300 mg/kg/day for the third period (P3, 14 days). Creatine kinase and myoglobin were measured, together with hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity markers. Behavioral responses were recorded for indication of toxicity. Pharmacokinetics was carried out following the 16th dosage of P1 and 17th dosage of P2 when myotoxicity was identified. Multivariable data analysis was employed to explore the relationship between pharmacokinetic parameters and myotoxicity markers. Consequently, myotoxicity occurred in monkey no. 2 (M2) and M6 in P1, M3 and M4 in P2, M3 and M6 in P3. Data analysis showed T80-150 (sustained time above the given concentration) contributed for myotoxicity discriminance and correlated with myotoxicity risk. This study revealed Cynomolgus monkey may be a good animal model for myotoxicity evaluation with sensitivity, reproducibility and similarities to humans. More interestingly, they exhibited a much higher incidence of myotoxicity than that of humans. Sustained high drug concentration plays an important role for the occurrence of myotoxicity. This may suggest an influence of drug transport and metabolism on myotoxicity.

  8. Effect of road transportation on the serum biochemical parameters of cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    OCHI, Takehiro; YAMADA, Azusa; NAGANUMA, Yuki; NISHINA, Noriko; KOYAMA, Hironari

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of long-distance (approximately 600 km) road transportation on the blood biochemistry of laboratory animals, we investigated the changes in serum biochemical parameters in healthy cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs transported by truck from Osaka to Tsukuba, Japan. The concentrations of serum cortisol, total bilirubin and aspartate aminotransferase in monkeys increased during transportation. Serum cortisol and total bilirubin levels in dogs also increased during transportation, but serum triglyceride decreased. Serum parameter values in truck-transported monkeys and dogs returned to baseline levels within two weeks following arrival. Taken together, these results suggest that a two-week acclimation period is the minimum duration required for adaptation following road transportation. PMID:26833142

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation for Substrate Selectivity of Cynomolgus Monkey Cytochrome P450 2C9, a New Efavirenz Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used as primate models in preclinical studies, because of their evolutionary closeness to humans. In humans, the cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C enzymes are important drug-metabolizing enzymes and highly expressed in livers. The CYP2C enzymes, including CYP2C9, are also expressed abundantly in cynomolgus monkey liver and metabolize some endogenous and exogenous substances like testosterone, S-mephenytoin, and diclofenac. However, comprehensive evaluation regarding substrate specificity of monkey CYP2C9 has not been conducted. In the present study, 89 commercially available drugs were examined to find potential monkey CYP2C9 substrates. Among the compounds screened, 20 drugs were metabolized by monkey CYP2C9 at a relatively high rates. Seventeen of these compounds were substrates or inhibitors of human CYP2C9 or CYP2C19, whereas three drugs were not, indicating that substrate specificity of monkey CYP2C9 resembled those of human CYP2C9 or CYP2C19, with some differences in substrate specificities. Although efavirenz is known as a marker substrate for human CYP2B6, efavirenz was not oxidized by CYP2B6 but by CYP2C9 in monkeys. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that monkey CYP2C9 and human CYP2B6 formed the same mono- and di-oxidized metabolites of efavirenz at 8 and 14 positions. These results suggest that the efavirenz 8-oxidation could be one of the selective markers for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C9 among the major three CYP2C enzymes tested. Therefore, monkey CYP2C9 has the possibility of contributing to limited specific differences in drug oxidative metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans. PMID:25948712

  10. Comprehensive Evaluation for Substrate Selectivity of Cynomolgus Monkey Cytochrome P450 2C9, a New Efavirenz Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used as primate models in preclinical studies, because of their evolutionary closeness to humans. In humans, the cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C enzymes are important drug-metabolizing enzymes and highly expressed in livers. The CYP2C enzymes, including CYP2C9, are also expressed abundantly in cynomolgus monkey liver and metabolize some endogenous and exogenous substances like testosterone, S-mephenytoin, and diclofenac. However, comprehensive evaluation regarding substrate specificity of monkey CYP2C9 has not been conducted. In the present study, 89 commercially available drugs were examined to find potential monkey CYP2C9 substrates. Among the compounds screened, 20 drugs were metabolized by monkey CYP2C9 at a relatively high rates. Seventeen of these compounds were substrates or inhibitors of human CYP2C9 or CYP2C19, whereas three drugs were not, indicating that substrate specificity of monkey CYP2C9 resembled those of human CYP2C9 or CYP2C19, with some differences in substrate specificities. Although efavirenz is known as a marker substrate for human CYP2B6, efavirenz was not oxidized by CYP2B6 but by CYP2C9 in monkeys. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed that monkey CYP2C9 and human CYP2B6 formed the same mono- and di-oxidized metabolites of efavirenz at 8 and 14 positions. These results suggest that the efavirenz 8-oxidation could be one of the selective markers for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C9 among the major three CYP2C enzymes tested. Therefore, monkey CYP2C9 has the possibility of contributing to limited specific differences in drug oxidative metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans.

  11. Pregnancy zone protein analogue in pregnant and non-pregnant primates, and its decrease during pregnancy in some monkey species.

    PubMed

    Lin, T M; Halbert, S P; Plasencia, R

    1976-12-01

    Rabbit antiserum to human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) cross-reacted with analogous proteins in several species of primates. The chimpanzee PZP showed reactions of identity with human PZP, while the PZP analogue in the orangutan, in four species of old world monkeys (pig-tailed, rhesus, cynomolgus and stump-tailed) and in a species of new world monkey (squirrel) showed equivalent reactions of partial identity with human PZP. In the chimpanzee and orangutan, the PZP analogue was present in low concentrations in non-pregnant animals, but as in the human, it increased quite appreciably during gestation. In the chimpanzee, this increase in pregnancy was about four-fold greater than in the human. In sharp contrast, in the old and new world monkeys, the PZP analogue was present in much higher concentrations in non-pregnant animals than it is in humans. In addition, during pregnancy the PZP analogue in these monkey species actually decreased during pregnancy. In the few cases studied, normal levels were regained about 1 month after delivery. A normal plasma protein, alpha2-macroglobin, was also studied in these primate species, because this protein shares some characteristics with PZP. Analogous alpha2-macroglobulin serum proteins were found in all the primates tested, but the observed gel diffusion identity patterns suggested that this protein was phylogenetically older than PZP. alpha2-macroglobulin increased slightly during human pregnancy, but in all the other primates studied, the alpha-macroglobulin analogue was either unchanged or slightly decreased during gestation.

  12. Gustatory responses in the nucleus tractus solitarius of the alert cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Scott, T R; Yaxley, S; Sienkiewicz, Z J; Rolls, E T

    1986-01-01

    Multiunit and single neuron responses to taste stimuli in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of alert cynomolgus monkeys were analyzed. Intensity-response functions, including neural thresholds to glucose and quinine HCl, agreed well with psychophysical reports, implying that the cynomolgus monkey and human share the same dynamic range of sensitivity to prototypical taste stimuli. The NTS is chemotopically organized: neurons most responsive to HCl are more common in the posterior gustatory area, whereas those most responsive to glucose and NaCl are located in the anterior NTS. Responsiveness to quinine is more widely distributed but tends toward the anterior. Efforts were made to determine if neurons could be divided into a discrete number of types, as determined by their sensitivities to the prototypical stimuli. The clearest distinction was between those that did or did not respond well to HCl. Beyond this, neuronal categories were not obvious. Individual neurons were quite broadly sensitive to our stimulus array, so that, for the typical NTS cell, no one of the four prototypes evoked a majority of the discharges. This extreme breadth of tuning suggests that taste-quality information in the monkey might be incorporated in relative discharge rates across the neuron population. Correlations among patterns of activity to the four prototypical stimuli indicated that only HCl and quinine HCl have closely related taste qualities.

  13. Hormone therapy effects on social behavior and activity levels of surgically postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Wood, Charles E; Register, Thomas C; Willard, Stephanie L; Lees, Cynthia J; Chen, Haiying; Sitruk-Ware, Regine L; Tsong, Yun-Yen; Cline, J Mark

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments reported here was to investigate central nervous system effects of commonly prescribed postmenopausal hormone therapies in a primate model, the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). The results of two experiments are reported. In the first, ovariectomized adult cynomolgus monkeys were treated for eight weeks each with oral micronized 17beta-estradiol (E2) (n=23), E2+medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) (n=23), E2+progesterone (P4) (n=23), and placebo (n=23) using a crossover design. In the second, ovariectomized adult cynomolgus monkeys were treated for eight weeks with oral micronized E2+oral micronized P4 (n=10), or E2+intravaginal micronized P4 delivered via a Silastic ring (n=8), or oral placebo and intravaginal placebo (n=5), using a parallel arm design. Behavior was recorded during weeks two through four. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood were sampled, and 24h heart rate recorded by telemetry during weeks five through seven. Monoaminergic metabolites were assayed in CSF, and cortisol was assayed in serum. There were no significant effects of treatment on CSF monoaminergic metabolites or heart rate. E2+MPA increased cortisol concentrations. While there were some differences in effects between experiments, both progestogens and both routes of administration increased time spent resting, particularly resting in body contact, resulting in increased passive affiliative interaction. Thus, synthetic progestogens appear to be as sedating as progesterone, and the ring delivery system does not appear to protect the central nervous system from effects of progestogens. Further research is needed to explore social context as an important feature of behavioral response to steroid hormone regimens and to verify and extend knowledge of systemic effects of vaginal ring-delivered progestogens.

  14. Effects of the inhibition of intestinal P-glycoprotein on aliskiren pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tsukimoto, Mikiko; Ohashi, Rikiya; Torimoto, Nao; Togo, Yoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Maeda, Toshio; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Aliskiren is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and is metabolized via cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). The aim of the present study was to assess whether P-gp influenced the pharmacokinetics of aliskiren and also if drug-drug interactions (DDIs) mediated through P-gp could be reproduced in cynomolgus monkeys. The study investigated the pharmacokinetics of aliskiren in mdr1a/1b gene-deficient (P-gp KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) following the oral administration of aliskiren was 6.9-fold higher in P-gp KO mice than in WT mice, while no significant differences were observed in the AUC or total plasma clearance following the intravenous administration of aliskiren to P-gp KO mice. Then the pharmacokinetics of aliskiren were evaluated and DDIs between aliskiren and P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and zosuquidar, examined in cynomolgus monkeys. The AUC for aliskiren were 8.3- and 42.1-fold higher after the oral administration of aliskiren with the concomitant oral administration of zosuquidar and CsA at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. In contrast, the AUC after the intravenous and oral administration of aliskiren was not significantly affected by the oral administration of zosuquidar or intravenous administration of CsA, respectively. These results indicated that P-gp strictly limited the intestinal absorption of aliskiren in mice and monkeys, and also that the effects of intestinal P-gp inhibition by CsA or zosuquidar on the pharmacokinetics of aliskiren were sensitively reproduced in monkeys. In conclusion, aliskiren can be used as a sensitive substrate to evaluate intestinal P-gp inhibition in monkeys.

  15. In vivo individual variations in pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for cytochrome P450 2C9.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Kitsugi, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kanami; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are used frequently in preclinical studies for new drug development due to their evolutionary closeness to humans. An antiretroviral drug, efavirenz, is a typical probe substrate for human cytochrome P450 (P450) 2B6, but is mainly metabolized by cynomolgus monkey P450 2C9. In this study, plasma concentrations of efavirenz were assessed in six cynomolgus monkeys genotyped for P450 2C9 c.334 A > C (I112L) (three wild-type, one heterozygote and two homozygotes) by high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. After intravenous administration at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, biphasic plasma elimination curves of efavirenz were seen in these cynomolgus monkeys. The mean plasma concentration of the primary metabolite 8-hydroxyefavirenz (1 h after treatment, with hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase) in the wild-type group was significantly higher (4.0-fold) than the combined heterozygous and homozygous group mean. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve value of efavirenz in the homozygous group after oral administration at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg was significantly higher (2.0-fold) than the combined wild-type and heterozygous group. These results collectively indicated that P450 2C9 c.334 A > C (I112L) variation was associated with efavirenz metabolic clearance in vivo. Cynomolgus P450 2C9 polymorphism might account for interindividual variations of efavirenz metabolism in cynomolgus monkeys. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27417918

  16. Behavioral and neurobiological characteristics influencing social hierarchy formation in female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Riddick, N V; Czoty, P W; Gage, H D; Kaplan, J R; Nader, S H; Icenhower, M; Pierre, P J; Bennett, A; Garg, P K; Garg, S; Nader, M A

    2009-02-18

    Socially housed monkeys have been used as a model to study human diseases. The present study examined behavioral, physiological and neurochemical measures as predictors of social rank in 16 experimentally naïve, individually housed female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). The two behavioral measures examined were novel object reactivity (NOR), as determined by latency to touch an opaque acrylic box placed in the home cage, and locomotor activity assessed in a novel open-field apparatus. Serum cortisol concentrations were evaluated three times per week for four consecutive weeks, and stress reactivity was assessed on one occasion by evaluating the cortisol response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) following dexamethasone suppression. Measures of serotonin (5-HT) function included whole blood 5-HT (WBS) concentrations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the 5-HT metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and brain 5-HT transporter (SERT) availability obtained using positron emission tomography (PET). After baseline measures were obtained, monkeys were assigned to four social groups of four monkeys per group. The two measures that correlated with eventual social rank were CSF 5-HIAA concentrations, which were significantly higher in the animals who eventually became subordinate, and latency to touch the novel object, which was significantly lower in eventual subordinate monkeys. Measures of 5-HT function did not change as a consequence of social rank. These data suggest that levels of central 5-HIAA and measures of novel object reactivity may be trait markers that influence eventual social rank in female macaques. PMID:19059311

  17. Scrub typhus vaccine candidate Kp r56 induces humoral and cellular immune responses in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Chan, Teik-Chye; Manetz, T Scott; Chao, Chien-Chung; Ching, Wei-Mei; Richards, Allen L

    2005-08-01

    A truncated recombinant 56-kDa outer membrane protein of the Karp strain of Orientia tsutsugamushi (Kp r56) was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for immunogenicity and safety as a vaccine candidate for the prevention of scrub typhus. This recombinant antigen induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses in two monkeys and was found to be well tolerated. Antigen-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG were produced to almost maximal levels within 1 week of a single immunization. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from vaccinated animals showed an induction of antigen-specific proliferation and gamma interferon production. The Kp r56 was not as efficient as infection with live organisms in preventing reinfection but was able to reduce the inflammation produced at the site of challenge. This report describes the results of the first systematic study of the immunogenicity of a recombinant scrub typhus vaccine candidate in a nonhuman primate model.

  18. Similar substrate specificity of cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C19 to reported human P450 2C counterpart enzymes by evaluation of 89 drug clearances.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are used widely in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. The amino acid sequence of cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) 2C19 is reportedly highly correlated to that of human CYP2C19 (92%) and CYP2C9 (93%). In the present study, 89 commercially available compounds were screened to find potential substrates for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19. Of 89 drugs, 34 were metabolically depleted by cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 with relatively high rates. Among them, 30 compounds have been reported as substrates or inhibitors of, either or both, human CYP2C19 and CYP2C9. Several compounds, including loratadine, showed high selectivity to cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19, and all of these have been reported as human CYP2C19 and/or CYP2C9 substrates. In addition, cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 formed the same loratadine metabolite as human CYP2C19, descarboethoxyloratadine. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 is generally similar to human CYP2C19 and CYP2C9 in its substrate recognition functionality.

  19. In vivo dosimetry of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Couch, R; Ehrenberg, L; Magnusson, A L; Nilsson, R; de la Rosa, M E; Törnqvist, M

    1996-10-25

    In mammals, including the cynomolgus monkey, a striking difference between the potencies of ethylene oxide (EO)* and propylene oxide (PO) with respect to induction of certain clastogenic effects has previously been observed. In order to clarify to what extent such differences can be ascribed to a difference in detoxification rate, cynomolgus monkeys were administered an equimolar mixture of the two epoxides at two dose levels, and the blood doses were determined by measurement of the degree of alkylation of N-terminal valines in hemoglobin (Hb). For the highest exposure a saturation in the detoxification of PO was evident from a marked increase in adduct level. At the lower exposure, the dose in blood resulting from exposure to PO was about one fourth of that from EO. Although playing a great role, differences in detoxification rate, therefore, cannot fully account for the much lower clastogenic potency of PO, which has been found in earlier studies. Furthermore, the determination of doses in blood gives data on relationship between in vivo dose and exposure dose (accounting for detoxification), with relevance for risk estimation. PMID:8876676

  20. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of approximately 64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  1. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L.; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2008-01-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of ≈64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  2. TALEN-based generation of a cynomolgus monkey disease model for human microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Ke, Qiong; Li, Weiqiang; Lai, Xingqiang; Chen, Hong; Huang, Lihua; Kang, Zhuang; Li, Kai; Ren, Jie; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Haiqing; Huang, Weijun; Ma, Yunhan; Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Zheng; Song, Xinming; Lin, Xinyi; Zhuang, Min; Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Mao, Frank Fuxiang; Xia, Huimin; Lahn, Bruce T; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Shihua; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2016-09-01

    Gene editing in non-human primates may lead to valuable models for exploring the etiologies and therapeutic strategies of genetically based neurological disorders in humans. However, a monkey model of neurological disorders that closely mimics pathological and behavioral deficits in humans has not yet been successfully generated. Microcephalin 1 (MCPH1) is implicated in the evolution of the human brain, and MCPH1 mutation causes microcephaly accompanied by mental retardation. Here we generated a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) carrying biallelic MCPH1 mutations using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. The monkey recapitulated most of the important clinical features observed in patients, including marked reductions in head circumference, premature chromosome condensation (PCC), hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and upper limb spasticity. Moreover, overexpression of MCPH1 in mutated dermal fibroblasts rescued the PCC syndrome. This monkey model may help us elucidate the role of MCPH1 in the pathogenesis of human microcephaly and better understand the function of this protein in the evolution of primate brain size.

  3. Temperature-sensitive mutants of enterovirus 71 show attenuation in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2005-05-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease and is sometimes associated with serious neurological disorders. In this study, an attempt was made to identify molecular determinants of EV71 attenuation of neurovirulence in a monkey infection model. An infectious cDNA clone of the virulent strain of EV71 prototype BrCr was constructed; temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations of an attenuated strain of EV71 or of poliovirus (PV) Sabin vaccine strains were then introduced into the infectious clone. In vitro and in vivo phenotypes of the parental and mutant viruses were analysed in cultured cells and in cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Mutations in 3D polymerase (3D(pol)) and in the 3' non-translated region (NTR), corresponding to ts determinants of Sabin 1, conferred distinct temperature sensitivity to EV71. An EV71 mutant [EV71(S1-3')] carrying mutations in the 5' NTR, 3D(pol) and in the 3' NTR showed attenuated neurovirulence, resulting in limited spread of virus in the central nervous system of monkeys. These results indicate that EV71 and PV1 share common genetic determinants of neurovirulence in monkeys, despite the distinct properties in their original pathogenesis.

  4. TALEN-based generation of a cynomolgus monkey disease model for human microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Ke, Qiong; Li, Weiqiang; Lai, Xingqiang; Chen, Hong; Huang, Lihua; Kang, Zhuang; Li, Kai; Ren, Jie; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Haiqing; Huang, Weijun; Ma, Yunhan; Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Zheng; Song, Xinming; Lin, Xinyi; Zhuang, Min; Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Mao, Frank Fuxiang; Xia, Huimin; Lahn, Bruce T; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Shihua; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2016-09-01

    Gene editing in non-human primates may lead to valuable models for exploring the etiologies and therapeutic strategies of genetically based neurological disorders in humans. However, a monkey model of neurological disorders that closely mimics pathological and behavioral deficits in humans has not yet been successfully generated. Microcephalin 1 (MCPH1) is implicated in the evolution of the human brain, and MCPH1 mutation causes microcephaly accompanied by mental retardation. Here we generated a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) carrying biallelic MCPH1 mutations using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. The monkey recapitulated most of the important clinical features observed in patients, including marked reductions in head circumference, premature chromosome condensation (PCC), hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and upper limb spasticity. Moreover, overexpression of MCPH1 in mutated dermal fibroblasts rescued the PCC syndrome. This monkey model may help us elucidate the role of MCPH1 in the pathogenesis of human microcephaly and better understand the function of this protein in the evolution of primate brain size. PMID:27502025

  5. Defined tuberculosis vaccine, Mtb72F/AS02A, evidence of protection in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.; Dalemans, Wilfried; Tan, Esterlina V.; DeLa Cruz, Eduardo C.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Orme, Ian M.; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Alderson, Mark R.; Cowgill, Karen D.; Prieels, Jean-Paul; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Dubois, Marie-Claude; Cohen, Joe; Mettens, Pascal; Lobet, Yves

    2009-01-01

    The development of a vaccine for tuberculosis requires a combination of antigens and adjuvants capable of inducing appropriate and long-lasting T cell immunity. We evaluated Mtb72F formulated in AS02A in the cynomolgus monkey model. The vaccine was immunogenic and caused no adverse reactions. When monkeys were immunized with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) and then boosted with Mtb72F in AS02A, protection superior to that afforded by using BCG alone was achieved, as measured by clinical parameters, pathology, and survival. We observed long-term survival and evidence of reversal of disease progression in monkeys immunized with the prime-boost regimen. Antigen-specific responses from protected monkeys receiving BCG and Mtb72F/AS02A had a distinctive cytokine profile characterized by an increased ratio between 3 Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2 and an innate cytokine, IL-6. To our knowledge, this is an initial report of a vaccine capable of inducing long-term protection against tuberculosis in a nonhuman primate model, as determined by protection against severe disease and death, and by other clinical and histopathological parameters. PMID:19188599

  6. TALEN-based generation of a cynomolgus monkey disease model for human microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Qiong; Li, Weiqiang; Lai, Xingqiang; Chen, Hong; Huang, Lihua; Kang, Zhuang; Li, Kai; Ren, Jie; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Haiqing; Huang, Weijun; Ma, Yunhan; Xu, Dongdong; Chen, Zheng; Song, Xinming; Lin, Xinyi; Zhuang, Min; Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Mao, Frank Fuxiang; Xia, Huimin; Lahn, Bruce T; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Shihua; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing in non-human primates may lead to valuable models for exploring the etiologies and therapeutic strategies of genetically based neurological disorders in humans. However, a monkey model of neurological disorders that closely mimics pathological and behavioral deficits in humans has not yet been successfully generated. Microcephalin 1 (MCPH1) is implicated in the evolution of the human brain, and MCPH1 mutation causes microcephaly accompanied by mental retardation. Here we generated a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) carrying biallelic MCPH1 mutations using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. The monkey recapitulated most of the important clinical features observed in patients, including marked reductions in head circumference, premature chromosome condensation (PCC), hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and upper limb spasticity. Moreover, overexpression of MCPH1 in mutated dermal fibroblasts rescued the PCC syndrome. This monkey model may help us elucidate the role of MCPH1 in the pathogenesis of human microcephaly and better understand the function of this protein in the evolution of primate brain size. PMID:27502025

  7. Pancreatic islet transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys. Initial studies and evidence that cyclosporine impairs glucose tolerance in normal monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stegall, M D; Chabot, J; Weber, C; Reemtsma, K; Hardy, M A

    1989-12-01

    Using a model of streptozotocin-induced, ketosis-prone, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in the cynomolgus monkey, we performed 11 intraportal transplants of collagenase-digested, Ficoll-purified pancreatic islets (9 ABO-compatible allografts and 2 concordant baboon xenografts). Islets were pretreated with ultraviolet-B irradiation and recipients received cyclosporine A immunosuppression. Two grafts never functioned, five grafts showed evidence of partial function, and four grafts (three allografts and one xenograft) showed evidence of good function, with the animals independent of exogenous insulin with morning fasting blood glucose levels less than 200 mg/dl. Because two grafts functioned only after CsA was either tapered or discontinued, we performed a related study that showed that therapeutic doses of CsA (morning trough serum level 150-250 ng/ml) impaired intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) of normal monkeys and may contributed to graft dysfunction in our islet transplantation model. The results show that there is a decrease in release of serum insulin during an IVGTT leading to impairment of glucose utilization, while serum glucagon remains unaffected. After cessation of CsA, the IVGTT did not return to normal for 28 days. Oral glucose tolerance tests were unaffected in CsA-treated monkeys. These initial studies show that the streptozotocin-diabetic monkey is a valuable model to study IDDM and islet transplantation in nonhuman primates. We also confirm studies in rodents, dogs, and sheep by showing that CsA partially inhibits beta cell function in normal monkeys.

  8. Metabolic fate and pharmacokinetics of the acyclovir prodrug valaciclovir in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Burnette, T C

    1994-01-01

    Valaciclovir, the L-valyl ester of acyclovir (ZOVIRAX), demonstrated good oral absorption and nearly complete conversion to acyclovir in cynomolgus monkeys, indicating its suitability as an orally administered prodrug. The major urinary metabolites of [8-14C]valaciclovir, administered orally (10 and 25 mg/kg) or intravenously (10 mg/kg) to male monkeys, were acyclovir (46%-59% of urinary radioactivity), 8-hydroxyacyclovir (25%-30%), and 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine (CMMG) (11%-12%). Following oral and intravenous dosing, intact prodrug accounted for only 0.5% and 6% of urinary radioactivity, respectively. Dose-independent kinetics were observed for acyclovir derived from orally administered [8-14C]valaciclovir at the 10 and 25 mg/kg dose levels, with both AUC (24 and 60 microM.hr, respectively) and Cmax (8 and 23 microM, respectively) increasing nearly in proportion to the dose. Acyclovir was present in plasma at all sampling times (5 min to 7 hr postdose) after both oral doses, whereas the prodrug was not detected following either oral dose. The elimination of acyclovir after oral administration was monophasic, with an apparent half-life of 1.3-1.5 hr. Similar to acyclovir, both 8-hydroxyacyclovir and CMMG demonstrated dose-independent kinetics with apparent elimination half-lives of 1-1.6 hr. Intravenously administered [8-14C]valaciclovir (10 mg/kg) was rapidly converted to acyclovir, with the elimination half-life of acyclovir (0.9 hr) being 1.5-fold that of the prodrug (0.6 hr). The oral bioavailability of acyclovir derived from valaciclovir in cynomolgus monkey was 67 +/- 13%, representing a significant improvement over the limited bioavailability after acyclovir administration to primates.

  9. Development of interspecies cloned embryos reconstructed with rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) oocytes and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) fibroblast cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Yamochi, Takayuki; Kida, Yuta; Oh, Noriyoshi; Ohta, Sei; Amano, Tomoko; Anzai, Masayuki; Kato, Hiromi; Kishigami, Satoshi; Mitani, Tasuku; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Saeki, Kazuhiro; Takenoshita, Makoto; Iritani, Akira; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    2013-11-01

    Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (ISCNT) has been proposed as a technique to produce cloned offspring of endangered species as well as to investigate nucleus-cytoplasm interactions in mammalian embryo. However, it is still not known which embryo culture medium is optimal for ISCNT embryos for the nuclear donor or the oocyte recipient. We assessed the effects of the culture medium on the developmental competence of the ISCNT embryos by introducing cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) fibroblast nuclei into enucleated rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) oocytes (monkey-rabbit embryo). The monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos that were cultured in mCMRL-1066 developed to the blastocyst stage, although all monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos cultured in M199 were arrested by the 4-cell stage. When monkey-rabbit ISCNT and rabbit-rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos were cultured in mCMRL-1066, the blastocyst cell numbers of the monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos corresponded to the cell numbers of the control rabbit-rabbit SCNT embryos, which were produced from a rabbit fibroblast nucleus and an enucleated rabbit oocyte. In addition, the presence of mitochondria, which were introduced with monkey fibroblasts into rabbit recipient cytoplasm, was confirmed up to the blastocyst stage by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This study demonstrated that: (1) rabbit oocytes can reprogramme cynomolgus monkey somatic cell nuclei, and support preimplantation development; (2) monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos developed well in monkey culture medium at early embryonic developmental stages; (3) the cell number of monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos is similar to that of rabbit-rabbit SCNT embryos; and (4) the mitochondrial fate of monkey-rabbit ISCNT embryos is heteroplasmic from the time just after injection to the blastocyst stage that has roots in both rabbit oocytes and monkey fibroblasts.

  10. Neurovirulence in cynomolgus monkeys of enterovirus 71 isolated from a patient with hand, foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, I; Hagiwara, A; Kodama, H

    1978-01-01

    Six cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated subcutaneously with enteroviurs 71 (E71), isolated from the stools of a patient with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Clinical symptoms were observed in three of the six monkeys. One monkey showed complete paralysis of the lower extremities and two animals showed weakness in the hind limbs 4 to 7 days after inoculation. Lesions were found in the central nervous system (CNS) of all monkeys. Mild to moderate vascular lesions, perivascular cuffings, degeneration and disappearance of the neurons and meningial lymphocytic infiltration were observed in the grey and/or white matter of the spinal cord, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex and brain stem. No virus was recovered from the CNS or liver of any of the six monkeys. However, serum neutralizing antibody titers had risen in monkeys inoculated with E71. PMID:205198

  11. Effect of Soy Isoflavones on Thyroid Hormones in Intact and Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Marnie G.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Appt, Susan E.; Register, Thomas C.; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Soy isoflavones are commonly used to alleviate menopause-related symptoms. Menopausal women are at an increased risk for hypothyroidism and there are concerns that isoflavones may be detrimental to thyroid health. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of soy protein and isoflavones on thyroid function and the relationship between thyroid and ovarian function. Methods Adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to consume two diets differing only in protein source: casein-lactalbumin (n = 44) or soy protein with isoflavones (n = 41). After 34 months all animals were ovariectomized via laparotomy. Half of the monkeys from each diet treatment group continued to consume their Pre-Ovariectomy treatment phase diet (either SOY [n = 19] or CL [n = 21]) for an additional 34 months. The remaining animals did not continue their diets, and thus were not considered further. Circulating progesterone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone were measured at baseline. Thyroid hormones were remeasured during each treatment phase. Results Dietary soy increased triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevented a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause (both p’s < 0.05). Mean progesterone concentrations were positively correlated with triiodothyronine at baseline in pre-ovariectomized monkeys (p < 0.01). Conclusions Progesterone levels and triiodothyronine are positively correlated in macaques. Dietary soy increases triiodothyronine in pre-ovariectomized monkeys and prevents a decline in thyroxine following surgical menopause. The outcomes observed in this study suggest soy protein and isoflavone consumption does not adversely affect and may even preserve thyroid function in postmenopausal women. PMID:24618766

  12. Social stress-associated depression in adult female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Friedman, David P; Morgan, Timothy M; Thompson, Jalonda; Lanier, Tasha

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes a behavior pattern in adult female cynomolgus monkeys that has several behavioral and physiological characteristics in common with human depression including reduced body fat, low levels of activity, high heart rate, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbances, and increased mortality. Under certain circumstances, this depressive behavior appears more common in socially stressed subordinate, than dominant, females. This is the first animal model of social stress-related depression in females and the first primate model of adult depression. It is important to have a female animal model of depression because women are more likely to experience a clinically significant depression than men, and depression in women is often associated with changes in reproductive system function. This model is particularly useful because these monkeys have menstrual cycles that are similar to those of women, and those that exhibit depressive behavior have relatively low levels of ovarian steroids. These monkeys may be a useful model of reproductive system-associated mood disorders in females.

  13. Pathogenesis of fulminant monkeypox with bacterial sepsis after experimental infection with West African monkeypox virus in a cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyo; Saijo, Masayuki; Kataoka, Michiyo; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Sato, Yuko; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Ogata, Momoko; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Sata, Tetsutaro; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of severe human monkeypox, which causes systemic and fulminant infections, is not clear. This study presents a case repot of fulminant monkeypox with bacterial sepsis after experimental infection with monkeypox virus in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). In our previous study (Saijo et al., 2009, J Gen Virol), two cynomolgus monkeys became moribund after experimental infection with monkeypox virus Liberia strain, West African strain. One exhibited typical monkeypox-related papulovesicular lesions. The other monkey presented fulminant clinical symptoms with a characteristic flat red rash similar to that found in smallpox, which is associated with extremely high fatality rates. In this study, we found that the monkey with flat red rash had high levels of viremia and neutropenia, as well as high plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared with the other monkey. Monkeypox virus replicates in epithelial cells and macrophages in various organs. Sepsis due to Gram-positive cocci was confirmed histopathologically in the monkey with flat red rash. The lack of inflammatory response in the lesion suggested that the monkey with sepsis experienced strong immune suppression during the viral infection. The neutropenia and excessive inflammatory cytokine responses indicate that neutrophils play key roles in the pathogenesis of systemic and fulminant human monkeypox virus infections with sepsis.

  14. Neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ide, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Akiko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Okazaki, Takanobu; Kobayashi, Kinji; Nakatsuji, Shunji; Matsumoto, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A male cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) of 5 years and 11 months of age from the vehicle control group of a 4-week repeated oral dose toxicity study had a spontaneously occurring mass lesion directly attached to the proximal part of the left trigeminal nerve. Histologically, the mass was characterized by a multifocal nodular appearance. Nodular zones showed low to moderate cellularity and were composed of small round cells exhibiting nuclear uniformity. On the other hand, inter-nodular zones were composed of nerve fiber containing septa and closely aggregated highly pleomorphic cells. Immunohistochemically, the small round cells were strongly immunopositive for synaptophysin, neuN, and class III beta-tubulin, while the highly pleomorphic cells were weakly immunopositive for neuN and occasionally immunopositive for class III beta-tubulin and doublecortin, suggesting that the tumor had originated from a neuronal lineage cell. Based on these findings, the mass was diagnosed as a neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve. PMID:27559245

  15. Neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve in a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Akiko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K.; Okazaki, Takanobu; Kobayashi, Kinji; Nakatsuji, Shunji; Matsumoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A male cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) of 5 years and 11 months of age from the vehicle control group of a 4-week repeated oral dose toxicity study had a spontaneously occurring mass lesion directly attached to the proximal part of the left trigeminal nerve. Histologically, the mass was characterized by a multifocal nodular appearance. Nodular zones showed low to moderate cellularity and were composed of small round cells exhibiting nuclear uniformity. On the other hand, inter-nodular zones were composed of nerve fiber containing septa and closely aggregated highly pleomorphic cells. Immunohistochemically, the small round cells were strongly immunopositive for synaptophysin, neuN, and class III beta-tubulin, while the highly pleomorphic cells were weakly immunopositive for neuN and occasionally immunopositive for class III beta-tubulin and doublecortin, suggesting that the tumor had originated from a neuronal lineage cell. Based on these findings, the mass was diagnosed as a neuroblastoma at the trigeminal nerve. PMID:27559245

  16. Carbon monoxide absorption through the oral and nasal mucosae of cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfisch, W.H.; Hoop, K.A.

    1980-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that blood levels of carbon monoxide increase during cigarette smoking. It has genrally been assumed that increases in blood levels of carbon monoxide could be interpreted as evidence that deep lung penetration of cigarette smoke had occurred. This study was designed to examine whether increased blood levels of carbon monoxide could result from absorption in the nasal and oral cavitites. The nasal and oral cavities of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed, independently of the lungs, to cigarette smoke under rigorous smoking conditions. Pre- and post-exposure blood levels of carbon monoxide were measured. As a positive control, similar volumes of cigarette smoke were passed directly into the lungs, thus bypassing the oral and nasal cavities, and blood levels of carbon monoxide were again measured. The results inidcate that absorption of carbon monoxide in the oral and nasal cavities is negligible under the heavy smoking regimen employed here, and hence, would be negligible under normal smoking conditions.

  17. Correlation between Presence of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in Heart Tissue of Baboons and Cynomolgus Monkeys, and Lymphocytic Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mubiru, James N.; Yang, Alice; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael; Sharp, R. Mark; VandeBerg, Jane F.; Shade, Robert E.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, preferentially infects cardiac and digestive tissues. Baboons living in Texas (Papio hamadryas) and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) have been reported to be infected naturally with T. cruzi. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed cases of animals that were diagnosed with lymphocytic myocarditis and used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method (S36/S35 primer set) to amplify T. cruzi DNA from archived frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cardiac tissues. We show that the PCR method is applicable in archived frozen and FFPE tissues and the sensitivity is in the femtogram range. A positive correlation between PCR positivity and lymphocytic myocarditis in both baboons and cynomolgus monkeys is shown. We also show epicarditis as a common finding in animals infected with T. cruzi. PMID:24567317

  18. A Naturally Occurring Outbreak of Tuberculosis in a Group of Imported Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Panarella, Matthew L; Bimes, Randy S

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis of tuberculosis (caused primarily by Mycobacterium bovis) in a group of newly imported Chinese origin cynomolgus monkeys. We also describe the use of sedation to enhance the accuracy of evaluation of the intrapalpebral tuberculin skin test using the mammalian old tuberculin reagent and report the first known diagnosis of Mycobacterium paraffinicum in a nonhuman primate. By 48 h after injection during the second tuberculin skin test, 6 of the 80 macaques had developed eyelid reactions ranging from mild (grade 1) to severe (grade 4). Given the range and severity of reactions, we suspected an outbreak of tuberculosis in the group. Because of the nature of the reactions, we sedated the animals at the 72-h evaluation to more closely observe and then palpate the injected eyelid. Evaluation of unsedated animals revealed 22 with a reaction to mammalian old tuberculin. We confirmed these 22 cases and identified an additional 11 animals with reactions when the monkeys were sedated. Mycobacterial culture of tissue from 6 macaques with reactions confirmed M. bovis in 3 animals. In addition, 1 of these 3 animals was culture-positive for both M. bovis and M. paraffinicum, and another was culture-positive for M. avium complex only. The addition of sedation to facilitate visual inspection and then palpation of the injected eyelid of these macaques increased the accuracy of evaluation and understanding of the number and severity of reactions to tuberculin skin testing. PMID:20353699

  19. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  20. Viral outcome of simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-89.6P adapted to cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Borsetti, A; Baroncelli, S; Maggiorella, M T; Bellino, S; Moretti, S; Sernicola, L; Belli, R; Ridolfi, B; Farcomeni, S; Negri, D R M; Cafaro, A; Ensoli, B; Titti, F

    2008-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6P is considered to be one of the most pathogenic chimeric viruses in rhesus macaques. However, when crossing from one to another species of monkeys the pathogenicity of this virus may be affected. By using SHIV-89.6P(cy243), a virus obtained by passaging SHIV-89.6P in cynomolgus macaques, we investigated the dynamics of viral replication and the impact of the inoculum size (from 10 up to 50 monkey infectious dose) on the progression of the infection in 22 cynomolgus macaques. SHIV-89.6P(cy243 )caused massive depletion of CD4+ T-cells within 4 weeks of the inoculum, followed by an irreversible immune deficiency in a high proportion of the infected monkeys. This study demonstrates that SHIV-89.6P(cy243) is pathogenic in cynomolgus macaques and that the dynamics of the viral replication and the rate of clinical progression depend on the size of the inoculum. Our findings provide unique and relevant data, particularly with regard to the value of the in vivo titration used to select the most appropriate infectious dose to study the "virus-host" interplay.

  1. An Enhanced Pre- and Postnatal Development Study in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Tabalumab: A Human IgG4 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Martin, Jennifer A; Halstead, Carolyn A; Newcomb, Deanna L; Chellman, Gary J

    2015-06-01

    Tabalumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with neutralizing activity against both soluble and membrane B-cell activating factor (BAFF), has been under development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential adverse effects of maternal tabalumab exposure on pregnancy, parturition, and lactation of the mothers and on the growth, viability, and development of the offspring through postnatal day (PND) 204. Tabalumab was administered by subcutaneous injection to presumed pregnant cynomolgus monkeys (16-19 per group) every 2 weeks from gestation day (GD) 20 to 22 until parturition at doses of 0, 0.3, or 30 mg/kg. Evaluations in mothers and infants included clinical signs, body weight, toxicokinetics, blood lymphocyte phenotyping, T-cell-dependent antibody response (infants only), antitherapeutic antibody (ATA), organ weights (infants only), and gross and microscopic histopathology. Infants were also examined for external and visceral morphologic and neurobehavioral development. There were no adverse tabalumab-related effects on maternal or infant endpoints. An expected pharmacological decrease in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes occurred in adults and infants; however, B-cell recovery was evident by PND154 in adults and infants at 0.3 mg/kg and by PND204 in infants at 30 mg/kg. At 30 mg/kg, a reduced IgM antibody response to T-cell-dependent antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was observed following primary immunization. Following secondary KLH immunization, all infants in both dose groups mounted anti-KLH IgM and IgG antibody responses similar to control. Placental and mammary transfer of tabalumab was demonstrated. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect level for maternal and developmental toxicity was 30 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. Exposures at 30 mg/kg provide a margin of safety of 16× the anticipated clinical exposure. PMID:26195230

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Denosumab Treatment Effects on Vertebral Strength in Ovariectomized Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Varela, Aurore; Kostenuik, Paul J; Ominsky, Michael S; Keaveny, Tony M

    2016-08-01

    Finite element analysis has not yet been validated for measuring changes in whole-bone strength at the hip or spine in people after treatment with an osteoporosis agent. Toward that end, we assessed the ability of a clinically approved implementation of finite element analysis to correctly quantify treatment effects on vertebral strength, comparing against direct mechanical testing, in cynomolgus monkeys randomly assigned to one of three 16-month-long treatments: sham surgery with vehicle (Sham-Vehicle), ovariectomy with vehicle (OVX-Vehicle), or ovariectomy with denosumab (OVX-DMAb). After treatment, T12 vertebrae were retrieved, scanned with micro-CT, and mechanically tested to measure compressive strength. Blinded to the strength data and treatment codes, the micro-CT images were coarsened and homogenized to create continuum-type finite element models, without explicit porosity. With clinical translation in mind, these models were then analyzed for strength using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared VirtuOst software application (O.N. Diagnostics, Berkeley, CA, USA), developed for analysis of human bones. We found that vertebral strength by finite element analysis was highly correlated (R(2)  = 0.97; n = 52) with mechanical testing, independent of treatment (p = 0.12). Further, the size of the treatment effect on strength (ratio of mean OVX-DMAb to mean OVX-Vehicle, as a percentage) was large and did not differ (p = 0.79) between mechanical testing (+57%; 95% CI [26%, 95%]) and finite element analysis (+51% [20%, 88%]). The micro-CT analysis revealed increases in cortical thickness (+45% [19%, 73%]) and trabecular bone volume fraction (+24% [8%, 42%]). These results show that a preestablished clinical finite element analysis implementation-developed for human bone and clinically validated in fracture-outcome studies-correctly quantified the observed treatment effects of denosumab on vertebral strength in cynomolgus monkeys. One

  3. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3–6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  4. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-09-07

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3-6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation.

  5. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3-6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  6. Dose-Dependent Changes in Auditory Sensory Gating in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Ya, Jinrong; Wu, Zhe; Wen, Chunmei; Zheng, Suyue; Tian, Chaoyang; Ren, Hui; Carlson, Synnöve; Yu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensory gating, often described as the ability to filter out irrelevant information that is repeated in close temporal proximity, is essential for the selection, processing, and storage of more salient information. This study aimed to test the effect of sensory gating under anesthesia in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys following injection of bromocriptine, haloperidol, and phencyclidine (PCP). Material/Methods We used an auditory evoked potential that can be elicited by sound to examine sensory gating during treatment with haloperidol, bromocriptine, and PCP in the PFC in the cynomolgus monkey. Scalp electrodes were located in the bilateral PFC and bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, and occipital lobes. Administration of bromocriptine (0.313 mg/kg, 0.625 mg/kg, and 1.25 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.001 mg/kg, 0.01 mg/kg, and 0.05 mg/kg), and the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist PCP (0.3 mg/kg) influenced sensory gating. Results We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex. Mid-dose haloperidol disrupted sensory gating in left occipital lobe. High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe. Conclusions Our studies showed that information processing was regulated by the dopaminergic system, which might play an important role in the PFC. The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information. PMID:27218151

  7. Dose-Dependent Changes in Auditory Sensory Gating in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Cynomolgus Monkey.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Ya, Jinrong; Wu, Zhe; Wen, Chunmei; Zheng, Suyue; Tian, Chaoyang; Ren, Hui; Carlson, Synnöve; Yu, Hualin; Chen, Feng; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensory gating, often described as the ability to filter out irrelevant information that is repeated in close temporal proximity, is essential for the selection, processing, and storage of more salient information. This study aimed to test the effect of sensory gating under anesthesia in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of monkeys following injection of bromocriptine, haloperidol, and phencyclidine (PCP). MATERIAL AND METHODS We used an auditory evoked potential that can be elicited by sound to examine sensory gating during treatment with haloperidol, bromocriptine, and PCP in the PFC in the cynomolgus monkey. Scalp electrodes were located in the bilateral PFC and bilateral temporal, bilateral parietal, and occipital lobes. Administration of bromocriptine (0.313 mg/kg, 0.625 mg/kg, and 1.25 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.001 mg/kg, 0.01 mg/kg, and 0.05 mg/kg), and the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist PCP (0.3 mg/kg) influenced sensory gating. RESULTS We demonstrated the following: (1) Administration of mid-dose bromocriptine disrupted sensory gating (N100) in the right temporal lobe, while neither low-dose nor high-dose bromocriptine impaired gating. (2) Low-dose haloperidol impaired gating in the right prefrontal cortex. Mid-dose haloperidol disrupted sensory gating in left occipital lobe. High-dose haloperidol had no obvious effect on sensory gating. (3) Gating was impaired by PCP in the left parietal lobe. CONCLUSIONS Our studies showed that information processing was regulated by the dopaminergic system, which might play an important role in the PFC. The dopaminergic system influenced sensory gating in a dose- and region-dependent pattern, which might modulate the different stages that receive further processing due to novel information. PMID:27218151

  8. Sertraline Effects on Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamines and Species-typical Socioemotional Behavior of Female Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Carol A.; Register, Thomas C.; Higley, J. Dee; Willard, Stephanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although widely prescribed, little is known about selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effects on social behavior and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamines in female primates. Objective To determine the effects of sertraline on agonistic and affiliative behavior. Methods 21 adult female cynomolgus monkeys were housed in small, stable social groups, trained to participate in oral dosing, and began a 5-week cumulative dose response study. Serial doses of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg of sertraline were administered orally for one week each. Behavior was recorded daily during 10-minute observations before and 4 hours after dosing. On the 7th day of dosing, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline and CSF monoamines/metabolites were determined 4 hours after the last dose. Results At 20 mg/kg, circulating sertraline/desmethylsertraline was in the therapeutic range. CSF 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid decreased 33% (p<0.05). Overall aggression, submission, locomotion and time alone decreased, whereas affiliative behaviors (body contact, grooming) increased (all p’s<0.05). Effects of sertraline on aggression and submission were social status-dependent, reducing aggression in dominants and submission in subordinates. Conclusions A clinically relevant oral dose of sertraline resulted in CSF metabolite changes similar to those observed in patients, and altered the socioemotional behavior of female monkeys. Changes in CSF 5-HT and dopamine are novel observations that may be sex-specific. The robust effects of sertraline on aggression and affiliation may explain the efficacy of SSRIs on a range of human behavioral pathologies that share the characteristics of increased aggression and decreased sociality. PMID:24193371

  9. Synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the olfactory bulb of the cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Liberia, Teresa; Blasco-Ibáñez, José Miguel; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio; Lanciego, José Luis; Crespo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) of mammals receives cholinergic afferents from the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB). At present, the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons on the circuits of the OB has only been investigated in the rat. In this report, we analyze the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic axons in the OB of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Our aim is to investigate whether the cholinergic innervation of the bulbar circuits is phylogenetically conserved between macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals. Our results demonstrate that the cholinergic axons form synaptic contacts on interneurons. In the glomerular layer, their main targets are the periglomerular cells, which receive axo-somatic and axo-dendritic synapses. In the inframitral region, their main targets are the granule cells, which receive synaptic contacts on their dendritic shafts and spines. Although the cholinergic boutons were frequently found in close vicinity of the dendrites of principal cells, we have not found synaptic contacts on them. From a comparative perspective, our data indicate that the synaptic connectivity of the cholinergic circuits is highly preserved in the OB of macrosmatic and microsmatic mammals. PMID:25852490

  10. Effect of long-term ovariectomy on bone mechanical properties in young female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kasra, M; Grynpas, M D

    1994-01-01

    Feral adult female cynomolgus monkeys were divided into two groups: normal controls and ovariectomized. Tibiae and trabecular bones from the femoral head, from each group, were tested using a materials testing machine. The bending stiffness of the tibiae was measured by nondestructive three-point bending tests and their maximum torque capacity by destructive torsion tests. The compressive strength of the trabecular bones was measured by compression tests. Ovariectomy caused significant decreases in elastic modulus of the tibiae (p < 0.008), measured by three-point bending tests, and in shear modulus (p < 0.015), failure shear stress (p < 0.01), and failure torque (p < 0.001) of the tibiae, measured by torsion tests. It caused a significant decrease in cortical bone density (p < 0.005), but no significant changes in tibial cross-sectional area and in cortical shaft external and internal diameters. The differences in elastic modulus, maximum compressive strength, and density of femoral trabecular bone samples between the two groups were not significant.

  11. Comparative Immunogenicity of the Tetanus Toxoid and Recombinant Tetanus Vaccines in Mice, Rats, and Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Liu, Shuling; Song, Xiaohong; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Fu, Ling; Hou, Lihua; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and is one of the most dreaded diseases especially in the developing countries. The current vaccine against tetanus is based on an inactivated tetanus toxin, which is effective but has many drawbacks. In our previous study, we developed a recombinant tetanus vaccine based on protein TeNT-Hc, with clear advantages over the toxoid vaccine in terms of production, characterization, and homogeneity. In this study, the titers, growth extinction, and persistence of specific antibodies induced by the two types of vaccine in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were compared. The booster vaccination efficacy of the two types of vaccines at different time points and protection mechanism in animals were also compared. The recombinant tetanus vaccine induced persistent and better antibody titers and strengthened the immunity compared with the commercially available toxoid vaccine in animals. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective recombinant tetanus vaccine to enhance the immunity of adolescents and adults as a substitute for the current toxoid vaccine. PMID:27348002

  12. Alterations in the hepatic transcriptional landscape after RNAi mediated ApoB silencing in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M Sabry; Kumar, Chanchal; Chia, Ser Mien; Anandalakshmi, Vidhya; Boo, Nicole; Strapps, Walter; Robinson, Michael; Caguyong, Michelle; Bartz, Steven; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; van Gool, Alain; Shih, Shian-Jiun

    2015-10-01

    The greater genomic conservation between humans and non-human primates (NHP) enables target validation studies for developing of therapeutic strategies for human diseases. Together with predicting activity and potential adverse clinical signs, the inclusion of NHP testing bequeaths to efficacy models for dose titration and pharmacodynamic effects. We have used lipid nanoparticle encapsulated siRNA to silence ApoB in the liver and assessed the phenotypic effects on serum lipids with various levels of hepatic ApoB mRNA knockdown in healthy lean cynomolgus monkeys. ApoB siRNA dosed animals demonstrated significant reductions of hepatic ApoB mRNA and serum APOB protein, with a substantial lowering of plasma lipid levels without obvious signs of toxicity. Microarray based assessment of ApoB siRNA mediated effects revealed a number of differentially expressed genes which mapped onto biological pathways and processes related to lipid and cholesterol metabolism. Furthermore, we identified potential targets and cellular effects that could be studied for therapeutic benchmarking of APOB mediated effects. The network of ApoB regulated genes should be of significance for the understanding and development of novel hypercholesterolemia therapies. PMID:26275376

  13. Stress-relevant social behaviors of middle-class male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    CUI, Ding; ZHOU, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Stress from dominance ranks in human societies, or that of other social animals, especially nonhuman primates, can have negative influences on health. Individuals holding different social status may be burdened with various stress levels. The middle class experiences a special stress situation within the dominance hierarchy due to its position between the higher and lower classes. Behaviorally, questions about where middle-class stress comes from and how individuals adapt to middle-class stress remain poorly understood in nonhuman primates. In the present study, social interactions, including aggression, avoidance, grooming and mounting behaviors, between beta males, as well as among group members holding higher or lower social status, were analyzed in captive male-only cynomolgus monkey groups. We found that aggressive tension from the higher hierarchy members was the main origin of stress for middle-class individuals. However, behaviors such as attacking lower hierarchy members immediately after being the recipient of aggression, as well as increased avoidance, grooming and mounting toward both higher and lower hierarchy members helped alleviate middle-class stress and were particular adaptations to middle-class social status. PMID:26646570

  14. Generation, cryopreservation, function and in vivo persistence of ex vivo expanded cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Lien; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Thomson, Angus W

    2015-05-01

    We expanded flow-sorted Foxp3(+) cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells (Treg) >1000-fold after three rounds of stimulation with anti-CD3 mAb-loaded artificial antigen-presenting cells, rapamycin (first round only) and IL-2. The expanded Treg maintained their expression of Treg signature markers, CD25, CD27, CD39, Foxp3, Helios, and CTLA-4, as well as CXCR3, which plays an important role in T cell migration to sites of inflammation. In contrast to expanded effector T cells (Teff), expanded Treg produced minimal IFN-γ and IL-17 and no IL-2 and potently suppressed Teff proliferation. Following cryopreservation, thawed Treg were less viable than their freshly-expanded counterparts, although no significant changes in phenotype or suppressive ability were observed. Additional rounds of stimulation/expansion restored maximal viability. Furthermore, adoptively-transferred autologous Treg expanded from cryopreserved second round stocks and labeled with CFSE or VPD450 were detected in blood and secondary lymphoid tissues of normal or immunosuppressed recipients at least two months after their systemic infusion. PMID:25732601

  15. Comparative Immunogenicity of the Tetanus Toxoid and Recombinant Tetanus Vaccines in Mice, Rats, and Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Liu, Shuling; Song, Xiaohong; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Fu, Ling; Hou, Lihua; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and is one of the most dreaded diseases especially in the developing countries. The current vaccine against tetanus is based on an inactivated tetanus toxin, which is effective but has many drawbacks. In our previous study, we developed a recombinant tetanus vaccine based on protein TeNT-Hc, with clear advantages over the toxoid vaccine in terms of production, characterization, and homogeneity. In this study, the titers, growth extinction, and persistence of specific antibodies induced by the two types of vaccine in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were compared. The booster vaccination efficacy of the two types of vaccines at different time points and protection mechanism in animals were also compared. The recombinant tetanus vaccine induced persistent and better antibody titers and strengthened the immunity compared with the commercially available toxoid vaccine in animals. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective recombinant tetanus vaccine to enhance the immunity of adolescents and adults as a substitute for the current toxoid vaccine. PMID:27348002

  16. Comparative Immunogenicity of the Tetanus Toxoid and Recombinant Tetanus Vaccines in Mice, Rats, and Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Liu, Shuling; Song, Xiaohong; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Fu, Ling; Hou, Lihua; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-06-25

    Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and is one of the most dreaded diseases especially in the developing countries. The current vaccine against tetanus is based on an inactivated tetanus toxin, which is effective but has many drawbacks. In our previous study, we developed a recombinant tetanus vaccine based on protein TeNT-Hc, with clear advantages over the toxoid vaccine in terms of production, characterization, and homogeneity. In this study, the titers, growth extinction, and persistence of specific antibodies induced by the two types of vaccine in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were compared. The booster vaccination efficacy of the two types of vaccines at different time points and protection mechanism in animals were also compared. The recombinant tetanus vaccine induced persistent and better antibody titers and strengthened the immunity compared with the commercially available toxoid vaccine in animals. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective recombinant tetanus vaccine to enhance the immunity of adolescents and adults as a substitute for the current toxoid vaccine.

  17. Age-related pharmacokinetic changes of acetaminophen, antipyrine, diazepam, diphenhydramine, and ofloxacin in male cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Koji; Kim, Soonih; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen (marker of gastric emptying), antipyrine (marker of hepatic metabolic activity and total body water), diazepam (lipophilic and highly distributed), diphenhydramine (hepatic blood flow-limited and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein bound) and ofloxacin (renally eliminated) were evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys (3-18 years old) and beagle dogs (2-11 years old) as models in elderly persons. 2. Gastric pH fluctuated with aging in monkeys and dogs. The concentration of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein appeared to be increased by aging. There were no age-related differences in the absorption rates of the drugs under the conditions used in the study. Total body fat increased and water decreased in monkeys, but these parameters did not change in dogs. 3. Hepatic blood flow decreased in both species, but a significant decrease of hepatic clearance was only seen in monkeys. Renal clearance decreased significantly with age in monkeys and showed a tendency to decrease in dogs. 4. Age-related alterations of physiological parameters in monkeys are in agreement with clinical observations in humans, except for the lack of a change in the plasma albumin concentration. Therefore, this study suggests that monkey might be a suitable animal model for prediction of age-related changes in pharmacokinetics in humans.

  18. Age-related pharmacokinetic changes of acetaminophen, antipyrine, diazepam, diphenhydramine, and ofloxacin in male cynomolgus monkeys and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Takashi; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Koji; Kim, Soonih; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen (marker of gastric emptying), antipyrine (marker of hepatic metabolic activity and total body water), diazepam (lipophilic and highly distributed), diphenhydramine (hepatic blood flow-limited and alpha-1 acid glycoprotein bound) and ofloxacin (renally eliminated) were evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys (3-18 years old) and beagle dogs (2-11 years old) as models in elderly persons. 2. Gastric pH fluctuated with aging in monkeys and dogs. The concentration of alpha-1 acid glycoprotein appeared to be increased by aging. There were no age-related differences in the absorption rates of the drugs under the conditions used in the study. Total body fat increased and water decreased in monkeys, but these parameters did not change in dogs. 3. Hepatic blood flow decreased in both species, but a significant decrease of hepatic clearance was only seen in monkeys. Renal clearance decreased significantly with age in monkeys and showed a tendency to decrease in dogs. 4. Age-related alterations of physiological parameters in monkeys are in agreement with clinical observations in humans, except for the lack of a change in the plasma albumin concentration. Therefore, this study suggests that monkey might be a suitable animal model for prediction of age-related changes in pharmacokinetics in humans. PMID:24650193

  19. Integrated pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunogenicity profiling of an anti-CCL21 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dudal, S; Subramanian, K; Flandre, T; Law, W S; Lowe, P J; Skerjanec, A; Genin, J-C; Duval, M; Piequet, A; Cordier, A; Jarai, G; Van Heeke, G; Taplin, S; Krantz, C; Jones, S; Warren, A P; Brennan, F R; Sims, J; Lloyd, P

    2015-01-01

    QBP359 is an IgG1 human monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to human CCL21, a chemokine hypothesized to play a role in inflammatory disease conditions through activation of resident CCR7-expressing fibroblasts/myofibroblasts. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of QBP359 in non-human primates were characterized through an integrated approach, combining PK, PD, immunogenicity, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tissue profiling data from single- and multiple-dose experiments in cynomolgus monkeys. When compared with regular immunoglobulin typical kinetics, faster drug clearance was observed in serum following intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of QBP359. We have shown by means of PK/PD modeling that clearance of mAb-ligand complex is the most likely explanation for the rapid clearance of QBP359 in cynomolgus monkey. IHC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry data suggested a high turnover and synthesis rate of CCL21 in tissues. Although lymphoid tissue was expected to accumulate drug due to the high levels of CCL21 present, bioavailability following subcutaneous administration in monkeys was 52%. In human disease states, where CCL21 expression is believed to be expressed at 10-fold higher concentrations compared with cynomolgus monkeys, the PK/PD model of QBP359 and its binding to CCL21 suggested that very large doses requiring frequent administration of mAb would be required to maintain suppression of CCL21 in the clinical setting. This highlights the difficulty in targeting soluble proteins with high synthesis rates. PMID:26230385

  20. Integrated pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunogenicity profiling of an anti-CCL21 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dudal, S; Subramanian, K; Flandre, T; Law, WS; Lowe, PJ; Skerjanec, A; Genin, J-C; Duval, M; Piequet, A; Cordier, A; Jarai, G; Van Heeke, G; Taplin, S; Krantz, C; Jones, S; Warren, AP; Brennan, FR; Sims, J; Lloyd, P

    2015-01-01

    QBP359 is an IgG1 human monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to human CCL21, a chemokine hypothesized to play a role in inflammatory disease conditions through activation of resident CCR7-expressing fibroblasts/myofibroblasts. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of QBP359 in non-human primates were characterized through an integrated approach, combining PK, PD, immunogenicity, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tissue profiling data from single- and multiple-dose experiments in cynomolgus monkeys. When compared with regular immunoglobulin typical kinetics, faster drug clearance was observed in serum following intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of QBP359. We have shown by means of PK/PD modeling that clearance of mAb-ligand complex is the most likely explanation for the rapid clearance of QBP359 in cynomolgus monkey. IHC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry data suggested a high turnover and synthesis rate of CCL21 in tissues. Although lymphoid tissue was expected to accumulate drug due to the high levels of CCL21 present, bioavailability following subcutaneous administration in monkeys was 52%. In human disease states, where CCL21 expression is believed to be expressed at 10-fold higher concentrations compared with cynomolgus monkeys, the PK/PD model of QBP359 and its binding to CCL21 suggested that very large doses requiring frequent administration of mAb would be required to maintain suppression of CCL21 in the clinical setting. This highlights the difficulty in targeting soluble proteins with high synthesis rates. PMID:26230385

  1. Competitive inhibition of SGLT2 by tofogliflozin or phlorizin induces urinary glucose excretion through extending splay in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takumi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Fukazawa, Masanori; Honda, Kiyofumi; Yamane, Mizuki; Yoshida, Ayae; Azabu, Hiroko; Kitamura, Hidekazu; Toyota, Naoto; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Yoshiki

    2014-06-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors showed a glucose lowering effect in type 2 diabetes patients through inducing renal glucose excretion. Detailed analysis of the mechanism of the glucosuric effect of SGLT2 inhibition, however, has been hampered by limitations of clinical study. Here, we investigated the mechanism of urinary glucose excretion using nonhuman primates with SGLT inhibitors tofogliflozin and phlorizin, both in vitro and in vivo. In cells overexpressing cynomolgus monkey SGLT2 (cSGLT2), both tofogliflozin and phlorizin competitively inhibited uptake of the substrate (α-methyl-d-glucopyranoside; AMG). Tofogliflozin was found to be a selective cSGLT2 inhibitor, inhibiting cSGLT2 more strongly than did phlorizin, with selectivity toward cSGLT2 1,000 times that toward cSGLT1; phlorizin was found to be a nonselective cSGLT1/2 inhibitor. In a glucose titration study in cynomolgus monkeys under conditions of controlled plasma drug concentration, both tofogliflozin and phlorizin increased fractional excretion of glucose (FEG) by up to 50% under hyperglycemic conditions. By fitting the titration curve using a newly introduced method that avoids variability in estimating the threshold of renal glucose excretion, we found that tofogliflozin and phlorizin lowered the threshold and extended the splay in a dose-dependent manner without significantly affecting the tubular transport maximum for glucose (TmG). Our results demonstrate the contribution of SGLT2 to renal glucose reabsorption (RGR) in cynomolgus monkeys and demonstrate that competitive inhibition of cSGLT2 exerts a glucosuric effect by mainly extending splay and lowering threshold without affecting TmG.

  2. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Dye, John M.; Hunter, Ty C.; Dabisch, Paul A.; Garza, Nicole L.; Bramel, Nicholas R.; Baker, Reese J.; Williams, Roger D.; Nichols, Donald K.; Nalca, Aysegul

    2012-01-01

    Filoviruses are members of the genera Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and “Cuevavirus”. Because they cause human disease with high lethality and could potentially be used as a bioweapon, these viruses are classified as CDC Category A Bioterrorism Agents. Filoviruses are relatively stable in aerosols, retain virulence after lyophilization, and can be present on contaminated surfaces for extended periods of time. This study explores the characteristics of aerosolized Sudan virus (SUDV) Boniface in non-human primates (NHP) belonging to three different species. Groups of cynomolgus macaques (cyno), rhesus macaques (rhesus), and African green monkeys (AGM) were challenged with target doses of 50 or 500 plaque-forming units (pfu) of aerosolized SUDV. Exposure to either viral dose resulted in increased body temperatures in all three NHP species beginning on days 4–5 post-exposure. Other clinical findings for all three NHP species included leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, dehydration, and lymphadenopathy. Disease in all of the NHPs was severe beginning on day 6 post-exposure, and all animals except one surviving rhesus macaque were euthanized by day 14. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) concentrations were elevated during the course of disease in all three species; however, AGMs had significantly higher ALT and AST concentrations than cynos and rhesus. While all three species had detectable viral load by days 3-4 post exposure, Rhesus had lower average peak viral load than cynos or AGMs. Overall, the results indicate that the disease course after exposure to aerosolized SUDV is similar for all three species of NHP. PMID:23202456

  3. Combined effects of Depo-Provera and Fadrozole on the sexual behavior of intact male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Zumpe, D; Michael, R P

    1994-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that treating castrated, testosterone-treated male cynomolgus monkeys with Depo-Provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate, MPA) decreased ejaculatory performance and also measures of male sexual motivation by about 40%. Similarly, treating castrated, testosterone-treated males with the nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor, Fadrozole, decreased ejaculatory performance and male sexual motivation again by about 40%. These behavioral decrements are, of course, mediated by totally different mechanisms. We have therefore hypothesized that both unchanged T and E2 might be important for the control of sexual behavior in this male primate, and the present study examined the consequences of administering Fadrozole at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg/day to intact male cynomolgus monkeys being treated with 40 mg/week MPA. Intact males were each tested with an ovariectomized, E2-treated female partner (i) before treatment, (ii) during treatment with MPA alone, and (iii) during treatment with MPA and either Fadrozole or water administered SC by osmotic minipumps. As in previous studies, MPA significantly decreased plasma T levels and sexual behavior. But additional treatment with Fadrozole resulted in a rapid increase in plasma T levels although causing a further decline in sexual behavior. Results supported the view that both unchanged T and its aromatized product are important for ejaculatory activity and sexual motivation in the primate. Fadrozole's effect on plasma T may have been due to the elimination of the negative feedback of E2 on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  4. Identification of a novel simian parvovirus in cynomolgus monkeys with severe anemia. A paradigm of human B19 parvovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, M G; Anderson, D C; Fikes, J D; Bain, F T; Carlson, C S; Green, S W; Young, N S; Brown, K E

    1994-01-01

    Although human B19 parvovirus infection has been clearly associated with a number of distinct syndromes (including severe anemia, abortion, and arthritis), detailed knowledge of its pathogenesis has been hindered by the lack of a suitable animal model. We have identified a novel simian parvovirus in cynomolgus monkeys with severe anemia. Sequencing of a 723-bp fragment of cloned viral DNA extracted from serum revealed that the simian parvovirus has 65% homology at the DNA level with the human B19 parvovirus but little homology with other known parvoviruses. Light microscopic examination of bone marrow from infected animals showed intranuclear inclusion bodies, and ultrastructural studies showed viral arrays characteristic of parvoviruses. Another striking feature was the presence of marked dyserythropoiesis in cells of the erythroid lineage, raising the possibility that B19 parvovirus infection may underlie related dyserythropoietic syndromes in human beings. Affected animals had concurrent infection with the immunosuppressive type D simian retrovirus, analogous to HIV patients who develop severe anemia because of infection with B19 parvovirus. The remarkable similarities between the simian and B19 parvoviruses suggest that experimentally infected cynomolgus monkeys may serve as a useful animal model of human B19 infection. Images PMID:8163659

  5. Stimulus-Food Pairings Produce Stimulus-Directed Touch Screen Responding in Cynomolgus Monkeys ("Macaca Fascicularis") with or without a Positive Response Contingency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Christopher E.; Myers, Todd M.

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition and maintenance of touch-screen responding was examined in naive cynomolgus monkeys ("Macaca fascicularis") under automaintenance and classical conditioning arrangements. In the first condition of Experiment 1, we compared acquisition of screen touching to a randomly positioned stimulus (a gray square) that was either stationary or…

  6. Pharmacodynamic Model of Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Xiao, Jim J; Sasu, Barbra; Hinkle, Beth; Perez-Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2016-05-01

    Hepcidin (H25) is a hormone peptide synthesized by the liver that binds to ferroportin and blocks iron export. In this study, H25 was inhibited by administration of single and multiple doses of an anti-H25 monoclonal antibody Ab 12B9m in cynomolgus monkeys. The objective of this analysis was to develop a pharmacodynamic model describing the role of H25 in regulating iron homeostasis and the impact of hepcidin inhibition by Ab 12B9m. Total serum H25 and Ab 12B9m were determined in each animal. Corresponding measurements of serum iron and hemoglobin (Hb) were obtained. The PD model consisted of iron pools in serum (FeS), reticuloendothelial macrophages (FeM), hemoglobin (FeHb), and liver (FeL). The iron was assumed to be transported between the FeS, FeHb, and FeM unidirectionally at rates k S, k Hb, and k M. H25 serum concentrations were described by the previously developed PK model with the parameters fixed at their estimates. The serum iron and Hb data were fitted simultaneously. The corresponding estimates of the rate constants were k S/Fe0 = 0.113 h(-1), k M = 0.00191 h(-1), and k Hb = 0.00817 h(-1). The model-based IC50 value for the H25 inhibitory effect on ferroportin activity was 0.398 nM. The PD model predicted a negligible effect of Ab 12B9m on Hb levels for the tested doses. The presented PD model adequately described the serum iron time courses following single and multiple doses of Ab 12B9m. Ab 12B9m-induced inhibition of H25 resulted in a temporal increase in serum and liver iron and a decrease in the iron stored in reticuloendothelial macrophages. PMID:26917226

  7. Selection of appropriate reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis in a streptozotocin-induced Alzheimer's disease model of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Youngjeon; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Heui-Soo; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has been widely used to quantify relative gene expression because of the specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this technique. In order to obtain reliable gene expression data from RT-qPCR experiments, it is important to utilize optimal reference genes for the normalization of target gene expression under varied experimental conditions. Previously, we developed and validated a novel icv-STZ cynomolgus monkey model for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. However, in order to enhance the reliability of this disease model, appropriate reference genes must be selected to allow meaningful analysis of the gene expression levels in the icv-STZ cynomolgus monkey brain. In this study, we assessed the expression stability of 9 candidate reference genes in 2 matched-pair brain samples (5 regions) of control cynomolgus monkeys and those who had received intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (icv-STZ). Three well-known analytical programs geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were used to choose the suitable reference genes from the total sample group, control group, and icv-STZ group. Combination analysis of the 3 different programs clearly indicated that the ideal reference genes are RPS19 and YWHAZ in the total sample group, GAPDH and RPS19 in the control group, and ACTB and GAPDH in the icv-STZ group. Additionally, we validated the normalization accuracy of the most appropriate reference genes (RPS19 and YWHAZ) by comparison with the least stable gene (TBP) using quantification of the APP and MAPT genes in the total sample group. To the best of our knowledge, this research is the first study to identify and validate the appropriate reference genes in cynomolgus monkey brains. These findings provide useful information for future studies involving the expression of target genes in the cynomolgus monkey.

  8. Effect of oral probenecid coadministration on the chronic toxicity and pharmacokinetics of intravenous cidofovir in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lacy, S A; Hitchcock, M J; Lee, W A; Tellier, P; Cundy, K C

    1998-08-01

    In animals and humans, intravenous administration of the antiviral nucleotide analogue cidofovir results in a dose-limiting nephrotoxicity characterized by damage to the proximal tubular epithelial cells. Probenecid, a competitive inhibitor of organic anion transport in the proximal tubular epithelial cells, was evaluated for its effect on the chronic toxicity and pharmacokinetics of cidofovir. Cynomolgus monkeys (5/sex/group) received cidofovir for 52 consecutive weeks as a once weekly intravenous bolus injection at 0 (saline), 0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg/dose alone or at 2.5 mg/kg/dose in combination with probenecid (30 mg/kg/dose via oral gavage 1 h prior to cidofovir administration). Cidofovir-associated histopathological changes were seen only in the kidneys, testes, and epididymides. Nephrotoxicity (mild to moderate cortical tubular epithelial cell karyomegaly, tubular dilation, basement membrane thickening) was present only in monkeys receiving 2.5 mg/kg/dose cidofovir without probenecid. The incidence and severity of testicular (hypo- and aspermatogenesis) and epididymal (severe oligo- and aspermia) changes were increased in monkeys administered cidofovir at 2.5 mg/kg/dose, either alone or in combination with oral probenecid. Renal drug clearance was decreased between Weeks 1 and 52 in the 2.5 mg/kg/dose groups and resulted in an increased systemic exposure to cidofovir (as measured by AUC) that was significantly greater in monkeys administered cidofovir alone (312% increase in males, 98% in females) than in those coadministered probenecid (32% increase in males, 3% in females). These results demonstrate that oral probenecid coadministration protects against the morphological evidence of nephrotoxicity and the accompanying decrease in renal clearance in monkeys receiving chronic intravenous cidofovir treatment.

  9. Gene expression profiling in the lung tissue of cynomolgus monkeys in response to repeated exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong-Doo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Choong Yong; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Han, Jin Soo; Yu, Il Je

    2010-03-01

    Many in the welding industry suffer from bronchitis, lung function changes, metal fume fever, and diseases related to respiratory damage. These phenomena are associated with welding fumes; however, the mechanism behind these findings remains to be elucidated. In this study, the lungs of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed to MMA-SS welding fumes for 229 days and allowed to recover for 153 days. After the exposure and recovery period, gene expression profiles were investigated using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human U133 plus 2.0. In total, it was confirmed that 1,116 genes were up-or downregulated (over 2-fold changes, P\\0.01) for the T1 (31.4 ± 2.8 mg/m3) and T2 (62.5 ± 2.7 mg/m3) dose groups. Differentially expressed genes in the exposure and recovery groups were analyzed, based on hierarchical clustering, and were imported into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to analyze the biological and toxicological functions. Functional analysis identified genes involved in immunological disease in both groups. Additionally, differentially expressed genes in common between monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure were compared using microarray data, and the gene expression of selected genes was verified by real-time PCR. Genes such as CHI3L1, RARRES1, and CTSB were up-regulated and genes such as CYP26B1, ID4, and NRGN were down-regulated in both monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure. This is the first comprehensive gene expression profiling conducted for welding fume exposure in monkeys, and these expressed genes are expected to be useful in helping to understand transcriptional changes in monkey lungs after welding fume exposure.

  10. Effects of the GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Dulaglutide on the Structure of the Exocrine Pancreas of Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Vahle, John L; Byrd, Richard A; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Martin, Jennifer A; Sorden, Steven D; Ryan, Thomas; Pienkowski, Thomas; Rosol, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Klöppel, Günter

    2015-10-01

    Clinical and nonclinical studies have implicated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist therapy as a risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effect that dulaglutide, an approved GLP-1 receptor agonist, has on the exocrine pancreas. Dulaglutide 8.15 mg/kg (approximately 500 times the maximum recommended human dose based on plasma exposure) was administered twice weekly for 12 months to cynomolgus monkeys. Serum amylase and lipase activities were measured and 6 sections of each pancreas were examined microscopically. Ductal epithelial cell proliferation was estimated using Ki67 labeling. Dulaglutide administration did not alter serum amylase or lipase activities measured at the end of treatment compared to control values. An extensive histologic evaluation of the pancreas revealed no changes in the acinar or endocrine portions and no evidence of pancreatitis, necrosis, or pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. An increase in goblet cells noted in 4 of the 19 treated monkeys was considered an effect of dulaglutide but was not associated with dilation, blockage, or accumulation of mucin in the pancreatic duct. There was no difference in cell proliferation in ductal epithelium between control and dulaglutide-treated monkeys. These data reveal that chronic dosing of nondiabetic primates with dulaglutide does not induce inflammatory or preneoplastic changes in exocrine pancreas.

  11. Accumulation of brown pigment-laden macrophages associated with vascular lesions in the lungs of cynomolgus monkeys(Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Yoshika; Ide, Tetsuya; Mitori, Hikaru; Oishi, Yuji; Matsumoto, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of macrophages containing brown pigments in the lungs is a well-known spontaneous lesion found in cynomolgus monkey. However, its pathogenesis has not been clearly described. In our survey, brown pigment-laden macrophages were found in the lungs of 4 out of 43 cases. Brown pigments were mostly found in the macrophages of the perivascular interstitium, which proved to be hemosiderin. Some small- to medium-sized vessels that exhibited prominent accumulation of brown pigment-laden macrophages showed degeneration and necrosis of the smooth muscle cells of tunica media. Furthermore, ruptures of the internal and external elastic laminae were seen in some of the vessels. These findings suggested that partial fragmentation of the vascular elastic lamina followed by degeneration and necrosis of the tunica media caused blood leakage leading to the accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the perivascular interstitium of the lungs. PMID:27559243

  12. Infinium monkeys: Infinium 450K array for the Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Ong, Mei-Lyn; Tan, Peck Yean; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Cheong, Clara Y; Stunkel, Walter; Chan, Louiza; Gluckman, Peter D; Chng, Keefe; Kobor, Michael S; Meaney, Michael J; Holbrook, Joanna D

    2014-05-08

    The Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip Array (Infinium 450K) is a robust and cost-efficient survey of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns. Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque) is an important disease model; however, its genome sequence is only recently published, and few tools exist to interrogate the molecular state of Cynomolgus macaque tissues. Although the Infinium 450K is a hybridization array designed to the human genome, the relative conservation between the macaque and human genomes makes its use in macaques feasible. Here, we used the Infinium 450K array to assay DNA methylation in 11 macaque muscle biopsies. We showed that probe hybridization efficiency was related to the degree of sequence identity between the human probes and the macaque genome sequence. Approximately 61% of the Human Infinium 450K probes could be reliably mapped to the Cynomolgus macaque genome and contain a CpG site of interest. We also compared the Infinium 450K data to reduced representation bisulfite sequencing data generated on the same samples and found a high level of concordance between the two independent methodologies, which can be further improved by filtering for probe sequence identity and mismatch location. We conclude that the Infinium 450K array can be used to measure the DNA methylome of Cynomolgus macaque tissues using the provided filters. We also provide a pipeline for validation of the array in other species using a simple BLAST-based sequence identify filter.

  13. Effect of Anterior Zonule Transection on the Change in Lens Diameter and Power in Cynomolgus Monkeys during Simulated Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Nankivil, Derek; Manns, Fabrice; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Ziebarth, Noel; Borja, David; Amelinckx, Adriana; Bernal, Andres; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the role of anterior zonular tension on the optomechanical lens response during simulation of accommodation in primates. Methods Postmortem cynomolgus monkey eyes (n = 14; age range, 3.0 –11.5 years) were dissected leaving intact the lens, zonules, ciliary body, hyaloid membrane, anterior vitreous, and a scleral rim. The lens was mounted in a lens-stretching system and stretched radially in step-wise fashion. The load, and the lens diameter and power were measured at each step and the diameter- and power-load relationships were quantified. The anterior zonular fibers were then transected, and the experiment was repeated. The equatorial lens diameter and lens optical power before and after zonular transection were compared. Results Stretching increased the lens diameter by 0.25 ± 0.09 mm (median ± interquartile range) before and 0.25 ± 0.19 mm after zonular transection. Stretching decreased the lens power by 13.0 ± 6.5 D before and 10.6 ± 8.0 D after zonular transection. The load required to change the diameter of the lens by 1 mm decreased from 18.8 ± 10.7 g before to 15.0 ± 7.8 g after zonular transection. The absolute change in power per gram of loading decreased from 2.5 ± 1.1 before to 2.0 ± 1.2 D after zonular transection. Conclusions The cynomolgus monkey lens retains a significant fraction of its accommodative ability after transection of the anterior zonules in simulated accommodation experiments. PMID:19324840

  14. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  15. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Akira; Ito, Kaori; Miwa, Yoshikatsu; Kanazawa, Yoshito; Chiba, Akiko; Iigo, Yutaka; Kashimoto, Yoshinori; Kanda, Akira; Murata, Shinji; Makino, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer's disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT) induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies. PMID:26539559

  16. Biodistribution of Idursulfase Formulated for Intrathecal Use (Idursulfase-IT) in Cynomolgus Monkeys after Intrathecal Lumbar Administration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy with intravenous idursulfase (recombinant iduronate-2-sulfatase) is approved for the treatment of Hunter syndrome. Intravenous administration does not, however, treat the neurological manifestations, due to its low central nervous system bioavailability. Using intrathecal-lumbar administration, iduronate-2-sulfatase is delivered directly to the central nervous system. This study investigates the central nervous system biodistribution of intrathecal-lumbar administered iduronate-2-sulfatase in cynomolgus monkeys. Twelve monkeys were administered iduronate-2-sulfatase in one 30 mg intrathecal-lumbar injection. Brain, spinal cord, liver, and kidneys were collected for iduronate-2-sulfatase concentration (measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) and enzyme activity measurement (via a method utilizing 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-iduronate-2-sulfate) at 1, 2, 5, 12, 24, and 48 hours following administration. The tissue enzyme linked immunosorbent assay confirmed iduronate-2-sulfatase uptake to the brain, spinal cord, kidneys, and liver in a time-dependent manner. In spinal cord and brain, iduronate-2-sulfatase appeared as early as 1 hour following administration, and peak concentrations were observed at ~2 and ~5 hours. Iduronate-2-sulfatase appeared in liver and kidneys 1 hour post intrathecal-lumbar dose with peak concentrations between 5 and 24 hours. Liver iduronate-2-sulfatase concentration was approximately 10-fold higher than kidney. The iduronate-2-sulfatase localization and enzyme activity in the central nervous system, following intrathecal administration, demonstrates that intrathecal-lumbar treatment with iduronate-2-sulfatase may be considered for further investigation as a treatment for Hunter syndrome patients with neurocognitive impairment. PMID:27764180

  17. Establishment of a translational endothelial cell model using directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from Cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Eva C.; Heckel, Tobias; Keller, David; Giroud, Nicolas; Leonard, Brian; Christensen, Klaus; Roth, Adrian; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Graf, Martin; Patsch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Due to their broad differentiation potential, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer a promising approach for generating relevant cellular models for various applications. While human PSC-based cellular models are already advanced, similar systems for non-human primates (NHPs) are still lacking. However, as NHPs are the most appropriate animals for evaluating the safety of many novel pharmaceuticals, the availability of in vitro systems would be extremely useful to bridge the gap between cellular and animal models. Here, we present a NHP in vitro endothelial cell system using induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Based on an adapted protocol for human IPSCs, we directly differentiated macaque IPSCs into endothelial cells under chemically defined conditions. The resulting endothelial cells can be enriched using immuno-magnetic cell sorting and display endothelial marker expression and function. RNA sequencing revealed that the differentiation process closely resembled vasculogenesis. Moreover, we showed that endothelial cells derived from macaque and human IPSCs are highly similar with respect to gene expression patterns and key endothelial functions, such as inflammatory responses. These data demonstrate the power of IPSC differentiation technology to generate defined cell types for use as translational in vitro models to compare cell type-specific responses across species. PMID:27779219

  18. Generation, cryopreservation, function and in vivo persistence of ex-vivo expanded cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Lien; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2015-01-01

    We expanded flow-sorted Foxp3+ cynomolgus monkey regulatory T cells (Treg) >1000-fold after three rounds of stimulation with anti-CD3 mAb-loaded artificial antigen-presenting cells, rapamycin (first round only) and IL-2. The expanded Treg maintained their expression of Treg signature markers, CD25, CD27, CD39, Foxp3, Helios, and CTLA-4, as well as CXCR3, which plays an important role in T cell migration to sites of inflammation. In contrast to expanded effector T cells (Teff), expanded Treg produced minimal IFN-γ and IL-17 and no IL-2 and potently suppressed Teff proliferation. Following cryopreservation, thawed Treg were less viable than their freshly-expanded counterparts, although no significant changes in phenotype or suppressive ability were observed. Additional rounds of stimulation/expansion restored maximal viability. Furthermore, adoptively-transferred autologous Treg expanded from cryopreserved second round stocks and labeled with CFSE or VPD450 were detected in blood and secondary lymphoid tissues of normal or immunosuppressed recipients at least two months after their systemic infusion. PMID:25732601

  19. The effects of the anti-hepcidin Spiegelmer NOX-H94 on inflammation-induced anemia in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schwoebel, Frank; van Eijk, Lucas T.; Zboralski, Dirk; Sell, Simone; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Purschke, Werner G.; Humphrey, Martin; Zöllner, Stefan; Eulberg, Dirk; Morich, Frank; Pickkers, Peter; Klussmann, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Anemia of chronic inflammation is the most prevalent form of anemia in hospitalized patients. A hallmark of this disease is the intracellular sequestration of iron. This is a consequence of hepcidin-induced internalization and subsequent degradation of ferroportin, the hepcidin receptor and only known iron-export protein. This study describes the characterization of novel anti-hepcidin compound NOX-H94, a structured L-oligoribonucleotide that binds human hepcidin with high affinity (Kd = 0.65 ± 0.06 nmol/L). In J774A.1 macrophages, NOX-H94 blocked hepcidin-induced ferroportin degradation and ferritin expression (half maximal inhibitory concentration = 19.8 ± 4.6 nmol/L). In an acute cynomolgus monkey model of interleukin 6 (IL-6)–induced hypoferremia, NOX-H94 inhibited serum iron reduction completely. In a subchronic model of IL-6–induced anemia, NOX-H94 inhibited the decrease in hemoglobin concentration. We conclude that NOX-H94 protects ferroportin from hepcidin-induced degradation. Therefore, this pharmacologic approach may represent an interesting treatment option for patients suffering from anemia of chronic inflammation. PMID:23349391

  20. A formulation-enabled preclinical efficacy assessment of a farnesoid X receptor agonist, GW4064, in hamsters and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Thompson, David C; Ghosh, Sarbani; Heitmeier, Monique R

    2011-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to one of the human nuclear receptor superfamilies that regulate gene transcription. FXR is widely expressed in liver, gall bladder, intestine, kidney, and adrenal glands. It serves as a key controller of bile acid homeostasis through its regulation of bile acid synthesis, conjugation, secretion, and absorption. FXR is also known to play a role in lipid regulation, triglyceride synthesis, and lipoprotein metabolism and clearance. We used a commercially available FXR agonist, GW4064, as a model compound to assess preclinical efficacy in two species (hamster and cynomolgus monkey). The crystalline GW4064, however, was found to have limited solubility, which resulted in poor oral bioavailability. This made it difficult to assess in vivo efficacy at the exposure levels desired. The physiochemical properties of GW4064 were assessed and both salt and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) formulation were developed and tested. The SEDDS formulation was found to greatly improve the oral bioavailability of GW4064, and permitted the evaluation of FXR agonist target efficacy.

  1. A new phenylpyrazoleanilide, y-320, inhibits interleukin 17 production and ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Hiroyuki; Ishibuchi, Seigo; Oshita, Koichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Kataoka, Hirotoshi; Sugahara, Kunio; Adachi, Kunitomo; Chiba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because both pro-inflammatory cytokines are found in synovial fluid of RA patients. In this study, we examined the pharmacological profiles of Y-320, a new phenylpyrazoleanilide immunomodulator. Y-320 inhibited IL-17 production by CD4 T cells stimulated with IL-15 with IC50 values of 20 to 60 nM. Oral administration of Y-320 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development and progression of arthritis and joint destruction with reduction of IL-17 mRNA expression in arthritic joints of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Y-320 in combination with anti-murine tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody showed a synergistic effect on mouse CIA. Moreover, therapeutic treatment with Y-320 (0.3 and 1 mg/kg orally) ameliorated CIA in cynomolgus monkeys. Our results suggest that Y-320, an orally active inhibitor for IL-17 production, provides a useful therapy for RA. PMID:24366113

  2. Pitavastatin as an in vivo probe for studying hepatic organic anion transporting polypeptide-mediated drug-drug interactions in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuka, Tatsuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tatekawa, Ichiro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kume, Toshiyuki

    2013-10-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) caused by the inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) can affect therapeutic efficacy and cause adverse reactions. We investigated the potential utility of pitavastatin as an in vivo probe substrate for preclinically studying OATP-mediated DDIs using cynomolgus monkeys. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and rifampicin (RIF), typical OATP inhibitors, inhibited active uptake of pitavastatin into monkey hepatocytes with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values comparable with those in human hepatocytes. CsA and RIF increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of intravenously administered pitavastatin in cynomolgus monkeys by 3.2- and 3.6-fold, respectively. In addition, there was no apparent prolongation of the elimination half-life of pitavastatin due to the decrease in both hepatic clearance and volume of distribution. These findings suggest that DDIs were caused by the inhibition of hepatic uptake of pitavastatin. CsA and RIF increased the AUC of orally administered pitavastatin by 10.6- and 14.8-fold, respectively, which was additionally caused by the effect of the CsA and RIF in the gastrointestinal tract. Hepatic contribution to the overall DDI for oral pitavastatin with CsA was calculated from the changes in hepatic availability and clearance, and it was shown that the magnitude of hepatic DDI was comparable between the present study and the clinical study. In conclusion, pharmacokinetic studies using pitavastatin as a probe in combination with drug candidates in cynomolgus monkeys are useful to support the assessment of potential clinical DDIs involving hepatic uptake transporters.

  3. Identification of putative substrates for cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C8 by substrate depletion assays with 22 human P450 substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in drug developmental stages as non-human primate models. Previous studies used 89 compounds to investigate species differences associated with cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) function that reported monkey specific CYP2C76 cleared 19 chemicals, and homologous CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 metabolized 17 and 30 human CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 substrates/inhibitors, respectively. In the present study, 22 compounds selected from viewpoints of global drug interaction guidances and guidelines were further evaluated to seek potential substrates for monkey CYP2C8, which is highly homologous to human CYP2C8 (92%). Amodiaquine, montelukast, quercetin and rosiglitazone, known as substrates or competitive inhibitors of human CYP2C8, were metabolically depleted by recombinant monkey CYP2C8 at relatively high rates. Taken together with our reported findings of the slow eliminations of amodiaquine and montelukast by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2C76, the present results suggest that these at least four chemicals may be good marker substrates for monkey CYP2C8. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26581561

  4. Identification of putative substrates for cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C8 by substrate depletion assays with 22 human P450 substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in drug developmental stages as non-human primate models. Previous studies used 89 compounds to investigate species differences associated with cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) function that reported monkey specific CYP2C76 cleared 19 chemicals, and homologous CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 metabolized 17 and 30 human CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 substrates/inhibitors, respectively. In the present study, 22 compounds selected from viewpoints of global drug interaction guidances and guidelines were further evaluated to seek potential substrates for monkey CYP2C8, which is highly homologous to human CYP2C8 (92%). Amodiaquine, montelukast, quercetin and rosiglitazone, known as substrates or competitive inhibitors of human CYP2C8, were metabolically depleted by recombinant monkey CYP2C8 at relatively high rates. Taken together with our reported findings of the slow eliminations of amodiaquine and montelukast by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2C76, the present results suggest that these at least four chemicals may be good marker substrates for monkey CYP2C8. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Behavioural Profiles in Captive-Bred Cynomolgus Macaques: Towards Monkey Models of Mental Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background To date, experimental and preclinical studies on neuropsychiatric conditions have almost exclusively been performed in experimentally-induced animal models and have only rarely relied upon an ethological approach where animals have been observed in more naturalistic settings. The laboratory species of choice has been the rodent while the potential of more closely-related non-human primates have remained largely underexplored. Methods The present study, therefore, aimed at investigating the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 cynomolgus macaques in captive conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence analysis and a hierarchical clustering. Results The study identified five distinct profiles (groups A to E) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, gaze directions and locations in the cage environment. We suggest that animals from the low n groups (D and E) present depressive-like and anxious-like symptoms, reminiscent of depressive and generalized anxiety disorders. Inter-individual differences were highlighted through unbiased ethological observations of spontaneous behaviours and associated parameters, although these were not associated with differences in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid levels of either stress-related hormones or monoamines, i.e. in accordance with the human situation. Conclusions No interventional behavioural testing was required to discriminate between 3 typical and 2 atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like and anxiety-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might, thus, allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23658620

  6. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; de Almeida, Adilson José; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; de Castro, Tatiana Xavier; do Nascimento, Jussara Pereira; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group. PMID:27074255

  7. Stimulation of cell division by argon and Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty in cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Dueker, D.K.; Norberg, M.; Johnson, D.H.; Tschumper, R.C.; Feeney-Burns, L. )

    1990-01-01

    Although laser treatment of the trabecular meshwork is the most common form of surgery for glaucoma, the tissue response to this therapy is still incompletely understood. We applied argon or Nd:YAG laser to the trabecular meshwork of six monkeys. Cell division was identified by injecting tritiated thymidine into the anterior chamber 24 hr after laser application. Autoradiography of tissue sections revealed significantly more labelled cells in eyes treated with laser than in the untreated controls. In addition, cells in neighboring tissues such as iris, ciliary body and sclera showed labelling in association with laser application. Furthermore, comparison of argon-induced lesions with those caused by pulsed Nd:YAG suggests that there are quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of trabecular meshwork and surrounding tissues to these two forms of laser energy.

  8. The distribution of zinc in the prostate of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys determined by electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, S.; Chandler, J.A.; Harper, M.E.; Blacklock, N.J.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of zinc in the prostate of the mature rhesus monkey is described. High levels of zinc were located in the nuclei of epithelial and basal cells in both lobes of the gland, while elevated concentrations of the metal were also found in secretory granules and along lateral cell membranes. A similar zinc distribution pattern was observed in the 2 lobes of the gland, but in general organelles in the cranial region had a higher content of the metal. In whole tissue, however, a 15 times greater zinc content was measured in the caudal lobe. This difference could be explained in terms of the high levels of the metal present in secretory granules and luminal secretion in the caudal lobe. A similar ultrastructural appearance and distribution of zinc was observed in the prostate of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

  9. Evaluation of 89 compounds for identification of substrates for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C76, a new bupropion/nifedipine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Uehara, Shotaro; Fujino, Hideki; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies during drug development because of their evolutionary closeness to humans, including their cytochrome P450s (P450s). Most cynomolgus monkey P450s are almost identical (≥90%) to human P450s; however, CYP2C76 has low sequence identity (approximately 80%) to any human CYP2Cs. Although CYP2C76 has no ortholog in humans and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans, a broad evaluation of potential substrates for CYP2C76 has not yet been conducted. In this study, a screening of 89 marketed compounds, including human CYP2C and non-CYP2C substrates or inhibitors, was conducted to find potential CYP2C76 substrates. Among the compounds screened, 19 chemicals were identified as substrates for CYP2C76, including substrates for human CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin), CYP2B6 (bupropion), CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan), and CYP3A4/5 (dextromethorphan and nifedipine), and inhibitors for CYP2B6 (sertraline, clopidogrel, and ticlopidine), CYP2C8 (quercetin), CYP2C19 (ticlopidine and nootkatone), and CYP3A4/5 (troleandomycin). CYP2C76 metabolized a wide variety of the compounds with diverse structures. Among them, bupropion and nifedipine showed high selectivity to CYP2C76. As for nifedipine, CYP2C76 formed methylhydroxylated nifedipine, which was not produced by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19, or CYP3A4, as identified by mass spectrometry and estimated by a molecular docking simulation. This unique oxidative metabolite formation of nifedipine could be one of the selective marker reactions of CYP2C76 among the major CYP2Cs and CYP3As tested. These results suggest that monkey CYP2C76 contributes to bupropion hydroxylation and formation of different nifedipine oxidative metabolites as a result of its relatively large substrate cavity.

  10. Evaluation of 89 compounds for identification of substrates for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C76, a new bupropion/nifedipine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Uehara, Shotaro; Fujino, Hideki; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies during drug development because of their evolutionary closeness to humans, including their cytochrome P450s (P450s). Most cynomolgus monkey P450s are almost identical (≥90%) to human P450s; however, CYP2C76 has low sequence identity (approximately 80%) to any human CYP2Cs. Although CYP2C76 has no ortholog in humans and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkeys and humans, a broad evaluation of potential substrates for CYP2C76 has not yet been conducted. In this study, a screening of 89 marketed compounds, including human CYP2C and non-CYP2C substrates or inhibitors, was conducted to find potential CYP2C76 substrates. Among the compounds screened, 19 chemicals were identified as substrates for CYP2C76, including substrates for human CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin), CYP2B6 (bupropion), CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan), and CYP3A4/5 (dextromethorphan and nifedipine), and inhibitors for CYP2B6 (sertraline, clopidogrel, and ticlopidine), CYP2C8 (quercetin), CYP2C19 (ticlopidine and nootkatone), and CYP3A4/5 (troleandomycin). CYP2C76 metabolized a wide variety of the compounds with diverse structures. Among them, bupropion and nifedipine showed high selectivity to CYP2C76. As for nifedipine, CYP2C76 formed methylhydroxylated nifedipine, which was not produced by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19, or CYP3A4, as identified by mass spectrometry and estimated by a molecular docking simulation. This unique oxidative metabolite formation of nifedipine could be one of the selective marker reactions of CYP2C76 among the major CYP2Cs and CYP3As tested. These results suggest that monkey CYP2C76 contributes to bupropion hydroxylation and formation of different nifedipine oxidative metabolites as a result of its relatively large substrate cavity. PMID:25318994

  11. Immunotoxicological Evaluation of Genetically Modified Rice Expressing Cry1Ab/Ac Protein (TT51-1) by a 6-Month Feeding Study on Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaobing; Tang, Yao; Lv, Jianjun; Zhang, Lin; Sun, Li; Yang, Yanwei; Miao, Yufa; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Gaofeng; Huang, Zhiying; Wang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the food safety of TT51-1, a new type of genetically modified rice that expresses the Cry1Ab/Ac protein (Bt toxin) and is highly resistant to most lepidopteran pests. Sixteen male and 16 female cynomolgus monkeys were randomly divided into four groups: conventional rice (non-genetically modified rice, non-GM rice), positive control, 17.5% genetically modified rice (GM rice) and 70% GM rice. Monkeys in the non-GM rice, positive control, and GM rice groups were fed on diets containing 70% non-GM rice, 17.5% GM rice or 70% GM rice, respectively, for 182 days, whereas animals in the positive group were intravenously injected with cyclophosphamide every other day for a total of four injections before the last treatment. Six months of treatment did not yield abnormal observations. Specifically, the following parameters did not significantly differ between the non-GM rice group and GM rice groups: body weight, food consumption, electrocardiogram, hematology, immuno-phenotyping of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, mitogen-induced peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation, splenocyte proliferation, KLH-T cell-dependent antibody response, organ weights and ratios, and histological appearance (p>0.05). Animals from the GM rice group differed from animals in the non-GM rice group (p<0.05) in several parameters: specifically, their body temperatures and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were higher, whereas their levels of serum K+, Cl- and cytokines (IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) were lower. Because dose- or time-dependent changes were not observed in this study and animals appeared histologically normal, the aforementioned differences were not considered to be adverse or related to the treatment with GM rice. In conclusion, a 6-month feeding study of TT51-1 did not show adverse immunotoxicological effects on cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:27684490

  12. Results of Life-Supporting GalT-KO kidneys in Cynomolgus Monkeys Using Two Different Sources of GalT-KO Swine

    PubMed Central

    Sekijima, Mitsuhiro; Waki, Shiori; Sahara, Hisashi; Tasaki, Masayuki; Wilkinson, Robert A.; Villani, Vincenzo; Shimatsu, Yoshiki; Nakano, Kazuaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Fishman, Jay A.; Shimizu, Akira; Yamada, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Various durations of survival have been observed in the xenotransplantation of life-supporting alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) porcine kidneys into nonhuman primates (NHPs). While others have demonstrated loss of GalT-KO transplanted kidneys within two weeks, we have reported an average survival of 51 days with the co-transplantation of the kidney and vascularized thymus and an average of 29 days with the kidney alone. In order to determine the factors responsible for this difference in survival time, we performed xenogeneic kidney transplantations into cynomolgus monkeys with an anti-CD40L-based regimen using two different strains of GalT-KO swine, one derived from MGH-Miniature swine and the other obtained from Meji University. Materials and Methods Eight cynomolgus moneys received GalT-KO kidneys. Three kidney grafts were from MGH/NIBS GalT-KO pigs and 5 GalT-KO grafts were from MEIJI GalT-KO swine. All cynomolgus recipients were treated identically. Results Recipients of kidneys from the MGH GalT-KO swine, produced by nuclear transfer in Japan, survived an average of 28.7 days, while recipients of MEIJI GalT-KO swine survived an average of 9.2 days. Among the differences between these two groups, one potentially revealing disparity was that the MEIJI swine were positive for porcine-CMV, while the MGH-derived swine were negative. Conclusions This is the first study comparing renal xenotransplantation from two different sources of GalT-KO swine into NHPs at a single center. The results demonstrate that porcine-CMV may be responsible for early loss of GalTKO swine kidney xenografts. PMID:25243512

  13. Immunogenicity studies with a genetically engineered hexavalent PorA and a wild-type meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine in infant cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rouppe van der Voort, E; Schuller, M; Holst, J; de Vries, P; van der Ley, P; van den Dobbelsteen, G; Poolman, J

    2000-01-31

    The immunogenicity of two meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines, namely the Norwegian wild-type OMV vaccine and the Dutch hexavalent PorA OMV vaccine, were examined in infant cynomolgus monkeys. For the first time, a wild-type- and a recombinant OMV vaccine were compared. Furthermore, the induction of memory and the persistence of circulating antibodies were measured. The Norwegian vaccine contained all four classes of major outer membrane proteins (OMP) and wild-type L3/L8 lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The Dutch vaccine consisted for 90% of class 1 OMPs, had low expression of class 4 and 5 OMP, and GalE LPS. Three infant monkeys were immunised with a human dose at the age of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 months. Two monkeys of each group received a fourth dose at the age of 11 months. In ELISA, both OMV vaccines were immunogenic and induced booster responses, particularly after the fourth immunisation. The Norwegian vaccine mostly induced sero-subtype P1.7,16 specific serum bactericidal antibodies (SBA), although some other SBA were induced as well. The antibody responses against P1.7,16, induced by the Norwegian vaccine, were generally higher than for the Dutch vaccine. However, the Dutch vaccine induced PorA specific SBA against all six sero-subtypes included in the vaccine showing differences in the magnitude of SBA responses to the various PorAs. PMID:10618530

  14. Effect of prolonged ketamine exposure on cardiovascular physiology in pregnant and infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Wang, Cheng; Slikker, William

    2007-11-01

    Physiologic measurements in nonhuman primates usually are collected from animals that are chemically or physically restrained. Both types of restraint may affect the parameters measured, and those effects can vary with age. Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, expired CO2, blood pressure, temperature, blood glucose, hematocrit, and venous blood gasses were measured in rhesus monkeys that were either infused intravenously with ketamine for 24 h or were cage-housed and physically restrained for sample collection. The subjects were pregnant monkeys at gestational day 120 to 123, infants 5 to 6 d old, and infants 35 to 37 d old. Heart rate and blood pressure were lower in ketamine-treated monkeys than physically restrained monkeys. Heart rate was higher in infants than adults, whereas blood pressure was lower in infants. Respiratory rate was higher in infants than adults and higher in physically restrained infants than ketamine-sedated infants but was not affected by ketamine in pregnant adults. Hematocrit was decreased in older infants. In summary, both physical restraint and ketamine sedation altered several physiologic parameters in pregnant and infant rhesus macaques. Investigators should consider these effects when designing experiments and evaluating experimental outcomes in monkeys.

  15. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  16. Comparison of the toxicokinetic behavior of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and nonafluorobutane-1-sulfonic acid (PFBS) in cynomolgus monkeys and rats.

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Myers, Nichole R; Shinohara, Motoki; Stetson, Philip L; Sved, Daniel W

    2009-06-01

    The toxicokinetics of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and nonafluoro-1-butanesulfonic acid (PFBS) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Systemic exposure to PFHxA was lower than for PFBS following single equivalent intravenous or oral (rat only) doses. Serum clearance was more rapid for PFHxA than for PFBS. In rats, exposure to PFHxA and PFBS was up to 8-fold (intravenous) and 4-fold (oral) higher for males than females and serum clearance of PFHxA and PFBS was more rapid in females than males; however, there was no appreciable difference in the extent or rate of urinary elimination between compounds or genders. There were no apparent differences between genders in the serum half-life for PFHxA following 26 days of repeated oral dosing in rats; exposure decreased upon repeated dosing.

  17. Assessing in vivo dynamics of multiple quality attributes from a therapeutic IgG4 monoclonal antibody circulating in cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinyin; Huang, Yu; Ferrant, Janine; Lyubarskaya, Yelena; Zhang, Yue (Emma); Li, Siyang (Peter); Wu, Shiaw-Lin (Billy)

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Characterization of biopharmaceutical proteins and assessment and understanding of the critical quality attributes (CQAs) is a significant part of biopharmaceutical product development and is routinely performed in vitro. In contrast, systematic analysis of the quality attributes in vivo is not as widespread, although metabolism and clearance of multiple variants of therapeutic proteins administered to non-human primates and human subjects may have a different impact on safety, efficacy and exposure. The major hurdles of such studies are usually sample availability and technical capability. In this study, we used affinity purification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis of the digested protein for consistent and simultaneous detection of the full amino acid sequence of a therapeutic IgG4 monoclonal antibody, MAB1. This methodology allowed us to assess in vivo changes of all sequence-related modifications and quality attributes of MAB1 over the duration of a preclinical pharmacokinetic study in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:27030286

  18. Differences among conventional, atypical and novel putative D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics on catalepsy-associated behaviour in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Agnès L; Kleven, Mark S; Barret-Grévoz, Catherine; Barreto, Martine; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan

    2009-11-01

    Typical antipsychotics such as haloperidol exert their therapeutic effects via blockade of dopamine (DA) D(2) receptors, leading to extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in humans and catalepsy in rodents. In contrast, atypical antipsychotics and new generation D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics have low cataleptogenic potential. However, there has been no systematic comparative study on the effects of these different classes of antipsychotics in non-human primates, a species displaying a more sophisticated repertoire of behavioural/motor activity than rats. Once weekly, six young adult female non-haloperidol-sensitised cynomolgus monkeys were treated i.m. with a test compound and videotaped to score catalepsy-associated behaviour (CAB: static postures, unusual positions and crouching). Haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, nemonapride and remoxipride induced, to different extents, an increase in unusual positions (a response akin to dystonia), some crouching and static postures. In contrast, clozapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole produced much lower or no unusual positions; clozapine also produced marked increases in static postures and crouching. Among novel D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics, SLV313 and F15063 augmented the number of unusual positions, albeit at doses 16-63 times higher than those of haloperidol for approximately the same score. SSR181507 and bifeprunox produced moderate static postures, little crouching and negligible unusual positions. These data provide the first comparative analysis in cynomolgus monkeys of EPS liability of conventional, atypical and novel D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics. They indicate that the latter are less prone than haloperidol to produce CAB, and provide a basis for comparison with rodent catalepsy studies. PMID:19464324

  19. A comparison of the pulpal response to freeze-dried bone, calcium hydroxide, and zinc oxide-eugenol in primary teeth in two cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fadavi, S; Anderson, A W

    1996-01-01

    This study assessed the pulp healing response to human freeze-dried bone (FDB) in two cynomolgus monkeys using 36 noncarious primary teeth pulpotomized and randomly assigned to three medicaments. FDB was applied on the pulp stumps and covered with sterile tin foil as experimental group. The two other groups received either calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2], or IRM (reinforced ZOE). All teeth were restored with amalgam. One animal was sacrificed at 6 weeks and the other 6 months after treatment. Teeth were extracted and placed in 10% formalin. Histological evaluation indicated that 100% of teeth treated with FDB had vital pulps compared with 75% of the Ca(OH)2 group after 6 weeks. Dentin bridges were present in 87.5% of FDB versus 75% of Ca(OH)2 group. Inflammatory cells were absent or mild in 100% of FDB-treated versus 75% of the Ca(OH)2 group. After 6 months, 83.3% of FDB-treated teeth had vital pulps compared with the Ca(OH)2 group, which showed 100% pulpal necrosis. In FDB-treated pulps, 100% of teeth showed dentin bridges versus 50% of teeth treated with Ca(OH)2. Inflammatory cells were absent or mildly present in 83.3% of FDB-treated teeth while 100% of Ca(OH)2 showed moderate to severe inflammation. IRM-treated teeth all showed pulpal necrosis after 6 months. We concluded that FDB was superior to calcium hydroxide in treating primary pulp dentition in cynomolgus monkeys.

  20. Discovery of 4-Aryl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroisoquinolines as Potent, Selective, and Orally Active Aldosterone Synthase (CYP11B2) Inhibitors: In Vivo Evaluation in Rodents and Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rainer E; Aebi, Johannes D; Hornsperger, Benoit; Krebs, Hans-Jakob; Kuhn, Bernd; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Alker, André M; Märki, Hans Peter; Müller, Stephan; Burger, Dominique; Ottaviani, Giorgio; Riboulet, William; Verry, Philippe; Tan, Xuefei; Amrein, Kurt; Mayweg, Alexander V

    2015-10-22

    Inappropriately high levels of aldosterone are associated with many serious medical conditions, including renal and cardiac failure. A focused screen hit has been optimized into a potent and selective aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) inhibitor with in vitro activity against rat, mouse, human, and cynomolgus monkey enzymes, showing a selectivity factor of 160 against cytochrome CYP11B1 in the last species. The novel tetrahydroisoquinoline compound (+)-(R)-6 selectively reduced aldosterone plasma levels in vivo in a dose-dependent manner in db/db mice and cynomolgus monkeys. The selectivity against CYP11B1 as predicted by cellular inhibition data and free plasma fraction translated well to Synacthen challenged cynomolgus monkeys up to a dose of 0.1 mg kg(-1). This compound, displaying good in vivo potency and selectivity in mice and monkeys, is ideally suited to perform mechanistic studies in relevant rodent models and to provide the information necessary for translation to non-human primates and ultimately to man. PMID:26403853

  1. Nectin-4-Dependent Measles Virus Spread to the Cynomolgus Monkey Tracheal Epithelium: Role of Infected Immune Cells Infiltrating the Lamina Propria

    PubMed Central

    Frenzke, Marie; Sawatsky, Bevan; Wong, Xiao X.; Delpeut, Sébastien; Mateo, Mathieu; von Messling, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    After the contagion measles virus (MV) crosses the respiratory epithelium within myeloid cells that express the primary receptor signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM), it replicates briskly in SLAM-expressing cells in lymphatic organs. Later, the infection spreads to epithelia expressing nectin-4, an adherens junction protein expressed preferentially in the trachea, but how it gets there is not understood. To characterize the mechanisms of spread, we infected groups of 5 or 6 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) with either a wild-type MV or its “N4-blind” derivative, which is unable to enter nectin-4-expressing cells because of the targeted mutation of two hemagglutinin residues. As expected, both viruses caused similar levels of immunosuppression, as monitored by reductions in white blood cell counts and lymphocyte proliferation activity. However, monkeys infected with the N4-blind MV cleared infection more rapidly. Wild-type virus-infected monkeys secreted virus, while marginal virus titers were detected in tracheal lavage fluid cells of N4-blind MV-infected hosts. Analyses of tracheal rings obtained at necropsy (day 12) documented widespread infection of individual cells or small cell clusters in the subepithelial lamina propria of monkeys infected with either virus. However, only wild-type MV spread to the epithelium, forming numerous infectious centers comprised of many contiguous columnar cells. Infected CD11c+ myeloid (macrophage or dendritic) cells were frequently observed in the lamina propria below epithelial infectious centers. Thus, MV may use myeloid cells as vehicles not only immediately after contagion but also to infect epithelia of tissues expressing nectin-4, including the trachea. PMID:23255790

  2. Infant cynomolgus monkeys exposed to denosumab in utero exhibit an osteoclast-poor osteopetrotic-like skeletal phenotype at birth and in the early postnatal period.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Rogely W; Varela, Aurore; Chouinard, Luc; Bussiere, Jeanine L; Chellman, Gary J; Ominsky, Michael S; Pyrah, Ian T

    2014-07-01

    RANKL is a key regulator of bone resorption and osteoclastogenesis. Denosumab is a fully human IgG2 monoclonal antibody that inhibits bone resorption by binding and inhibiting the activity of RANKL. To determine the effects of denosumab on pre- and postnatal skeletal growth and development, subcutaneous injections of 0 (control) or 50 mg/kg/month denosumab were given to pregnant cynomolgus monkeys from approximately gestation day (GD) 20 until parturition (up to 6 doses). For up to 6 months postpartum (birth day [BD] 180/181), evaluation of the infants included skeletal radiographs, bone biomarkers, and oral examinations for assessment of tooth eruption. Infant bones were collected at necropsy for densitometry, biomechanical testing, and histopathologic evaluation from control and denosumab-exposed infants on BD1 (or within 2 weeks of birth) and BD181, and from infants that died or were euthanized moribund from BD5 to BD69. In all denosumab-exposed infants, biomarkers of bone resorption and formation were markedly decreased at BD1 and BD14 and slightly greater at BD91 vs. control, then similar to control values by BD181. Spontaneous long bone fractures were detected clinically or radiographically in 4 denosumab-exposed infants at BD28 and BD60, with evidence of radiographic healing at ≥BD60. In BD1 infants exposed to denosumab in utero, radiographic evaluations of the skeleton revealed decreased long bone length; a generalized increased radio-opacity of the axial and appendicular skeleton and bones at the base of the skull with decreased or absent marrow cavities, widened growth plates, flared/club-shaped metaphysis, altered jaw/skull shape, and reduced jaw length; and delayed development of secondary ossification centers. Densitometric evaluations in these infants demonstrated a marked increase in bone mineral density at trabecular sites, but cortical bone mineral density was decreased. Histologically, long bone cortices were attenuated and there was an absence

  3. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  4. Assessment of ixekizumab, an interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, for potential effects on reproduction and development, including immune system function, in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Clarke, D O; Hilbish, K G; Waters, D G; Newcomb, D L; Chellman, G J

    2015-12-01

    The reproductive and developmental toxicity of ixekizumab, a selective inhibitor of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), was assessed in the following studies in cynomolgus monkeys: fertility (3-month dosing), embryo-fetal development (EFD; dosing from gestation day (GD) 20 through 139), and pre-postnatal development (PPND; dosing from GD 20 through parturition). Because IL-17A has functional roles in innate and humoral immunity, immune system modulation was evaluated in the EFD and PPND studies; immunological evaluations in infants comprised peripheral blood immunophenotyping, Natural Killer cell cytolytic activity, and T-cell-dependent antibody (IgG and IgM) primary and secondary responses to antigen challenge. Ixekizumab exposure was sustained during the dosing periods in most adult monkeys. Fetal exposure at Cesarean section (GD 140-142; EFD study) was 18-25% of maternal exposure and ixekizumab was present in infants for up to 29 weeks postpartum. There were no adverse effects attributed to ixekizumab in any study. Importantly, immune system development and maturation were unaffected.

  5. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  6. The Role of VP1 Amino Acid Residue 145 of Enterovirus 71 in Viral Fitness and Pathogenesis in a Cynomolgus Monkey Model

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Chikako; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kotani, Osamu; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nagata, Noriyo; Ami, Yasushi; Wakita, Takaji; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease, occasionally causes severe neurological symptoms. We identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) as an EV71 receptor and found that an amino acid residue 145 in the capsid protein VP1 (VP1-145) defined PSGL-1-binding (PB) and PSGL-1-nonbinding (non-PB) phenotypes of EV71. However, the role of PSGL-1-dependent EV71 replication in neuropathogenesis remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated viral replication, genetic stability, and the pathogenicity of PB and non-PB strains of EV71 in a cynomolgus monkey model. Monkeys were intravenously inoculated with cDNA-derived PB and non-PB strains of EV71, EV71-02363-EG and EV71-02363-KE strains, respectively, with two amino acid differences at VP1-98 and VP1-145. Mild neurological symptoms, transient lymphocytopenia, and inflammatory cytokine responses, were found predominantly in the 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys. During the early stage of infection, viruses were frequently detected in clinical samples from 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys but rarely in samples from 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Histopathological analysis of central nervous system (CNS) tissues at 10 days postinfection revealed that 02363-KE induced neuropathogenesis more efficiently than that induced by 02363-EG. After inoculation with 02363-EG, almost all EV71 variants detected in clinical samples, CNS, and non-CNS tissues, possessed a G to E amino acid substitution at VP1-145, suggesting a strong in vivo selection of VP1-145E variants and CNS spread presumably in a PSGL-1-independent manner. EV71 variants with VP1-145G were identified only in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in two out of four 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Thus, VP1-145E variants are mainly responsible for the development of viremia and neuropathogenesis in a non-human primate model, further suggesting the in vivo involvement of amino acid polymorphism at VP1-145 in cell-specific viral

  7. Investigating the effect of autoinduction in cynomolgus monkeys of a novel anticancer MDM2 antagonist, idasanutlin, and relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Kelli J; Yu, Li J; Reddy, Micaela B; Fretland, Adrian J; Parrott, Neil; Hussain, Sazzad; Palacios, Mary; Vazvaei, Faye; Zhi, Jianguo; Tuerck, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    1. Idasanutlin (RG7388) is a potent p53-MDM2 antagonist currently in clinical development for treatment of cancer. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the cause of marked decrease in plasma exposure after repeated oral administration of RG7388 in monkeys and whether the autoinduction observed in monkeys is relevant to humans. 2. In monkey liver and intestinal microsomes collected after repeated oral administration of RG7388 to monkeys, significantly increased activities of homologue CYP3A8 were observed (ex vivo). Investigation using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model suggested that the loss of exposure was primarily due to induction of metabolism in the gut of monkeys. 3. Studies in monkey and human primary hepatocytes showed that CYP3A induction by RG7388 only occurred in monkey hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes, which suggests the observed CYP3A induction is monkey specific. 4. The human PK data obtained from the first cohorts confirmed the lack of relevant induction as predicted by the human hepatocytes and the PBPK modelling based on no induction in humans. PMID:26586447

  8. Pharmacokinetics of doxylamine given as Bendectin in the pregnant monkey and baboon.

    PubMed

    Rowland, J M; Slikker, W; Holder, C L; Denton, R; Prahalada, S; Young, J F; Hendrickx, A G

    1989-01-01

    The object of the present study was to determine the maternal plasma pharmacokinetics of doxylamine (the antihistamine component of Bendectin) following Bendectin administration. Bendectin was administered daily, po, at a dosage approximately 10 times the maximum human therapeutic dosage (7 mg/kg/day) throughout organogenesis (approximately days 22 through 50 of gestation) to three cynomolgus monkeys, four rhesus monkeys, and five baboons. Two pharmacokinetic experiments were performed in each animal, one on the first day of treatment and one on the last day of treatment. Although this study was not designed specifically as a teratologic examination, no morphologic abnormalities were observed when the fetuses were examined on approximately day 100 of gestation. A single-compartment, parallel first- and second-order elimination model was used to analyze the data. Although considerable interindividual variation was evident, no significant differences between species were observed when the half-life for the absorption of doxylamine from the gut or the elimination of doxylamine and metabolites from the plasma were compared. The plasma elimination half-lives and the clearance values were not altered by the 29 days of Bendectin treatment for any of the species. Only the half-life for the absorption of doxylamine in the baboon was reduced by daily dosing with Bendectin, but this did not alter doxylamine elimination. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of doxylamine administered as Bendectin were similar in the three nonhuman primate species examined and were not altered by repeated daily administration.

  9. Sites of particle retention and lung tissue responses to chronically inhaled diesel exhaust and coal dust in rats and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Nikula, K J; Avila, K J; Griffith, W C; Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of pulmonary carcinogenicity data from rats exposed to high concentrations of particles for quantitatively predicting lung cancer risk in humans exposed to much lower environmental or occupational concentrations has been questioned. The results of several chronic inhalation bioassays of poorly soluble, nonfibrous particles have suggested that rats may be more prone than other rodent species to develop persistent pulmonary epithelial hyperplasia, metaplasia, and tumors in response to the accumulation of inhaled particles. In addition, rats and primates differ in their pulmonary anatomy and rate of particle clearance from the lung. This paper reviews results of recent Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (Albuquerque, NM) investigations that directly compared the anatomical patterns of particle retention and the lung tissue responses of rats and monkeys exposed chronically to high occupational concentrations of poorly soluble particles. Lung sections from male cynomolgus monkeys and F344 rats exposed 7 hr/day, 5 days/week for 24 months to filtered ambient air, diesel exhaust (2 mg soot/m3), coal dust (2 mg respirable particulate material/m3), or diesel exhaust and coal dust combined (1 mg soot and 1 mg respirable coal dust/m3) were obtained from a study conducted at the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and examined histopathologically and morphometrically. Within each species, the sites of particle retention and lung tissue responses were the same for diesel soot, coal dust, and combined material. Rats retained a significantly greater portion of the particulate material in the lumens of alveolar ducts and alveoli than monkeys. Conversely, monkeys retained a significantly greater portion of the particulate material in the interstitium than rats. Rats, but not monkeys, had significant alveolar epithelial hyperplastic, inflammatory, and septal fibrotic responses to the retained particles. These results suggest that anatomic

  10. Drug safety evaluation through biomarker analysis-A toxicity study in the cynomolgus monkey using an antibody-cytotoxic conjugate against ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Frank Y. Tengstrand, Elizabeth; Lee, J.-W.; Li, Lily Y.; Silverman, Lee; Riordan, Bill; Miwa, Gerald; Milton, Mark; Alden, Carl; Lee, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Antibody-cytotoxin conjugates are complex novel therapeutic agents whose toxicological properties are not presently well understood. The objective of this study was to identify serum biomarkers that correlate with MLN8866 (an Antibody-Cytotoxic Conjugate, mAb8866-CT) pathological events in monkeys and to predict the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) level using biomarkers. Cynomolgus monkeys were administered a single dose MLN8666 (5, 15 or 30 mg/kg) by intravenous infusion and evaluated over a 7-day period. Exposure levels were determined by quantifying MLN8866 levels (C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h}) in serum. The increase in MLN8866 C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h} was approximately dose proportional. Two biomarkers in serum (m/z 316 and m/z 368) were identified to be correlated with MLN8866 toxicological outcomes. The predicted MTD, 11.4 mg/kg, was within the MTD range set by pathology results (5-15 mg/kg). Administration of MLN8866 at 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg dose levels resulted in changes in hematology parameters associated with impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow toxicity. The projected MLN8866 MTD exposure level was integrated with toxicokinetic analysis and showed C{sub max} = 236 {mu}g/mL and AUC{sub 0-96h} = 7246 h mg/mL. The safety of three different MLN8866 dosing regimens with three dosing schedules was explored with pharmacokinetic modeling.

  11. Effects of eight-month treatment with ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, on bone metabolism, strength and microstructure in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yasuo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Yasutomo; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Kawada, Naoki; Kunishige, Akiko; Hashimoto, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Makoto; Sugitani, Masafumi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effect of ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, on bone turnover, mineral density (BMD), mechanical strength and microstructure in ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys. Vehicle, ONO-5334 (3, 10 or 30 mg/kg) or alendronate (0.5 mg/kg) was orally administered for eight months to sham- and OVX-operated monkeys. ONO-5334 dose-dependently suppressed OVX-induced increase in bone turnover markers (urinary C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) and serum osteocalcin). At the dose of 30 mg/kg, ONO-5334 maintained urinary CTX at nearly zero level and kept serum osteocalcin around the level of the sham animals. Marker levels in the alendronate-treated animals were similar to those in the sham animals throughout the study. ONO-5334 dose-dependently reversed the effect of OVX on vertebral BMD as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) with improvement of bone mechanical strength. Both ONO-5334 and alendronate suppressed OVX-induced changes in vertebral microstructure and turnover state. In the femoral neck, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) analysis showed that ONO-5334 increased total and cortical BMD. In particular, ONO-5334 significantly increased cortical BMD with improvement of bone mechanical strength. In microstructural analysis, alendronate suppressed OVX-induced increase in femoral mid-shaft osteonal bone formation rate (BFR) to a level below that recorded in the sham group, whereas ONO-5334 at 30 mg/kg did not suppress periosteal, osteonal and endocortical BFR. This finding supports the significant effect of ONO-5334 on cortical BMD and mechanical strength in the femoral neck. The results of this study suggest that ONO-5334 has good therapeutic potential for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. Repeat-dose toxicology evaluation in cynomolgus monkeys of AVI-4658, a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug for the treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane W; Palyada, Kiran; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug designed to restore dystrophin expression in a subset of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Previous reports demonstrated this clinical proof-of-principle in patients with DMD following intramuscular injection of AVI-4658. This preclinical study evaluated the toxicity and toxicokinetic profile of AVI-4658 when administered either intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SC) to cynomolgus monkeys once weekly over 12 weeks, at doses up to the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg per injection. No drug-related effects were noted on survival, clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, opthalmoscopic or electrocardiographic evaluations, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, and macroscopic evaluations. Drug-related microscopic renal effects were dose-dependent, apparently reversible, and included basophilic granules (minimal), basophilic tubules (minimal to moderate), and tubular vacuolation (minimal to mild). These data establish the tolerability of AVI-4658 at doses up to and including the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg by IV bolus or SC injection.

  13. Spontaneous obesity-linked type 2 diabetes in the absence of islet amyloid in a cynomolgus monkey infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Strom, A; Yutzy, B; Kruip, C; Völker, I; Schloot, N C; Roden, M; Scott, F W; Löwer, J; Holznagel, E

    2013-09-01

    A 9-year-old cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) infected orally with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was presented for necropsy following euthanasia 4 years post infection (p.i.). This macaque R984 was exposed to a BSE dose that causes a simian form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) within 5 years p.i. in other macaques. All orally BSE-infected macaques developed a significant weight gain within the first 2 years p.i. compared with non-BSE-infected age- and sex-matched control animals, suggesting increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In contrast, macaque R984 developed rapid weight loss, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria and had to be euthanatized 4 years p.i. before clinical signs of vCJD. Pancreas histopathological evaluation revealed severe islet degeneration but, remarkably, no islet amyloid deposits were present. Immunostaining of pancreas sections for insulin and glucagon confirmed the loss of endocrine cells. In addition, prions were present in the adenohypophysis but not in other areas of the brain, indicating centripetal prion spread from the gut during the preclinical phase of BSE infection. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations of macaque R984 became abnormal with age and resembled T2D. This unusual case of spontaneous T2D in the absence of islet amyloid deposits could have been due to early prion spread from the periphery to the endocrine system or could have occurred spontaneously.

  14. Daily application of alprostadil topical cream (Vitaros) does not impact vaginal pH, flora, or histology in female cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Meier-Davis, Susan R; Debar, Salma; Siddoway, Jacob; Rabe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Topical alprostadil cream (Vitaros) is approved in Canada and Europe for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To determine the effects on the female urogenital tract with repeated administration of the entire dose (300 μg alprostadil containing 2.5% dodecyl-2-n,n-dimethylaminopropionate hydrochloride), the vaginal pH, flora, and histology were assessed as a model for 100% transference from male to the female during unprotected sexual intercourse. Female cynomolgus monkeys were administered the entire dose of Vitaros for 14 days with a 7-day recovery. Relative to vehicle and placebo cream, the vaginal pH and microflora were determined at baseline and weekly, thereafter. Vaginal biopsies were evaluated at the end of dosing and recovery. All animals were clinically normal for the study duration, and the vaginal pH was consistent between dose groups and the dosing period. Vaginal microflora and histopathology findings of mild inflammation were generally similar across treatment groups. In conclusion, repeated vaginal exposure to Vitaros did not alter the pH, microflora, or histology after 14 daily doses, supporting the safety of Vitaros transference to the female partner. PMID:25691520

  15. Non‐clinical safety evaluation of repeated intramuscular administration of the AS15 immunostimulant combined with various antigens in rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, N.; Silvano, J.; Kuper, C. F.; Baudson, N.; Gérard, C.; Forster, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Combination of tumor antigens with immunostimulants is a promising approach in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed animal model toxicity of AS15 combined with various tumor antigens: WT1 (rabbits), or p501, dHER2 and recPRAME (cynomolgus monkeys), administered in seven or 20 dose regimens versus a saline control. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations, followed by extensive post‐mortem pathological examinations, were performed on all animals. Blood hematology and biochemistry parameters were also assessed. Antigen‐specific antibody titers were determined by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Additional assessments in monkeys included electrocardiography and immunohistochemical evaluations of the p501 expression pattern. Transient increases in body temperature were observed 4 h or 24 h after injections of recPRAME + AS15 and dHER2 + AS15. Edema and erythema were observed up to 1 week after most injections of recPRAME + AS15 and all injections of dHER2 + AS15. No treatment‐related effects were observed for electrocardiography parameters. Mean fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in all treated groups compared to controls, but no differences could be observed at the end of the treatment‐free period. Transient but significant differences in biochemistry parameters were observed post‐injection: lower albumin/globulin ratios (p501 + AS15), and higher bilirubin, urea and creatinine (dHER2 + AS15). Pathology examinations revealed significant increases in axillary lymph node mean weights (recPRAME + AS15) compared to controls. A 100% seroconversion rate was observed in all treated groups, but not in controls. p501 protein expression was observed in prostates of all monkeys from studies assessing p501 + AS15. These results suggest a favorable safety profile of the AS15‐containing candidate vaccines, supporting the use of AS15 for clinical development of potential anticancer vaccines. Copyright © 2015 The

  16. Reactivation of organophosphate-inhibited human, Cynomolgus monkey, swine and guinea pig acetylcholinesterase by MMB-4: A modified kinetic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Worek, Franz; Wille, Timo; Aurbek, Nadine; Eyer, Peter; Thiermann, Horst

    2010-12-15

    Treatment of poisoning by highly toxic organophosphorus compounds (OP, nerve agents) is a continuous challenge. Standard treatment with atropine and a clinically used oxime, obidoxime or pralidoxime is inadequate against various nerve agents. For ethical reasons testing of oxime efficacy has to be performed in animals. Now, it was tempting to investigate the reactivation kinetics of MMB-4, a candidate oxime to replace pralidoxime, with nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from human and animal origin in order to provide a kinetic basis for the proper assessment of in vivo data. By applying a modified kinetic approach, allowing the use of necessary high MMB-4 concentrations, it was possible to determine the reactivation constants with sarin-, cyclosarin-, VX-, VR- and tabun-inhibited AChE. MMB-4 exhibited a high reactivity and low affinity towards OP-inhibited AChE, except of tabun-inhibited enzyme where MMB-4 had an extremely low reactivity. Species differences between human and animal AChE were low (Cynomolgus) to moderate (swine, guinea pig). Due to the high reactivity of MMB-4 a rapid reactivation of inhibited AChE can be anticipated at adequate oxime concentrations which are substantially higher compared to HI-6. Additional studies are necessary to determine the in vivo toxicity, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of MMB-4 in humans in order to enable a proper assessment of the value of this oxime as an antidote against nerve agent poisoning.

  17. Dysfunction of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in a mimic model of human multiple sclerosis in Cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ma, Anlun; Xiong, Zuquan; Hu, Yanxin; Qi, Shijie; Song, Lijun; Dun, Hao; Zhang, Liangyan; Lou, Deyan; Yang, Penghui; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Wang, Xiliang; Zhang, Dongqing; Daloze, Pierre; Chen, Huifang

    2009-05-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg and IL-10(+) Tr1 cells play a major role in controlling autoimmunity by suppressing self-reactive T cells. Dysfunction of Tregs appears to be a critical factor in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of CNS, where CD4(+) T cells result in nervous tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of Treg and Tr1 cells in a mimic model of human MS in Cynomolgus monkeys. This study indicated the suppressive capacity of Tregs from MS monkeys was impaired compared with naive controls. The population of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs was decreased in acute stage of MS. However, they showed a restored function and percentage in remitting monkeys. In stable phase, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs differentially expressed elevated level of CD62P cell adhesion molecule which contributes to the mechanism by which Treg cells inhibit CD4(+) T cell responses. On the other hand, the percentage of CD4(+)IL-10(+) Tr1 and suppressive function of Tr1 cells were found reduced in MS monkeys. IL-10 secretion was diminished almost 9-fold in active MS, and recovered in active MS. This deficit in IL-10 secretion was specific to CD3/CD46, but not to CD3/CD28 stimulation. The concentrations of IFN-gamma secreted by CD3/CD46-activated T cells were also not affected. These results demonstrate that Tregs are dysfunctional in Cynomolgus monkey with MS. Loss of regulatory function appears to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of MS. Hence, to develop new approaches for induction of Tregs in vivo may be beneficial for the clinical treatment in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19539557

  18. Effect of repeated apoA-IMilano/POPC infusion on lipids, (apo)lipoproteins, and serum cholesterol efflux capacity in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Herman J; Gomaraschi, Monica; Bellibas, S Eralp; Plassmann, Stephanie; Zerler, Brad; Collins, Heidi L; Adelman, Steven J; Calabresi, Laura; Wijngaard, Peter L J

    2013-09-01

    MDCO-216, a complex of dimeric recombinant apoA-IMilano (apoA-IM) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), was administered to cynomolgus monkeys at 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg every other day for a total of 21 infusions, and effects on lipids, (apo)lipoproteins, and ex-vivo cholesterol efflux capacity were monitored. After 7 or 20 infusions, free cholesterol (FC) and phospholipids (PL) were strongly increased, and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), apoA-I, and apoA-II were strongly decreased. We then measured short-term effects on apoA-IM, lipids, and (apo)lipoproteins after the first or the last infusion. After the first infusion, PL and FC went up in the HDL region and also in the LDL and VLDL regions. ApoE shifted from HDL to LDL and VLDL regions, while ApoA-IM remained located in the HDL region. On day 41, ApoE levels were 8-fold higher than on day 1, and FC, PL, and apoE resided mostly in LDL and VLDL regions. Drug infusion quickly decreased the endogenous cholesterol esterification rate. ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux on day 41 was markedly increased, whereas scavenger receptor type B1 (SRB1) and ABCG1-mediated effluxes were only weakly increased. Strong increase of FC is due to sustained stimulation of ABCA1-mediated efflux, and drop in HDL and formation of large apoE-rich particles are due to lack of LCAT activation. PMID:23828780

  19. Effect of repeated apoA-IMilano/POPC infusion on lipids, (apo)lipoproteins, and serum cholesterol efflux capacity in cynomolgus monkeys[S

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Herman J.; Gomaraschi, Monica; Bellibas, S. Eralp; Plassmann, Stephanie; Zerler, Brad; Collins, Heidi L.; Adelman, Steven J.; Calabresi, Laura; Wijngaard, Peter L. J.

    2013-01-01

    MDCO-216, a complex of dimeric recombinant apoA-IMilano (apoA-IM) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), was administered to cynomolgus monkeys at 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg every other day for a total of 21 infusions, and effects on lipids, (apo)lipoproteins, and ex-vivo cholesterol efflux capacity were monitored. After 7 or 20 infusions, free cholesterol (FC) and phospholipids (PL) were strongly increased, and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), apoA-I, and apoA-II were strongly decreased. We then measured short-term effects on apoA-IM, lipids, and (apo)lipoproteins after the first or the last infusion. After the first infusion, PL and FC went up in the HDL region and also in the LDL and VLDL regions. ApoE shifted from HDL to LDL and VLDL regions, while ApoA-IM remained located in the HDL region. On day 41, ApoE levels were 8-fold higher than on day 1, and FC, PL, and apoE resided mostly in LDL and VLDL regions. Drug infusion quickly decreased the endogenous cholesterol esterification rate. ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux on day 41 was markedly increased, whereas scavenger receptor type B1 (SRB1) and ABCG1-mediated effluxes were only weakly increased. Strong increase of FC is due to sustained stimulation of ABCA1-mediated efflux, and drop in HDL and formation of large apoE-rich particles are due to lack of LCAT activation. PMID:23828780

  20. Nascent VLDL from liver perfusions of cynomolgus monkeys are preferentially enriched in RRR- compared with SRR-alpha-tocopherol: Studies using deuterated tocopherols

    SciTech Connect

    Traber, M.G.; Rudel, L.L.; Burton, G.W.; Hughes, L.; Ingold, K.U.; Kayden, H.J. )

    1990-04-01

    The transport and secretion of vitamin E in lipoproteins have been studied in cynomolgus monkeys fed tocopherols labeled with different amounts of deuterium. The animals were fed a single dose of vitamin E containing 60 mumol of each 2R,4'R,8'R-alpha-(5,7-(C2H3)2)tocopheryl acetate (d6-RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry), 2S,4'R,8'R-alpha-5-(C2H3)tocopheryl acetate (d3-SRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate; alpha-tocopherol with unnatural stereochemistry), and 2R,4'R,8'R-gamma-(3,4-2H)tocopherol (d2-RRR-gamma-tocopherol; gamma-tocopherol with natural stereochemistry). Chylomicrons, as well as the other plasma lipoproteins, contained equal concentrations of all three tocopherols at the earliest time points after feeding suggesting that all three tocopherols were absorbed equally. At later times plasma lipoproteins became preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol. This is likely to be due to hepatic secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and other lipoproteins, which were enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol, as demonstrated in the lipoproteins isolated from perfused livers that had been obtained 24 h following the administration of the deuterated tocopherols. Taken together these data demonstrate that the liver, not the intestine, is the likely site of discrimination between tocopherol isomers and that the liver secretes nascent lipoproteins preferentially enriched in d6-RRR-alpha-tocopherol.

  1. Effects of denosumab, alendronate, or denosumab following alendronate on bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, bone mass and bone strength in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul J; Smith, Susan Y; Samadfam, Rana; Jolette, Jacquelin; Zhou, Lei; Ominsky, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a chronic disease wherein increased bone remodeling reduces bone mass and bone strength. Antiresorptive agents including bisphosphonates are commonly used to mitigate bone loss and fracture risk. Osteoclast inhibition via denosumab (DMAb), a RANKL inhibitor, is a newer approach for reducing fracture risk in patients at increased risk for fracture. The safety of transitioning from bisphosphonate therapy (alendronate; ALN) to DMAb was examined in mature ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys (cynos). One day after OVX, cynos (7-10/group) were treated with vehicle (VEH, s.c.), ALN (50 μg/kg, i.v., twice monthly) or DMAb (25 mg/kg/month, s.c.) for 12 months. Other animals received VEH or ALN for 6 months and then transitioned to 6 months of DMAb. DMAb caused significantly greater reductions in serum CTx than ALN, and transition from ALN to DMAb caused further reductions relative to continued ALN. DMAb and ALN decreased serum calcium (Ca), and transition from ALN to DMAb resulted in a lesser decline in Ca relative to DMAb or to VEH-DMAb transition. Bone histomorphometry indicated significantly reduced trabecular and cortical remodeling with DMAb or ALN. Compared with ALN, DMAb caused greater reductions in osteoclast surface, eroded surface, cortical porosity and fluorochrome labeling, and transition from ALN to DMAb reduced these parameters relative to continued ALN. Bone mineral density increased in all active treatment groups relative to VEH controls. Destructive biomechanical testing revealed significantly greater vertebral strength in all three groups receiving DMAb, including those receiving DMAb after ALN, relative to VEH controls. Bone mass and strength remained highly correlated in all groups at all tested skeletal sites, consistent with normal bone quality. These data indicate that cynos transitioned from ALN to DMAb exhibited reduced bone resorption and cortical porosity, and increased BMD and bone strength, without

  2. Uptake and metabolism of (/sup 3/H)testosterone in the brain, pituitary gland and genital tract of the male cynomolgus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsall, R.W.; Rees, H.D.; Micheal, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    To study the mechanism by which testosterone restores the sexual potency of castrated cynomolgus monkeys, two males (body weights 5.2 and 5.3 kg) were castrated and, 3 days later, injected with 3 mCi (/sup 3/H)testosterone ((/sup 3/H)T) as an intravenous bolus. After 30 min, males were killed and brains and samples of other tissues were rapidly removed and placed on ice. Samples were dissected from the right halves of the brain and homogenized. Purified cell nuclei were prepared and ether extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase HPCL. Generally, unchanged (/sup 3/H)T was the major form of radioactivity in brain and pituitary gland, but in cell nuclei from hypothalamus, preoptic area and amygdala, a large proportion (34 - 61%) was in the form of (/sup 3/H)estradiol ((/sup 4/H)E/sub 2/). Little or no (/sup 3/H)dihydrotestosterone ((/sup 3/H)DHT) was detected in cell nuclei from any brain region or from pituitary gland. However, (/sup 3/H)DHT was the major form (61 - 95%) of radioactivity in cell nuclei from glans penis, prostrate and seminal vesicles. In autoradiograms of the left halves of the same brains, the percentage of cells that accumulated radioactivity in their nuclei was high in specific regions of the hypothalamus, preoptic areas and amygdala. The authors conclude that the peripheral actions of T are mediated via DHT, but its central actions are dependent on unchanged T or on E/sub 2/ formed locally by aromatization.

  3. Target-mediated drug disposition and prolonged liver accumulation of a novel humanized anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Vexler, Vladimir; Yu, Li; Pamulapati, Chandrasena; Garrido, Rosario; Grimm, Hans Peter; Sriraman, Priya; Bohini, Sandhya; Schraeml, Michael; Singh, Usha; Brandt, Michael; Ries, Stefan; Ma, Han; Klumpp, Klaus; Ji, Changhua

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is an essential receptor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). K21 is a novel high affinity anti-CD81 antibody with potent broad spectrum anti-HCV activity in vitro. The pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics and liver distribution of K21 were characterized in cynomolgus monkeys after intravenous (i.v.) administration of K21. Characteristic target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) was shown based on the PK profile of K21 and a semi-mechanistic TMDD model was used to analyze the data. From the TMDD model, the estimated size of the total target pool at baseline (Vc • Rbase) is 16 nmol/kg and the estimated apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) is 4.01 nM. A simulation using estimated TMDD parameters indicated that the number of free receptors remains below 1% for at least 3 h after an i.v. bolus of 7 mg/kg. Experimentally, the availability of free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was measured by immunostaining with anti-CD81 antibody JS81. After K21 administration, a dose- and time-dependent reduction in free CD81 on peripheral lymphocytes was observed. Fewer than 3% of B cells could bind JS81 3 h after a 7 mg/kg dose. High concentrations of K21 were found in liver homogenates, and the liver/serum ratio of K21 increased time-dependently and reached ~160 at 168 h post-administration. The presence of K21 bound to hepatocytes was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The fast serum clearance of K21 and accumulation in the liver are consistent with TMDD. The TMDD-driven liver accumulation of the anti-CD81 antibody K21 supports the further investigation of K21 as a therapeutic inhibitor of HCV entry. PMID:23924796

  4. Individual differences in hyperlipidemia and vitamin E status in response to chronic alcohol self-administration in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lebold, Katie M.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Freeman, Willard M; Wiren, Kristine M.; Miller, Galen W.; Kiley, Caitlin; Leonard, Scott W.; Traber, Maret G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic ethanol self-administration induces oxidative stress and exacerbates lipid peroxidation. α-Tocopherol is a potent lipid antioxidant and vitamin that is dependent upon lipoprotein transport for tissue delivery. Methods To evaluate the extent to which vitamin E status is deranged by excessive alcohol consumption, monkeys voluntarily drinking ethanol (1.36 to 3.98 g/kg/day for 19 months, n=11) were compared with non-drinkers (n=5, control) Results Three alcohol drinking animals developed hyperlipidemia with plasma triglyceride levels (1.8 ± 0.9 mmol/L) double those of normolipidemic (NL) drinkers (0.6 ± 0.2) and controls (0.6 ± 0.3, p<0.05); elevated plasma cholesterol (3.6 ± 0.5 mmol/L) compared with NL drinkers (2.3 ± 0.2, p<0.05) and controls (2.9 ± 0.3); and lower plasma α-tocopherol per triglycerides (14 ± 6 mmol/mol) than controls (27 ± 8) and NL drinkers (23 ± 6 p<0.05). Hyperlipidemic monkey liver α-tocopherol (47 ± 15 nmol/g) was lower than NL drinkers (65 ± 13) and controls (70 ± 15, p=0.080), as was adipose α-tocopherol (84 ± 37nmol/g) compared with controls (224 ± 118) and NL drinkers (285 ± 234, p<0.05). Plasma apolipoprotein (apo) CIII increased compared to baseline at both 12 and 19 months in the normolipidemic (P=0.0016 and P=0.0028, respectively) and in the hyperlipidemic drinkers (P<0.05 and P<0.05, respectively). Plasma apo H concentrations at 19 months were elevated hyperlipidemics (P<0.05) relative to concentrations in control animals. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, was increased compared to baseline at both the 12- and 19-month time points in the normolipidemic (P=0.005 and P=0.0153, respectively) and hyperlipidemic drinkers (P=0.016 and P=0.0201, respectively). Conclusion A subset of alcohol drinking monkeys showed a predisposition to alcohol-induced hyperlipidemia. The defect in lipid metabolism resulted in lower plasma α-tocopherol per triglycerides and depleted adipose tissue

  5. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and kinetics of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-2-(heptafluoropropoxy)propanoic acid ammonium salt following a single dose in rat, mouse, and cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Shawn A; Fasano, William J; Mawn, Michael P; Nabb, Diane L; Buck, Robert C; Buxton, L William; Jepson, Gary W; Frame, Steven R

    2016-01-18

    Ammonium, 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-2-(heptafluoropropoxy)-propanoate has been developed as a processing aid used in the manufacture of fluoropolymers. The absorption, distribution, elimination, and distribution (ADME) and kinetic behavior of this substance has been evaluated in rats, mice, and cynomolgus monkeys by oral and intravenous routes of exposure and studied in both plasma and urine. The test substance is rapidly and completely absorbed in both rats and mice and both in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that it is not metabolized. The test substance is rapidly eliminated exclusively in the urine in both rats and mice, with rats eliminating it more quickly than mice (approximately 5h elimination half-life in rats, 20 h half-life in mice). Pharmacokinetic analysis in monkeys, rats, and mice indicate rapid, biphasic elimination characterized by a very fast alpha phase and a slower beta phase. The beta phase does not contribute to potential accumulation after multiple dosing in rats or monkeys. Comparative pharmacokinetics in rats, mice, and monkeys indicates that the rat is more similar to the monkey and is therefore a more appropriate rodent model for pharmacokinetics in primates. PMID:26743852

  6. Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Cynomolgus Monkey Using a Polycistronic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus–Based Vector, Differentiation Toward Functional Cardiomyocytes, and Generation of Stably Expressing Reporter Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Haase, Alexandra; Merkert, Sylvia; Beier, Jennifer; Schwanke, Kristin; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Göhring, Gudrun; Curnow, Eliza C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel cell source for regenerative therapies. Many emerging iPSC-based therapeutic concepts will require preclinical evaluation in suitable large animal models. Among the large animal species frequently used in preclinical efficacy and safety studies, macaques show the highest similarities to humans at physiological, cellular, and molecular levels. We have generated iPSCs from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) as a segue to regenerative therapy model development in this species. Because typical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors show poor transduction of simian cells, a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-based vector was chosen for efficient transduction of cynomolgus skin fibroblasts. A corresponding polycistronic vector with codon-optimized reprogramming factors was constructed for reprogramming. Growth characteristics as well as cell and colony morphology of the resulting cynomolgus iPSCs (cyiPSCs) were demonstrated to be almost identical to cynomolgus embryonic stem cells (cyESCs), and cyiPSCs expressed typical pluripotency markers including OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. Furthermore, differentiation in vivo and in vitro into derivatives of all three germ layers, as well as generation of functional cardiomyocytes, could be demonstrated. Finally, a highly efficient technique for generation of transgenic cyiPSC clones with stable reporter expression in undifferentiated cells as well as differentiated transgenic cyiPSC progeny was developed to enable cell tracking in recipient animals. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyiPSCs represent a valuable cell source for establishment of macaque-based allogeneic and autologous preclinical cell transplantation models for various fields of regenerative medicine. PMID:23194451

  7. Induction of systemic and mucosal immunity and maintenance of its memory against influenza A virus by nasal vaccination using a new mucosal adjuvant SF-10 derived from pulmonary surfactant in young cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Dai; Kimoto, Takashi; Sakai, Satoko; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Kim, Hyejin; Kido, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Induction of systemic and mucosal immunity and maintenance of its memory was investigated in 12 young male cynomolgus monkeys after intranasal instillation of flu vaccine using a new mucosal adjuvant SF-10 derived from pulmonary surfactant constituents. Split-product of influenza virus A/California/7/2009(H1N1)pdm hemagglutinin vaccine (HAv) at 15 μg with or without SF-10 and the adjuvant alone were instilled intranasally three times every 2 weeks. SF-10-adjuvanted HAv (SF-10-HAv) elicited significantly higher HAv-specific IgG and hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) titers in serum and HAv-specific secretory IgA and its neutralizing activities in nasal washes compared with HAv antigen and SF-10 alone. Significant cross-neutralizing activities of nasal washes after the third vaccination to several other H1N1 and H3N2 strains were observed. HI titers in serum and neutralizing activities in nasal washes reached peak levels at 6 weeks after initial vaccination, then gradually decreased after 10 weeks and returned to the baseline levels at 36 weeks. A single intranasal revaccination of SF-10-HAv at 36 weeks rapidly and significantly increased both immunity in serum and nasal washes compared with naïve monkeys. Revaccination by one or two doses achieved almost maximal immunity at 2 or 4 weeks after instillation. Statistically significant adverse effects (e.g., body weight loss, elevated body temperature, nasal discharge, change in peripheral blood leukocyte and platelet counts) were not observed for 2 weeks after vaccination of SF-10-HAv, HAv or SF-10 and also during the experimental period. These results in young monkey model suggest the potential of clinical use SF-10 for intranasal flu vaccine. PMID:26954466

  8. Birth Origin Differentially Affects Depressive-Like Behaviours: Are Captive-Born Cynomolgus Monkeys More Vulnerable to Depression than Their Wild-Born Counterparts?

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine MJ.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse early-life experience might lead to the expression of abnormal behaviours in animals and the predisposition to psychiatric disorder (e.g. major depressive disorder) in Humans. Common breeding processes employ weaning and housing conditions different from what happens in the wild. Methods The present study, therefore, investigated whether birth origin impacts the possible existence of spontaneous atypical/abnormal behaviours displayed by 40 captive-born and 40 wild-born socially-housed cynomolgus macaques in farming conditions using an unbiased ethological scan-sampling analysis followed by multifactorial correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses. Results We identified 10 distinct profiles (groups A to J) that significantly differed on several behaviours, body postures, body orientations, distances between individuals and locations in the cage. Data suggest that 4 captive-born and 1 wild-born animals (groups G and J) present depressive-like symptoms, unnatural early life events thereby increasing the risk of developing pathological symptoms. General differences were also highlighted between the captive- and wild-born populations, implying the expression of differential coping mechanisms in response to the same captive environment. Conclusions Birth origin thus impacts the development of atypical ethologically-defined behavioural profiles, reminiscent of certain depressive-like symptoms. The use of unbiased behavioural observations might allow the identification of animal models of human mental/behavioural disorders and their most appropriate control groups. PMID:23861787

  9. Multiple animal studies for medical chemical defense program in soldier/patient decontamination and drug development. Task 85-19: Investigations of apneic oxygenation efficacy in cynomolgus monkeys following soman inhalation challenge. Final report, 1 January 1986-1 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, C.R.; Moutvic, R.; Mezza, E.; Joiner, L.

    1988-10-01

    A cynomolgus monkey model was developed to evaluate the efficacy of LOFTI (low-flow trans tracheal insufflation), a variation of apneic oxygenation, when the apnea was produced by soman (GD) and of LOFTI combined with more conventional therapy (atropine) in the animal model. Tris buffer was used to reverse acidosis occurring during apnea. The experiments indicated that LOFTI enables survival of animals for 3 hours; however, there is a dramatic decrease in cardiac activity resulting from the decreased blood pH. The animals that received buffer demonstrated marked improvement in blood pH and cardiac activity.

  10. The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on corticotrophin-releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, and pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, S; Farley, A; Reid, R L; Foster, W G; Van Vugt, D A

    2001-10-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widespread environmental contaminant that has profound deleterious effects on development and reproduction. TCDD may act at one or more levels to alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TCDD modulates neuroendocrine systems by altering gene expression of arginine vasopressin (AVP), corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), or pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), which are important neuroregulators of the HPA and HPG axes. Four groups of female cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were administered daily oral doses of gelatin capsule containing TCDD (0, 1, 5, or 25 ng/kg body weight) mixed with glucose 5 days a week for 1 year. At the end of the dosing period, animals were euthanized and brains were harvested. CRH, AVP, and POMC mRNA levels were semiquantified by in situ hybridization histochemistry on 30-microm coronal sections of the brain. Blood collected on the day of euthanasia was assayed for cortisol and progesterone. CRH mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were significantly increased by the 2 higher TCDD doses (5 and 25 ng/kg/day) compared to controls (p < 0.05). There was a trend towards increased AVP mRNA levels in both the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and PVN. No effect of TCDD on POMC was observed. Cortisol levels were significantly increased in TCDD-exposed animals. Progesterone concentrations and menstruation data indicated that TCDD did not interfere with ovulation. We conclude that TCDD stimulated the HPA axis by a central effect involving CRH, but had no effect on the HPG axis at the doses tested.

  11. Aluminium assay and evaluation of the local reaction at several time points after intramuscular administration of aluminium containing vaccines in the Cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Verdier, François; Burnett, Roger; Michelet-Habchi, Claire; Moretto, Philippe; Fievet-Groyne, Françoise; Sauzeat, Elisabeth

    2005-02-01

    Aluminium hydroxide and aluminium phosphate have been widely used as vaccine adjuvants with a good safety record for several decades. The recent observation in human deltoid muscle of macrophage aggregates containing aluminium hydroxide spicules and termed Macrophagic Myofasciitis (MMF) has encouraged research on aluminium salts. This study was conducted in order to further investigate the clearance of aluminium at the vaccine injection site and the features of induced histopathological lesions. Two groups of 12 monkeys were immunised in the quadriceps muscle with Diphtheria-Tetanus vaccines, which were adjuvanted with either aluminium hydroxide or aluminium phosphate. Three, six or twelve months after vaccination, four monkeys from each group were sacrificed and histopathological examination and aluminium assays were performed on quadriceps muscle sections. Histopathological lesions, similar to the MMF described in humans, were observed and were still present 3 months after aluminium phosphate and 12 months after aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccine administration. An increase in aluminium concentration, more marked in the area of the lesions, was also observed at the 3- and 6-month time points. These findings were localised at the injection site and no similar changes were observed in the distal or proximal muscle fragments. We conclude from this study that aluminium adjuvanted vaccines administered by the intramuscular route trigger histopathological changes restricted to the area around the injection site which persist for several months but are not associated with abnormal clinical signs. PMID:15661384

  12. Identification of microRNAs in Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus Monkey) by Homology Search and Experimental Validation by Small RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR Using Kidney Cortex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Veeranagouda, Yaligara; Rival, Pierrick; Prades, Catherine; Mariet, Claire; Léonard, Jean-François; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Zhou, Xiaobing; Wang, Jufeng; Li, Bo; Ozoux, Marie-Laure; Boitier, Eric

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) present in tissues and biofluids are emerging as sensitive and specific safety biomarkers. MiRNAs have not been thoroughly described in M. fascicularis, an animal model used in pharmaceutical industry especially in drug safety evaluation. Here we investigated the miRNAs in M. fascicularis. For Macaca mulatta, a closely related species of M. fascicularis, 619 stem-loop precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) and 914 mature miRNAs are available in miRBase version 21. Using M. mulatta miRNAs as a reference list and homology search tools, we identified 604 pre-miRNAs and 913 mature miRNAs in the genome of M. fascicularis. In order to validate the miRNAs identified by homology search we attempted to sequence miRNAs expressed in kidney cortex from M. fascicularis. MiRNAs expressed in kidney cortex may indeed be released in urine upon kidney cortex damage and be potentially used to monitor drug induced kidney injury. Hence small RNA sequencing libraries were prepared using kidney cortex tissues obtained from three naive M. fascicularis and sequenced. Analysis of sequencing data indicated that 432 out of 913 mature miRNAs were expressed in kidney cortex tissues. Assigning these 432 miRNAs to pre-miRNAs revealed that 273 were expressed from both the -5p and -3p arms of 150 pre-miRNAs and 159 miRNAs expressed from either the -5p or -3p arm of 176 pre-miRNAs. Mapping sequencing reads to pre-miRNAs also facilitated the detection of twenty-two new miRNAs. To substantiate miRNAs identified by small RNA sequencing, 313 miRNAs were examined by RT-qPCR. Expression of 262 miRNAs in kidney cortex tissues ware confirmed by TaqMan microRNA RT-qPCR assays. Analysis of kidney cortex miRNA targeted genes suggested that they play important role in kidney development and function. Data presented in this study may serve as a valuable resource to assess the renal safety biomarker potential of miRNAs in Cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:26562842

  13. Pharmacokinetics and cell trafficking dynamics of 2-amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720) in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral and intravenous doses.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongshan; Meno-Tetang, Guy M L; Chiba, Kenji; Arima, Noriyuki; Heining, Peter; Jusko, William J

    2002-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics and cell trafficking dynamics of 2-amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720), a novel immunosuppressive agent, were examined in cynomolgus monkeys (three males and three females). After single doses of 0.1 mg/kg p.o. or i.v. bolus and 1 mg/kg p.o. were administered to the animals, the concentrations of FTY720, and the numbers of lymphocytes, CD20+CD2-B cells, and CD2+CD20-T cells in blood were measured over 23 days. A linear three-compartment model characterized the time course of FTY720 concentrations with a terminal half-life of about 31 h, clearance of about 0.53 l/h/kg, and bioavailability of about 38%. The dynamic responses were not area under the curve (or dose) proportional for either males or females. An indirect response model with a distribution pool captured the cell trafficking data for all doses for each cell type, where initial blood counts (R(0)) were about 7650, 2100, and 5250 cells/microl; maximum fractional inhibition (I(max)) about 0.88, 0.85, and 0.91; influx (k(in)) about 6014, 1312, and 5662 cells/microl/h; efflux (k(out)) about 0.798, 0.555, and 1.08 h(-1); intercompartmental k(cp) about 0.134, 0.192, and 0.082 h(-1); and intercompartmental k(pc) rate constants about 3.9 x 10(-4), and 0.016 and 8.9 x 10(-6) h(-1) for lymphocytes, B cells, and T cells, respectively. The inhibition concentration IC(50) was about 0.48 microg/l for all cells, which was remarkably low. The apparent distribution volumes of peripheral pool (V(p)) were markedly larger than blood volume (V(b)) for all cells. The I(max) for cell trafficking was achieved at doses smaller than that producing graft protection, indicating stronger central than peripheral effects of this drug. The profound cell trafficking effects of FTY720 can be readily captured and interpreted with an extended indirect response model. PMID:11961052

  14. Nitric oxide regulation of monkey myometrial contractility

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzli, Karri A; Buxton, Iain L O; Bradley, Michael E

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) donor CysNO (S-nitroso-L-cysteine) and endogenous NO upon spontaneous contractility in non-pregnant cynomolgus monkeys. We also assessed the role of intracellular guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic GMP]i) as a second messenger for NO in monkey uterine smooth muscle.CysNO reduced spontaneous contractility by 84% (P<0.05) at maximal concentrations, and significantly elevated [cyclic GMP]i (P<0.05). However, increases in [cyclic GMP]i were not required for CysNO-induced relaxations; CysNO inhibited contractile activity despite the complete inhibition of guanylyl cyclase by methylene blue or LY83,583.Analogues of cyclic GMP had no significant effect upon spontaneous contractile activity. L-arginine produced a 62% reduction in spontaneous activity (P<0.05) while D-arginine had no effect. The competitive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) not only blocked L-arginine-induced relaxations, but also significantly increased spontaneous contractile activity when added alone (P<0.05); the inactive D-enantiomer of NOARG had no such effect.While both endogenous NO and the NO donor CysNO relax monkey myometrium, this effect is not causally related to CysNO-induced elevations in [cyclic GMP]i. The failure of cyclic GMP analogues to alter monkey uterine smooth muscle tension also argues against a role for [cyclic GMP]i in the regulation of uterine contractility. Not only do these findings argue for the existence of a functionally-relevant NOS in the monkey uterus, but increases in contractile activity seen in the presence of NOS inhibitors suggest a role for NO in the moment-to-moment regulation of contractile activity in this organ. PMID:9630344

  15. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi. PMID:25946071

  16. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J.; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J.; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi. PMID:25946071

  17. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  18. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin; Chen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Y. Alex

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  19. [TRIMCyp frequency of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in captivity in China].

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuai; Meng, Yu-Huan; Liu, Ming-Yu; Sun, Fei; Chen, Jun-Hui; Du, Hong-Li; Wang, Xiao-Ning

    2013-04-01

    In most Old world monkey species, TRIM5α plays a role in combating retroviruses and restricting HIV-1. Alongside TRIM5α, the TRIMCyp fusion gene formed by the retrotransposition of a CypA pseudogene cDNA to 3' terminal or 3'-UTR of TRIM5 gene in these monkeys has become a key research area in anti HIV-1 factors. The regional differences, gene frequencies, genotypes, and retrovirus restrictive activities of TRIMCyp vary among different primate species. While the frequencies of cynomolgus TRIMCyp have been studied in several areas of Southeast Asia, the frequency and prevalence of cynomolgus TRIMCyp in China remains unclear. In this study, we screened 1, 594 cynomolgus samples from 11 monkey manufacturers located across 5 provinces in China. Our results showed that the frequencies of TRIMCyp range from 7.65% to 19.79%, markedly lower than the frequencies found in monkey species in the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia (ranging from 34.85% to 100%). We speculate that potentially the latter were isolated groups established since 1978. The NE haplotype frequencies of cynomolgus TRIMCyp were 4.93% in China, also significantly lower than those found in species in the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia (from 11.1% to 14.3%). Our research provides interesting findings that contribute towards a more firm basis of further studies of HIV-1 animal models and relevant pathogenesis.

  20. Effects of Transportation on Antioxidant Status in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Pan, Xueying; Lu, Liang; Zeng, Xiancheng; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of transportation on oxidative stress in cynomolgus monkeys, we measured serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl (PC) and the activities of total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase in cynomolgus macaques before transportation (day 0), on the day of arrival (day 1), and on days 7, 14, and 21 after transportation. Compared with that on day 0, TAOC and catalase activities on days 1, 7, and 14 after transportation were significantly decreased, reached their nadirs on day 7, and increased thereafter to reach their pretransportation levels by day 21 after transportation. Compared with day 0 levels, mean SOD activity and GSH concentration were decreased significantly on day 1; they thereafter increased to reach their pretransportation measures by day 7 after transportation. In contrast, PC and malondialdehyde concentrations in serum and the activity of GSH-Px were increased on day 1 compared with day 0 and thereafter decreased to reach their pretransportation levels by day 14 after transportation. In summary, GSH, TAOC, catalase, and SOD levels decreased and malondialdehyde, PC, and GSH-Px concentrations increased in cynomolgus macaques after transportation. These results suggest that transportation might imbalance oxidant and antioxidant levels to create excess oxidative stress in cynomolgus macaques. Therefore, cynomolgus macaques should have at least 21 d to recover after transportation and regain their healthy status. PMID:27657707

  1. Metabolism and placental transfer of /sup 125/I-proinsulin and /sup 125/I-tyrosylated C-peptide in the pregnant rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Gruppuso, P.A.; Susa, J.B.; Sehgal, P.; Frank, B.; Schwartz, R.

    1987-10-01

    /sup 125/I-Proinsulin or /sup 125/I-tyrosylated-C-peptide (/sup 125/I-tyr-CP) was administered to pregnant Rhesus monkeys by bolus followed by constant infusion to examine placental transfer of these peptides. At the end of each infusion, fetuses were exsanguinated in situ via the umbilical vein. The bolus-constant infusion technique produced a steady state in maternal plasma of immunoprecipitable label, measured using excess insulin or C-peptide antiserum. In animals infused with /sup 125/I-proinsulin, analysis of umbilical venous plasma revealed no apparent transfer to the fetus of immunoprecipitable label. In animals infused with /sup 125/I-tyr-CP, 3-13% of the umbilical venous plasma radioactivity was immunoprecipitable, representing 1.4-5.8% of the immunoprecipitable radioactivity in maternal plasma at delivery. Gel filtration chromatography of umbilical venous plasma revealed that the immunoprecipitated moiety was a fragment of /sup 125/I-tyr-CP. Analysis of maternal plasma showed that the predominant peak of radioactivity represented intact C-peptide. A peak corresponding to the fetal immunoprecipitable peak was also present. Analysis of simultaneous maternal arterial and uterine vein plasma samples showed that degradation of /sup 125/I-tyr-CP occurred across the uterus. Studies in one nonpregnant and three postpartum animals indicated that pregnancy increased the rate of metabolism of /sup 125/I-tyr-CP. When /sup 125/I-tyr-CP was incubated with trophoblastic cells in culture, degradation to a species corresponding on gel filtration to the immunoprecipitable fetal metabolite was found. We conclude that proinsulin, like insulin, does not traverse the placenta. Immunoreactive fragments of C-peptide do cross, however, and pregnancy alters the metabolism of /sup 125/I-tyr-CP, probably owing to placental degradation.

  2. Usefulness of the monkey model to investigate the role soy in postmenopausal women's health.

    PubMed

    Appt, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Some of the important health issues for postmenopausal women include cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, breast cancer, and relief of menopausal symptoms. Ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) have many strengths as models for research in this area including a close phylogenetic relationship to humans, similarities in lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and coronary artery anatomy, similar skeletal anatomical and morphological characteristics, mammary glands with similar pathophysiological characteristics, and a 28-day menstrual cycle with similar hormonal fluctuations. Monkeys (macaques) also experience declining ovarian function and irregular menstrual cycles (natural menopause) when they approach 24 to 29 yr of age. However, because of their very short life span after natural menopause, ovariectomized macaques are used to model postmenopausal women. The cynomolgus monkey model has been useful in defining the potential cardiovascular benefits of soy foods and soy supplements; however, it remains unclear whether the observations are generalizable to all women or only to those who, like cynomolgus monkeys, convert the soy isoflavone daidzein to the metabolite equol. Particularly important has been the use of the cynomolgus monkey model to understand the effects of soy on breast health. There is evidence from a cynomolgus monkey trial to suggest that soy/soy phytoestrogens have no estrogen agonist effects for breast. Finally, soy/soy phytoestrogens do not appear to be an adequate alternative to postmenopausal hormone therapy. Nevertheless, important attributes of soy have been identified, and it may have potential as a complementary component to hormone therapy.

  3. Comparison of the treatment of cyanide poisoning in the cynomolgus monkey with sodium nitrite of 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-dmap), with and without sodium thiosulfate. Technical report, April 1979-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Stemler, F.W.; Groff, W.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Froehlich, H.L.

    1994-02-01

    Two methemoglobin generating compounds, sodium nitrite (iv) or 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-DMAP) (im), with and without sodium thiosulfate (iv), were compared as post-treatment therapy in anesthetized monkeys poisoning with cyanide. Arterial blood samples were taken before and after an injection of sodium cyanide (8.4 mg/kg) and treatment for analyses of blood cyanide, plasma cyanide, thiocyanate and methemoglobin content. Physiologic parameters were monitored in these treated cyanide-poisoned animals. The time course of methemoglobin formation and physiologic parameters were also monitored in animals receiving only 4-DMAP or sodium nitrite. A maximal methemoglobin level was observed at 30 minutes following injection of 4-DMAP, and 60 minutes post injection with sodium nitrite. Volumes of distribution (Vd) of cyanide were calculated from the concentrations of cyanide in blood samples and doses of cyanide injected. Although 4-DMAP forms methemoglobin more rapidly than sodium nitrite, both compounds form methemoglobin quickly enough to provide protection against cyanide poisoning. The protection offered by either compound against the lethal effects of cyanide was potentiated when used in combination with sodium thiosulfate.

  4. Geographical, genetic and functional diversity of antiretroviral host factor TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Saito, Akatsuki; Kono, Ken; Nomaguchi, Masako; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Akio; Shioda, Tatsuo; Akari, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Emi E

    2012-03-01

    The antiretroviral factor tripartite motif protein 5 (TRIM5) gene-derived isoform (TRIMCyp) has been found in at least three species of Old World monkey: rhesus (Macaca mulatta), pig-tailed (Macaca nemestrina) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Although the frequency of TRIMCyp has been well studied in rhesus and pig-tailed macaques, the frequency and prevalence of TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques remain to be definitively elucidated. Here, the geographical and genetic diversity of TRIM5α/TRIMCyp in cynomolgus macaques was studied in comparison with their anti-lentiviral activity. It was found that the frequency of TRIMCyp in a population in the Philippines was significantly higher than those in Indonesian and Malaysian populations. Major and minor haplotypes of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the cyclophilin A domain were also found. The functional significance of the polymorphism in TRIMCyp was examined, and it was demonstrated that the major haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but not HIV-2, whilst the minor haplotype of TRIMCyp suppressed HIV-2 but not HIV-1. The major haplotype of TRIMCyp did not restrict a monkey-tropic HIV-1 clone, NL-DT5R, which contains a capsid with the simian immunodeficiency virus-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 and the entire vif gene. These results indicate that polymorphisms of TRIMCyp affect its anti-lentiviral activity. Overall, the results of this study will help our understanding of the genetic background of cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp, as well as the host factors composing species barriers of primate lentiviruses.

  5. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CEBUS CAPUCINA (THE SOUTH AMERICAN RINGTAIL MONKEY) AND CERCOPITHECUS CEPHUS (THE AFRICAN MUSTACHE MONKEY) TO POLIOMYELITIS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Joseph L.; Paul, John R.

    1943-01-01

    1. The South American ringtail monkey, Cebus capucina, has been infected with the virus of poliomyelitis as found in ultracentrifuged concentrates from poliomyelitic human stools. 2. This species was also found susceptible to poliomyelitis virus found in rhesus and cynomolgus monkey cords, representing early generations of virus derived from two different human sources and from flies trapped in an epidemic area. 3. The Hartford strain of poliomyelitis has been successfully established in different generations in Cebus capucina monkeys. 4. The African mustache monkey, Cerocopithecus cephus, has been infected with poliomyelitis virus by the intra- and subcutaneous routes as readily as the green African monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops sabaeus, and the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. PMID:19871327

  6. Visible lesion laser thresholds in Cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) retina with a 1064 nm 12-ns pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Kumru, Semih S.

    2007-02-01

    A series of experiments in a new animal model for retinal damage, cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), have been conducted to determine the damage threshold for 12.5-nanosecond laser exposures at 1064 nm. These results provide a direct comparison to threshold values obtained in rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), which is the model historically used in establishing retinal maximum permissible exposure (MPE) limits. In this study, the irradiance level of a collimated Gaussian laser beam of 2.5 mm diameter at the cornea was randomly varied to produce a rectangular grid of exposures on the retina. Exposures sites were fundoscopically evaluated at post-irradiance intervals of 1 hour and 24 hours. Probit analysis was performed on dose-response data to obtain probability of response curves. The 50% probability of damage (ED50) values for 1 and 24 hours post-exposure are 28.5(22.7-38.4) μJ and 17.0(12.9-21.8) μJ, respectively. These values compare favorably to data obtained with the rhesus model, 28.7(22.3-39.3) μJ and 19.1(13.6-24.4) μJ, suggesting that the cynomolgus monkey may be a suitable replacement for rhesus monkey in photoacoustic minimum visible lesion threshold studies.

  7. Anterior hippocampal volume is reduced in behaviorally depressed female cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Friedman, David P; Henkel, Craig K; Shively, Carol A

    2009-11-01

    Hippocampal (HC) function and morphology have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Reduced HC volume has been observed in depressed humans, although the effect is not always significant. Studies of functional differentiation of the HC have revealed that the anterior portion is associated with emotional and anxiety-related functioning, and the posterior portion with memory processing. As such, measuring whole HC volume may mask differences seen only in the anterior or posterior HC. We used unbiased stereology to measure whole, anterior, and posterior HC volumes in 12 adult female cynomolgus macaques, half of which exhibited spontaneously occurring depressive behavior defined as a slumped/collapsed body posture with open eyes, and a relative lack of responsivity to environmental stimuli. The two groups were otherwise matched on circulating estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol levels, social status, estimated age, and body weight. Frozen postmortem HC tissue from depressed and nondepressed monkeys was serially sectioned and thionin-stained. According to established neuroanatomical guidelines and with the aid of Neurolucida software (MBF Bioscience), every 10th section throughout the extent of the HC was manually traced and used to reconstruct the 3D models used to determine volumes. Anterior and posterior HC were delineated by the presence or absence of the uncus. No significant differences were found between depressed and nondepressed monkeys for whole or posterior HC volume, although the average HC volume was 4% smaller in depressed than nondepressed monkeys. Anterior HC volumes were significantly smaller (15.4%) in depressed compared to nondepressed monkeys. These results indicate that reduced volume in the anterior HC, an area previously implicated in emotional functioning, may be associated with a depressive phenotype in female cynomolgus macaques.

  8. Calcified foci at the junction between adrenal cortex and medulla of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kast, A; Peil, H; Weisse, I

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of calcified foci at the junction of adrenal medulla and cortex in monkeys obtained from toxicity studies during a 10-year period is reported. The survey included reinvestigated adrenal samples from 274 male and 270 female rhesus monkeys and 52 male and 52 female cynomolgus monkeys. The incidence of calcified foci was 46% in male and 45% in female rhesus monkeys, and 6% in male cynomolgus monkeys, while their females did not show the lesion. In male rhesus monkeys, the mean number of foci was 4 for both glands, in females, 2 for the right and 4 for the left one. Initial stages indicated that the lesions develop possibly from focal apoptosis of medulla cells followed by a dystrophic mineralization. No correlation was observed concerning dose groups, test article, study length, testing facility, origin of monkeys, their sex, age, diet or final body weight. The foci of mineralization were dystrophic, species-specific in the rhesus monkey and possibly related to stress. The location of the foci at the cortico-medullary junction, precisely the location of the remnants of the fetal zone, may indicate their origin from this zone.

  9. Identification of 32 major histocompatibility complex class I alleles in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Li, A; Li, L; Yan, X; Fa, Y; Zeng, L; Fan, J; Liu, B; Sun, Z

    2014-09-01

    The African green monkey may be an ideal replacement for the rhesus monkey in biomedical research, but relatively little is known about the genetic background of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In analysis of 12 African green monkeys, 13 Chae-A and 19 Chae-B alleles were identified. Among these alleles, 12 Chae-A and 9 Chae-B were new lineages. The full amino acid length deduced for Chae-A genes is 365 amino acids, but for Chae-B genes, the lengths are 365, 362, 361, and 359 amino acids, respectively. There were 1-3 Chae-A alleles and 2-5 Chae-B alleles in each animal. In African green monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and cynomolgus monkeys, the MHC-A and MHC-B alleles display trans-species polymorphism, rather than being clustered in a species-specific fashion.

  10. Molecular demonstration of hemotropic mycoplasmas in wild Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Sashida, Hinako; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Rokuhara, Sou; Nagai, Kazuya; Harasawa, Ryô

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasmas in wild monkeys is largely unknown. Here, we report the presence of hemoplasmas in blood specimens collected from wild Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) tentatively captured for ecological survey in Mie prefecture, Japan. We examined 9 monkeys using hemoplasma-specific real-time PCR and found all of them positive for a hemoplasma infection. The 16S rRNA gene and 16S to 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region of the hemoplasma detected in wild monkeys were amplified using end-point PCR. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR products were further determined and compared to those of other hemoplasmas. Our examinations revealed a wide prevalence of a hemoplasma strain in Japanese monkeys, which was similar to 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque' reported in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Pathogenic traits of this hemoplasma strain remain unexplored.

  11. Generation of a monkey with MECP2 mutations by TALEN-based gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Xue; Zhu, Ying; Chen, Zhi-Fang; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Nie, Yan-Hong; Sang, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yue-Fang; Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Sun, Qiang; Qiu, Zilong

    2014-06-01

    Gene editing in model organisms has provided critical insights into brain development and diseases. Here, we report the generation of a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) carrying MECP2 mutations using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-mediated gene targeting. After injecting TALENs mRNA into monkey zygotes achieved by in vitro fertilization and embryo transplantation into surrogate monkeys, we obtained one male newborn monkey with an MECP2 deletion caused by frameshifting mutation in various tissues. The monkey carrying the MECP2 mutation failed to survive after birth, due to either the toxicity of TALENs or the critical requirement of MECP2 for neural development. The level of MeCP2 protein was essentially depleted in the monkey's brain. This study demonstrates the feasibility of introducing genetic mutations in non-human primates by site-specific gene-editing methods.

  12. Measurement of fetal biparietal diameter in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Schuler, A Michele; Brady, Alan G; Tustin, George W; Parks, Virginia L; Morris, Chris G; Abee, Christian R

    2010-09-01

    Owl monkeys are New World primates frequently used in biomedical research. Despite the historical difficulty of breeding owl monkeys in captivity, several productive owl monkey breeding colonies exist currently. The animals in the colony we describe here are not timed-pregnant, and determination of gestational age is an important factor in prenatal care. Gestational age of human fetuses is often determined by using transabdominal measurements of fetal biparietal diameter. The purpose of this study was to correlate biparietal diameter measurements with gestational age in owl monkeys. We found that biparietal diameter can be used to accurately predict gestational age in owl monkeys.

  13. Adaptation of the mineralocorticoid target tissues to the high circulating cortisol and progesterone plasma levels in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Chrousos, G P; Loriaux, D L; Brandon, D; Shull, J; Renquist, D; Hogan, W; Tomita, M; Lipsett, M B

    1984-07-01

    Many New World primate species have elevated circulating free plasma cortisol concentrations, target tissue resistance to cortisol, and no evidence of sodium retention. A representative New World primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), has plasma cortisol concentrations above those necessary to cause complete suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in an Old World primate, the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Despite this, the arterial blood pressure as well as the plasma sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate levels of the squirrel monkey are similar to those of the cynomolgus monkey, and its plasma aldosterone concentrations are approximately 2-fold higher. These findings suggest that cortisol has minimal sodium-retaining effects in this species. Renal cytosol aldosterone receptor concentrations are about 2- to 3-fold lower in the squirrel monkey than in the cynomolgus, whereas the receptor affinities for [3H]aldosterone are similar in the two monkeys. Higher concentrations of cortisol are needed to displace [3H]aldosterone from the mineralocorticoid receptor in the squirrel monkey than from the renal receptor in the cynomolgus [apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) = 7.8 X 10(-7) vs. 2.9 X 10(-8) M, respectively]. In addition, in contrast to man and presumably other Old World primates, plasma aldosterone concentrations in the female squirrel monkey do not increase during the reproductive cycle or pregnancy when progesterone concentrations are 10- to 20-fold higher than those of the male or the reproductively quiescent female. This suggests that progesterone is a poor aldosterone antagonist in this species. We conclude that a low concentration of mineralocorticoid receptors in New World Primates is compensated for by higher aldosterone levels, with a concomitant increase in receptor occupancy. The salt-retaining potency of cortisol is low, presumably because of a decrease in the affinity of the aldosterone receptor for

  14. Contrasting infection susceptibility of the Japanese macaques and cynomolgus macaques to closely related malaria parasites, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium cynomolgi.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Shin-Ichiro; Kawai, Satoru; Katakai, Yuko; Takahashi, Hideo; Nakade, Toru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    Although the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is closely related to Asian Old World monkey malaria parasites, there are no reports of P. vivax infections in macaques. In this study, we compared the infectivity of P. vivax and Plasmodium cynomolgi in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) and in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). The Japanese macaques were highly susceptible to P. cynomolgi but not to P. vivax, whereas cynomolgus macaques showed mild/limited P. cynomolgi infection and were, also, not susceptible to P. vivax. Serotyping and amino acid sequence comparison of erythrocyte surface Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC) indicate that the Japanese macaque DARC sequence is nearly identical to that of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus macaques. This suggests that the macaques share a common mechanism for preventing P. vivax infection. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domain from several different Plasmodium species suggests that P. vivax DBLs will not bind to macaque DARCs, which can explain the lack of P. vivax infectivity. The DBL sequence analyses also suggest that P. cynomolgi DBLs may target Japanese macaque erythrocytes through a DARC-independent interaction.

  15. Severe Acquired Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia in a Female Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Parrula, Cecilia M; Mysore, Jagannatha; Burr, Holly; Freebern, Wendy; Neef, Natasha

    2015-06-01

    A 4-y-old female cynomolgus macaque presented for veterinary evaluation prior to placement in a preclinical study showed markedly low platelet counts that continued to decrease over time. Physical examination over the next several days showed areas of pale red discoloration in forelimbs, anterior thorax, and inguinal area and multifocal pinpoint areas of erythema or scabs. An area of dark red discoloration approximately 2 cm in diameter on the dorsal surface of the tongue was discovered on day 9. The macaque was euthanized, and histopathologic evaluation showed multifocal, ulcerative or erosive, hemorrhagic, lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic glossitis and tonsillitis. The lesions on the tongue were associated with opportunistic fungi consistent with Candida albicans. The bone marrow showed megakaryocytic hyperplasia. There was no evidence of increased consumption of platelets, sequestration of platelets, or bone marrow suppression. The monkey was serologically negative for simian retrovirus, SIV, and simian T-lymphotropic virus. In light of cases reported in humans, immune-mediated destruction of platelets due to autoantibodies secondary to Candida albicans infection was considered. However, we were unable to detect antiplatelet antibodies on the platelet surface or in serum to support this etiology; therefore idiopathic thrombocytopenia was diagnosed. To our knowledge, this case represents the second reported observation of acquired thrombocytopenia in a nonhuman primate and the first reported observation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  16. Monkey Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  17. Generation of Transgenic Monkeys with Human Inherited Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony W.S; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2009-01-01

    Modeling human diseases using nonhuman primates including chimpanzee, rhesus, cynomolgus, marmoset and squirrel monkeys has been reported in the past decades. Due to the high similarity between nonhuman primates and humans, including genome constitution, cognitive behavioral functions, anatomical structure, metabolic, reproductive, and brain functions; nonhuman primates have played an important role in understanding physiological functions of the human body, clarifying the underlying mechanism of human diseases, and the development of novel treatments for human diseases. However, nonhuman primate research has been restricted to cognitive, behavioral, biochemical and pharmacological approaches of human diseases due to the limitation of gene transfer technology in nonhuman primates. The recent advancement in transgenic technology that has led to the generation of the first transgenic monkey in 2001 and a transgenic monkey model of Huntington's disease (HD) in 2008 has changed that focus. The creation of transgenic HD monkeys that replicate key pathological features of human HD patients further suggests the crucial role of nonhuman primates in the future development of biomedicine. These successes have opened the door to genetic manipulation in nonhuman primates and a new era in modeling human inherited genetic disorders. We focused on the procedures in creating transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys, but our work can be applied to transgenesis in other nonhuman primate species. PMID:19467335

  18. Insulin/IGF signaling-related gene expression in the brain of a sporadic Alzheimer's disease monkey model induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngjeon; Kim, Young-Hyun; Park, Sang-Je; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Hong, Yonggeun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that the intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ)-treated cynomolgus monkey showed regionally specific glucose hypometabolism in FDG-PET imaging, similar to that observed in the early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). However, further pathological analyses of this model at the molecular level are needed to validate it as a feasible model for sAD. Two cynomolgus monkeys were injected with 2 mg/kg STZ into the cerebellomedullary cistern at day 1, 7 and 14. Two control monkeys were given normal saline. At 5 months after injection, the expression levels of genes encoding 9 upstream molecules in insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling and markers for 4 cell-type populations in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, posterior cingulate, precuneus, and occipital cortex of control and icv-STZ treated cynomolgus monkeys were examined. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses demonstrated that the overall mRNA expression of insulin/IGF signaling-related genes was mainly impaired in the anterior part of the cerebrum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus, similar to the early stage of sAD. The changes were accompanied by the loss of oligodendrocytes and neurons. The posterior part of the cerebrum did not show degenerative alterations. The present study provides important fundamental information on the icv-STZ monkey model for sAD. These results may help guide future studies using this model for the investigation of pathological mechanisms and the development of drugs for sAD.

  19. Monkey liver cytochrome P450 2C19 is involved in R- and S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Yoshio; Uno, Yasuhiro; Murayama, Norie; Fujino, Hideki; Shukuya, Mitsunori; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Shimizu, Makiko; Utoh, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2012-12-15

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used as primate models in preclinical studies. However, some differences are occasionally seen between monkeys and humans in the activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes. R- and S-warfarin are model substrates for stereoselective oxidation in humans. In this current research, the activities of monkey liver microsomes and 14 recombinantly expressed monkey cytochrome P450 enzymes were analyzed with respect to R- and S-warfarin 6- and 7-hydroxylation. Monkey liver microsomes efficiently mediated both R- and S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation, in contrast to human liver microsomes, which preferentially catalyzed S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation. R-Warfarin 7-hydroxylation activities in monkey liver microsomes were not inhibited by α-naphthoflavone or ketoconazole, and were roughly correlated with P450 2C19 levels and flurbiprofen 4-hydroxylation activities in microsomes from 20 monkey livers. In contrast, S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation activities were not correlated with the four marker drug oxidation activities used. Among the 14 recombinantly expressed monkey P450 enzymes tested, P450 2C19 had the highest activities for R- and S-warfarin 7-hydroxylations. Monkey P450 3A4 and 3A5 slowly mediated R- and S-warfarin 6-hydroxylations. Kinetic analysis revealed that monkey P450 2C19 had high V(max) and low K(m) values for R-warfarin 7-hydroxylation, comparable to those for monkey liver microsomes. Monkey P450 2C19 also mediated S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation with V(max) and V(max)/K(m) values comparable to those for recombinant human P450 2C9. R-warfarin could dock favorably into monkey P450 2C19 modeled. These results collectively suggest high activities for monkey liver P450 2C19 toward R- and S-warfarin 6- and 7-hydroxylation in contrast to the saturation kinetics of human P450 2C9-mediated S-warfarin 7-hydroxylation.

  20. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  1. Protection of monkeys against Machupo virus by the passive administration of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever immunoglobulin (human origin).

    PubMed

    Eddy, G A; Wagner, F S; Scott, S K; Mahlandt, B J

    1975-01-01

    Bolivian haemorrhagic fever immunoglobulin of human origin, given either prior to or shortly after experimental infection with Machupo virus, protected rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys against initial clinical illness. Some survivors developed severe neurological signs 30-47 days after virus inoculation and died 4-6 days later. Results from one of the experiments suggested that the development of neurological signs was associated more frequently with high doses of immunoglobulin than with intermediate or low doses.

  2. Glucagon Receptor Blockade With a Human Antibody Normalizes Blood Glucose in Diabetic Mice and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Haruka; Kim, Jinrang; Aglione, JohnPaul; Lee, Joseph; Cavino, Katie; Na, Erqian; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Harp, Joyce; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-08-01

    Antagonizing glucagon action represents an attractive therapeutic option for reducing hepatic glucose production in settings of hyperglycemia where glucagon excess plays a key pathophysiological role. We therefore generated REGN1193, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling in vitro. REGN1193 administration to diabetic ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice lowered blood glucose to levels observed in GCGR-deficient mice. In diet-induced obese mice, REGN1193 reduced food intake, adipose tissue mass, and body weight. REGN1193 increased circulating levels of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 and was associated with reversible expansion of pancreatic α-cell area. Hyperglucagonemia and α-cell hyperplasia was observed in fibroblast growth factor 21-deficient mice treated with REGN1193. Single administration of REGN1193 to diabetic cynomolgus monkeys normalized fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance and increased circulating levels of glucagon and amino acids. Finally, administration of REGN1193 for 8 weeks to normoglycemic cynomolgus monkeys did not cause hypoglycemia or increase pancreatic α-cell area. In summary, the GCGR-blocking antibody REGN1193 normalizes blood glucose in diabetic mice and monkeys but does not produce hypoglycemia in normoglycemic monkeys. Thus, REGN1193 provides a potential therapeutic modality for diabetes mellitus and acute hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26020795

  3. Depressive-like behavioral profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Sandrine M. J.; Rochais, Céline; Blois-Heulin, Catherine; Li, Qin; Hausberger, Martine; Bezard, Erwan

    2014-01-01

    Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD), the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament, or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored. Methods: Behavioral data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances, and locations in the cage) were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys. Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g., inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall) among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles. Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a “spontaneous” model of depressive disorders. PMID:24600363

  4. A primacy effect in monkeys when list position is relevant.

    PubMed

    Buffalo, B; Gaffan, D; Murray, E A

    1994-11-01

    In Experiment 1 (1a and 1b), Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) learned lists of two-choice visual discriminations in which list position was relevant to discrimination performance. For example, Stimulus A was the rewarded stimulus if it was presented at List Position 1, but was not rewarded if it was presented at any other position in the list; similarly, Stimulus B was rewarded only at List Position 2, and so on. In learning these lists, all animals showed a marked primacy effect. In Experiment 2 (2a and 2b), Rhesus monkeys and Cynomolgus monkeys (M. fascicularis) learned lists of visual discriminations in which each visual stimulus occupied a fixed position in a list, but list position was not relevant to discrimination performance. For example, Stimulus E was always rewarded, and was always presented at List Position 1. To increase the salience of list beginning as a distinctive event, successive presentations of the list were separated by 24-hr intervals. In Experiment 2 there was no primacy effect, however. These results show for the first time that a primacy effect can be obtained in visual discrimination learning by monkeys. Furthermore, they suggest that it is obtained only when list position is relevant to the discrimination learning task.

  5. The effect of satiety on responses of gustatory neurons in the amygdala of alert cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Yan, J; Scott, T R

    1996-11-18

    An alert cynomolgus macaque was fed a sweet solution to satiety as the activity of a gustatory neuron in the amygdala was recorded to that solution and to four other taste stimuli. This experiment was conducted a total of 14 times in two monkeys. The responses of individual neurons to the satiety stimuli were suppressed by as little as 1%, and as much as 100% by the induction of satiety (mean suppression = 58%). Nine of the 14 cells responded to the satiety solution with excitation, and their responses were suppressed by a mean of 62% by satiety. Five neurons responded with inhibition, and their responses were suppressed by a mean of 50%. Responses to other taste stimuli, not associated with satiety, were affected to a lesser extent. The amygdala is a taste relay between the primary gustatory cortex, where satiety has no influence on responses to taste stimuli, and the lateral hypothalamic area where the effect of satiety is total. The data presented here indicate that the amygdala is a functional as well as anatomical intermediary between these two areas, and serves as a stage in the process through which sensory stimuli are imbued with motivational significance.

  6. Effects of Two Years of Conjugated Equine Estrogens on Cholinergic Neurons in Young and Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Carole; Tobin, Joseph R.; Voytko, Mary Lou

    2009-01-01

    The effect of estrogen on the number and size of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain was examined in surgically menopausal young and middle-aged cynomolgus monkeys. Young and middle-aged female monkeys were ovariectomized and treated with conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin) at doses that are equivalent to those currently prescribed to postmenopausal women. In the medial septum/diagonal band (MS/DB), no effect of treatment with Premarin was observed in the cholinergic neurons in either ovariectomized young or middle-aged monkeys. However, the number and size of cholinergic neurons in the MS/DB of middle-aged monkeys was greater than that in the young monkeys. In the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) of middle-aged monkeys, the number of cholinergic neurons in the intermediate region (Ch4i) was greater in Premarin-treated monkeys as compared to controls and numbers of neurons in this region were greater at higher levels of estrogen. No effects of estrogen were observed in other NBM regions in the middle-aged monkeys and the size of cholinergic neurons was unaffected by Premarin. These findings suggest that treatment with Premarin has selective beneficial effects on cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain but that these effects are both age and region specific. PMID:19401167

  7. Hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone expression in female monkeys with different sensitivity to stress.

    PubMed

    Centeno, M-L; Sanchez, R L; Cameron, J L; Bethea, C L

    2007-08-01

    Psychosocial stress, combined with mild dieting and moderate exercise, are observed in women seeking treatment for hypothalamic amenorrhea. Using female cynomolgus macaques, we previously reported that the same combination of mild stresses suppressed reproductive hormone secretion and menstrual cycles in some individuals (stress-sensitive, SS), but not in others (highly stress-resilient, HSR). Compared to HSR monkeys, SS monkeys exhibited lower oestradiol and progesterone levels at the midcycle peak and decreased gene expression in the central serotonergic system during nonstressed cycles. Because steroids and serotonin impinge upon the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, we hypothesised that the differences between SS and HSR monkeys in the sensitivity of the HPG axis to stress may ultimately manifest in differences in the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) system. GnRH in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry were performed with hypothalamic sections from SS and HSR animals, euthanised in the early follicular phase of a nonstressed menstrual cycle. Compared to HSR monkeys, SS monkeys exhibited a significantly higher number and density of GnRH cell bodies, as well as a higher number of soma with extremely robust expression of GnRH mRNA, but SS monkeys exhibited a lower density of immunostained GnRH fibres in the median eminence. We suggest that neuronal mechanisms involved in the control of GnRH synthesis, transport and release differ in SS compared to HSR animals.

  8. A 52-week safety study in cynomolgus macaques for genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jie; Sun, Xing; Cheng, Jian-Hua; Shi, Yong-Jie; Wang, Xin-Zheng; Qin, Jun-Jie; Sang, Zhi-Hong; He, Kun; Xia, Qing

    2016-09-01

    A 52-week feeding study in cynomolgus macaques was carried out to evaluate the safety of Bt rice Huahui 1 (HH1), a transgenic rice line expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein. Monkeys were fed a diet with 20% or 60% HH1 rice, 20% or 60% parental rice (Minghui 63, MH63), normal diet, normal diet spiked with purified recombinant Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein or bovine serum albumin (BSA) respectively. During the feeding trail, clinical observations were conducted daily, and multiple parameters, including body weight, body temperature, electrocardiogram, hematology, blood biochemistry, serum metabolome and gut microbiome were examined at regular intervals. Upon sacrifice, the organs were weighted, and the macroscopic, microscopic and electron microscopic examinations were performed. The results show no adverse or toxic effects of Bt rice HH1 or Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein on monkeys. Therefore, the present 52-week primate feeding study suggests that the transgenic rice containing Cry 1Ab/1Ac is equivalent to its parental rice line MH63. PMID:27338709

  9. A 52-week safety study in cynomolgus macaques for genetically modified rice expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jie; Sun, Xing; Cheng, Jian-Hua; Shi, Yong-Jie; Wang, Xin-Zheng; Qin, Jun-Jie; Sang, Zhi-Hong; He, Kun; Xia, Qing

    2016-09-01

    A 52-week feeding study in cynomolgus macaques was carried out to evaluate the safety of Bt rice Huahui 1 (HH1), a transgenic rice line expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac protein. Monkeys were fed a diet with 20% or 60% HH1 rice, 20% or 60% parental rice (Minghui 63, MH63), normal diet, normal diet spiked with purified recombinant Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein or bovine serum albumin (BSA) respectively. During the feeding trail, clinical observations were conducted daily, and multiple parameters, including body weight, body temperature, electrocardiogram, hematology, blood biochemistry, serum metabolome and gut microbiome were examined at regular intervals. Upon sacrifice, the organs were weighted, and the macroscopic, microscopic and electron microscopic examinations were performed. The results show no adverse or toxic effects of Bt rice HH1 or Cry1Ab/1Ac fusion protein on monkeys. Therefore, the present 52-week primate feeding study suggests that the transgenic rice containing Cry 1Ab/1Ac is equivalent to its parental rice line MH63.

  10. Standard electrocardiographic data of young Japanese monkeys (Macaca fusucata).

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Arao; Koie, Hiroshi; Sato, Tsuneo; Kanayama, Kiichi; Taira, Masato

    2013-07-01

    The electrocardiogram of nonhuman primates is similar to that of humans because of similar intrathoracic heart position and structure. Despite the frequent use of nonhuman primates in biologic studies, few electrocardiographic studies of Japanese monkeys (Macaca fusucata) have been reported, and no reference data are available for this species. We obtained limb-lead electrocardiograms from indoor-bred and housed ketamine-sedated Japanese macaques (48 male; 56 female; mean age, 44.3 mo; mean body weight, 4.84 kg) in the dorsal recumbency. The following quantitative data was obtained: heart rate, P wave amplitude and width, R wave amplitude, QRS duration, PR interval, QT interval, T wave height, and mean electrical axis. Corrected QT intervals were calculated by using the Bazett and Fridericia formulae. Measurements were evaluated according to sex and age. The duration of the QRS complex showed moderate correlation with age in male monkeys. All parameters, except heart rate, were similar to previous reports from Japanese, cynomolgus, and other macaques. P waves, R waves and mean electrical axis did not differ significantly between humans and Japanese macaques, but the wave amplitude in macaques was half that in humans. Our electrocardiographic measurements can serve as normal reference data for sedated, young Japanese monkeys.

  11. Retained fetal adrenal cortex in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher; Evans, Mark

    2014-10-01

    An incidental, bilateral, retained fetal adrenal cortex was detected in a male cynomolgus macaque (age, approximately 2.4 y) used in a 4-week toxicology study. Microscopic examination of the adrenal gland cortex zone revealed the presence of additional solid sheets and columns of cells supported by vascular capillary bed and composed of large polyhedral cells with abundant eosinophilic, slightly finely vacuolated cytoplasm that surrounded the entire circumference of the medulla. Nuclei were vesicular, round to oval with prominent small nucleoli. There was no evidence for inflammation or cellular degeneration. Based on the microscopic examination, a diagnosis of retained fetal cortex of the adrenal gland was made. This morphologic change resembles fetal cortex in human infants. To our knowledge, this case description is the first report of a cynomolgus macaque with the rare entity of retained fetal cortex, which should not be misinterpreted as a test article-related change.

  12. Vaginal Stone in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Canfield, Don R

    2015-12-01

    A 20-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) housed in an indoor primate facility presented for poor appetite and acute weakness after several years of no adverse health events. Physical examination revealed a firm, ovoid mass in the caudal abdomen. Further evaluation revealed the mass to be a vaginal calculus composed of calcium carbonate, apatite, and struvite. To our knowledge, this case is the first reported description of a vaginal stone in an NHP.

  13. Search for lymphatic drainage of the monkey orbit

    SciTech Connect

    McGetrick, J.J.; Wilson, D.G.; Dortzbach, R.K.; Kaufman, P.L.; Lemke, B.N.

    1989-02-01

    Colloid solutions of technetium Tc-99m and india ink injected into the retrobulbar space of the cynomolgus monkey outside the extraocular muscle cone were removed from the orbit by the lymphatic vessels of the conjunctiva and eyelids and were then concentrated within the lymph nodes that drained the conjunctival and eyelid areas. Colloid solutions injected into the retrobulbar space inside the extraocular muscle cone did not reach the conjunctiva and did not collect in any lymph nodes over a 24-hour period. Within the orbit, the injected colloids spread along the planes of the connective-tissue septa. No lymphatic vessels were identified within the orbits posterior to the conjunctiva. Small amounts of india ink left the posterior orbit and ultimately entered the contralateral orbit. This posterior pathway did not lead to lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes and therefore does not appear to represent a prelymphatic pathway.

  14. The genomic sequence of lymphocryptovirus from cynomolgus macaque.

    PubMed

    Kamperschroer, Cris; Gosink, Mark M; Kumpf, Steven W; O'Donnell, Lynn M; Tartaro, Karrie R

    2016-01-15

    Lymphocryptoviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cause persistent infections in human and non-human primates, and suppression of the immune system can increase the risk of lymphocryptovirus (LCV)-associated tumor development in both human and non-human primates. To enable LCV infection as a non-clinical model to study effects of therapeutics on EBV immunity, we determined the genomic DNA sequence of the LCV from cynomolgus macaque, a species commonly used for non-clinical testing. Comparison to rhesus macaque LCV and human EBV sequences indicates that LCV from the cynomolgus macaque has the same genomic arrangement and a high degree of similarity in most genes, especially with rhesus macaque LCV. Genes showing lower similarity were those encoding proteins involved in latency and/or tumor promotion or immune evasion. The genomic sequence of LCV from cynomolgus macaque should aid the development of non-clinical tools for identifying therapeutics that impact LCV immunity and carry potential lymphoma risk.

  15. Comparison of oxime reactivation and aging of nerve agent-inhibited monkey and human acetylcholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chunyuan; Tong, Min; Maxwell, Donald M; Saxena, Ashima

    2008-09-25

    Non-human primates are valuable animal models that are used for the evaluation of nerve agent toxicity as well as antidotes and results from animal experiments are extrapolated to humans. It has been demonstrated that the efficacy of an oxime primarily depends on its ability to reactivate nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). If the in vitro oxime reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited animal AChE is similar to that of human AChE, it is likely that the results of an in vivo animal study will reliably extrapolate to humans. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare the aging and reactivation of human and different monkey (Rhesus, Cynomolgus, and African Green) AChEs inhibited by GF, GD, and VR. The oximes examined include the traditional oxime 2-PAM, two H-oximes HI-6 and HLo-7, and the new candidate oxime MMB4. Results indicate that oxime reactivation of all three monkey AChEs was very similar to human AChE. The maximum difference in the second-order reactivation rate constant between human and three monkey AChEs or between AChEs from different monkey species was 5-fold. Aging rate constants of GF-, GD-, and VR-inhibited monkey AChEs were very similar to human AChE except for GF-inhibited monkey AChEs, which aged 2-3 times faster than the human enzyme. The results of this study suggest that all three monkey species are suitable animal models for nerve agent antidote evaluation since monkey AChEs possess similar biochemical/pharmacological properties to human AChE.

  16. Monkey Able After Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    On May 28, 1959, a Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by a U.S. Army team in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, A South American squirrel monkey and Able, An American-born rhesus monkey. This photograph shows Able after recovery of the nose cone of the Jupiter rocket by U.S.S. Kiowa.

  17. Monkey Retardate Learning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamove, A. S.; Molinaro, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Seven rhesus monkeys reared on diets high in phenylalanine to induce phenylketonuria (PKU--a metabolic disorder associated with mental retardation if untreated) were compared with normal, pair-fed, and younger controls; frontal brain-lesioned monkeys; and those raised on high-tryptophan diets in three object discrimination tasks. (Author)

  18. Animal cognition: monkey meteorology.

    PubMed

    Platt, Michael

    2006-06-20

    Mangabey monkeys have been shown to rely on memory of recent trends in temperature and solar radiation to decide whether to feed on a particular patch of fruit. These observations reveal a rich mental representation of the physical environment in monkeys and suggest foraging may have been an important selective pressure in primate cognitive evolution.

  19. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  20. Autism-like behaviours and germline transmission in transgenic monkeys overexpressing MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Jun-Tao; Cai, Yi-Jun; Cheng, Tian-Lin; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Nie, Yan-Hong; Chen, Zhi-Fang; Bian, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Jianqiu; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Yue-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Di; Sang, Xiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Xu, Xiu; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Xiang; Gong, Neng; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Sun, Qiang; Qiu, Zilong

    2016-02-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) has crucial roles in transcriptional regulation and microRNA processing. Mutations in the MECP2 gene are found in 90% of patients with Rett syndrome, a severe developmental disorder with autistic phenotypes. Duplications of MECP2-containing genomic segments cause the MECP2 duplication syndrome, which shares core symptoms with autism spectrum disorders. Although Mecp2-null mice recapitulate most developmental and behavioural defects seen in patients with Rett syndrome, it has been difficult to identify autism-like behaviours in the mouse model of MeCP2 overexpression. Here we report that lentivirus-based transgenic cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) expressing human MeCP2 in the brain exhibit autism-like behaviours and show germline transmission of the transgene. Expression of the MECP2 transgene was confirmed by western blotting and immunostaining of brain tissues of transgenic monkeys. Genomic integration sites of the transgenes were characterized by a deep-sequencing-based method. As compared to wild-type monkeys, MECP2 transgenic monkeys exhibited a higher frequency of repetitive circular locomotion and increased stress responses, as measured by the threat-related anxiety and defensive test. The transgenic monkeys showed less interaction with wild-type monkeys within the same group, and also a reduced interaction time when paired with other transgenic monkeys in social interaction tests. The cognitive functions of the transgenic monkeys were largely normal in the Wisconsin general test apparatus, although some showed signs of stereotypic cognitive behaviours. Notably, we succeeded in generating five F1 offspring of MECP2 transgenic monkeys by intracytoplasmic sperm injection with sperm from one F0 transgenic monkey, showing germline transmission and Mendelian segregation of several MECP2 transgenes in the F1 progeny. Moreover, F1 transgenic monkeys also showed reduced social interactions when tested in pairs, as

  1. Optomechanical Response of Human and Monkey Lenses in a Lens Stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie; Denham, David; Billotte, Christian; Ziebarth, Noel; Borja, David; Fernandez, Viviana; Aly, Mohammed; Arrieta, Esdras; Ho, Arthur; Holden, Brien

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the forces necessary to change the shape and optical power of human and monkey lenses. Methods Cynomolgus monkey (n = 48; age: 3.8–11 years), rhesus monkey (n = 35; age: 0.7–17 years) and human (n = 20, age 8–70 years) eyes obtained postmortem, including the lens, capsule, zonules, ciliary body, and sclera were mounted in an optomechanical lens-stretching system. Starting at zero load, the lenses were symmetrically stretched in a stepwise fashion in 0.25- or 0.5-mm steps. The load, lens diameter, inner ciliary body diameter, and lens power were measured at each step and the diameter- and power-load responses were quantified. Results The diameter- and power-load responses were found to be linear in the physiologically relevant range of stretching. The average change in cynomolgus, rhesus, and human lens diameter, respectively, was 0.094, 0.109, and 0.069 mm/g in young lenses, and 0.069, 0.067, and 0.036, mm/g in older lenses. For the same lenses, the average change in lens power was −3.73, −2.83, and −1.22 D/g in young lenses and −2.46, − 2.16, and −0.49 D/g in older lenses. Conclusions The force necessary to change the lens diameter and lens power increases with age in human and monkey lenses. The results agree with the Helmholtz theory of accommodation and with presbyopia theories that predict that the force required to disaccommodate the lens increases with age. PMID:17591897

  2. Distinctive Leukocyte Subpopulations According to Organ Type in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Zitsman, Jonah S; Alonso-Guallart, Paula; Ovanez, Christopher; Kato, Yojiro; Rosen, Joanna F; Weiner, Joshua I; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (CYNO; Macaca fascicularis) are a well-established NHP model used for studies in immunology. To provide reference values on the baseline cell distributions in the hematopoietic and lymphoid organs (HLO) of these animals, we used flow cytometry to analyze the peripheral blood, bone marrow, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus of a cohort of male, adult, research-naïve, Mauritian CYNO. Our findings demonstrate that several cell distribution patterns differ between CYNO and humans. First, the CD4(+):CD8(+) T-cell ratio is lower in CYNO compared with humans. Second, the peripheral blood of CYNO contains a population of CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. Third, the CD31 level was elevated in all organs studied, suggesting that CD31 may not be an accurate marker of recent thymic emigrants within the CD4(+) T cells of CYNO. Finally the B-cell population is lower in CYNO compared with humans. In summary, although the majority of immune cell populations are similar between cynomolgus macaques and humans, several important differences should be considered when using CYNO in immunologic studies. Our current findings provide valuable information to not only researchers but also veterinarians working with CYNO at research centers, in zoos, or in the wild. PMID:27538862

  3. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Dick, Edward J; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-04-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque.

  4. Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Cassondra; Dunn, Betty G; Brothman, Arthur R; Jr, Edward J Dick; Christensen, Chris; Voges, Andra; Moore, Charleen M

    2012-01-01

    A 2.3-y-old female cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) presented with a broken right tibia and fibula. Radiographs showed multiple cyst-like defects in all long bones. We suspected that both fractures were pathologic because they occurred through these defects. Ultrasonography, MRI, and dual X-ray absorptiometry revealed that the defects were filled with soft tissue. Grossly, the bones were abnormal in shape, and a gelatinous material filled the defects and the surrounding marrow cavity. Histologically, the gelatinous material was composed of fibrin and cartilage; few normal bone cells were seen. Genetic testing revealed extra material on the short arm of chromosome 8 in all tissues examined, but no copy number alterations of likely clinical significance were observed, and no abnormalities were found that were unique to the lesions. In light of the clinical signs and radiographic and pathologic findings, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia was diagnosed. This report represents the first documented case of fibrous dysplasia in a cynomolgus macaque. PMID:22546922

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in a captive colony of macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Daniel, M D; Letvin, N L; Sehgal, P K; Schmidt, D K; Silva, D P; Solomon, K R; Hodi, F S; Ringler, D J; Hunt, R D; King, N W

    1988-04-15

    The prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in the macaque colony of the New England Regional Primate Research Center (NERPRC) was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures as well as radioimmunoprecipitation-SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence tests. Out of 848 macaques, 3 (0.35%) had antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), 27 (3.2%) had antibodies to simian T-lymphotropic virus type I (STLV-1) and approximately 285 (34%) had antibodies to type D retrovirus. Of 3 macaques infected with SIV, 2 were rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and I was a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). STLV-1 and D retrovirus infection occurred in all 4 macaque species examined. SIV, STLV-1 and D retroviruses were isolated from sero-positive macaques. The low prevalence of SIV infection suggests that SIV is not being readily transmitted among macaques at NERPRC; this contrasts markedly with the high SIV prevalence in some captive mangabey colonies. In contrast to African green monkeys from eastern Africa, 160 Caribbean green monkeys examined showed no sign of SIV infection. These results provide a framework for monitoring spontaneous disease associated with infection by these 3 retroviruses and will help in further definition of STLV-1 and SIV infection of non-human primates as animal models for human disease.

  6. SLO angiography: arterio-venous filling times in monkey and minipig.

    PubMed

    Rosolen, Serge G; Saint-Macary, Gérard; Gautier, Vincent; Le Gargasson, Jean-François

    2002-03-01

    Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) is a new technique which enables ocular fundus image recording and dynamic retinal angiography to be performed. The ocular fundus image is acquired sequentially, point by point, and is reconstructed on a video monitor at the rate of 25 images per second. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of measuring retinal arterio-venous filling times (AVFT) with a I + Tech cSLO. Three young adult cynomolgus monkeys and three young adult Göttingen minipigs were used as experimental models. All animals were anesthetized using a zolazepam + tiletamine mixture injected intramuscularly; heart rate and rectal temperature were monitored and corneal irrigation was regularly performed. For all subjects, prior to examination, hematocrit and globe axial length were measured. The images were recorded, stabilized and analyzed. The retinal examination consisted of retinal images with 40 degrees field cSLO, retinal fluorescein angiography and arterio-venous 50% filling time measurements. For each subject all images were easily recorded while keeping the animals in a normally lighted room without having to use any additional optical device. AVFT using an I + Tech cSLO is easily performed in monkeys and minipigs. AVFT measurements in minipigs and monkeys are similar. These results suggest that minipigs can replace monkeys as an experimental species for AVFT investigations. PMID:11940243

  7. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  8. Acute and chronic structural effects of pilocarpine on monkey outflow tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Lütjen-Drecoll, E; Wiendl, H; Kaufman, P L

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Determine the effects of supraclinical topical doses of pilocarpine on the structure of the trabecular meshwork (TM), ciliary muscle (CM), and ciliary processes in monkeys. METHODS: Cynomolgus monkeys received topical pilocarpine hydrochloride doses of 1 to 2 mg unilaterally once or twice daily for 1 to 211 days. Both eyes were examined by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: After 1 dose, the TM was expanded and the flow pathways open. Some elastic anterior CM tendons were disconnected from the muscle tips and/or the tips themselves were disrupted; macrophage-like cells accumulated in these regions. In eyes that had long-term treatment, scar tissue at the muscle tips and disruption of myofibrils within muscle cells indicated regions of previous disconnection. Most collagen tendons inserting into the peripheral cornea were unaffected. With increasing treatment duration in younger monkeys, there was anteroposterior shortening of Schlemm's canal, TM densification due to collapse, and increased cellularity in the subendothelial region of Schlemm's canal. TM densification and Schlemm's canal shortening were not found in older monkeys, implicating posterior movement of the elastic young limbal region induced by strong CM contraction, rather than pilocarpine toxicity. In the ciliary body we found vasodilation, Greeff's vesicles, and blood-aqueous barrier breakdown in the anterior ciliary processes and vasodilation, edema, and round-cell infiltration in the posterior pars plana. CONCLUSIONS: Large pilocarpine doses induce morphologic changes in the monkey anterior segment, likely consequent to intense CM contraction. Changes in the TM and Schlemm's canal are seen only in young monkeys, apparently owing to mechanical deformation of the elastic limbal region. Images FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 2D FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 5 PMID:10360289

  9. A Genetic Comparison of Two Alleged Subspecies of Philippine Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Glenn; Ng, Jillian; George, Debra; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Houghton, Paul; Singh, Balbir; Villano, Jason; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan

    2014-01-01

    Two subspecies of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are alleged to co-exist in the Philippines, M. f. philippensis in the north and M. f. fascicularis in the south. However, genetic differences between the cynomolgus macaques in the two regions have never been studied to document the propriety of their subspecies status. We genotyped samples of cynomolgus macaques from Batangas in southwestern Luzon and Zamboanga in southwestern Mindanao for 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci and sequenced an 835 bp fragment of the mtDNA of these animals. The STR genotypes were compared with those of cynomolgus macaques from southern Sumatra, Singapore, Mauritius and Cambodia, and the mtDNA sequences of both Philippine populations were compared with those of cynomolgus macaques from southern Sumatra, Indonesia and Sarawak, Malaysia. We conducted STRUCTURE and PCA analyses based on the STRs and constructed a median joining network based on the mtDNA sequences. The Philippine population from Batangas exhibited much less genetic diversity and greater genetic divergence from all other populations, including the Philippine population from Zamboanga. Sequences from both Batangas and Zamboanga were most closely related to two different mtDNA haplotypes from Sarawak from which they are apparently derived. Those from Zamboanga were more recently derived than those from Batangas, consistent with their later arrival in the Philippines. However, clustering analyses do not support a sufficient genetic distinction of cynomolgus macaques from Batangas from other regional populations assigned to subspecies M. f. fascicularis to warrant the subspecies distinction M. f. philippensis. PMID:24979664

  10. Cerebral Baylisascaris larva migrans in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Shoieb, Ahmed; Radi, Zaher A

    2014-08-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, focal inflammatory lesion was detected in brain cerebrum of an approximately 6-year-old, female cynomolgus macaque from a chronic toxicology study. No gross lesions were noted at necropsy. Microscopically, the lesion contained a cross-section of larvae approximately 70-80 μm in diameter, a centrally located intestine flanked on either side by large triangular excretory columns, and prominent single lateral cuticular alae. Mixed inflammatory cells of eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with abundant connective tissue stroma and necrosis surrounded the larvae. Histochemical stains for trichrome revealed significant amount of fibrous connective tissue. The morphology of the larvae was compatible with Baylisascaris spp. Based on the microscopic and histochemical examination, a diagnosis of neural Baylisascaris spp. larva migrans was made.

  11. Genomic Sequencing and Characterization of Cynomolgus Macaque Cytomegalovirus▿

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Ambagala, Aruna P. N.; Dzamba, Misko; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Pilon, Richard; Fournier, Jocelyn; Sandstrom, Paul; Brudno, Michael; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common opportunistic infection in immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients or people living with HIV/AIDS, and congenital CMV is the leading viral cause of developmental disabilities in infants. Due to the highly species-specific nature of CMV, animal models that closely recapitulate human CMV (HCMV) are of growing importance for vaccine development. Here we present the genomic sequence of a novel nonhuman primate CMV from cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis; CyCMV). CyCMV (Ottawa strain) was isolated from the urine of a healthy, captive-bred, 4-year-old cynomolgus macaque of Philippine origin, and the viral genome was sequenced using next-generation Illumina sequencing to an average of 516-fold coverage. The CyCMV genome is 218,041 bp in length, with 49.5% G+C content and 84% protein-coding density. We have identified 262 putative open reading frames (ORFs) with an average coding length of 789 bp. The genomic organization of CyCMV is largely colinear with that of rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV). Of the 262 CyCMV ORFs, 137 are homologous to HCMV genes, 243 are homologous to RhCMV 68.1, and 200 are homologous to RhCMV 180.92. CyCMV encodes four ORFs that are not present in RhCMV strain 68.1 or 180.92 but have homologies with HCMV (UL30, UL74A, UL126, and UL146). Similar to HCMV, CyCMV does not produce the RhCMV-specific viral homologue of cyclooxygenase-2. This newly characterized CMV may provide a novel model in which to study CMV biology and HCMV vaccine development. PMID:21994460

  12. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  13. Particle-to-PFU Ratio of Ebola Virus Influences Disease Course and Survival in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Alfson, Kendra J.; Avena, Laura E.; Beadles, Michael W.; Staples, Hilary; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Ticer, Anysha; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael A.; Reed, Christopher; Patterson, Jean L.; Carrion, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study addresses the role of Ebola virus (EBOV) specific infectivity in virulence. Filoviruses are highly lethal, enveloped, single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses that can cause hemorrhagic fever. No approved vaccines or therapies exist for filovirus infections, and infectious virus must be handled in maximum containment. Efficacy testing of countermeasures, in addition to investigations of pathogenicity and immune response, often requires a well-characterized animal model. For EBOV, an obstacle in performing accurate disease modeling is a poor understanding of what constitutes an infectious dose in animal models. One well-recognized consequence of viral passage in cell culture is a change in specific infectivity, often measured as a particle-to-PFU ratio. Here, we report that serial passages of EBOV in cell culture resulted in a decrease in particle-to-PFU ratio. Notably, this correlated with decreased potency in a lethal cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of infection; animals were infected with the same viral dose as determined by plaque assay, but animals that received more virus particles exhibited increased disease. This suggests that some particles are unable to form a plaque in a cell culture assay but are able to result in lethal disease in vivo. These results have a significant impact on how future studies are designed to model EBOV disease and test countermeasures. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus (EBOV) can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with a high case-fatality rate, and there are no approved vaccines or therapies. Specific infectivity can be considered the total number of viral particles per PFU, and its impact on disease is poorly understood. In stocks of most mammalian viruses, there are particles that are unable to complete an infectious cycle or unable to cause cell pathology in cultured cells. We asked if these particles cause disease in nonhuman primates by infecting monkeys with equal infectious doses of genetically

  14. Improvements of Vaginal Atrophy without Systemic Side Effects after Topical Application of Pueraria mirifica, a Phytoestrogen-rich Herb, in Postmenopausal Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    JAROENPORN, Sukanya; URASOPON, Nontakorn; WATANABE, Gen; MALAIVIJITNOND, Suchinda

    2014-01-01

    The estrogenic efficacy of topical vaginal application of Pueraria mirifica extract (PM) on the restoration of vaginal atrophy, and the presence of any systemic side effects, were investigated in postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques. Twelve postmenopausal cynomolgus macaques, with complete cessation of menstruation for at least 5 years before start of this experiment, were divided into three groups. They received a topical vaginal application daily of 0.1 or 1% (w/w) PM cream or a conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) cream (a mixture of estrone, equilin, 17β-dihydroequilin, 17α-estradiol and 17α-dihydroequilin at 0.625 mg total estrogen/g cream) for 28 days. Estrogenic efficacy was assessed weekly by vaginal cytology assay and vaginal pH measurement, whilst the plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex skin coloration levels were determined at the end of each treatment period to evaluate the systemic side effects. PM significantly increased the proportion of superficial cells in a dose-dependent manner, with a similar efficacy between 1% (w/w) PM and CEE. Together with increased vaginal maturation, PM decreased the vaginal pH to acidic levels, as observed in the CEE group. PM induced no detected systemic side effects, whilst CEE decreased the plasma LH level and increased the reddish color of the sex skin during the posttreatment period. Topical vaginal treatment with PM stimulated the maturation of the vaginal epithelium without causing systemic side effects in postmenopausal monkeys. The implication is that PM could be a safer alternative to treat vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. PMID:24748397

  15. Monkey see, monkey do: contagious itch in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Feneran, Ashley N; O'Donnell, Russell; Press, Ashley; Yosipovitch, Gil; Cline, Mark; Dugan, Greg; Papoiu, Alexandru D P; Nattkemper, Leigh A; Chan, Yiong Huak; Shively, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    "Contagious itch" has been anecdotally reported and recently confirmed in a controlled setting in humans. Here, we investigated in adult rhesus macaques whether 'contagious itch' occurs spontaneously in monkeys. In a first experiment, the latency to scratch following cage-mate scratching was observed in pair-housed adult rhesus macaques. Scratching increased within the first 60 s and subsequently declined. In a second experiment, scratching behavior was recorded for individually caged adult rhesus macaques which where shown videos of monkeys scratching, but also neutral stimuli. A greater frequency of scratching was observed when monkeys viewed a video sequence of another monkey scratching as well as during the neutral stimulus immediately following the monkey scratching segment. In conclusion, viewing other monkeys scratching significantly increased scratching behavior in adult rhesus macaques.

  16. Immunochemical quantification of cynomolgus CYP2J2, CYP4A and CYP4F enzymes in liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Murayama, Norie; Nakanishi, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Chika; Hashizume, Takanori; Zeldin, Darryl C; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2015-02-01

    1. An increasing number of studies have indicated the roles of CYP4 proteins in drug metabolism; however, CYP4 expression has not been measured in cynomolgus monkeys, an important animal species for drug metabolism studies. 2. In this study, cynomolgus CYP4A11, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, along with CYP2J2, were immunoquantified using selective antibodies in 28 livers and 35 small intestines, and their content was compared with CYP1A, CYP2A, CYP2B6, CYP2C9/19, CYP2D, CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, previously quantified. 3. In livers, CYP2J2, CYP4A11, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, varied 1.3- to 4.3-fold, represented 11.2, 14.4, 8.0, 2.7 and 0.3% of total immunoquantified CYP1-4 proteins, respectively. 4. In small intestines, CYP2J2, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, varied 2.4- to 9.7-fold, represented 6.9, 36.4, 2.4 and 9.3% of total immunoquantified CYP1-4 proteins, respectively, making CYP4F the most abundant P450 subfamily in small intestines. CYP4A11 was under the detection limit in all of the samples analyzed. 5. Significant correlations were found in liver for CYP4A11 with lauric acid 11-/12-hydroxylation and for CYP4F2/3 and CYP4F11 with astemizole hydroxylation. 6. This study revealed the relatively abundant contents of cynomolgus CYP2J2, CYP4A11 and CYP4Fs in liver and/or small intestine, suggesting their potential roles for the metabolism of xenobitotics and endogenous substrates.

  17. Immunochemical quantification of cynomolgus CYP2J2, CYP4A and CYP4F enzymes in liver and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Murayama, Norie; Nakanishi, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Chika; Hashizume, Takanori; Zeldin, Darryl C; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2015-02-01

    1. An increasing number of studies have indicated the roles of CYP4 proteins in drug metabolism; however, CYP4 expression has not been measured in cynomolgus monkeys, an important animal species for drug metabolism studies. 2. In this study, cynomolgus CYP4A11, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, along with CYP2J2, were immunoquantified using selective antibodies in 28 livers and 35 small intestines, and their content was compared with CYP1A, CYP2A, CYP2B6, CYP2C9/19, CYP2D, CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, previously quantified. 3. In livers, CYP2J2, CYP4A11, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, varied 1.3- to 4.3-fold, represented 11.2, 14.4, 8.0, 2.7 and 0.3% of total immunoquantified CYP1-4 proteins, respectively. 4. In small intestines, CYP2J2, CYP4F2/3, CYP4F11 and CYP4F12, varied 2.4- to 9.7-fold, represented 6.9, 36.4, 2.4 and 9.3% of total immunoquantified CYP1-4 proteins, respectively, making CYP4F the most abundant P450 subfamily in small intestines. CYP4A11 was under the detection limit in all of the samples analyzed. 5. Significant correlations were found in liver for CYP4A11 with lauric acid 11-/12-hydroxylation and for CYP4F2/3 and CYP4F11 with astemizole hydroxylation. 6. This study revealed the relatively abundant contents of cynomolgus CYP2J2, CYP4A11 and CYP4Fs in liver and/or small intestine, suggesting their potential roles for the metabolism of xenobitotics and endogenous substrates. PMID:25138712

  18. Altered expression of glial and synaptic markers in the anterior hippocampus of behaviorally depressed female monkeys.

    PubMed

    Willard, Stephanie L; Hemby, Scott E; Register, Thomas C; McIntosh, Scot; Shively, Carol A

    2014-03-20

    The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. We reported reduced neuropil volume and number of glia in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA)1 of the anterior hippocampus in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques. To determine the biochemical correlates of morphometric and behavioral differences between behaviorally depressed and nondepressed adult female monkeys, glial and synaptic transcripts and protein levels were assessed in the DG, CA3 and CA1 of the anterior hippocampus. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was increased whereas spinophilin and postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 protein were decreased in the CA1 of depressed monkeys. GFAP was reciprocally related to spinophilin and PSD-95 protein in the CA1. Gene expression of GFAP paralleled the protein changes observed in the CA1 and was inversely related to serum estradiol levels in depressed monkeys. These results suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by astrocytic and synaptic protein alterations in the CA1. Moreover, these findings indicate a potential role for estrogen in modulating astrocyte-mediated impairments in synaptic plasticity.

  19. Altered Expression of Glial and Synaptic Markers in the Anterior Hippocampus of Behaviorally Depressed Female Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Hemby, Scott E.; Register, Thomas C.; McIntosh, Scot; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. We reported reduced neuropil volume and number of glia in the dentate gyrus (DG) and cornu ammonis (CA)1 of the anterior hippocampus in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques. To determine the biochemical correlates of morphometric and behavioral differences between behaviorally depressed and nondepressed adult female monkeys, glial and synaptic transcripts and protein levels were assessed in the DG, CA3 and CA1 of the anterior hippocampus. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was increased whereas spinophilin and postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 protein were decreased in the CA1 of depressed monkeys. GFAP was reciprocally related to spinophilin and PSD-95 protein in the CA1. Gene expression of GFAP paralleled the protein changes observed in the CA1 and was inversely related to serum estradiol levels in depressed monkeys. These results suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by astrocytic and synaptic protein alterations in the CA1. Moreover, these findings indicate a potential role for estrogen in modulating astrocyte-mediated impairments in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24440617

  20. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  1. Usefulness of optical coherence tomography to detect central serous chorioretinopathy in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Kyu; Jo, Woori; Choi, Hyun-Ji; Kim, Bongcheol; Lee, Gilnam; Seo, Jeongbeob; Cho, Suk Young; Kim, Choung-Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Lee, Joo Yong; Yoon, Young Hee; Son, Woo-Chan

    2015-02-01

    Many systemic drugs can induce ocular toxicity and several ocular side-effects have been identified in clinical studies. However, it is difficult to detect ocular toxicity in preclinical studies because of the lack of appropriate evaluation methods. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is useful because it can provide real-time images throughout a study period, whereas histopathology only provides images of sacrificed animals. Using OCT alongside histopathology, attempts were made to find effective approaches for screening of drug-induced ocular toxicity in monkeys. Such approaches could be used in preclinical studies prior to human trials. Six male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis Raffles) were orally administered one of six candidate MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Central serous chorioretinopathy, a known side-effect of such inhibitors, was identified in four monkeys by OCT. Artifacts generated during tissue processing meant that histopathology could not detect edematous changes. Thus, OCT is a useful tool to detect ocular toxicity which cannot be detected by histopathology in preclinical studies.

  2. ANGPTL3 blockade with a human monoclonal antibody reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gusarova, Viktoria; Alexa, Corey A; Wang, Yan; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Buckler, David; Mintah, Ivory J; Shihanian, Lisa M; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H; Xin, Yurong; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-07-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating protein synthesized exclusively in the liver that inhibits LPL and endothelial lipase (EL), enzymes that hydrolyze TGs and phospholipids in plasma lipoproteins. Here we describe the development and testing of a fully human monoclonal antibody (REGN1500) that binds ANGPTL3 with high affinity. REGN1500 reversed ANGPTL3-induced inhibition of LPL activity in vitro. Intravenous administration of REGN1500 to normolipidemic C57Bl/6 mice increased LPL activity and decreased plasma TG levels by ≥50%. Chronic administration of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic C57Bl/6 mice for 8 weeks reduced circulating plasma levels of TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) without any changes in liver, adipose, or heart TG contents. Studies in EL knockout mice revealed that REGN1500 reduced serum HDL-C through an EL-dependent mechanism. Finally, administration of a single dose of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic cynomolgus monkeys caused a rapid and pronounced decrease in plasma TG, nonHDL-C, and HDL-C. REGN1500 normalized plasma TG levels even in monkeys with a baseline plasma TG greater than 400 mg/dl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that neutralization of ANGPTL3 using REGN1500 reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys, and thus provides a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25964512

  3. Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Miquel, J.; Rubinstein, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of 32 monkeys which survived one to seven years after total body exposure to protons or to high-energy X rays. Among these 32 monkeys there were 21 which survived two years or longer after exposure to 200 to 800 rad. Glioblastoma multiforme developed in 3 of the 10 monkeys surviving three to five years after receiving 600 or 800 rad 55-MeV protons. Thus, the incidence of tumor development in the present series was far higher than the incidence of spontaneously developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literature. This suggests that the tumors in the present series may have been radiation-induced.

  4. Cell Number and Neuropil Alterations in Subregions of the Anterior Hippocampus in a Female Monkey Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Willard, Stephanie L.; Riddle, David R.; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Shively, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The anterior hippocampus is associated with emotional functioning and hippocampal volume is reduced in depression. More women are clinically depressed than men, yet the depressed female brain is little studied. We reported reduced anterior hippocampal volume in behaviorally depressed adult female cynomolgus macaques; the mechanisms contributing to that reduction are unknown. The present study represents the first systematic morphological investigation of the entire hippocampus in depressed female primates. Methods Cellular determinants of hippocampal size were examined in subregions of anterior and posterior hippocampus in antidepressant-naive, adult female monkeys characterized for behavioral depression and matched on variables that influence hippocampal size (n=8 depressed, 8 nondepressed). Unbiased stereology was used to estimate neuronal and glial numbers, neuronal soma size, and regional and layer volumes. Results Neuropil and cell layer volumes were reduced in cornu ammonis (CA)1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the anterior but not the posterior hippocampus of depressed compared to nondepressed monkeys. Glial numbers were 30% lower in anterior CA1 and DG of depressed monkeys, with no differences observed in the posterior hippocampus. Granule neuron number tended towards a reduction in anterior DG; pyramidal neuron number was unchanged in any region. Size of pyramidal neurons and glial densities tended to be reduced throughout the whole hippocampus of depressed monkeys, whereas neuronal densities were unchanged. Conclusions The reduced size of the anterior hippocampus in depressed females appears to arise from alterations in numbers of glia and extent of neuropil, but not numbers of neurons, in CA1 and DG. PMID:23607969

  5. Development of a new device for artificial insemination in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Shuzo; FUKUDA, Koji; WATANABE, Sho; KOHARA, Sakae; TSUCHIYA, Hideaki; FUKUZAKI, Koichiro; NAGANO, Masashi; UNO, Yasuhiro; HOSOI, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    In cynomolgus macaques, an important animal species for biomedical research, efficient reproduction has been hampered partly due to the difficulties of artificial insemination (AI) using straw tubes developed for humans or farm animals, because cynomolgus macaques have a complex cervical canal structure. In this study, taking into consideration the unique structure of the macaque cervical canal, we developed a novel device for AI, comprised of a syringe and an outer cylinder. At 24 and 48 h after using this device to inject semen into one female, viable sperm were observed in the oviduct where the sperm meets the oocytes. We then attempted AI using this new device on 10 females that were at pre-ovulation, and pregnancy was successful in three animals (30% pregnancy rate). These results show that the newly developed device can be used for AI in cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27319580

  6. Effects of Ketamine on Metabolomics of Serum and Urine in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Pan, Xueying; Zeng, Xiancheng; Hong, Jiehua; Yuan, Congli; Cui, Li; Ma, Jing; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a metabolomics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and pertinent multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the effect of ketamine on metabolic markers in cynomolgus macaques. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis showed that ketamine (10 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, ketamine-treated macaques had lower serum levels of α-glucose, myoinositol, lactate and succinate and lower urine levels of pyruvate and lactate. In contrast, the levels of leucine in serum and arginine in urine were significantly higher in the ketamine group. Our results also demonstrated that a single injection of ketamine influenced the major energy and amino acid metabolic pathways in cynomolgus macaques. Our study suggests that these influences should be considered in the design of experiments and the interpretation related blood and urine data from ketamine-sedated cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27657710

  7. Prevention of Nonimmunologic Loss of Transplanted Islets in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Koulmanda, M.; Sampathkumar, R. S.; Bhasin, M.; Qipo, A.; Fan, Z.; Singh, G.; Movahedi, B.; Duggan, M.; Chipashvili, V.; Strom, T. B.

    2014-01-01

    The nonimmunologic loss of islets in the pre-, peri-, and early post-islet transplant periods is profound. To determine the potential role that transplantation of only a marginal mass of functioning beta cells may play in triggering late nonimmunologic graft loss, we studied the effect of treatment with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the autologous cynomolgus islet transplant model. A marginal mass of autologous islets, that is islets prepared from 70% to 80% of the pancreas, was transplanted at 1600–4100 IEQ/kg into subtotal pancreatectomized, streptozotocin-treated and insulin-deficient diabetic hosts. In this marginal mass islet transplant model, islet function is insidiously lost over time and diabetes recurs in all untreated monkeys by 180 days posttransplantation. Short-term treatment with AAT, an acute phase reactant, in the peritransplant period serves to terminate inflammation through effects upon expression of TGFβ, NFκB and AKT and favorably altering expression of cell death and survival pathways, as detected by a system biology approach and histology. These effects enabled functional expansion of the islet mass in transplanted hosts such that graft function improves rather than deteriorating over time. PMID:24913821

  8. Prevention of nonimmunologic loss of transplanted islets in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, M; Sampathkumar, R S; Bhasin, M; Qipo, A; Fan, Z; Singh, G; Movahedi, B; Duggan, M; Chipashvili, V; Strom, T B

    2014-07-01

    The nonimmunologic loss of islets in the pre-, peri-, and early post-islet transplant periods is profound. To determine the potential role that transplantation of only a marginal mass of functioning beta cells may play in triggering late nonimmunologic graft loss, we studied the effect of treatment with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) in the autologous cynomolgus islet transplant model. A marginal mass of autologous islets, that is islets prepared from 70% to 80% of the pancreas, was transplanted at 1600-4100 IEQ/kg into subtotal pancreatectomized, streptozotocin-treated and insulin-deficient diabetic hosts. In this marginal mass islet transplant model, islet function is insidiously lost over time and diabetes recurs in all untreated monkeys by 180 days posttransplantation. Short-term treatment with AAT, an acute phase reactant, in the peri-transplant period serves to terminate inflammation through effects upon expression of TGFβ, NFκB and AKT and favorably altering expression of cell death and survival pathways, as detected by a system biology approach and histology. These effects enabled functional expansion of the islet mass in transplanted hosts such that graft function improves rather than deteriorating over time. PMID:24913821

  9. Sonar biparietal diameter growth standards in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Sabbagha, R E; Turner, J H; Chez, R A

    1975-02-01

    Serial sonar fetal cephalometry was performed on 67 pregnant monkeys (Macaca ulatta) with known breeding dates. A normal biparietal diameter (BPD) growth curve was constructed along four percentile divisions; namely, the 10th to the 24th, 25th to the 49th, 50th to the 74th, and the 75th to the 90th. It is shown that under normal conditions fetuses initially positioned in any one of these divisions will continue to grow within the confines of that same percentile range. This biologic phenomenon has not been previously reported. It is significant because it leads to a more precise separation of normal vs. suboptimal intrauterine growth.

  10. The pregnant dental patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Medha

    2012-01-01

    When dealing with a pregnant patient, the dental practitioner should keep in mind the various physiological changes that occur in the pregnant female and the potential effects on the fetus in using various types of local anesthesia. This article reviews the current considerations in the use of local anesthesia in the pregnant dental patient, and the safety of local anesthetics, their dosage, and any adverse effect on mother and fetus. It also discusses various dental procedures and the trimester during which they can be performed. Lastly, this article talks about the complications that can occur with a pregnant dental patient in the dental chair.

  11. Monkeys reject unequal pay.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Sarah F; De Waal, Frans B M

    2003-09-18

    During the evolution of cooperation it may have become critical for individuals to compare their own efforts and pay-offs with those of others. Negative reactions may occur when expectations are violated. One theory proposes that aversion to inequity can explain human cooperation within the bounds of the rational choice model, and may in fact be more inclusive than previous explanations. Although there exists substantial cultural variation in its particulars, this 'sense of fairness' is probably a human universal that has been shown to prevail in a wide variety of circumstances. However, we are not the only cooperative animals, hence inequity aversion may not be uniquely human. Many highly cooperative nonhuman species seem guided by a set of expectations about the outcome of cooperation and the division of resources. Here we demonstrate that a nonhuman primate, the brown capuchin monkey (Cebus apella), responds negatively to unequal reward distribution in exchanges with a human experimenter. Monkeys refused to participate if they witnessed a conspecific obtain a more attractive reward for equal effort, an effect amplified if the partner received such a reward without any effort at all. These reactions support an early evolutionary origin of inequity aversion.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Dax1 knockout in the monkey recapitulates human AHC-HH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Zheng, Bo; Shen, Bin; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianying; Niu, Yuyu; Cui, Yiqiang; Zhou, Jiankui; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Bian; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao; Ji, Weizhi; Huang, Xingxu

    2015-12-20

    Mutations in the DAX1 locus cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), which manifest with primary adrenal insufficiency and incomplete or absent sexual maturation, respectively. The associated defects in spermatogenesis can range from spermatogenic arrest to Sertoli cell only syndrome. Conclusions from Dax1 knockout mouse models provide only limited insight into AHC/HH disease mechanisms, because mouse models exhibit more extensive abnormalities in testicular development, including disorganized and incompletely formed testis cords with decreased number of peritubular myoid cells and male-to-female sex reversal. We previously reported successful clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome targeting in cynomolgus monkeys. Here, we describe a male fetal monkey in which targeted genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 produced Dax1-null mutations in most somatic tissues and in the gonads. This DAX1-deficient monkey displayed defects in adrenal gland development and abnormal testis architecture with small cords, expanded blood vessels and extensive fibrosis. Sertoli cell formation was not affected. This phenotype strongly resembles findings in human patients with AHC-HH caused by mutations in DAX1. We further detected upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin-VEGF signaling in the fetal Dax1-deficient testis, suggesting abnormal activation of signaling pathways in the absence of DAX1 as one mechanism of AHC-HH. Our study reveals novel insight into the role of DAX1 in HH and provides proof-of-principle for the generation of monkey models of human disease via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting.

  13. Toxicokinetics of inhaled 1,3-butadiene in monkeys: Comparison to toxicokinetics in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Sun, J.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Bond, J.A.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Mauderly, J.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Sabourin, P.J.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1991-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene is a potent carcinogen in mice and a weaker carcinogen in rats. People are exposed to butadiene through its industrial use--largely in rubber production (over 3 billion pounds of butadiene were produced in 1989)--and because it is common in the environment, occurring in cigarette smoke, gasoline vapor and in the effluents from fossil fuel incineration. Epidemiological studies have provided some evidence for butadiene carcinogenicity in people. Differences in the uptake and metabolism of inhaled butadiene between rodents and primates, including people, might be reflected in differences in its toxicity. In order to compare uptake and metabolism in primates to that in rodents--for which data were already available--the authors exposed cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to 14C-labeled butadiene at concentrations of 10.1, 310 or 7760 ppm for 2 hr. Exhaled air and excreta were collected during exposure and for 96 hr after exposure. The uptake of butadiene as a result of metabolism was much lower in monkeys than in rodents. For equivalent inhalation exposures, the concentrations of total butadiene metabolites in the blood were 5-50 times lower in monkey than in the mouse, the more sensitive rodent species, and 4-14 times lower than in the rat. If the toxicokinetics of butadiene in people is more like that of the monkey than that of rodents, then our data suggest that people will receive lower doses of butadiene and its metabolites than rodents following equivalent inhalation exposures to butadiene. This has important implications for assessing the risk to humans of butadiene exposure based on animal studies.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Dax1 knockout in the monkey recapitulates human AHC-HH.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Zheng, Bo; Shen, Bin; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianying; Niu, Yuyu; Cui, Yiqiang; Zhou, Jiankui; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Bian; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao; Ji, Weizhi; Huang, Xingxu

    2015-12-20

    Mutations in the DAX1 locus cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), which manifest with primary adrenal insufficiency and incomplete or absent sexual maturation, respectively. The associated defects in spermatogenesis can range from spermatogenic arrest to Sertoli cell only syndrome. Conclusions from Dax1 knockout mouse models provide only limited insight into AHC/HH disease mechanisms, because mouse models exhibit more extensive abnormalities in testicular development, including disorganized and incompletely formed testis cords with decreased number of peritubular myoid cells and male-to-female sex reversal. We previously reported successful clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome targeting in cynomolgus monkeys. Here, we describe a male fetal monkey in which targeted genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 produced Dax1-null mutations in most somatic tissues and in the gonads. This DAX1-deficient monkey displayed defects in adrenal gland development and abnormal testis architecture with small cords, expanded blood vessels and extensive fibrosis. Sertoli cell formation was not affected. This phenotype strongly resembles findings in human patients with AHC-HH caused by mutations in DAX1. We further detected upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin-VEGF signaling in the fetal Dax1-deficient testis, suggesting abnormal activation of signaling pathways in the absence of DAX1 as one mechanism of AHC-HH. Our study reveals novel insight into the role of DAX1 in HH and provides proof-of-principle for the generation of monkey models of human disease via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting. PMID:26464492

  15. In Vivo Safety and Persistence of Endoribonuclease Gene-Transduced CD4+ T Cells in Cynomolgus Macaques for HIV-1 Gene Therapy Model

    PubMed Central

    Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiroaki; Ageyama, Naohide; Terao, Keiji; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Junichi; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2011-01-01

    Background MazF is an endoribonuclease encoded by Escherichia coli that specifically cleaves the ACA sequence of mRNA. In our previous report, conditional expression of MazF in the HIV-1 LTR rendered CD4+ T lymphocytes resistant to HIV-1 replication. In this study, we examined the in vivo safety and persistence of MazF-transduced cynomolgus macaque CD4+ T cells infused into autologous monkeys. Methodology/Principal Findings The in vivo persistence of the gene-modified CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood was monitored for more than half a year using quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry, followed by experimental autopsy in order to examine the safety and distribution pattern of the infused cells in several organs. Although the levels of the MazF-transduced CD4+ T cells gradually decreased in the peripheral blood, they were clearly detected throughout the experimental period. Moreover, the infused cells were detected in the distal lymphoid tissues, such as several lymph nodes and the spleen. Histopathological analyses of tissues revealed that there were no lesions related to the infused gene modified cells. Antibodies against MazF were not detected. These data suggest the safety and the low immunogenicity of MazF-transduced CD4+ T cells. Finally, gene modified cells harvested from the monkey more than half a year post-infusion suppressed the replication of SHIV 89.6P. Conclusions/Significance The long-term persistence, safety and continuous HIV replication resistance of the mazF gene-modified CD4+ T cells in the non-human primate model suggests that autologous transplantation of mazF gene-modified cells is an attractive strategy for HIV gene therapy. PMID:21858176

  16. Pharmacokinetics of anti-hepcidin monoclonal antibody Ab 12B9m and hepcidin in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jim J; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Wang, Yow-Ming; Li, Hongyan; Rose, Mark J; Ma, Mark; Wu, Yuling; Hinkle, Beth; Perez-Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2010-12-01

    Hepcidin is a key regulator responsible for systemic iron homeostasis. A semi-mechanistic PK model for hepcidin and a fully human anti-hepcidin monoclonal antibody (Ab 12B9m) was developed to describe their total (free + bound) serum concentration-time data after single and multiple weekly intravenous or subcutaneous doses of Ab 12B9m. The model was based on target mediated drug disposition and the IgG-FcRn interaction concepts published previously. Both total Ab 12B9m and total hepcidin exhibited nonlinear kinetics due to saturable Fc-FcRn interaction. Ab 12B9m showed a limited volume of distribution and negligible linear elimination from serum. The nonlinear elimination of Ab 12B9m was attributed to the endosomal degradation of Ab 12B9m that was not bound to the FcRn receptor. The terminal half-life, assumed to be the same for free and total serum Ab 12B9m, was estimated to be 16.5 days. The subcutaneous absorption of Ab 12B9m was described with a first-order absorption rate constant k(a) of 0.0278 h⁻¹, with 86% bioavailability. The model suggested a rapid hepcidin clearance of approximately 800 mL h⁻¹ kg⁻¹. Only the highest-tested Ab 12B9m dose of 300 mg kg⁻¹ week⁻¹ was able to maintain free hepcidin level below the baseline during the dosing intervals. Free Ab 12B9m and free hepcidin concentrations were simulated, and their PK profiles were nonlinear as affected by their binding to each other. Additionally, the total amount of FcRn receptor involved in Ab 12B9m recycling at a given time was calculated empirically, and the temporal changes in the free FcRn levels upon Ab 12B9m administration were inferred. PMID:20737261

  17. Efficacy of Selective PDE4D Negative Allosteric Modulators in the Object Retrieval Task in Female Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Jane S.; Beaumont, Vahri; Watson, James M.; Chew, Chang Sing; Beconi, Maria; Hutcheson, Daniel M.; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and information processing in the hippocampal and basal ganglia systems. The augmentation of cAMP signalling through the selective inhibition of phosphodiesterases represents a viable strategy to treat disorders associated with dysfunction of these circuits. The phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 4 inhibitor rolipram has shown significant pro-cognitive effects in neurological disease models, both in rodents and primates. However, competitive non-isoform selective PDE4 inhibitors have a low therapeutic index which has stalled their clinical development. Here, we demonstrate the pro-cognitive effects of selective negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of PDE4D, D159687 and D159797 in female Cynomolgous macaques, in the object retrieval detour task. The efficacy displayed by these NAMs in a primate cognitive task which engages the corticostriatal circuitry, together with their suitable pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles, suggests that clinical development of these allosteric modulators should be considered for the treatment of a variety of brain disorders associated with cognitive decline. PMID:25050979

  18. How monkeys see others: Discrimination and recognition of monkeys' shape.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, W

    1994-12-01

    The two experiments described in this study address the question of the perceptual basis of species discrimination and body recognition in monkeys. Longtailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were trained to discriminate line drawings of different monkey bodies. The procedure consisted of a simultaneous discrimination between four images under continuous reinforcement. Social communication between the test animal and other group members during test sessions was almost unrestricted. In the first experiment all monkeys learned, within at least 7 sessions, to discriminate one monkey from other monkeys. Discrimination was invariant against transformations of size and rotation of the stimuli. A preference test for particular features resulted in a graded estimation of particular body features. Generalisation to different views of facial stimuli was demonstrated. In the second experiment the monkeys had to relearn a new association which involved a differentiation of the previously shown stimuli. After reaching the learning criterion it was shown that the same features as in the previous experiment were evaluated differently. The experiments generally support the view that perceptual mechanisms of the signal receiver are crucial for individual recognition. Results are discussed in contrast to a 'theory of mind' approach in primate cognition.

  19. Effects of feeding selenium deficient diets to rhesus monkeys (Macaca Mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Whanger, P.D.; Patton, N.M.

    1988-02-01

    Pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were fed either selenium (Se) deficient or Se supplemented diets with adequate vitamin E. Except for some cardiac irregularities in the first babies born to these females, no physiological disorders due to Se deficiency were seen in a subsequent offspring. Plasma and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activities and blood Se levels increased in the Se supplemented monkeys but decreased in the deficient ones. The data indicated that hair Se levels reflect long term exposure to this element. In a very preliminary experiment, evidence was obtained to indicate that dietary protein deficiency along with Se deficiency will generate cardiomyopathic lesions characteristic of Se deficiency. It is hypothesized that, in addition to Se deficiency, another dietary deficiency (or abnormality) is necessary to produce Se deficiency lesions in higher primates. Higher glutathione transferase (or non-Se glutathione peroxidase) activity in tissues of rhesus monkeys may account for this resistance.

  20. Species differences in toxicokinetic parameters of glycidol after a single dose of glycidol or glycidol linoleate in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Kurata, Yoshimasa; Harada, Tomoo; Tamaki, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Kasamatsu, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Glycidol fatty acid esters (GEs) have been identified as contaminants in refined edible oils. Although the possible release of glycidol (G) from GEs is a concern, little is known about the conversion of GEs to G in the human body. This study addressed the toxicokinetics of glycidol linoleate (GL) and G in male Crl:CD(SD) rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Equimolar amounts of GL (341 mg/kg) or G (75 mg/kg) were administered by gavage to each animal. G was found in both species after the G and GL administration, while plasma GL concentrations were below the lower limit of quantification (5 ng/ml) in both species. In rats, the administration of GL or G produced similar concentration-time profiles for G. In monkeys, the C(max) and AUC values after GL administration were significantly lower than those after G administration. The oral bioavailability of G in monkeys (34.3%) was remarkably lower than that in rats (68.8%) at 75 mg/kg G administration. In addition, plasma G concentrations after oral administration at three lower doses of GL or G were measured in both species. In monkeys, G was detected only at the highest dose of G. In contrast, the rats exhibited similar plasma G concentration-time profiles after GL or G administration with significantly higher G levels than those in monkeys. In conclusion, these results indicate that there are remarkable species differences in the toxicokinetics of GEs and G between rodents and primates, findings that should be considered when assessing the human risk of GEs.

  1. Pregnant Guppy in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Pregnant Guppy is a modified Boeing B-377 Stratocruiser used to transport the S-IV (second) stage for the Saturn I launch vehicle between manufacturing facilities on the West coast, and testing and launch facilities in the Southeast. The fuselage of the B-377 was lengthened to accommodate the S-IV stage and the plane's cabin section was enlarged to approximately double its normal volume. The idea was originated by John M. Conroy of Aero Spaceliners, Incorporated, in Van Nuys, California. The former Stratocruiser became a B-377 PG: the Pregnant Guppy. This photograph depicts the Pregnant Guppy in flight.

  2. ANGPTL3 blockade with a human monoclonal antibody reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys1[S

    PubMed Central

    Gusarova, Viktoria; Alexa, Corey A.; Wang, Yan; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Buckler, David; Mintah, Ivory J.; Shihanian, Lisa M.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.; Xin, Yurong; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating protein synthesized exclusively in the liver that inhibits LPL and endothelial lipase (EL), enzymes that hydrolyze TGs and phospholipids in plasma lipoproteins. Here we describe the development and testing of a fully human monoclonal antibody (REGN1500) that binds ANGPTL3 with high affinity. REGN1500 reversed ANGPTL3-induced inhibition of LPL activity in vitro. Intravenous administration of REGN1500 to normolipidemic C57Bl/6 mice increased LPL activity and decreased plasma TG levels by ≥50%. Chronic administration of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic C57Bl/6 mice for 8 weeks reduced circulating plasma levels of TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) without any changes in liver, adipose, or heart TG contents. Studies in EL knockout mice revealed that REGN1500 reduced serum HDL-C through an EL-dependent mechanism. Finally, administration of a single dose of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic cynomolgus monkeys caused a rapid and pronounced decrease in plasma TG, nonHDL-C, and HDL-C. REGN1500 normalized plasma TG levels even in monkeys with a baseline plasma TG greater than 400 mg/dl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that neutralization of ANGPTL3 using REGN1500 reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys, and thus provides a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25964512

  3. Static lung mechanics of intact and excised rhesus monkey lungs and lobes.

    PubMed

    Pare, P D; Boucher, R; Michoud, M C; Hogg, J C

    1978-04-01

    Subdivisions of lung volume and pressure-volume (PV) curves of the lung and chest wall (CW) were measured in 12 rhesus monkeys (Macacca mulatta) under pentobarbital anesthesia. In addition, volumes and PV curves were obtained on the excised lungs and lobes of 12 cynomolgus monkeys (M. fasicularis). Boyle's law was used to determine functional residual capacity (FRC) in the intact animals and water displacement to determine minimal volume (MV) in the excised lungs. Total lung capacity (TLC = lung volume at a transpulmonary pressure of 30 cmH2O) was similar in vivo and in vitro (90 + 83 ml/kg) but residual volume (RV = volume at airway pressure of -50 cmH2O) and MV differed markedly (16.5 + 5.9 ml/kg). In the intact animals a very stiff CW appeared to determine RV, whereas airway closure determined MV in excised lungs. PV curves of upper and lower lobes were not different when expressed as %TLC but when expressed as milliliters of gas per gram of lung, the upper lobes contained significantly more gas per unit weight. PMID:417053

  4. Travelers' Health: Pregnant Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... animals presents risk of trauma to the abdomen. INFECTIOUS DISEASES Pregnant women who develop travelers’ diarrhea or other ... and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) ...

  5. Toxoplasmosis and Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth after changing a litter box, or while gardening without gloves. Fruits and vegetables may have contact ... pregnant. Keep outdoor sandboxes covered. Wear gloves when gardening and during contact with soil or sand because ...

  6. Monkey Able Being Ready for preflight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Able, is being ready for placement into a capsule for a preflight test of Jupiter, AM-18 mission. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959 and also carried a rhesus monkey, Baker, into suborbit.

  7. Lip salivary-gland hamartoma in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Morton, Daniel G

    2014-02-01

    An incidental, asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, solitary, submucosal nodular mass was detected on the mucosal surface of the inner lower lip in a female cynomolgus macaque (age, approximately 2.4 y) during a juvenile chronic toxicology study. Grossly, the nodule was soft with brown to tan discoloration and measured approximately 4 mm in diameter. Microscopically, the nodule was covered by normal stratified squamous epithelium and composed of well-circumscribed irregular lobules containing hyperplastic and normal-appearing mucinous salivary gland acini and ducts, which were separated by thick connective tissue septae. In light of the gross pathology and results of microscopic examination, salivary gland hamartoma was diagnosed. This lesion resembles adenomatoid hyperplasia of mucous salivary glands in humans, which is a rare nonneoplastic swelling. To our knowledge, this case description is the first report of a cynomolgus macaque with the rare entity of lip salivary gland hamartoma, which likely represents adenomatous hyperplasia in humans.

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and bleeding in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Marnie G; El-Amin, Colette Kirk; Shively, Carol A

    2014-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are associated with an increased bleeding risk in humans. This report describes a bleeding event in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) treated with the SSRI sertraline HCl (Zoloft). During the treatment course, the subject presented with a maculopapular rash, cutaneous bleeding, epistaxis, bleeding from the eye, melena, and a severe thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of an SSRI-related adverse event in a nonhuman primate. This report demonstrates that the clinical presentation of SSRI-associated bleeding in cynomolgus macaques is consistent with that reported in humans and that complications from SSRI treatment should be considered as a differential diagnosis for maculopapular dermatitis or spontaneous bleeding in this species.

  9. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and Bleeding in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Marnie G; El-Amin, Colette Kirk; Shively, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are associated with an increased bleeding risk in humans. This report describes a bleeding event in a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) treated with the SSRI sertraline HCl (Zoloft). During the treatment course, the subject presented with a maculopapular rash, cutaneous bleeding, epistaxis, bleeding from the eye, melena, and a severe thrombocytopenia. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of an SSRI-related adverse event in a nonhuman primate. This report demonstrates that the clinical presentation of SSRI-associated bleeding in cynomolgus macaques is consistent with that reported in humans and that complications from SSRI treatment should be considered as a differential diagnosis for maculopapular dermatitis or spontaneous bleeding in this species. PMID:24956214

  10. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience. PMID:27388917

  11. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience.

  12. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone. PMID:26187058

  13. Precocious quantitative cognition in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Stephen; Hughes, Kelly D; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2016-02-01

    Basic quantitative abilities are thought to have an innate basis in humans partly because the ability to discriminate quantities emerges early in child development. If humans and nonhuman primates share this developmentally primitive foundation of quantitative reasoning, then this ability should be present early in development across species and should emerge earlier in monkeys than in humans because monkeys mature faster than humans. We report that monkeys spontaneously make accurate quantity choices by 1 year of age in a task that human children begin to perform only at 2.5 to 3 years of age. Additionally, we report that the quantitative sensitivity of infant monkeys is equal to that of the adult animals in their group and that rates of learning do not differ between infant and adult animals. This novel evidence of precocious quantitative reasoning in infant monkeys suggests that human quantitative reasoning shares its early developing foundation with other primates. The data further suggest that early developing components of primate quantitative reasoning are constrained by maturational factors related to genetic development as opposed to learning experience alone.

  14. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  15. Get the Monkey off Your Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciabattini, David; Custer, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Monkeys are the problems that need solutions, the tasks that need to be accomplished, the decisions that need to be made, and the actions that need to be taken. According to a theory, people carry monkeys around on their backs until they can successfully shift their burden to someone else and the monkey leaps from one back to the next. Managers…

  16. Monkeys Match and Tally Quantities across Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kerry E.; MacLean, Evan L.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    We report here that monkeys can actively match the number of sounds they hear to the number of shapes they see and present the first evidence that monkeys sum over sounds and sights. In Experiment 1, two monkeys were trained to choose a simultaneous array of 1-9 squares that numerically matched a sample sequence of shapes or sounds. Monkeys…

  17. Evaluation of Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis) Endogenous Retrovirus Expression Following Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Angie K.; Willer, David O.; Skokovets, Olena; Iwajomo, Oluwadamilola H.; Chan, Jacqueline K.; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2012-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) transcripts are upregulated in the plasma of HIV-infected individuals and have been considered as targets for an HIV vaccine. We evaluated cynomolgus macaque endogenous retrovirus (CyERV) mRNA expression by RT-qPCR in PBMCs isolated from a cohort of animals previously utilized in a live attenuated SIV vaccine trial. CyERV env transcript levels decreased following vaccination (control and vaccine groups) and CyERV env and gag mRNA expression was decreased following acute SIV-infection, whereas during chronic SIV infection, CyERV transcript levels were indistinguishable from baseline. Reduced susceptibility to initial SIV infection, as measured by the number of SIV challenges required for infection, was associated with increased CyERV transcript levels in PBMCs. In vitro analysis revealed that SIV infection of purified CD4+ T-cells did not alter CyERV gene expression. This study represents the first evaluation of ERV expression in cynomolgus macaques following SIV infection, in an effort to assess the utility of cynomolgus macaques as an animal model to evaluate ERVs as a target for an HIV/SIV vaccine. This non-human primate model system does not recapitulate what has been observed to date in the plasma of HIV-infected humans suggesting that further investigation at the cellular level is required to elucidate the impact of HIV/SIV infection on endogenous retrovirus expression. PMID:22768246

  18. Development of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 assays utilizing homogenates of adrenal glands: Utility of monkey as a surrogate for human.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Matthew A; Csengery, Alexander; Schmenk, Jennifer; Frederick, Kosea

    2015-11-01

    Elevated levels of aldosterone are associated with arterial hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and obesity. Aldosterone is produced predominantly in the zona glomerulosa of the cortex of the adrenal gland by the enzyme aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2). Treatment of the above indications by decreasing production of aldosterone is thought to be of therapeutic benefit by lessening the deleterious effects of aldosterone mediated through both the mineralocorticoid receptor and also through so called non-genomic pathways. However, inhibition of the highly similar enzyme, CYP11B1, which is responsible for the production of cortisol, must be avoided in the development of clinically useful aldosterone synthase inhibitors due to the resulting impairment of the cortisol-induced stress response. In efforts to assess the interactions of compounds with the CYP11B enzymes, a variety of cell-based inhibitor screening assays for both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 have been reported. Herein we report details of assays employing both cynomolgus monkey adrenal homogenate (CAH) and human adrenal homogenate (HAH) as sources of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 enzymes. Utilizing both CAH and HAH, we have characterized the kinetics of the CYP11B1-mediated conversion of 11-deoxycortisol to cortisol and the CYP11B2-mediated oxidation of corticosterone to aldosterone. Inhibition assays for both CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 were subsequently developed. Based on a comparison of human and monkey amino acid sequences, kinetics data, and inhibition values derived from the HAH and CAH assays, evidence is provided in support of using cynomolgus monkey tissue-derived cell homogenates as suitable surrogates for the human enzymes.

  19. Dietary behaviour of pregnant versus non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Wim; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates dietary behaviour and the perceived role of food for health of pregnant versus non-pregnant women. Data were collected between 15 January 2003 and 15 March 2003 in Belgium. One hundred and forty-eight pregnant and 130 non-pregnant women aged between 20 and 40 years completed a self-administered questionnaire about their dietary behaviour and nutritional attitudes. Both sub-samples match with respect to individual factors such as relevant socio-demographics and general food perceptions. Pregnant women report higher consumption of fruits, which results in a better score for fibre intake. They also report higher consumption of beef and dairy products, as well as a higher fat intake. No difference in fish consumption between pregnant and non-pregnant women is observed. In line with recommendations, pregnant women report reduced consumption of food products with heightened safety-related risks, lower use of alcohol and tobacco, and safer food handling practices. Reduced intake of raw vegetables for food safety reasons is not compensated by higher intake of cooked vegetables. Pregnant women also report a lower frequency of moderate physical activity. Most differences in food choice by pregnant versus non-pregnant women pertain to the avoidance of specific, potentially harmful food groups. A substantial share of pregnant women does not follow upon recommendations with respect to alcohol use and exposure to tobacco. Personal medical sources for pregnant women and personal social sources for non-pregnant women are reported as the most attended sources of diet-related information. The perceived role of food for health is not different between pregnant and non-pregnant women, and there were no significant interaction effects between pregnancy and presence of children, which indicates that the observed differences in dietary behaviour can be attributed to the state of being pregnant. PMID:17005297

  20. Breeding monkeys for biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, G. H.; Golarzdebourne, M. N.; Keeling, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Captive bred rhesus monkeys show much less pathology than wild born animals. The monkeys may be bred in cages or in an outdoor compound. Cage bred animals are not psychologically normal which makes then unsuited for some types of space related research. Compound breeding provides contact between mother and infant and an opportunity for the infants to play with their peers which are important requirements to help maintain their behavioral integrity. Offspring harvested after a year in the compound appear behaviorally normal and show little histopathology. Compound breeding is also an economical method for the rapid production of young animals. The colony can double its size about every two and a half years.

  1. Systems biology of the vervet monkey.

    PubMed

    Jasinska, Anna J; Schmitt, Christopher A; Service, Susan K; Cantor, Rita M; Dewar, Ken; Jentsch, James D; Kaplan, Jay R; Turner, Trudy R; Warren, Wesley C; Weinstock, George M; Woods, Roger P; Freimer, Nelson B

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHP) provide crucial biomedical model systems intermediate between rodents and humans. The vervet monkey (also called the African green monkey) is a widely used NHP model that has unique value for genetic and genomic investigations of traits relevant to human diseases. This article describes the phylogeny and population history of the vervet monkey and summarizes the use of both captive and wild vervet monkeys in biomedical research. It also discusses the effort of an international collaboration to develop the vervet monkey as the most comprehensively phenotypically and genomically characterized NHP, a process that will enable the scientific community to employ this model for systems biology investigations.

  2. A critical analysis of the cynomolgus macaque, Macaca fascicularis, as a model to test HIV-1/SIV vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Antony, Joseph M; MacDonald, Kelly S

    2015-06-17

    The use of a number of non-rhesus macaque species, but especially cynomolgus macaques as a model for HIV-1 vaccine development has increased in recent years. Cynomolgus macaques have been used in the United Kingdom, Europe, Canada and Australia as a model for HIV vaccine development for many years. Unlike rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques infected with SIV show a pattern of disease pathogenesis that more closely resembles that of human HIV-1 infection, exhibiting lower peak and set-point viral loads and slower progression to disease with more typical AIDS defining illnesses. Several advances have been made recently in the use of the cynomolgus macaque SIV challenge model that allow the demonstration of vaccine efficacy using attenuated viruses and vectors that are both viral and non-viral in origin. This review aims to probe the details of various vaccination trials carried out in cynomolgus macaques in the context of our modern understanding of the highly diverse immunogenetics of this species with a view to understanding the species-specific immune correlates of protection and the efficacy of vectors that have been used to design vaccines.

  3. Modelling Social Learning in Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Jeremy R.

    2008-01-01

    The application of modelling to social learning in monkey populations has been a neglected topic. Recently, however, a number of statistical, simulation and analytical approaches have been developed to help examine social learning processes, putative traditions, the use of social learning strategies and the diffusion dynamics of socially…

  4. The multistage vaccine H56 boosts the effects of BCG to protect cynomolgus macaques against active tuberculosis and reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Dietrich, Jes; Tan, Esterlina; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Burgos, Jasmin; Bigbee, Carolyn; Bigbee, Matthew; Milk, Leslie; Gideon, Hannah P.; Rodgers, Mark; Cochran, Catherine; Guinn, Kristi M.; Sherman, David R.; Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Christopher; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Andersen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection typically remains latent, but it can reactivate to cause clinical disease. The only vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is largely ineffective, and ways to enhance its efficacy are being developed. Of note, the candidate booster vaccines currently under clinical development have been designed to improve BCG efficacy but not prevent reactivation of latent infection. Here, we demonstrate that administering a multistage vaccine that we term H56 in the adjuvant IC31 as a boost to vaccination with BCG delays and reduces clinical disease in cynomolgus macaques challenged with M. tuberculosis and prevents reactivation of latent infection. H56 contains Ag85B and ESAT-6, which are two of the M. tuberculosis antigens secreted in the acute phase of infection, and the nutrient stress–induced antigen Rv2660c. Boosting with H56/IC31 resulted in efficient containment of M. tuberculosis infection and reduced rates of clinical disease, as measured by clinical parameters, inflammatory markers, and improved survival of the animals compared with BCG alone. Boosted animals showed reduced pulmonary pathology and extrapulmonary dissemination, and protection correlated with a strong recall response against ESAT-6 and Rv2660c. Importantly, BCG/H56-vaccinated monkeys did not reactivate latent infection after treatment with anti-TNF antibody. Our results indicate that H56/IC31 boosting is able to control late-stage infection with M. tuberculosis and contain latent tuberculosis, providing a rationale for the clinical development of H56. PMID:22133873

  5. Novel mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains with high degree of resistance to cynomolgus macaque TRIMCyp generated by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Tahmina; Nakayama, Emi E; Tobita, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Masaru; Seki, Yohei; Saito, Akatsuki; Nomaguchi, Masako; Adachi, Akio; Akari, Hirofumi; Sato, Hironori; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Old World monkey TRIM5α strongly suppresses human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. A fusion protein comprising cynomolgus macaque (CM) TRIM5 and cyclophilin A (CM TRIMCyp) also potently suppresses HIV-1 replication. However, CM TRIMCyp fails to suppress a mutant HIV-1 that encodes a mutant capsid protein containing a SIVmac239-derived loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5). There are seven amino acid differences between L4/5 of HIV-1 and SIVmac239. Here, we investigated the minimum numbers of amino acid substitutions that would allow HIV-1 to evade CM TRIMCyp-mediated suppression. We performed random PCR mutagenesis to construct a library of HIV-1 variants containing mutations in L4/5, and then we recovered replication-competent viruses from CD4+ MT4 cells that expressed high levels of CM TRIMCyp. CM TRIMCyp-resistant viruses were obtained after three rounds of selection in MT4 cells expressing CM TRIMCyp and these were found to contain four amino acid substitutions (H87R, A88G, P90D and P93A) in L4/5. We then confirmed that these substitutions were sufficient to confer CM TRIMCyp resistance to HIV-1. In a separate experiment using a similar method, we obtained novel CM TRIM5α-resistant HIV-1 strains after six rounds of selection and rescue. Analysis of these mutants revealed that V86A and G116E mutations in the capsid region conferred partial resistance to CM TRIM5α without substantial fitness cost when propagated in MT4 cells expressing CM TRIM5α. These results confirmed and further extended the previous notion that CM TRIMCyp and CM TRIM5α recognize the HIV-1 capsid in different manners. PMID:26795727

  6. Hormonal monitoring of age at sexual maturation in female Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii) in their family groups.

    PubMed

    Dettling, A; Pryce, C R

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether or not sexual maturation is attained in the family group in captive-born Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii) and if so, at what age and body weight. To monitor ovarian activity in 14 female Goeldi's monkeys, urinary content of pregnanediol-3alpha-glucuronide (PdG) was determined using radioimmunoassay. Urinary samples were collected between the ages of 6 and 70 weeks. Subjects became sexually mature while still housed in their family groups, at a median age of 57 weeks (48-< 70 weeks). Median body weight at the age of sexual maturity was 473 g (N=10; 420-543 g). This corresponded to 90% of the median non-pregnant body weight of breeding females in our colony (526 g, N=8). Therefore, Goeldi's monkey is similar to Leontopithecus but different from Cebuella, Callithrix, and Saguinus, in terms of daughters ovulating in the family group and at a relatively young age.

  7. Counseling the pregnant adolescent.

    PubMed

    Dibiasi, V; Sturgis, S H

    1980-07-01

    Approaches employed in counseling pregnant adolescents at the Crittenton Clinic in Boston are described. Concentrating on concrete issues of management of the pregnancy -- supplying information and exploring the pros and cons of various alternatives are advocated; probing into the psychological and emotional background of the pregnant adolescent is discouraged. Counseling about contraceptives and taking into account each individual situation are considered essential. Case studies are reviewed and figures representing the attitudes and contraceptive use of patients 1 year after abortion are presented. It is considered important to establish a trusting relationship with the adolescent, which will increase the likelihood that she will return for follow-up and additional help if she needs it. PMID:12314921

  8. The metabolism of trifluoperazine (TFP) exhibits atypical kinetic behavior in both human liver microsomes (HLMs) and monkey liver microsomes (MyLM).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Gao-Wang; Yang, Xue-Ying; Xiao, Pan; Hou, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hai-Tang; Tang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ting; Zhen, Chen; Fang, Hai-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Glucuronidation reaction of trifluoperazine (TFP) is a typical probe reaction to phenotype the activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A4. The present study aims to compare the metabolic behavior of TFP in the liver microsomes from human and cynomolgus monkey, including the kinetic type and parameters. In vitro human liver microsome incubation system was used. The Eadie-Hofstee plot was used to determine the kinetic type. The results showed that the data for human liver microsomes (HLMs) and monkey liver microsomes (MyLMs)-catalyzed glucuronidation were best fit to the substrate inhibition model. For the metabolism of TFP in HLMs, the kinetic parameters were calculated to be 40 ± 5 and 140 ± 20 μM for K m and K si values, respectively. For the MyLM-mediated metabolism of TFP, the K m and K si values were calculated to be 108 ± 10 and 250 ± 30 μM, respectively. The same metabolic kinetic type and different kinetic parameters were demonstrated for the metabolism of TFP between HLMs and MyLMs. All these data were helpful for understanding the metabolism difference of TFP between human and monkey.

  9. Comparative long-term preclinical safety evaluation of two glatiramoid compounds (glatiramer Acetate, Copaxone(R), and TV-5010, protiramer) in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ramot, Yuval; Rosenstock, Moti; Klinger, Ety; Bursztyn, Dizza; Nyska, Abraham; Shinar, Doron M

    2012-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA), the active ingredient in Copaxone®, is a complex mixture of polypeptides used for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. Glatiramoids are related mixtures that may differ in some characteristics of the prototype molecule. Our aim is to describe the long-term toxicity studies with protiramer (TV-5010), a new glatiramoid, in comparison with similar studies conducted with GA. The toxicity of twice-weekly subcutaneous injections of protiramer to Sprague-Dawley rats (twenty-six weeks) and cynomolgus monkeys (fifty-two weeks) was compared with similar studies done with daily subcutaneous injections of GA. Daily treatment with GA was safe and well tolerated, without systemic effects or death. Protiramer administration was not as well tolerated as GA and led to dose- and time-related mortalities, probably mediated through severe injection-site lesions both in rats and in monkeys. Bridging fibrosis in the liver and severe progressive nephropathy were seen in rats. A dose-related increase in eosinophils was observed in monkeys. The protiramer toxicity studies show that minor variations in the manufacturing of glatiramoids may lead to significant toxic effects. It is therefore essential that the safety of any new glatiramoid be studied in long-term preclinical studies before exposing humans. PMID:22083585

  10. A novel HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of astemizole and its major metabolite in dog or monkey plasma and application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Back, Hyun-moon; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byungjeong; Seo, Joung-Wook; Yun, Hwi-yeol; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2015-10-10

    Astemizole (AST), a second-generation antihistamine, is metabolized to desmethyl astemizole (DEA), and although it has been removed from the market for inducing QT interval prolongation, it has reemerged as a potential anticancer and antimalarial agent. This report describes a novel high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of AST and DEA in beagle dog and cynomolgus monkey plasma with simple preparation method and short retention time. Prior to HPLC analyses, the plasma samples were extracted with simple liquid-liquid extraction method. The isocratic mobile phase was 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA dissolved in acetonitrile) and 20 mM ammonium acetate (94:6) at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min and diphenhydramine used as internal standard. In MS/MS analyses, precursor ions of the analytes were optimized as protonated molecular ions: [M+H](+). The lower limit of quantification of astemizole was 2.5 ng/mL in both species and desmethyl astemizole were 7.5 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL in dog and monkey plasma, respectively. The accuracy, precision, and stability of the method were in accordance with FDA guidelines for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Finally this validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in dogs and monkeys after oral administration of 10 mg/kg AST. PMID:26037160

  11. A novel HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of astemizole and its major metabolite in dog or monkey plasma and application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Back, Hyun-moon; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byungjeong; Seo, Joung-Wook; Yun, Hwi-yeol; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2015-10-10

    Astemizole (AST), a second-generation antihistamine, is metabolized to desmethyl astemizole (DEA), and although it has been removed from the market for inducing QT interval prolongation, it has reemerged as a potential anticancer and antimalarial agent. This report describes a novel high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneously determining the concentrations of AST and DEA in beagle dog and cynomolgus monkey plasma with simple preparation method and short retention time. Prior to HPLC analyses, the plasma samples were extracted with simple liquid-liquid extraction method. The isocratic mobile phase was 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA dissolved in acetonitrile) and 20 mM ammonium acetate (94:6) at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min and diphenhydramine used as internal standard. In MS/MS analyses, precursor ions of the analytes were optimized as protonated molecular ions: [M+H](+). The lower limit of quantification of astemizole was 2.5 ng/mL in both species and desmethyl astemizole were 7.5 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL in dog and monkey plasma, respectively. The accuracy, precision, and stability of the method were in accordance with FDA guidelines for the validation of bioanalytical methods. Finally this validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in dogs and monkeys after oral administration of 10 mg/kg AST.

  12. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. PMID:25776759

  13. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Reed F.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-07-15

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log{sub 10} PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. - Highlights: • Small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus results in a severe respiratory disease. • CT findings correlated with peripheral oxygen saturation and monocyte increases. • Virus dissemination was limited and mainly confined to the respiratory tract. • CT provides insight into pathogenesis to aid development of animal models of disease.

  14. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. PMID:25776759

  15. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases.

  16. Examining the Species-Specificity of Rhesus Macaque Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Perciani, Catia T.; Russell, Justen N. Hoffman; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Janes, Michelle; Antony, Joseph M.; Pilon, Richard; Sandstrom, Paul; Willer, David O.; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly species-specific virus that has co-evolved with its host over millions of years and thus restricting cross-species infection. To examine the extent to which host restriction may prevent cross-species research between closely related non-human primates, we evaluated experimental infection of cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant rhesus macaque-derived CMV (RhCMV-eGFP). Twelve cynomolgus macaques were randomly allocated to three groups: one experimental group (RhCMV-eGFP) and two control groups (UV-inactivated RhCMV-eGFP or media alone). The animals were given two subcutaneous inoculations at week 0 and week 8, and a subset of animals received an intravenous inoculation at week 23. No overt clinical or haematological changes were observed and PBMCs isolated from RhCMV-eGFP inoculated animals had comparable eGFP- and IE-1-specific cellular responses to the control animals. Following inoculation with RhCMV-eGFP, we were unable to detect evidence of infection in any blood or tissue samples up to 4 years post-inoculation, using sensitive viral co-culture, qPCR, and Western blot assays. Co-culture of urine and saliva samples demonstrated the presence of endogenous cynomolgus CMV (CyCMV) cytopathic effect, however no concomitant eGFP expression was observed. The absence of detectable RhCMV-eGFP suggests that the CyCMV-seropositive cynomolgus macaques were not productively infected with RhCMV-eGFP under these inoculation conditions. In a continued effort to develop CMV as a viral vector for an HIV/SIV vaccine, these studies demonstrate that CMV is highly restricted to its host species and can be highly affected by laboratory cell culture. Consideration of the differences between lab-adapted and primary viruses with respect to species range and cell tropism should be a priority in evaluating CMV as vaccine vector for HIV or other pathogens at the preclinical development stage. PMID:25822981

  17. Stereotypy in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Ridley, R M; Baker, H F

    1982-02-01

    Stereotyped movements are described in monkeys and humans and are classified as arising from constraint, sensory deprivation in infancy, amphetamine treatment or psychotic states. It is argued that, with the exception of cage stereotypies, stereotyped behaviour is evidence of abnormality in the nervous system consequent upon distorted maturational processes, organic defect or biochemical disturbance. Stereotypy is associated with a state of cognitive inflexibility and social and sensory isolation in humans and monkeys. It is suggested that, while no simple biochemical disturbance in the brain can describe these various occurrences of stereotypy, the cross-species occurrence of a syndrome of isolation, cognitive inflexibility and stereotypy implies a related mechanism mediating these divergent effects. If stereotypy is regarded as a consequence of failure to use sensory input to direct behaviour, therapeutic regimes designed to stimulate responsive behaviours and social interactions are more likely to be effective in the long run than direct attempts to suppress stereotypy.

  18. Animal behaviour: fair refusal by capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Clive D L

    2004-03-11

    Brosnan and de Waal report that capuchin monkeys show evidence of a sense of fairness or 'inequity aversion' because they rejected a less preferred reward when they saw a partner monkey receive a preferred reward for the same task. However, this does not show that monkeys are averse to inequity, only that they reject a lesser reward when better rewards are available. There are risks inherent in seeking anthropomorphic explanations for non-human behaviour.

  19. Endowment effect in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lakshminaryanan, Venkat; Chen, M Keith; Santos, Laurie R

    2008-12-12

    In humans, the capacity for economically rational choice is constrained by a variety of preference biases: humans evaluate gambles relative to arbitrary reference points; weigh losses heavier than equally sized gains; and demand a higher price for owned goods than for equally preferred goods that are not yet owned. To date, however, fewer studies have examined the origins of these biases. Here, we review previous work demonstrating that human economic biases such as loss aversion and reference dependence are shared with an ancestrally related New World primate, the capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). We then examine whether capuchins display an endowment effect in a token-trading task. We identified pairs of treats (fruit discs versus cereal chunks) that were equally preferred by each monkey. When given a chance to trade away their owned fruit discs to obtain the equally valued cereal chunks (or vice versa), however, monkeys required a far greater compensation than the equally preferred treat. We show that these effects are not due to transaction costs or timing issues. These data suggest that biased preferences rely on cognitive systems that are more evolutionarily ancient than previously thought-and that common evolutionary ancestry shared by humans and capuchins may account for the occurrence of the endowment effect in both species. PMID:18840573

  20. Macaque monkeys experience visual crowding.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Erin A; Olson, Carl R

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral vision, objects that are easily discriminated on their own become less discriminable in the presence of surrounding clutter. This phenomenon is known as crowding.The neural mechanisms underlying crowding are not well understood. Better insight might come from single-neuron recording in nonhuman primates, provided they exhibit crowding; however, previous demonstrations of crowding have been confined to humans. In the present study, we set out to determine whether crowding occurs in rhesus macaque monkeys. We found that animals trained to identify a target letter among flankers displayed three hallmarks of crowding as established in humans. First, at a given eccentricity, increasing the spacing between the target and the flankers improved recognition accuracy. Second, the critical spacing, defined as the minimal spacing at which target discrimination was reliable, was proportional to eccentricity. Third, the critical spacing was largely unaffected by object size. We conclude that monkeys, like humans, experience crowding. These findings open the door to studies of crowding at the neuronal level in the monkey visual system.

  1. Endowment effect in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lakshminaryanan, Venkat; Chen, M Keith; Santos, Laurie R

    2008-12-12

    In humans, the capacity for economically rational choice is constrained by a variety of preference biases: humans evaluate gambles relative to arbitrary reference points; weigh losses heavier than equally sized gains; and demand a higher price for owned goods than for equally preferred goods that are not yet owned. To date, however, fewer studies have examined the origins of these biases. Here, we review previous work demonstrating that human economic biases such as loss aversion and reference dependence are shared with an ancestrally related New World primate, the capuchin monkey (Cebus apella). We then examine whether capuchins display an endowment effect in a token-trading task. We identified pairs of treats (fruit discs versus cereal chunks) that were equally preferred by each monkey. When given a chance to trade away their owned fruit discs to obtain the equally valued cereal chunks (or vice versa), however, monkeys required a far greater compensation than the equally preferred treat. We show that these effects are not due to transaction costs or timing issues. These data suggest that biased preferences rely on cognitive systems that are more evolutionarily ancient than previously thought-and that common evolutionary ancestry shared by humans and capuchins may account for the occurrence of the endowment effect in both species.

  2. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported. PMID:25266590

  3. Steroid metabolism by monkey and human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalakshmi, M.; Sehgal, A.; Pruthi, J.S.; Anand-Kumar, T.C.

    1983-05-01

    Freshly ejaculated spermatozoa from monkey and human were washed and incubated with tritium labelled androgens or estradiol to study the pattern of spermatozoa steroid metabolism. When equal concentrations of steroid substrates were used for incubation, monkey and human spermatozoa showed very similar pattern of steroid conversion. Spermatozoa from both species converted testosterone mainly to androstenedione, but reverse conversion of androstenedione to testosterone was negligible. Estradiol-17 beta was converted mainly to estrone. The close similarity between the spermatozoa of monkey and men in their steroid metabolic pattern indicates that the rhesus monkey could be an useful animal model to study the effect of drugs on the metabolic pattern of human spermatozoa.

  4. Periodic eye tracking in the monkey

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, A. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. Eye movements were measured in monkeys trained for visual tracking. 2. In response to periodic square wave target movements, monkeys do not show a significant reduction in the latency of saccadic movements. 3. Under similar conditions, human beings subconsciously reduce their latency and after several cycles are in step with the target. 4. In response to sinusoidal targets, monkeys show a latency or phase lag which increases monotonically with frequency starting at 0·3 c/s. Human beings can remain in phase with the target at frequencies up to 1·0 c/s. 5. Hence, monkeys do not exhibit the human predictive tracking response. PMID:16992282

  5. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported.

  6. Origin and topography of fibers contributing to the fornix in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Richard C; Aggleton, John P

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of neurons contributing to the fornix was mapped by placing the retrograde tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in polyacrylamide gels in different medial to lateral locations within the fornix of three rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). The HRP was placed from 3 to 5 mm caudal to the descending columns of the fornix. Additional information came from a series of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasciculata) with anterograde tracer injections in the medial temporal lobe. The hippocampal formation, including the subiculum and presubiculum, together with the entorhinal cortex (EC) and perirhinal cortex (area 35) contribute numerous axons to the fornix in a topographical manner. In contrast, the lateral perirhinal cortex (area 36) and parahippocampal cortical areas TF and TH only contained a handful of cells labeled via the fornix. The medial fornix originates from cells in the caudal half of the subiculum, the lamina principalis interna of the caudal half of the presubiculum, and from the perirhinal cortex (area 35). The intermediate portion of the fornix (i.e., that part midway between the midline and most lateral parts of the fornix) originates from cells in the rostral half of the subiculum and prosubiculum, the anterior presubiculum (only from the lamina principalis externa), the caudal presubiculum (primarily from lamina principalis interna), the rostral half of CA3, the EC (primarily 28I and 28M), and the perirhinal cortex (area 35). The lateral parts of the fornix arise from the rostral EC (28L only) and the most rostral portion of CA3. Subcortically, the medial septum, nucleus of the diagonal band, supramammillary nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and the thalamic nucleus reuniens all send projections through the fornix, which presumably terminate in the hippocampus and adjacent parahippocampal region. These results not only help to define those regions that project via the fornix, but also reveal those subcortical

  7. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Transplantation in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristin A; Tonsho, Makoto; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-08-01

    A 5.5-y-old intact male cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis) presented with inappetence and weight loss 57 d after heterotopic heart and thymus transplantation while receiving an immunosuppressant regimen consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone to prevent graft rejection. A serum chemistry panel, a glycated hemoglobin test, and urinalysis performed at presentation revealed elevated blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (727 mg/dL and 10.1%, respectively), glucosuria, and ketonuria. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed, and insulin therapy was initiated immediately. The macaque was weaned off the immunosuppressive therapy as his clinical condition improved and stabilized. Approximately 74 d after discontinuation of the immunosuppressants, the blood glucose normalized, and the insulin therapy was stopped. The animal's blood glucose and HbA1c values have remained within normal limits since this time. We suspect that our macaque experienced new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation, a condition that is commonly observed in human transplant patients but not well described in NHP. To our knowledge, this report represents the first documented case of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  8. Cup tool use by squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, Christine L; Hyde, Shellie A; Parker, Karen J; Lyons, David M

    2015-12-01

    Captive-born male and female squirrel monkeys spontaneously 'invented' a cup tool use technique to Contain (i.e., hold and control) food they reduced into fragments for consumption and to Contain water collected from a valve to drink. Food cup use was observed more frequently than water cup use. Observations indicate that 68% (n = 39/57) of monkeys in this population used a cup (a plastic slip cap) to Contain food, and a subset of these monkeys, 10% (n = 4/39), also used a cup to Contain water. Cup use was optional and did not replace, but supplemented, the hand/arm-to-mouth eating and direct valve drinking exhibited by all members of the population. Strategies monkeys used to bring food and cups together for food processing activity at preferred upper-level perching areas, in the arboreal-like environment in which they lived, provides evidence that monkeys may plan food processing activity with the cups. Specifically, prior to cup use monkeys obtained a cup first before food, or obtained food and a cup from the floor simultaneously, before transporting both items to upper-level perching areas. After food processing activity with cups monkeys rarely dropped the cups and more often placed the cups onto perching. Monkeys subsequently returned to use cups that they previously placed on perching after food processing activity. The latter behavior is consistent with the possibility that monkeys may keep cups at preferred perching sites for future food processing activity and merits experimental investigation. Reports of spontaneous tool use by squirrel monkeys are rare and this is the first report of population-level tool use. These findings offer insights into the cognitive abilities of squirrel monkeys and provide a new context for behavior studies with this genus and for comparative studies with other primates.

  9. PIG-TO-MONKEY ISLET XENOTRANSPLANTATION USING MULTI-TRANSGENIC PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Bottino, R.; Wijkstrom, M.; van der Windt, D.J.; Hara, H.; Ezzelarab, M.; Murase, N.; Bertera, S.; He, J.; Phelps, C.; Ayares, D.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Trucco, M.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of pigs with genetic modifications has significantly advanced the field of xenotransplantation. New genetically-engineered pigs were produced on an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout background with ubiquitous expression of human CD46 (GTKO/CD46 pigs), with islet beta cell-specific expression of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (hTFPI) and/or human CD39 and/or porcine CTLA4-lg. Isolated islets from pigs with 3, 4, or 5 genetic modifications were transplanted intraportally into streptozotocin-diabetic, immunosuppressed cynomolgus monkeys (n=5). Immunosuppression was based on anti-CD154mAb costimulation blockade. Monitoring included features of early islet destruction, glycemia, exogenous insulin requirement, and histopathology of the islets at necropsy. Using these modified pig islets, there was evidence of reduced islet destruction in the first hours after transplantation, compared with two series of historical controls that received identical therapy but were transplanted with islets from pigs with either no or only one genetic modification. Despite encouraging effects on early islet loss, these multi-transgenic islet grafts did not demonstrate consistency in regard to long-term success, with only 2 of 5 demonstrating function beyond 5 months. PMID:25220221

  10. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A.; Prow, Natalie A.; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities. PMID:26447467

  11. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A; Prow, Natalie A; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities.

  12. Aerosolized rift valley fever virus causes fatal encephalitis in african green monkeys and common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Powell, Diana S; Bethel, Laura M; Caroline, Amy L; Schmid, Richard J; Oury, Tim; Reed, Douglas S

    2014-02-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a veterinary and human disease in Africa and the Middle East. The causative agent, RVF virus (RVFV), can be naturally transmitted by mosquito, direct contact, or aerosol. We sought to develop a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of severe RVF in humans to better understand the pathogenesis of RVF and to use for evaluation of medical countermeasures. NHP from four different species were exposed to aerosols containing RVFV. Both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques developed mild fevers after inhalation of RVFV, but no other clinical signs were noted and no macaque succumbed to RVFV infection. In contrast, both marmosets and African green monkeys (AGM) proved susceptible to aerosolized RVF virus. Fever onset was earlier with the marmosets and had a biphasic pattern similar to what has been reported in humans. Beginning around day 8 to day 10 postexposure, clinical signs consistent with encephalitis were noted in both AGM and marmosets; animals of both species succumbed between days 9 and 11 postexposure. Marmosets were susceptible to lower doses of RVFV than AGM. Histological examination confirmed viral meningoencephalitis in both species. Hematological analyses indicated a drop in platelet counts in both AGM and marmosets suggestive of thrombosis, as well as leukocytosis that consisted mostly of granulocytes. Both AGM and marmosets would serve as useful models of aerosol infection with RVFV.

  13. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  14. Test monkeys anesthetized by routine procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test monkeys are safely anesthetized for five minutes by confining them for less than six minutes in enclosures containing a controlled volume of ether. Thus the monkeys can be properly and safely positioned on test couches and fitted with electrodes or other devices prior to physiological tests.

  15. Metacognition in Monkeys during an Oculomotor Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlebrooks, Paul G.; Sommer, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether rhesus monkeys show evidence of metacognition in a reduced, visual oculomotor task that is particularly suitable for use in fMRI and electrophysiology. The 2-stage task involved punctate visual stimulation and saccadic eye movement responses. In each trial, monkeys made a decision and then made a bet. To earn…

  16. Prototype Abstraction by Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David; Redford, Joshua S.; Haas, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors analyze the shape categorization of rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") and the role of prototype- and exemplar-based comparison processes in monkeys' category learning. Prototype and exemplar theories make contrasting predictions regarding performance on the Posner-Homa dot-distortion categorization task. Prototype theory--which…

  17. On Loss Aversion in Capuchin Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberberg, Alan; Roma, Peter G.; Huntsberry, Mary E.; Warren-Boulton, Frederick R.; Sakagami, Takayuki; Ruggiero, Angela M.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Chen, Lakshminarayanan, and Santos (2006) claim to show in three choice experiments that monkeys react rationally to price and wealth shocks, but, when faced with gambles, display hallmark, human-like biases that include loss aversion. We present three experiments with monkeys and humans consistent with a reinterpretation of their data that…

  18. Vaccinations for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K; Heine, R Phillips

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and neonatal benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and health care provider resources. PMID:25560127

  19. Vaccinations for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Geeta K.; Heine, R. Phillips

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician–gynecologists are well-suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease–related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and infant benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and provider resources. PMID:25560127

  20. Gustatory neural coding in the monkey cortex: stimulus quality.

    PubMed

    Smith-Swintosky, V L; Plata-Salaman, C R; Scott, T R

    1991-10-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from 50 single neurons in the insular-opercular cortex of two alert cynomolgus monkeys during gustatory stimulation of the tongue and palate. 2. Sixteen stimuli, including salts, sugars, acids, alkaloids, monosodium glutamate, and aspartame, were chosen to represent a wide range of taste qualities. Concentrations were selected to elicit a moderate gustatory response, as determined by reference to previous electrophysiological data or to the human psychophysical literature. 3. The cortical region over which taste-evoked activity could be recorded included the frontal operculum and anterior insula, an area of approximately 75 mm3. Taste-responsive cells constituted 50 (2.7%) of the 1,863 neurons tested. Nongustatory cells responded to mouth movement (20.7%), somatosensory stimulation of the tongue (9.6%), stimulus approach or anticipation (1.7%), and tongue extension (0.6%). The sensitivities of 64.6% of these cortical neurons could not be identified by our stimulation techniques. 4. Taste cells had low spontaneous activity levels (3.7 +/- 3.0 spikes/s, mean +/- SD) and showed little inhibition. They were moderately broadly tuned, with a mean entropy coefficient of 0.76 +/- 0.17. Excitatory responses were typically not robust. 5. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to determine whether neurons could be divided into discrete types, as defined by their response profiles to the entire stimulus array. There was an apparent division of response profiles into four general categories, with primary sensitivities to sodium (n = 18), glucose (n = 15), quinine (n = 12), and acid (n = 5). However, these categories were not statistically independent. Therefore the notion of functionally distinct neuron types was not supported by an analysis of the distribution of response profiles. It was the case, however, that neurons in the sodium category could be distinguished from other neurons by their relative specificity. 6. The

  1. Androgen Resistance in Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Katherine L; Westberry, Jenne M; Hubler, Tina R; Sadosky, Patti W; Singh, Ravinder J; Taylor, Robert L; Scammell, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the basis for high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze serum testosterone, androstenedione, and dihydrotestosterone of male squirrel monkeys during the nonbreeding (n = 7) and breeding (n = 10) seasons. All hormone levels were elevated compared with those of humans, even during the nonbreeding season; the highest levels occurred during the breeding season. The ratio of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkeys is high during the breeding season compared to man. Squirrel monkeys may have high testosterone to compensate for inefficient metabolism to dihydrotestosterone. We also investigated whether squirrel monkeys have high androgens to compensate for low-activity androgen receptors (AR). The response to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkey cells transfected with AR and AR-responsive reporter plasmids was 4-fold, compared with 28-fold in human cells. This result was not due to overexpression of cellular FKBP51, which causes glucocorticoid and progestin resistance in squirrel monkeys, because overexpression of FKBP51 had no effect on dihydrotestosterone-stimulated reporter activity in a human fibroblast cell line. To test whether the inherently low levels of FKBP52 in squirrel monkeys contribute to androgen insensitivity, squirrel monkey cells were transfected with an AR expression plasmid, an AR-responsive reporter plasmid, and a plasmid expressing FKBP52. Expression of FKBP52 decreased the EC50 or increased the maximal response to dihydrotestosterone. Therefore, the high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys likely compensate for their relatively low 5α-reductase activity during the breeding season and AR insensitivity resulting from low cellular levels of FKBP52. PMID:18724781

  2. Pre-Columbian monkey tools.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Michael; Luncz, Lydia V; Staff, Richard A; Bradshaw, Fiona; Ottoni, Eduardo B; Falótico, Tiago

    2016-07-11

    Stone tools reveal worldwide innovations in human behaviour over the past three million years [1]. However, the only archaeological report of pre-modern non-human animal tool use comes from three Western chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) sites in Côte d'Ivoire, aged between 4.3 and 1.3 thousand years ago (kya) [2]. This anthropocentrism limits our comparative insight into the emergence and development of technology, weakening our evolutionary models [3]. Here, we apply archaeological techniques to a distinctive stone tool assemblage created by a non-human animal in the New World, the Brazilian bearded capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus). Wild capuchins at Serra da Capivara National Park (SCNP) use stones to pound open defended food, including locally indigenous cashew nuts [4], and we demonstrate that this activity dates back at least 600 to 700 years. Capuchin stone hammers and anvils are therefore the oldest non-human tools known outside of Africa, opening up to scientific scrutiny questions on the origins and spread of tool use in New World monkeys, and the mechanisms - social, ecological and cognitive - that support primate technological evolution. PMID:27404235

  3. Pre-Columbian monkey tools.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Michael; Luncz, Lydia V; Staff, Richard A; Bradshaw, Fiona; Ottoni, Eduardo B; Falótico, Tiago

    2016-07-11

    Stone tools reveal worldwide innovations in human behaviour over the past three million years [1]. However, the only archaeological report of pre-modern non-human animal tool use comes from three Western chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) sites in Côte d'Ivoire, aged between 4.3 and 1.3 thousand years ago (kya) [2]. This anthropocentrism limits our comparative insight into the emergence and development of technology, weakening our evolutionary models [3]. Here, we apply archaeological techniques to a distinctive stone tool assemblage created by a non-human animal in the New World, the Brazilian bearded capuchin monkey (Sapajus libidinosus). Wild capuchins at Serra da Capivara National Park (SCNP) use stones to pound open defended food, including locally indigenous cashew nuts [4], and we demonstrate that this activity dates back at least 600 to 700 years. Capuchin stone hammers and anvils are therefore the oldest non-human tools known outside of Africa, opening up to scientific scrutiny questions on the origins and spread of tool use in New World monkeys, and the mechanisms - social, ecological and cognitive - that support primate technological evolution.

  4. Age- and brain region-dependent α-synuclein oligomerization is attributed to alterations in intrinsic enzymes regulating α-synuclein phosphorylation in aging monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xin; Li, Xuran; Wang, Peng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Hui; Chan, Piu; Yu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that the levels of α-syn oligomers, which play pivotal pathogenic roles in age-related Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, increase heterogeneously in the aging brain. Here, we show that exogenous α-syn incubated with brain extracts from older cynomolgus monkeys and in Lewy body pathology (LBP)-susceptible brain regions (striatum and hippocampus) forms higher amounts of phosphorylated and oligomeric α-syn than that in extracts from younger monkeys and LBP-insusceptible brain regions (cerebellum and occipital cortex). The increased α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization in the brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions were associated with higher levels of polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2), an enzyme promoting α-syn phosphorylation, and lower activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an enzyme inhibiting α-syn phosphorylation, in these brain extracts. Further, the extent of the age- and brain-dependent increase in α-syn phosphorylation and oligomerization was reduced by inhibition of PLK2 and activation of PP2A. Inversely, phosphorylated α-syn oligomers reduced the activity of PP2A and showed potent cytotoxicity. In addition, the activity of GCase and the levels of ceramide, a product of GCase shown to activate PP2A, were lower in brain extracts from older monkeys and in LBP-susceptible brain regions. Our results suggest a role for altered intrinsic metabolic enzymes in age- and brain region-dependent α-syn oligomerization in aging brains. PMID:27032368

  5. [The pregnant adolescent].

    PubMed

    Grenon-Plante, D

    1982-03-01

    According to the Canadian Association of Family Planning 85% of adolescents are unprotected at their 1st intercourse, and 16% become pregnant; only 20% of those having a regular sex life use contraception. Women below 20 contributed to 17% of births in 1976 in Canada; in the same year 41.5% of all new mothers were unmarried, and only 27.5% of new fathers accepted responsibility for their paternity. These figures give an idea of the extent of the problem of unwanted pregnancy among adolescents, a problem shared by all Western countries. The adolescent mother is too young to know what she wants, not to mention to accept responsibility for the caring of an infant. Risk of maternal mortality is twice as great among teenage mothers, and so is risk of infant death, mostly due to prematurity. Nurses can play a very important role in helping adolescent mothers, and they must never project their moral values on their young patients.

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys (Aotus spp.).

    PubMed

    Knowlen, Grant G; Weller, Richard E; Perry, Ruby L; Baer, Janet F; Gozalo, Alfonso S

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common postmortem finding in owl monkeys. In most cases the animals do not exhibit clinical signs until the disease is advanced, making antemortem diagnosis of subclinical disease difficult and treatment unrewarding. We obtained echocardiograms, electrocardiograms, and thoracic radiographs from members of a colony of owl monkeys that previously was identified as showing a 40% incidence of gross myocardial hypertrophy at necropsy, to assess the usefulness of these modalities for antemortem diagnosis. No single modality was sufficiently sensitive and specific to detect all monkeys with cardiac hypertrophy. Electrocardiography was the least sensitive method for detecting owl monkeys with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Thoracic radiographs were more sensitive than was electrocardiography in this context but cannot detect animals with concentric hypertrophy without an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Echocardiography was the most sensitive method for identifying cardiac hypertrophy in owl monkeys. The most useful parameters suggestive of left ventricular hypertrophy in our owl monkeys were an increased average left ventricular wall thickness to chamber radius ratio and an increased calculated left ventricular myocardial mass. Parameters suggestive of dilative cardiomyopathy were an increased average left ventricular myocardial mass and a decreased average ratio of left ventricular free wall thickness to left ventricular chamber radius. When all 4 noninvasive diagnostic modalities (physical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography, and thoracic radiography) were used concurrently, the probability of detecting hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in owl monkeys was increased greatly.

  7. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  8. Delayed Disease Progression in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Ebola Virus Makona Strain.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Günther, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    In late 2013, the largest documented outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever started in Guinea and has since spread to neighboring countries, resulting in almost 27,000 cases and >11,000 deaths in humans. In March 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the causative agent. This study compares the pathogenesis of a new EBOV strain, Makona, which was isolated in Guinea in 2014 with the prototype strain from the 1976 EBOV outbreak in the former Zaire. Both strains cause lethal disease in cynomolgus macaques with similar pathologic changes and hallmark features of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. However, disease progression was delayed in EBOV-Makona-infected animals, suggesting decreased rather than increased virulence of this most recent EBOV strain.

  9. Dose Response of MARV/Angola Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques following IM or Aerosol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sara C.; Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Raymond, Jo Lynne W.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Wilkinson, Eric R.; Botto, Miriam A.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Marburg virus infection in humans causes a hemorrhagic disease with a high case fatality rate. Countermeasure development requires the use of well-characterized animal models that mimic human disease. To further characterize the cynomolgus macaque model of MARV/Angola, two independent dose response studies were performed using the intramuscular or aerosol routes of exposure. All animals succumbed at the lowest target dose; therefore, a dose effect could not be determined. For intramuscular-exposed animals, 100 PFU was the first target dose that was not significantly different than higher target doses in terms of time to disposition, clinical pathology, and histopathology. Although a significant difference was not observed between aerosol-exposed animals in the 10 PFU and 100 PFU target dose groups, 100 PFU was determined to be the lowest target dose that could be consistently obtained and accurately titrated in aerosol studies. PMID:26413900

  10. Estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in neuroendocrine and related neurons of the pubertal female monkey hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, P C; Boggan, J E; Thind, K K

    1997-05-01

    Expression of hypothalamic estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) is barely evident in prepubertal monkeys but is prominent in adults. To investigate whether adult patterns of ER and PR expression are established in mid-pubertal female cynomolgus monkeys, we labeled neuroendocrine (NEU) neurons by microinjection of retrograde tracer into the median eminence, and then identified ER and PR by specific immunostaining in separate sets of hypothalamic sections. ER and PR appeared in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells identified exclusively as neurons, and retrograde tracer remained clearly visible in the cytoplasm of NEU neurons after immunostaining. Numbers of NEU and related neurons expressing ER or PR were quantified in principal hypothalamic regions. In the supraoptic nucleus, almost all neurons analyzed (n = 580) contained ER (94%) with many also NEU (73% ER + NEU), while lesser amounts of the neurons examined (n = 214) expressed PR (75%) and were NEU (53% PR + NEU). In the paraventricular nucleus, most of the neurons analyzed (n = 302) contained ER (90% ER; 54% ER + NEU), but few of the neurons studied (n = 269) contained PR (34% PR; 19% PR + NEU). In the periventricular zone, nearly all neurons examined (n = 795) contained ER (95% ER; 48% ER + NEU), but fewer of those studied (n = 298) exhibited PR (79% PR; 47% PR + NEU). In the arcuate-periventricular zone, all neurons examined (n = 542) contained ER (100%) but few were NEU (4% ER + NEU), while nearly all neurons studied (n = 418) contained PR (95%), some of which were NEU (21% PR + NEU). Neurons expressing ER were also prevalent in areas without NEU labeling, including the diagonal band of Broca, medial preoptic area, and mammillary bodies, but were less common in the septum and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Likewise, neuronal PR expression was seen frequently in the mammillary bodies, but occurred less often in the diagonal band of Broca, medial preoptic area, and dorsomedial hypothalamus. Neurons

  11. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James V; Endy, Timothy P; Hensley, Lisa E; Garrison, Aura; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Lesar, May; Baric, Ralph S; Kulesh, David A; Norwood, David A; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Ulrich, Melanie P; Slezak, Tom R; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Huggins, John W; Jahrling, Peter B; Paragas, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs) infected with SARS-CoV. Methods and Findings In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain. Conclusions SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children. PMID:16605302

  12. Endemic Viruses of Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Donna L; McClure, Gloria B; Ruiz, Julio C; Abee, Christian R; Vanchiere, John A

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are the experimental animals of choice for the study of many human diseases. As such, it is important to understand that endemic viruses of primates can potentially affect the design, methods, and results of biomedical studies designed to model human disease. Here we review the viruses known to be endemic in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). The pathogenic potential of these viruses in squirrel monkeys that undergo experimental manipulation remains largely unexplored but may have implications regarding the use of squirrel monkeys in biomedical research. PMID:26141448

  13. Behavioral consequences of developmental iron deficiency in infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Germann, Stacey L.; Capitanio, John P.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Human studies have shown that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in infants are associated with behavioral impairment, but the periods of brain development most susceptible to iron deficiency have not been established. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were deprived of iron by dietary iron restriction during prenatal (n = 14, 10 μg Fe/g diet) or early postnatal (n = 12, 1.5 mg Fe/L formula) brain development and compared to controls (n = 12, 100 μg Fe/g diet, 12 mg Fe/L formula) in behavioral evaluations conducted during the first four months of life in the nonhuman primate nursery. Iron deficiency anemia was detected in the pregnant dams in the third trimester and compromised iron status was seen in the prenatally iron-deprived infants at birth, but no iron deficiency was seen in either the prenatally or postnatally iron-deprived infants during the period of behavioral evaluation. Neither prenatal nor postnatal iron deprivation led to significant delays in growth, or gross or fine motor development. Prenatally deprived infants demonstrated a 20% reduced spontaneous activity level, lower inhibitory response to novel environments, and more changes from one behavior to another in weekly observation sessions. Postnatally deprived infants demonstrated poorer performance of an object concept task, and greater emotionality relative to controls. This study indicates that different syndromes of behavioral effects are associated with prenatal and postnatal iron deprivation in rhesus monkey infants and that these effects can occur in the absence of concurrent iron deficiency as reflected in hematological measures. PMID:16343844

  14. Vitreal syneresis in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stuck, B E; Talsma, D M; Beatrice, E S

    1977-11-01

    The eyes of 15 rhesus monkeys were evaluated. Various degrees of vitreal syneresis were observed in 28 of the 30 eyes. The observed vitreal structures varied from fine strands randomly spaced throughout the vitreous to thick, intertwining, fibrous networks with some clumping of the collagenous condensate at the fiber junctions. Qualitatively, the degree of syneresis was slightly more extensive in the eight older mature males than in the seven younger animals. In all animals a clear view of the fundus could be obtained with the ophthalmoscope. The vitreous structures may be one cause of variability in ocular dose-response relationships for exposure to laser radiation. The effect on retinal exposure experiments of the finer vitreal structure is considered minimal.

  15. Generation of Chimeric Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Ramsey, Cathy; Ma, Hong; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2011-01-01

    Summary Totipotent cells in early embryos are progenitors of all stem cells and are capable of developing into a whole organism, including extraembryonic tissues such as placenta. Pluripotent cells in the inner cell mass (ICM) are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into any cell type of a body except extraembryonic tissues. The ability to contribute to chimeric animals upon reintroduction into host embryos is the key feature of murine totipotent and pluripotent cells. Here, we demonstrate that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolated ICMs fail to incorporate into host embryos and develop into chimeras. However, chimeric offspring were produced following aggregation of totipotent cells of the 4-cell embryos. These results provide insights into the species-specific nature of primate embryos and suggest that a chimera assay using pluripotent cells may not be feasible. PMID:22225614

  16. Cytogenesis in the monkey retina

    SciTech Connect

    La Vail, M.M.; Rapaport, D.H.; Rakic, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Time of cell origin in the retina of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) was studied by plotting the number of heavily radiolabeled nuclei in autoradiograms prepared from 2- to 6-month-old animals, each of which was exposed to a pulse of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR) on a single embryonic (E) or postnatal (P) day. Cell birth in the monkey retina begins just after E27, and approximately 96% of cells are generated by E120. The remaining cells are produced during the last (approximately 45) prenatal days and into the first several weeks after birth. Cell genesis begins near the fovea, and proceeds towards the periphery. Cell division largely ceases in the foveal and perifoveal regions by E56. Despite extensive overlap, a class-specific sequence of cell birth was observed. Ganglion and horizontal cells, which are born first, have largely congruent periods of cell genesis with the peak between E38 and E43, and termination around E70. The first labeled cones were apparent by E33, and their highest density was achieved between E43 and E56, tapering to low values at E70, although some cones are generated in the far periphery as late as E110. Amacrine cells are next in the cell birth sequence and begin genesis at E43, reach a peak production between E56 and E85, and cease by E110. Bipolar cell birth begins at the same time as amacrines, but appears to be separate from them temporally since their production reaches a peak between E56 and E102, and persists beyond the day of birth. Mueller cells and rod photoreceptors, which begin to be generated at E45, achieve a peak, and decrease in density at the same time as bipolar cells, but continue genesis at low density on the day of birth. Thus, bipolar, Mueller, and rod cells have a similar time of origin.

  17. Chromosome evolution in new world monkeys (Platyrrhini).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, E H C; Neusser, M; Müller, S

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, New World monkey (NWM, Platyrrhini, Anthropoideae) comparative cytogenetics has shed light on many fundamental aspects of genome organisation and evolution in this fascinating, but also highly endangered group of neotropical primates. In this review, we first provide an overview about the evolutionary origin of the inferred ancestral NWM karyotype of 2n = 54 chromosomes and about the lineage-specific chromosome rearrangements resulting in the highly divergent karyotypes of extant NWM species, ranging from 2n = 16 in a titi monkey to 2n = 62 in a woolly monkey. Next, we discuss the available data on the chromosome phylogeny of NWM in the context of recent molecular phylogenetic analyses. In the last part, we highlight some recent research on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the large-scale evolutionary genomic changes in platyrrhine monkeys.

  18. Can Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Represent Invisible Displacement?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filion, Christine M.; Washburn, David A.; Gulledge, Jonathan P.

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to assess whether or not rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could represent the unperceived movements of a stimulus. Subjects were tested on 2 computerized tasks, HOLE (monkeys) and LASER (humans and monkeys), in which subjects needed to chase or shoot at, respectively, a moving target that either remained visible or became invisible for a portion of its path of movement. Response patterns were analyzed and compared between target-visible and target-invisible conditions. Results of Experiments 1, 2, and 3 demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of extrapolating movement. That this extrapolation involved internal representation of the target's invisible movement was suggested but not confirmed. Experiment 4, however, demonstrated that the monkeys are capable of representing the invisible displacements of a stimulus.

  19. The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness was investigated using test conditions that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness in squirrel monkeys. Ten male rhesus monkeys and ten male Bolivian squirrel monkeys were rotated in the vertical axis at 150 deg/s for a maximum duration of 45 min. Each animal was tested in two conditions, continuous rotation and intermittent rotation. None of the rhesus monkeys vomited during the motion tests but all of the squirrel monkeys did. Differences were observed between the species in the amount of activity that occurred during motion test, with the squirrel monkeys being significantly more active than the rhesus monkeys. These results, while substantiating anecdotal reports of the resistance of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness, should be interpreted with caution because of the documented differences that exist between various species with regard to stimuli that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness.

  20. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Virus Images Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Pregnant Women & Influenza (Flu) Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  1. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  2. Sequential planning in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Danly, Erin; Morgan, Gin; Colombo, Michael; Terrace, Herbert S.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the planning abilities of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) by training them on a five-item list composed of coloured photographs and then testing them on switch and mask trials. In contrast to previous studies where monkeys made responses using a joystick, in the current study, monkeys made responses directly to a touch screen. On switch trials, after a response to the first list item, the on-screen positions of two list items were exchanged. Performance on trials in which the second and third list items were exchanged was poorer compared to normal (non-switch) trials for all subjects. When the third and fourth items were exchanged, however, only one subject continued to show performance deficits. On mask trials, following a response to the first item, the remaining items were covered by opaque white squares. When two items were masked, all four subjects responded to each masked item at a level significantly above chance. When three items were masked, however, only one subjected was able to respond to all three masked items at a level significantly above chance. The results of the present study indicate that three of our four monkeys planned one response ahead while a single monkey planned two responses ahead. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to previous studies on planning in chimpanzees and monkeys. PMID:21184125

  3. Pathology of experimental Machupo virus infection, Chicava strain, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by intramuscular and aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Robinson, C G; Wilkinson, E R; Hensley, L E; Cashman, K A

    2015-01-01

    Machupo virus, the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever of which little is known and for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics are available. This study evaluated the cynomolgus macaque as an animal model using the Machupo virus, Chicava strain, via intramuscular and aerosol challenge. The incubation period was 6 to 10 days with initial signs of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, mild fever, and a petechial skin rash. These were often followed by neurologic signs and death within an average of 18 days. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia as well as marked thrombocytopenia. Serum chemistry values identified a decrease in total protein, marked increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and moderate increases in alkaline phosphatase. Gross pathology findings included a macular rash extending across the axillary and inguinal regions beginning at approximately 10 days postexposure as well as enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, enlarged and friable liver, and sporadic hemorrhages along the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and necrosis/apoptosis in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system (nonsuppurative encephalitis) was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection in cynomolgus macaques and supports the usefulness of cynomolgus macaques as a viable model of human Machupo virus infection.

  4. Fluorescent image analysis of HIV-1 and HIV-2 uncoating kinetics in the presence of old world monkey TRIM5α.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eri; Kono, Ken; Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Uncoating of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) conical cores is an important early step for establishment of infection. In Old World Monkey (OWM) cells, the TRIM5α cellular factor potently suppresses an early step of infection by HIV-1. Previously, biochemical studies using whole cell lysates of infected cells revealed that OWM TRIM5α accelerates the uncoating of HIV-1, leading to premature reverse transcription. In the present study, we re-evaluated uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 in the presence of OWM TRIM5α by using an in situ uncoating assay, which allowed us to differentiate productive HIV-1 entry from simple (non-productive) endocytosis. Results showed that the uncoating kinetics of HIV-1 was indeed accelerated in the presence of OWM TRIM5α. Furthermore, we adapted an in situ uncoating assay to HIV-2, which showed wide variations in TRIM5α sensitivity among different isolates. HIV-2 isolate GH123, whose infectivity was suppressed by cynomolgus monkey (CM) TRIM5α, showed accelerated uncoating in the presence of CM TRIM5α. In contrast, mutant HIV-2 ASA, whose infectivity was unaltered by CM TRIM5α, showed no change in uncoating kinetics in the presence of CM TRIM5α. These results confirmed and further extended the previous notion that accelerated uncoating is associated with restriction activity of TRIM5α against lentiviruses.

  5. Correlation between decreased motor activity and dopaminergic degeneration in the ventrolateral putamen in monkeys receiving repeated MPTP administrations: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuji; Minamimoto, Takafumi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Ito, Hiroshi; Ito, Nobuhiko; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2012-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have remarkably reduced levels of dopaminergic biomarkers in the caudal putamen. However, the relationship between motor impairments and the localization of intrastriatal dopaminergic degeneration in monkey PD models remains unclear. To identify the striatal areas with dopaminergic dysfunction responsible for motor impairments, we measured changes in both general motor activity and in vivo dopaminergic biomarkers in three cynomolgus monkeys that repeatedly received 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), starting in the normal state and continuing until after tremor appearance. Binding of dopamine transporters (DAT) and D(2) receptors were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) using [(11)C]PE2I and [(11)C]raclopride, respectively. Region-of-interest-based regression analysis demonstrated the degree of general motor activity reduction to be explained by striatal DAT binding but not by D(2) receptor binding. Furthermore, voxel-based analysis revealed a significant correlation between reduced general motor activity and decreased DAT binding, specifically in the ventrolateral putamen, which corresponds to the area receiving upper body motor inputs from the primary motor cortex. These results suggest that specific functional deficits in PD models are closely related to the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatal subregion responsible for these functions and that the level of deficit is dependent on the degree of degeneration.

  6. Monkey see, Monkey reach: Action selection of reaching movements in the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Luisa; Camperio-Ciani, Andrea; Bulgheroni, Maria; Castiello, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient systems are needed to link perception with action in the context of the highly complex environments in which primates move and interact. Another important component is, nonetheless, needed for action: selection. When one piece of fruit from a branch is being chosen by a monkey, many other pieces are within reach and visible: do the perceptual features of the objects surrounding a target determine interference effects? In humans, reaching to grasp a desired object appears to integrate the motor features of the objects which might become potential targets - a process which seems to be driven by inhibitory attention mechanisms. Here we show that non-human primates use similar mechanisms when carrying out goal-directed actions. The data indicate that the volumetric features of distractors are internally represented, implying that the basic cognitive operations allowing for action selection have deep evolutionary roots. PMID:24503774

  7. Neurobehavioral deficits in neonatal rhesus monkeys exposed to cocaine in utero.

    PubMed

    He, Na; Bai, Jie; Champoux, Maribeth; Suomi, Stephen J; Lidow, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    In spite of significant efforts, the neurobehavioral deficits in infants born from cocaine-abusing mothers have not been clearly defined. In the present study, we examined the presence of these abnormalities in a rhesus monkey model of prenatal cocaine exposure using a nonhuman primate adaptation of the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS). Pregnant monkeys (n = 14) received 10 mg/kg cocaine twice a day orally (in fruit treats) from the 40th through 102nd postconception days (PCD40-PCD102), which is the period of cerebral cortical neuronogenesis (approximately second trimester). The control consisted of pregnant monkeys (n = 14) receiving fruit treats only. The animals were allowed to deliver vaginally at term (approximately PCD165). The first testing session was conducted on PCD171 (within the first week after birth); the second testing session was conducted on PCD177 (within the second week after birth); the third test was conducted on PCD183 (within the third week after birth); and the fourth testing session was conducted on PCD189 (within the fourth week after birth). The prenatally cocaine-exposed infants showed deficits in orientation, state control, and motor maturity, which were detectable during the second, third, and fourth testing sessions. The same testing sessions also revealed a significant reduction in the time devoted to toy manipulation, which points to impaired attention. None of these abnormalities were seen during the first testing session. The first session, however, revealed increased tremulousness (one of the indicators of autonomic stability) in the prenatally cocaine-exposed infants. This impairment disappeared by the third testing session. The present findings demonstrate the potential of prenatal cocaine exposure to induce neurobehavioral deficits detectable by NBAS-like testing in primate infants. PMID:15001210

  8. Biological and behavioral effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to 2450-MHz electromagnetic radiation in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J.; Polson, P.; Rebert, C.; Lunan, K.; Gage, M.

    1982-01-01

    Near the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy, 33 squirrel monkeys were exposed to 2450-MHz irradiation in a multimode cavity at whole-body average specific absorption rates equivalent to those resulting from exposure to plane wave irradiation at 0.034, 0.34, and 3.4 W/kg; exposed monkeys were compared with eight pregnant sham-exposed monkeys. Eighteen of the irradiated mothers and their offspring were exposed for an additional 6 months after parturition, and then their offspring were exposed for another 6 months. No differences were found between irradiated and control adults with respect to the number of live births produced or to measures of locomotor activity, maternal care, urinary catecholamines, plasma cortisol, 3H-thymidine and 14C-uridine uptake by phytohemagglutininstimulated blood lymphocytes, or electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Similarly, no differences were found between exposed and nonexposed offspring on the same blood, urine, and EEG parameters. Growth rate and most aspects of behavioral development were not altered by exposure. The major difference between irradiated and control offspring was the high mortality rate (4/5) before 6 months of age in those exposed at 3.4 W/kg both before and after birth. These results indicate that microwaves at power densities to 3.4 W/kg might have little direct effect on the monkey fetus when exposures occur in utero during the latter half to two-thirds of pregnancy, but that continued exposure after birth might be harmful.

  9. Interspecies variability in expression of hepatobiliary transporters across human, dog, monkey, and rat as determined by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Prasad, Bhagwat; Salphati, Laurent; Chu, Xiaoyan; Gupta, Anshul; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Evers, Raymond; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2015-03-01

    We quantified, by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, transporter protein expression of BSEP, MATE1, MRP3, MRP4, NTCP, and OCT1 in our human liver bank (n = 55) and determined the relationship between protein expression and sex, age and genotype. These data complement our previous work in the same liver bank where we quantified the protein expression of OATPs, BCRP, MDR1, and MRP2. In addition, we quantified and compared the interspecies differences in expression of the hepatobiliary transporters, corresponding to the above human transporters, in liver tissue and hepatocytes of male beagle dogs, cynomolgus monkeys, Sprague-Dawley rats, and Wistar rats. In all the species, the sinusoidal OATPs/Oatps were the most abundant hepatic transporters. However, there were notable interspecies differences in the relative abundance of the remaining transporters. For example, the next most abundant transporter in humans and monkeys was OCT1/Oct1, whereas it was Mrp2 and Ntcp in dogs/Wistar rats and Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively. In contrast, the protein expression of the efflux transporters BCRP/Bcrp, MDR1/Mdr1, MRP3/Mrp3, MRP4/Mrp4, and MATE1/Mate1 was much lower across all the species. For most transporters, the expression in the liver tissues was comparable to that in the unplated cryopreserved hepatocytes. These data on human liver transporter protein expression complete the picture of the expression of major human hepatobiliary transporters important in drug disposition and toxicity. In addition, the data on expression of the corresponding hepatobiliary transporters in preclinical species will be helpful in interpreting and extrapolating pharmacokinetic, pharmacological, and toxicological results from preclinical studies to humans.

  10. Renal uptake and tolerability of a 2'-O-methoxyethyl modified antisense oligonucleotide (ISIS 113715) in monkey.

    PubMed

    Henry, Scott P; Johnson, Mark; Zanardi, Thomas A; Fey, Robert; Auyeung, Diana; Lappin, Patrick B; Levin, Arthur A

    2012-11-15

    The primary target organ for uptake of systemically administered phosphorothioate oligonucleotides is the kidney cortex and the proximal tubular epithelium in particular. To determine the effect of oligonucleotide uptake on renal function, a detailed renal physiology study was performed in cynomolgus monkeys treated with 10-40 mg/kg/week ISIS 113715 for 4 weeks. The concentrations of oligonucleotide in the kidney cortex ranged from 1400 to 2600 μg/g. These concentrations were associated with histologic changes in proximal tubular epithelial cells that ranged from the appearance of cytoplasmic basophilic granules to atrophic and degenerative changes at higher concentrations. However, there were no renal functional abnormalities as determined by the typical measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, or urine specific gravity. Nor were there changes in glomerular filtration rate, or renal blood flow. Specific urinary markers of tubular epithelial cell damage, such as N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and α-glutathione-s-transferase were not affected. Tubular function was further evaluated by monitoring the urinary excretion of amino acids, β(2)-microglobulin, or glucose. Renal function was challenged by administering a glucose load and by examining concentrating ability after a 4-h water deprivation. Neither challenge produced any evidence of change in renal function. The only change observed was a low incidence of increased urine protein/creatinine ratio in monkeys treated with ≥40 mg/kg/week which was rapidly reversible. Collectively, these data indicate that ISIS 113715-uptake by the proximal tubular epithelium has little or no effect on renal function at concentrations of 2600 μg/g.

  11. Application of a Plug-and-Play Immunogenicity Assay in Cynomolgus Monkey Serum for ADCs at Early Stages of Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Triguero, Montserrat; Davis, Helen; Zhu, Yuda; Coleman, Daniel; Nazzal, Denise; Vu, Paul; Kaur, Surinder

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenicity assessment during early stages of nonclinical biotherapeutic development is not always warranted. It is rarely predictive for clinical studies and evidence for the presence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) may be inferred from the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. However, collecting and banking samples during the course of the study are prudent for confirmation and a deeper understanding of the impact on PK and safety. Biotherapeutic-specific ADA assays commonly developed can require considerable time and resources. In addition, the ADA assay may not be ready when needed if the study of PK and safety data triggers assay development. During early stages of drug development for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), there is the added complication of the potential inclusion of several molecular variants in a study, differing in the linker and/or drug components. To simplify analysis of ADAs at this stage, we developed plug-and-play generic approaches for both the assay format and the data analysis steps. Firstly, the assay format uses generic reagents to detect ADAs. Secondly, we propose a cut point methodology based on animal specific baseline variability instead of a population data approach. This assay showed good sensitivity, drug tolerance, and reproducibility across a variety of antibody-derived biotherapeutics without the need for optimization across molecules. PMID:27092313

  12. Application of a Plug-and-Play Immunogenicity Assay in Cynomolgus Monkey Serum for ADCs at Early Stages of Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Triguero, Montserrat; Davis, Helen; Zhu, Yuda; Coleman, Daniel; Nazzal, Denise; Vu, Paul; Kaur, Surinder

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenicity assessment during early stages of nonclinical biotherapeutic development is not always warranted. It is rarely predictive for clinical studies and evidence for the presence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) may be inferred from the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. However, collecting and banking samples during the course of the study are prudent for confirmation and a deeper understanding of the impact on PK and safety. Biotherapeutic-specific ADA assays commonly developed can require considerable time and resources. In addition, the ADA assay may not be ready when needed if the study of PK and safety data triggers assay development. During early stages of drug development for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), there is the added complication of the potential inclusion of several molecular variants in a study, differing in the linker and/or drug components. To simplify analysis of ADAs at this stage, we developed plug-and-play generic approaches for both the assay format and the data analysis steps. Firstly, the assay format uses generic reagents to detect ADAs. Secondly, we propose a cut point methodology based on animal specific baseline variability instead of a population data approach. This assay showed good sensitivity, drug tolerance, and reproducibility across a variety of antibody-derived biotherapeutics without the need for optimization across molecules. PMID:27092313

  13. Morphology and kainate-receptor immunoreactivity of identified neurons within the entorhinal cortex projecting to superior temporal sulcus in the cynomolgus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, P. F.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Projections of the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus are well known from the classical studies of Cajal (Ramon y Cajal, 1904) and Lorente de No (1933). Projections from the entorhinal cortex to neocortical areas are less well understood. Such connectivity is likely to underlie the consolidation of long-term declarative memory in neocortical sites. In the present study, a projection arising in layer V of the entorhinal cortex and terminating in a polymodal association area of the superior temporal gyrus has been identified with the use of retrograde tracing. The dendritic arbors of neurons giving rise to this projection were further investigated by cell filling and confocal microscopy with computer reconstruction. This analysis demonstrated that the dendritic arbor of identified projection neurons was largely confined to layer V, with the exception of a solitary, simple apical dendrite occasionally ascending to superficial laminae but often confined to the lamina dissecans (layer IV). Finally, immunoreactivity for glutamate-receptor subunit proteins GluR 5/6/7 of the dendritic arbor of identified entorhinal projection neurons was examined. The solitary apical dendrite of identified entorhinal projection neurons was prominently immunolabeled for GluR 5/6/7, as was the dendritic arbor of basilar dendrites of these neurons. The restriction of the large bulk of the dendritic arbor of identified entorhinal projection neurons to layer V implies that these neurons are likely to be heavily influenced by hippocampal output arriving in the deep layers of the entorhinal cortex. Immunoreactivity for GluR 5/6/7 throughout the dendritic arbor of such neurons indicates that this class of glutamate receptor is in a position to play a prominent role in mediating excitatory neurotransmission within hippocampal-entorhinal circuits.

  14. Evaluation of neonatal squirrel monkeys receiving tritiated water throughout gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.C.L.; Krebs, J.S.; Sasmore, D.P.; Mitoma, C.

    1980-09-01

    Pregnant squirrel monkeys received tritiated water (HTO) in the drinking water throughout gestation at levels ranging from 16 to 1000 times the permissible level for human consumption (0.003 ..mu..Ci/ml), resulting in mean body water HTO levels ranging from 0.05 to 3.1 ..mu..Ci/ml. There were no discernible effects of HTO administration on the newborn progeny in terms of body weight, body dimensions, selected organ weights (brain, heart, adrenal, kidney, liver, spleen), hematologic patterns, and histology of selected organs and tissues (adrenal, kidney, liver, lung, brain, pancreas, jejunum, pituitary, spleen, testes, thymus, skin) other than ovaries. The number of primary oocytes in female progeny decreased markedly with increasing levels of HTO in maternal drinking water. Quantitative analysis of neonate ovaries, testes, brain tissue, and retinal tissue is in progress. No effects of HTO administration on maternal body weight, gestation time, or maintenance of pregnancy to full term were observed. Body weights of HTO-treated inseminated females that did not deliver were less than control weights, but the lack of dose dependence implies that this effect may have been associated with a stimulus characteristic of the HTO administration rather than with irradiation.

  15. Circadian phase relationships in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Wekstein, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Two adult male pigtail monkeys were placed in an isolated, soundproofed chamber (entered for cleaning only) for a period of six months, during which time their deep body temperatures T sub DB, telemetered from transmitters implanted in the abdominal cavity), fluid intake, urinary output (UV), urinary sodium and potassium were continuously monitored. During the first 3 1/2 months, lights (L) were turned on at 0000 hours, off at 1200 hours. Photoperiod phase was then delayed (light span prolonged) 6 hours to a new schedule: L on at 0600 hours, off at 1800 hours. Six weeks later, photoperiod phase was advanced 6 hours to return to the original schedule. Prior to shift, T sub DB typically began a steep rise 0-5 hours prior to L on, a steep fall 3-4 hours prior to L off, relative plateaus in between. Urinary Na typically peaks 2 hours prior to L off, has a minimum 2-4 hours prior to L on; K tends both to peak and show a minimum 2-8 hours earlier than Na; in contrast, UV peaks at L on, has a minimum 2-6 hours after L off. Upon delaying photoperiod phase, T sub DB shift was completed in 8 days. UV shifted more rapidly but tended to overshoot the new phase. Within 5 days, UV and K completed their shifts, although Na did not fully resynchronize within the 6 week period monitored.

  16. DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161106.html DNA-Based Vaccine Guards Against Zika in Monkey Study ... THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental DNA-based vaccine protected monkeys from infection with the ...

  17. Neuronal hemoglobin in mitochondria is reduced by forming a complex with α-synuclein in aging monkey brains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Li, Xuran; Li, Xin; Li, Xuying; Yu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal hemoglobin (nHb) plays a critical role in maintaining normal mitochondrial functioning in the brain. However, in aging and Parkinson's disease (PD) brains, mitochondrial nHb levels are greatly reduced in neurons that accumulate α-synuclein (α-syn), suggesting a link between the two proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that α-syn and Hb can form a complex in both brain tissue and peripheral red blood cells (RBCs) in aging cynomolgus monkeys. nHb-α-syn complex levels in the mitochondrial fraction of the striatum decreased with age; this was negatively correlated with levels in the cytoplasmic fraction and in RBCs and was accompanied by a reduction in mitochondrial free nHb. In contrast, no changes in nHb-α-syn complex formation or free nHb levels were detected in the cerebellum. In vitro studies using a cultured dopaminergic cell line showed that intracellular accumulation of α-syn caused an elevation in nHb-α-syn complex levels in both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic fractions as well as a reduction in mitochondrial free nHb. nHb overexpression increased free nHb levels in mitochondria, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced α-syn-induced apoptosis. The above results suggest that α-syn forms a complex with nHb in selected regions of the aging brain, thereby decreasing mitochondrial function and increasing the risk of PD. PMID:26824991

  18. The Paraventricular Thalamic Nucleus: Subcortical Connections and Innervation by Serotonin, Orexin, and Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David T.; Price, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines subcortical connections of Pa, following small anterograde and retrograde tracer injections in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). An anterograde tracer injection into the dorsal midline thalamus revealed strong projections to the accumbens nucleus, basal amygdala, lateral septum, and hypothalamus. Retrograde tracer injections into these areas labeled neurons specifically in Pa. Following a retrograde tracer injection into Pa, labeled neurons were found in the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and periaqueductal gray. Pa contained a remarkably high density of axons and axonal varicosities immunoreactive for serotonin (5-HT) and orexin/hypocretin (ORX), as well as a moderate density of fibers immunoreactive for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). A retrograde tracer injection into Pa combined with immunohistochemistry demonstrated that ORX and 5-HT axons originate from neurons in the hypothalamus and midbrain. Pa-projecting neurons were localized in the same nuclei of the hypothalamus, amygdala, and midbrain as CRH neurons, although no double-labeling was found. The connections of Pa and its innervation by 5-HT, ORX, and CRH suggest that it may relay stress signals between the midbrain and hypothalamus with the accumbens nucleus, basal amygdala, and subgenual cortex, as part of a circuit that manages stress and possibly stress-related psychopathologies. PMID:19085970

  19. Experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to cynomolgus macaques, a non-human primate.

    PubMed

    Ono, Fumiko; Terao, Keiji; Tase, Naomi; Hiyaoka, Akio; Ohyama, Atsushi; Tezuka, Yukio; Wada, Naomi; Kurosawa, Asuka; Sato, Yuko; Tobiume, Minoru; Hagiwara, Ken'ichi; Yamakawa, Yoshio; Sata, Tetsutaro

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was transmitted to three macaques by intracerebral inoculation of a brain homogenate from affected cattle detected in Japan. All monkeys developed abnormal behavioral signs, such as intermittent anorexia and hyperekplexia, around 24 months after inoculation. Neuronal symptoms, such as tremor, myoclonic jerking, and paralysis, appeared 27-44 months after inoculation. These symptoms worsened and total paralysis ensued within a year after onset. The disease duration was approximately 8-12 months. Both the incubation period and the duration of disease were shortened in the secondary transmission experiment to macaques. Heavy accumulation of disease-causing conformer(s) of prion protein (PrP(Sc)), with a similar glycoform profile to the PrP(Sc) contained in the inoculum, and severe spongiform changes in the histology of the brain, confirmed the successful transmission of BSE to monkeys. Florid plaques, a characteristic histological hallmark of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, were prominent in the cerebral cortex, in which a prion antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). PrP(Sc) was mostly confined to the central nervous system, although small amounts of PrP(Sc) accumulated in the peripheral nerves of monkeys, as detected by Western blotting (WB). Neither IHC nor WB detected PrP(Sc) in the lymphatic organs/tissues, such as the tonsils, spleen, and appendix.

  20. Metabolism of [2-14C]p-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid in rat, monkey and human hepatocytes and in bile-duct cannulated rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Liu-Kreyche, Peggy; Iyer, Ramaswamy A

    2011-04-01

    We determined the metabolism of [2-(14)C]p-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid (p-HPA) in rat (male, Sprague-Dawley), monkey (male, Cynomolgus), and human (male, Caucasian) hepatocytes, and in bile-duct cannulated (BDC) rats (male, Sprague-Dawley). Unchanged p-HPA ranged from 87.0 to 92.6% of the total radioactivity (TRA) in the extracts of rat, monkey, and human hepatocytes. Metabolites M1 (a glucuronide conjugate of p-HPA) and M2 (a glycine conjugate of p-HPA) were detected, accounting for 1-4% of TRA. After an oral dose of [2-(14)C]p-HPA to BDC rats, p-HPA-related components was predominantly excreted in urine, accounting for 83% of the dose. Bile excretion was limited, accounting for only 1.5% of the dose. Unchanged p-HPA was the predominant radioactivity in plasma (84.6% of the TRA in 1-h pooled plasma) and urine (69.6% of the dose). Metabolites M1, M2, and M3 (a glucuronide of p-HPA) were all detected in plasma, urine, and bile as minor components. In summary, p-HPA was not metabolized extensively in rat, monkey, and human hepatocytes. In rats, absorption and elimination of p-HPA were nearly complete with urinary excretion of the unchanged p-HPA as the predominant route of elimination after oral dosing. No oxidative metabolites were detected, suggesting a minimal role for P450 enzymes in its overall metabolic clearance. Therefore, p-HPA has a low potential for drug-drug interactions mediated by the concomitant inhibitors and inducers of P450 enzymes.

  1. Differentiation of monkey embryonic stem cells to hepatocytes by feeder-free dispersion culture and expression analyses of cytochrome p450 enzymes responsible for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Junya; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Yamaori, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Sakae; Kamada, Noboru; Nakamura, Katsunori; Kikuchi, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were differentiated into hepatocytes by formation of embryoid bodies (EBs). However, this EB formation method is not always efficient for assays using a large number of samples simultaneously. A dispersion culture system, one of the differentiation methods without EB formation, is able to more efficiently provide a large number of feeder-free undifferentiated cells. A previous study demonstrated the effectiveness of the Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for feeder-free dispersion culture and induction of differentiation of monkey ESCs into neural cells. In the present study, the induction of differentiation of cynomolgus monkey ESCs (cmESCs) into hepatocytes was performed by the dispersion culture method, and the expression and drug inducibility of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in these hepatocytes were examined. The cmESCs were successfully differentiated into hepatocytes under feeder-free dispersion culture conditions supplemented with Y-27632. The hepatocytes differentiated from cmESCs expressed the mRNAs for three hepatocyte marker genes (α-fetoprotein, albumin, CYP7A1) and several CYP enzymes, as measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In particular, the basal expression of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) in these hepatocytes was detected at mRNA and enzyme activity (testosterone 6β-hydroxylation) levels. Furthermore, the expression and activity of cmCYP3A4 (3A8) were significantly upregulated by rifampicin. These results indicated the effectiveness of Y-27632 supplementation for feeder-free dispersed culture and induction of differentiation into hepatocytes, and the expression of functional CYP enzyme(s) in cmESC-derived hepatic cells.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of 2 Formulations of Transdermal Fentanyl in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Amy M; Kelly Iii, Richard; Fetterer, David P; Rico, Pedro J; Bailey, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is a μ-opioid agonist that often is used as the analgesic component for balanced anesthesia in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing, and the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl are unknown in NHP. The pharmacokinetic properties of 2 transdermal fentanyl delivery methods, a solution (2.6 and 1.95 mg/kg) and a patch (25 μg/h), were determined when applied topically to the dorsal scapular area of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Serum fentanyl concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compared with the patch, the transdermal fentanyl solution generated higher drug concentrations over longer time. Adverse reactions occurred in the macaques that received the transdermal fentanyl solution at 2.6 mg/kg. Both preparations showed significant interanimal variability in the maximal serum drug levels, time to achieve maximal fentanyl levels, elimination half-life, and AUC values. Both the maximal concentration and the time at which this concentration occurred were increased in macaques compared with most other species after application of the transdermal fentanyl patch and compared with dogs after application of the transdermal fentanyl solution. The pharmacokinetic properties of transdermal fentanyl in macaques are markedly different from those in other veterinary species and preclude its use as a long-acting analgesic drug in NHP. PMID:27423151

  3. Comparison of physiologic and pharmacologic parameters in Asian and mauritius cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kozlosky, John C; Mysore, Jagannatha; Clark, Shawn P; Burr, Holly N; Li, Jinze; Aranibar, Nelly; Vuppugalla, Ragini; West, Ronald C; Mangipudy, Raja S; Graziano, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This comparative study was conducted to assess background physiologic and pharmacologic parameters of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) from Cambodia, from a mixed Asian source (Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia), and from Mauritius. This evaluation provides a comprehensive assessment of several of these parameters in a single study. Ten male and 10 female captive-bred, age-matched macaques from each source were evaluated. Criteria for evaluation included weight gain, assessment of drug metabolizing enzyme activity, metabolomic analysis, immunologic assessments (lymphocyte subsets, TDAR, and serum Ig isotyping), clinical pathology evaluations, physical (respiratory, neurologic, cardiovascular, and ophthalmologic) examinations, pathogen screening, organ weights, and gross and microscopic pathology analyses. The results of this evaluation indicate that, compared to macaques of Asian origin, macaques from Mauritius had the lowest incidence and/or severity of spontaneous pathologic findings in several organs and tissues (lymphoid organs, stomach, kidney, urothelium, heart, arteries and lung) and better testicular maturity at a given age with minimal variability in organ weights. Although slight differences were observed in other parameters, none were considered detrimental to the use of macaques of Asian or Mauritius origin in pharmaceutical candidate safety studies with the use of a consistent source, concomitant controls, and appropriate background knowledge and screening.

  4. Progression of pathogenic events in cynomolgus macaques infected with variola virus.

    PubMed

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Cann, Jennifer A; Rubins, Kathleen H; Huggins, John W; Fisher, Robert W; Johnson, Anthony J; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Larsen, Thomas; Raymond, Jo Lynne; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Smallpox, caused by variola virus (VARV), is a devastating human disease that affected millions worldwide until the virus was eradicated in the 1970 s. Subsequent cessation of vaccination has resulted in an immunologically naive human population that would be at risk should VARV be used as an agent of bioterrorism. The development of antivirals and improved vaccines to counter this threat would be facilitated by the development of animal models using authentic VARV. Towards this end, cynomolgus macaques were identified as adequate hosts for VARV, developing ordinary or hemorrhagic smallpox in a dose-dependent fashion. To further refine this model, we performed a serial sampling study on macaques exposed to doses of VARV strain Harper calibrated to induce ordinary or hemorrhagic disease. Several key differences were noted between these models. In the ordinary smallpox model, lymphoid and myeloid hyperplasias were consistently found whereas lymphocytolysis and hematopoietic necrosis developed in hemorrhagic smallpox. Viral antigen accumulation, as assessed immunohistochemically, was mild and transient in the ordinary smallpox model. In contrast, in the hemorrhagic model antigen distribution was widespread and included tissues and cells not involved in the ordinary model. Hemorrhagic smallpox developed only in the presence of secondary bacterial infections - an observation also commonly noted in historical reports of human smallpox. Together, our results support the macaque model as an excellent surrogate for human smallpox in terms of disease onset, acute disease course, and gross and histopathological lesions.

  5. A hepatitis E virus variant from the United States: molecular characterization and transmission in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Erker, J C; Desai, S M; Schlauder, G G; Dawson, G J; Mushahwar, I K

    1999-03-01

    The partial sequence of a hepatitis E virus (HEV-US1) isolated from a patient in the United States (US), suffering from acute viral hepatitis with no known risk factors for acquiring HEV, has been reported. These sequences were significantly different from previously characterized HEV isolates, alluding to the existence of a distinct human variant. In this paper, we report the near full-length sequences of HEV-US1 and a second US isolate (HEV-US2). HEV-US2 was identified in a US patient suffering from acute viral hepatitis. These sequences verify the presence of a new HEV strain in North America and provide information as to the degree of variability between variants. The HEV-US nucleotide sequences are 92% identical to each other and only 74% identical to the Burmese and Mexican strains. Amino acid and phylogenetic analyses also demonstrate that the US isolates are genetically distinct, suggesting the presence of three genotypes of HEV. Serum from the second US patient induced hepatitis following inoculation into a cynomolgus macaque. Within 2-4 weeks, HEV-US2 RNA was detectable in both the serum and faecal material coinciding with elevated serum alanine transaminase levels. Infection resolved as antibody titres increased 8 weeks post-inoculation.

  6. Reproductive success of wild-caught and captive-bred cynomolgus macaques at a breeding facility.

    PubMed

    Levallois, Laurent; de Marigny, Sandra Desvaux

    2015-10-01

    The revised European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes encourages the scientific community to consider the feasibility of transitioning from the use of wild-caught breeders toward the exclusive use of captive-born breeders in non-human primate breeding centers. Little is known about how such a transition will affect animal health, productivity and accompanying husbandry practices. These concerns are important both for the efficient operation of a breeding facility and for the optimal welfare of the animals in its care. The authors analyzed records of wild-caught and captive-born female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used for breeding at a facility between 2006 and 2011. Productivity was measured by proportional birth rate and interbirth interval; perinatal mortality was quantified by cause and type of death; and body condition was estimated using recorded visual assessments. Captive-born breeders generally showed lower productivity, higher perinatal mortality and poorer body condition than wild-caught breeders in the same husbandry conditions. These findings indicate that facilities transitioning to the use of captive-born macaques in breeding might need to explore new and revised husbandry strategies that address potential developmental and behavioral differences of captive-born breeders. PMID:26398613

  7. Pharmacokinetics of 3 Formulations of Meloxicam in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Cassondra; Frost, Patrice; Kirschner, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Meloxicam is a commonly used COX2-preferential NSAID in both human and veterinary patients. Minimal information has been published regarding appropriate dosing in nonhuman primates. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic parameters of 3 formulations of meloxicam in cynomolgus macaques. A single dose of meloxicam SR, an extended-release formulation purported to provide therapeutic levels for as long as 72 h, was compared with the intramuscular and oral formulations dosed for 3 consecutive days and as a single dose. The oral formulation, both over 3 d and as a single dose, yielded lower plasma levels and a shorter duration than did intramuscular and sustained-release subcutaneous formulations. The intramuscular formulation, both over 3 d and as a single dose, provided lower plasma levels and a shorter duration than did a sustained-release subcutaneous formulation. The sustained-release formulations generated the highest plasma concentrations for the longest periods of time. None of the formulations caused significant effects on kidney or liver function. Our results indicate that the sustained-release formulation of meloxicam can achieve an adequate steady-state plasma concentration for 2 to 3 d in nonhuman primates. The standard intramuscular formulation provides adequate plasma concentrations for 12 to 24 h, with waxing and waning levels associated with daily dosing. The oral formulation has limited utility in nonhuman primates because of low circulating levels of drug. PMID:25255073

  8. Efficacy of a Tetravalent Chimeric Dengue Vaccine (DENVax) in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Brewoo, Joseph N.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Arguello, John; Moldovan, Ioana R.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Powell, Tim D.; Livengood, Jill A.; Kinney, Richard M.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.

    2011-01-01

    Three tetravalent formulations of chimeric dengue (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of serotypes 1–4 expressed by the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Subcutaneous injection of the DENVax formulations was well-tolerated. Low levels of viremia of only one of the four vaccine viruses were detected yet virus neutralizing antibody titers were induced against all four dengue virus serotypes after one or two administrations of vaccine. All animals immunized with the high-dose formulation were protected from viremia, and all immunized animals were completely protected from DENV-3 and DENV-4 challenge. A lower dose of DENVax formulation partially protected animals from DENV-1 or DENV-2 challenge. In contrast, all control animals developed high levels of viremia for multiple days after challenge with DENV 1–4. This study highlights the immunogenicity and efficacy of the tetravalent DENVax formulations in nonhuman primates. PMID:21633037

  9. Long-term effects of castration on the skeleton of male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Matthew J; Wang, Qian; Cerroni, Antonietta M; Grynpas, Marc D; Gonzalez Velez, Olga D; Rawlins, Richard G; Ethun, Kelly F; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H; Kensler, Terry B; Pritzker, Kenneth P H

    2016-01-01

    While osteopenia (OPE) and osteoporosis (OPO) have been studied in various species of aging nonhuman primates and extensively in ovariectomized rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, there is virtually no information on the effects of castration on the skeleton of male nonhuman primates. Most information on castrated male primates comes from a few studies on the skeletons of eunuchs. This report used a subset of the Caribbean Primate Research Center's (CPRC) Cayo Santiago (CS) rhesus macaque skeletal collection to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of castrated and age-matched intact males and, thereby, determine the long-term effects of castration (orchidectomy) on bone. Lumbar vertebrae, femora, and crania were evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA or DXA) and digital radiography augmented, when fresh tissues were available, with autoradiography and histology. Results confirmed physical examinations of long bones that castration causes changes in the skeleton of male rhesus macaques similar to those found in eunuchs, including OPE and OPO of the vertebrae and femora, thinning of the skull, and vertebral fractures and kyphosis of the spine more severe than that caused by normal aging alone. Also like eunuchs, some castrated CS male rhesus monkeys had a longer life span than intact males or females. Based on these results and the effects of castration on other tissues and organs of eunuchs, on behavior, hormone profiles and possibly on cognition and visual perception of human and nonhuman primates, and other mammals, castrated male rhesus macaques should be used with caution for laboratory studies and should be considered a separate category from intact males. Despite these caveats, the castrated male rhesus macaque should make an excellent animal model in which to test hormone replacement therapies for boys and men orchidectomized for testicular and prostate cancer.

  10. Relationship between response rates and measures of reinforcing strength using a choice procedure in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Gould, Robert W; Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A

    2008-07-01

    Concurrent schedules of reinforcement are increasingly being used to investigate the reinforcing strength of abused drugs. A purported advantage of concurrent schedules is that the primary dependent measure, percentage of responses emitted on the drug-associated manipulandum, is independent of the rate-altering effects of drugs. Data supporting this hypothesis are, however, rarely presented, which was one goal of this study. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that drug-induced decreases in response rates provides an additional index to characterize abuse liability of drugs. This study examined the relationship between response rate and response allocation (i.e. drug choice) when 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 0.03-0.3 mg/kg/inj) or cocaine (0.003-0.1 mg/kg/inj) was the alternative to food under concurrent fixed-ratio reinforcement schedules in rhesus (n=4) and cynomolgus (n=16) monkeys, respectively. Increasing doses of MDMA or cocaine resulted in increased drug choice and dose-dependent decreases in overall response rates. For both drugs, response rates on the drug-associated lever were not affected by dose and were not different from saline. Furthermore, at most doses, rates of responding on the food-associated lever were significantly higher than response rates on the drug-associated lever. Finally, MDMA but not cocaine decreased food-reinforced responding, providing evidence for potential differences between the drugs. These results demonstrate that under concurrent food-drug reinforcement schedules, response rates on the drug-associated lever are independent of measures of reinforcement, whereas disruptions in food-maintained responding may be inversely related to abuse liability. PMID:18622187

  11. Monkey bites among US military members, Afghanistan, 2011.

    PubMed

    Mease, Luke E; Baker, Katheryn A

    2012-10-01

    Bites from Macaca mulatta monkeys, native to Afghanistan, can cause serious infections. To determine risk for US military members in Afghanistan, we reviewed records for September-December 2011. Among 126 animal bites and exposures, 10 were monkey bites. Command emphasis is vital for preventing monkey bites; provider training and bite reporting promote postexposure treatment.

  12. [Adverse drug reactions in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Isabelle; Cabou, Cendrine; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Damase-Michel, Christine

    2007-01-01

    A Prospective pharmacovigilance survey of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in pregnant women was performed in collaboration with gynaecologists and obstetricians of Midi-Pyrenees area (south west of france). The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of adverse drug reactions in pregnant women. The incidence of ADRs in pregnant women was low: 0.3%. Moreover, a retrospective pharmacoepidemiological study was conducted to characterize ADRs in pregnant women. Reports of ADRs collected in the Midi-Pyrenees pharmacovigilance centre from 1982 to 2002 were used: type of ADRs, drugs involved and potential risk factors were compared for pregnant women and for age-matched non pregnant women. Forty seven and 94 reports of ADRs were collected in pregnant and non-pregnant women respectively. Anaphylactic reactions were only observed in pregnant women (3 cases, p = 0.04). We observed 1 ADR related stillbirth (due to anaphylactic reaction) in pregnant women. Drugs for gynaecological and cardiovascular systems were more frequently involved in ADRs in pregnant women than in controls. ADRs mainly occurred during the third trimester of pregnancy. The incidence of ADRs is very low in pregnant women. However, one must pay attention on the risk of anaphylactic reactions in pregnant women. PMID:18206108

  13. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses.

    PubMed

    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A

    2014-08-01

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of fMRI experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained concerning human brain evolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of awake monkey fMRI studies mainly confined to the visual system. We review the latest insights about the topographic organization of monkey visual cortex and discuss the spatial relationships between retinotopy and category- and feature-selective clusters. We briefly discuss the functional layout of parietal and frontal cortex and continue with a summary of some fascinating functional and effective connectivity studies. Finally, we review recent comparative fMRI experiments and speculate about the future of nonhuman primate imaging.

  14. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  15. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  16. Spaceflight and immune responses of Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies indicates that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of Rhesus monkeys. The expected significance of the work is a determination of the range of immunological functions of the Rhesus monkey, a primate similar in many ways to man, affected by space flight. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection may be determined as well as the duration of alterations in immune responses. Additional information on the nature of cellular interactions for the generation of immune responses may also be obtained.

  17. Steps to take before you get pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... get pregnant. Long-term health problems, such as asthma or diabetes, should be stable before you get pregnant. If you are obese, your provider will recommend losing weight before pregnancy. Doing so will reduce your risk of complications ...

  18. Quitting Smoking While Pregnant: What Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160106.html Quitting Smoking While Pregnant: What Works Nicotine patches, Zyban helped 4 out ... of nicotine patches or the drug Zyban helps pregnant women quit smoking before and after they give ...

  19. CDC Updates Zika Guidelines for Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160052.html CDC Updates Zika Guidelines for Pregnant Women Any sex partner, male ... News) -- U.S. health officials on Monday updated their Zika virus guidelines, saying that pregnant women could contract ...

  20. Reducing Smoking among Pregnant Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Joanne; Coates, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes psychosocial intervention designed to reduce smoking in a group of pregnant teenagers. Five modules are presented, each being designed to heighten awareness of the issue; provide motivational messages; enhance the adolescent's social skills; and teach specific smoking-cessation skills. (Author/NB)

  1. Nutrition and the Pregnant Teen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vicki; McCamey, Jody

    This illustrated guide for pregnant teenagers discusses the nutritional needs of the mother and her unborn child in a month-by-month format. The information presented for each of the 9 months typically includes a sample daily menu; a checklist of recommended servings per day for each of four food groups; a description of the usual emotional and…

  2. PRRSV and the pregnant female

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Pregnant Gilt Model (PGM) is substantially complete and has provided substantive deliverables for the swine industry in Canada and beyond. The success of the PGM was largely dependent on a team of more than 30 researchers, students and technicians, along with external collaborators and instituti...

  3. Pathology of experimental Machupo virus infection, Chicava strain, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by intramuscular and aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Robinson, C G; Wilkinson, E R; Hensley, L E; Cashman, K A

    2015-01-01

    Machupo virus, the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever of which little is known and for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics are available. This study evaluated the cynomolgus macaque as an animal model using the Machupo virus, Chicava strain, via intramuscular and aerosol challenge. The incubation period was 6 to 10 days with initial signs of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, mild fever, and a petechial skin rash. These were often followed by neurologic signs and death within an average of 18 days. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia as well as marked thrombocytopenia. Serum chemistry values identified a decrease in total protein, marked increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and moderate increases in alkaline phosphatase. Gross pathology findings included a macular rash extending across the axillary and inguinal regions beginning at approximately 10 days postexposure as well as enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, enlarged and friable liver, and sporadic hemorrhages along the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and necrosis/apoptosis in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system (nonsuppurative encephalitis) was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection in cynomolgus macaques and supports the usefulness of cynomolgus macaques as a viable model of human Machupo virus infection. PMID:24990481

  4. 42 CFR 435.116 - Pregnant women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pregnant women. 435.116 Section 435.116 Public..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA Mandatory Coverage Mandatory Coverage of Pregnant Women, Children Under 19, and Newborn Children § 435.116 Pregnant women. (a) Basis. This section implements sections...

  5. 42 CFR 435.116 - Pregnant women.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pregnant women. 435.116 Section 435.116 Public..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA Mandatory Coverage Mandatory Coverage of Pregnant Women, Children Under 19, and Newborn Children § 435.116 Pregnant women. (a) Basis. This section implements sections...

  6. Telephone smoking cessation quitline use among pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Jennifer M; Farr, Sherry L; Dietz, Patricia M; Tong, Van T; Zhang, Lei; Rabius, Vance

    2013-08-01

    To describe characteristics, referrals, service utilization, and self-reported quit rates among pregnant and non-pregnant women enrolled in a smoking cessation quitline. This information can be used to improve strategies to increase pregnant and non-pregnant smokers' use of quitlines. We examined tobacco use characteristics, referral sources, and use of services among 1,718 pregnant and 24,321 non-pregnant women aged 18-44 years enrolled in quitline services in 10 states during 2006-2008. We examined self-reported 30-day quit rates 7 months after enrollment among 246 pregnant and 4,123 non-pregnant women and, within groups, used Chi-square tests to compare quit rates by type of service received. The majority of pregnant and non-pregnant callers, respectively, smoked ≥10 cigarettes per day (62 %; 83 %), had recently attempted to quit (55 %; 58 %), smoked 5 or minutes after waking (59 %; 55 %), and lived with a smoker (63 %; 48 %). Of callers, 24.3 % of pregnant and 36.4 % of non-pregnant women were uninsured. Pregnant callers heard about the quitline most often from a health care provider (50 %) and non-pregnant callers most often through mass media (59 %). Over half of pregnant (52 %) and non-pregnant (57 %) women received self-help materials only, the remainder received counseling. Self-reported quit rates at 7 months after enrollment in the subsample were 26.4 % for pregnant women and 22.6 % for non-pregnant women. Quitlines provide needed services for pregnant and non-pregnant smokers, many of whom are uninsured. Smokers should be encouraged to access counseling services.

  7. Aging: Lessons for Elderly People from Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Crockford, Catherine

    2016-07-11

    As life expectancy increases, health in the elderly is a growing issue. Health is linked to remaining socially active, but the elderly typically narrow their social networks. The social life of aging monkeys shows interesting parallels, indicating social patterns may be rooted in evolution. PMID:27404240

  8. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  9. Rosalie: the Brazilian female monkey of Charcot.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Arruda, Walter O; Werneck, Lineu C

    2005-09-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot, the father of Neurology, a very austere and reserved man that did not express affection freely for human being, had a profound affection to animals, particularly to a small female monkey, called "Rosalie", which came from Brazil and was a gift of Dom Pedro II to Charcot.

  10. Computing Arm Movements with a Monkey Brainet.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Ifft, Peter J; Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Byun, Yoon Woo; Zhuang, Katie Z; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2015-07-09

    Traditionally, brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) extract motor commands from a single brain to control the movements of artificial devices. Here, we introduce a Brainet that utilizes very-large-scale brain activity (VLSBA) from two (B2) or three (B3) nonhuman primates to engage in a common motor behaviour. A B2 generated 2D movements of an avatar arm where each monkey contributed equally to X and Y coordinates; or one monkey fully controlled the X-coordinate and the other controlled the Y-coordinate. A B3 produced arm movements in 3D space, while each monkey generated movements in 2D subspaces (X-Y, Y-Z, or X-Z). With long-term training we observed increased coordination of behavior, increased correlations in neuronal activity between different brains, and modifications to neuronal representation of the motor plan. Overall, performance of the Brainet improved owing to collective monkey behaviour. These results suggest that primate brains can be integrated into a Brainet, which self-adapts to achieve a common motor goal.

  11. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sulzman, F M; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C

    1977-11-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation was examined on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys. In the absence of other time cues, 24-h cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 h with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined. PMID:412829

  12. Cell-Type-Specific Optogenetics in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-09-01

    The recent advent of technologies enabling cell-type-specific recording and manipulation of neuronal activity spurred tremendous progress in neuroscience. However, they have been largely limited to mice, which lack the richness in behavior of primates. Stauffer et al. now present a generalizable method for achieving cell-type specificity in monkeys. PMID:27610562

  13. Exploring the potential of variola virus infection of cynomolgus macaques as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E; Martinez, Mark J; Leduc, James W; Rubins, Kathleen H; Relman, David A; Huggins, John W

    2004-10-19

    Smallpox virus (variola) poses a significant threat as an agent of bioterrorism. To mitigate this risk, antiviral drugs and an improved vaccine are urgently needed. Satisfactory demonstration of protective efficacy against authentic variola will require development of an animal model in which variola produces a disease course with features consistent with human smallpox. Toward this end, cynomolgus macaques were exposed to several variola strains through aerosol and/or i.v. routes. Two strains, Harper and India 7124, produced uniform acute lethality when inoculated i.v. in high doses (10(9) plaque-forming units). Lower doses resulted in less fulminant, systemic disease and lower mortality. Animals that died had profound leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum creatinine levels. After inoculation, variola was disseminated by means of a monocytic cell-associated viremia. Distribution of viral antigens by immunohistochemistry correlated with the presence of replicating viral particles demonstrated by electron microscopy and pathology in the lymphoid tissues, skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, reproductive system, and liver. These particles resembled those seen in human smallpox. High viral burdens in target tissues were associated with organ dysfunction and multisystem failure. Evidence of coagulation cascade activation (D dimers) corroborated histologic evidence of hemorrhagic diathesis. Depletion of T cell-dependent areas of lymphoid tissues occurred, probably as a consequence of bystander apoptotic mechanisms initiated by infected macrophages. Elaboration of cytokines, including IL-6 and IFN-gamma, contribute to a cytokine storm formerly known as "toxemia." A more precise understanding of disease pathogenesis should provide targets for therapeutic intervention, to be used alone or in combination with inhibitors of variola virus replication.

  14. Development of an Inhalational Bacillus anthracis Exposure Therapeutic Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jason E.; Stark, Gregory V.; Ray, Bryan D.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Knostman, Katherine A. B.; Meister, Gabriel T.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate animal models are required to test medical countermeasures to bioterrorist threats. To that end, we characterized a nonhuman primate (NHP) inhalational anthrax therapeutic model for use in testing anthrax therapeutic medical countermeasures according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule. A clinical profile was recorded for each NHP exposed to a lethal dose of Bacillus anthracis Ames spores. Specific diagnostic parameters were detected relatively early in disease progression, i.e., by blood culture (∼37 h postchallenge) and the presence of circulating protective antigen (PA) detected by electrochemiluminescence (ECL) ∼38 h postchallenge, whereas nonspecific clinical signs of disease, i.e., changes in body temperature, hematologic parameters (ca. 52 to 66 h), and clinical observations, were delayed. To determine whether the presentation of antigenemia (PA in the blood) was an appropriate trigger for therapeutic intervention, a monoclonal antibody specific for PA was administered to 12 additional animals after the circulating levels of PA were detected by ECL. Seventy-five percent of the monoclonal antibody-treated animals survived compared to 17% of the untreated controls, suggesting that intervention at the onset of antigenemia is an appropriate treatment trigger for this model. Moreover, the onset of antigenemia correlated with bacteremia, and NHPs were treated in a therapeutic manner. Interestingly, brain lesions were observed by histopathology in the treated nonsurviving animals, whereas this observation was absent from 90% of the nonsurviving untreated animals. Our results support the use of the cynomolgus macaque as an appropriate therapeutic animal model for assessing the efficacy of medical countermeasures developed against anthrax when administered after a confirmation of infection. PMID:22956657

  15. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  16. Characterization of a Cynomolgus Macaque Model of Pneumonic Plague for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jessica; Martin, Shannon; Metcalfe, Karen; Krile, Robert; Barnewall, Roy; Hart, Mary Kate; Lockman, Hank

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a recombinant plague vaccine (rF1V) was evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (CMs) to establish the relationship among vaccine doses, antibody titers, and survival following an aerosol challenge with a lethal dose of Yersinia pestis strain Colorado 92. CMs were vaccinated with a range of rF1V doses on a three-dose schedule (days 0, 56, and 121) to provide a range of survival outcomes. The humoral immune response following vaccination was evaluated with anti-rF1, anti-rV, and anti-rF1V bridge enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Animals were challenged via aerosol exposure on day 149. Vaccine doses and antibody responses were each significantly associated with the probability of CM survival (P < 0.0001). Vaccination also decreased signs of pneumonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. There were statistically significant correlations between the vaccine dose and the time to onset of fever (P < 0.0001), the time from onset of fever to death (P < 0.0001), the time to onset of elevated respiratory rate (P = 0.0003), and the time to onset of decreased activity (P = 0.0251) postinfection in animals exhibiting these clinical signs. Delays in the onset of these clinical signs of disease were associated with larger doses of rF1V. Immunization with ≥12 μg of rF1V resulted in 100% CM survival. Since both the vaccine dose and anti-rF1V antibody titers correlate with survival, rF1V bridge ELISA titers can be used as a correlate of protection. PMID:26224691

  17. Characterization of a Cynomolgus Macaque Model of Pneumonic Plague for Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Patricia; Price, Jessica; Martin, Shannon; Metcalfe, Karen; Krile, Robert; Barnewall, Roy; Hart, Mary Kate; Lockman, Hank

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of a recombinant plague vaccine (rF1V) was evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (CMs) to establish the relationship among vaccine doses, antibody titers, and survival following an aerosol challenge with a lethal dose of Yersinia pestis strain Colorado 92. CMs were vaccinated with a range of rF1V doses on a three-dose schedule (days 0, 56, and 121) to provide a range of survival outcomes. The humoral immune response following vaccination was evaluated with anti-rF1, anti-rV, and anti-rF1V bridge enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Animals were challenged via aerosol exposure on day 149. Vaccine doses and antibody responses were each significantly associated with the probability of CM survival (P < 0.0001). Vaccination also decreased signs of pneumonic plague in a dose-dependent manner. There were statistically significant correlations between the vaccine dose and the time to onset of fever (P < 0.0001), the time from onset of fever to death (P < 0.0001), the time to onset of elevated respiratory rate (P = 0.0003), and the time to onset of decreased activity (P = 0.0251) postinfection in animals exhibiting these clinical signs. Delays in the onset of these clinical signs of disease were associated with larger doses of rF1V. Immunization with ≥ 12 μg of rF1V resulted in 100% CM survival. Since both the vaccine dose and anti-rF1V antibody titers correlate with survival, rF1V bridge ELISA titers can be used as a correlate of protection.

  18. Expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in glutamate and GABA neurons of the pubertal female monkey hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Thind, K K; Goldsmith, P C

    1997-05-01

    We have previously reported direct glutamate (Glu) synapses upon GnRH-containing neurons in the primate hypothalamus, and extensive interactions between Glu and aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in areas associated with reproductive function. Both Glu and GABA are known to affect peripubertal GnRH neurohormone release, but their relative roles remain unclear. In a developmental survey, estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) were virtually undetectable after immunostaining the hypothalamus of prepubertal monkeys, but were clearly evident in neurons of adults. We hypothesized, therefore, that Glu and GABA neurons which develop ER or PR expression during puberty may participate in reactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. To identify those neurons in midpubertal female cynomolgus monkeys, we performed immunofluorescence staining for ER or for PR in separate sets of hypothalamic sections, and then immunostained for Glu or for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, to identify GABA neurons) using a contrasting fluorophore. ER and PR were localized in the cytoplasm and nuclei of Glu and GAD neurons in nine hypothalamic and related brain regions. Quantitation revealed intranuclear ER in an average of 80% of the Glu neurons in all regions analyzed, and an average of 84% of the GAD neurons in all regions except the supraoptic nucleus (28%). Intranuclear PR expression was more variable, occurring in an average of 93% of the Glu neurons in seven regions, but in only 41% in the medial preoptic area, and 0% in the arcuate-periventicular zone. In addition, while intranuclear PR was seen in 96% of the GAD neurons in the septum, it appeared in 67% of the GAD neurons in the paraventricular nucleus, 47% in the medial preoptic area, 40% in the periventricular zone, and was absent from neurons in the supraoptic nucleus and mammillary bodies. In summary, certain subpopulations of Glu and GABA neurons in principal hypothalamic regions of the female monkey express

  19. Stabilization of gaze during circular locomotion in light. I. Compensatory head and eye nystagmus in the running monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, D.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    1. A rhesus and cynomolgus monkey were trained to run around the perimeter of a circular platform in light. We call this "circular locomotion" because forward motion had an angular component. Head and body velocity in space were recorded with angular rate sensors and eye movements with electrooculography (EOG). From these measurements we derived signals related to the angular velocity of the eyes in the head (Eh), of the head on the body (Hb), of gaze on the body (Gb), of the body in space (Bs), of gaze in space (Gs), and of the gain of gaze (Gb/Bs). 2. The monkeys had continuous compensatory nystagmus of the head and eyes while running, which stabilized Gs during the slow phases. The eyes established and maintained compensatory gaze velocities at the beginning and end of the slow phases. The head contributed to gaze velocity during the middle of the slow phases. Slow phase Gb was as high as 250 degrees/s, and targets were fixed for gaze angles as large as 90-140 degrees. 3. Properties of the visual surround affected both the gain and strategy of gaze compensation in the one monkey tested. Gains of Eh ranged from 0.3 to 1.1 during compensatory gaze nystagmus. Gains of Hb varied around 0.3 (0.2-0.7), building to a maximum as Eh dropped while running past sectors of interest. Consistent with predictions, gaze gains varied from below to above unity, when translational and angular body movements with regard to the target were in opposite or the same directions, respectively. 4. Gaze moved in saccadic shifts in the direction of running during quick phases. Most head quick phases were small, and at times the head only paused during an eye quick phase. Eye quick phases were larger, ranging up to 60 degrees. This is larger than quick phases during passive rotation or saccades made with the head fixed. 5. These data indicate that head and eye nystagmus are natural phenomena that support gaze compensation during locomotion. Despite differential utilization of the head and

  20. 1: Infections in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2002-03-01

    Some infections are more serious in pregnant than non-pregnant women because of the potential for vertical transmission to the fetus or infant (eg, varicella, rubella, cytomegalovirus infection, toxoplasmosis and listeriosis). Pre-pregnancy or routine antenatal screening for presence of, or susceptibility to, some of these infections and appropriate management can prevent adverse fetal or perinatal outcomes; screening should include rubella IgG, hepatitis B surface antigen, serological tests for syphilis and HIV antibody. If certain other vertically transmissible infections are suspected because of a positive antenatal test result, confirmatory tests for maternal and, if indicated, fetal infection are essential before intervention is considered (eg, cytomegalovirus infection). For some vertically transmissible infections that are not readily preventable, appropriate management of maternal infection can reduce fetal damage (eg, toxoplasmosis). PMID:11999241

  1. Preclinical Development of Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Combination Immunotherapy: Mouse Tumor Models, In Vitro Functional Studies, and Cynomolgus Macaque Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Selby, Mark J; Engelhardt, John J; Johnston, Robert J; Lu, Li-Sheng; Han, Minhua; Thudium, Kent; Yao, Dapeng; Quigley, Michael; Valle, Jose; Wang, Changyu; Chen, Bing; Cardarelli, Pina M; Blanset, Diann; Korman, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) have shown remarkable antitumor activity in an increasing number of cancers. When combined, ipilimumab and nivolumab have demonstrated superior activity in patients with metastatic melanoma (CHECKMATE-067). Here we describe the preclinical development strategy that predicted these clinical results. Synergistic antitumor activity in mouse MC38 and CT26 colorectal tumor models was observed with concurrent, but not sequential CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade. Significant antitumor activity was maintained using a fixed dose of anti-CTLA-4 antibody with decreasing doses of anti-PD-1 antibody in the MC38 model. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses confirmed that CD3+ T cells accumulated at the tumor margin and infiltrated the tumor mass in response to the combination therapy, resulting in favorable effector and regulatory T-cell ratios, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and activation of tumor-specific T cells. Similarly, in vitro studies with combined ipilimumab and nivolumab showed enhanced cytokine secretion in superantigen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and in mixed lymphocyte response assays. In a cynomolgus macaque toxicology study, dose-dependent immune-related gastrointestinal inflammation was observed with the combination therapy; this response had not been observed in previous single agent cynomolgus studies. Together, these in vitro assays and in vivo models comprise a preclinical strategy for the identification and development of highly effective antitumor combination immunotherapies. PMID:27610613

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  3. Preclinical Development of Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Combination Immunotherapy: Mouse Tumor Models, In Vitro Functional Studies, and Cynomolgus Macaque Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Mark J.; Engelhardt, John J.; Johnston, Robert J.; Lu, Li-Sheng; Han, Minhua; Thudium, Kent; Yao, Dapeng; Quigley, Michael; Valle, Jose; Wang, Changyu; Chen, Bing; Cardarelli, Pina M.; Blanset, Diann; Korman, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) have shown remarkable antitumor activity in an increasing number of cancers. When combined, ipilimumab and nivolumab have demonstrated superior activity in patients with metastatic melanoma (CHECKMATE-067). Here we describe the preclinical development strategy that predicted these clinical results. Synergistic antitumor activity in mouse MC38 and CT26 colorectal tumor models was observed with concurrent, but not sequential CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade. Significant antitumor activity was maintained using a fixed dose of anti-CTLA-4 antibody with decreasing doses of anti-PD-1 antibody in the MC38 model. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analyses confirmed that CD3+ T cells accumulated at the tumor margin and infiltrated the tumor mass in response to the combination therapy, resulting in favorable effector and regulatory T-cell ratios, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and activation of tumor-specific T cells. Similarly, in vitro studies with combined ipilimumab and nivolumab showed enhanced cytokine secretion in superantigen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes and in mixed lymphocyte response assays. In a cynomolgus macaque toxicology study, dose-dependent immune-related gastrointestinal inflammation was observed with the combination therapy; this response had not been observed in previous single agent cynomolgus studies. Together, these in vitro assays and in vivo models comprise a preclinical strategy for the identification and development of highly effective antitumor combination immunotherapies. PMID:27610613

  4. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Cecatto, Vanessa; Biazim, Samia Khalil; Ferreira, José Henrique Fermino; Danielli, Caroline; Genske, Rodrigo Daniel; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Franco, Marcello Fabiano de

    2015-12-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS

    PubMed Central

    LOTH, Eduardo Alexandre; CECATTO, Vanessa; BIAZIM, Samia Khalil; FERREIRA, José Henrique Fermino; DANIELLI, Caroline; GENSKE, Rodrigo Daniel; GANDRA, Rinaldo Ferreira; de FRANCO, Marcello Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring. PMID:27049707

  6. Imaging Pregnant and Lactating Patients.

    PubMed

    Tirada, Nikki; Dreizin, David; Khati, Nadia J; Akin, Esma A; Zeman, Robert K

    2015-10-01

    As use of imaging in the evaluation of pregnant and lactating patients continues to increase, misperceptions of radiation and safety risks have proliferated, which has led to often unwarranted concerns among patients and clinicians. When radiologic examinations are appropriately used, the benefits derived from the information gained usually outweigh the risks. This review describes appropriateness and safety issues, estimated doses for imaging examinations that use iodizing radiation (ie, radiography, computed tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology), radiation risks to the mother and conceptus during various stages of pregnancy, and use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents and radiotracers in pregnant and lactating women. Maternal radiation risk must be weighed with the potential consequences of missing a life-threatening diagnosis such as pulmonary embolus. Fetal risks (ie, spontaneous abortion, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis) vary with gestational age and imaging modality and should be considered in the context of the potential benefit of medically necessary diagnostic imaging. When feasible and medically indicated, modalities that do not use ionizing radiation (eg, magnetic resonance imaging) are preferred in pregnant and lactating patients. Radiologists should strive to minimize risks of radiation to the mother and fetus, counsel patients effectively, and promote a realistic understanding of risks related to imaging during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26466183

  7. Online Medicine for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Davidesko, Sharon; Segal, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the use of cell phones and email as means of communication between pregnant women and their gynecologists and family physicians. Study Design. A cross-sectional study of pregnant women at routine followup. One hundred and twenty women participated in the study. Results. The mean age was 27.4 ± 3.4 years. One hundred nineteen women owned a cell phone and 114 (95%) had an email address. Seventy-two women (60%) had their gynecologist's cell phone number and 50 women (42%) had their family physician's cell phone number. More women contacted their gynecologist via cell phone or email during pregnancy compared to their family physician (P = 0.005 and 0.009, resp.). Most preferred to communicate with their physician via cell phone at predetermined times, but by email at any time during the day (P < 0.0001). They would use cell phones for emergencies or unusual problems but preferred email for other matters (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Pregnant women in the Negev region do not have a preference between the use of cell phones or email for medical consultation with their gynecologist or family physician. The provision of the physician's cell phone numbers or email address together with the provision of guidelines and resources could improve healthcare services. PMID:25132848

  8. Craving and Withdrawal Symptoms During Smoking Cessation: Comparison of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Smokers.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Ivan; Singleton, Edward G; Heishman, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Although pregnant smokers are aware of the negative peri- and postnatal health consequences of smoking, the cessation rate in pregnancy is low, raising the question of why pregnant smokers have difficulty quitting. Reasons might be that pregnant smokers experience more intense craving and withdrawal symptoms than non-pregnant smokers. We compared craving and withdrawal in 306 pregnant smokers versus 93 non-pregnant women using data from two smoking cessation trials. Complete data were analyzed using pre-quit and post-quit (2 weeks after quit date) craving and withdrawal measured by the 12-item French Tobacco Craving Questionnaire (FTCQ-12) and French Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (FMNWS). Pregnant smokers started smoking and smoked regularly earlier and succeeded far less at quitting smoking by week 2 than the general population of smokers (11% versus 43%). Post-quit date FTCQ-12 general score was higher in pregnant smokers compared to comparison groups, and was driven by elevated emotionality and expectancy. FMNWS decreased significantly less among pregnant smokers than among non-pregnant smokers. Insufficient reduction of craving and withdrawal symptoms in response to a quit attempt may partially explain why pregnant smokers may have more difficulty quitting than non-pregnant smokers. Because this was a historical comparison, findings are preliminary; however, they might foster further investigation of differences in craving and withdrawal symptoms in pregnant versus non-pregnant smokers.

  9. Physiological and analytical validations of fecal steroid hormone measures in black howler monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Negrín, Ariadna; Flores-Escobar, Elizabeth; Chavira, Roberto; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo; Dias, Pedro Américo D

    2014-10-01

    The measurement of hormones in fecal samples allows for the noninvasive assessment of the endocrine status of free-ranging primates. However, procedures and techniques for hormone analysis in feces must be validated, both analytically and physiologically. Few studies have addressed the endocrinology of black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra). Due to its conservation status, direct handling of individuals from this species and invasive sample collection are highly regulated, and therefore traditional methods for the validation of hormone assays, such as pharmacological challenges, are not allowed. As a consequence, sometimes studies of the fecal hormones of free-ranging black howler monkeys do not report physiological validations and therefore the biological reliability of such measurements cannot be assessed. In order to stimulate future research with this species, the present study aimed at providing methodological bases for fecal endocrine monitoring. Specifically, we compared the validity of two immunoassays (radioimmunoassays, RIA; solid-phase chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay, SPCEI) performed with commercial kits to measure cortisol, testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone; and demonstrate how the physiological functions of these steroid hormones can be determined through non-pharmacological validations. We found no differences between the analytical validity of RIA and SPCEI assays to measure cortisol and testosterone, whereas for estradiol and progesterone RIA showed better results. Concerning the physiological validation of our assays, we demonstrated that: (1) comparisons between pre- and post-stress situations may be used to assess cortisol response, (2) comparisons between females and males may be used to assess variation in testosterone levels, and (3) comparisons between pregnant and non-pregnant females may be used to determine variation in estradiol and progesterone activity. The analytical and physiological validations that we performed

  10. Head Rotation Detection in Marmoset Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhadri, Sravanthi

    Head movement is known to have the benefit of improving the accuracy of sound localization for humans and animals. Marmoset is a small bodied New World monkey species and it has become an emerging model for studying the auditory functions. This thesis aims to detect the horizontal and vertical rotation of head movement in marmoset monkeys. Experiments were conducted in a sound-attenuated acoustic chamber. Head movement of marmoset monkey was studied under various auditory and visual stimulation conditions. With increasing complexity, these conditions are (1) idle, (2) sound-alone, (3) sound and visual signals, and (4) alert signal by opening and closing of the chamber door. All of these conditions were tested with either house light on or off. Infra-red camera with a frame rate of 90 Hz was used to capture of the head movement of monkeys. To assist the signal detection, two circular markers were attached to the top of monkey head. The data analysis used an image-based marker detection scheme. Images were processed using the Computation Vision Toolbox in Matlab. The markers and their positions were detected using blob detection techniques. Based on the frame-by-frame information of marker positions, the angular position, velocity and acceleration were extracted in horizontal and vertical planes. Adaptive Otsu Thresholding, Kalman filtering and bound setting for marker properties were used to overcome a number of challenges encountered during this analysis, such as finding image segmentation threshold, continuously tracking markers during large head movement, and false alarm detection. The results show that the blob detection method together with Kalman filtering yielded better performances than other image based techniques like optical flow and SURF features .The median of the maximal head turn in the horizontal plane was in the range of 20 to 70 degrees and the median of the maximal velocity in horizontal plane was in the range of a few hundreds of degrees per

  11. Locomotor Anatomy and Behavior of Patas Monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) with Comparison to Vervet Monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops)

    PubMed Central

    Zihlman, Adrienne L.; Underwood, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) living in African savanna woodlands and grassland habitats have a locomotor system that allows them to run fast, presumably to avoid predators. Long fore- and hindlimbs, long foot bones, short toes, and a digitigrade foot posture were proposed as anatomical correlates with speed. In addition to skeletal proportions, soft tissue and whole body proportions are important components of the locomotor system. To further distinguish patas anatomy from other Old World monkeys, a comparative study based on dissection of skin, muscle, and bone from complete individuals of patas and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) was undertaken. Analysis reveals that small adjustments in patas skeletal proportions, relative mass of limbs and tail, and specific muscle groups promote efficient sagittal limb motion. The ability to run fast is based on a locomotor system adapted for long distance walking. The patas' larger home range and longer daily range than those of vervets give them access to highly dispersed, nutritious foods, water, and sleeping trees. Furthermore, patas monkeys have physiological adaptations that enable them to tolerate and dissipate heat. These features all contribute to the distinct adaptation that is the patas monkeys' basis for survival in grassland and savanna woodland areas. PMID:24187623

  12. Metabolism of lithocholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in the squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, H.; Hamada, M.; Kato, F.

    1985-09-01

    Metabolism of lithocholic acid (LCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was studied in the squirrel monkey to clarify the mechanism of the lack of toxicity of CDCA in this animal. Radioactive LCA was administered to squirrel monkeys with biliary fistula. Most radioactivity was excreted in the bile in the form of unsulfated lithocholyltaurine. The squirrel monkey thus differs from humans and chimpanzees, which efficiently sulfate LCA, and is similar to the rhesus monkey and baboon in that LCA is poorly sulfated. When labeled CDCA was orally administered to squirrel monkeys, less than 20% of the dosed radioactivity was recovered as LCA and its further metabolites in feces over 3 days, indicating that bacterial metabolism of CDCA into LCA is strikingly less than in other animals and in humans. It therefore appears that LCA, known as a hepatotoxic secondary bile acid, is not accumulated in the squirrel monkey, not because of its rapid turnover through sulfation, but because of the low order of its production.

  13. Sequence of Pathogenic Events in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Aerosolized Monkeypox Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G.; Pearson, G.; Rayner, E.; Graham, V. A.; Steeds, K.; Bewley, K. R.; Hatch, G. J.; Dennis, M.; Taylor, I.; Roberts, A. D.; Funnell, S. G. P.; Vipond, J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To evaluate new vaccines when human efficacy studies are not possible, the FDA's “Animal Rule” requires well-characterized models of infection. Thus, in the present study, the early pathogenic events of monkeypox infection in nonhuman primates, a surrogate for variola virus infection, were characterized. Cynomolgus macaques were exposed to aerosolized monkeypox virus (105 PFU). Clinical observations, viral loads, immune responses, and pathological changes were examined on days 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 postchallenge. Viral DNA (vDNA) was detected in the lungs on day 2 postchallenge, and viral antigen was detected, by immunostaining, in the epithelium of bronchi, bronchioles, and alveolar walls. Lesions comprised rare foci of dysplastic and sloughed cells in respiratory bronchioles. By day 4, vDNA was detected in the throat, tonsil, and spleen, and monkeypox antigen was detected in the lung, hilar and submandibular lymph nodes, spleen, and colon. Lung lesions comprised focal epithelial necrosis and inflammation. Body temperature peaked on day 6, pox lesions appeared on the skin, and lesions, with positive immunostaining, were present in the lung, tonsil, spleen, lymph nodes, and colon. By day 8, vDNA was present in 9/13 tissues. Blood concentrations of interleukin 1ra (IL-1ra), IL-6, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) increased markedly. By day 10, circulating IgG antibody concentrations increased, and on day 12, animals showed early signs of recovery. These results define early events occurring in an inhalational macaque monkeypox infection model, supporting its use as a surrogate model for human smallpox. IMPORTANCE Bioterrorism poses a major threat to public health, as the deliberate release of infectious agents, such smallpox or a related virus, monkeypox, would have catastrophic consequences. The development and testing of new medical countermeasures, e.g., vaccines, are thus priorities; however, tests for efficacy in humans cannot be performed because it

  14. Chronic, multisite, multielectrode recordings in macaque monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Dimitrov, Dragan; Carmena, Jose M.; Crist, Roy; Lehew, Gary; Kralik, Jerald D.; Wise, Steven P.

    2003-09-01

    A paradigm is described for recording the activity of single cortical neurons from awake, behaving macaque monkeys. Its unique features include high-density microwire arrays and multichannel instrumentation. Three adult rhesus monkeys received microwire array implants, totaling 96-704 microwires per subject, in up to five cortical areas, sometimes bilaterally. Recordings 3-4 weeks after implantation yielded 421 single neurons with a mean peak-to-peak voltage of 115 ± 3 μV and a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 5:1. As many as 247 cortical neurons were recorded in one session, and at least 58 neurons were isolated from one subject 18 months after implantation. This method should benefit neurophysiological investigation of learning, perception, and sensorimotor integration in primates and the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  15. 75 FR 76007 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Permit to Import Cynomolgus, African Green, or Rhesus Monkeys into the United States (OMB Control No... Cynomolgus, African Green, or Rhesus Monkeys into the United States'', for another three years. This data... import Cynomolgus, African Green, or Rhesus monkeys. To receive a special permit to import...

  16. The pathology of innactivation in monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, G. H.; Golarz De Bourne, M. N.; Mcclure, H.; Keeling, M.

    1973-01-01

    Progress report on a long-term experiment using rhesus monkeys and designed to study the effects of isolation up to one year, as well as the effects of bed rest simulated by immobilization in a plaster cast for six months. The investigation includes histopathological and histochemical studies of these effects on various internal organs and tissues, and some of the preliminary results of these studies are presented and discussed.

  17. A freely-moving monkey treadmill model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin D.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Freifeld, Oren; Gao, Hua; Walker, Ross; Ryu, Stephen I.; Meng, Teresa H.; Murmann, Boris; Black, Michael J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Motor neuroscience and brain-machine interface (BMI) design is based on examining how the brain controls voluntary movement, typically by recording neural activity and behavior from animal models. Recording technologies used with these animal models have traditionally limited the range of behaviors that can be studied, and thus the generality of science and engineering research. We aim to design a freely-moving animal model using neural and behavioral recording technologies that do not constrain movement. Approach. We have established a freely-moving rhesus monkey model employing technology that transmits neural activity from an intracortical array using a head-mounted device and records behavior through computer vision using markerless motion capture. We demonstrate the flexibility and utility of this new monkey model, including the first recordings from motor cortex while rhesus monkeys walk quadrupedally on a treadmill. Main results. Using this monkey model, we show that multi-unit threshold-crossing neural activity encodes the phase of walking and that the average firing rate of the threshold crossings covaries with the speed of individual steps. On a population level, we find that neural state-space trajectories of walking at different speeds have similar rotational dynamics in some dimensions that evolve at the step rate of walking, yet robustly separate by speed in other state-space dimensions. Significance. Freely-moving animal models may allow neuroscientists to examine a wider range of behaviors and can provide a flexible experimental paradigm for examining the neural mechanisms that underlie movement generation across behaviors and environments. For BMIs, freely-moving animal models have the potential to aid prosthetic design by examining how neural encoding changes with posture, environment and other real-world context changes. Understanding this new realm of behavior in more naturalistic settings is essential for overall progress of basic

  18. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Adair, E R; Adams, B W

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  19. Giving is self-rewarding for monkeys

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Frans B. M.; Leimgruber, Kristin; Greenberg, Amanda R.

    2008-01-01

    Helping and sharing among humans is often motivated by empathy and accompanied by a sense of satisfaction. To determine whether similar self-rewarding mechanisms may underpin assistance among nonhuman primates, eight female brown capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) underwent testing in a simple choice paradigm. Paired with a partner, subjects could select either a “selfish” option that rewarded only themselves, or a “prosocial” option that rewarded both of them. Subjects systematically favored the prosocial option provided their partner was a) familiar, b) visible, and c) receiving rewards of equal value. Prosocial tendencies increased with social closeness, being lowest toward strangers and highest toward kin. That the monkeys understood the options was suggested by greater orientation to the partner during prosocial than selfish choices. Prosocial preferences were reduced by inequity, when the partner received a superior reward. If the view between both monkeys was blocked, choices became strikingly selfish. Thus, under certain conditions, delivering benefits to others seems gratifying to nonhuman primates. PMID:18757730

  20. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  1. Spaceflight and Immune Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    In the grant period, we perfected techniques for determination of interleukin production and leukocyte subset analysis of rhesus monkeys. These results are outlined in detail in publication number 2, appended to this report. Additionally, we participated in the ARRT restraint test to determine if restraint conditions for flight in the Space Shuttle could contribute to any effects of space flight on immune responses. All immunological parameters listed in the methods section were tested. Evaluation of the data suggests that the restraint conditions had minimal effects on the results observed, but handling of the monkeys could have had some effect. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 3, appended to this report. Additionally, to help us develop our rhesus monkey immunology studies, we carried out preliminary studies in mice to determine the effects of stressors on immunological parameters. We were able to show that there were gender-based differences in the response of immunological parameters to a stressor. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 4, appended to this report.

  2. Hot-hand bias in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Tommy C; Wilke, Andreas; Hayden, Benjamin Y

    2014-07-01

    Human decision-makers often exhibit the hot-hand phenomenon, a tendency to perceive positive serial autocorrelations in independent sequential events. The term is named after the observation that basketball fans and players tend to perceive streaks of high accuracy shooting when they are demonstrably absent. That is, both observing fans and participating players tend to hold the belief that a player's chance of hitting a shot are greater following a hit than following a miss. We hypothesize that this bias reflects a strong and stable tendency among primates (including humans) to perceive positive autocorrelations in temporal sequences, that this bias is an adaptation to clumpy foraging environments, and that it may even be ecologically rational. Several studies support this idea in humans, but a stronger test would be to determine whether nonhuman primates also exhibit a hot-hand bias. Here we report behavior of 3 monkeys performing a novel gambling task in which correlation between sequential gambles (i.e., temporal clumpiness) is systematically manipulated. We find that monkeys have better performance (meaning, more optimal behavior) for clumped (positively correlated) than for dispersed (negatively correlated) distributions. These results identify and quantify a new bias in monkeys' risky decisions, support accounts that specifically incorporate cognitive biases into risky choice, and support the suggestion that the hot-hand phenomenon is an evolutionary ancient bias.

  3. Battered and pregnant: a prevalence study.

    PubMed Central

    Helton, A S; McFarlane, J; Anderson, E T

    1987-01-01

    We interviewed 290 pregnant women randomly selected from public and private prenatal clinics, 80 per cent of whom were at least five months pregnant (ages 18-43, 42 per cent Latino, 22 per cent Black). Twenty-four women reported physical battering during this pregnancy (44 reported physical battering before the current pregnancy). Eight of the 24 pregnant women had sought medical treatment for injuries sustained; none reported having been assessed by prenatal care providers for abuse. PMID:3631370

  4. Kittens as therapists: social behavior sequences in isolated squirrel monkeys after exposure to young nonconspecifics.

    PubMed

    Huebner, D K; King, J E

    1984-05-01

    Squirrel monkeys that had been exposed to repeated separations from cloth surrogates were given continuous access to domestic kittens. Information-theoretic measures showed that these monkeys exerted greater constraint on behaviors of adult feral squirrel monkeys than did monkeys who had not received previous kitten exposure. The latter monkeys displayed a behavioral encapsulation characterized by increased susceptibility to the constraint imposed by their own preceding behaviors and a decreased susceptibility to constraint from other monkeys' behaviors. In addition, kitten-reared monkeys displayed a high level of positive social behaviors, particularly following noncohesive or divisive behaviors by another monkey. PMID:6724141

  5. [Tracheal paraganglioma in pregnant woman].

    PubMed

    Djurhuus, Bjarki Ditlev; Krogdahl, Annelise Solveig; Godballe, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Paraganglioma with tracheal location is a rare tumor. Twelve cases with involvement of the trachea have been reported in English literature, including six cases of solely tracheal paragangliomas. We present a case of a paraganglioma confined to the tracheal wall in a 33-year-old pregnant woman. The tumor was locally resected. Follow-up 17 months later showed no evidence of relapse. Based on the literature, we found that the most common symptoms are respiratory impairment and haemoptysis. None of the cases showed malignant behaviour. PMID:20594539

  6. A new threat to pregnant women's autonomy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, D

    1987-01-01

    Courts and legislatures are increasingly being called upon to restrict the autonomy of pregnant women by requiring them to behave in ways that others determine are best for the fetuses they carry. The state should not attempt to transform pregnant women into ideal baby-making machines. Pregnant women make decisions about their behavior in the context of the rest of their lives, with all the attendant complexities and pressures. Our interest in helping future children by improving prenatal care would best be furthered by helping pregnant women to make informed, less constrained choices, not by punishing women or depriving them of choices altogether.

  7. Cerebrovascular amyloidosis in squirrel monkeys and rhesus monkeys: apolipoprotein E genotype.

    PubMed

    Morelli, L; Wei, L; Amorim, A; McDermid, J; Abee, C R; Frangione, B; Walker, L C; Levy, E

    1996-01-29

    Some neuropathological changes characteristic of aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans are present also in senescent non-human primates. The human apoE4 allele is associated with an increased risk of developing late-onset familial and sporadic AD. We found that rhesus monkeys and three subspecies of squirrel monkeys are homozygous for apoE phenotype with arginine at positions 112 and 158 as in human apoE4. However, in both species threonine replaces arginine at position 61 of human apoE. It was previously shown that arginine 61 was critical in determining apoE4 lipoprotein distribution in humans.

  8. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important. PMID:26608924

  9. A CpG-Ficoll Nanoparticle Adjuvant for Anthrax Protective Antigen Enhances Immunogenicity and Provides Single-Immunization Protection against Inhaled Anthrax in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kachura, Melissa A; Hickle, Colin; Kell, Sariah A; Sathe, Atul; Calacsan, Carlo; Kiwan, Radwan; Hall, Brian; Milley, Robert; Ott, Gary; Coffman, Robert L; Kanzler, Holger; Campbell, John D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticulate delivery systems for vaccine adjuvants, designed to enhance targeting of secondary lymphoid organs and activation of APCs, have shown substantial promise for enhanced immunopotentiation. We investigated the adjuvant activity of synthetic oligonucleotides containing CpG-rich motifs linked to the sucrose polymer Ficoll, forming soluble 50-nm particles (DV230-Ficoll), each containing >100 molecules of the TLR9 ligand, DV230. DV230-Ficoll was evaluated as an adjuvant for a candidate vaccine for anthrax using recombinant protective Ag (rPA) from Bacillus anthracis. A single immunization with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll induced 10-fold higher titers of toxin-neutralizing Abs in cynomolgus monkeys at 2 wk compared with animals immunized with equivalent amounts of monomeric DV230. Monkeys immunized either once or twice with rPA plus DV230-Ficoll were completely protected from challenge with 200 LD50 aerosolized anthrax spores. In mice, DV230-Ficoll was more potent than DV230 for the induction of innate immune responses at the injection site and draining lymph nodes. DV230-Ficoll was preferentially colocalized with rPA in key APC populations and induced greater maturation marker expression (CD69 and CD86) on these cells and stronger germinal center B and T cell responses, relative to DV230. DV230-Ficoll was also preferentially retained at the injection site and draining lymph nodes and produced fewer systemic inflammatory responses. These findings support the development of DV230-Ficoll as an adjuvant platform, particularly for vaccines such as for anthrax, for which rapid induction of protective immunity and memory with a single injection is very important.

  10. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  11. Photopigments and colour vision in New World monkeys from the family Atelidae.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G H; Deegan, J F

    2001-04-01

    Most New World monkeys have an X-chromosome opsin gene polymorphism that produces a variety of different colour vision phenotypes. Howler monkeys (Alouatta), one of the four genera in the family Atelidae lack this polymorphism. Instead, they have acquired uniform trichromatic colour vision similar to that of Old World monkeys, apes and people through opsin gene duplication. In order to determine whether closely related monkeys share this arrangement, spectral sensitivity functions that allow inferences about cone pigments were measured for 56 monkeys from two other Atelid genera, spider monkeys (Ateles) and woolly monkeys (Lagothrix). Unlike howler monkeys, both spider and woolly monkeys are polymorphic for their middle- and long-wavelength cone photopigments. However, they also differ from other polymorphic New World monkeys in having two rather than three possible types of middle- and long-wavelength cone pigments. This feature directly influences the relative numbers of dichromatic and trichromatic monkeys. PMID:11321057

  12. A Nonhuman Primate Scrub Typhus Model: Protective Immune Responses Induced by pKarp47 DNA Vaccination in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S.; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D.; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi–specific, IFN-γ–producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine

  13. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  14. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections.

  15. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Anthony C.; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A.; Gooch, Karen E.; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J.; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A.; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J.; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J.; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Stewart, James P.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  16. A nonhuman primate scrub typhus model: protective immune responses induced by pKarp47 DNA vaccination in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Chattopadhyay, Suchismita; Jiang, Ju; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Lee, John S; Tan, Esterlina; Dela Cruz, Eduardo; Burgos, Jasmin; Abalos, Rodolfo; Blacksell, Stuart D; Lombardini, Eric; Turner, Gareth D; Day, Nicholas P J; Richards, Allen L

    2015-02-15

    We developed an intradermal (ID) challenge cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of scrub typhus, the leading cause of treatable undifferentiated febrile illness in tropical Asia, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi. A well-characterized animal model is required for the development of clinically relevant diagnostic assays and evaluation of therapeutic agents and candidate vaccines. We investigated scrub typhus disease pathophysiology and evaluated two O. tsutsugamushi 47-kDa, Ag-based candidate vaccines, a DNA plasmid vaccine (pKarp47), and a virus-vectored vaccine (Kp47/47-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle) for safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy against homologous ID challenge with O. tsutsugamushi Karp. Control cynomolgus macaques developed fever, classic eschars, lymphadenopathy, bacteremia, altered liver function, increased WBC counts, pathogen-specific Ab (IgM and IgG), and cell-mediated immune responses. Vaccinated macaques receiving the DNA plasmid pKarp47 vaccine had significantly increased O. tsutsugamushi-specific, IFN-γ-producing PBMCs (p = 0.04), reduced eschar frequency and bacteremia duration (p ≤ 0.01), delayed bacteremia onset (p < 0.05), reduced circulating bacterial biomass (p = 0.01), and greater reduction of liver transaminase levels (p < 0.03) than controls. This study demonstrates a vaccine-induced immune response capable of conferring sterile immunity against high-dose homologous ID challenge of O. tsutsugamushi in a nonhuman primate model, and it provides insight into cell-mediated immune control of O. tsutsugamushi and dissemination dynamics, highlights the importance of bacteremia indices for evaluation of both natural and vaccine-induced immune responses, and importantly, to our knowledge, has determined the first phenotypic correlates of immune protection in scrub typhus. We conclude that this model is suitable for detailed investigations into vaccine-induced immune

  17. NICOTINE METABOLISM IN PREGNANT AND NON-PREGNANT RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Tutka, Piotr; Dempsey, Delia A.; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Smoking remains a major public health concern during pregnancy and is associated with numerous adverse effects. Recently the clearance of nicotine (NIC) and cotinine (COT) was shown to be substantially increased in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls. The present study investigated the usefulness of the rabbit for studying the molecular basis for the observed changes in NIC and COT disposition during pregnancy. NIC was largely metabolized to COT in rabbit liver microsomes (approximately 50% of total metabolism) with significant amounts of nicotine-N’-oxide and nornicotine also being detected. The conversion of NIC to COT was also detected in rabbit placental and fetal liver microsomes albeit at only a fraction of the rate in adult rabbit liver microsomes. The major products of COT metabolism in rabbit liver microsomes were 5’-hydroxycotinine, cotinine-N’-oxide and norcotinine. Differences between human and rabbit liver were most apparent for COT, with the major human metabolite 3’-hydroxycotinine, being formed at only low levels in rabbit liver microsomes. Pregnancy had no effect on the metabolism of NIC or on the expression of CYP2A6 immunoreactive proteins in rabbit liver microsomes. These studies provide a complete quantitative assessment of NIC metabolism in rabbit liver microsomes and suggest that the rabbit may not be an appropriate animal model to study the effects of pregnancy on NIC and COT metabolism. However, a molecular understanding of these effects is essential for prediction of the pharmacological and toxicological consequences of smoking during pregnancy. PMID:18686186

  18. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test ... The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then ...

  19. Nutritional Guide for Pregnant and Lactating Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelbard, Nancy

    Designed to provide accurate and up-to-date information about nutrition and health, this booklet is centered on the nutritional needs of pregnant and lactating adolescents and on the role of schools and the California State Department of Education in meeting those needs. The first section presents information for pregnant adolescents regarding…

  20. Pregnant Teenagers' Knowledge of Infant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Ann S.

    This study investigated pregnant teenagers' knowledge about infant development during the period of their pregnancy. The sample consisted of 98 teenagers between 14 and 19 years old who were pregnant with their first child; all were planning to keep their babies. The group was approximately 50% black and 50% white, 50% middle class and 50% working…

  1. Comparative studies of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and titi monkeys (Callicebus) in travel tasks.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D M

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel and titi monkeys were observed in a series of experiments in which the subjects' task was to move to a distant goal along above-ground pathways. The pathways were entirely visible to the subjects in all experiments. However, visual cues along the pathways (in Experiment I) and physical and spatial properties of the pathways (in Experiments II and III) were varied systematically in order to determine what effect features had upon selection of travel paths for monkeys of each species. Marked performance differences between the species were evident in these experiments, including differences in latency to move past the choice point, proportion of trials in which the shortest route was chosen first, and changes over test sessions in frequency of initial choice of the shortest route. In particular, titis tended to move past the choice point more slowly than squirrel monkeys; to pay more attention to distant properties of the pathways prior to making a decision, especially after experience in the test setting; and to prefer habitual pathways when these were available, whereas squirrel monkeys preferred novel routes when these were available. The relative "optimality" of decision making in these tasks in relation to species-typical modes of traveling and foraging in natural habitats is discussed. An alternative view of decision making, in which optimality is not assumed to be the only decision-making strategy, is suggested as an appropriate vehicle for further investigation into the sources of short-term variability in choice behavior. PMID:7223106

  2. Do monkeys think in metaphors? Representations of space and time in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Dustin J; Casasanto, Daniel; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Research on the relationship between the representation of space and time has produced two contrasting proposals. ATOM posits that space and time are represented via a common magnitude system, suggesting a symmetrical relationship between space and time. According to metaphor theory, however, representations of time depend on representations of space asymmetrically. Previous findings in humans have supported metaphor theory. Here, we investigate the relationship between time and space in a nonverbal species, by testing whether non-human primates show space-time interactions consistent with metaphor theory or with ATOM. We tested two rhesus monkeys and 16 adult humans in a nonverbal task that assessed the influence of an irrelevant dimension (time or space) on a relevant dimension (space or time). In humans, spatial extent had a large effect on time judgments whereas time had a small effect on spatial judgments. In monkeys, both spatial and temporal manipulations showed large bi-directional effects on judgments. In contrast to humans, spatial manipulations in monkeys did not produce a larger effect on temporal judgments than the reverse. Thus, consistent with previous findings, human adults showed asymmetrical space-time interactions that were predicted by metaphor theory. In contrast, monkeys showed patterns that were more consistent with ATOM.

  3. Comparative studies of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri) and titi monkeys (Callicebus) in travel tasks.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D M

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel and titi monkeys were observed in a series of experiments in which the subjects' task was to move to a distant goal along above-ground pathways. The pathways were entirely visible to the subjects in all experiments. However, visual cues along the pathways (in Experiment I) and physical and spatial properties of the pathways (in Experiments II and III) were varied systematically in order to determine what effect features had upon selection of travel paths for monkeys of each species. Marked performance differences between the species were evident in these experiments, including differences in latency to move past the choice point, proportion of trials in which the shortest route was chosen first, and changes over test sessions in frequency of initial choice of the shortest route. In particular, titis tended to move past the choice point more slowly than squirrel monkeys; to pay more attention to distant properties of the pathways prior to making a decision, especially after experience in the test setting; and to prefer habitual pathways when these were available, whereas squirrel monkeys preferred novel routes when these were available. The relative "optimality" of decision making in these tasks in relation to species-typical modes of traveling and foraging in natural habitats is discussed. An alternative view of decision making, in which optimality is not assumed to be the only decision-making strategy, is suggested as an appropriate vehicle for further investigation into the sources of short-term variability in choice behavior.

  4. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella) Remember Future Responses in a Computerized Task

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Evans, Theodore A.; Klein, Emily D.; Einstein, Gilles O.

    2012-01-01

    Planning is an important aspect of many daily activities for humans. Planning involves forming a strategy in anticipation of a future need. However, evidence that nonhuman animals can plan for future situations is limited, particularly in relation to the many other kinds of cognitive capacities that they appear to share with humans. One critical aspect of planning is the ability to remember future responses, or what is called prospective coding. Two monkey species performed a series of computerized tasks that required encoding a future response at the outset of each trial. Monkeys of both species showed competence in all tests that were given, providing evidence that they anticipated future responses, and that they appropriately engaged in those responses when the time was right for such responses. In addition, some tests demonstrated that monkeys even remembered future responses that were not as presently motivating as were other aspects of the task environment. These results indicated that monkeys can anticipate future responses and retain and implement those responses when appropriate. PMID:22545901

  5. Monkeying around: Use of Survey Monkey as a Tool for School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massat, Carol Rippey; McKay, Cassandra; Moses, Helene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an online survey tool called Survey Monkey, which can be used by school social workers and school social work educators for evaluation of practice, needs assessment, and program evaluation. Examples of questions are given. Principles of writing good survey questions are described. (Contains 2 tables and 1…

  6. Past Oral Contraceptive Use and Current Dietary Soy Isoflavones Influence Estrogen Metabolism in Postmenopausal Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Tooze, Janet A.; Wood, Charles E.; Register, Thomas C.; Kock, Nancy D.; Cline, J. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen metabolism may play an important role in mammary carcinogenesis in postmenopausal women. We evaluated the effects of prior oral contraceptive (OC) treatment and current soy isoflavone consumption on endogenous estrogen metabolite concentration and biomarkers of tissue estrogen exposure in a monkey model. One hundred eighty-one female cynomolgus macaques were randomized to receive OC or placebo for 26 months premenopausally, then ovariectomized and randomized to one of three diets for 36 months: an isoflavone-depleted soy protein isolate (Soy−) diet, a diet containing soy protein isolate with a human equivalent of 129 mg isoflavone/d (Soy+), or a Soy− diet supplemented with conjugated equine estrogens (CEE+) at a human equivalent dose of 0.625 mg/d. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography directly coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to measure the concentrations of estrogen species in urine samples. Generally, prior OC treatment was associated with significantly reduced urinary estrogen metabolites (25–55% reduction; P < 0.05 for each versus OC−). Animals that consumed isoflavones postmenopausally had increased urinary 2-hydroxyestrone and 16α-hydroxyestrone (50% and 56% increases, respectively), but reduced levels of 2-hydroxyestradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol, and 17-epiestriol (92%, 63%, and 66%, respectively), compared with animals fed a Soy− diet. Isoflavones did not have widespread effects on uterine or mammary proliferation biomarkers, whereas prior OC significantly reduced two of three proliferation end points in the endometrium. Premenopausal OCs may have long-term systemic effects on response to estrogen and its metabolism whereas postmenopausal dietary isoflavones may alter endogenous estrogen metabolism in a modest but selective manner. PMID:18843000

  7. The Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor Platensimycin Improves Insulin Resistance without Inducing Liver Steatosis in Mice and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nawrocki, Andrea R.; Zhou, Dan; Wu, Margaret; Previs, Stephen; Miller, Corey; Liu, Haiying; Hines, Catherine D. G.; Madeira, Maria; Cao, Jin; Herath, Kithsiri; Wang, Liangsu; Kelley, David E.; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Platensimycin (PTM) is a natural antibiotic produced by Streptomyces platensis that selectively inhibits bacterial and mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS) without affecting synthesis of other lipids. Recently, we reported that oral administration of PTM in mouse models (db/db and db/+) with high de novo lipogenesis (DNL) tone inhibited DNL and enhanced glucose oxidation, which in turn led to net reduction of liver triglycerides (TG), reduced ambient glucose, and improved insulin sensitivity. The present study was conducted to explore translatability and the therapeutic potential of FAS inhibition for the treatment of diabetes in humans. Methods We tested PTM in animal models with different DNL tones, i.e. intrinsic synthesis rates, which vary among species and are regulated by nutritional and disease states, and confirmed glucose-lowering efficacy of PTM in lean NHPs with quantitation of liver lipid by MRS imaging. To understand the direct effect of PTM on liver metabolism, we performed ex vivo liver perfusion study to compare FAS inhibitor and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) inhibitor. Results The efficacy of PTM is generally reproduced in preclinical models with DNL tones comparable to humans, including lean and established diet-induced obese (eDIO) mice as well as non-human primates (NHPs). Similar effects of PTM on DNL reduction were observed in lean and type 2 diabetic rhesus and lean cynomolgus monkeys after acute and chronic treatment of PTM. Mechanistically, PTM lowers plasma glucose in part by enhancing hepatic glucose uptake and glycolysis. Teglicar, a CPT1 inhibitor, has similar effects on glucose uptake and glycolysis. In sharp contrast, Teglicar but not PTM significantly increased hepatic TG production, thus caused liver steatosis in eDIO mice. Conclusions These findings demonstrate unique properties of PTM and provide proof-of-concept of FAS inhibition having potential utility for the treatment of diabetes and related metabolic

  8. Monkeys, Apes and Other Primates. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Andre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the primate family, their physiology, and habits. Topics described include: (1) kinds of monkeys, including lemur, chimpanzee, gorilla, squirrel monkey, and marmoset; (2) behaviors when…

  9. Effects of Permanent Separation from Mother on Infant Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomi, Stephen; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A study designed to investigate the effects of permanent maternal separation in infant rhesus monkeys, 60, 90, and 120 days of age, and housed individually or in Paris. Monkeys separated at 90 days and housed individually showed the highest levels of disturbance. (DP)

  10. Perceptual Learning: 12-Month-Olds' Discrimination of Monkey Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Joseph; Flom, Ross; Jones, Jacob; Martin, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Six-month-olds reliably discriminate different monkey and human faces whereas 9-month-olds only discriminate different human faces. It is often falsely assumed that perceptual narrowing reflects a permanent change in perceptual abilities. In 3 experiments, ninety-six 12-month-olds' discrimination of unfamiliar monkey faces was examined. Following…

  11. Spatial Relational Memory in 9-Month-Old Macaque Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assesses spatial and nonspatial relational memory in freely moving 9-mo-old and adult (11-13-yr-old) macaque monkeys ("Macaca mulatta"). We tested the use of proximal landmarks, two different objects placed at the center of an open-field arena, as conditional cues allowing monkeys to predict the location of food rewards hidden in…

  12. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  13. Discrimination Reversal Learning in Capuchin Monkeys ("Cebus apella")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Klein, Emily D.; Evans, Theodore A.; Chan, Betty; Flemming, Timothy M.; Harris, Emily H.; Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    2008-01-01

    Learning styles in capuchin monkeys were assessed with a computerized reversal-learning task called the mediational paradigm. First, monkeys were trained to respond with 90% accuracy on a two-choice discrimination (A+B-). Then the authors examined differences in performance on three different types of reversal trials (A-B+, A-C+, B+C-), each of…

  14. Social separation increases alcohol consumption in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, G W; McKinney, W T

    1985-01-01

    This study used 16 socially reared juvenile rhesus monkeys as subjects to test the hypothesis that social separation promotes alcohol consumption in this species. In the first part of the study, 12 monkeys were intermittently separated from their social groups, while 4 were separated before the beginning of the study and remained continuously separated. Refrigerated water or aspartame-sweetened water (vehicle) containing 6% alcohol (w/v) were presented after 4.5 h of fluid deprivation. Intermittently separated monkeys drank more alcohol during separation than when they were socially housed, and more than the continuously separated monkeys. Stable individual differences in consumption rate developed over repeated separations. These differences were not correlated with consumption of refrigerated water or vehicle, or with differential behavioral (locomotor) responses to social separation. This suggested that some monkeys were predisposed to drink more alcohol than others. The second part of the study determined whether established alcohol/vehicle consumption rates for all 16 monkeys were altered when the monkeys were not water deprived, and then when water and the vehicle were available at the same time as alcohol/vehicle. Among monkeys that drank the most (mean of 2.4 g/kg/h) and the least (mean of 0.8 g/kg/h), alcohol consumption was not affected. These results, combined with previous reports, suggest a neurobiological linkage between genetically based social attachment mechanisms, social stressors, and vulnerability to alcohol abuse and addiction in primates.

  15. Visual list memory in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    PubMed

    Wright, A A

    1999-03-01

    Memory of 3 capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella, was tested with lists of 4 travel-slide pictures and different retention intervals. They touched different areas of a video monitor to indicate whether a test picture was in a list. At short retention intervals (0 s, 1 s, 2 s), memory was good for the last list items (recency effect). At a 10-s retention interval, memory improved for 1st list items (primacy effect). At long retention intervals (20 s and 30 s), primacy effects were strong and recency effects had dissipated. The pattern of retention-interval changes was similar to rhesus monkeys, humans, and pigeons. The time course of recency dissipation was similar to rhesus monkeys. The capuchin's superior tool-use ability was discussed in relation to whether it reflects a superior general cognitive ability, such as memory. In terms of visual memory, capuchin monkeys were not shown to be superior to rhesus monkeys.

  16. Motion Sickness-Induced Food Aversions in the Squirrel Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, M. Aaron; Brizzee, Kenneth R.

    1979-01-01

    Conditioned aversions to colored, flavored water were established in Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) by following consumption with 90 min of simultaneous rotational and vertical stimulation. The experimental group (N= 13) drank significantly less of the green, almond-flavored test solution than did the control group (N=14) during three post-treatment preference testing days. Individual differences were noted in that two experimental monkeys readily drank the test solution after rotational stimulation. Only two of the experimental monkeys showed emesis during rotation, yet 10 monkeys in this group developed an aversion. These results suggest that: (1) motion sickness can be readily induced in Squirrel monkeys with simultaneous rotational and vertical stimulation, and (2) that conditioned food aversions are achieved in the absence of emesis in this species.

  17. PET imaging of ischemia-induced impairment of mitochondrial complex I function in monkey brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Hideo; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Harada, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To assess the capability of 18F-2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (18F-BCPP-EF), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) probe for mitochondrial complex I (MC-I) activity, as a specific marker of ischemia-induced neuronal death without being disturbed by inflammation, translational research was conducted using an animal PET in ischemic brains of Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Focal ischemia was induced by the right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 3 hours, then PET scans were conducted at Day-7 with 15O-gases for regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral metabolism of oxygen (rCMRO2), and 18F-BCPP-EF for MC-I with arterial blood sampling. On Day-8, the additional PET scans conducted with 11C-flumazenil (11C-FMZ) for central-type benzodiazepine receptors, 11C-PBR28 for translocator protein, and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) for regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). The total distribution volume (VT) values of 18F-BCPP-EF showed the significant reduction in MC-I activity in the damaged area at Day-7. When correlated with rCBF and rCMRO2, the VT values of 18F-BCPP-EF provided better correlation with rCMRO2 than with rCBF. In the inflammatory regions (region of interest, ROIPBR) of the ischemic hemisphere detected with 11C-PBR28, higher 18F-FDG uptake and lower VT of 18F-BCPP-EF, 11C-FMZ, and rCMRO2 than those in normal contralateral hemisphere were observed. These results strongly suggested that 18F-BCPP-EF could discriminate the neuronal damaged areas with neuroinflammation, where 18F-FDG could not owing to its high uptake into the activated microglia. PMID:24447952

  18. Gustatory neural coding in the monkey cortex: the quality of sweetness.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R; Scott, T R; Smith-Swintosky, V L

    1993-02-01

    1. We analyzed the activity of single neurons in gustatory cortex of alert cynomolgus monkeys in response to the four basic taste stimuli and to a range of chemicals, all of which are predominantly sweet to humans. 2. We recorded taste-evoked responses from a cortical area that measured 4.0 mm in its anteroposterior extent, 5.6 mm dorsoventrally and 2.2 mm mediolaterally. Taste-responsive neurons constituted 4.7% of the 3,066 neurons tested in the course of 66 recording tracks. Nongustatory cells included those responsive to mouth movement (34.1%), tongue touch (1.9%), stimulus approach (0.7%), and tongue extension (0.5%). The functions of 58.2% of the cells we isolated could not be determined. 3. The mean breadth of tuning of these cortical taste neurons was a moderate 0.59 (range 0.00-0.93). 4. There was no evidence that taste cells with similar functional attributes were clustered in the cortex, i.e., there was no apparent topographic organization of taste qualities. 5. A taste space was generated from the correlations among patterns of neural activity evoked by the stimulus array. Within the space, NaCl was most isolated from other stimuli; the profiles elicited by HCl, quinine HCl, and water were all moderately intercorrelated and were clearly distinct from the cluster of sweet stimuli. 6. The 19 sweet chemicals formed a coherent cluster centered on the simple carbohydrates (glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose) and sorbitol. Nearest this core were calcium cyclamate, aspartame, and cran-raspberry juice. In the next concentric ring were acesulfame potassium, xylose, xylitol, sorbose, polycose, and myoinositol. Increasingly distant from the sugars were sodium saccharin, stevioside, neohesperidin DHC, L-tryptophan and monellin. 7. We compared these results with those of a human psychophysical study of sweet stimuli. Using the position of glucose as a reference, we measured the distances to all other stimuli that were common to the two studies (n = 15). The

  19. Plasma Hormone Concentrations in Monkeys after Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Mukku, V. R.; Dotsenko, R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Bigbee, A. J.; Helwig, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a 12.5 day spaceflight on the endocrine status of Rhesus monkeys. Male monkeys (three to four years old; 4 kg) were adapted to chair restraint and trained for 20 months. Blood samples were obtained from four control (C) and two flight (F) monkeys preflight (PF), post-flight (Recovery-R; days 0, 3, 11, and 17), and before and after a mission length simulation (S). Cortisol, T4, T3, testosterone (T), and IGF-1 were measured by RIA (radioimmunassay). Growth hormone (GH) was measured by an in vitro bioassay. Cortisol (16-34 ug/dl), T4 (3.9-7.4 ug/dl), and T (0.2-0.4 mg/ml) did not differ between F and C or between PF, R, and S samples. The low T values reflect the immaturity of the animals. In F, T3 fell from C levels of 208 +/- 4 ng/dl to 44 on R+0 and 150 on R+3, then returned to C. F showed a 55% decrease in GH at R+0 and decreases of 93, 89, and 80%, respectively, at R+3, 11, and 17. IGF-1 decreased from PF levels of 675 ng/ml to 365 (R+0) and 243 (R+3), but returned to C at R+11. GH and IGF-1 levels before and after S did not differ from each other or from C. The cause of the transitory decrease in T3 is unknown. The suppressed GH levels for 17 days after flight may reflect reduced proprioceptive input during flight. The faster recovery of IGF-1 suggests that factors other than reduced GH secretion are involved.

  20. Volume effects in Rhesus monkey spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, T.E. ); Stephens, L.C.; Price, R.E.; Ang, K.K.; Peters, L.J. )

    1994-04-30

    An experiment was conducted to test for the existence of a volume effect in radiation myelopathy using Rhesus monkeys treated with clinically relevant field sizes and fractionation schedules. Five groups of Rhesus monkeys were irradiated using 2.2 Gy per fraction to their spinal cords. Three groups were irradiated with 8 cm fields to total doses of 70.4, 77, and 83.6 Gy. Two additional groups were irradiated to 70.4 Gy using 4 and 16 cm fields. The incidence of paresis expressed within 2 years following the completion of treatment was determined for each group. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to determine parameters of a logistic dose response function. The volume effect was modeled using the probability model in which the probability of producing a lesion in an irradiated volume is governed by the probability of the occurrence of independent events. This is a two parameter model requiring only the estimates of the parameters of the dose-response function for the reference volume, but not needing any additional parameters for describing the volume effect. The probability model using a logistic dose-response function fits the data well with the D[sub 50] = 75.8 Gy for the 8-cm field. No evidence was seen for a difference in sensitivities for different anatomical levels of the spinal cord. Most lesions were type 3, combined white matter parenchymal and vascular lesions. Latent periods did not differ significantly from those of type 3 lesions in humans. The spinal cord exhibits a volume effect that is well described by the probability model. Because the dose response function for radiation myelopathy is steep, the volume effect is modest. The Rhesus monkey remains the animal model most similar to humans in dose response, histopathology, and latency for radiation myelopathy. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  2. The misbehaviour of a metacognitive monkey

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Ken; Evans, Theodore A.; Menzel, Emilie; Smith, J. David; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Metacognition, the monitoring of one’s own mental states, is a fundamental aspect of human intellect. Despite tests in nonhuman animals suggestive of uncertainty monitoring, some authors interpret these results solely in terms of primitive psychological mechanisms and reinforcement regimes, where “reinforcement” is invariably considered to be the delivery and consumption of earned food rewards. Surprisingly, few studies have detailed the trial-by-trial behaviour of animals engaged in such tasks. Here we report ethology-based observations on a rhesus monkey completing sparse-dense discrimination problems, and given the option of escaping trials (i.e., responding “uncertain”) at its own choosing. Uncertainty responses were generally made on trials of high objective difficulty, and were characterized by long latencies before beginning visible trials, long times taken for response, and, even after controlling for difficulty, high degrees of wavering during response. Incorrect responses were also common in trials of high objective difficulty, but were characterized by low degrees of wavering. This speaks to the likely adaptive nature of “hesitation,” and is inconsistent with models which argue or predict implicit, inflexible information-seeking or “alternative option” behaviours whenever challenging problems present themselves, Confounding models which suggest that nonhuman behaviour in metacognition tasks is driven solely by food delivery/consumption, the monkey was also observed allowing pellets to accumulate and consuming them during and after trials of all response/outcome categories (i.e., whether correct, incorrect, or escaped). This study thus bolsters previous findings that rhesus monkey behaviour in metacognition tasks is in some respects disassociated from mere food delivery/consumption, or even the avoidance of punishment. These and other observations fit well with the evolutionary status and natural proclivities of rhesus monkeys

  3. Early life stress and novelty seeking behavior in adolescent monkeys.

    PubMed

    Parker, Karen J; Rainwater, Kimberly L; Buckmaster, Christine L; Schatzberg, Alan F; Lindley, Steven E; Lyons, David M

    2007-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that early exposure to mild stress promotes the development of novelty seeking behavior. Here we test this hypothesis in squirrel monkeys and investigate whether novelty seeking behavior is associated with differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA), the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA), the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol (MHPG), and the neuropeptide corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF). Monkeys were randomized early in life to either mild intermittent stress (IS) or no stress (NS) conditions, and subsequently presented with opportunities to interact with a familiar or novel object in a test box that was connected to each monkey's home cage. To further minimize the potentially stressful nature of the test situation, monkeys were acclimated to the test procedures prior to study initiation. Post-test plasma levels of cortisol in IS and NS monkeys did not differ significantly from baseline levels measured in undisturbed conditions. During testing, more IS than NS monkeys voluntarily left the home cage, and IS monkeys spent more time in the test box compared to NS monkeys. More IS than NS monkeys engaged in object exploration in the test box, and IS monkeys preferred to interact with the novel vs. familiar object. Novelty seeking was not associated with differences in 5HIAA, HVA, MHPG, or CRF, but correlated with differences in object exploration observed in a different test situation at an earlier age. These trait-like differences in novelty seeking appear to reflect mild early stress-induced adaptations that enhance curiosity and resilience. PMID:17604913

  4. Which senses play a role in nonhuman primate food selection? A comparison between squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys.

    PubMed

    Laska, Matthias; Freist, Pamela; Krause, Stephanie

    2007-03-01

    In order to optimize foraging efficiency and avoid toxicosis, animals must be able to detect, discriminate, and learn about the predictive signals of potential food. Primates are typically regarded as animals that rely mainly on their highly developed visual systems, and little is known about the role that the other senses may play in food selection. It was therefore the aim of the present study to assess which senses are involved in the evaluation of food by two species of New World primates: the squirrel monkey and the spider monkey. To this end, six animals per species were repeatedly presented with both familiar and novel food items, and their behavior was videotaped and analyzed. To obtain a further indication of the relative importance of visual and chemosensory cues, the animals were also presented with familiar food items that were experimentally modified in color, odor, or both color and odor. The results demonstrate that squirrel monkeys and spider monkeys use olfactory, gustatory, and tactile cues in addition to visual information to evaluate novel food, whereas they mainly inspect familiar food items visually prior to consumption. Our findings also show that in both species the use of nonvisual cues decreased rapidly with repeated presentations of novel food, suggesting a fast multimodal learning process. Further, the two species clearly differ in their relative use of nonvisual cues when evaluating novel or modified food, with spider monkeys relying more on olfactory cues than squirrel monkeys, and squirrel monkeys relying more on tactile cues compared to spider monkeys. PMID:17146790

  5. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    PubMed Central

    Bramlett-Parker, Jessica; Washburn, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task) to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT) of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates. PMID:27304969

  6. Wild bearded capuchin monkeys crack nuts dexterously.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Madhur; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2015-05-18

    Dexterous tool use has been crucial in the evolution of hominid percussive technology. According to Newell, "dexterity" is the ability of an organism to make goal-directed corrections in movements to optimize effort. Dexterous movements are smooth and effective and accomplish the same goal with less energy than less dexterous movements. Dexterity develops during the later phases of refining a motor skill as the actor becomes sensitive to the outcome of the preceding movement, or to its modulation. In the present study, we examined how wild bearded capuchin monkeys, Sapajus libidinosus, at Fazenda Boa Vista in Piauí, Brazil, that routinely crack palm nuts using stones by placing them on rock outcrops, boulders, and logs (collectively termed anvils) modulate the kinematic parameters of the strikes while processing a single tucum, Astrocaryum campestre nut. The monkeys cracked the nuts by repeatedly striking them with moderate force (i.e., not exceeding a threshold), rather than by striking them more forcefully once, and modulated the kinematic parameters of the current strike on the basis of the condition of the nut following the preceding strike (i.e., the development of any fracture or crack). Repeatedly striking the nuts with moderate force is energetically more efficient than forcefully striking them once and reduces the likelihood of smashing the kernel. Determining the changing energetic constraints of the task and dynamically optimizing movements using those as criteria are dexterous accomplishments. We discuss the implications of the present findings. PMID:25936553

  7. Opiate antagonists stimulate affiliative behaviour in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Nys, C; Meller, R E; Keverne, E B

    1982-04-01

    The effects of treating captive talapoin monkeys acutely (twice daily for 7 days) with naltrexone hydrochloride (0.25 mg 0.5 mg and 1 mg/kg intramuscular injections twice daily), naloxone hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg IM twice daily) and sulpiride (1.5 mg/kg IM twice daily) was studied in social pairs and singly caged animals. The behaviour of social pairs and endocrine changes in all treated monkeys were monitored before, during and after withdrawal of the course of drug treatment. Naltrexone and naloxone, but not sulpiride, significant increased grooming and grooming invitations while aggressive behaviour, self grooming, scratching and general locomotor activity were unaffected. There was an overall increase in LH, testosterone and cortisol in plasma samples taken 60 mins after opiate receptor blockade. Prolactin was unchanged but increased dramatically in animals treated with sulpiride. No significant endocrine changes were observed to precede the increased grooming behaviour which opiate receptor blockade induced. The behavioural changes reported for this primate support the view that positive affect arising from social bonds may be mediated by cerebral endorphin containing systems. PMID:6280208

  8. Delay discounting of saccharin in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kevin B; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Woolverton, William L

    2009-10-01

    The value of a reinforcer decreases as the time until its receipt increases, a phenomenon referred to as delay discounting. Although delay discounting of non-drug reinforcers has been studied extensively in a number of species, our knowledge of discounting in non-human primates is limited. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were allowed to choose in discrete trials between 0.05% saccharin delivered in different amounts and with different delays. Indifference points were calculated and discounting functions were established. Discounting functions for saccharin were well described by a hyperbolic function. Moreover, the discounting rates for saccharin in all six monkeys were comparable to those of other non-human animals responding for non-drug reinforcers. Also consistent with other studies of non-human animals, changing the amount of a saccharin reinforcer available after a 10-s delay did not affect its relative subjective value. Discounting functions for saccharin were steeper than we found in a previous study with cocaine, raising the possibility that drugs such as cocaine may be discounted less steeply than non-drug reinforcers. PMID:19540317

  9. Delay discounting of cocaine by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, William L; Myerson, Joel; Green, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    The present, subjective value of a reinforcer typically decreases as a function of the delay to its receipt, a phenomenon termed delay discounting. Delay discounting, which is assumed to reflect impulsivity, is hypothesized to play an important role in drug abuse. The present study examined delay discounting of cocaine injections by rhesus monkeys. Subjects were studied on a discrete-trials task in which they chose between 2 doses of cocaine: a smaller, immediate dose and a larger, delayed dose. The immediate dose varied between 0.012 and 0.4 mg/kg/injection, whereas the delayed dose was always 0.2 mg/kg/injection and was delivered after a delay that varied between 0 and 300 s in different conditions. At each delay, the point at which a monkey chose the immediate and delayed doses equally often (i.e., the ED50) provided a measure of the present, subjective value of the delayed dose. Dose-response functions for the immediate dose shifted to the left as delay increased. The amount of the immediate dose predicted to be equal in subjective value to the delayed dose decreased as a function of the delay, and hyperbolic discounting functions provided good fits to the data (median R(2)=.86). The current approach may provide the basis for an animal model of the effect of delay on the subjective value of drugs of abuse. PMID:17563210

  10. Inequity responses of monkeys modified by effort

    PubMed Central

    van Wolkenten, Megan; Brosnan, Sarah F.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2007-01-01

    Without joint benefits, joint actions could never have evolved. Cooperative animals need to monitor closely how large a share they receive relative to their investment toward collective goals. This work documents the sensitivity to reward division in brown, or tufted, capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). In addition to confirming previous results with a larger subject pool, this work rules out several alternative explanations and adds data on effort sensitivity. Thirteen adult monkeys exchanged tokens for rewards, showing negative reactions to receiving a less-favored reward than their partner. Because their negative reaction could not be attributed to the mere visibility of better rewards (greed hypothesis) nor to having received such rewards in the immediate past (frustration hypothesis), it must have been caused by seeing their partner obtain the better reward. Effort had a major effect in that by far the lowest level of performance in the entire study occurred in subjects required to expend a large effort while at the same time seeing their partner receive a better reward. It is unclear whether this effort–effect was based on comparisons with the partner, but it added significantly to the intensity of the inequity response. These effects are as expected if the inequity response evolved in the context of cooperative survival strategies. PMID:18000045

  11. Wild bearded capuchin monkeys crack nuts dexterously.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Madhur; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2015-05-18

    Dexterous tool use has been crucial in the evolution of hominid percussive technology. According to Newell, "dexterity" is the ability of an organism to make goal-directed corrections in movements to optimize effort. Dexterous movements are smooth and effective and accomplish the same goal with less energy than less dexterous movements. Dexterity develops during the later phases of refining a motor skill as the actor becomes sensitive to the outcome of the preceding movement, or to its modulation. In the present study, we examined how wild bearded capuchin monkeys, Sapajus libidinosus, at Fazenda Boa Vista in Piauí, Brazil, that routinely crack palm nuts using stones by placing them on rock outcrops, boulders, and logs (collectively termed anvils) modulate the kinematic parameters of the strikes while processing a single tucum, Astrocaryum campestre nut. The monkeys cracked the nuts by repeatedly striking them with moderate force (i.e., not exceeding a threshold), rather than by striking them more forcefully once, and modulated the kinematic parameters of the current strike on the basis of the condition of the nut following the preceding strike (i.e., the development of any fracture or crack). Repeatedly striking the nuts with moderate force is energetically more efficient than forcefully striking them once and reduces the likelihood of smashing the kernel. Determining the changing energetic constraints of the task and dynamically optimizing movements using those as criteria are dexterous accomplishments. We discuss the implications of the present findings.

  12. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  13. Squirrel Monkey Requirements for Chronic Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined: (1) the ability of a small non-human primate to tolerate chronic centrifugation on a centrifuge with a radius of 0.9 m, and (2) the influence of centrifuge radius on the response of primates to hyperdynamic fields. Eight adult male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 1.5 g via centrifugation at two different radii (0.9 m and 3.0 m). Body temperature, activity, feeding and drinking were monitored. These primates did tolerate and adapt to 1.5G via centrifugation on either radius centrifuge. The results show, however, that centrifuge radius does have an effect on the responses of the primate to the hyperdynamic environment. Adaptation to the hyperdynamic environment occurred more quickly on the larger centrifuge. This study demonstrates that a small, non-human primate model, such as the squirrel monkey, could be used on a 0.9 m radius centrifuge such as is being considered by the NASA Space Station Program.

  14. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  15. Thermoregulatory responses of rhesus monkeys during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Ferraro, J. S.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.; Klimovitsky, V.; Magedov, V.; Alpatov, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the activity, axillary temperature (T(ax)), and ankle skin temperature (Tsk) of two male Rhesus monkeys exposed to microgravity in space. The animals were flown on a Soviet biosatellite mission (COSMOS 1514). Measurements on the flight animals, as well as synchronous flight controls, were performed in the Soviet Union. Additional control studies were performed in the United States to examine the possible role of metabolic heat production in the T(ax) response observed during the spaceflight. All monkeys were exposed to a 24-h light-dark cycle (LD 16:8) throughout these studies. During weightlessness, T(ax) in both flight animals was lower than on earth. The largest difference (0.75 degree C) occurred during the night. There was a reduction in mean heart rate and Tsk during flight. This suggests a reduction in both heat loss and metabolic rate during spaceflight. Although the circadian rhythms in all variables were present during flight, some differences were noted. For example, the amplitude of the rhythms in Tsk and activity were attenuated. Furthermore, the T(ax) and activity rhythms did not have precise 24.0 hour periods and may have been externally desynchronized from the 24-h LD cycle. These data suggest a weakening of the coupling between the internal circadian pacemaker and the external LD synchronizer.

  16. Delay discounting of saccharin in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kevin B; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Woolverton, William L

    2009-10-01

    The value of a reinforcer decreases as the time until its receipt increases, a phenomenon referred to as delay discounting. Although delay discounting of non-drug reinforcers has been studied extensively in a number of species, our knowledge of discounting in non-human primates is limited. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were allowed to choose in discrete trials between 0.05% saccharin delivered in different amounts and with different delays. Indifference points were calculated and discounting functions were established. Discounting functions for saccharin were well described by a hyperbolic function. Moreover, the discounting rates for saccharin in all six monkeys were comparable to those of other non-human animals responding for non-drug reinforcers. Also consistent with other studies of non-human animals, changing the amount of a saccharin reinforcer available after a 10-s delay did not affect its relative subjective value. Discounting functions for saccharin were steeper than we found in a previous study with cocaine, raising the possibility that drugs such as cocaine may be discounted less steeply than non-drug reinforcers.

  17. Experimental pulmonary inflammatory injury in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Revak, S D; Rice, C L; Schraufstätter, I U; Halsey, W A; Bohl, B P; Clancy, R M; Cochrane, C G

    1985-09-01

    Inflammatory pulmonary injury was induced in Macaca mulatta rhesus monkeys by the intrabronchial instillation of the formylated peptide norleu-leu-phe (FNLP) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Indicators of pulmonary injury included an increase in mean protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 0.51 mg/ml in untreated animals to 3.74 mg/ml and 6.64 mg/ml in FNLP- and PMA-treated animals, respectively, the appearance of a diffuse pulmonary infiltrate in chest roentgenograms, and histologic evidence of a predominantly neutrophilic leukocytic infiltration. Concomitant with the appearance of pulmonary injury was the generation of proteases and oxidants in the BAL fluids. Neutrophil elastase, bound to alpha 1-protease inhibitor (alpha 1-PI), was found to increase from 0.47 micrograms/ml in untreated monkeys to 0.99 micrograms/ml in FNLP-treated animals and 1.23 micrograms/ml in monkeys receiving PMA. Radioiodinated human prekallikrein, instilled for 2 min into the inflammatory site and retrieved by lavaging, was found to have undergone proteolytic cleavage; this cleavage was not consistently inhibitable with the inclusion of antibody to elastase. BAL fluids were shown to contain an amidolytic activity when tested on the synthetic substrate H-D-pro-phe-arg-pNA. This activity was partially inhibitable with known inhibitors of active Hageman factor and kallikrein. beta-Glucuronidase levels in the BAL fluids increased from 0.85 U/ml to 4.36 U/ml and 8.25 U/ml in FNLP- and PMA-treated animals, respectively. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels also increased from 1.37 OD U/ml X min to 16.59 and 30.47 OD U/ml X min in the same groups of animals. Oxidant generation was also assessed in several different ways. The specific activity of the oxidant-sensitive inhibitor alpha 1-PI recovered in the BAL fluid decreased from 0.80 in control samples to 0.57 and 0.65 in FNLP- and PMA-treated animals. That this inactivation was due to oxidant injury of the molecule was confirmed

  18. Trauma Management of the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Lucia, Amie; Dantoni, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Trauma continues to be a leading cause of nonobstetric maternal and fetal mortality worldwide. Caring for the pregnant trauma patient requires a systematic and multidisciplinary approach. It is important to understand the anatomic and physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy. Accepted trauma guidelines for imaging and interventions should generally not be deviated from just because a patient is pregnant. Focus should be placed on injury prevention and education of at risk patients to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with traumatic injuries in pregnant patients.

  19. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  20. Germline transmission in transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Sean; Chi, Tim; Prucha, Melinda S.; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Connor-Stroud, Fawn; Jean, Sherrie; Gould, Kenneth; Chan, Anthony W. S.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic nonhuman primate models are increasingly popular model for neurological and neurodegenerative disease because their brain functions and neural anatomies closely resemble those of humans [1–6]. Transgenic Huntington’s disease monkeys (HD monkeys) developed clinical features similar to those seen in HD patients, making the monkeys suitable for preclinical study of HD [6–12]. However, until HD monkey colonies can be readily expanded, their use in preclinical studies will be limited [1, 13, 14]. In the present study, we confirmed germline transmission of the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) transgene in both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generated from three male HD monkey founders (F0), as well as in second-generation offspring (F1) produced via artificial insemination by using intrauterine insemination (IUI) technique. A total of five offspring were produced from fifteen females that were inseminated by IUI using semen collected from the three HD founders (5/15; 33%). Thus far, sperm collected from HD founder (rHD8) has led to two F1 transgenic HD moenkys with germline transmission rate at 100% (2/2). mHTT expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using skin fibroblasts from the F1 HD monkeys, as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established from one of the F1 HD monkeys (rHD8-2). Here we report the stable germline transmission and expression of the mHTT transgene in HD monkeys, which suggest possible expansion of HD monkey colonies for preclinical and biomedical researches. PMID:25917881

  1. Pulse register phonation in Diana monkey alarm calls.

    PubMed

    Riede, Tobias; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    The adult male Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) produce predator-specific alarm calls in response to two of their predators, the crowned eagles and the leopards. The acoustic structure of these alarm calls is remarkable for a number of theoretical and empirical reasons. First, although pulsed phonation has been described in a variety of mammalian vocalizations, very little is known about the underlying production mechanism. Second, Diana monkey alarm calls are based almost exclusively on this vocal production mechanism to an extent that has never been documented in mammalian vocal behavior. Finally, the Diana monkeys' pulsed phonation strongly resembles the pulse register in human speech, where fundamental frequency is mainly controlled by subglottal pressure. Here, we report the results of a detailed acoustic analysis to investigate the production mechanism of Diana monkey alarm calls. Within calls, we found a positive correlation between the fundamental frequency and the pulse amplitude, suggesting that both humans and monkeys control fundamental frequency by subglottal pressure. While in humans pulsed phonation is usually considered pathological or artificial, male Diana monkeys rely exclusively on pulsed phonation, suggesting a functional adaptation. Moreover, we were unable to document any nonlinear phenomena, despite the fact that they occur frequently in the vocal repertoire of humans and nonhumans, further suggesting that the very robust Diana monkey pulse production mechanism has evolved for a particular functional purpose. We discuss the implications of these findings for the structural evolution of Diana monkey alarm calls and suggest that the restricted variability in fundamental frequency and robustness of the source signal gave rise to the formant patterns observed in Diana monkey alarm calls, used to convey predator information.

  2. A perspective on color vision in platyrrhine monkeys.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G H

    1998-11-01

    Studies carried out over the past two decades show that many platyrrhine (New World) monkeys have polymorphic color vision. This condition results from the sorting of allelic versions of X-chromosome cone opsin genes at a single gene site, yielding a mixture of dichromatic and trichromatic phenotypes in the population. Two genera of platyrrhine monkey are known to deviate significantly from this pattern. Examination of color vision, photopigments, and photopigment genes of all of these monkeys have stimulated a renewed interest in understanding the evolution of primate color vision. PMID:9893842