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Sample records for prehospital hypertonic resuscitation-head

  1. Superiority of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran Over Hypertonic Saline during the First 30 Minutes of Resuscitation Following Hemorrhagic Hypotension in Conscious Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Comole:ion. :mediately after nerorrhage, zne swine were aarnin stereo nyoer:cn c sal ine/dextran or hyper~onc saline at 4 mi/kg, and 4finCtiona; variac as... C , Ho HS, Gunther RA, Boyle WA, Holcroft JW. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran solution. Surg 1986;100(No. 2):239-246. 2...concept. J Trauma 1985;25:65-70. 11. Border JR, Lewis FR, Aprahamian C , Haller JA, Jacobs LM, Luterman A. Prehospital trauma care--stabilize or scoop and

  2. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  3. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  4. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  5. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  6. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  7. Prehospital Sepsis Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Lawner, Benjamin J

    2017-02-01

    Prehospital care providers are tasked with the delivery of time-sensitive care, and emergency medical services (EMS) systems must match patients to appropriate clinical resources. Modern systems are uniquely positioned to recognize and treat patients with sepsis. Interventions such as administration of intravenous fluid and transporting patients to the appropriate level of definitive care are linked to improved patient outcomes. As EMS systems refine their protocols for the recognition and stabilization of patients with suspected or presumed sepsis, EMS providers need to be educated about the spectrum of sepsis-related presentations and treatment strategies need to be standardized.

  8. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  9. Imaging of prehospital stroke therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle P; Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant quality improvement efforts to streamline in-hospital acute stroke care in the conventional model, there remain inherent layers of treatment delays, which could be eliminated with prehospital diagnostics and therapeutics administered in a mobile stroke unit. Early diagnosis using Telestroke and neuroimaging while in the ambulance may enable targeted routing to hospitals with specialized care, which will likely improve patient outcomes. Key clinical trials in Telestroke, mobile stroke units with prehospital neuroimaging capability, prehospital ultrasound and co-administration of various classes of neuroprotectives, antiplatelets and antithrombin agents with intravenous thrombolysis are discussed in this article. PMID:26308602

  10. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-10-05

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models.

  11. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  12. Resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock patients with hypertonic saline-without dextran-inhibits neutrophil and endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Junger, Wolfgang G; Rhind, Shawn G; Rizoli, Sandro B; Cuschieri, Joseph; Shiu, Maria Y; Baker, Andrew J; Li, Linglin; Shek, Pang N; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2012-10-01

    Posttraumatic inflammation and excessive neutrophil activation cause multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a major cause of death among hemorrhagic shock patients. Traditional resuscitation strategies may exacerbate inflammation; thus, novel fluid treatments are needed to reduce such posttraumatic complications. Hypertonic resuscitation fluids inhibit inflammation and reduce MODS in animal models. Here we studied the anti-inflammatory efficacy of hypertonic fluids in a controlled clinical trial. Trauma patients in hypovolemic shock were resuscitated in a prehospital setting with 250 mL of either 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS; n = 9), 7.5% hypertonic saline + 6% dextran 70 (HSD; n = 8), or 0.9% normal saline (NS; n = 17). Blood samples were collected on hospital admission and 12 and 24 h after resuscitation. Multicolor flow cytometry was used to quantify neutrophil expression of cell-surface activation/adhesion (CD11b, CD62L, CD64) and degranulation (CD63, CD66b, CD35) markers as well as oxidative burst activity. Circulating concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVACM-1), P- and E-selectins, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were assessed by immunoassay. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, leukocytosis, and mortality were lower in the HS and HSD groups than in the NS group. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Hypertonic saline prevented priming and activation and neutrophil oxidative burst and CD11b and CD66b expression. Hypertonic saline also reduced circulating markers of neutrophil degranulation (MPO and MMP-9) and endothelial cell activation (sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, soluble E-selectin, and soluble P-selectin). Hypertonic saline + 6% dextran 70 was less capable than HS of suppressing the upregulation of most of these activation markers. This study demonstrates that initial resuscitation with HS, but neither NS nor HSD, can attenuate

  13. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Methods Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50±5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Results Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Conclusions Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection

  14. Hypertonicity: Clinical entities, manifestations and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Argyropoulos, Christos; Ing, Todd S; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid J; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and is associated with mortality and severe short-term and long-term neurological sequelae. The main clinical syndromes of hypertonicity are hypernatremia and hyperglycemia. Hypernatremia results from relative excess of body sodium over body water. Loss of water in excess of intake, gain of sodium salts in excess of losses or a combination of the two are the main mechanisms of hypernatremia. Hypernatremia can be hypervolemic, euvolemic or hypovolemic. The management of hypernatremia addresses both a quantitative replacement of water and, if present, sodium deficit, and correction of the underlying pathophysiologic process that led to hypernatremia. Hypertonicity in hyperglycemia has two components, solute gain secondary to glucose accumulation in the extracellular compartment and water loss through hyperglycemic osmotic diuresis in excess of the losses of sodium and potassium. Differentiating between these two components of hypertonicity has major therapeutic implications because the first component will be reversed simply by normalization of serum glucose concentration while the second component will require hypotonic fluid replacement. An estimate of the magnitude of the relative water deficit secondary to osmotic diuresis is obtained by the corrected sodium concentration, which represents a calculated value of the serum sodium concentration that would result from reduction of the serum glucose concentration to a normal level. PMID:28101446

  15. Pre-Hospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsen Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium , chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement...NS. As expected, sodium , chloride, and osmo- larity were higher for HS and HSD groups compared with NS. All patients included in this study were...biochemistry and coagulation Sodium , mEq/L 142.4 (7.5) 147.9 (1.9)† 147.6 (2.4)† 136.9 (7) Chloride, mEq/L 108.6 (8.8) 114.9 (5.4)† 109.1 (7.8) 104.9

  16. Prehospital curriculum development: a learning objective approach.

    PubMed

    Schafermeyer, R W

    1993-02-01

    Prehospital curriculum development is a time-consuming, yet essential, component of emergency medical technician and paramedic education. Over the past several years, much has changed within the EMS system and with the approach to educating the prehospital care provider. Learning is defined as a permanent change in behavior that comes about as a result of a planned experience. This planned experience must include learning objectives that incorporate assessment of presenting signs and symptoms and demonstrate the prehospital care providers' psychomotor skills in providing prehospital care based on that assessment.

  17. Prehospital Nursing in Maryland - Legal Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    midwifery . In Massachusetts, the Board of Registration in Nursing is authorized to establish conditions and regulations for nursing practice in the...because as a registered nurse, she could orly practice midwifery after complying with the Prehospital Nursing 41 Board’s rules and regulations regarding...standards for the practice of Certified Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Midwifery (Md. Health Occu. Code Ann. §8-306 & §§8-601-603, 1991). Prehospital nursing

  18. Reassessing training levels for prehospital EMS personnel.

    PubMed

    Briese, G L

    1983-01-01

    One of the major questions confronting prehospital care services today concerns determining the appropriate level of training for EMS personnel that will provide the most cost effective systems. Unfortunately there are no studies which assess this problem. Various communities have modified or expanded the roles of prehospital personnel beyond the traditional training of EMTs and paramedics. Continuing education and skills maintenance are ongoing problems faced by all EMS systems, which have been addressed in various ways by individual locales.

  19. The prehospital management of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Scott A; Rojanasarntikul, Dhanadol; Jagoda, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of death and disability, particularly in younger populations. The prehospital evaluation and management of TBI is a vital link between insult and definitive care and can have dramatic implications for subsequent morbidity. Following a TBI the brain is at high risk for further ischemic injury, with prehospital interventions targeted at reducing this secondary injury while optimizing cerebral physiology. In the following chapter we discuss the prehospital assessment and management of the brain-injured patient. The initial evaluation and physical examination are discussed with a focus on interpretation of specific physical examination findings and interpretation of vital signs. We evaluate patient management strategies including indications for advanced airway management, oxygenation, ventilation, and fluid resuscitation, as well as prehospital strategies for the management of suspected or impending cerebral herniation including hyperventilation and brain-directed hyperosmolar therapy. Transport decisions including the role of triage models and trauma centers are discussed. Finally, future directions in the prehospital management of traumatic brain injury are explored.

  20. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance.

  1. Prehospital research in sub-saharan Africa: establishing research tenets.

    PubMed

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Sasser, Scott M; Wallis, Lee A

    2013-12-01

    Prehospital care constitutes an important link in the continuum of emergency care and confers a survival benefit to injured and ill persons. As development of acute and emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa expands, there is a strong need to improve the delivery of prehospital care to help relieve the overwhelming regional morbidity and mortality attributable to time-sensitive, life-threatening conditions. Effective research is integral to prehospital care development, as it helps quantify the need for prehospital care and tests effective solutions. Unfortunately, there is limited consensus guiding such research in the low-resource nations of sub-Saharan Africa that face unique challenges. This article aims to assimilate the current pertinent literature to demonstrate research success stories and challenges, and ultimately to build on previous efforts to establish prehospital research priorities for sub-Saharan Africa. Region-specific obstacles hindering prehospital research include the lack of epidemiologic data on emergency conditions, the underdevelopment of in-hospital emergency care, confusing prehospital terminology, poorly defined prehospital research priorities, the lack of qualified local prehospital researchers, and a poor understanding of local prehospital care systems. Solutions are offered to overcome each challenge by building on previous recommendations, by proposing new guiding principles, and by identifying areas where further consensus-building is needed. These guiding principles and suggestions are designed to steer discussions and output from future global health meetings targeted at improving prehospital research and development in sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. Anaesthesia and pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Booth, A; Steel, A; Klein, J

    2013-01-01

    Major trauma is a leading cause of death and disability in the UK, particularly in the young. Pre-hospital emergency medicine (PHEM) involves provision of immediate medical care to critically ill and injured patients, across all age ranges, often in environments that may be remote and are not only physically challenging but also limited in terms of time and resources. PHEM is now a GMC-recognised subspecialty of anaesthesia or emergency medicine and the first recognised training program in the UK commenced in August 2012. This article discusses subspeciality development in PHEM, the competency based framework for training in PHEM, and the provision of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia.

  3. Prehospital management of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mattu, Amal; Lawner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of prehospital treatment of decompensated congestive heart failure has in some ways come full circle: rather than emphasizing a battery of new pharmacotherapies, out-of-hospital providers have a renewed focus on aggressive use of nitrates, optimization of airway support, and rapid transport. The use of furosemide and morphine has become de-emphasized, and a flurry of research activity and excitement revolves around the use of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation. Further research will clarify the role of bronchodilators and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in the prehospital setting.

  4. Military Medical Revolution: Prehospital Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Military medical revolution: Prehospital combat casualty care Lorne H. Blackbourne, MD, David G. Baer, PhD, Brian J. Eastridge, MD, Bijan Kheirabadi...sur- vival for patients with combat-related traumatic injuries. J Trauma. 2009;66(suppl 4):S69 S76. 33. Eastridge BJ, Hardin M, Cantrell J, Oetjen

  5. [Stiff baby syndrome is a rare cause of neonatal hypertonicity].

    PubMed

    Rønne, Maria Sode; Nielsen, Preben Berg; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2014-02-24

    Stiff baby syndrome (hyperekplexia) is a rare genetic disorder. The condition can easily be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or severe sepsis because of hypertonicity and seizure-like episodes and has an increased risk of severe apnoea and sudden infant death. Tapping of the nasal bridge inducing a startle response is the clinical hallmark. We report cases of two sisters born with stiff baby syndrome with hypertonicity, exaggerated startle reaction and cyanosis. The syndrome has a good prognosis if treated with clonazepam and both cases were developmental normal after one year.

  6. The Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services

    PubMed Central

    Frischknecht Christensen, Erika; Berlac, Peter Anthony; Nielsen, Henrik; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services (QEMS) is to assess, monitor, and improve the quality of prehospital emergency medical service care in the entire prehospital patient pathway. The aim of this review is to describe the design and the implementation of QEMS. Study population The study population consists of all “112 patient contacts” defined as emergency patients, where the entrance to health care is a 112 call forwarded to one of the five regional emergency medical coordination centers in Denmark since January 1, 2014. Estimated annual number of included “112 patients” is 300,000–350,000. Main variables We defined nine quality indicators and the following variables: time stamps for emergency calls received at one of the five regional emergency medical coordination centers, dispatch of prehospital unit(s), arrival of first prehospital unit, arrival of first supplemental prehospital unit, and mission completion. Finally, professional level and type of the prehospital resource dispatched to an incident and end-of-mission status (mission completed by phone, on scene, or admission to hospital) are registered. Descriptive data Descriptive data included age, region, and Danish Index for Emergency Care including urgency level. Conclusion QEMS is a new database under establishment and is expected to provide the basis for quality improvement in the prehospital setting and in the entire patient care pathway, for example, by providing prehospital data for research and other quality databases. PMID:27843347

  7. ROC Trials Update on Prehospital Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation in the Aftermath of the US-Canadian Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    protocols, were initiated for the study of 2 subpopulations of trauma patients: patients with hypovolemic shock and patients with severe TBI (43... hypovolemic shock patients and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) score at 6 mo in the TBI study (43). Secondary outcomes included incidence of...28 d. In the hypovolemic shock study, 895 patients were randomized, and 220, 256 and 375 patients were included for analysis in the HSD, HS and NS

  8. Prehospital care and new models of regionalization.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C; Brooke Lerner, E; Band, Roger A; Renjilian, Chris; Bobrow, Bentley J; Crawford Mechem, C; Carter, Alix J E; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2010-12-01

    This article summarizes the discussions of the emergency medical services (EMS) breakout session at the June 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." The group focused on prehospital issues such as the identification of patients by EMS personnel, protocol-driven destination selection, bypassing closer nondesignated centers to transport patients directly to more distant designated specialty centers, and the modes of transport to be used as they relate to the regionalization of emergency care. It is our hope that the proposed research agenda will be advanced in a way that begins to rigorously approach the unanswered research questions and that these answers, in turn, will lead to an evidence-based, cohesive, comprehensive, and more uniform set of guidelines that govern the delivery and practice of prehospital emergency care.

  9. Prehospital ACLS--does it work?

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Alok; Mehrotra, Avanti; Gupta, Anoop K; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2002-11-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in the United States, and sudden cardiac arrest frequently claims the lives of men and women during their most productive years. It is believed that much better survival rates can be achieved for victims of cardiac arrest through optimizing the "chain of survival" as described by the American Heart Association. The relative and incremental benefit of full prehospital ACLS over basic life support and defibrillation is unproven, however. This is an important issue in this era of cost containment. Some of the ongoing studies including the OPALS study may clarify the cost effectiveness and relative efficacy of rapid defibrillation and full ACLS programs for victims of prehospital cardiac arrest [6].

  10. Clinical governance in pre-hospital care.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Steel, I; Edwards, S; Gough, M

    2001-01-01

    This article seeks to discover and recognize the importance of clinical governance within a new and emerging quality National Health Service (NHS) system. It evaluates the present state of prehospital care and recommends how change, via clinical governance, can ensure a paradigm shift from its currently fragmented state to a seamless ongoing patient care episode. Furthermore, it identifies the drivers of a quality revolution, examines the monitoring and supervision of quality care, and evaluates the role of evidence-based practice. A frank and open view of immediate care doctors is presented, with recommendations to improve the quality of skill delivery and reduce the disparity that exists. Finally, it reviews the current problems with pre-hospital care and projects a future course for quality and patient care excellence. PMID:11383428

  11. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  12. Efflux of red cell water into buffered hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    OLMSTEAD, E G

    1960-03-01

    Buffered NaCl solutions hypertonic to rabbit serum were prepared and freezing point depressions of each determined after dilution with measured amounts of water. Freezing point depression of these dilutions was a linear function of the amount of water added. One ml. of rabbit red cells was added to each 4 ml. of the hypertonic solutions and after incubation at 38 degrees C. for 30 minutes the mixture was centrifuged and a freezing point depression determined on the supernatant fluid. The amount of water added to the hypertonic solutions by the red cells was calcuated from this freezing point depression. For each decrease in the freezing point of -0.093 degrees C. of the surrounding solution red cells gave up approximately 5 ml. of water per 100 ml. of red cells in the range of -0.560 to -0.930 degrees C. Beyond -0.930 degrees C. the amount of water given up by 100 ml. of red cells fits best a parabolic equation. The maximum of this equation occurred at a freezing point of the hypertonic solution of -2.001 degrees C. at which time the maximum amount of water leaving the red cells would be 39.9 ml. per 100 ml. of red cells. The data suggest that only about 43 per cent of the red cell water is available for exchange into solutions of increasing tonicity.

  13. Hypertonic saline inhibits luminal sodium channels in respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hebestreit, Alexandra; Kersting, Ulrich; Hebestreit, Helge

    2007-05-01

    Physical exercise with increased ventilation leads to a considerable rise in water loss from the airways. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of transepithelial fluid transport necessary to compensate for these losses are unknown but may include changes in luminal ion channel conductance. The present study was designed to examine the effects of an increase in luminal chloride and sodium concentrations which may locally occur during hyperventilation on luminal ion conductance in the respiratory epithelium of healthy controls and patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF). Changes in luminal chloride and sodium conductance were inferred by recording nasal potential difference in eight healthy subjects and 10 patients with CF, using superfusing solutions based on isotonic saline (150 mM) on one occasion and solutions based on hypertonic saline (300 mM) on the other. Switching from isotonic to hypertonic saline superfusion decreased potential difference in controls and CF patients significantly. Amiloride induced a decrease of potential difference which was larger with isotonic than with hypertonic saline (controls 9.5 +/- 6.1 vs. 3.7 +/- 4.6 mV; CF 17.2 +/- 7.2 vs. 9.8 +/- 7.6 mV). Chloride conductance stimulated with solutions low in chloride and containing isoproterenol was not significantly changed by hypertonic saline solutions compared with isotonic solutions in both groups. The findings indicate a significant inhibition of luminal sodium conductance by high luminal sodium concentrations. This mechanism may be involved in the regulation of fluid transport across the respiratory epithelium during exercise and in the improvement of mucociliary clearance and lung functions with inhalation of hypertonic saline in CF.

  14. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  15. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  16. Treatment of hypertonicity in muscles of lip retraction.

    PubMed

    Hand, C R; Burns, M O; Ireland, E

    1979-06-01

    An EMG biofeedback program was developed for a 56-year-old Parkinsonism patient who exhibited pathological lip hypertonia and retraction. The program was designed to achieve the following goals: (1) to demonstrate a reduction in postural lip hypertonicity and (2) to demonstrate a reduction in lip hypertonicity during a series of increasingly complex speech activities. To achieve the first goal, contrastive tasks of full contraction and relaxation were utilized. Each posture was sustained while voltage measurements were made at specific intervals. Procedures to modify lip retraction during speech included five tasks in which the patient was to monitor the audio feedback signal. The tasks involved: prolongation of a neutral vowel, consonant-vowel combinations, monosyllabic words, sentences, and a paragraph-reading task. Data collected over six biofeedback sessions are presented. Trend analyses showed consistent muscular reduction within each task. The following explanations for the decrease in the patient's hypertonicity were discussed: (1) reduction of anisometric contraction, (2) reduction of isometric contraction, (3) relearning of agonistic-antagonistic muscle balance.

  17. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  18. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  19. Prevalence of Prehospital Hypoxemia and Oxygen Use in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics suspected traumatic brain injury in 22 (9.8%), and 20 (8.9%) were...admitted; 36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. None underwent prehospital endotracheal intubation . Hypoxemia occurred in 86 (38.4%), paramedics...36.2% sustained a penetrating injury. No subject underwent endotracheal intubation in the pre hospital setting; 7 (3.1%) underwent intubation in the

  20. The prehospital management of avalanche victims.

    PubMed

    Kornhall, Daniel K; Martens-Nielsen, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Avalanche accidents are frequently lethal events with an overall mortality of 23%. Mortality increases dramatically to 50% in instances of complete burial. With modern day dense networks of ambulance services and rescue helicopters, health workers often become involved during the early stages of avalanche rescue. Historically, some of the most devastating avalanche accidents have involved military personnel. Armed forces are frequently deployed to mountain regions in order to train for mountain warfare or as part of ongoing conflicts. Furthermore, military units are frequently called to assist civilian organised rescue in avalanche rescue operations. It is therefore important that clinicians associated with units operating in mountain regions have an understanding of, the medical management of avalanche victims, and of the preceding rescue phase. The ensuing review of the available literature aims to describe the pathophysiology particular to avalanche victims and to outline a structured approach to the search, rescue and prehospital medical management.

  1. Pre-hospital care--current concepts.

    PubMed

    Boyington, T; Williams, D

    1995-01-01

    After a brief outline of past developments in the training of ambulance personnel, this paper traces the adoption in the UK of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) courses from the US. The 1991 World Student Games in Sheffield, UK led to liaison between training staff from South Yorkshire Metropolitan Ambulance and Paramedic Service (SYMAPS) and from Western New York Medical Training Institute. As a result, the trauma care policy of SYMAPS was altered from aiming to stabilise the patient at the scene of the accident to emphasising rapid and thorough assessment, packaging and transport. This is a resume of the scope of the PHTLS provider course. The course concentrates on the principles of PHTLS for the multisystems trauma victim.

  2. Prehospital analgesia with nitrous oxide/oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    A pilot study of prehospital analgesia with 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen was undertaken in patients experiencing severe pain from various sources. Under the supervision of an ambulance attendant N2O/O2 was administered through a face mask held by the patient and connected to a portable regulator/tank unit. Two types of units were evaluated -- Entonox (with premixed N2O and O2) and Nitronox (with separate cylinders of N2O and O2, the gases being mixed at the time of administration). Of the 72 patients 69 obtained worthwhile analgesia (marked or partial relief of pain) during treatment in the field or in the ambulance. There were no serious side effects, and those that did occur reflected N2O's expected action (e.g., giddiness). N2O/O2 is thus considered a safe and effective analgesic, suitable for use by ambulance personnel. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:7306895

  3. Prehospital Thrombolysis: A Manual from Berlin

    PubMed Central

    Ebinger, Martin; Lindenlaub, Sascha; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E.; Wendt, Matthias; Winter, Benjamin; Kellner, Philipp A.; Kaczmarek, Sabina; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J.

    2013-01-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, time from symptom onset to intervention is a decisive prognostic factor. In order to reduce this time, prehospital thrombolysis at the emergency site would be preferable. However, apart from neurological expertise and laboratory investigations a computed tomography (CT) scan is necessary to exclude hemorrhagic stroke prior to thrombolysis. Therefore, a specialized ambulance equipped with a CT scanner and point-of-care laboratory was designed and constructed. Further, a new stroke identifying interview algorithm was developed and implemented in the Berlin emergency medical services. Since February 2011 the identification of suspected stroke in the dispatch center of the Berlin Fire Brigade prompts the deployment of this ambulance, a stroke emergency mobile (STEMO). On arrival, a neurologist, experienced in stroke care and with additional training in emergency medicine, takes a neurological examination. If stroke is suspected a CT scan excludes intracranial hemorrhage. The CT-scans are telemetrically transmitted to the neuroradiologist on-call. If coagulation status of the patient is normal and patient's medical history reveals no contraindication, prehospital thrombolysis is applied according to current guidelines (intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, iv rtPA, alteplase, Actilyse). Thereafter patients are transported to the nearest hospital with a certified stroke unit for further treatment and assessment of strokeaetiology. After a pilot-phase, weeks were randomized into blocks either with or without STEMO care. Primary end-point of this study is time from alarm to the initiation of thrombolysis. We hypothesized that alarm-to-treatment time can be reduced by at least 20 min compared to regular care. PMID:24300505

  4. Vasopressin responses to corticotropin-releasing factor and hypertonicity after truncal vagotomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Raff, H; Papanek, P E; Cowles, V E

    1996-01-01

    Infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) augments the plasma vasopressin response to infusion of hypertonic saline in conscious dogs. Furthermore, afferent vagal nerve input from the abdomen is involved in the control of vasopressin release and may be altered by CRF. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effect of CRF on the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and to determine if it is mediated by afferent input carried from the abdominal vagus. Conscious male dogs (n = 5) underwent infusion of isotonic saline (vehicle), CRF (10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1), hypertonic saline (0.2 mmol.kg-1.min-1), or the combination of CRF and hypertonic saline. Hypertonic saline increased plasma sodium from 147 +/- 1 to 153 +/- 1 meq/1 and plasma vasopressin from 2.5 +/- 0.1 to 5.8 +/- 0.4 pg/ml. CRF infusion alone had no effect on plasma vasopressin. The addition of 10 or 20 ng.kg-1.min-1 CRF augmented the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline to 7.7 +/- 1.7 and 6.9 +/- 0.3 pg/ml, respectively. Truncal vagotomy did not attenuate the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline with or without CRF infusion. We conclude that CRF augments the vasopressin response to hypertonic saline and that this effect is not mediated via afferents from the abdominal vagus.

  5. Epinephrine Improves the Efficacy of Nebulized Hypertonic Saline in Moderate Bronchiolitis: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Comino-Vazquez, Paloma; Palma-Zambrano, Encarnación; Bulo-Concellón, Rocio; Santos-Sánchez, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is no evidence that the epinephrine-3% hypertonic saline combination is more effective than 3% hypertonic saline alone for treating infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. We evaluated the efficacy of nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline. Patients and Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 208 infants hospitalized with acute moderate bronchiolitis. Infants were randomly assigned to receive nebulized 3% hypertonic saline with either 3 mL of epinephrine or 3 mL of placebo, administered every four hours. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay. Results A total of 185 infants were analyzed: 94 in the epinephrine plus 3% hypertonic saline group and 91 in the placebo plus 3% hypertonic saline group. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Length of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the epinephrine group as compared with the placebo group (3.94 ±1.88 days vs. 4.82 ±2.30 days, P = 0.011). Disease severity also decreased significantly earlier in the epinephrine group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036 on days 3 and 5, respectively). Conclusions In our setting, nebulized epinephrine in 3% hypertonic saline significantly shortens hospital stay in hospitalized infants with acute moderate bronchiolitis compared to 3% hypertonic saline alone, and improves the clinical scores of severity from the third day of treatment, but not before. Trial Registration EudraCT 2009-016042-57 PMID:26575036

  6. Protein kinase Cmu plays an essential role in hypertonicity-induced heat shock protein 70 expression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Sook; Lee, Jae Seon; Huang, Tai Qin; Seo, Jeong Sun

    2008-12-31

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), which evidences important functions as a molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic molecule, is substantially induced in cells exposed to a variety of stresses, including hypertonic stress, heavy metals, heat shock, and oxidative stress, and prevents cellular damage under these conditions. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the induction of HSP70 in response to hypertonicity has been characterized to a far lesser extent. In this study, we have investigated the cellular signaling pathway of HSP70 induction under hypertonic conditions. Initially, we applied a variety of kinase inhibitors to NIH3T3 cells that had been exposed to hypertonicity. The induction of HSP70 was suppressed specifically by treatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (Gö6976 and GF109203X). As hypertonicity dramatically increased the phosphorylation of PKCmu, we then evaluated the role of PKCmu in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression and cell viability. The depletion of PKCmu with siRNA or the inhibition of PKCmu activity with inhibitors resulted in a reduction in HSP70 induction and cell viability. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), a transcription factor for hypertonicity-induced HSP70 expression, was translocated rapidly into the nucleus and was modified gradually in the nucleus under hypertonic conditions. When we administered treatment with PKC inhibitors, the mobility shift of TonEBP was affected in the nucleus. However, PKCmu evidenced no subcellular co-localization with TonEBP during hypertonic exposure. From our results, we have concluded that PKCmu performs a critical function in hypertonicity-induced HSP70 induction, and finally cellular protection, via the indirect regulation of TonEBP modification.

  7. Rationale for hypertonic saline therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Donaldson, Scott; Boucher, Richard C

    2007-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by alterations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTCR) gene. More than 1400 mutations in the CFTCR gene have been described, but the most common mutation (noted in 70% of CF chromosomes) is DeltaF508. Alterations in the CFTCR gene result in deranged sodium and chloride ion transport channels. This leads to failure of airway epithelia to hydrate their surfaces normally, particularly in response to infectious or toxic insults. Additional effects include mucus adhesion to airway surface, chronic inflammation, and infections. The concept that airway surface dehydration can cause CF-like lung disease is supported by in vitro data and in vivo animal models. Rehydrating airway surfaces may reduce or prevent lung injury and damage. Short- and longer term studies have shown that inhalation of hypertonic saline is well tolerated and improves lung function, reduces exacerbations, and improves quality of life in CF patients. This review discusses the importance of airway epithelial sodium and chloride channels in the pathogenesis of CF, and strategies (particularly the use of inhaled hypertonic saline) to reverse or minimize lung inflammation and injury in this disease.

  8. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Anas M; Turner, Michael R; Mager, Donald E; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-03-01

    The subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after s.c. administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyperosmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as the animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and O-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) on the plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after s.c. administration. An increase was observed in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, compared with isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to the improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph nodes in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatics, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05% in isotonic buffer to 13% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. The data suggest that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option for improving s.c. bioavailability.

  9. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  10. Prehospital thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction: the Belgian eminase prehospital study (BEPS). BEPS Collaborative Group.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    Interest in early thrombolysis has prompted a study on the feasibility and time course of prehospital thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in six centres in Belgium. Patients with clinically suspected AMI and with typical ECG changes presenting within 4 h after onset of pain were treated with 30 units of Anisoylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Activator Complex (APSAC, eminase) intravenously by a mobile intensive care unit (MICU). Sixty-two patients were included in the study and an AMI was confirmed in 60. The mean time (+/- 1 SD) from onset of pain to injection of APSAC was 95 +/- 47 min and the mean estimated time gain, calculated as the time difference between the arrival of the MICU at home and the arrival of the MICU at the emergency department, was 50 +/- 17 min. In the prehospital period four patients developed ventricular fibrillation and one cardiogenic shock. During hospital stay severe complications were observed in four patients. Two events were fatal, one diffuse haemorrhage and one septal rupture; two events were non fatal, one feasible and that an estimated time gain of 50 min can be obtained. Potential risks and benefits remain to be demonstrated in a large controlled clinical trial.

  11. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings.

  12. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  13. Hypertonic saline challenge in an adult epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Rabone, S J; Phoon, W O; Anderson, S D; Wan, K C; Seneviratne, M; Gutierrez, L; Brannan, J

    1996-06-01

    Bronchial provocation tests using pharmacological agents such as methacholine or histamine are used in epidemiological studies to identify asthma despite recognition of limitations in specificity, positive predictive value and availability of reagents. Hypertonic saline (4.5%) bronchial challenge (HSBC), although less sensitive than pharmacological challenges, is reportedly highly specific in diagnosing current asthma. Added advantages are that reagents are cheap, stable and recognized by participants. Thus, HSBC may offer benefits over pharmacological tests in epidemiological surveys. This paper reports on the second field survey using the test, a study of 99 adults from the timber industry in Western Australia. The test is described and critically appraised as a practical epidemiological tool for assessing asthma prevalence. At a cutoff point of 20% FEV, fall, HSBC was positive in 8% of subjects, appeared specific for asthma, was safe, well-accepted and easy to use in the field.

  14. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  15. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  16. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1.

  17. Intradermal microdialysis of hypertonic saline attenuates cutaneous vasodilatation in response to local heating.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Jennifer J; Farquhar, William B; Edwards, David G

    2011-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that microdialysis of hypertonic saline would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating. Seventeen healthy subjects (23 ± 1 years old) were studied. In one group (n = 9), four microdialysis fibres were placed in the forearm skin and infused with the following: (1) Ringer solution; (2) normal saline (0.9% NaCl); (3) hypertonic saline (3% NaCl); and (4) 10 mm l-NAME. A second group (n = 8) was infused with the following: (1) normal saline; (2) hypertonic saline; (3) normal saline + l-NAME; and (4) hypertonic saline + l-NAME. Red blood cell flux was measured via laser Doppler flowmetry during local heating to 42°C. Site-specific maximal vasodilatation was determined by infusing 28 mm sodium nitroprusside while the skin was heated to 43°C. Data were expressed as the percentage of maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (%CVC(max)). The local heating response at the Ringer solution and normal saline sites did not differ (n = 9; initial peak Ringer solution, 69 ± 6 versus normal saline, 66 ± 2%CVC(max); plateau Ringer solution, 89 ± 4 versus normal saline, 89 ± 5%CVC(max)). Hypertonic saline reduced the initial peak (n = 9; normal saline, 66 ± 2 versus hypertonic saline, 54 ± 4%CVC(max); P < 0.05) and plateau (normal saline, 89 ± 5 versus hypertonic saline, 78 ± 2%CVC(max); P < 0.05) compared with normal saline. Plateau %CVC(max) was attenuated to a similar value at the normal saline + l-NAME and hypertonic saline + l-NAME sites (n = 8; normal saline + l-NAME, 39 ± 6 and hypertonic saline + l-NAME, 39 ± 5%CVC(max)). The nitric oxide contribution (plateau %CVC(max) - l-NAME plateau %CVC(max)) was lower at the hypertonic saline site (normal saline, 55 ± 6 versus hypertonic saline, 35 ± 4; P < 0.01). These data suggest an effect of salt on the cutaneous response to local heating, which may be mediated through a decreased production and/or availability of nitric oxide.

  18. Prehospital Administration of Epinephrine in Pediatric Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Eli; Hern, H Gene; Barger, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Anaphylaxis in the pediatric population is both serious and potentially lethal. The incidence of allergic and anaphylactic reactions has been increasing and the need for life saving intervention with epinephrine must remain an important part of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provider training. Our aim was to characterize dosing and timing of epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol in the pediatric patient with anaphylaxis. In this retrospective chart review, we studied prehospital medication administration in pediatric patients ages 1 month up to 14 years old classified as having a severe allergic reaction or anaphylaxis. We compared rates of epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol given to patients with allergic conditions including anaphylaxis. In addition, we calculated the rate of epinephrine administration in cases of anaphylaxis and determined what percentage of time the epinephrine was given by EMS or prior to their arrival. Of the pediatric patient contacts, 205 were treated for allergic complaints. Of those with allergic complaints, 98 of 205 (48%; 95% CI 41%, 55%) had symptoms consistent with anaphylaxis and indications for epinephrine. Of these 98, 53 (54%, 95% CI 44%, 64%) were given epinephrine by EMS or prior to EMS arrival. Among the patients in anaphylaxis not given epinephrine prior to EMS arrival, 6 (12%; 95% CI 3%, 21%) received epinephrine from EMS, 10 (20%; 95% CI 9%, 30%) received diphenhydramine only, 9 (18%, 95% CI 7%-28%) received only albuterol and 17 (33%, 95% CI 20%-46%) received both albuterol and diphenhydramine. 9 patients in anaphylaxis received no treatment prior to arriving to the emergency department (18%, 95% CI 7%-28%). In pediatric patients who met criteria for anaphylaxis and the use of epinephrine, only 54% received epinephrine and the overwhelming majority received it prior to EMS arrival. EMS personnel may not be treating anaphylaxis appropriately with epinephrine.

  19. What are the effects of hypertonic saline plus furosemide in acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Patricio; Rain, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Paola

    2015-08-27

    In search of new therapies to solve diuretic resistance in acute heart failure, the addition of hypertonic saline has been proposed. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews including nine pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded hypertonic saline associated with furosemide probably decrease mortality, length of hospital stay and hospital readmission in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

  20. Dose Response Effects of Hypertonic Saline and Dextran on Cardiovascular Responses in Sheep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    137-144, 1995 DOSE RESPONSE EFFECTS OF HYPERTONIC SALINE AND DEXTRAN ON CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES AND PLASMA VOLUME EXPANSION IN SHEEP Michael A...addressed the dose - response effects of HS or D-70 solutions or their possible synergistic combinations to evaluate optimal concentrations of the HS and D...205-217, 1989. 13. Halvorsen L, Günther RA, Dubick MA, Holcroft JW: Dose response characteristics of hypertonic saline dextran solution. J Trauma

  1. Comparison of Normal Saline, Hypertonic Saline Albumin and Terlipressin plus Hypertonic Saline Albumin in an Infant Animal Model of Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In series of cases and animal models suffering hemorrhagic shock, the use of vasopressors has shown potential benefits regarding hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin with a longer half-life that can be administered by bolus injection. We have previously observed that hypertonic albumin improves resuscitation following controlled hemorrhage in piglets. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the treatment with the combination of terlipressin and hypertonic albumin can produce better hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters than normal saline or hypertonic albumin alone at early stages of hemorrhagic shock in an infant animal model. Methods Experimental, randomized animal study including 39 2-to-3-month-old piglets. Thirty minutes after controlled 30 ml/kg bleed, pigs were randomized to receive either normal saline (NS) 30 ml/kg (n = 13), 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline (AHS) 15 ml/kg (n = 13) or single bolus of terlipressin 15 μg/kg i.v. plus 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline 15 ml/kg (TAHS) (n = 13) over 30 minutes. Global hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters were compared. Results After controlled bleed a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac index, central venous saturation, carotid and peripheral blood flow, brain saturation and an increase of heart rate, gastric PCO2 and lactate was observed. After treatment no significant differences in most hemodynamic (cardiac index, mean arterial pressure) and perfusion parameters (lactate, gastric PCO2, brain saturation, cutaneous blood flow) were observed between the three therapeutic groups. AHS and TAHS produced higher increase in stroke volume index and carotid blood flow than NS. Conclusions In this pediatric animal model of hypovolemic shock, albumin plus hypertonic saline with or without terlipressin achieved similar hemodynamics and perfusion parameters than twice the volume of NS. Addition of terlipressin did not

  2. Hypertonicity enhances GABA uptake by cultured rat retinal capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Tohru; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously that taurine transporter (TauT) mediates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a substrate in a conditionally immortalized rat retinal capillary endothelial cell line (TR-iBRB2 cells). This study investigates how TauT-mediated GABA transport is regulated in TR-iBRB2 cells under hypertonic conditions. [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells exposed to 12 h- to 24 h-hypertonic culture medium was significantly greater than that of isotonic culture medium. [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was Na(+)-, Cl(-)-, and concentration-dependent with a Michaelis-Menten (K(m)) constant of 3.5 mM under isotonic conditions and K(m) of 0.324 and 5.48 mM under hypertonic conditions. Under hypertonic conditions, [³H]GABA uptake by TR-iBRB2 cells was more potently inhibited by substrates of TauT, such as taurine and β-alanine, than those of GABA transporters such as GABA, nipecotic acid, and betaine. These results suggest that an unknown high-affinity GABA transport process and TauT-mediated GABA transport are enhanced under hypertonic conditions. In conclusion, hypertonicity enhances GABA uptake by cultured rat retinal capillary endothelial cells.

  3. Effects of hypertonic perfusion on the ultrastructure of frog cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Hatae, J; Kawata, H

    1978-11-01

    The ultrastructural changes induced by hypertonic perfusion were investigated using the ventricular muscle of the bullfrog. It was demonstrated that the fixative tonicity critically affects the ultrastructure. Effects of sucrose-, NaCl- and urea-hypertonicities were investigated and compared. In both sucrose- and NaCl-hypertonic media, although the cardiac muscle strongly shrank and the extracellular spaces markedly increased according to increasing tonicity the width of the intercalated disc cleft remained unchanged and the cleft was never separated even in 3 times hypertonicity. The sucrose-hypertonicity made the feature of the fine structure extremely obscure and the electron densities in both the Z-line and the intercalated disc region markedly decreased. When both the perfusate and fixative were made hypertonic by urea, which is known to easily penetrate the cell membrane, a shrinkage of the myocardial cells was observed but to a lesser extent as compared with sucrose or NaCl. The striation pattern was disordered in this condition though the intercalated discs were never affected.

  4. Creatine as a compatible osmolyte in muscle cells exposed to hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Roberta R; Bonelli, Mara A; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Brigotti, Maurizio; Fumarola, Claudia; Sestili, Piero; Mozzoni, Paola; De Palma, Giuseppe; Mutti, Antonio; Carnicelli, Domenica; Vacondio, Federica; Silva, Claudia; Borghetti, Angelo F; Wheeler, Kenneth P; Petronini, Pier Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of C2C12 muscle cells to hypertonic stress induced an increase in cell content of creatine transporter mRNA and of creatine transport activity, which peaked after about 24 h incubation at 0.45 osmol (kg H2O)−1. This induction of transport activity was prevented by addition of either cycloheximide, to inhibit protein synthesis, or of actinomycin D, to inhibit RNA synthesis. Creatine uptake by these cells is largely Na+ dependent and kinetic analysis revealed that its increase under hypertonic conditions resulted from an increase in Vmax of the Na+-dependent component, with no significant change in the Km value of about 75 μmol l−1. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a more than threefold increase in the expression of creatine transporter mRNA in cells exposed to hypertonicity. Creatine supplementation significantly enhanced survival of C2C12 cells incubated under hypertonic conditions and its effect was similar to that obtained with the well known compatible osmolytes, betaine, taurine and myo-inositol. This effect seemed not to be linked to the energy status of the C2C12 cells because hypertonic incubation caused a decrease in their ATP content, with or without the addition of creatine at 20 mmol l−1 to the medium. This induction of creatine transport activity by hypertonicity is not confined to muscle cells: a similar induction was shown in porcine endothelial cells. PMID:16873409

  5. [Recruitment and training of prehospital emergency care nurses in Paris].

    PubMed

    Pladec, Boris Martin le; Menoret, Romuald; Rodes, Raphaël

    2016-11-01

    In collaboration with the ambulance driver and the emergency doctor, the prehospital nurse provides care in a universe which is often difficult and sometimes hostile. Whether they are a nurse from the Samu (urgent medical aid service) or from the Paris fire service, how are they recruited and what training do these emergency care professionals receive?

  6. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures.

  7. Hypertonic saline up-regulates A3 adenosine receptors expression of activated neutrophils and increases acute lung injury after sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Pauzenberger, Reinhard; Mark, Hirsh I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hypertonic saline resuscitation reduces tissue damage by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Hypertonic saline triggers polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release adenosine triphosphate that is converted to adenosine, inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils through A2a adenosine receptors. polymorphonuclear neutrophils also express A3 adenosine receptors that enhance polymorphonuclear neutrophils functions. Here we investigated whether A3 receptors may diminish the efficacy of hypertonic saline in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized animal study and laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Interventions The effect of A3 receptors on the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation was assessed in A3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Animals were treated with hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl, 4 mL/kg) before or after cecal ligation and puncture, and acute lung injury and mortality were determined. The effect of timing of hypertonic saline exposure on A3 receptor expression and degranulation was studied in vitro with isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Measurements and main results Treatment of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with hypertonic saline before stimulation with formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited A3 receptor expression and degranulation, whereas hypertonic saline-treatment after formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulation augmented A3 receptor expression and degranulation. Acute lung injury in wild-type mice treated with hypertonic saline after cecal ligation and puncture was significantly greater than in wild-type mice pretreated with hypertonic saline. This aggravating effect of delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was absent in A3 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, mortality in wild-type mice with delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was significantly higher (88%) than in animals treated with hypertonic saline before cecal ligation and puncture (50%). Mortality in A3

  8. Are pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L. M.; Redmond, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine what proportion of pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury--deaths at the scene of the accident and those that occur before the person has reached hospital--are preventable. DESIGN--Retrospective study of all deaths from accidental injury that occurred between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1990 and were reported to the coroner. SETTING--North Staffordshire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Injury severity score, probability of survival (probit analysis), and airway obstruction. RESULTS--There were 152 pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury (110 males and 42 females). In the same period there were 257 deaths in hospital from accidental injury (136 males and 121 females). The average age at death was 41.9 years for those who died before reaching hospital, and their average injury severity score was 29.3. In contrast, those who died in hospital were older and equally likely to be males or females. Important neurological injury occurred in 113 pre-hospital deaths, and evidence of airway obstruction in 59. Eighty six pre-hospital deaths were due to road traffic accidents, and 37 of these were occupants in cars. On the basis of the injury severity score and age, death was found to have been inevitable or highly likely in 92 cases. In the remaining 60 cases death had not been inevitable and airway obstruction was present in up to 51 patients with injuries that they might have survived. CONCLUSION--Death was potentially preventable in at least 39% of those who died from accidental injury before they reached hospital. Training in first aid should be available more widely, and particularly to motorists as many pre-hospital deaths that could be prevented are due to road accidents. PMID:8173428

  9. Abstracts of the International Conference on Hypertonic Resuscitation (5th) Held in Galveston, Texas on 3-5 June 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Intracranial Hypertension: Mannitol us. Hypertonlc/Hyperoncotic Saline/ Dextran R. Harti (Munich, Germany): Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Solutions in Traumatic...Hyperoncotic Saline Oextran (HHS: 7.2% NaCI/18% Dextran 66) Instantaneously Restores Gut Mucosal Blood Flow (BF). K. Kesel (Munich, Germany): Hypertonic...Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Hemorrhagic Shock Effectively Improves Intramucosal Acidosis. C. Com (Galveston, U.S.A.): Hypertonic Saline- Dextran Does

  10. Prehospital Blood Transfusion in the En Route Management of Severe Combat Trauma: A Matched Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Prehospital blood transfusion in the en route management of severe combat trauma: A matched cohort study David J. O’Reilly, FRCS, Jonathan J...BACKGROUND: The value of prehospital blood transfusion (PHBTx) in the management of severe trauma has not been established. This study aimed to evaluate the...prehospital interventions, reached hospital more quickly, and had lower heart rate at admission (all p G 0.05). Matched recipients received more red blood

  11. Prehospital Pain Medication Use by U.S. Forces in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:304, 2015 Prehospital Pain Medication Use by U.S. Forces in Afghanistan Col Stacy A. Shackelford, USAF MC*; Marcie Fowler...a process improvement initiative to examine the current use and safety of prehospital pain medications by U.S. Forces in Afghanistan. Prehospital pain ...casualties (39%) received pain medication during POI care and 283 (92%) received pain medication during tactical evacuation (TACEVAC). Morphine and

  12. Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0080 TITLE: Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Study of Tranexamic Acid During Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial (STAAMP trial) 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...IRB approval regarding changes to the protocol language. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prehospital; Tranexamic acid 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  13. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study: rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Lyver, M B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Dagnone, E; Maloney, J P; Jones, G R; Luinstra, L G; Jermyn, B D; Ward, R; DeMaio, V J

    1998-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period. The study will evaluate the incremental benefit of rapid defibrillation and prehospital Advanced Cardiac Life Support measures for cardiac arrest survival and the benefit of Advanced Life Support for patients with traumatic injuries and other critically ill prehospital patients. This article describes the OPALS study with regard to the rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

  14. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  15. Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prehospital emergency amputation is a rare procedure, which may be necessary to free a time-critical patient from entrapment. This study aimed to evaluate four techniques of cadaveric lower limb prehospital emergency amputation. Method A guillotine amputation of the distal femur was undertaken in fresh frozen self-donated cadavers. A prehospital doctor conducted a surgical amputation with Gigli saw or hacksaw for bone cuts and firefighters carried out the procedure using the reciprocating saw and Holmatro device. The primary outcome measures were time to full amputation and the number of attempts required. The secondary outcomes were observed quality of skin cut, soft tissue cut and CT assessment of the proximal bone. Observers also noted the potential risks to the rescuer or patient during the procedure. Results All techniques completed amputation within 91 s. The reciprocating saw was the quickest technique (22 s) but there was significant blood spattering and continuation of the cut to the surface under the leg. The Holmatro device took less than a minute. The quality of the proximal femur was acceptable with all methods, but 5 cm more proximal soft tissue damage was made by the Holmatro device. Conclusions Emergency prehospital guillotine amputation of the distal femur can effectively be performed using scalpel and paramedic shears with bone cuts by the Gigli saw or fire service hacksaw. The reciprocating saw could be used to cut bone if no other equipment was available but carried some risks. The Holmatro cutting device is a viable option for a life-threatening entrapment where only firefighters can safely access the patient, but would not be a recommended primary technique for medical staff. PMID:27280425

  16. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  17. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  18. Immediate emergency department external cardiac pacing for prehospital bradyasystolic arrest.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Nowak, R M; Martin, G B; Best, R; Carden, D L; Tomlanovich, M C

    1985-04-01

    Approximately 25% of patients in prehospital cardiac arrest present in bradyasystolic rhythms, and their long-term prognosis is very poor. Our study was undertaken to determine the utility of immediate emergency department (ED) external cardiac pacing in this situation. Twenty patients presenting with bradyasystolic prehospital cardiac arrest were entered in the study. All received the usual advanced cardiac life support therapy, but also were externally paced immediately using an automated external defibrillator and pacemaker (AEDP). Only two of 20 patients showed evidence of electrical capture, and none developed pulses with pacing. Four of the 20 patients developed a sinus rhythm and blood pressure during resuscitation. Three survived to leave the ED, but none survived to leave the hospital. An increase in the rate of bradycardia and pulseless idioventricular rhythms that was independent of electrical capture or pharmacologic therapy was noted occasionally. Although survival was not enhanced using the AEDP, the device was reliable, easy to use, and free of complications. External cardiac pacing warrants further investigation in the prehospital setting.

  19. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome.

  20. State of the Art of Fluid Resuscitation 2010: Prehospital and Immediate Transition to the Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    0003; 2003. 29. McSwain NE Jr, Salomone J, Pons P, Bitner M, Callaway D, Guy J (eds). PHTLS : Prehospital Trauma life Support. 7th ed. St. Louis, MO...Mosby, Inc.; 2010. 30. McSwain NE Jr, Salomone J, Pons P, Giebner S (eds). PHTLS : Basic and Advanced Prehospital Trauma Life Support. 6th ed. St. Louis

  1. Prehospital diagnosis of massive ethylene glycol poisoning and use of an early antidote.

    PubMed

    Amathieu, Roland; Merouani, Medhi; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Smail, Nadia; Adnet, Frédéric

    2006-08-01

    We report the case of a patient suspected of voluntary massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. Prehospital diagnosis was established by portable blood analyser and an early antidote with 4 MP treatment initiated in out-of-hospital setting. Use of portable blood analyser in prehospital care should be considered in case of suspected massive poisoning by ethylene glycol.

  2. Supporting Information Use and Retention of Pre-Hospital Information during Trauma Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study of Pre-Hospital Communications and Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-hospital communication is a critical first step towards ensuring efficient management of critically injured patients during trauma resuscitation. Information about incoming patients received from the field and en route serves a critical role in helping emergency medical teams prepare for patient care. Despite many efforts, inefficiencies persist. In this paper, we examine the pre-hospital communications between pre-hospital and hospital providers, including the types of information transferred during en-route calls, as well as the information needs of trauma teams. Our findings show that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams report a great deal of information from the field, most of which match the needs of trauma teams. We discuss design implications for a computerized system to support the use and retention of pre-hospital information during trauma resuscitation. PMID:24551428

  3. Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation Restores Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Post-Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    immunocompetant cells experience bidirectional communication with hormones and cytokines [35,40]. Thus, despite compelling experimental findings, HSD has not...hypertonic saline with 6% dextran-70 (HSD) has been shown in experimental studies to reduce shock/resuscitation-induced inflammatory reactions and...alterations have been described in clinical and experimental investigations of post-traumatic hemorrhagic shock [13]. The initial immunological

  4. Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation Restores Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Post-Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    hypertonic saline with 6% dextran-70 (HSD) has been shown in experimental studies to reduce shock/resuscitation-induced inflammatory reactions and...hemodynamics and reestablishing inflammatory equilibrium [12]. Various immunoinflammatory alterations have been described in clinical and experimental ...ultimately causing greater morbidity and mortality [4]. Moreover, convincing experimental evidence indicates that conventional large-volume fluid

  5. Cerebral regulation of renal sodium excretion in sheep infused intravenously with hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed Central

    Chodobski, A; McKinley, M J

    1989-01-01

    1. The natriuretic response to intravenous infusion of 2 M-NaCl was investigated in six conscious sheep. This hypertonic NaCl load resulted in relatively small, physiological (2-3 mmol l-1) increases in plasma Na+ concentration and was followed by a natriuresis with a maximum mean urinary sodium excretion 5 times higher than pre-infusion values. 2. Intravenous infusion of isotonic NaCl, delivering the same Na+ load as hypertonic NaCl infusion, did not induce natriuresis. This suggested, therefore, that with the hypertonic sodium load administered in the present study, the rise in plasma Na+ and/or tonicity rather than increase in blood volume is important in evoking the natriuretic response. 3. Intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reduced CSF Na+ concentration, decreased plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels and caused a copious water diuresis. This was associated with excessive loss of water and large increases in plasma Na+ concentration and osmolality. 4. The natriuresis induced by intravenous hypertonic NaCl load could be blocked by lowering CSF Na+ concentration in situations where water diuresis was either prevented or reduced by intravenous infusion of AVP or by delayed intracerebroventricular infusion of low-Na+ CSF, respectively. 5. The results of the present study provide further evidence that renal sodium excretion can be controlled by the central nervous system. PMID:2621619

  6. Dose Effect of HSD (Hypertonic Saline/Dextran) Survival Following Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    injured patients. Ann Surg 1987;206:279-288. 6. Kramer GC, Perron PR, Lindsey C , et al. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline dextran...No.3:297-298. 12. Greenfield RH, Bessen HA, Henneman PL. Effect of crystalloid infusion on hematocrit and intravascular volume in healthy, nonbleeding

  7. The hypertonic environment differentially regulates wild-type CFTR and TNR-CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Cheng, Jie; Krasnov, Kristina; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Cutting, Garry R; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that the hypertonic environment of the renal medulla regulates the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) and its natural splice variant, TNR-CFTR. To accomplish this, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) stable cell lines expressing TNR-CFTR or CFTR were used. The cells were treated with hypertonic medium made with either NaCl or urea or sucrose (480 mOsm/kg or 560 mOsm/kg) to mimic the tonicity of the renal medulla environment. Western blot data showed that CFTR and TNR-CFTR total cell protein is increased by hypertonic medium, but using the surface biotinylation technique, only CFTR was found to be increased in cell plasma membrane. Confocal microscopy showed TNR-CFTR localization primarily at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. In conclusion, CFTR and TNR-CFTR have different patterns of distribution in MDCK cells and they are modulated by a hypertonic environment, suggesting their physiological importance in renal medulla.

  8. Hypertonic saline attenuates TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nydam, Trevor L; Moore, Ernest E; McIntyre, Robert C; Wright, Franklin L; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia; Eckels, Phillip C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2009-05-01

    Resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HTS) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) and modulates postinjury hyperinflammation. TNF-alpha-stimulated pulmonary epithelium is a major contributor to hemorrhage-induced ALI. We hypothesized that HTS would inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB proinflammatory signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells. Therefore, we pretreated human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) with hypertonic medium (180 mM NaCl) for 30 min, followed by TNF-alpha stimulation (10 ng/mL). Key regulatory steps and protein concentrations in this pathway were assessed for significant alterations. Hypertonic saline significantly reduced TNF-alpha-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 levels and NF-kappaB nuclear localization. The mechanism is attenuated phosphorylation and delayed degradation of IkappaB alpha. Hypertonic saline did not alter TNF-alpha-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation or constitutive vascular endothelial growth factor expression, suggesting that the observed inhibition is not a generalized suppression of protein phosphorylation or cellular function. These results show that HTS inhibits TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activation in the pulmonary epithelium and, further, our understanding of its beneficial effects in hemorrhage-induced ALI.

  9. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  10. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  11. [Peritoneal equilibrium test with hypertonic exchange: practical application in a peritoneal dialysis program].

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A; Marrón, B; Berlanga, J R; Reyero, A; Gazapo, R

    2001-01-01

    Peritoneal equilibration test (PET) employing a 2.27%/2.5% glucose exchange is the most widely used method of to evaluating peritoneal function and small solute transport. Hypertonic (3.86%/4.25% glucose) PET has been recently recommended for the evaluation of ultrafiltration and to study certain causes of ultrafiltration failure, such as aquaporin dysfunction, through the analysis of dialysate sodium. However, there is not enough information on the optimal way to express the changes in dialysate sodium concentration, the normal range of values for this parameter, and possible adverse effects of hypertonic PET in the general population of peritoneal dialysis patients. A hypertonic PET was performed in 22 patients. Ultrafiltration failure (ultrafiltration < 0.4 L) was present in seven patients. Patients with ultrafiltration failure had higher small solute peritoneal transport and dialysate sodium concentration and had been treated with peritoneal dialysis for longer periods of time. Dialysate sodium concentration at 60 and 240 minutes was directly correlated with small solute peritoneal transport calculated as D/PCr240 (r = 0.74, p = 0.0008 y r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with ultrafiltration (r = 0.64, p = 0.0016 y r = 0.72, p = 0.0002). An absence of a dip in dialysis sodium, suggestive of aquaporin dysfunction, was only observed in one patient with a high-average small solute peritoneal transport. Dialysate sodium concentration at 60 minutes is a better discriminator between ultrafiltration failure patients than parameters such as D/PNa or the absolute dip in dialysate sodium with respect to time zero. We observed the following adverse effects: symptomatic hypotension in 2 patients with preserved ultrafiltration. In conclusion, hypertonic PET allows to confirm the diagnosis of ultrafiltration failure, but monitoring dialysate sodium concentration offers additional information only in patients with severe aquaporin dysfunction. Hypertonic PET may

  12. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  13. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  14. Would a prehospital practitioner model improve patient care in rural Australia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, P

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Soft systems methodology was used to develop and critically appraise the prehospital practitioner model as an alternative to existing models. This approach started from the philosophical viewpoint that prehospital services should be patient centred. Soft systems methodology was used to structure the elements of prehospital systems and the relations between them into metaphors and pictures that could be analysed. Results: This analysis showed that the most powerful reason for advocating the prehospital practitioner model is that it places prehospital systems within a symbiotic relationship with the healthcare system. Unlike the existing emergency service models or the "chain of survival" model, it is an integrated system that provides a range of services at multiple points during the patient care cycle. Thus, the prehospital practitioner would have roles in the prevention of injury and illness, responding to emergencies, facilitating recovery, and planning future strategies for a healthy community. Conclusions: Implementing this new model would see the prehospital system using its available capacity more effectively to fulfill broader public health and primary care outreach roles than is currently the case. Patients would be referred or transported to the most appropriate and cost effective facility as part of a seamless system that provides patients with well organised and high quality care. PMID:12642545

  15. [Prehospital stage of medical aid to patients with acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment].

    PubMed

    Vertkin, A L; Morozov, S N; Fedorov, A I

    2013-01-01

    We studied effect of time on the outcome of acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment at the prehospital stage. Logistic regression analysis revealed two time-dependent predictors: "symptom-needle" time and total call service time. In patients undergoing prehospital thrombolysis, these indices (88 and 85 min respectively) reliably predicted the probability of fatal outcome. Their values of 71 and 77 min respectively predicted the risk of unfavourable outcome. The total call service time may serve as an indicator of the quality of work of an ambulance crew at the prehospital stage of management of acute coronary syndrome with elevated ST segment.

  16. Effect of hypertonic saline treatment on the inflammatory response after hydrochloric acid-induced lung injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holms, Carla Augusto; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Kahvegian, Marcia; Massoco, Cristina Oliveira; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Junior, Jose Otavio Costa Auler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertonic saline has been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade in certain experimental conditions, including pulmonary inflammation caused by inhaled gastric contents. The present study aimed to assess the potential anti-inflammatory effects of administering a single intravenous dose of 7.5% hypertonic saline in an experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hydrochloric acid. METHODS: Thirty-two pigs were anesthetized and randomly allocated into the following four groups: Sham, which received anesthesia and were observed; HS, which received intravenous 7.5% hypertonic saline solution (4 ml/kg); acute lung injury, which were subjected to acute lung injury with intratracheal hydrochloric acid; and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline, which were subjected to acute lung injury with hydrochloric acid and treated with hypertonic saline. Hemodynamic and ventilatory parameters were recorded over four hours. Subsequently, bronchoalveolar lavage samples were collected at the end of the observation period to measure cytokine levels using an oxidative burst analysis, and lung tissue was collected for a histological analysis. RESULTS: Hydrochloric acid instillation caused marked changes in respiratory mechanics as well as blood gas and lung parenchyma parameters. Despite the absence of a significant difference between the acute lung injury and acute lung injury + hypertonic saline groups, the acute lung injury animals presented higher neutrophil and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage analysis. The histopathological analysis revealed pulmonary edema, congestion and alveolar collapse in both groups; however, the differences between groups were not significant. Despite the lower cytokine and neutrophil levels observed in the acute lung injury + hypertonic saline group, significant differences were not observed among the treated and non-treated groups. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertonic saline

  17. Early Response of Protein Quality Control in Gills Is Associated with Survival of Hypertonic Shock in Mozambique tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2013-01-01

    The protein quality control (PQC) mechanism is essential for cell function and viability. PQC with proper biological function depends on molecular chaperones and proteases. The hypertonicity-induced protein damage and responses of PQC mechanism in aquatic organisms, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we examine the short-term effects of different hypertonic shocks on the levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs, e.g., HSP70 and HSP90), ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and protein aggregation in gills of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Following transfer from fresh water (FW) to 20‰ hypertonicity, all examined individuals survived to the end of experiment. Moreover, the levels of branchial HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins significantly increased at 3 and 24 h post-transfer, respectively. Up-regulation of HSPs and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins was sufficient to prevent the accumulation of aggregated proteins. However, the survival rate of tilapia dramatically declined at 5 h and all fish died within 7 h after direct transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. We presumed that this result was due to the failed activation of gill PQC system, which resulted in elevating the levels of aggregated proteins at 3 and 4 h. Furthermore, in aggregated protein fractions, the amounts of gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) remained relatively low when fish were transferred to 20‰ hypertonicity, whereas abundant NKA was found at 4 h post-transfer to 30‰ hypertonicity. This study demonstrated that the response of PQC in gills is earlier than observable changes in localization of ion-secreting transport proteins upon hypertonic challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the regulation of PQC mechanism in fish and characterize its important role in euryhaline teleost survival in response to hypertonic stress. PMID:23690986

  18. A study of prehospital medical documentation by military medical providers during precombat training.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Adam B; Mott, Jeffrey C; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Documentation of medical care provided is paramount for improving performance and ultimately reducing morbidity and mortality. However, documentation of prehospital trauma care on the battlefield has historically been suboptimal. Modernization of prehospital documentation tools have aligned data and information to be gathered with up-to-date treatment being rendered through Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) protocols and practices. Our study was conducted to evaluate TCCC Card completion, and accuracy of card completion, by military medical providers conducting precombat training through the Tactical Combat Medical Care Course. Study results do not show a deficiency in TCCC documentation training as provided by this course which should translate to adequate ability to accurately document prehospital trauma care on the battlefield. Leadership emphasis and community acceptance is required to increase compliance with prehospital documentation.

  19. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy. PMID:26997926

  20. The Swiss bus accident on 13 March 2012: lessons for pre-hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent bus crash in Switzerland involving many children provides several lessons for the pre-hospital care community. The use of multiple helicopters that are capable of flying at night and that carry advanced medical pre-hospital teams undoubtedly saved lives following the tragedy. We describe the medical response to the incident and the lessons that can be learned for emergency medical services. PMID:22784360

  1. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-21

    Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effec- tive at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible...illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual com- ponents reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality , and end-user...challenges may be relevant to broader efforts in de- ploying automated decision-support functionality in prehospital environments. In addition, the ex

  2. Hypertonic sabouraud broth as a simple and powerful test for Candida dubliniensis screening.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sydney Hartz; Milan, Eveline Pipolo; de Laet Sant'Ana, Priscilla; Oliveira, Loiva O; Santurio, Janio M; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

    2002-05-01

    We developed a new screening test for C. dubliniensis based on its inability to grow on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 6.5% NaCl. A total of 266 clinical yeast isolates and 3 reference strains were tested, including 250 C. albicans and 19 C. dubliniensis strains. All C. albicans isolates tested exhibited significant growth on hypertonic Sabouraud broth up to 96 h, while, all C. dubliniensis isolates did not exhibit any visually detectable growth during the same period.

  3. Emergency anesthesia for evacuating a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage in a child overdosed with hypertonic saline

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, Chulananda; Bedford, James; Harpreet, Sodhi; Giombini, Mariangela; Sheikh, Asme

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old child with a traumatic acute subdural hemorrhage received 10 times higher dose of hypertonic saline inadvertently immediately before surgery. This case report describes deviations in fluid management needed to alleviate salt toxicity and its adverse effects during surgery under anesthesia perioperatively. The child made an uneventful recovery with no evident residual damage at follow-up. PMID:28217157

  4. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-06-16

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking.

  5. Combination of Hot-Hypertonic Saline and Pressure Dressing in the Management of Parotid Fistula.

    PubMed

    Aisha; Fatima, Saira; Memon, Aijaz Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Parotid fistula is a rare complication of surgical or non-surgical trauma on or in the vicinity of parotid gland. Many pharmacological agents and surgical methods are used to treat it with their own merits, demerits and patient preferences. Injection of hypertonic hot saline along with compression dressing is an economical, patient-preferred and almost complication-free method to deal parotid fistula with promising results.

  6. Effects of hypertonic saline infusion and water drinking on atrial peptide.

    PubMed

    Salazar, F J; Granger, J P; Joyce, M L; Burnett, J C; Bove, A A; Romero, J C

    1986-12-01

    This study was undertaken to define the changes in plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) induced by hypertonic saline infusion followed by spontaneous water drinking and to determine whether these changes in ANP are correlated with changes in right atrial pressure (RAP) and plasma levels of vasopressin (AVP). Conscious dogs (n = 5) were infused with hypertonic saline (6%) at a rate of 1.4 ml/min for 4 h. Water was withheld for the first 2 h and administered ad libitum for the final 2 h. Hypertonic saline infusion induced increases (P less than 0.05) in plasma osmolality (posM), pAVP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and RAP (1.9 +/- 0.6 to 3.1 +/- 0.7 mmHg). These changes were accompanied by an increase of pANP (68 +/- 14 to 120 +/- 33 pg/ml, P less than 0.05). Spontaneous water drinking (1,410 +/- 127 ml) returned posM and pAVP to control levels and produced a further and significant increment in RAP (150%) and pANP (100%). During the water-drinking phase MAP was not further altered, and hematocrit decreased by 11.1% (P less than 0.05). A positive linear correlation (P less than 0.001) was found between increases in RAP and pANP. The administration of an AVP vasopressor antagonist in a similar protocol, and before hypertonic saline infusion, inhibited the increase of MAP, but it did not alter the changes of posM, hematocrit, RAP, nor pANP. These results suggest that changes in the release of ANP during increases in posM and after spontaneous water drinking are predominantly controlled by changes in RAP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Early Implementation of THAM for ICP Control: Therapeutic Hypothermia Avoidance and Reduction in Hypertonics/Hyperosmotics.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, F A; Gillman, L M; Teitelbaum, J; West, M

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tromethamine (THAM) has been demonstrated to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP). Early consideration for THAM may reduce the need for other measures for ICP control. Objective. To describe 4 cases of early THAM therapy for ICP control and highlight the potential to avoid TH and paralytics and achieve reduction in sedation and hypertonic/hyperosmotic agent requirements. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 4 patients treated with early THAM for ICP control. Results. We identified 2 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 2 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) receiving early THAM for ICP control. The mean time to initiation of THAM therapy was 1.8 days, with a mean duration of 5.3 days. In all patients, after 6 to 12 hours of THAM administration, ICP stability was achieved, with reduction in requirements for hypertonic saline and hyperosmotic agents. There was a relative reduction in mean hourly hypertonic saline requirements of 89.1%, 96.1%, 82.4%, and 97.0% for cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, comparing pre- to post-THAM administration. Mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and paralytics were avoided in all patients. Conclusions. Early administration of THAM for ICP control could potentially lead to the avoidance of other ICP directed therapies. Prospective studies of early THAM administration are warranted.

  8. [Septic shock. Update of treatment using hypertonic saline and antidiuretic hormone-vasopressin].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramírez, J; Aguirre Sánchez-Covisa, M; Araujo, F; Gil Trujillo, S; Collar, L G; Bocharán, S

    2012-01-01

    Safety in the use of small volumes of hypertonic saline solution for hypovolaemic shock and in the treatment of intracranial hypertension has been demonstrated in studies in the field of resuscitation. There is little experience of this for septic shock in humans. Beneficial immunomodulatory effects have been detected in pre-clinical studies. Interactions with the pituitary-adrenal axis and with the secretion of anti-diuretic hormone are varied and suggestive, but are not sufficiently understood. On the other hand, vasopressin has cardiovascular, osmoregulatory, and coagulation effects, and also acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is a relative deficit of vasopressin in septic shock. Its use in these patients does not seem to have any advantages as regards mortality, but may be beneficial in patients at risk from acute renal failure, or those who receive corticosteroids. Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue that has also been studied. The synergy between vasopressin and hypertonic saline is a hypothesis that is mainly supported in pre-clinical studies. The use of hypertonic saline solution in septic shock, although promising, is still experimental, and must be restricted to the field of controlled clinical trials.

  9. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  10. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

  11. Prehospital care - scoop and run or stay and play?

    PubMed

    Smith, R Malcolm; Conn, Alasdair K T

    2009-11-01

    Improved training and expertise has enabled emergency medical personnel to provide advanced levels of care at the scene of trauma. While this could be expected to improve the outcome from major injury, current data does not support this. Indeed, prehospital interventions beyond the BLS level have not been shown to be effective and in many cases have proven to be detrimental to patient outcome. It is better to "scoop and run" than "stay and play". Current data relates to the urban environment where transport times to trauma centres are short and where it appears better to simply rapidly transport the patient to hospital than attempt major interventions at the scene. There may be more need for advanced techniques in the rural environment or where transport times are prolonged and certainly a need for more studies into subsets of patients who may benefit from interventions in the field.

  12. [The prehospital use of antibiotics in military operations].

    PubMed

    Rump, A

    2012-03-01

    War wounds usually show abundant devitalized tissue and often contain foreign material (environmental matter, shrapnels, and bullets). Thus, they are particularly prone to infection. Moreover, evacuation to a medical treatment facility and surgical debridement are often delayed due to tactical constraints. Thus, the early administration of an antibiotic on the ground in a prehospital setting seems justified to slow bacterial growth and the development of early infection. However, antibiotics are never a substitute for surgical treatment. The mix of microorganisms expected in war wounds is highly variable and determines the choice of the antibacterial agent. In a prehospital setting and in the absence of medical or paramedical personnel, the antibiotic must be administered orally (combat pill pack). In view of the antibacterial activity as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmaceutical properties, a combination of a fluoroquinolone active against Pseudomonas and a lincomycine with a high oral bioavailability at high doses seems to be a rational choice (ciprofloxacine 750 mg or alternatively levofloxacine 500 mg+clindamycine 600 mg tablets). If oral administration is excluded (unconsciousness, penetrating abdominal trauma, shock), the parenteral administration will be delayed until the patient has been taken in charge by medical or paramedical personnel. In that case, the intravenous administration of an association of an ureidopenicilline with antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas and a ß-lactamase-inhibitor at high doses could be a rational choice (piperacilline 4 g+tazobactam 0.5 g) (Tazocilline®). An antibiotic treatment beyond the time of surgery may become necessary in individual patients depending on the local features of the wound and should be prescribed by the medical officer in charge of the patient on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Application of Telemedicine System to Prehospital Medical Control

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Suck Ju; Kwon, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although ambulance-based telemedicine has been reported to be safe and feasible, its clinical usefulness has not been well documented, and different prehospital management systems would yield different results. The authors evaluated the feasibility and usefulness of telemedicine-assisted direct medical control in the Korean emergency medical service system. Methods Twenty ambulances in the Busan area were equipped with a telemedicine system. Three-lead electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry data from the patient and audiovisual input from the scene were transferred to a server. Consulting physicians used desktop computers and the internet to connect to the server. Both requesting emergency medical service (EMS) providers and consulting physicians were asked to fill out report forms and submit them for analysis. Results In the 41 cases in which telemedicine equipment was used, cellular phones were concomitantly used in 28 cases (68.35%) to compensate for the poor audio quality provided by the equipment. The EMS providers rated the video transmission quality with a 4-point average score (interquartile range [IQR] 2-5) on a 5-point scale, and they rated the biosignal transmission quality as 4 (IQR 3-5). The consulting physicians rated the video quality as 4 (IQR 2.5-4) and the biosignal quality as 4 (IQR 3-4). The physicians' ratings for usefulness for making diagnosis or treatment decisions did not differ significantly in relation to the method of communication used. Conclusions Our study did not find any significant advantage of implementing telemedicine over the use of voice calls in delivering on-line medical control. More user-friendly, smaller devices with clear advantages over voice communication would be required before telemedicine can be successfully implemented in prehospital patient care. PMID:26279957

  14. Pre-Hospital Intravenous Fluid is Associated with Increased Survival in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, David A.; Fabricant, Löic J.; Differding, Jerry; Diggs, Brian; Underwood, Samantha; De La Cruz, Dodie; Holcomb, John B.; Brasel, Karen J.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Fox, Erin E.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Phelan, Herb A.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Wade, Charles E.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of intravenous crystalloid fluids (IVF) remains a tradition-based priority during pre-hospital resuscitation of trauma patients. Hypotensive and targeted resuscitation algorithms have been shown to improve patient outcomes. We hypothesized that receiving any pre-hospital IVF is associated with increased survival in trauma patients compared to receiving no pre-hospital IVF. Methods Prospective data from ten Level 1 trauma centers were collected. Patient demographics, pre-hospital IVF volume, pre-hospital and Emergency Department vital signs, life-saving interventions, laboratory values, outcomes and complications were collected and analyzed. Patients who did or did not receive pre-hospital IVF were compared. Tests for non-parametric data were utilized to assess significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent influence of IVF on outcome and complications. Results The study population consisted of 1245 trauma patients; 45 were removed due to incomplete data; 84% (n=1009) received pre-hospital IVF, and 16% (n=191) did not. There was no difference between the groups with respect to gender, age, and Injury Severity Score. The on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP) was lower in the IVF group (110 vs. 100 mmHg, p<0.04) and did not change significantly after IVF, measured at ED admission (110 vs. 105 mmHg, p=0.05). Hematocrit/hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and platelets were lower (p<0.05), and Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio and Partial Thromboplastin Time were higher (p<0.001) in the IVF group. The IVF group received a median fluid volume of 700ml (IQR: 300-1300). The Cox regression revealed that pre-hospital fluid administration was associated with increased survival, Hazard Ratio: 0.84 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.72, 0.98; p=0.03). Site differences in ISS and fluid volumes were demonstrated (p<0.001). Conclusions Pre-hospital IVF volumes commonly used by PROMMTT

  15. Prehospital delay and time to reperfusion therapy in ST elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    George, Linsha; Ramamoorthy, Lakshmi; Satheesh, Santhosh; Saya, Rama Prakasha; Subrahmanyam, D. K. S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite efforts aimed at reducing the prehospital delay and treatment delay, a considerable proportion of patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) present late and receive the reperfusion therapy after unacceptably long time periods. This study aimed at finding out the patients' decision delay, prehospital delay, door-to-electrocardiography (ECG), door-to-needle, and door-to-primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) times and their determinants among STEMI patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted among 96 patients with STEMI admitted in a tertiary care center in South India. The data were collected using interview of the patients and review of records. The distribution of the data was assessed using Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, and the comparisons of the patients' decision delay, prehospital delay, and time to start reperfusion therapy with the different variables were done using Mann–Whitney U-test or Kruskal–Wallis test based on the number of groups. Results: The mean (standard deviation) and median (range) age of the participants were 55 (11) years and 57 (51) years, respectively. The median patients' decision delay, prehospital delay, door-to-ECG, door-to-needle, and door-to-primary PCI times were 75, 290, 12, 75, 110 min, respectively. Significant factors associated (P < 0.05) with patients' decision delay were alcoholism, symptom progression, and attempt at symptom relief measures at home. Prehospital delay was significantly associated (P < 0.05) with domicile, difficulty in arranging money, prior consultation at study center, place of symptom onset, symptom interpretation, and mode of transportation. Conclusions: The prehospital delay time among the South Indian population is still unacceptably high. Public education, improving the systems of prehospital care, and measures to improve the patient flow and management in the emergency department are essentially required. The time taken to take ECG

  16. National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines Strategy: A Summary for EMS Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Gaither, Joshua B; Bigham, Blair L; Myers, J Brent; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple national organizations have recommended and supported a national investment to increase the scientific evidence available to guide patient care delivered by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and incorporate that evidence directly into EMS systems. Ongoing efforts seek to develop, implement, and evaluate prehospital evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) using the National Model Process created by a multidisciplinary panel of experts convened by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS) and the National EMS Advisory Council (NEMSAC). Yet, these and other EBG efforts have occurred in relative isolation, with limited direct collaboration between national projects, and have experienced challenges in implementation of individual guidelines. There is a need to develop sustainable relationships among stakeholders that facilitate a common vision that facilitates EBG efforts. Herein, we summarize a National Strategy on EBGs developed by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) with involvement of 57 stakeholder organizations, and with the financial support of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the EMS for Children program. The Strategy proposes seven action items that support collaborative efforts in advancing prehospital EBGs. The first proposed action is creation of a Prehospital Guidelines Consortium (PGC) representing national medical and EMS organizations that have an interest in prehospital EBGs and their benefits to patient outcomes. Other action items include promoting research that supports creation and evaluates the impact of EBGs, promoting the development of new EBGs through improved stakeholder collaboration, and improving education on evidence-based medicine for all prehospital providers. The Strategy intends to facilitate implementation of EBGs by improving guideline dissemination and incorporation into protocols, and seeks to establish standardized evaluation methods for prehospital EBGs. Finally, the Strategy

  17. Assessment of the Status of Prehospital Care in 13 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Katie; Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul; Rubiano, Andres M.; Zakariah, Ahmed; Rivara, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Injury and other medical emergencies are becoming increasingly common in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many to most of the deaths from these conditions occur outside of hospitals, necessitating the development of prehospital care. Prehospital capabilities are inadequately developed to meet the growing needs for emergency care in most LMICs. In order to better plan for development of prehospital care globally, this study sought to better understand the current status of prehospital care in a wide range of LMICs. Methods A survey was conducted of emergency medical services (EMS) leaders and other key informants in 13 LMICs in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Questions addressed methods of transport to hospital, training and certification of EMS providers, organization and funding of EMS systems, public access to prehospital care, and barriers to EMS development. Results Prehospital care capabilities varied significantly, but in general, were less developed in low-income countries and in rural areas, where utilization of formal emergency medical services was often very low. Commercial drivers, volunteers, and other bystanders provided a large proportion of prehospital transport and occasionally also provide first aid in many locations. Although taxes and mandatory motor vehicle insurance provided supplemental funds to EMS in 85% of the countries, the most frequently cited barriers to further development of prehospital care was inadequate funding (36% of barriers cited). The next most commonly sited barriers were lack of leadership within the system (18%) and lack of legislation setting standards (18%). Conclusions Expansion of prehospital care to currently under- or un-served areas, especially in low-income countries and in rural areas, could make use of the already existing networks of first responders, such as commercial drivers and lay persons. Efforts to increase their effectiveness, such as more widespread first aid training, and better

  18. Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice. Methods An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context. Results The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage. Conclusion Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of

  19. Hypertonicity Compromises Renal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Signaling through Tis11b-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Control

    PubMed Central

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na+-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3′-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3′-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na+ diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  20. The effect of cooling and hypertonic exposure on murine oocyte function, fertilization, and development.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J E; Fuller, B J; Bernard, A; Shaw, R W

    1995-08-01

    Several individual but related steps are involved in the cryopreservation process, including the addition of cryoprotectants at various temperatures, cooling to subzero temperatures, and long-term storage. The process is completed by rewarming and removal of cryoprotectants prior to a return to physiological conditions. In this series of experiments we have attempted to distinguish the effects of some of these procedures. Control, untreated ovulated mouse oocytes showed 95% in vitro fertilization (190/200) and 92% subsequent development to hatching blastocyst (184/200). Exposure of oocytes to either isotonic or hypertonic media at 37 degrees C did not significantly change the rate of fertilization (90%, 108/120; and 89%, 154/174, respectively) or subsequent embryonic development (85%, 102/120; and 82%, 143/174, respectively). Slow cooling in isotonic medium (-3 degrees C/min) to 0 degree C had no effect on the rate of fertilization (83%, 103/124), but rapid cooling (> 1000 degrees C/min) to 0 degree C resulted in a significant reduction in fertilization rate to 75% (151/202). When oocytes suspended in a hypertonic solution were cooled using slow or rapid rates, there were marked decreases in fertilization to 26% (61/231) and 56% (156/278), respectively. Subsequent embryonic growth was reduced to 15% (34/231) after slow cooling and 26% (72/278) after rapid cooling. Exposure of oocytes to glycerol at 37 degrees C and dimethyl sulfoxide at 0 degree C reduced the fertilization rate to 57% (67/118) and 73% (103/145), respectively, with a corresponding reduction in embryonic growth to 52% (61/118) and 65% (94/145), but there were no additional effects of cooling or hypertonic exposure after addition of cryoprotectants.

  1. SABRE: a multicentre randomised control trial of nebulised hypertonic saline in infants hospitalised with acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Mark L; Hind, Daniel; Ugonna, Kelechi; Freeman, Jennifer; Bradburn, Mike; Cooper, Cindy L; Cross, Elizabeth; Maguire, Chin; Cantrill, Hannah; Alexander, John; McNamara, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    Aim Acute bronchiolitis is the commonest cause for hospitalisation in infancy. Supportive care remains the cornerstone of current management and no other therapy has been shown to influence the course of the disease. It has been suggested that adding nebulised hypertonic saline to usual care may shorten the duration of hospitalisation. To determine whether hypertonic saline does have beneficial effects we undertook an open, multi-centre parallel-group, pragmatic RCT in ten UK hospitals. Methods Infants admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchiolitis and requiring oxygen therapy were randomised to receive usual care alone or nebulised 3% hypertonic saline (HS) administered 6-hourly. Randomisation was within 4 h of admission. The primary outcome was time to being assessed as ‘fit’ for discharge with secondary outcomes including time to discharge, incidence of adverse events together with follow up to 28 days assessing patient centred health related outcomes. Results A total of 317 infants were recruited to the study. 158 infants were randomised to HS (141 analysed) and 159 to standard care (149 analysed). There was no difference between the two arms in time to being declared fit for discharge (hazard ratio: 0−95, 95% CI: 0.75−1.20) nor to actual discharge (hazard ratio: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.76−1.23). There was no difference in adverse events. One infant in the HS group developed bradycardia with desaturation. Conclusion This study does not support the use of nebulised HS in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis over usual care with minimal handlings. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number NCT01469845. PMID:25389139

  2. AAGBI: Safer pre-hospital anaesthesia 2017: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Crewdson, K; Davies, G; Jenkins, B; Klein, J; Laird, C; Mahoney, P F; Nolan, J; Pountney, A; Shinde, S; Tighe, S; Russell, M Q; Price, J; Wright, C

    2017-03-01

    Pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia with oral tracheal intubation is the technique of choice for trauma patients who cannot maintain their airway or achieve adequate ventilation. It should be carried out as soon as safely possible, and performed to the same standards as in-hospital emergency anaesthesia. It should only be conducted within organisations with comprehensive clinical governance arrangements. Techniques should be straightforward, reproducible, as simple as possible and supported by the use of checklists. Monitoring and equipment should meet in-hospital anaesthesia standards. Practitioners need to be competent in the provision of in-hospital emergency anaesthesia and have supervised pre-hospital experience before carrying out pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia. Training programmes allowing the safe delivery of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia by non-physicians do not currently exist in the UK. Where pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia skills are not available, oxygenation and ventilation should be maintained with the use of second-generation supraglottic airways in patients without airway reflexes, or basic airway manoeuvres and basic airway adjuncts in patients with intact airway reflexes.

  3. Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Resuscitation from Shock: Reduced Volume Requirement and Lower Intracranial Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    volume re- gs reference organs for measurement 3f organ blood suscitation with hypertonic saline dextran flow, using radioactive microspheres. All...oastllto Amaintained throyighout the 30 minute shoth Interval Blood was At ot; sir -o,;tnrn M,’.t was rvdured Iron 1111 tmean+SC r-ov~ed to reduce...a volume much smaller than the original shed blood volume (4-12). The addition of colloid, usually 6.0% low-molecular weight dextran , has been used

  4. [Dynamics of pre-hospital lethality in acute coronary insufficiency and myocardial infarct in Krasnoyarsk during 1963-1975].

    PubMed

    Opaleva-Stegantseva, V A; Rybkin, I A; Protopopova, A N; Litvintseva, G A; Ratovskaia, V I

    1978-05-01

    The data on the dynamics of prehospital mortality in acute coronary failure (ACF) and myocardial infarction (MI) depending on the improvement in medical service in the prehospital stage of treatment are presented. The research showed that prehospital mortality in ACF and MI accounts for 75% of the total mortality. Among deaths registered in the prehospital stage 73.7% were sudden. As the result of improvements in prehospital medical service due to the training of physicians of the emergency medical service, the organization of cardiologic emergency aid teams, clinico-pathologic conferences held at the emergency medical service stations, etc. extrahospital mortality dropped from 45.6% (1963) to 26.2% (1975) with simultaneous drop in total mortality from 61.9% (1963) to 37.4% (1975).

  5. Evaluation of the Maintained Effect of 3% Hypertonic Saline Solution in an Animal Model of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Leonardo M.; de Andrade, Almir F.; Belon, Alessandro R.; Soares, Matheus S.; Amorim, Robson Luis; Otochi, Jose Pinhata; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Paiva, Wellingson S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current clinical treatment methods for refractory intracranial hypertension include elevation of the decubitus, ventilation adjustment, and use of hypertonic solutions such as hypertonic saline and mannitol solutions. Previous studies have shown that hypertonic solutions are particularly effective. Although several concentrations of saline solution have been proposed, a 3% solution is the most widely used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maintained efficacy of a 3% hypertonic saline solution in an experimental model of intracranial hypertension. Material/Methods A porcine model of reversible intracranial hypertension was created by inserting a balloon catheter into the brain parenchyma, which was inflated and deflated to simulate intracranial hypertension and its surgical correction. The experiment included 3 groups of animals (A, B, and C) with different balloon inflation volumes. In group B, balloons were inflated 2 times to simulate reexpansion. A 20 mL/kg bolus of 3% saline solution was infused using a pump 90 minutes after the start of balloon inflation, and the effects of intracranial pressure were evaluated 60 minutes after infusion. Results No increases outside of the normal range were observed in mean serum sodium concentrations (p=0.09). In addition, we identified no differences within each group in serum sodium levels measured during hypertonic saline infusion (p=0.21). No significant reductions in intracranial pressure were observed in any of the 3 groups. Conclusions Bolus infusion of 3% hypertonic saline solution with the aid of a pump does not significantly reduce intracranial pressure in an animal model of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27777397

  6. A model of prehospital trauma training for lay persons devised in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tiska, M; Adu-Ampofo, M; Boakye, G; Tuuli, L; Mock, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Over 300 commercial drivers attended a first aid and rescue course designed specifically for roadway trauma and geared to a low education level. The training programme has been evaluated twice at one and two year intervals by interviewing both trained and untrained drivers with regard to their experiences with injured persons. In conjunction with a review of prehospital care literature, lessons learnt from the evaluations were used in the revision of the training model. Results: Control of external haemorrhage was quickly learnt and used appropriately by the drivers. Areas identified needing emphasis in future trainings included consistent use of universal precautions and protection of airways in unconscious persons using the recovery position. Conclusion: In low income countries, prehospital trauma care for roadway casualties can be improved by training laypersons already involved in prehospital transport and care. Training should be locally devised, evidence based, educationally appropriate, and focus on practical demonstrations. PMID:14988361

  7. Triage in the Tower of Babel: interpreter services for children in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ramsey C; Kelley, Maureen C

    2013-12-01

    Minority pediatric populations have higher rates of emergency medical services use than the general pediatric population, and prior studies have documented that limited-English proficiency patients are more likely to undergo invasive procedures, require more resources, and be admitted once they arrive in the emergency department. Furthermore, limited-English proficiency patients may be particularly vulnerable because of immigration or political concerns. In this case report, we describe an infant with breath-holding spells for whom a language barrier in the prehospital setting resulted in an escalation of care to the highest level of trauma team activation. This infant underwent unnecessary, costly, and harmful interventions because of a lack of interpreter services. In a discussion of the legal, ethical, and medical implications of this case, we conclude that further investigation into prehospital strategies for overcoming language barriers is required to provide optimal prehospital care for pediatric patients.

  8. [Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin.

    PubMed

    Beygui, Farzin; Castren, Maaret; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando; Christ, Michael; Zeymer, Uwe; Huber, Kurt; Folke, Fredrik; Svensson, Leif; Bueno, Hector; Van't Hof, Arnoud; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Nibbe, Lutz; Charpentier, Sandrine; Swahn, Eva; Tubaro, Marco; Goldstein, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care.

  9. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  10. EMS Adherence to a Pre-hospital Cervical Spine Clearance Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Raynard J.; Miller, Kenneth; Langdorf, Mark I.; Johnson, David

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the degree of adherence to a cervical spine (c-spine) clearance protocol by pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel by both self-assessment and receiving hospital assessment, to describe deviations from the protocol, and to determine if the rate of compliance by paramedic self-assessment differed from receiving hospital assessment. Methods: A retrospective sample of pre-hospital (consecutive series) and receiving hospital (convenience sample) assessments of the compliance with and appropriateness of c-spine immobilization. The c-spine clearance protocol was implemented for Orange County EMS just prior to the April–November 1999 data collection period. Results: We collected 396 pre-hospital and 162 receiving hospital data forms. From the pre-hospital data sheet, the percentage deviation from the protocol was 4.0% (16/396). Only one out of 16 cases that did not comply with the protocol was due to over immobilization (0.2%). The remaining 15 cases were under immobilized, according to protocol. Nine of the under immobilized cases (66%) that should have been placed in c-spine precautions met physical assessment criteria in the protocol, while the other five cases met mechanism of injury criteria. The rate of deviations from protocol did not differ over time. The receiving hospital identified 8.0% (13/162; 6/l6 over immobilized, 7/16 under immobilized) of patients with deviations from the protocol; none was determined to have actual c-spine injury. Conclusion: The implementation of a pre-hospital c-spine clearance protocol in Orange County was associated with a moderate overall adherence rate (96% from the pre-hospital perspective, and 9250 from the hospital perspective. p = .08 for the two evaluation methods). Most patients who deviated from protocol were under immobilized. but no c-spine injuries were missed. The rate of over immobilization was better than previously reported, implying a saving of resources. PMID:20852696

  11. The effect of hypertonic saline dextran solutions on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in anaesthetised piglets.

    PubMed

    Bellezza, M; Kerbaul, F; Roussel, L; Imbert, M; Guidon, C

    2002-10-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a regulatory mechanism by which blood is diverted from poorly ventilated to better ventilated areas of the lung. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent to which hypertonic saline dextran and dextran solutions modify the magnitude of HPV during isovolumic haemodilution in intact acutely instrumented piglets. Eighteen large white piglets were anesthetised and assigned to two groups. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and cardiac output (Q), systemic arterial pressure and left arterial pressure (LAP) were measured. A decrease in Q was obtained by reducing venous return. This enabled measurement of transpulmonary pressures (mean PAP minus LAP) at four levels of Q in hyperoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2)=0.4) then in hypoxia (Fi,O2=0.1) in the two groups before blood soustraction (10 mL x kg(-1)) and after loading with sodium chloride (NaCl) 7.5% and dextran 6% or with dextran 6% alone. Dextran alone led to a decrease in mean PAP-LAP/Q values, and NaCl with dextran was associated with a significant shift of mean PAP-LAP/Q plots to higher pressures in hypoxia. Hypertonic saline dextran solution, as replacement fluid in isovolaemic haemodilution increased the magnitude of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas dextran solution reduced it.

  12. Desiccation and hypertonicity of the airway surface fluid and thermally induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Kotaru, Chakradhar; Hejal, Rana B; Finigan, J H; Coreno, Albert J; Skowronski, Mary E; Brianas, Lori; McFadden, E R

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether drying and hypertonicity of the airway surface fluid (ASF) are involved in thermally induced asthma, nine subjects performed isocapnic hyperventilation (HV) (minute ventilation 62.2 +/- 8.3 l/min) of frigid air (-8.9 +/- 3.3 degrees C) while periciliary fluid was collected endoscopically from the trachea. Osmolality was measured by freezing-point depression. The baseline 1-s forced expiratory volume was 73 +/- 4% of predicted and fell 26.4% 10 min postchallenge (P > 0.0001). The volume of ASF collected was 11.0 +/- 2.2 microl at rest and remained constant during and after HV as the airways narrowed (HV 10.6 +/- 1.9, recovery 6.5 +/- 1.7 microl; P = 0.18). The osmolality also remained stable throughout (rest 336 +/- 16, HV 339 +/- 16, and recovery 352 +/- 19 mosmol/kgH(2)O, P = 0.76). These data demonstrate that airway desiccation and hypertonicity of the ASF do not develop during hyperpnea in asthma; therefore, other mechanisms must cause exercise- and hyperventilation-induced airflow limitation.

  13. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  14. BET 2: Is prehospital focused abdominal ultrasound useful during triage at mass casualty incidents?

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    A short-cut review was carried out to determined whether the addition of prehospital focused abdominal ultrasound to triage protocols might reduce time to necessary surgery and reduce overall mortality. Thirty-five papers were found using the reported searches, of which three presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of those best papers are shown in table 2. It is concluded that although the feasibility of prehospital ultrasound in mass casualty incidents has been demonstrated, there is, as yet, no clear evidence of benefit as part of a triage protocol.

  15. Resuscitation with a Bolus of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran Improves Renal Function Following Hemorrhage in Conscious Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-28

    is well-known that infusions of hypertonic salt solutions induce a diuresis and a natriuresis - this occurred in both the control as well as the...pressure), neither pigs (18) nor humans (19-21) responded with an excessive diuresis which would exacerbate hypovolemia. Sondeen et al -- 9 Although it

  16. Comparison of intranasal hypertonic dead sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Scott; Harjo, Jim B; Miner, Linda

    2005-07-01

    Intranasal corticosteroids are well known to be efficacious in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Nasal irrigation with saline, including hypertonic saline, has long been recommended for the treatment of sinonasal disease, and it has been shown to have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa. Until now, no study of the clinical efficacy of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline as a monotherapy for seasonal allergic rhinitis has been reported. We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled comparison of intranasal hypertonic Dead Sea saline spray and intranasal aqueous triamcinolone spray in 15 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Results were based on a 7-day regimen. Based on Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire scores, clinically and statistically significant (p < 0.0001) improvements were seen in both active-treatment groups; as expected, the corticosteroid spray was the more effective of the two treatments. No significant improvement occurred in the control group. Our preliminary results not only confirm the efficacy of intranasal corticosteroid therapy in moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis, they also suggest that the Dead Sea saline solution can be an effective alternative in mild-to-moderate allergic rhinitis, particularly with respect to nasal and eye symptoms. The hypertonicity of the Dead Sea solution may have a positive effect on the physiology of the nasal mucosa by improving mucociliary clearance. In addition, the dominant cation in the Dead Sea solution--magnesium--probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects on the nasal mucosa and on the systemic immune response.

  17. Analysis of central opioid receptor subtype antagonism of hypotonic and hypertonic saline intake in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, R J; Glass, M J; Koch, J E

    1995-01-01

    Intake of either hypotonic or hypertonic saline solutions is modulated in part by the endogenous opioid system. Morphine and selective mu and delta opioid agonists increase saline intake, while general opioid antagonists reduce saline intake in rats. The present study evaluated whether intracerebroventricular administration of general (naltrexone) and selective mu (beta-funaltrexamine, 5-20 micrograms), mu, (naloxonazine, 50 micrograms), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine, 5-20 micrograms), delta (naltrindole, 20 micrograms), or delta 1 (DALCE, 40 micrograms) opioid receptor subtype antagonists altered water intake and either hypotonic (0.6%) or hypertonic (1.7%) saline intake in water-deprived (24 h) rats over a 3-h time course in a two-bottle choice test. Whereas peripheral naltrexone (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced water intake and hypertonic saline intake, central naltrexone (1-50 micrograms) significantly reduced water intake and hypotonic saline intake. Water intake was significantly reduced following mu and kappa receptor antagonism, but not following mu 1, delta, or delta 1 receptor antagonism. In contrast, neither hypotonic nor hypertonic saline intake was significantly altered by any selective antagonist. These data are discussed in terms of opioid receptor subtype control over saline intake relative to the animal's hydrational state and the roles of palatability and/or salt appetite.

  18. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  19. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hai-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Chao; Sun, Yong-An; Lyu, Pu; Cui, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments. This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes. Methods: From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years, this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit, conscious or not, and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province. All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria. Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes’ discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes. Results: Among the 1989 patients, 797, 689, 109, and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and other forms of nonstroke, respectively. A history of atrial fibrillation, vomiting, and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction, while vomiting, systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg, and age <65 years were more typical of ICH. For noncomatose stroke patients, Bayes’ discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients, corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%. Conclusions: The model herein presented, with multiple parameters, can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning, either in alert or comatose patients. This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke. PMID:27098788

  20. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  1. Elemental distribution in striated muscle and the effects of hypertonicity: Electron probe analysis of cryo sections

    PubMed Central

    Somlyo, AV; Shuman, H; Somlyo, AP

    1977-01-01

    A method of rapid freezing in supercooled Freon 22 (monochlorodifluoromethane) followed by cryoultramicrotomy is described and shown to yield ultrathin sections in which both the cellular ultrastructure and the distribution of diffusible ions across the cell membrane are preserved and intracellular compartmentalization of diffusabler ions can be quantitated. Quantitative electron probe analysis (Shuman, H., A.V. Somlyo, and A.P. Somlyo. 1976. Ultramicros. 1:317-339.) of freeze-dried ultrathin cryto sections was found to provide a valid measure of the composition of cells and cellular organelles and was used to determine the ionic composition of the in situ terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the distribution of CI in skeletal muscle, and the effects of hypertonic solutions on the subcellular composition if striated muscle. There was no evidence of sequestered CI in the terminal cisternae of resting muscles, although calcium (66mmol/kg dry wt +/- 4.6 SE) was detected. The values of [C1](i) determined with small (50-100 nm) diameter probes over cytoplasm excluding organelles over nuclei or terminal cisternae were not significantly different. Mitochondria partially excluded C1, with a cytoplasmic/ mitochondrial Ci ratio of 2.4 +/- 0.88 SD. The elemental concentrations (mmol/kg dry wt +/- SD) of muscle fibers measured with 0.5-9-μm diameter electron probes in normal frog striated muscle were: P, 302 +/- 4.3; S, 189 +/- 2.9;C1, 24 +/- 1.1;K, 404 +/- 4.3, and Mg, 39 +/- 2.1. It is concluded that: (a) in normal muscle the "excess CI" measured with previous bulk chemical analyses and flux studies is not compartmentalized in the SR or in other cellular organelles, and (b) the cytoplasmic C1 in low [K](0) solutions exceeds that predicted by a passive electrochemical distribution. Hypertonic 2.2 X NaCl, 2.5 X sucrose, or 2.2 X Na isethionate produced: (a) swollen vacuoles, frequently paired, adjacent to the Z lines and containing significantly higher than

  2. Membrane potential stabilization in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres in hypertonic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A; Fraser, James A; Chawla, Sangeeta; Skepper, Jeremy N; Schwiening, Christof J; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated membrane transport mechanisms influencing relative changes in cell volume (V) and resting membrane potential (Em) following osmotic challenge in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres. It demonstrated a stabilization of Em despite cell shrinkage, which was attributable to elevation of intracellular [Cl−] above electrochemical equilibrium through Na+–Cl− and Na+−K+−2Cl− cotransporter action following exposures to extracellular hypertonicity. Fibre volumes (V) determined by confocal microscope xz-scanning of cutaneous pectoris muscle fibres varied linearly with [1/extracellular osmolarity], showing insignificant volume corrections, in fibres studied in Cl−-free, normal and Na+-free Ringer solutions and in the presence of bumetanide, chlorothiazide and ouabain. The observed volume changes following increases in extracellular tonicity were compared with microelectrode measurements of steady-state resting potentials (Em). Fibres in isotonic Cl−-free, normal and Na+-free Ringer solutions showed similar Em values consistent with previously reported permeability ratios PNa/PK(0.03–0.05) and PCl/PK (∼2.0) and intracellular [Na+], [K+] and [Cl−]. Increased extracellular osmolarities produced hyperpolarizing shifts in Em in fibres studied in Cl−-free Ringer solution consistent with the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation. In contrast, fibres exposed to hypertonic Ringer solutions of normal ionic composition showed no such Em shifts, suggesting a Cl−-dependent stabilization of membrane potential. This stabilization of Em was abolished by withdrawing extracellular Na+ or by the combined presence of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter (NCC) inhibitor chlorothiazide (10 μm) and the Na+−K+−2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) inhibitor bumetanide (10 μm), or the Na+−K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain (1 or 10 μm) during alterations in extracellular osmolarity. Application of such agents after such increases in tonicity only produced a

  3. Osmolyte and Na+ transport balances of rat hepatocytes as a function of hypertonic stress.

    PubMed

    Wehner, F; Tinel, H

    2000-11-01

    The initial event in the regulatory volume increase (RVI) of rat hepatocytes is an influx of Na+ that is then exchanged for K+ via stimulation of Na+/K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). In this study, we analysed the activation pattern of the Na+ transporters underlying RVI as a function of the degree of hypertonic stress. In confluent primary cultures, four hypertonic conditions were tested (changes from 300 to 327, 360, 400 or 450 mosmol/l) and the activities of Na+ conductance, Na+/H+ antiport, Na+-K+-2Cl- symport and Na+/K+-ATPase were quantified using intracellular microelectrodes, microfluorometry and time-dependent, furosemide- or ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, respectively. Neither Na+ conductance nor Na+-K+-2Cl- symport responded to 327 mosmol/A. At 360, 400 and 450 mosmol/l, uptake via these transporters would lead to increases of cell Na+ by 33.0, 49.0 and 49.0 and by 4.5, 10.4 and 9.2 mmol/l per 10 min, respectively. In contrast, Na+/H+ antiport exhibited 65% of its maximal activation already at 327 mosmol/l. At the four osmolarities tested, this transporter would augment cell Na+ by 6.9, 8.9, 9.8 and 10.6 mmol/l per 10 min. The sums of Na+ import were consistent with the amounts of Na+ exported via Na+/K+-ATPase plus the actual increases of cell Na+ (21.2, 58.5, 63.6 and 68.3 mmol/l per 10 min and 2.2, 4.0, 6.3 and 8.2 mmol/l, respectively). In addition, these elevations of cell Na+ plus the increases of cell K+ (via Na+/K+-ATPase) that amounted to 5.0, 6.5, 17.5 and 18.4 mmol/l were consistent with the increases of intracellular osmotic (cationic) activity of 2.5, 11.5, 21.0 and 28.5 mmol/l, respectively, computed from RVI data. It is concluded that the principle of rat hepatocyte RVI, i.e. an initial uptake of Na+ that is then exchanged for K+ via Na+/K+-ATPase, is realized over the entire range of 9-50% hypertonicity tested. The set-point for the activation of RVI clearly lies below 327 mosmol/l. Na+/H+ antiport is the most sensitive Na+ importer

  4. Analysis of Prehospital Documentation of Injury-Related Pain Assessment and Analgesic Administration on the Contemporary Battlefield.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Reeves, Patrick T; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Robinson, John B; Butler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In addition to life-saving interventions, the assessment of pain and subsequent administration of analgesia are primary benchmarks for quality emergency medical services care which should be documented and analyzed. Analyze US combat casualty data from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) with a primary focus on prehospital pain assessment, analgesic administration and documentation. Retrospective cohort study of battlefield prehospital and hospital casualty data were abstracted by DoDTR from available records from 1 September 2007 through 30 June 2011. Data included demographics; injury mechanism; prehospital and initial combat hospital pain assessment documented by standard 0-to-10 numeric rating scale; analgesics administered; and survival outcome. Records were available for 8,913 casualties (median ISS of 5 [IQR 2 to 10]; 98.7% survived). Prehospital analgesic administration was documented for 1,313 cases (15%). Prehospital pain assessment was recorded for 581 cases (7%; median pain score 6 [IQR 3 to 8]), hospital pain assessment was recorded for 5,007 cases (56%; median pain score5 [CI95% 3 to 8]), and 409 cases (5%) had both prehospital and hospital pain assessments that could be paired. In this paired group, 49.1% (201/409) had alleviation of pain evidenced by a decrease in pain score (median 4,, IQR 2 to 5); 23.5% (96/409) had worsening of pain evidenced by an increase in pain score (median 3, CI95 2.8 to 3.7, IQR 1 to 5); 27.4% (112/409) had no change; and the overall difference was an average decrease in pain score of 1.1 (median 0, IQR 0 to 3, p < 0.01). Time-series analysis showed modest increases in prehospital and hospital pain assessment documentation and prehospital analgesic documentation. Our study demonstrates that prehospital pain assessment, management, and documentation remain primary targets for performance improvement on the battlefield. Results of paired prehospital to hospital pain scores and time-series analysis demonstrate

  5. Hypertonic stress induces VEGF production in human colon cancer cell line Caco-2: inhibitory role of autocrine PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luciana B; Piva, Bruno; Diaz, Bruno L

    2011-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG)E₂ are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE₂ generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE₂ generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE₂ production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE₂ on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA₂ (ATK) and COX-2 (NS-398) inhibitors, that completely block PGE₂ generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE₂ receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE₂ or selective EP₂ receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE₂ appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl₂ was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE₂ generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE₂ plays an inhibitory

  6. Prehospital airway management: high tech meets trauma: an air medical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in the United States for those younger than 35 years and injuries sustained from trauma are a significant source of moderate to severe disability. The inability to establish, secure, or maintain a definitive airway is a major cause of preventable death and secondary injury due to inadequate oxygenation and ventilation. Prehospital airway management is an essential skill of any prehospital care provider. A critical component to providing excellent airway management is the ability of the provider to quickly establish endotracheal intubation without complications such as hypoxia, hyper/hypocapnea, or hypotension. These complications have been shown to cause increased morbidity and mortality, especially in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury. This article presents some of the challenges faced by flight nurses in the air medical environment and how Airlift Northwest has developed a structured, standardized approach to airway management both in training and it the prehospital setting. We will discuss the process improvements that lead to the implementation of video laryngoscopy as our first-line intubation tool. The ultimate goal of any air medical or prehospital emergency medical services program is to manage 100% of airways without complications, which will decrease morbidity and mortality, ultimately improving patient outcomes.

  7. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  8. Prehospital coagulation monitoring of resuscitation with point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    A variety of point-of-care monitors for the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood gas with electrolytes, and lactate can be used also in the prehospital setting for optimizing and individualizing trauma resuscitation. Point-of-care coagulation testing with activated prothrombin test, prothrombin test, and activated coagulation/clotting time tests is available for prehospital use. Although robust, battery driven, and easy to handle, many devices lack documentation for use in prehospital care. Some of the devices correspond poorly to corresponding laboratory analyses in acute trauma coagulopathy and at lower hematocrits. In trauma, viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography can rapidly detect acute trauma coagulopathy and give an overall dynamic picture of the hemostatic system and the interaction between its different components: coagulation activation, fibrin polymerization, fibrin platelet interactions within the clot, and fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry is shock resistant and has the potential to be used outside the hospital setting to guide individualized coagulation factor and blood component therapies. Sonoclot and Rheorox are two small viscoelastic instruments with one-channel options, but with less documentation. The point-of-care market for coagulation tests is quickly expanding, and new devices are introduced all the time. Still they should be better adopted to prehospital conditions, small, robust, battery charged, and rapid and use small sample volumes and whole blood.

  9. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  10. Prehospital Medical Documentation in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry: A Retrospective Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Nesbitt , DSc, PA-C, Amelia M. Duran-Stanton, PhD, PA-C, and Robert T. Gerhardt, MD, MPH, FACEP Background: Prehospital care of combat casualties is a...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Therien S. P., Nesbitt M. E., Duran-Stanton A. M., Gerhardt R. T., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  11. Prehospital and En Route Analgesic Use in the Combat Setting: A Prospectively Designed, Multicenter, Observational Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Suppl 1): S38–42. 20. Borland ML, Jacobs I, Rogers IR: Options in prehospital analgesia. Emerg Med (Fremantle) 2002; 14(1): 77–84. 21. Park CL, Roberts ...analgesia–a basic approach. J R Army Med Corps 1996; 142(3): 101–2. 24. Laskowski K, Stirling A, McKay WP, Lim HJ: A systematic review of intravenous

  12. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  13. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-06-27

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.

  14. Prehospital Systolic Hypertension and Outcomes in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Connie; Govindarajan, Prasanthi

    2017-01-01

    Background It is well known that hematoma volume and expansion is associated with poor outcomes in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). The factors associated with hematoma volume and possible expansion include the use of anticoagulant medications, autoimmune or bacterial diseases that reduce platelet production, and genetic defects of Von Willebrand factor causing inhibition or reduction of platelet aggregation. However, little is known about the role of elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) on hematoma volume and its ultimate role on sICH when identified in the prehospital setting. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of elevated SBP among diagnosed sICH patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS), and to explore possible associations between prehospital elevated SBP and hematoma volume. Methods This is a hypothesis-generating study for which we used a retrospective observational design. The subjects included 243 adult patients who were seen and treated for sICH in an emergency department serving a county hospital in a large metropolitan city. Elevated SBP in the setting of sICH was defined as ≥140 mm Hg. A univariate analysis was performed to investigate associations between patient demographics, elevated SBP, and sICH characteristics with the pre-determined outcome of hematoma volume. We then performed a multivariable logistic regression model to determine if elevated prehospital SBP remained associated with hematoma volume. Results The number of subjects with a hospital-based diagnosis of sICH was 243. Of those, 193 (79%) were transported by an ambulance. Among those transported by ambulance, 180 (93%) had a documented prehospital SBP; out of those patients with a documented SBP, 173 (96%) showed an elevated SBP of ≥140 mm Hg, and 82 (46%) had a hematoma volume of ≥30 mL. Our univariate analysis showed that sICH patients with an elevated prehospital SBP of ≥140 mm Hg were associated with hematoma volume

  15. Cap-independent protein synthesis is enhanced by betaine under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicelli, Domenica; Arfilli, Valentina; Onofrillo, Carmine; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2017-02-12

    Protein synthesis is one of the main cellular functions inhibited during hypertonic challenge. The subsequent accumulation of the compatible osmolyte betaine during the later adaptive response allows not only recovery of translation but also its stimulation. In this paper, we show that betaine modulates translation by enhancing the formation of cap-independent 48 S pre-initiation complexes, leaving cap-dependent 48 S pre-initiation complexes basically unchanged. In the presence of betaine, CrPV IRES- and sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter-2 (SNAT2) 5'-UTR-driven translation is 2- and 1.5-fold stimulated in MCF7 cells, respectively. Thus, betaine could provide an advantage in translation of messengers coding for proteins implicated in the response of cells to different stressors, which are often recognized by ribosomal 40 S subunit through simplified cap-independent mechanisms.

  16. Isotonic and hypertonic saline droplet deposition in a human upper airway model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Kim, Chong S

    2006-01-01

    The evaporative and hygroscopic effects and deposition of isotonic and hypertonic saline droplets have been simulated from the mouth to the first four generations of the tracheobronchial tree under laminar-transitional-turbulent inspiratory flow conditions. Specifically, the local water vapor transport, droplet evaporation rate, and deposition fractions are analyzed. The effects of inhalation flow rates, thermodynamic air properties and NaCl-droplet concentrations of interest are discussed as well. The validated computer simulation results indicate that the increase of NaCl-solute concentration, increase of inlet relative humidity, or decrease of inlet air temperature may reduce water evaporation and increase water condensation at saline droplet surfaces, resulting in higher droplet depositions due to the increasing particle diameter and density. However, solute concentrations below 10% may not have a very pronounced effect on droplet deposition in the human upper airways.

  17. Ultramicroscopic and biochemical changes in ram spermatozoa cryopreserved with trehalose-based hypertonic extenders.

    PubMed

    Aisen, E; Quintana, M; Medina, V; Morello, H; Venturino, A

    2005-06-01

    The ability of a range of extenders to cryopreserve ram spermatozoa was tested. The extenders were modified by the inclusion of citrate, Tris buffer, trehalose, and EDTA. Ejaculates from three Pampinta rams were evaluated and pooled at 30 degrees C. The semen was diluted to contain 1 x 10(9) cells/mL, cooled to 5 degrees C, loaded into 0.25-mL straws, frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen. Evaluation was based on the hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS test), electron microscopy, and biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation and reduced and total glutathione levels, all measured after thawing. The HOS test indicated that the percentage of intact plasma membranes after freezing and thawing was significantly higher for the hypertonic extender containing trehalose (T), compared with an extender containing trehalose+EDTA (TE) or an isotonic Tris extender (B) (p < 0.05). Membrane evaluation by ultramicroscopy also indicated better sperm cryopreservation in extender T compared with the others, and there was a significant reduction in the number of damaged membranes (27%, p < 0.0002). The level of reduced glutathione was significantly higher after sperm cryopreservation in either hypertonic diluent (T and TE) with respect to the isotonic extender B, immediately after thawing (12%) and after a 3-h post-thawing thermotolerance test at 37 degrees C (17%, p = 0.007). Total glutathione levels did not show statistical differences among the extenders. After 3h post-thawing incubation at 37 degrees C, lipid peroxide levels in spermatozoa were statistically lower for T than TE (35%) or isotonic extender B (44%) (p = 0.002). Taken together these results indicate a reduction in the oxidative stress provoked by freezing and thawing when semen is cryopreserved in extender T. The antioxidant properties of extender T may be related to its effectiveness in membrane cryopreservation.

  18. Centrally administered vasopressin cross-sensitizes rats to amphetamine and drinking hypertonic NaCl.

    PubMed

    McBride, Shawna M; Flynn, Francis W

    2007-09-01

    Prior sodium restriction cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor effects of amphetamines and vice versa. Repeated central injections of vasopressin (VP) induce a psychomotor sensitization similar to amphetamine sensitization and repeated sodium deficiency. Thus brain VP signaling may be a common mechanism involved in mediating these two motivational systems. In experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that rats previously sensitized to central VP would show enhanced psychomotor responses to amphetamine. Rats were administered saline, VP (50 ng), or amphetamine (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg) on days 1 and 2, and given saline or amphetamine on day 3. Amphetamine produced psychomotor arousal in all groups. However, amphetamine on day 3 elicited a significantly greater psychomotor response in rats that had prior injections of amphetamine or VP than in rats previously treated with saline. In experiment 2, the hypothesis that prior experience with central VP would cross-sensitize rats to drinking hypertonic sodium (NaCl) solutions was tested. Rats were administered VP (50 ng) or saline for 3 days. On the fourth day, nondeprived rats were given access to 0.3 M NaCl and water for 1 h. Control and saline-treated rats only drank 1 ml of 0.3 M NaCl, but rats previously exposed to central VP drank significantly more hypertonic saline (4 ml). These results show that prior experience with central VP cross-sensitizes rats to the psychomotor stimulant effects of amphetamine and the ingestion of concentrated NaCl solutions. This pattern of cross-sensitization links central VP signaling, amphetamine, and sodium deficiency, and therefore it may play a role in the cross-sensitization between sodium appetite and amphetamines.

  19. Axial hypertonicity in Parkinson's disease: direct measurements of trunk and hip torque.

    PubMed

    Wright, W G; Gurfinkel, V S; Nutt, J; Horak, F B; Cordo, P J

    2007-11-01

    A cardinal feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is muscle hypertonicity, i.e. rigidity. Little is known about the axial tone in PD or the relation of hypertonia to functional impairment. We quantified axial rigidity to assess its relation to motor symptoms as measured by UPDRS and determine whether rigidity is affected by levodopa treatment. Axial rigidity was measured in 12 PD and 14 age-matched controls by directly measuring torsional resistance of the longitudinal axis to twisting (+/-10 degrees ). Feet were rotated relative to fixed hips (Hip Tone) or feet and hips were rotated relative to fixed shoulders (Trunk Tone). To assess tonic activity only, low constant velocity rotation (1 degrees /s) and low acceleration (<12 degrees /s(2)) were used to avoid eliciting phasic sensorimotor responses. Subjects stood during testing without changing body orientation relative to gravity. Body parts fixed against rotation could translate laterally within the boundaries of normal postural sway, but could not rotate. PD OFF-medication had higher axial rigidity (p<0.05) in hips (5.07 N m) and trunk (5.30 N m) than controls (3.51 N m and 4.46 N m, respectively), which did not change with levodopa (p>0.10). Hip-to-trunk torque ratio was greater in PD than controls (p<0.05) and unchanged by levodopa (p=0.28). UPDRS scores were significantly correlated with hip rigidity for PD OFF-medication (r values=0.73, p<0.05). Torsional resistance to clockwise versus counter-clockwise axial rotation was more asymmetrical in PD than controls (p<0.05), however, there was no correspondence between direction of axial asymmetry and side of disease onset. In conclusion, these findings concerning hypertonicity may underlie functional impairments of posture and locomotion in PD. The absence of a levodopa effect on axial tone suggests that axial and appendicular tones are controlled by separate neural circuits.

  20. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. Results 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p < 0.001) more deficits in their professional training than paramedics. 80% of the paramedics affirmed to have had adequate training with respect to prehospital trauma care, all physicians claimed not to have had sufficient training for prehospital trauma care situations at Medical School. Physicians were statistically most significant dissatisfied then paramedics (p < 0.001). While most participants gave positive feedback, anesthetists were less convinced of PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn’t benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p < 0.001). After PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. Conclusion The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital

  1. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  2. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. Methods This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Results Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. Conclusion The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen “positive coping” characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies. PMID:28243409

  3. Prehospital Use of Magnesium Sulfate as Neuroprotection in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Eckstein, Marc; Stratton, Samuel J.; Pratt, Franklin D.; Hamilton, Scott; Conwit, Robin; Liebeskind, David S.; Sung, Gene; Kramer, Ian; Moreau, Gary; Goldweber, Robert; Sanossian, Nerses

    2016-01-01

    -group differences were noted with respect to mortality (15.4% in the magnesium group and 15.5% in the placebo group, P = 0.95) or all serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Prehospital initiation of magnesium sulfate therapy was safe and allowed the start of therapy within 2 hours after the onset of stroke symptoms, but it did not improve disability outcomes at 90 days. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; FAST-MAG ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059332.) PMID:25651247

  4. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Rick; Meenan, Molly; Prince, Erin; Murphy, Ronald; Tambussi, Caitlin; Rohrbach, Rick; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS) immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based); the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria); and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients <12 or >65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness).To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Results Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1–96.9%); Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5–72.6%); Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9–84.7%). There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Conclusion Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS criteria

  5. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  6. [Incidence of sudden death cases in acute coronary insufficiency and acute myocardial infarction at the pre-hospital stage in Krasnoyarsk].

    PubMed

    Opaleva-Stegantseva, V A; Ivanov, A G; Gavrilina, I A; Khar'kov, E I; Ratovskaia, V I

    1986-05-01

    The impact of improvements in prehospital cardiologic service on total and prehospital mortality associated with acute coronary insufficiency (ACI) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and the causes of fatal outcomes is illustrated by a study based on the acute myocardial infarction register involving populations from two city districts between 20 and 69 years of age. Prehospital mortality caused by ACI and AMI is shown to decline with the progress of cardiologic care. The decline is attributed to reduced incidence of some causes of death, such as heart failure and cardiogenic shock. Sudden coronary death (85.1%) remains the principal cause of prehospital mortality.

  7. Exclusion of context knowledge in the development of prehospital guidelines: results produced by realistic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital work is accomplished using guidelines and protocols, but there is evidence suggesting that compliance with guidelines is sometimes low in the prehospital setting. The reason for the poor compliance is not known. The objective of this study was to describe how guidelines and protocols are used in the prehospital context. Methods This was a single-case study with realistic evaluation as a methodological framework. The study took place in an ambulance organization in Sweden. The data collection was divided into four phases, where phase one consisted of a literature screening and selection of a theoretical framework. In phase two, semi-structured interviews with the ambulance organization's stakeholders, responsible for the development and implementation of guidelines, were performed. The third phase, observations, comprised 30 participants from both a rural and an urban ambulance station. In the last phase, two focus group interviews were performed. A template analysis style of documents, interviews and observation protocols was used. Results The development of guidelines took place using an informal consensus approach, where no party from the end users was represented. The development process resulted in guidelines with an insufficiently adapted format for the prehospital context. At local level, there was a conscious implementation strategy with lectures and manikin simulation. The physical format of the guidelines was the main obstacle to explicit use. Due to the format, the ambulance personnel feel they have to learn the content of the guidelines by heart. Explicit use of the guidelines in the assessment of patients was uncommon. Many ambulance personnel developed homemade guidelines in both electronic and paper format. The ambulance personnel in the study generally took a positive view of working with guidelines and protocols and they regarded them as indispensable in prehospital care, but an improved format was requested by both

  8. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases.

  9. Sensory findings after stimulation of the thoracolumbar fascia with hypertonic saline suggest its contribution to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Magerl, Walter; Benrath, Justus; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline into deep tissues of the back (subcutis, muscle, or the surrounding fascia) can induce acute low back pain (LBP). So far, no study has analyzed differences in temporal, qualitative, and spatial pain characteristics originating from these tissues. The current study aimed to investigate the role of the thoracolumbar fascia as a potential source of LBP. In separate sessions, 12 healthy subjects received ultrasound-guided bolus injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) or hypertonic saline (5.8%) into the erector spinae muscle, the thoracolumbar fascia (posterior layer), and the overlying subcutis. Subjects were asked to rate pain intensity, duration, quality, and spatial extent. Pressure pain thresholds were determined pre and post injection. Injections of hypertonic saline into the fascia resulted in significantly larger area under the curve of pain intensity over time than injections into subcutis (P<0.01) or muscle (P<0.001), primarily based on longer pain durations and, to a lesser extent, on higher peak pain ratings. Pressure hyperalgesia was only induced by injection of hypertonic saline into muscle, but not fascia or subcutis. Pain radiation and pain affect evoked by fascia injection exceeded those of the muscle (P<0.01) and the subcutis significantly (P<0.05). Pain descriptors after fascia injection (burning, throbbing, and stinging) suggested innervation by both A- and C-fiber nociceptors. These findings show that the thoracolumbar fascia is the deep tissue of the back that is most sensitive to chemical stimulation, making it a prime candidate to contribute to nonspecific LBP but not to localized pressure hyperalgesia.

  10. Acute inhalation of hypertonic saline does not improve mucociliary clearance in all children with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known of how mucociliary clearance (MCC) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and normal pulmonary function compares with healthy adults, or how an acute inhalation of 7% hypertonic saline (HS) aerosol affects MCC in these same children. Methods We compared MCC in 12 children with CF and normal pulmonary function after an acute inhalation of 0.12% saline (placebo), or HS, admixed with the radioisotope 99 mtechnetium sulfur colloid in a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study. Mucociliary clearance on the placebo day in the children was also compared to MCC in 10 healthy, non-CF adults. Mucociliary clearance was quantified over a 90 min period, using gamma scintigraphy, and is reported as MCC at 60 min (MCC60) and 90 min (MCC90). Results Median [interquartile range] MCC60 and MCC90 in the children on the placebo visit were 15.4 [12.4-24.5]% and 19.3 [17.3-27.8%]%, respectively, which were similar to the adults with 17.8 [6.4-28.7]% and 29.6 [16.1-43.5]%, respectively. There was no significant improvement in MCC60 (2.2 [-6.2-11.8]%) or MCC90 (2.3 [-1.2-10.5]%) with HS, compared to placebo. In addition, 5/12 and 4/12 of the children showed a decrease in MCC60 and MCC90, respectively, after inhalation of HS. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the change in MCC90 after HS showed a significantly greater improvement in MCC in children with lower placebo MCC90 compared to those with higher placebo MCC90 (p = 0.045). Conclusions These data suggest that percent MCC varies significantly between children with CF lung disease and normal pulmonary functions, with some children demonstrating MCC values within the normal range and others showing MCC values that are below normal values. In addition, although MCC did not improve in all children after inhalation of HS, improvement did occur in children with relatively low MCC values after placebo. This finding suggests that acute inhalation of hypertonic saline may benefit a subset of children with low MCC

  11. Generating chimeric mice from embryonic stem cells via vial coculturing or hypertonic microinjection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The generation of a fertile embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived or F0 (100 % coat color chimerism) mice is the final criterion in proving that the ESC is truly pluripotent. Many methods have been developed to produce chimeric mice. To date, the most popular methods for generating chimeric embryos is well sandwich aggregation between zona pellucida (ZP) removed (denuded) 2.5-day post-coitum (dpc) embryos and ESC clumps, or direct microinjection of ESCs into the cavity (blastocoel) of 3.5-dpc blastocysts. However, due to systemic limitations and the disadvantages of conventional microinjection, aggregation, and coculturing, two novel methods (vial coculturing and hypertonic microinjection) were developed in recent years at my laboratory.Coculturing 2.5-dpc denuded embryos with ESCs in 1.7-mL vials for ~3 h generates chimeras that have significantly high levels of chimerism (including 100 % coat color chimerism) and germline transmission. This method has significantly fewer instrumental and technological limitations than existing methods, and is an efficient, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible method for "mass production" of chimeric embryos. For laboratories without a microinjection system, this is the method of choice for generating chimeric embryos. Microinjecting ESCs into a subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos can generate germline-transmitted chimeras including 100 % coat color chimerism. However, this method is adopted rarely due to the very small and tight space between ZP and blastomeres. Using a laser pulse or Piezo-driven instrument/device to help introduce ESCs into the subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos demonstrates the superior efficiency in generating ESC-derived (F0) chimeras. Unfortunately, due to the need for an expensive instrument/device and extra fine skill, not many studies have used either method. Recently, ESCs injected into the large subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos in an injection medium containing 0.2-0.3 M sucrose very efficiently generated

  12. TRPV4 mediates pain-related behavior induced by mild hypertonic stimuli in the presence of inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Joseph, Elizabeth; Dina, Olayinka A; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Levine, Jon D

    2005-11-01

    The ligand-gated ion channel, TRPV4, functions as a transducer of hypotonic stimuli in primary afferent nociceptive neurons and contributes to inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Hypertonic saline also stimulates primary afferent nociceptors and the injection of mild hypertonic saline (2-5%) is widely used as an experimental model of pain in humans. Therefore, we tested whether TRPV4 participates in the transduction of hypertonic stimuli. Intradermal injection of 2% (607 mOsm) or 10% (3,250 mOsm) saline solution in the hind paw of rats induced a concentration-dependent pain-related behavior, flinching. Sensitization with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) caused a 7-fold increase in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline but failed to increase those caused by 10% saline. Spinal administration of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to TRPV4 caused a 46% decrease in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline, but there was no change in flinching induced by 10% saline. Similarly, only the nociceptive behavior caused by 2% saline was reduced in TRPV4(-/-) knockout mice. The TRPV4-mediated nociceptive behaviors induced by hyper- and hypotonic stimuli were dependent on Src tyrosine kinase. We suggest TRPV4 is a transducer in primary afferents that mediates nociceptive behavior induced by small increases or decreases in osmolarity. Such changes in osmolarity might contribute to pain in inflammatory and neuropathic states.

  13. Prehospital Glidescope video laryngoscopy for difficult airway management in a helicopter rescue program with anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Struck, Manuel Florian; Wittrock, Maike; Nowak, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the prehospital use of a Glidescope video laryngoscope (GSVL) due to anticipated and unexpected difficult airway in a helicopter emergency medical service setting in which emergency physicians (EP) are experienced anesthetists. Retrospective observational study and survey of the experiences of EP were conducted for more than a 3-year period (July 2007-August 2010). In 1675 missions, 152 tracheal intubations (TI) were performed. GSVL was used in 23 cases (15%). A total of 17 patients presented with multiple traumas, including nine with cervical spine immobilization, three with burns, and three with nontraumatic diagnoses. Eight patients experienced previously failed TI with conventional laryngoscopy (five by nonhelicopter emergency medical service EP). In two patients, the EP required two attempts with GSVL to obtain a successful TI. Since the introduction of the GSVL, no other backup airway device was necessary. GSVL may be a valuable support instrument in the prehospital management of difficult airways in emergency patients.

  14. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  15. [Role of lung biopsy in diagnosis of pulmonary pathology at the prehospital level].

    PubMed

    Filippov, V P; Evgushchenko, G V; Gedymin, L E; Sidirova, N F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the work was to assess the value of biopsy techniques for fibrobronchoscopy under local anesthesia in patients with pulmonary pathology at the prehospital level. It included 706 subjects with lobular, segmental or diffuse lesions in the lungs of specific (tuberculosis), non-specific (pneumonia, exogenous alveolitis), and other origin. All known methods of endobronchial biopsy were employed (bronchoalveolar lavage or liquid lung biopsy, tissue biopsy, transbronchial biopsy, brush biopsy, puncture and aspiration biopsy) with subsequent cytomorphological and bacteriological studies of bioptates. Diagnostic efficiency of direct biopsy was estimated at 97%, transbronchial biopsy at 5-90% depending on nosological form of lung disease, brush and puncture biopsy 20-50 and 6% respectively. Reversible complications occurred in 1.4% and were resolved by therapeutic methods. Cost effectiveness of prehospital instrumental examination of patients with pulmonary pathology is 10 times the intrahospital one.

  16. The SAMUKeppra study in prehospital status epilepticus: lessons for future study

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    In the Lancet Neurology article “Prehospital treatment with levetiracetam plus clonazepam or placebo plus clonazepam in status epilepticus (SAMUKeppra): a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial” the authors conducted a prehospital, randomized controlled study to determine which treatment is more effective for status epilepticus (SE): benzodiazepine alone, or in combination with levetiracetam (LEV). Although the study had negative results, several aspects of the trial design likely masked any added effect that LEV may have had in controlling SE, including: higher doses of benzodiazepines, lower thresholds for determining cessation of SE, and a smaller sample size. Regardless, the study reaffirms the effectiveness and importance of early and adequate benzodiazepine dosing and helps guide us in designing future studies for treatment of SE. PMID:28090524

  17. Pre-Hospital and In-Hospital Thoracostomy: Indications and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Aylwin, Christopher J; Brohi, Karim; Davies, Gareth D; Walsh, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pleural drainage with chest tube insertion for thoracic trauma is a common and often life-saving technique. Although considered a simple procedure, complication rates have been reported to be 2–25%. We conducted a prospective cohort observational study of emergency pleural drainage procedures to validate the indications for pre-hospital thoracostomy and to identify complications from both pre- and in-hospital thoracostomies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data were collected over a 7-month period on all patients receiving either pre-hospital thoracostomy or emergency department tube thoracostomy. Outcome measures were appropriate indications, errors in tube placement and subsequent complications. RESULTS Ninety-one chest tubes were placed into 52 patients. Sixty-five thoracostomies were performed in the field without chest tube placement. Twenty-six procedures were performed following emergency department identification of thoracic injury. Of the 65 pre-hospital thoracostomies, 40 (61%) were for appropriate indications of suspected tension pneumothorax or a low output state. The overall complication rate was 14% of which 9% were classified as major and three patients required surgical intervention. Twenty-eight (31%) chest tubes were poorly positioned and 15 (17%) of these required repositioning. CONCLUSIONS Pleural drainage techniques may be complicated and have the potential to cause life-threatening injury. Pre-hospital thoracostomies have the same potential risks as in-hospital procedures and attention must be paid to insertion techniques under difficult scene conditions. In-hospital chest tube placement complication rates remain uncomfortably high, and attention must be placed on training and assessment of staff in this basic procedure. PMID:18201502

  18. County-level effects of prehospital regionalization of critically ill patients: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Alotaik, Osama; Wallace, David J.; Elhabashy, Ahmed E.; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Rea, Thomas D; Angus, Derek C.; Nichol, Graham; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Regionalization may improve critical care delivery, yet stakeholders cite concerns about its feasibility. We sought to determine the operational effects of prehospital regionalization of non-trauma, non-arrest critical illness. Design Discrete event simulation study Patients and setting All 2006 hospital discharge data from King County, Washington, linked to all adult, eligible patients transported by county EMS agencies. Methods We simulated active triage of high-risk patients to designated referral centers using a validated prehospital risk score; we studied three regionalization scenarios: (1) up triage, (2) up & down triage, (3) up & down triage after reducing intensive care unit (ICU) beds by 25%. We determined the effect on patient routing, ICU occupancy at referral and non-referral hospitals, and EMS transport times. Measurements and Main Results 119,117 patients were hospitalized at 11 non-referral centers and 76,817 patients were hospitalized at three referral centers. Among 20,835 EMS patients, 7,817 (43%) patients were eligible for up triage and 10,242 (57%) patients were eligible for down triage. At baseline mean daily ICU bed occupancy was 61% referral and 47% at non-referral hospitals. Up-triage increased referral ICU occupancy to 68%, up and down triage to 64%, and up and down triage with bed reduction to 74%. Mean daily non-referral ICU occupancy did not exceed 60%. Total EMS transport time increased by less than 3% with up and down triage. Conclusions Regionalization based on prehospital triage of the critically ill can allocate high-risk patients to referral hospitals without adversely affecting ICU occupancy or prehospital travel time. PMID:26102251

  19. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. Method In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Results Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic “bubble-wrap” were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. Conclusion The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic “bubble wrap”, and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units. PMID:23938145

  20. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  1. Is Heart Rate Variability Better Than Routine Vital Signs for Prehospital Identification of Major Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    sinus arrhythmia that was identified by computer algorithm (each cycle indicated by numerals above the RRI waveform); see text for more details about...SampEn], and rate of sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) measured up to the 15th minute of each subject’s prehospital data record. SDNN [8-11] and SampEn [2...themultivariate logistic regressionmodels consisting of different combinations of routine vital signs and rate of sinus arrhythmia for predicting 24-hour PRBC

  2. 911 (nueve once): Spanish-speaking parents' perspectives on prehospital emergency care for children.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer; Cowden, John D; Cupertino, A Paula; Dowd, M Denise; Kennedy, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Racial, ethnic and language-based disparities occur throughout the US health system. Pediatric prehospital emergency medical services are less likely to be used by Latinos. We identified perceptions of and barriers to prehospital pediatric emergency care (911) access among Spanish-speaking parents. A qualitative study involving six focus groups was conducted. Spanish-speaking parents participated with a bilingual moderator. Topics discussed included experiences, knowledge, beliefs, fears, barriers, and improvement strategies. All groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and reviewed for recurring themes. Forty-nine parents participated. Though parents believed 911 was available to all, many were uncertain how to use it, and what qualified as an emergency. Barriers included language discordance, fear of exposing immigration status, and fear of financial consequences. Parents strongly desired to learn more about 911 through classes, brochures, and media campaigns. Prehospital emergency care should be available to all children. Further quantitative studies may help solidify the identified barriers and uncover areas needing improvement within Emergency Medical Systems. Addressing barriers to 911 use in Spanish-speaking communities could improve the equity of health care delivery, while also decreasing the amount of non-emergency 911 use.

  3. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: Is there still room for improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Sollid, Stephen JM; Heltne, Jon Kenneth; Søreide, Eldar; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2008-01-01

    Background Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Method Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Results Of the 17 available respondents, most (88%) felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. Conclusion The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted. PMID:18957064

  4. Insurance and Prehospital Delay in Patients ≤55 Years of Age with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Serene I.; Wang, Yongfei; Dreyer, Rachel; Strait, Kelly M.; Spatz, Erica S.; Xu, Xiao; Smolderen, Kim G.; Desai, Nihar R.; Lorenze, Nancy P.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Spertus, John A.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Bueno, Héctor; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study assessed whether gender differences in health insurance help explain gender differences in delay in seeking care for US patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We also assessed gender differences in such prehospital delay for AMI in Spain, a country with universal insurance. We used data from 2,951 US and 496 Spanish patients aged 18–55 years with AMI. US patients were grouped by insurance status: adequately insured, underinsured, or uninsured. For each country, we assessed the association between gender and prehospital delay (symptom onset to hospital arrival). For the US cohort, we modeled the relationship between insurance groups and delay of >12 hours. US women were less likely than men to be uninsured, but more likely to be underinsured and a larger proportion of women than men experienced delays of >12 hours (38% versus 29%). We found no association between insurance status and delays of >12 hours in men or women. Only 17.3% of Spanish patients had delays of >12 hours and there were no significant gender differences. In conclusion, women were more likely than men to delay, though it was not explained by differences in insurance status. The lack of gender differences in prehospital delays in Spain suggests that these differences may vary by health care system and culture. PMID:26541907

  5. Patients with acute chest pain - experiences of emergency calls and pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Kihlgren, Mona; Ostman, Ingela; Sørlie, Venke

    2005-01-01

    Acute chest pain is a common reason why people call an emergency medical dispatch (EMD) centre. We examined how patients with acute chest pain experience the emergency call and their pre-hospital care. A qualitative design was used with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Thirteen patients were interviewed, three women and 10 men. The patients were grateful that their lives had been saved and in general were satisfied with their pre-hospital contact. Sometimes they felt that it took too long for the emergency operators to answer and to understand the urgency. They were in a life-threatening situation and their feeling of vulnerability and dependency was great. Time seemed to stand still while they were waiting for help during their traumatic experience. The situation was fraught with pain, fear and an experience of loneliness. A sense of individualized care is important to strengthen trust and confidence between the patient and the pre-hospital personnel. Patients were aware of what number to call to reach the EMD centre, but were uncertain about when to call. More lives can be saved if people do not hesitate to call for help.

  6. Development and Validation of the Pre-Hospital Stroke Symptoms Coping Test

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuemei; Zuo, Qingqing; Wu, Yanni; Yang, Liu; Gao, Wei; Li, Minghui; Cheng, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Measures of specific knowledge of coping with pre-hospital stroke symptoms can help educate high-risk patients and family caregivers. This study aimed to develop and validate the Pre-hospital Stroke Symptoms Coping Test (PSSCT). Materials and Methods Reliability and validity were analyzed using multiple data sources. The Delphi expert consultation method was applied to assess the test’s surface validity and content validity index. The final edition of the 19-item PSSCT contained 3 sections assessing coping with typical symptoms and symptoms associated with vomiting and twitching. Its psychometric properties were investigated in a community sample of 300 high-risk patients and family members. Results The PSSCT was readily accepted by participants. It demonstrated adequate surface validity and content validity, and good internal consistency (KR20 = 0.822) and test-retest reliability (0.769), with difficulty (P) and degree of differentiation (D) ranges of 0.28–0.83 and 0.15–0.66, respectively. It was also able to distinguish between individuals who had/had not experienced a stroke. Experienced individuals scored significantly higher overall and on coping with typical symptoms and twitching (P<0.01). Conclusions The PSSCT can practically and directly assess critical knowledge regarding coping with pre-hospital stroke symptoms and has good reliability and validity. PMID:25330453

  7. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  8. [Effect of sodium cromoglycate on airway vascular leakage caused by hypertonic saline in the rat trachea].

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, I; Tamaoki, J; Takeda, Y; Konno, K

    1996-09-01

    The action of the anti-asthmatic drug sodium cromoglycate (SCG) on airway inflammation remains uncertain. Using Evans blue dye as a maker of plasma leakage, we studied the effect of SCG on neurogenic vascular extravasation evoked by hypertonic saline (HTS) in the rat trachea. Inhalation of HTS (5-15%) caused a concentration-dependent increase in plasma leakage, but inhaled 0.9% NaCl had no effect. Inhalation of SCG did not affect the baseline level of vascular permeability, but it inhibited the effect of HTS in a dose-dependent manner: plasma extravasation induced by 10% NaCl was significantly reduced by 2 minutes of inhalation of SCG at concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/ml (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). SCG (10 mg/ml), also inhibited the changes in microvascular permeability caused by aerosols of substance P (10(-4) M), whereas it did not affect the responses to aerosols of platelet-activating factor (3 x 10(-4) M). A similar dose of SCG did not significantly alter microvascular leakage caused by 5% NaCl. However, phosphoramidon, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiated the response to 5% NaCl, an effect that was inhibited by SCG (p < 0.05). These results suggest that SCG inhibits HTS-induced airway vascular permeability, presumably through a tachykinin-antagonist-like property, and that this inhibition is exaggerated when the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase is low.

  9. Some Effects of Hypertonic Solutions on Contraction and Excitation-Contraction Coupling in Frog Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. M.; Godt, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    In frog fast skeletal muscle, we find a decline of twitch, tetanus, and maximum K and caffeine contracture tensions as tonicity of the bathing solution is increased. The decline of tension independent of the method of producing contraction indicates that the major effect of hypertonicity is directly on contractile tension probably because of the increased internal ionic strength. However, there is some apparent disruption of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in solutions made three times the normal tonicity (3T solutions) since: (a) in 3T solutions tetanic and K contracture tensions decline to zero from a value near the average maximum caffeine contracture tension at this tonicity (10% of 1T tetanic tension). At this time, caffeine contractures of 10% of 1T tetanic tension can be elicited; (b) once the K contracture tension has declined, elevated [Ca++]o, 19.8 mM, restores K contracture tension to 13% of 1T tetanic tension. This probable disruption is not caused by changes in mechanical threshold since in 2T solutions the mechanical threshold is shifted by 12 mv in the hyperpolarizing direction. This is consistent with neutralization of fixed negative charges on the inside of the membrane. The repriming curve is also shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction in 2T solutions. Shifts of the repriming curve coupled with membrane depolarizations in 3T solutions (about 20 mv) may produce loss of repriming ability at the resting potential and disruption of E-C coupling. PMID:5415044

  10. Cardiovascular effects of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions when injected into the liquor space of anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, W; Wei, E

    1979-05-01

    1 In cats anaesthetized with chloralose, hyper- and hypotonic solutions were injected into the cisterna magna (in 0.5 ml) or into a lateral cerebral ventricle (in 0.2 to 0.3 ml), with aqueduct cannulated to prevent the injected solution from entering the subarachnoid space, and the effects on blood pressure and heart rate were examined. 2 Cisternal injections of hyper- and hypotonic solutions of NaCl (0.51 M and 0.05 M), glucose (1.03 M and 0.10 M), or sucrose (1.02 M and 0.10 M), as well as distilled water produced a rise in arterial blood pressure with tachycardias. Isotonic solutions of NaCl, glucose or sucrose were ineffective. 3 Ventricular injections of the hypertonic NaCl solution, also produced a pressor response with tachycardia effects when injected in this way. 4 The pressor responses and the tachycardias occurred after bilateral vagotomy and resulted from a sympathetic discharge which, on cisternal injection, originated from structures reached from the subarachnoid space, and on ventricular injection, from structures in the ventricular walls, probably in the hypothalamus. 5 The stimuli responsible for the discharge, were, on cisternal injection, the changes in osmolarity and on ventricular injection, the sodium ions.

  11. Osmoregulation in water-deprived rats drinking hypertonic saline: effect of area postrema lesions.

    PubMed

    Stricker, E M; Craver, C F; Curtis, K S; Peacock-Kinzig, K A; Sved, A F; Smith, J C

    2001-03-01

    Rats drank rapidly when 0.3 M NaCl was the only drinking fluid available after overnight water deprivation, consuming approximately 200 ml/24 h. Although such large intakes of this hypertonic solution initially elevated plasma osmolality, excretion of comparable volumes of urine more concentrated than 300 meq Na(+)/l ultimately appears to restore plasma osmolality to normal levels. Rats drank approximately 100 ml of 0.5 M NaCl after overnight water deprivation, but urine Na(+) concentration (U(Na)) did not increase sufficiently to achieve osmoregulation. When an injected salt load exacerbated the initial dehydration caused by water deprivation, rats increased U(Na) to void the injected load and did not significantly alter 24-h intake of 0.3 or 0.5 M NaCl. Rats with lesions of area postrema had much higher saline intakes and lower U(Na) than did intact control rats; nonetheless, they appeared to osmoregulate well while drinking 0.3 M NaCl but not while drinking 0.5 M NaCl. Detailed analyses of drinking behavior by intact rats suggest that individual bouts were terminated by some rapid postabsorptive consequence of the ingested NaCl load that inhibited further NaCl intake, not by a fixed intake volume or number of licks that temporarily satiated thirst.

  12. Repeated Dosing of 23.4% Hypertonic Saline for Refractory Intracranial Hypertension. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Alden K; Nau, Karen M; Miller, David A; Hanel, Ricardo A; Freeman, WD

    2008-01-01

    Background: Hypertonic saline (HTS) at a concentration of 23.4% is an emerging therapy for intracranial hypertension. Compared to mannitol which can be given as a single bolus or as repeated bolus dosing, little data exists regarding safety or efficacy of repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. We report the first case of 16 doses of 23.4% HTS over a 5 day period in a patient with refractory intracranial hypertension. Case Report: A 43-year-old woman with Fisher 3 subarachnoid hemorrhage and hydrocephalus requiring an external ventricular drain developed global cerebral edema on computed tomography. Medically refractory intracranial hypertension ensued which required repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. Reductions in intracranial pressure (ICP) occurred after each dose of 23.4% HTS. No central nervous system complications occurred. Anasarca was the only observed complication, which responded to furosemide diuresis. Conclusion: Repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS was effective in reducing ICP in a case of medically refractory intracranial hypertension without major systemic complications. Prospective studies should address the safety and efficacy of repeat dose 23.4% HTS on serum sodium, intracranial pressure, and complications. PMID:22518235

  13. A3 adenosine receptor inhibition improves the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sumi, Yuka; Woehrle, Tobias; Chen, Yu; Hirsh, Mark I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2011-01-01

    We reported previously that hypertonic saline (HS) treatment can prevent or upregulate the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via A2a adenosine receptors (A2aR) or A3 adenosine receptors (A3R), respectively. A3R translocate to the cell surface upon PMN stimulation and thus HS promotes PMN responses under conditions of delayed HS treatment. Here we investigated if inhibition of A3R improves the protective effects of HS resuscitation in a mouse sepsis model. We found that HS nearly triples extracellular adenosine concentrations in whole blood and that inhibition of A3R with the selective antagonist MRS-1191 dose-dependently improves the inhibitory effect of HS. MRS-1191 at a concentration of 1 nM enhanced the inhibitory effect of HS and reduced stimulatory effects of delayed HS treatment. Using a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, we found that MRS-1191 reduces acute lung injury and PMN accumulation in lung tissue. While delayed HS treatment (4 ml/kg of 7.5 % NaCl) of mice 1 h after CLP aggravated PMN accumulation, lung tissue damage, and mortality 24 h after CLP, infusion of MRS-1191 (2 ng/kg body weight) combined with HS reduced these detrimental effects of delayed HS treatment. Our data thus show that A3 receptor antagonists can strengthen the beneficial effects of HS resuscitation by avoiding stimulatory side effects that result from delayed HS administration. PMID:20661181

  14. Muscular hypertonicity: a suspected contributor to rheumatological manifestations observed in ambulatory practice

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Kamat, Sona; Gajdosik, Richard; Ahmad, Naila; Aldag, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this retrospective study of non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients was to investigate if the individuals clinically identified with muscular hypertonicity (MHT) had increased clinical manifestations compared with those of age- and gender-matched patients with the same disorders. Material and Methods The MHT status was clinically identified in the rheumatologist’s myofascial protocol examination as relatively increased passive resistance of relaxed muscle on a slow gentle stretch. Clinical and laboratory data were abstracted on a pre-coded form, including symptom and physical examination features, serum assays, and medications. Results The 19 MHT cases complained of greater subjective stiffness (p=0.010) and tiredness (p=0.018) at initial encounters and increased aching pain (p=0.049) and were prescribed more (p=0.003) mild narcotic analgesics than the 19 comparison patients. The cases had higher (p=0.027) serum creatine kinase levels, and patients with diffuse MHT had greater frequency of heavy (30+pack-years) cigarette smoking (p=0.002) than comparison subjects. Narcotic usage was also greater in cases with diffuse involvement. Conclusion Non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients with MHT had an overall similar profile as that of comparison patients but had greater musculoskeletal complaints, and those with diffuse involvement had greater narcotic usage. Further research, including quantitative measurements of muscle stiffness, are required to determine whether MHT is a documented entity associated with increased rheumatological manifestations. PMID:27708929

  15. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  16. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Ramsey C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS) has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. Methods A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A four-prong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key) through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Results Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45%) focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50%) reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of addressing language

  17. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers

    PubMed Central

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P.; Giummarra, Melita J.; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers’ knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one

  18. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  19. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  20. Effect of hypertonic NaCl-starch-solution on oedema of different pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Koch, T; Neuhof, H; Kohler, P; Duncker, H P; Buse, A; van Ackern, K

    1994-02-01

    Small volumes of hypertonic NaCl-solutions have been proven to restore haemodynamics in hypovolemic shock patients. Topic of this study was to investigate whether bolus application of 7.5% NaCl-6.5% starch-solution (HSS) apart from its relevance in shock might be an effective therapy in oedema. Considering differential therapeutic aspects, the volume effects of 7.2 ml HSS were tested in three types of oedema: hydrostatic oedema induced by venous congestion (n = 6), oedema caused by bradykinin injection (n = 6), and proteinase-induced oedema (n = 6). The arterial, venous pressure and weight changes indicating volume shifts between intra- and extravascular space were continuously monitored in 36 isolated perfused rabbit hindlimbs. Oedema formation was induced corresponding to a weight gain of 18-20 g. Subsequently 7.2 ml HSS were injected into the extracorporeal circulation system containing 200 ml cell free, isoosmotic perfusate. Six experiments of each oedema group without HSS-application served as controls. 75-100% of oedema formation could be remobilised via bolus application of HSS within 5 min in all types of oedema. A persisting weight reduction was detectable in the hydrostatic and bradykinin oedema, whereas in the elastase oedema the initial weight loss was followed by a regain of weight up to 180% of initial oedema formation at 120 min after HSS-application. The results show that, due to the osmotic gradient induced by bolus application of HSS, the hydrostatic and bradykinin oedema can be permanently remobilised, whereas the therapeutic effect during proteinase oedema is only short-lasting due to an irreversible damage of barrier function.

  1. Median preoptic nucleus mediates the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Rosa, Daniel Alves; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Ianzer, Danielle; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250-300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Chronic physiological increases in cortisol inhibit the vasopressin response to hypertonicity in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Papanek, P E; Raff, H

    1994-11-01

    Chronic increases in cortisol inhibit basal plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP). Acute pretreatment with cortisol inhibits the large increase in AVP during hypotension or hypoxia but does not inhibit the modest increase in AVP in response to hypertonic saline (HS). We evaluated the effect of a chronic increase in cortisol (physiological range) on the acute AVP response to HS. Five male dogs received a continuous infusion of either vehicle or cortisol (65 mg/day) for 7 days. The AVP response to HS (0.2 mmol.kg-1.min-1 for 30 min) was tested before infusion, on days 1, 4, and 7 of chronic infusion, and 2 days after the infusion was discontinued. Plasma cortisol increased significantly from 1.0 +/- 0.2 micrograms/dl to an average over the 7 days of infusion of 5.0 +/- 0.2 micrograms/dl, and basal plasma AVP was significantly decreased during cortisol infusion. The increase in plasma Na and osmolality during HS was unaffected by chronic infusion. HS resulted in an increase in AVP from 3.5 +/- 0.2 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 pg/ml before cortisol infusion. After 7 days of cortisol, the AVP response to HS (from 2.6 +/- 0.1 to 3.9 +/- 0.7 pg/ml) was significantly attenuated. Sustained, physiological increases in cortisol significantly inhibited osmotically stimulated AVP release. The decrease in AVP during hypercortisolism and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone in patients with adrenal insufficiency appear to be due to an inhibitory effect of cortisol on the osmotic sensitivity of the AVP control system.

  3. Comparison of 3% and 7.5% Hypertonic Saline in Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Han, Juan; Ren, Hui-Qin; Zhao, Qing-Bo; Wu, You-Liang; Qiao, Zhuo-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Hypertonic saline solutions (HSSs) (7.5%) are useful in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock because they provide immediate intravascular volume expansion via the delivery of a small volume of fluid, improving cardiac function. However, the effects of using 3% HSS in hypovolemic shock resuscitation are not well known. This study was designed to compare the effects of and complications associated with 3% HSS, 7.5% HSS, and standard fluid in resuscitation. In total, 294 severe trauma patients were enrolled from December 2008 to February 2012 and subjected to a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Individual patients were treated with 3% HSS (250 mL), 7.5% HSS (250 mL), or lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) (250 mL). Mean arterial pressure, blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored and recorded before fluid infusion and at 10, 30, 45, and 60 min after infusion, and the incidence of complications and survival rate were analyzed. The results indicate that 3% and 7.5% HSSs rapidly restored mean arterial pressure and led to the requirement of an approximately 50% lower total fluid volume compared with the LRS group (P < 0.001). However, a single bolus of 7.5% HSS resulted in an increase in heart rate (mean of 127 beats/min) at 10 min after the start of resuscitation. Higher rates of arrhythmia and hypernatremia were noted in the 7.5% HSS group, whereas higher risks of renal failure (P< 0.001), coagulopathy (P < 0.001), and pulmonary edema (P < 0.001) were observed in the LRS group. Neither severe electrolyte disturbance nor anaphylaxis was observed in the HSS groups. It is notable that 3% HSS had similar effects on resuscitation because both the 7.5% HSS and LRS groups but resulted in a lower occurrence of complications. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of 3% HSS in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock.

  4. Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury in Neurocritical Care Patients Receiving Continuous Hypertonic Saline

    PubMed Central

    Riha, Heidi; Bode, Lauren; Chang, Jason J.; Jones, G. Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Continuous intravenous 3% hypertonic saline (HTS) infusions are commonly used for the management of cerebral edema following severe neurologic injuries. Despite widespread use, data regarding the incidence and predictors of nephrotoxicity are lacking. The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence and identify predictors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neurocritical care patients administered continuous infusion HTS. Methods: This was an institutional review board–approved, multicenter, retrospective cohort study of patients receiving HTS infusions at 2 academic medical centers. A univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify predictors of AKI. Data regarding AKI were evaluated during treatment with HTS and up to 24 hours after discontinuation. Results: A total of 329 patients were included in our analysis, with 54 (16%) developing AKI. Those who developed AKI experienced significantly longer stays in the intensive care unit (14.8 vs 11.5 days; P = .006) and higher mortality (48.1% vs 21.9%; P < .001). We identified past medical history of chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR]: 9.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-50.6; P = .007), serum sodium greater than 155 mmol/L (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 2.1-8.0; P < .001), concomitant administration of piperacillin/tazobactam (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.7-9.3; P = .002), male gender (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.5-6.6; P = .002), and African American race (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.3-5.2; P = .007) as independent predictors of AKI. Conclusion: Acute kidney injury is relatively common in patients receiving continuous HTS and may significantly impact clinical outcomes. PMID:28042364

  5. Duration of action of hypertonic saline on mucociliary clearance in the normal lung

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Fuller, F.; Balcazar, J. R.; Zeman, K. L.; Duckworth, H.; Donn, K. H.; O'Riordan, T. G.; Boucher, R. C.; Donaldson, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS) acutely enhances mucociliary clearance (MC) in both health and disease. In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), repeated use of HS causes a sustained improvement in MC as well as clinical benefit. The pharmacodynamic duration of activity on MC may be an important determinant of its therapeutic potential in other airways diseases. Before moving toward testing the clinical benefits of HS for non-CF indications, we sought to assess the duration of pharmacodynamic effects of HS in healthy subjects by performing radiotracer clearance studies at baseline, 30-min post-HS administration, and 4-h post-HS administration. Indeed, acceleration of MC was observed when measured 30 min after HS inhalation. This acceleration was most pronounced in the first 30 min after inhaling the radiotracer in the central lung region (mean Ave30Clr = 15.5 vs. 8.6% for 30-min post-HS treatment vs. mean baseline, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that acute HS effects were greatest in the larger bronchial airways. In contrast, when MC was measured 4 h after HS administration, all indices of central lung region MC were slower than at baseline: Ave30Clr = 5.9% vs. 8.6% (P = 0.10); Ave90Clr = 12.4% vs. 16.8% (P < 0.05); clearance through 3 h = 29.4 vs. 43.7% (P < 0.002); and clearance through 6 h = 39.4 vs. 50.2% (P < 0.02). This apparent slowing of MC in healthy subjects 4-h post-HS administration may reflect depletion of airway mucus following acute HS administration. PMID:25911685

  6. [Prehospital management of very elderly patients with ST segment elevation in Paris by mobile intensive care units (Samu)].

    PubMed

    Leroy, J E; Bensouda, C; Durand, E; Greffet, A; Scemama, A; Carli, P; Danchin, N; Sauval, P

    2005-03-01

    More and more elderly people are hospitalised with myocardial infarction. Little is known on their pre-hospital management. In 2001 and 2002, 105 patients aged 80 years or more with suspected ST elevation infarction were managed by the mobile intensive care unit system of the SAMU de Paris-Necker. Diagnosis of infarction was confirmed in 92 (88%). Over 60% of the patients were women. Median time delay from symptom onset to call to the emergency service was 127 minutes, longer in nonagenarians (175 vs 101 minutes). Prehospital use of aspirin was 81% and 39% received an intravenous bolus of heparin. A reperfusion strategy was decided in only 30% (primary PCI: 23/26). One-month mortality was 21% and was related to older age, time when the call to the Samu was made, and absence of current smoking. Overall, the prehospital management of very elderly patients with suspected ST elevation infarction appears far from optimal.

  7. CNS sites activated by renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) in response to hypertonic saline in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Vanessa S; Terrill, Christopher; Hopewood, Ian; Loewy, Arthur D; Knuepfer, Mark M

    2017-05-01

    In some patients, renal nerve denervation has been reported to be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. Considerable evidence suggests that afferent renal nerves (ARN) and sodium balance play important roles in the development and maintenance of high blood pressure. ARN are sensitive to sodium concentrations in the renal pelvis. To better understand the role of ARN, we infused isotonic or hypertonic NaCl (308 or 500mOsm) into the left renal pelvis of conscious rats for two 2hours while recording arterial pressure and heart rate. Subsequently, brain tissue was analyzed for immunohistochemical detection of the protein Fos, a marker for neuronal activation. Fos-immunoreactive neurons were identified in numerous sites in the forebrain and brainstem. These areas included the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). The most effective stimulus was 500mOsm NaCl. Activation of these sites was attenuated or prevented by administration of benzamil (1μM) or amiloride (10μM) into the renal pelvis concomitantly with hypertonic saline. In anesthetized rats, infusion of hypertonic saline but not isotonic saline into the renal pelvis elevated ARN activity and this increase was attenuated by simultaneous infusion of benzamil or amiloride. We propose that renal pelvic epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) play a role in activation of ARN and, via central visceral afferent circuits, this system modulates fluid volume and peripheral blood pressure. These pathways may contribute to the development of hypertension.

  8. Taking the Blood Bank to the Field: The Design and Rationale of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) Trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua B; Guyette, Francis X; Neal, Matthew D; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Daley, Brian J; Harbrecht, Brian G; Miller, Richard S; Phelan, Herb A; Adams, Peter W; Early, Barbara J; Peitzman, Andrew B; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage and trauma induced coagulopathy remain major drivers of early preventable mortality in military and civilian trauma. Interest in the use of prehospital plasma in hemorrhaging patients as a primary resuscitation agent has grown recently. Trauma center-based damage control resuscitation using early and aggressive plasma transfusion has consistently demonstrated improved outcomes in hemorrhaging patients. Additionally, plasma has been shown to have several favorable immunomodulatory effects. Preliminary evidence with prehospital plasma transfusion has demonstrated feasibility and improved short-term outcomes. Applying state-of-the-art resuscitation strategies to the civilian prehospital arena is compelling. We describe here the rationale, design, and challenges of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) trial. The primary objective is to determine the effect of prehospital plasma transfusion during air medical transport on 30-day mortality in patients at risk for traumatic hemorrhage. This study is a multicenter cluster randomized clinical trial. The trial will enroll trauma patients with profound hypotension (SBP ≤ 70 mmHg) or hypotension (SBP 71-90 mmHg) and tachycardia (HR ≥ 108 bpm) from six level I trauma center air medical transport programs. The trial will also explore the effects of prehospital plasma transfusion on the coagulation and inflammatory response following injury. The trial will be conducted under exception for informed consent for emergency research with an investigational new drug approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration utilizing a multipronged community consultation process. It is one of three ongoing Department of Defense-funded trials aimed at expanding our understanding of the optimal therapeutic approaches to coagulopathy in the hemorrhaging trauma patient.

  9. Induction of the high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- by hypertonic stress in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Martinez, A; Felipe, A; Nicholson, B; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M; McGivan, J

    1995-01-01

    The high-affinity Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport system XAG- is induced (threefold increase in Vmax. with no change in Km) by hypertonicity in the renal epithelial cell line NBL-1. This effect is dependent on protein synthesis and glycosylation and is accompanied by an increase in EAAC1 mRNA levels. Other Na(+)-dependent transport systems in this cell line do not respond to hypertonic stress. In contrast to recent findings [Ruiz-Montasell, Gomez-Angelats, Casado, Felipe, McGivan and Pastor-Anglada (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 9569-9573] showing that increased system A activity after hyperosmotic shock results from induction of a regulatory protein, this is the first demonstration that hypertonicity may increase the expression of the gene for an amino acid transport protein itself. Images Figure 4 PMID:7654212

  10. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2011. Prehospital combat casualty care; The starting point of battlefield survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    We Don’t Know: Prehospital Data in Combat Casualty Care 11 COL Brian J. Eastridge; LTC Robert Mabry; COL Lorne H. Blackbourne; CAPT (Ret) Frank K...trauma care. COL Brian Eastridge and his team examined the differences between the advances of military trauma care in the hospital setting and that...constant in the under- We Don’t Know What We Don’t Know: Prehospital Data in Combat Casualty Care COL Brian J. Eastridge, MC, USA LTC Robert Mabry, MC

  11. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  12. Intramuscular midazolam versus intravenous lorazepam for the prehospital treatment of status epilepticus in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Robert D.; Nicholas, Katherine; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie L.; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Conwit, Robin; Mahajan, Prashant V.; Lewandowski, Christopher; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM) midazolam versus intravenous (IV) lorazepam for the treatment of pediatric patients with status epilepticus (SE) in the prehospital care setting. Methods This multicenter clinical trial randomized patients diagnosed with SE to receive either IM midazolam or IV lorazepam administered by paramedics in the prehospital care setting. Included in this secondary analysis were only patients younger than 18 years of age. Evaluated were the associations of the treatment group (IM vs. IV) with the primary outcome, defined as seizure cessation prior to emergency department (ED) arrival, and with patient characteristics, time to important events, and adverse events. Descriptive statistics and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for the analysis. Results Of 893 primary study subjects, 120 met criteria for this study (60 in each treatment group). There were no differences in important baseline characteristics or seizure etiologies between groups. The primary outcome was met in 41 (68.3%) and 43 (71.7%) of subjects in the IM and IV groups, respectively (risk difference [RD] −3.3%, 99% CI −24.9% to 18.2%). Similar results were noted for those younger than 11 years (RD −1.3%, 99% CI −25.7% to 23.1%). Time from initiating the treatment protocol was shorter for children who received IM midazolam, mainly due to the shorter time to administer the active treatment. Safety profiles were similar. Significance IM midazolam can be rapidly administered and appears to be safe and effective for the management of children with SE treated in the prehospital setting. The results must be interpreted in the context of the secondary analysis design and sample size of the study. PMID:25597369

  13. The epidemiology of non-traumatic prehospital sudden death in Split-Dalmatia County.

    PubMed

    Aljinović, Jure; Novak, Katarina; Mirić, Lina; Grandić, Leo; Kunac, Nenad; Pisac, Valdi Pesutić

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine epidemiology of non-traumatic prehospital sudden adult deaths in Split-Dalmatia County from 2000 to 2005. The following information were collected from autopsy reports in the archives of University Hospital Split: gender of deceased, birth date, date of death, location of death, immediate cause of death, previously diagnosed diseases that might lead to terminal outcome. There were 160 non-traumatic prehospital sudden adult deaths in the observed period, with 104 (65%) male and 56 (35%) female autopsies performed. Diseases of cardiovascular system were the main cause of death, responsible for 95 (59.37%) sudden deaths, followed by diseases of respiratory system (14.37%) and central nervous system (8.12%). The most frequent cause of non-traumatic sudden death was myocardial infarction, found in 50 cases. July and September were the months of the most frequent occurrence of sudden death. In this study it was confirmed that sudden death incidence increases with age, with almost half of all deaths occurring in people between ages of 61-80. The result that a fifth of all sudden deaths occurred in people aged 51-60 is troubling and potentially preventable. The most frequent location of death was deceased's place of residence (N = 29), followed by the ambulance vehicle (N = 17). In conclusion, this is the first publication describing the incidence of prehospital sudden non-traumatic adult death in Split-Dalmatia County. Causes of sudden death and its incidence are in accordance with World Health Organization's information on general causes of death in Croatia and Western Europe.

  14. Impact of the prehospital trauma life support programme in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; George, B; Taylor, A; Patino, T; West, U; Ali, E; Bedaysie, H

    1998-09-01

    The impact of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) programme, introduced in Trinidad and Tobago in 1992, was assessed by questionnaires completed by 26 medical personnel (MP); 71 ambulance personnel (AP); and 50 non ambulance paramedical personnel (NAP). Of the 23 MP, 45 AP and 38 NAP who were aware of the programme, 19 (82.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 25 (65.8%) NAP were able to differentiate personnel that had taken the PHTLS programme based on their performance. 32 (71.1%) of the AP were PHTLS trained. 24 (53.3%) and 4 (9%) of the AP identified poor equipment and poor supervision, respectively, as reasons for difficulty in applying PHTLS principles. Improvements observed among those completing the PHTLS programme were: improved resuscitation techniques by 20 (86.9%) MP, 38 (84.4%) AP and 27 (71.1%) NAP; better vital signs recording by 8 (34.8%) MP, 27 (60%) AP and 8 (21.1%) NAP; improved immobilization by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 33 (86.8%) NAP; better haemorrhage control by 22 (95.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 24 (63.2%) NAP; appropriate splinting of fractures by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 32 (84.2%) NAP; and increased utilization of oxygen by 15 (65.2%) MP, 31 (68.9%) AP and 21 (55.3%) NAP. 32 (71.1%) AP with PHTLS training indicated improvement in their ability to resuscitate and transport trauma victims, with 42 (93.3%) reporting improvement in overall prehospital care. Medical, paramedical and ambulance personnel all perceive a significant positive impact of PHTLS training on prehospital trauma care. Although improvements in supervision, documentation and equipment are still required, improved trauma resuscitative techniques after PHTLS training should improve trauma patient outcome in Trinidad and Tobago.

  15. Outcome of traumatic brain injuries in 1,508 patients: impact of prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Rudehill, Anders; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Weitzberg, Eddie; Bredbacka, Sixten; Backheden, Magnus; Gordon, Emeric

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the outcome of 1,508 patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) treated in a single neurosurgical unit over an 8-year period. Our aim has been to compare those outcomes with our previous results and with other large patient series. Another important goal was to evaluate the effect of the introduction of a 4-year ongoing study initiated in January 1993 using a new strategy of prehospital care on postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Results from the 1,508 patients showed good recovery or moderate disability in 69%, severe disability or vegetative state in 11%, and a mortality rate of 20%. When outcome of the most severely injured patients (GCS < or = 8) was compared with those of our previous and other large international patient series, more favorable outcome figures were shown in the present study. To evaluate the impact of the improved prehospital care after half of the study period, a logistic regression analysis showed after January 1993 a significantly increased expected odds/ratio for a postresuscitation GCS 8-15 rather than a GCS 3-4 (odds/ratio: 2.2; p < 0.001). For patients with postresuscitation GCS 5-7 and 8-15, the expected odds/ratio for a GOS 4-5 instead of GOS 1 increased significantly (odds/ratio: 2.2 and 1.7, respectively; p < 0.05-0.01). For patients with GCS 3-4, an increased expected odds/ratio (2.0; p < 0.05) for a GOS 2-3 rather than a GOS 1 was seen. The principal conclusion is that outcome for the severely injured patients in the present study is more favorable than in other large series of TBI. We posit that the introduction of effective prehospital care most likely contributed to the improved postresuscitation neurological status and consequently to the better outcome observed after January 1993.

  16. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  17. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction.

  18. Development and Implementation of a Novel Prehospital Care System in the State of Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heather A; Douglass, Katherine A; Ejas, Shafi; Poovathumparambil, Venugopalan

    2016-12-01

    Most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have struggled to find a system for prehospital care that can provide adequate patient care and geographical coverage while maintaining a feasible price tag. The emergency medical systems of the Western world are not necessarily relevant in developing economic systems, given the lack of strict legislation, the scarcity of resources, and the limited number of trained personnel. Meanwhile, most efforts to provide prehospital care in India have taken the form of adapting Western models to the Indian context with limited success. Described here is a novel approach to prehospital care designed for and implemented in the State of Kerala, India. The Active Network Group of Emergency Life Savers (ANGELS) was launched in 2011 in Calicut City, the third largest city in the Indian State of Kerala. The ANGELS integrated an existing fleet of private and state-owned ambulances into a single network utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and a single statewide call number. A total of 85 volunteer emergency medical certified technicians (EMCTs) were trained in basic first aid and trauma care principles. Public awareness campaigns accompanied all activities to raise awareness amongst community members. Funding was provided via public-private partnership, aimed to minimize costs to patients for service utilization. Over a two-year period from March 2011 to April 2013, 8,336 calls were recorded, of which 54.8% (4,569) were converted into actual ambulance run sheets. The majority of calls were for medical emergencies and most patients were transported to Medical College Hospital in Calicut. This unique public-private partnership has been responsive to the needs of the population while sustaining low operational costs. This system may provide a relevant template for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) development in other resource-limited settings. Brown HA , Douglass KA , Ejas S , Poovathumparambil V . Development and

  19. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  20. Detailed Analysis of Prehospital Interventions in Medical Priority Dispatch System Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Sporer, Karl A.; Johnson, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) is a type of Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) system used to prioritize 9-1-1 calls and optimize resource allocation. Dispatchers use a series of scripted questions to assign determinants to calls based on chief complaint and acuity. Objective: We analyzed the prehospital interventions performed on patients with MPDS determinants for breathing problems, chest pain, unknown problem (man down), seizures, fainting (unconscious) and falls for transport status and interventions. Methods: We matched all prehospital patients in complaint-based categories for breathing problems, chest pain, unknown problem (man down), seizures, fainting (unconscious) and falls from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2006, with their prehospital record. Calls were queried for the following prehospital interventions: Basic Life Support care only, intravenous line placement only, medication given, procedures or non-transport. We defined Advanced Life Support (ALS) interventions as the administration of a medication or a procedure. Results: Of the 77,394 MPDS calls during this period, 31,318 (40%) patients met inclusion criteria. Breathing problems made up 12.2%, chest pain 6%, unknown problem 1.4%, seizures 3%, falls 9% and unconscious/fainting 9% of the total number of MPDS calls. Patients with breathing problem had a low rate of procedures (0.7%) and cardiac arrest medications (1.6%) with 38% receiving some medication. Chest pain patients had a similar distribution; procedures (0.5%), cardiac arrest medication (1.5%) and any medication (64%). Unknown problem: procedures (1%), cardiac arrest medication (1.3%), any medication (18%). Patients with Seizures had a low rate of procedures (1.1%) and cardiac arrest medications (0.6%) with 20% receiving some medication. Fall patients had a lower rate of severe illness with more medication, mostly morphine: procedures (0.2%), cardiac arrest medication (0.2%), all medications (28%). Unconscious

  1. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. Methods A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Conclusions Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process. PMID:21059243

  2. Impact of hypertonic saline on postoperative complications for patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Siqi; Shang, Qingjuan; Geng, Qiankun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the impact of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) intragastric administration for patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal surgery. During the postoperative period, 3% HS has been suggested as a means to improve the intestinal edema and reduce gastrointestinal complications. The medical records of 111 patients with HS intragastric administration following upper gastrointestinal surgery and 268 patients, served as control, were reviewed retrospectively. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for selected baseline variables. Clinical outcomes, including early gastrointestinal function recovery, postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, were compared according to the HS intragastric administration or not. HS intragastric administration was associated with prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery, including first flatus (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–1.65; P = 0.048) and feeding within 3 postoperative days (RR (95% CI), 0.57 (0.49–0.77); P = 0.036). Early ileus occurred in 25 of 108 patients with HS treatment versus 36 of 108 patients without HS treatment (RR (95% CI), 1.43 (0.63–2.15); P = 0.065). The patients with HS experienced a lower overall postoperative complication (odds ratio [OD] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.33–1.09; P = 0.063), including trend toward a decrease for infectious complications (15[13.9] vs 23[21.3]; P = 0.11; OD, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.29–1.22). There was a decreased incidence of anastomotic leakage (1[0.9] vs 7[6.5]; P = 0.033) and postoperative ileuas (5[4.6%] vs 11[10.2%]; P = 0.096) in the HS administration patients. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of HS intragastric administration in patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery, such as prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery and reduced overall postoperative complications, which may be attributed to a

  3. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are protected against acetic acid, but not hydrochloric acid, by hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, B; Ross, T

    2009-06-01

    Chapman et al. (B. Chapman, N. Jensen, T Ross, and M. B. Cole, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5165-5172, 2006) demonstrated that an increased NaCl concentration prolongs survival of Escherichia coli O157 SERL 2 in a broth model simulating the aqueous phase of a food dressing or sauce containing acetic acid. We examined the responses of five other E. coli strains and four Salmonella enterica strains to increasing concentrations of NaCl under conditions of lethal acidity and observed that the average "lag" time prior to inactivation decreases in the presence of hydrochloric acid but not in the presence of acetic acid. For E. coli in the presence of acetic acid, the lag time increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 2 to 4% at pH 4.0, up to 4 to 6% at pH 3.8, and up to 4 to 7% (wt/wt of water) NaCl at pH 3.6. Salmonella was inactivated more rapidly by combined acetic acid and NaCl stresses than E. coli, but increasing NaCl concentrations still decreased the lag time prior to inactivation in the presence of acetic acid; at pH 4.0 up to 1 to 4% NaCl was protective, and at pH 3.8 up to 1 to 2% NaCl delayed the onset of inactivation. Sublethal injury kinetics suggest that this complex response is a balance between the lethal effects of acetic acid, against which NaCl is apparently protective, and the lethal effects of the NaCl itself. Compared against 3% NaCl, 10% (wt/wt of water) sucrose with 0.5% NaCl (which has similar osmotic potential) was found to be equally protective against adverse acetic acid conditions. We propose that hypertonicity may directly affect the rate of diffusion of acetic acid into cells and hence cell survival.

  4. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Antagonism Inhibits Bronchoconstriction in Respose to Hypertonic Saline Inhalation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kazani, Shamsah; Sadeh, Jonathan; Bunga, Sreedhar; Wechsler, Michael E; Israel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    Background In asthma, cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) play varying roles in the bronchomotor response to multiple provocative stimuli. The contribution of CysLTs on the airway's response to hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation in asthma is unknown. Whether polymorphisms in the leukotriene biosynthetic pathway affect the contribution of CysLTs to this response is also unknown. Methods In a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study, mild and moderate asymptomatic asthmatics underwent inhaled 3% HS challenge by doubling the duration of nebulization (0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 min) two hours after one dose of montelukast (a CysLT receptor 1 [CysLTR1] antagonist) or placebo, and after three week courses. We examined the effect of the leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) polymorphism (A-444C) on the efficacy of montelukast against HS inhalation in an exploratory manner. Results In 37 subjects, two hours after administration of montelukast, the mean provocative dose of HS required to cause a 20% drop in FEV1 (HS-PD20) increased by 59% (9.17 after placebo vs. 14.55 ml after montelukast, p = 0.0154). Three weeks of cysLTR1 antagonism increased the HS-PD20 by 84% (10.97 vs. 20.21 ml, p = 0.0002). Three weeks of CysLTR1 antagonism appeared to produce greater effects on blocking bronchial hyper responsiveness (two hour vs. three week HS-PD20 values 14.55 vs. 20.21 ml respectively, p = 0.0898). We did not observe an effect of the LTC4S polymorphism on the response to CysLTR1 antagonism in this cohort. Conclusions A significant proportion of HS-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated by release of leukotrienes as evidenced by substantial acute inhibition with a CysLTR1 antagonist. There was a trend toward greater inhibition of bronchial responsiveness with three weeks of therapy as opposed to acute CysLTR1 antagonism. PMID:21169002

  5. Ad Libitum Fluid Intake and Plasma Responses After Pickle Juice, Hypertonic Saline, or Deionized Water Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Scott; Miller, Kevin C.; Albrecht, Jay; Garden-Robinson, Julie; Blodgett-Salafia, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context: Adding sodium (Na+) to drinks improves rehydration and ad libitum fluid consumption. Clinicians (∼25%) use pickle juice (PJ) to treat cramping. Scientists warn against PJ ingestion, fearing it will cause rapid plasma volume restoration and thereby decrease thirst and delay rehydration. Advice about drinking PJ has been developed but never tested. Objective: To determine if drinking small volumes of PJ, hypertonic saline (HS), or deionized water (DIW) affects ad libitum DIW ingestion, plasma variables, or perceptual indicators. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen, euhydrated (urine specific gravity ≤ 1.01) men (age = 22 ± 2 years, height = 178 ± 6 cm, mass = 82.9 ± 8.4 kg). Intervention(s): Participants completed 3 testing days (≥72 hours between days). After a 30-minute rest, a blood sample was collected. Participants completed 60 minutes of hard exercise (temperature = 36 ± 2°C, relative humidity = 16 ± 1%). Postexercise, they rested for 30 minutes; had a blood sample collected; rated thirst, fullness, and nausea; and ingested 83 ± 8 mL of PJ, HS, or DIW. They rated drink palatability (100-mm visual analog scale) and were allowed to drink DIW ad libitum for 60 minutes. Blood samples and thirst, fullness, and nausea ratings (100-mm visual analog scales) were collected at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes posttreatment drink ingestion. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ad libitum DIW volume, percentage change in plasma volume, plasma osmolality (OSMp,) plasma sodium concentration ([Na+]p), and thirst, fullness, nausea, and palatability ratings. Results: Participants consumed more DIW ad libitum after HS (708.03 ± 371.03 mL) than after DIW (532.99 ± 337.14 mL, P < .05). Ad libitum DIW ingested after PJ (700.35 ± 366.15 mL) was similar to that after HS and DIW (P > .05). Plasma sodium concentration, OSMp, percentage change in plasma volume, thirst, fullness, and nausea did not differ among treatment drinks

  6. Effect of Atractylodes macrocephala on Hypertonic Stress-Induced Water Channel Protein Expression in Renal Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Pyo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Hye Yoom; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a symptom that results from the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body. The cause of edema is related to the level of aquaporin (AQP)2 protein expression, which regulates the reabsorption of water in the kidney. Edema is caused by overexpression of the AQP2 protein when the concentration of Na+ in the blood increases. The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used in traditional oriental medicine as a diuretic drug; however, the mechanism responsible for the diuretic effect of the aqueous extract from A. macrocephala rhizomes (AAMs) has not yet been identified. We examined the effect of the AAM on the regulation of water channels in the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-3 cells under hypertonic stress. Pretreatment of AAM attenuates a hypertonicity-induced increase in AQP2 expression as well as the trafficking of AQP2 to the apical plasma membrane. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor known to play a central role in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of some proteins, including AQP2. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of TonEBP also decrease after AAM treatment. These results suggest that the AAM has a diuretic effect by suppressing water reabsorption via the downregulation of the TonEBP-AQP2 signaling pathway. PMID:23258995

  7. The effect of a Computerised Decision Support System (CDSS) on compliance with the prehospital assessment process: results of an interrupted time-series study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Errors in the decision-making process are probably the main threat to patient safety in the prehospital setting. The reason can be the change of focus in prehospital care from the traditional “scoop and run” practice to a more complex assessment and this new focus imposes real demands on clinical judgment. The use of Clinical Guidelines (CG) is a common strategy for cognitively supporting the prehospital providers. However, there are studies that suggest that the compliance with CG in some cases is low in the prehospital setting. One possible way to increase compliance with guidelines could be to introduce guidelines in a Computerized Decision Support System (CDSS). There is limited evidence relating to the effect of CDSS in a prehospital setting. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of CDSS on compliance with the basic assessment process described in the prehospital CG and the effect of On Scene Time (OST). Methods In this time-series study, data from prehospital medical records were collected on a weekly basis during the study period. Medical records were rated with the guidance of a rating protocol and data on OST were collected. The difference between baseline and the intervention period was assessed by a segmented regression. Results In this study, 371 patients were included. Compliance with the assessment process described in the prehospital CG was stable during the baseline period. Following the introduction of the CDSS, compliance rose significantly. The post-intervention slope was stable. The CDSS had no significant effect on OST. Conclusions The use of CDSS in prehospital care has the ability to increase compliance with the assessment process of patients with a medical emergency. This study was unable to demonstrate any effects of OST. PMID:25106732

  8. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  9. Physiological-social scores in predicting outcomes of prehospital internal patients.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    The physiological-social modified early warning score system is a newly developed instrument for the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the physiological-social modified early warning score system for the identification of patients that needed prehospital emergency care. This prospective cohort study was conducted with 2157 patients. This instrument was used as a measure to detect critical illness in patients hospitalised in internal wards. Judgment by an emergency medicine specialist was used as a measure of standard. Data were analyzed by using receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve with 95% confidence interval. The mean score of the physiological-social modified early warning score system was 2.71 ± 3.55. Moreover, 97.6% patients with the score ≥ 4 needed prehospital emergency services. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.738 (95% CI = 0.708-0.767). Emergency medical staffs can use PMEWS ≥ 4 to identify those patients hospitalised in the internal ward as at risk patients. The physiological-social modified early warning score system is suggested to be used for decision-making of emergency staff about internal patients' wards in EMS situations.

  10. Physiological-Social Scores in Predicting Outcomes of Prehospital Internal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    The physiological-social modified early warning score system is a newly developed instrument for the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the physiological-social modified early warning score system for the identification of patients that needed prehospital emergency care. This prospective cohort study was conducted with 2157 patients. This instrument was used as a measure to detect critical illness in patients hospitalised in internal wards. Judgment by an emergency medicine specialist was used as a measure of standard. Data were analyzed by using receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve with 95% confidence interval. The mean score of the physiological-social modified early warning score system was 2.71 ± 3.55. Moreover, 97.6% patients with the score ≥ 4 needed prehospital emergency services. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.738 (95% CI = 0.708–0.767). Emergency medical staffs can use PMEWS ≥ 4 to identify those patients hospitalised in the internal ward as at risk patients. The physiological-social modified early warning score system is suggested to be used for decision-making of emergency staff about internal patients' wards in EMS situations. PMID:25298893

  11. Pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of severe injuries: changes and trends.

    PubMed

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of most severely injured patients has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In this context, the factor time has gained more and more attention, particularly in German-speaking countries. While the management in the early 1990s aimed at comprehensive and complete therapy at the accident site, the premise today is to stabilise trauma patients at the accident site and transfer them into the hospital rapidly. In addition, the introduction of training and education programmes such as Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS(®)), Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) concept or the TEAM(®) concept has increased the quality of treatment of most severely injured trauma patients both in the preclinical field and in the emergency trauma room. Today, all emergency surgical procedures in severely injured patients are generally performed in accordance with the Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) principle. The advancements described in this article provide examples for the improved quality of the management of severely injured patients in the preclinical field and during the initial in-hospital treatment phase. The implementation of trauma networks, the release of the S3 polytrauma guidelines, and the DGU "Weißbuch" have contributed to a more structured management of most severely injured patients.

  12. Prehospital clearance of the cervical spine: does it need to be a pain in the neck?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, B P; Simpson, H K; Crouch, R; Deakin, C D

    2007-07-01

    Prehospital cervical spine (c-spine) immobilisation is common, despite c-spine injury being relatively rare. Unnecessary immobilisation results in a significant burden on limited prehospital and emergency department (ED) resources. This study aimed to determine whether the incidence of unnecessary c-spine immobilisation by ambulance personnel could be safely reduced through the implementation of an evidence-based algorithm. Following a training programme, complete forms on 103 patients were identified during the audit period, of which 69 (67%) patients had their c-spines cleared at scene. Of these, 60 (87%) were discharged at scene, with no clinical adverse events reported, and 9 (13%) were taken to the local ED with non-distracting minor injuries, all being discharged home the same day. 34 (33%) patients could not have their c-spines safely cleared at scene according to the algorithm. Of these, 4 (12%) patients self-discharged at scene and 30 (88%) were conveyed to an ED as per the normal procedure. C-spine clearance at scene by ambulance personnel may have positive impacts on patient care, efficient use of resources and cost to healthcare organisations.

  13. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2015-12-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)-particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols-such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)-have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a "train-the-trainer" approach for exponential growth-both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS.

  14. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  15. A Novel Approach to Improve Time to First Shock in Prehospital STEMI Complicated by Ventricular Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Ampofo, Maxwell; Cheskes, Sheldon; Byers, Adam; Drennan, Ian R; Buick, Jason E; Verbeek, P Richard

    2016-01-01

    Lethal cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pVT) complicate up to 6% of all out-of-hospital STEMIs. Typically, paramedics respond to this by applying defibrillation pads and delivering a shock as soon as possible. A recently introduced "pads-on" protocol directed paramedics to apply defibrillation pads to all STEMI patients (regardless of clinical stability) with the aim of decreasing time to first shock. In this article we present two cases of prehospital STEMI complicated by VF to illustrate times to first shock for the two different protocols. One case each of a STEMI complicated by VF before implementation of the pads-on protocol and after the implementation of the protocol is presented. An important difference in the time to first shock is noted between the two patients with STEMI complicated by VF. While it took 2 min 43 s for the pads-off patient to be defibrillated, only 27 s elapsed before the pads-on patient was defibrillated. These two cases demonstrate that the application of defibrillation pads immediately following the diagnosis of prehospital STEMI has the potential to decrease the time to shock in patients suffering VF/pVT.

  16. Prehospital Lactated Ringer's Solution Treatment and Survival in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Prospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Akihito; Hasegawa, Manabu; Abe, Takeru; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Nagata, Takashi; Nabeshima, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Background No studies have evaluated whether administering intravenous lactated Ringer's (LR) solution to patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) improves their outcomes, to our knowledge. Therefore, we examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and patients' return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-month survival, and neurological or physical outcomes at 1 month after the event. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data of all patients with OHCA from 2005 through 2009 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between prehospital use of LR solution and short- and long-term survival. The study patients were ≥18 years of age, had an OHCA before arrival of EMS personnel, were treated by EMS personnel, and were then transported to hospitals. A total of 531,854 patients with OHCA met the inclusion criteria. Among propensity-matched patients, compared with those who did not receive pre-hospital intravenous fluids, prehospital use of LR solution was associated with an increased likelihood of ROSC before hospital arrival (odds ratio [OR] adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 1.239 [1.146–1.339] [p<0.001], but with a reduced likelihood of 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (cerebral performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.764 [0.589–0.992] [p = 0.04]; and overall performance category 1 or 2, OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.746 [0.573–0.971] [p = 0.03]). There was no association between prehospital use of LR solution and 1-month survival (OR adjusted for all covariates [95% CI] = 0.960 [0.854–1.078]). Conclusion In Japanese patients experiencing OHCA, the prehospital use of LR solution was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of a good functional outcome 1 month after the event, but with an increased likelihood of ROSC

  17. Potassium depletion and hypertonic medium reduce "non-coated" and clathrin-coated pit formation, as well as endocytosis through these two gates.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, J L; Sawano, F; Geiger, D; Gorden, P; Perrelet, A; Orci, L

    1989-03-01

    Intracellular potassium depletion inhibits receptor-mediated endocytotic processes occurring through clathrin-coated pits. Besides the clathrin-coated pit route, flask-shaped invaginations that do not bear a typical clathrin coat have been recently implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis of cholera toxin. These invaginations are called "non-coated" to distinguish them from the typical clathrin-coated pits. In the present study, we have investigated whether "non-coated" invaginations are sensitive, as are clathrin-coated pits, to potassium depletion and whether hypertonic medium, which inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis, also affects "non-coated" invaginations. We found that 1) both potassium depletion and hypertonic medium reduce "non-coated" invaginations on the cell surface; 2) similar to potassium depletion, hypertonic medium markedly decreases the number of clathrin-coated pits; 3) these changes are accompanied by an inhibition of the internalization (measured morphologically) of cholera toxin-gold through "non-coated" invaginations, as well as of alpha 2-macroglobulin-gold taken up by clathrin-coated pits; and 4) in addition, both the hypertonic medium and potassium depletion inhibit the uptake of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of fluid-phase endocytosis.

  18. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Mehrara, Mostafa; Tavakoli, Nader; Fathi, Marzieh; Mahshidfar, Babak; Zare, Mohammad Amin; Asadi, Azita; Hosseinzadeh, Saeedeh; Safdarian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC), there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC). Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards. Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78) were audited (55.4% male). 61 (60.3%) patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7%) cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%), O2 therapy (32.8%), nitroglycerin administration (60.7%), and aspirin administration (52.5%) in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%), O2 therapy (75%), cardiac monitoring (25%), pupils examination (25%), bedside glucometery (50%), and assessing for naloxone administration (55%) in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor. Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting. PMID:28286847

  19. Randomised clinical study comparing the effectiveness and physiological effects of hypertonic and isotonic polyethylene glycol solutions for bowel cleansing

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Hiro-o; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakaoka, Michiko; Himori, Ryogo; Yoshida, Yuko; Satou, Kentarou; Imai, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bowel cleansing is necessary before colonoscopy, but is a burden to patients because of the long cleansing time and large dose volume. A low-volume (2 L) hypertonic polyethylene glycol-ascorbic acid solution (PEG-Asc) has been introduced, but its possible dehydration effects have not been quantitatively studied. We compared the efficacy and safety including the dehydration risk between hypertonic PEG-Asc and isotonic PEG regimens. Design This was an observer-blinded randomised study. Participants (n=310) were allocated to receive 1 of 3 regimens on the day of colonoscopy: PEG-Asc (1.5 L) and water (0.75 L) dosed with 1 split (PEG-Asc-S) or 4 splits (PEG-Asc-M), or PEG-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES; 2.25 L) dosed with no split. Dehydration was analysed by measuring haematocrit (Ht). Results The cleansing time using the hypertonic PEG-Asc-S (3.33±0.48 hours) was significantly longer than that with isotonic PEG-ES (3.05±0.56 hours; p<0.001). PEG-Asc-M (3.00±0.53 hours) did not have this same disadvantage. Successful cleansing was achieved in more than 94% of participants using each of the 3 regimens. The percentage changes in Ht from baseline (before dosing) to the end of dosing with PEG-Asc-S (3.53±3.32%) and PEG-Asc-M (4.11±3.07%) were significantly greater than that with PEG-ES (1.31±3.01%). Conclusions These 3 lower volume regimens were efficacious and had no serious adverse effects. Even patients cleansed with isotonic PEG-ES showed significant physiological dehydration at the end of dosing. The four-split PEG-Asc-M regimen is recommended because of its shorter cleansing time without causing serious nausea. Trial registration number UMIN000013103; Results. PMID:27547443

  20. German critical incident reporting system database of prehospital emergency medicine: Analysis of reported communication and medication errors between 2005–2015

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein, Christian; Fleischmann, Thomas; Rupp, Peter; Hempel, Dorothea; Wilk, Sophia; Winning, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication failure in prehospital emergency medicine can affect patient safety as it does in other areas of medicine as well. We analyzed the database of the critical incident reporting system for prehospital emergency medicine in Germany retrospectively regarding communication errors. METHODS: Experts of prehospital emergency medicine and risk management screened the database for verbal communication failure, non-verbal communication failure and missing communication at all. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2015, 845 reports were analyzed, of which 247 reports were considered to be related to communication failure. An arbitrary classification resulted in six different kinds: 1) no acknowledgement of a suggestion; 2) medication error; 3) miscommunication with dispatcher; 4) utterance heard/understood improperly; 5) missing information transfer between two persons; and 6) other communication failure. CONCLUSION: Communication deficits can lead to critical incidents in prehospital emergency medicine and are a very important aspect in patient safety. PMID:27313802

  1. Evaluation of Standard Versus Nonstandard Vital Signs Monitors in the Prehospital and Emergency Departments: Results and Lessons Learned from a Trauma Patient Care Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-24

    anddisplay prehospital and hospital physiologic data in real time on a handheld computer and in the trauma bay.Multivariate logistic regression...Wilkins) LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic/care management, level IV. KEY WORDS: Prehospital physiologic data; lifesaving interventions; vital signs; signal...and interfaces (i.e., ‘‘smart device’’ or non-SVSMs) capable of supplying the medic with constant physiologic observations and datamay enhance the care

  2. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury...pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384...pressure; Glasgow Coma Scale; heart rate; prehospital; traumatic brain injury Introduction The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was developed to stan-dardize the

  3. Effect of basic prehospital trauma life support program on cognitive and trauma management skills.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R; Josa, D; Pierre, I; Bedsaysie, H; West, U; Winn, J; Ali, E; Haynes, B

    1998-12-01

    We tested the effectiveness of a basic prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) program by assessing cognitive performance and trauma management skills among prehospital trauma personnel. Fourteen subjects who completed a standard PHTLS course (group I) were compared to a matched group not completing a PHTLS program (group II). Cognitive performance was assessed on 50-item multiple choice examinations, and trauma skills management was assessed with four simulated trauma patients. Pre-PHTLS multiple choice questionnaire scores were similar (45.8 +/- 9.4% vs. 48.8 +/- 8.9% for groups I and II, respectively), but the post-PHTLS scores were higher in group I (80.4 +/- 5.9%) than in group II (52.6 +/- 4.9%). Pre-PHTLS simulated trauma patient performance scores (standardized to a maximum total of 20 for each station) were similar at all four stations for both groups, ranging from 7.9 to 10.4. The post-PHTLS scores were statistically significantly higher at all four stations for group I (range 16.0-19.0) compared to those for group II (range 8.0-11.1). The overall mean pre-PHTLS score for all four stations was 8.3 +/- 2.1 for group I and 8.8 +/- 2.0 (NS) for group II; the group I post-PHTLS mean score for the four stations was 17.1 +/- 2.7 (p < 0.05) compared to 9.1 +/- 2.3 for group II. Pre-PHTLS Adherence to Priority scores on a scale of 1 to 7 were similar (1.1 +/- 0.9 for group I and 1.2 +/- 1.0 for group II). Post-PHTLS group I Priority scores increased to 5.9 +/- 1.1. Group II (1.1 +/- 1.0) did not improve their post-PHTLS scores. The pre-PHTLS Organized Approach scores in the simulated trauma patients on a scale of 1 to 5 were 2.1 +/- 1.0 for group I and 1.9 +/- 1.2 for group II (NS) compared to 4.2 +/- 0.9 (p < 0.05) in group I and 2.0 +/- 0.8 in group II after PHTLS. This study demonstrates improved cognitive and trauma management skills performance among prehospital paramedical personnel who complete the basic PHTLS program.

  4. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  5. Factors Impacting Mortality in the Pre-Hospital Period After Road Traffic Accidents in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Ananthnarayan; Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Sandhya; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Background India currently has the dubious distinction of experiencing the highest number of road traffic accidents in the world. Objectives We believe that this study on road traffic accidents may help to identify factors in the pre-hospital setting that may influence mortality rates. Patients and Methods A prospective observational study was carried out in a metro area in India over a period of one year. The study included consecutive patients admitted to the trauma service after road traffic accidents. Demographic information, time and place of accident, and details regarding the vehicle and the events leading up to the hospital admission were recorded. Injury severity, management in the hospital, and final outcomes in terms of mortality were noted. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results A total of 773 patients were enrolled. Of these, there were 197 deaths and 576 survivors. The majority of patients were aged 15 - 40 years (67%) and were male (87.84%). More accidents occurred at night (58.2%) than during the day (41.8%). Mortality was not significantly associated with age, sex, or time of accident. City roads (38.9%) saw more accidents than highways (26.13%), but highway accidents were more likely to be fatal. Two-wheeler riders (37.65%) and pedestrians (35.75%) formed the majority of our study population. Mortality was significantly associated with crossing the road on foot (P = 0.004). Pillion riders on two-wheeler vehicles were more likely to experience poor outcomes (relative risk [RR] = 1.9, P = 0.001). Front-seat occupants in four-wheeler vehicles were at an increased risk of not surviving the accident (61.98%; RR=2.56, P = 0.01). Lack of safety gear, such as helmets, seat belts, and airbags, was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.05). Delays in transfers of patients to the hospital and a lack of pre-hospital emergency services was significantly associated with increased mortality (P = 0.000). Conclusions A lack of respect for the

  6. Neurological outcomes in patients transported to hospital without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in Japan are not allowed to perform termination of resuscitation in the field, most patients experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) are transported to hospitals without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). As the crucial prehospital factors for outcomes are not clear in patients who had an OHCA without a prehospital ROSC, we aimed to determine the prehospital factors associated with 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC 1–2)). Methods We analyzed the data of 398,121 adult OHCA patients without a prehospital ROSC from a prospectively recorded nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database from 2007 to 2010. The primary endpoint was 1-month CPC 1–2. Results The rate of 1-month CPC 1–2 was 0.49%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the independent variables associated with CPC 1–2 were the following nine prehospital factors: (1) initial non-asystole rhythm (ventricular fibrillation (VF): adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 9.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.71 to 11.4; pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT): aOR, 8.50; 95% CI, 5.36 to 12.9; pulseless electrical activity (PEA): aOR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.40 to 3.15), (2) age <65 years (aOR, 3.90; 95% CI, 3.28 to 4.67), (3) arrest witnessed by EMS personnel (aOR, 2.82; 95% CI, 2.48 to 3.19), (4) call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes (aOR, 2.58; 95% CI, 2.22 to 3.01), (5) arrest witnessed by any layperson, (6) physician-staffed ambulance, (7) call-to-response time <5 minutes, (8) prehospital shock delivery, and (9) presumed cardiac cause. When four crucial key factors (with an aOR >2.0 in the regression model: initial non-asystole rhythm, age <65 years, EMS-witnessed arrest, and call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes) were present, the rates of 1-month CPC 1–2 and 1-month survival were 16.1% and 23.2% in initial VF, 8.3% and 16.7% in pulseless VT, and 3

  7. Antinociception by neutrophil-derived opioid peptides in noninflamed tissue--role of hypertonicity and the perineurium.

    PubMed

    Rittner, H L; Hackel, D; Yamdeu, R-S; Mousa, S A; Stein, C; Schäfer, M; Brack, A

    2009-05-01

    Inflammatory pain can be controlled by intraplantar opioid injection or by secretion of endogenous opioid peptides from leukocytes in inflamed rat paws. Antinociception requires binding of opioid peptides to opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerve terminals. In the absence of inflammation, hydrophilic opioid peptides do not penetrate the perineurial barrier and, thus, do not elicit antinociception. This study was designed to examine the conditions under which endogenous, neutrophil-derived hydrophilic opioid peptides (i.e. Met-Enkephalin and beta-endorphin) can raise nociceptive thresholds in noninflamed tissue in rats. Intraplantar injection of the chemokine CXCL2/3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-2) induced selective neutrophil recruitment without overt signs of inflammation or changes in mechanical nociceptive thresholds (paw pressure threshold). Following intraplantar injection of hypertonic saline, the perineurial barrier was permeable for hours and intraplantar injection of opioid peptides increased mechanical nociceptive thresholds. While formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils in vitro, nociceptive thresholds were unchanged in vivo. In vitro, hypertonicity interfered with fMLP-induced p38 mitogen activated kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and opioid peptide release from neutrophils. These inhibitory effects were fully reversible by washout. In vivo, return to normotonicity occurred within 30min while the perineurium remained permeable for hours. Under these conditions, fMLP triggered MAPK phosphorylation and induced opioid peptide-mediated increases in nociceptive thresholds in the noninflamed paw. Taken together, antinociception mediated by endogenous opioids in noninflamed tissue has two important requirements: (i) opening of the perineurial barrier for opioid peptide access and (ii) opioid peptide release from neutrophils involving p38 MAPK.

  8. [Cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine - retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Claas T; Kleber, Christian; Tsokos, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Hess, Thorsten; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Emergency medical research is subject to special conditions. Emergency patients e.g. are generally considered to be non-capable of giving consent. This results in sparse emergency medical data when compared to clinical observation studies under controlled conditions. After emergency medical treatment, deceased patients are not rarely subject to forensic investigation. The cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine has not only emergency medical training potential in individual cases, but also scientific innovation potential especially with respect to the retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures. Such partnerships (like in Berlin at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin between the Institute of Legal Medicine and the Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery or in Hamburg between the Institute for Legal Medicine at the University Hospital and the Municipal Fire Brigade with the Emergency Medical Service) are yet exceptional in Germany.

  9. Pre-hospital core temperature measurement in accidental and therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Procter, Emily; Paal, Peter; Brugger, Hermann

    2014-06-01

    Core temperature (T core) measurement is the only diagnostic tool to accurately assess the severity of hypothermia. International recommendations for management of accidental hypothermia encourage T core measurement for triage, treatment, and transport decisions, but they also recognize that lack of equipment may be a limiting factor, particularly in the field. The aim of this nonsystematic review is to highlight the importance of field measurement of T core and to provide practical guidance for clinicians on pre-hospital temperature measurement in accidental and therapeutic hypothermia. Clinicians should recognize the difference between alternative measurement locations and available thermometers, tailoring their decision to the purpose of the measurement (i.e., intermittent vs. continual measurement), and the impact on management decisions. The importance of T core measurement in therapeutic hypothermia protocols during early cooling and monitoring of target temperature is discussed.

  10. Critical incidents during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: what are the problems nobody wants to talk about?

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Christian; Rupp, Peter; Fleischmann, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We wanted to identify incidents that led or could have led to patient harm during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A nationwide anonymous and Internet-based critical incident reporting system gave the data. During a 4-year period we received 548 reports of which 74 occurred during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Human error was responsible for 85% of the incidents, whereas equipment failure contributed to 15% of the reports. Equipment failure was considered to be preventable in 61% of all the cases, whereas incidents because of human error could have been prevented in almost all the cases. In most cases, prevention can be accomplished by simple strategies with the Poka-Yoke technique. Insufficient training of emergency medical service physicians in Germany requires special attention. The critical incident reports raise concerns regarding the level of expertize provided by emergency medical service doctors.

  11. [Nursing and pre-hospital care: dead-ends and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Martins, Pedro Paulo; do Prado, Marta Lenise

    2003-01-01

    The present paper is about a reflection related to the emerging of Pre-Hospital Care in Brazil ant its respective models of care during the last few decades. By drawing out a basic historical trajectory we were able to point out the successful and dead end paths of this modality of health assistance in our country. The most recent attempts of standardization at a national level of this kind of service were analyzed, especially the Health Ministry Decree no. 2048/02, which constitutes itself as a starting point, offering subsidies to institutions and to those involved in this specific field of health knowledge, in order to remake the path within another perspective.

  12. Prehospital endotracheal tube airway or esophageal gastric tube airway: a critical comparison.

    PubMed

    Shea, S R; MacDonald, J R; Gruzinski, G

    1985-02-01

    This study compares two similar groups of patients in cardiopulmonary arrest with ventricular fibrillation (VF). In the survival study group of 296 patients, 148 patients received an endotracheal tube airway (ETA) and 148 patients received an esophageal gastric tube airway (EGTA), the improved version of the esophageal obturator airway (EOA). Survival rates, both short term (ETA = 35.8%, EGTA = 39.1%) and long term (ETA = 11.5%, EGTA = 16.2%), and neurological sequelae of survivors showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P greater than .05). In addition, we found that success and complication rates of intubation were similar. Training time was longer for the ETA. We conclude that both airways have a place in the prehospital setting.

  13. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  14. Operation Canine Lifeline: Recommendations for Enhancing Prehospital Care for Government Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Corse, Teija; Firth, Chelsea; Burke, John; Schor, Kenneth; Koterski, James F; McGraw, Sabrina; Vincent-Johnson, Nancy; Gordon, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Operation Canine Lifeline was a tabletop exercise developed by students and faculty of Boston University School of Medicine's Healthcare Emergency Management master's program. The tabletop exercise led to discussion on current protocols for canines working in the field, what occurs if a canine encounters a toxin in the field, and what to do in situations of national security that require working with civilian agencies. This discussion led to the creation of a set of recommendations around providing prehospital veterinary care to government working dogs. The recommendations include a government-run veterinary toxicology hotline for the sole use of the government, issuing handlers deployment kits and preprogrammed smartphones that contain information on the care practices for dogs, and an increased effort for civilian integration, through local emergency medical services, in the emergency care of government canines. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:15-20).

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as an Adjunct to Pre-hospital Advanced Trauma Life Support.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Most commercial diving operations and naval operations have 24/7, on-site availability of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to perform routine surface decompression or immediate treatment of arterial gas embolism or decompression sickness. Availability and prompt use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the field for treatment of divers with dysbaric conditions has demonstrated its efficacy in acute, co-morbid conditions such as acute exsanguination, blast injury, crush injury, and cardiopulmonary arrest affecting those same divers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy applied in these cases has demonstrated its utility to augment the efficacy of conventional, pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support. Case studies gleaned from actual experience with the diving industry illustrate the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in these conditions. The unexpectedly favorable results have been replicated by controlled laboratory animal studies. The deck decompression or saturation multiplace chambers used by offshore diving operations can easily and quickly be converted for use as medical field resuscitative units. Lightweight and mobile hyperbaric chambers can be outfitted for use in ambulances or helicopters to address civilian street injury or military "far-forward" injury. These transport chambers are compact in design to be efficient transport stretchers designed to hold both the patient and the medical support clinician. It is hoped that hyperbaric oxygen therapy will gain an increasing role as an adjunct to pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support resuscitative efforts as a low-cost, high-yield intervention. In this regard HBO as applied to ATLS/ACLS in civilian and military medical systems may be a productive, disruptive new application of technology.

  16. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. Results The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. Conclusions In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders. PMID:24886096

  17. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH) in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%); the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%). The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%). Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%). The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates. PMID:23531089

  18. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  19. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic.

  20. Present-day prehospital airway management in the former Eastern German state of Thuringia: equipment and education of emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Hüter, Lars; Schreiber, Torsten; Reichel, Jens; Schwarzkopf, Konrad

    2009-04-01

    We describe the condition of education and equipment regarding prehospital airway management in the German federal state of Thuringia, representing a part of former Eastern Germany. In 2006 a postal survey of the 39 emergency medical stations (EMS) in Thuringia was carried out. The response rate was 100%. In 72% of the EMS, a device for extraglottic airway management and in all EMS a device for cricothyrotomy was available. A device to monitor end-tidal CO2 was available in 41%. Difficulties in airway management in the past two years were reported from 74% of the EMS. Ongoing training and education in airway management is provided in 82% of the emergency districts. This survey reveals wide variations in the equipment for airway management available to prehospital emergency physicians in Thuringia. Given the reported difficulties in airway management, availability of a more standardized set of airway management devices in Thuringia may be helpful.

  1. Use of Respiratory Impedance in Prehospital Care of Hypotensive Patients Associated with Hemorrhage and Trauma: A Case Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Use of respiratory impedance in prehospital care of hypotensive patients associated with hemorrhage and trauma: A case series Victor A. Convertino...J.Z., D.L.), Toledo , Ohio; Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services (K.T., L.V.), Spring, Texas; Em- press EmergencyMedical Services (D.B.), Yonkers...Minneapolis, Minnesota. Address for reprints: Victor A. Convertino, PhD, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Fort Sam

  2. Treatment of transtentorial herniation unresponsive to hyperventilation using hypertonic saline in dogs: effect on cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Wilson, David A; Traystman, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that transtentorial herniation (TTH) represents a state of cerebral ischemia that can be reversed by hypertonic saline. Because of the high mortality associated with TTH, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed for rapid and effective reversal of this process. We produced TTH (defined by acute dilatation of one or both pupils) by creating supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage with autologous blood injection in seven mongrel dogs anesthetized using intravenous pentobarbital and fentanyl. We measured serial rCBF (regional cerebral blood flow) using radiolabeled microspheres in regions around and distant to the hematoma. Cerebral oxygen extraction and oxygen consumption (CMRO2) were measured by serial sampling of cerebral venous blood from the sagittal sinus. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) were continuously monitored. TTH was successfully reversed over a mean period of 25.7 +/- 4.9 minutes after intravenous administration of 23.4% sodium chloride (1.4 mL/kg) in all animals. All measurements were recorded 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of 23.4% sodium chloride. Compared to prehematoma ICP (14.1 +/- 1.7 mm Hg, mean +/- SE), elevation in ICP was observed during TTH (36.2 +/- 7.2 mm Hg) with no change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (80.4 +/- 4.7 vs. 76.7 +/- 10.1 mm Hg) because of concomitant elevation in mean arterial pressure. Compared to baseline values, there was a reduction in rCBF (mL/100 gm/min +/- SE) in brainstem (12.1 +/- 2.0 vs. 21.4 +/- 1.4), gray matter (18.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 31.4 +/- 1.8), and white matter (8.6 +/- 1.7 vs.18.7 +/- 0.9) in the hemisphere contralateral to the hematoma; and gray matter (12.9 +/- 2.9 vs. 27.9 +/- 2.2) and white matter (8.3 +/- 2.0 vs.19.9 +/- 1.0) in the ipsilateral hemisphere distant from the hematoma. Administration of 23.4% sodium chloride resulted in reduced ICP at 15 minutes (12.7 +/- 1.4) and 30 minutes (15.6 +/- 3.1) after administration

  3. NKCC2A and NFAT5 regulate renal TNF production induced by hypertonic NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shoujin; Bellner, Lars; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2013-03-01

    Pathways that contribute to TNF production by the kidney are not well defined. Mice given 1% NaCl in the drinking water for 3 days exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in urinary, but not plasma, TNF levels compared with mice given tap water. Since furosemide attenuated the increase in TNF levels, we hypothesized that hypertonic NaCl intake increases renal TNF production by a pathway involving the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC2). A 2.5-fold increase in NKCC2A mRNA accumulation was observed in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) tubules from mice given 1% NaCl; a concomitant 2-fold increase in nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) mRNA and protein expression was observed in the outer medulla. Urinary TNF levels were reduced in mice given 1% NaCl after an intrarenal injection of a lentivirus construct designed to specifically knockdown NKCC2A (EGFP-N2A-ex4); plasma levels of TNF did not change after injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4. Intrarenal injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4 also inhibited the increase of NFAT5 mRNA abundance in the outer medulla of mice given 1% NaCl. TNF production by primary cultures of mTAL cells increased approximately sixfold in response to an increase in osmolality to 400 mosmol/kgH2O produced with NaCl and was inhibited in cells transiently transfected with a dnNFAT5 construct. Transduction of cells with EGFP-N2A-ex4 also prevented increases in TNF mRNA and protein production in response to high NaCl concentration and reduced transcriptional activity of a NFAT5 promoter construct. Since NKCC2A expression is restricted to the TAL, NKCC2A-dependent activation of NFAT5 is part of a pathway by which the TAL produces TNF in response to hypertonic NaCl intake.

  4. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  5. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Michael J; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are subjected to the physiological stress imposed by hypertonic conditions. In contrast, protein synthesis in MEFs with a double knockout of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 remains resistant to mTOR inhibitors under these conditions. Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) is blocked by the mTOR inhibitor Ku0063794 equally well in both wild-type and 4E-BP knockout cells, under both normal and hypertonic conditions. The response of protein synthesis to hypertonic stress itself does not require the 4E-BPs. These data suggest that under certain stress conditions: (i) translation has a greater requirement for mTOR activity and (ii) there is an absolute requirement for the 4E-BPs for regulation by mTOR. Importantly, dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and Akt is not sufficient to affect protein synthesis acutely.

  6. The efficacy of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicholas S; Spinks, Anneliese; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the supporting evidence for the clinical use of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting. Two authors searched three databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and The Cochrane Library) for relevant English language articles published through September 2014. Reference lists, conference proceedings and non-indexed academic journals were manually searched. A separate search was conducted using the Internet search engine Google to source additional studies from burns advisory agencies, first aid bodies, military institutions, manufacturer and paramedic websites. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and relevance of non-traditional data forms for inclusion. Studies were independently assessed and included if Hydrogel-based burn dressings (HBD) were examined in first aid practices in the pre-hospital setting. A total of 129 studies were considered for inclusion, of which no pre-hospital studies were identified. The review highlights that current use of HBD in the pre-hospital setting appears to be driven by sources of information that do not reflect the paramedic environment. We recommend researchers in the pre-hospital settings undertake clinical trials in this field. More so, the review supports the need for expert consensus to identify key demographic, clinical and injury outcomes for clinicians and researchers undertaking further research into the use of dressings as a first aid measure.

  7. Comparison of Fentanyl and Morphine in the Prehospital Treatment of Ischemic Type Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Erin R; Ariano, Robert E; Grierson, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, reduction of sympathetic stress and catecholamine release is an important therapeutic goal. One method used to achieve this goal is pain reduction through the systemic administration of analgesia. Historically, morphine has been the analgesic of choice in ischemic cardiac pain. This randomized double-blind controlled trial seeks to prove the utility of fentanyl as an alternate first-line analgesic for ischemic-type chest pain in the prehospital setting. Successive patients who were treated for suspected ischemic chest pain in the emergency medical services system were considered eligible. Once chest pain was confirmed, patients received oxygen, aspirin, and nitroglycerin therapy. If the ischemic-type chest pain continued the patient was randomized in a double-blinded fashion to treatment with either morphine or fentanyl. Pain scale scores, necessity for additional dosing, and rate of adverse events between the groups were assessed every 5 minutes and were compared using t-testing, Fisher's Exact test, or Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) where appropriate. The primary outcome of the study was incidence of hypotension and the secondary outcome was pain reduction as measured by the visual analog score and numeric rating score. A total of 207 patients were randomized with 187 patients included in the final analysis. Of the 187 patients, 99 were in the morphine group and 88 in the fentanyl group. No statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to hypotension was found (morphine 5.1% vs. fentanyl 0%, p = 0.06). Baseline characteristics, necessity for additional dosing, and other adverse events between the two groups were not statistically different. There were no significant differences between the changes in visual analog scores and numeric rating scale scores for pain between the two groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.15, respectively). This study supports that fentanyl and morphine are comparable in

  8. Regulation of the hypertonic stress response and other cellular functions by the Rel-like transcription factor NFAT5.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Estrada-Gelonch, Anaïs; Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Santiago, Verónica; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2006-11-30

    Stress, be it from environmental factors or intrinsic to the cell as result of growth and metabolism, can be harmful to cells. Mammalian cells have developed numerous mechanisms to respond to diverse forms of stress. These mechanisms combine signaling cascades and activation of gene expression programs to orchestrate an adaptive response that will allow the cell to survive and resume its normal functioning. In this review we will focus on the transcription factor NFAT5, a fundamental regulator of the response to osmotic stress in mammalian cells. Identified in 1999, NFAT5 is the latest addition to the Rel family, which comprises the NF-kappaB and NFATc proteins. Though in some of its structural and functional features NFAT5 is a hybrid between these two major groups of Rel proteins, it has unique characteristics that make it stand on its own as a third type of Rel transcription factor. Since its discovery, NFAT5 has been studied mostly in the context of the hypertonicity stress response. The advent of mouse models deficient in NFAT5 and other recent advances have confirmed a fundamental osmoprotective role for this factor in mammals, but also revealed features that suggest it may have a wider range of functions.

  9. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  10. Impact of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic-hydroxyethyl starch versus lactated ringer on hemorheology and microcirculation in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Guerci, Philippe; Tran, Nguyen; Menu, Patrick; Losser, Marie-Reine; Meistelman, Claude; Longrois, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The choice of volume expander for fluid resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock is still debated. Changes in plasma viscosity (PV) are barely investigated while PV modulates functional capillary density, microcirculation and organ function. The present study evaluated the impact of 2 strategies of fluid resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock in pigs. Ten pigs were subjected to hemorrhagic shock and randomly assigned to a low viscosity fluid regimen (Lactated Ringer's, LR) group or a high viscosity regimen (hypertonic-hydroxyethyl starch, HES) for volume resuscitation. Sublingual microcirculatory flow and tissue oxygen tension were assessed together with macro- and microcirculatory, biochemical and rheological variables at baseline, 30 minutes after hemorrhagic shock, immediately after reaching resuscitation endpoints (R-0), and 60 minutes after resuscitation (R-60). PV decreased similarly in both groups following resuscitation (from 1.36 [1.32-1.38] to 1.21 [1.21-1.23] for LR, and from 1.32 [1.31-1.32] to 1.20 [1.17-1.21] mPa.s for HES). No differences were found between the groups for other rheological variables, microcirculatory flow or tissue oxygen tension at R-0 and R-60. Despite a 6-fold difference in the volumes required to achieve blood flow endpoints, commercially available volume expanders had similar effects on rheological and microcirculatory variables, irrespective of their viscosity. Our findings are consistent with the absence of clinically relevant differences between crystalloid and colloid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock.

  11. The cardioprotective effect of hypertonic saline is associated with inhibitory effect on macrophage migration inhibitory factor in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Li; Lam, Kwok-Keung; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Kung, Ching-Wen; Chen, Shu-Ying; Chao, Chun-Chih; Hwang, Hwong-Ru; Chung, Ming-Ting; Lee, Yen-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis can cause myocardial dysfunction, which contributes to the high mortality of sepsis. Hypertonic saline (HS) has been reported to increase myocardial contractility in sepsis. In the present study, mechanisms of action of HS resuscitation (4 mL of 7.5% NaCl per kilogram) on cardiac function have been evaluated in septic rats. HS was administered 1 h after LPS (10 mg/kg, i.v.) challenge. The mean arterial blood pressure significantly decreased 4 h after LPS challenge, and septic shock was observed at the end of experiment (6 h). Posttreatment with HS prevented hypotension caused by LPS and significantly improved cardiac function, evidenced by increases in left ventricular developed pressure, mean +dP/dt and -dP/dt. The amplitude of electrical-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) transient in isolated single cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced after 6 h LPS insult, which was recovered by HS. In addition, LPS resulted in significant increases in neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and NF-κB phospho-p65 protein levels in myocardium at 6 h, which were significantly attenuated by HS. In conclusion, HS improved myocardial contractility and prevented circulatory failure induced by endotoxemia, which may attribute to improvement of intracellular calcium handling process and inhibitory effects on neutrophil infiltration and MIF production in hearts.

  12. Exploration of key stakeholders' preferences for pre-hospital physiologic monitoring by emergency rescue services.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Rushworth, Gordon F

    2013-12-01

    To gather preferences for novel pre-hospital physiologic monitoring technologies from emergency rescue services. Qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with three groups from UK Search and Rescue (SAR); (1) Extractors (e.g. SAR teams), (2) Transporters (personnel primarily responsible for casualty transport), and (3) Treaters (e.g. Emergency Department doctors). Three themes were defined; SAR casualty management, novel physiologic monitor potential, and physiologic monitor physical properties. Some SAR groups already employed physiologic monitoring but there was no consensus on which monitor(s) to carry or what to monitor and how frequently. Existing monitors also tended to be bulky and heavy and could be unreliable in an unstable environment or if the casualty was cold. Those performing monitoring tended to have only basic first-aid training, and their workload was often high particularly if there was more than one casualty. The potential benefits of employing a novel monitor were strategic and clinical; an opportunity for transmitting data off-scene in order to facilitate monitoring or generate advice (i.e. telemedicine) was also voiced. A range of more intuitive, physical properties was also raised (e.g. small/compact, lightweight). SAR-specific technology should be simple to operate by those with less medical training, which means that clinical data interpretation and presentation should be carefully considered. It would be beneficial if novel monitors carried out a majority of the interpretation, allowing rescuers to proceed with their priority task of removing the casualty to safety.

  13. Mobile prehospital emergency care: an analysis of implementation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Alves, Renan Paes; Salvador, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-06-01

    Mobile prehospital care is a key component of emergency care. The aim of this study was to analyze the implementation of the State of Rio de Janeiro's Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU, acronym in Portuguese). The methodology employed included document analysis, visits to six SAMU emergency call centers, and semistructured interviews conducted with 12 local and state emergency care coordinators. The study's conceptual framework was based on Giddens' theory of structuration. Intergovernmental conflicts were observed between the state and municipal governments, and between municipal governments. Despite the shortage of hospital beds, the SAMUs in periphery regions were better integrated with the emergency care network than the metropolitan SAMUs. The steering committees were not very active and weaknesses were observed relating to the limited role played by the state government in funding, management, and monitoring. It was concluded that the SAMU implementation process in the state was marked by political tensions and management and coordination weaknesses. As a result, serious drawbacks remain in the coordination of the SAMU with the other health services and the regionalization of emergency care in the state.

  14. The methodology of the Australian Prehospital Outcomes Study of Longitudinal Epidemiology (APOStLE) Project.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C; Irvine, Katrina A; Middleton, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of a large emergency medical services (EMS) data linkage research project currently under way in the statewide EMS system of New South Wales, Australia. The paper is intended to provide the reader with an understanding of how linkage techniques can be used to facilitate EMS research. This project, the Australian Prehospital Outcomes Study of Longitudinal Epidemiology (APOStLE) Project, links data from six statewide sources (computer-assisted dispatch, EMS patient health care reports, emergency department data, inpatient data, and two death registries) to enable researchers to examine the patient's entire journey through the health care system, from the emergency 0-0-0 call to the emergency department and inpatient setting, through to discharge or death, for approximately 2.6 million patients transported by the Ambulance Service of New South Wales to emergency departments between June 2006 and July 2009. Manual, deterministic, and probabilistic data linkages are described, and potential applications of linked data in EMS research are outlined.

  15. Orofacial injuries associated with prehospital management of febrile convulsion in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Ndukwe, Kizito C; Folayan, Morenike O; Ugboko, Vincent I; Elusiyan, Jerome B E; Laja, Olajumoke O

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine in a population of pediatric patients with febrile convulsions the prevalence and pattern of orofacial and dental injuries caused by traditional remedies used in a suburban Nigerian community. Over the study period of 28 months, 75 cases of febrile convulsion presented to the Children's Emergency unit of our hospital. Of these, 27 children (36%) sustained orofacial injuries caused by forceful insertion of a spoon into the mouth (96.3%) or a bite (3.7%) during convulsive episodes. The ages of the patients ranged from 12 to 84 months with a mean 39.8 +/- 18.3 months. There were 15 males and 11 females with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. The orofacial and dental injuries sustained from prehospital treatment at home were lacerations and bruising of soft tissues including lips, tongue, mucosa and commissures and tooth subluxation, displacement or avulsion. Other injuries sustained outside the mouth include second-degree burns to the feet, a chin laceration and facial bruises resulting from a fall. Many oral injuries were overlooked by pediatricians. Prompt recognition and appropriate management of febrile convulsion would be of great benefit to the pediatric patients.

  16. The frequency of 'occult' ventricular fibrillation masquerading as a flat line in prehospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Cummins, R O; Austin, D

    1988-08-01

    We investigated the frequency with which a "vector of ventricular fibrillation" may exist in persons in prehospital cardiac arrest. Emergency medical technicians trained in defibrillation were directed to record the rhythm in three different monitor leads whenever they noted an initial flat line. Before these lead switches, the technicians performed a flat line protocol that included inspection of the lead connections to the patient and to the defibrillator, and checks of the calibration and battery status of the devices. They performed this flat line protocol for 127 cardiac arrest patients; 118 were in confirmed asystole after technical problems were corrected. Ventricular fibrillation was detected in only three (2.5%) when the monitor lead was switched. Initial technical problems were more frequent and were identified for ten patients (8%). The frequency of occult ventricular fibrillation (three of 118 asystolic patients) yields a 95% confidence that the true frequency is no greater than 8% to 9%. This suggests that ventricular fibrillation masquerading as asystole is rare. These data do not support protocols for empiric countershocks of patients with an initial flat line on the monitor.

  17. French pre-hospital trauma triage criteria: Does the “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion provide additional benefit in triage?

    PubMed Central

    Hornez, Emmanuel; Maurin, Olga; Mayet, Aurélie; Monchal, Tristan; Gonzalez, Federico; Kerebel, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of the specific French Vittel “Pre-Hospital (PH) resuscitation” criteria in selecting polytrauma patients during the pre-hospital stage and its potential to increase the positive predictive value (PPV) of pre-hospital trauma triage. METHODS: This was a monocentric prospective cohort study of injured adults transported by emergency medical service to a trauma center. Patients who met any of the field trauma triage criteria were considered “triage positive”. Hospital data was statistically linked to pre-hospital records. The primary outcome of defining a “major trauma patient” was Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 16. RESULTS: There were a total of 200 injured patients evaluated over a 2 years period who met at least 1 triage criterion. The number of false positives was 64 patients (ISS < 16). The PPV was 68%. The sensitivity and the negative predictive value could not be evaluated in this study since it only included patients with positive Vittel criteria. The criterion of “PH resuscitation” was present for 64 patients (32%), but 10 of them had an ISS < 16. This was statistically significant in correlation with the severity of the trauma in univariate analysis (OR = 7.2; P = 0.005; 95%CI: 1.6-31.6). However, despite this correlation the overall PPV was not significantly increased by the use of the criterion “PH resuscitation” (68% vs 67.8%). CONCLUSION: The criterion of “pre-hospital resuscitation” was statistically significant with the severity of the trauma, but did not increase the PPV. The use of “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion could be re-considered if these results are confirmed by larger studies. PMID:25379459

  18. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  19. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  20. Reduction of Tendon Adhesions following Administration of Adaprev, a Hypertonic Solution of Mannose-6-Phosphate: Mechanism of Action Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K. F.; Metcalfe, Anthony D.; Wong, Richard; Bush, Jim; Platt, Chris; Garcon, Arnaud; Goldspink, Nick; McGrouther, Duncan A.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Repaired tendons may be complicated by progressive fibrosis, causing adhesion formation or tendon softening leading to tendon rupture and subsequent reduced range of motion. There are few therapies available which improve the gliding of damaged tendons in the hand. We investigate the role of Mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in a 600 mM hypertonic solution (Adaprev) on tendon adhesion formation in vivo using a mouse model of severed tendon in conjunction with analysis of collagen synthesis, cellular proliferation and receptors involved in TGF beta signalling. Cytotoxicity was assessed by measuring tissue residency, mechanical strength and cell viability of tendons after treatment with Adaprev. To elicit potential modes of action, in vitro and ex vivo studies were performed investigating phosphorylation of p38, cell migration and proliferation. Adaprev treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the development of adhesions and improved collagen organisation without reducing overall collagen synthesis following tendon injury in vivo. The bioavailability of Adaprev saw a 40% reduction at the site of administration over 45 minutes and tendon fibroblasts tolerated up to 120 minutes of exposure without significant loss of cell viability or tensile strength. These favourable effects were independent of CI-MPR and TGF-β signalling and possibly highlight a novel mechanism of action related to cellular stress demonstrated by phosphorylation of p38. The effect of treatment reduced tendon fibroblast migration and transiently halted tendon fibroblast proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. Our studies demonstrate that the primary mode of action for Adaprev is potentially via a physical, non-chemical, hyperosmotic effect. PMID:25383548

  1. LL-37 complexation with glycosaminoglycans in cystic fibrosis lungs inhibits antimicrobial activity, which can be restored by hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Bergsson, Gudmundur; Reeves, Emer P; McNally, Paul; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Greene, Catherine M; Greally, Peter; Murphy, Philip; O'Neill, Shane J; McElvaney, Noel G

    2009-07-01

    There is an abundance of antimicrobial peptides in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Despite this, individuals with CF are susceptible to microbial colonization and infection. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial response within the CF lung, focusing on the human cathelicidin LL-37. We demonstrate the presence of the LL-37 precursor, human cathelicidin precursor protein designated 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein, in the CF lung along with evidence that it is processed to active LL-37 by proteinase-3. We demonstrate that despite supranormal levels of LL-37, the lung fluid from CF patients exhibits no demonstrable antimicrobial activity. Furthermore Pseudomonas killing by physiological concentrations of exogenous LL-37 is inhibited by CF bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid due to proteolytic degradation of LL-37 by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin D. The endogenous LL-37 in CF BAL fluid is protected from this proteolysis by interactions with glycosaminoglycans, but while this protects LL-37 from proteolysis it results in inactivation of LL-37 antimicrobial activity. By digesting glycosaminoglycans in CF BAL fluid, endogenous LL-37 is liberated and the antimicrobial properties of CF BAL fluid restored. High sodium concentrations also liberate LL-37 in CF BAL fluid in vitro. This is also seen in vivo in CF sputum where LL-37 is complexed to glycosaminoglycans but is liberated following nebulized hypertonic saline resulting in increased antimicrobial effect. These data suggest glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 complexes to be potential therapeutic targets. Factors that disrupt glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 aggregates promote the antimicrobial effects of LL-37 with the caveat that concomitant administration of antiproteases may be needed to protect the now liberated LL-37 from proteolytic cleavage.

  2. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  3. Unilateral fluid absorption and effects on peak power after ingestion of commercially available hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic sports drinks.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, David S; Bonetti, Darrell L; Hopkins, Will G

    2011-12-01

    Isotonic sports drinks are often consumed to offset the effects of dehydration and improve endurance performance, but hypotonic drinks may be more advantageous. The purpose of the study was to compare absorption and effects on performance of a commercially available hypotonic sports drink (Mizone Rapid: 3.9% carbohydrate [CHO], 218 mOsmol/kg) with those of an isotonic drink (PowerAde: 7.6% CHO, 281 mOsmol/ kg), a hypertonic drink (Gatorade: 6% CHO, 327 mOsmol/kg), and a noncaloric placebo (8 mOsmol/kg). In a crossover, 11 cyclists consumed each drink on separate days at 250 ml/15 min during a 2-hr preload ride at 55% peak power followed by an incremental test to exhaustion. Small to moderate increases in deuterium oxide enrichment in the preload were observed with Mizone Rapid relative to PowerAde, Gatorade, and placebo (differences of 88, 45, and 42 parts per million, respectively; 90% confidence limits ±28). Serum osmolality was moderately lower with Mizone Rapid than with PowerAde and Gatorade (-1.9, -2.4; mOsmol/L; ±1.2 mOsmol/L) but not clearly different vs. placebo. Plasma volume reduction was small to moderate with Mizone Rapid, PowerAde, and Gatorade relative to placebo (-1.9%, -2.5%, -2.9%; ± 2.5%). Gut comfort was highest with Mizone Rapid but clearly different (8.4% ± 4.8%) only vs PowerAde. Peak power was highest with Mizone Rapid (380 W) vs. placebo and other drinks (1.2-3.0%; 99% confidence limits ±4.7%), but differences were inconclusive with reference to the smallest important effect (~1.2%). The outcomes are consistent with fastest fluid absorption with the hypotonic sports drink. Further research should determine whether the effect has a meaningful impact on performance.

  4. Evidence for a Higher Risk of Hypovolemia-Induced Hemodynamic Instability in Females: Implications for Decision Support During Prehospital Triage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    purpose of this study was to predict TTP based on demographic characteristics ( sex , age, height, and body mass index) and physiological variables (heart...Hg LBNP. The prediction model revealed that TTP (seconds) = 1667.5 + (5.1 +Age) + (61.1 + Sex ) − (21.5 +DHR) + (55.3 +DDAP) − (88.2 +DTPR) − (4.9 +DBRS...males. Young age and female sex are predictors of low tolerance to blood loss, and should be considered for early triage in the prehospital setting

  5. Early free access to hypertonic NaCl solution induces a long-term effect on drinking, brain cell activity and gene expression of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Macchione, A F; Beas, C; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E; Godino, A; Ponce, L F; Amigone, J L; Vivas, L

    2015-07-09

    Exposure to an altered osmotic environment during a pre/postnatal period can differentially program the fluid intake and excretion pattern profile in a way that persists until adulthood. However, knowledge about the programming effects on the underlying brain neurochemical circuits of thirst and hydroelectrolyte balance, and its relation with behavioral outputs, is limited. We evaluated whether early voluntary intake of hypertonic NaCl solution may program adult offspring fluid balance, plasma vasopressin, neural activity, and brain vasopressin and angiotensinergic receptor type 1a (AT1a)-receptor gene expression. The manipulation (M) period covered dams from 1 week before conception until offspring turned 1-month-old. The experimental groups were (i) Free access to hypertonic NaCl solution (0.45 M NaCl), food (0.18% NaCl) and water [M-Na]; and (ii) Free access to food and water only [M-Ctrol]. Male offspring (2-month-old) were subjected to iv infusion (0.15 ml/min) of hypertonic (1.5M NaCl), isotonic (0.15M NaCl) or sham infusion during 20 min. Cumulative water intake (140 min) and drinking latency to the first lick were recorded from the start of the infusion. Our results indicate that, after systemic sodium overload, the M-Na group had increased water intake, and diminished neuronal activity (Fos-immunoreactivity) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and nucleus of the solitary tract. They also showed reduced relative vasopressin (AVP)-mRNA and AT1a-mRNA expression at the supraoptic nucleus and SFO, respectively. The data indicate that the availability of a rich source of sodium during the pre/postnatal period induces a long-term effect on drinking, neural activity, and brain gene expression implicated in the control of hydroelectrolyte balance.

  6. Infusion of hypertonic saline into the lung parenchyma during radiofrequency ablation of the lungs with multitined expandable electrodes: results using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Iishi, Tatsuhiko; Hiraki, Takao; Mimura, Hidefumi; Gobara, Hideo; Kurose, Taichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Jun; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-06-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the effect of hypertonic saline infusion into the lung parenchyma on radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lungs. A total of 20 ablation zones were created in 3 pigs. The ablation zones were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (n=6) consisted of ablation zones created by applying smaller radiofrequency (RF) power without saline infusion; group 2 (n=5) zones were created by applying greater RF power without saline infusion;and group 3 (n=9) zones were created by applying greater RF power with saline infusion. The techniques of saline infusion included administration of hypertonic saline 1 ml before RFA, followed by continuous administration at a rate of 1 ml/min during the first 2 min after the initiation of RFA. The ablation parameters and coagulation necrosis volumes were compared among the groups. Group 3 had a tendency toward smaller mean impedance than group 1 (p=0.059) and group 2 (p=0.053). Group 3 showed significantly longer RF application time than group 2 (p=0.004) and significantly greater maximum RF power than group 1 (p=0.001) and group 2 (p=0.004). Group 3 showed significantly larger coagulation necrosis volume (mean, 1,421mm3) than group 2 (mean, 858 mm3, p=0.039) and had a tendency toward larger necrosis volume than group 1 (mean, 878 mm3, p=0.077). Although this small study had limited statistical power, hypertonic saline infusion during RFA appeared to enlarge coagulation necrosis of the lung parenchyma.

  7. Complications associated with insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters: an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity and uterine perforation resulting in fetal distress after insertion of an intrauterine pressure catheter.

    PubMed

    Rood, Kara M

    2012-01-01

    Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four.

  8. The 60-Day Temperature-Dependent Degradation of Midazolam and Lorazepam in the Prehospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Jason T.; Pinnawin, Ashley; Jones, Elizabeth; Denninghoff, Kurt; Siewart, Nicholas; Spaite, Daniel W.; Zaleski, Erin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of the optimal benzodiazepine to treat prehospital status epilepticus is unclear. Lorazepam is preferred in the emergency department, but concerns about nonrefrigerated storage limits emergency medical services (EMS) use. Midazolam is increasingly popular, but its heat stability is undocumented. Objective This study evaluated temperature-dependent degradation of lorazepam and midazolam after 60 days in the EMS environment. Methods Lorazepam or midazolam samples were collected prior to (n = 139) or after (n = 229) 60 days of EMS deployment during spring–summer months in 14 metropolitan areas across the United States. Medications were stored in study boxes that logged temperature every minute and were stored in EMS units per local agency policy. Mean kinetic temperature (MKT) exposure was derived for each sample. Drug concentrations were determined in a central laboratory by high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentration as a function of MKT was analyzed by linear regression. Results Prior to deployment, measured concentrations of both benzodiazepines were 1.0 relative to labeled concentration. After 60 days, midazolam showed no degradation (mean relative concentration 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.00) and was stable across temperature exposures (adjusted R2 –0.008). Lorazepam experienced little degradation (mean relative concentration 0.99, 95% CI 0.98–0.99), but degradation was correlated to increasing MKT (adjusted R2 0.278). The difference between the temperature dependence of degradation of midazolam and lorazepam was statistically significant (T = −5.172, p < 0.001). Conclusions Lorazepam experiences small but statistically significant temperature-dependent degradation after 60 days in the EMS environment. Additional study is needed to evaluate whether clinically significant deterioration occurs after 60 days. Midazolam shows no degradation over this duration, even in high-heat conditions. PMID:23148574

  9. Job Involvement and Organizational Commitment of Employees of Prehospital Emergency Medical System

    PubMed Central

    Rahati, Alireza; Sotudeh-Arani, Hossein; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Rostami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies are available on organizational commitment of employees in different organizations. However, the organizational commitment and job involvement of the employees in the prehospital emergency medical system (PEMS) of Iran have largely been ignored. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the organizational commitment and job involvement of the employees of PEMS and the relationship between these two issues. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 160 employees of Kashan PEMS who were selected through a census method in 2014. A 3-part instrument was used in this study, including a demographic questionnaire, the Allen and Miller’s organizational commitment inventory, and the Lodahl and Kejner’s job involvement inventory. We used descriptive statistics, Spearman correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, analysis of variance, and Tukey post hoc tests to analyze the data. Results: The mean job involvement and organizational commitment scores were 61.78 ± 10.69 and 73.89 ± 13.58, respectively. The mean scores of job involvement and organizational commitment were significantly different in subjects with different work experiences (P = 0.043 and P = 0.012, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between the mean scores of organizational commitment and job involvement in subjects with different fields of study, different levels of interest in the profession, and various educational levels. A direct significant correlation was found between the total scores of organizational commitment and job involvement of workers in Kashan PEMS (r = 0.910, P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study showed that the employees in the Kashan PEMS obtained half of the score of organizational commitment and about two-thirds of the job involvement score. Therefore, the higher level managers of the emergency medical system are advised to implement some strategies to increase the employees’ job involvement

  10. Feasibility of prehospital treatment with activated charcoal: Who could we treat, who should we treat?

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, G; Dawson, A; Whyte, I

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Review of deliberate self poisoning presentations to the emergency department (ED) of a toxicology unit by ambulance over six years. Data were extracted from a standardised prospective database of poisonings. Outcomes included: number of patients attended by ambulance and number arriving in emergency within one hour. Cases were stratified by ingestion type, based on toxicity and sedative activity. Results: 2041 poisoning admissions were included. The median time to ambulance attendance was 1 h 23 min (IQR 37 min–3 h) and to hospital attendance was 2 h 15 min (IQR 1 h 25 min–4 h). In 774 cases (38%) ambulance attendance occurred within one hour, but in only 161 (8%) did ED attendance occur within one hour. Non-sedating, highly toxic substances were ingested in 55 cases, 24 (23 with GCS>14) with ambulance attendance, and five with ED attendance, within one hour. Conversely 439 patients ingested a less toxic, sedative agent, 160 with ambulance attendance, and 32 with ED attendance, within one hour. Limiting decontamination to patients ingesting highly toxic, non-sedating compounds (GCS<14) reduces the proportion requiring treatment to 23 of the 774 (3.0%), an additional 18 patients. Conclusion: More patients could potentially be decontaminated if all patients attended by ambulance within one hour received charcoal. However, this would expose 128 patients with sedative, low risk poisonings to the risk of aspiration, and only treat 18 extra high risk poisonings. This small potential benefit of prehospital charcoal is unlikely to justify the expense in training and protocols required to implement it PMID:12835364

  11. A pilot study of quality of life in German prehospital emergency care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G.; Sand, Daniel; Vorstius, Christian; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life in patients represents an important area of assessment. However, attention to health professionals should be equally important. The literature on the quality of life (QOL) of emergency physicians is scarce. This pilot study investigated QOL in emergency physicians in Germany. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to June in 2015. We approached the German Association of Emergency Medicine Physicians and two of the largest recruitment agencies for emergency physicians in Germany and invited their members to participate. We used the WHO Q-BREF to obtain QOL scores in four domains that included physical, mental, social, and environmental health. Results: The 478 German emergency physicians included in the study held board certifications in general medicine (n = 40; 8.4%), anesthesiology (n = 243; 50.8%), surgery (n = 63; 13.2%), internal medicine (n = 81; 17.0%), or others (n = 51; 10.7%). The women surveyed tended to report a better QOL but worse general health than the men. Regarding specific domains, women scored worse in physical health, particularly energy during everyday work (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.98 [1.21–3.24]). Both men and women scored worse in psychological health than general health, particularly young women. Women were also more likely to view their safety (RRR: 1.87 [1.07–3.28]) and living place (RRR: 2.51 [1.10–5.73]) as being poor than their male counterparts. Conclusion: QOL in German prehospital emergency care physicians is satisfactory for the included participants; however, there were some negative effects in the psychological health domain. This is particularly obvious in young female emergency physicians. PMID:28331519

  12. Prehospital recognition of severe sepsis: development and validation of a novel EMS screening tool

    PubMed Central

    Polito, Carmen C.; Isakov, Alex; Yancey, Arthur H.; Wilson, Duncan K.; Anderson, Blake A.; Bloom, Ingrid; Martin, Greg S.; Sevransky, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To derive and validate a predictive model and novel Emergency Medical Services (EMS) screening tool for severe sepsis (SS). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A single EMS system and an urban, public hospital. Patients Sequential adult, non-trauma, non-arrest, at-risk, EMS-transported patients between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. At-risk patients were defined as having all 3 of the following criteria present in the EMS setting: heart rate >90bpm, 2) respiratory rate >20bpm, and 3) systolic blood pressure <110mmHg. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Among 66,439 EMS encounters, 555 met criteria for analysis. Fourteen percent (n=75) of patients had SS, of which 19% (n=14) were identified by EMS clinical judgment. In-hospital mortality for patients with SS was 31% (n=23). Six EMS characteristics were found to be predictors of SS: older age, transport from nursing home, Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) 9-1-1 chief complaint category of “Sick Person”, hot tactile temperature assessment, low systolic blood pressure, and low oxygen saturation. The final predictive model showed good discrimination in derivation and validation subgroups (AUC 0.843 and 0.820, respectively). Sensitivity of the final model was 91% in the derivation group and 78% in the validation group. At a pre-defined threshold of 2 or more points, prehospital severe sepsis (PRESS) score sensitivity was 86%. Conclusions The PRESS score is a novel EMS screening tool for SS that demonstrates a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 47%. Additional validation is needed before this tool can be recommended for widespread clinical use. PMID:26070235

  13. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50–14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  14. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients. OPALS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Nichol, G; O'Brien, B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Lyver, M B; Luinstra, L G; Dagnone, E; Campeau, T; Ward, R; Anderson, S

    1999-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period (1994-2002). The current article, Part II, describes in detail the rationale and methodology for major trauma and respiratory distress patients and for an economic evaluation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) programs in the OPALS Study. The OPALS Study, using a rigorous controlled methodology and a large sample size, should clearly indicate the benefit in trauma and respiratory distress patient survival and morbidity that results from the widespread introduction of prehospital ALS programs to communities of many different sizes. [Stiell IG, Wells GA, Spaite DW, Nichol G, O'Brien B, Munkley DP, Field BJ, Lyver MB, Luinstra LG, Dagnone E, Campeau T, Ward R, Anderson S, for the OPALS Study Group: The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients.

  15. Recent advances in TeleStroke: a systematic review on applications in prehospital management and Stroke Unit treatment or TeleStroke networking in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Gordian J; Müller-Barna, Peter; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2014-12-01

    TeleStroke has become an increasing means to overcome shortage of stroke expertise in underserved areas. This rapidly growing field has triggered a large amount of publications in recent years. We aimed to analyze recent advances in the field of telemedicine for acute stroke, with main focus on prehospital management, Stroke Unit treatment and network implementations in developing countries. Out of 260 articles, 25 were selected for this systematic review: 9 regarding prehospital management, 14 regarding Stroke Unit treatment and 2 describing a network in developing countries. Prehospital management showed that stroke recognition can start at the dispatch emergency call, important clinical information can be electronically transmitted to hospitals before admission and even acute treatment such as thrombolysis can be initiated in the prehospital field if ambulances are equipped with CT scan and point-of-care laboratory. Articles on remote clinical examination, telemedical imaging interpretation, trial recruitment and cost-effectiveness described various aspects of Stroke Unit treatment within TeleStroke networks, underlining reliability, safety and cost savings of these systems of care. Only one network was described to have been implemented in a developing/emerging nation. TeleStroke is a growing field expanding its focus to a broader spectrum of stroke care. It still seems to be underused, particularly in developing countries.

  16. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  17. Safety and feasibility of prehospital thrombolysis in combination with active rescue PCI strategy for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Firanescu, C.; Wilbers, R.; Meeder, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objectives The purpose of this observational study was to provide an impression of the outcomes of prehospital thrombolysis in combination with an active coronary angioplasty intervention (PCI) strategy for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Methods In a group of 151 consecutive patients the following parameters were measured: time delay, percentage of reperfusion, reocclusion, stroke, death, need for PCI and the number of protocol violations. Results The diagnosis by the ambulance paramedics was made in 8±6 minutes, followed by thrombolysis in 13±7 minutes (median±SD). In 2% (3) of the patients the thrombolytic agent was erroneously administered without complications. The elapsed time from onset of symptoms to treatment was a median of 112±77 minutes. Five percent (7) of the patients died in the first 30 days and 2% (3) suffered an intracerebral haemorrhage. Reperfusion was documented in 76% (112) of the patients, from which 18% (20) reoccluded in the following 24 hours. In patients where reperfusion was not established or reocclusion occurred, patients underwent rescue/facilitated PCI: in total 37% (55 patients). After three months 9% (13) of the patients had severly impaired (EF <40%) left ventricular function. Conclusion In our region, we successfully implemented the prehospital thrombolysis system achieving a competitive call-to-needle time and reperfusion rate. The percentage of patients who violated the protocol, suffered an intracerebral haemorrhage, died and/or had severely impaired left ventricular function was acceptable. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696516

  18. [Analysis of the implementation of a mobile pre-hospital treatment system in five Brazilian state capitals].

    PubMed

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira

    2008-08-01

    The article presents a description and analysis of the implementation of a pre-hospital treatment system (SAMU) as part of the research project Diagnostic Analysis of the Implementation of a National Policy for the Reduction of Violence and Accidents. Implementation and organization of the SAMU service, together with the related materials, human resources, and equipment, was studied in five Brazilian State capitals with high morbidity and mortality rates from external causes: Curitiba (Paraná), Recife (Pernambuco), Brasília (Federal District), Rio de Janeiro, and Manaus (Amazonas). The study involved four phases, each developing exploratory and analytical cycles, combined with fieldwork, triangulating quantitative and qualitative data. Implementation of the pre-hospital treatment system is now a key health sector asset. Further necessary steps include: comprehensive legislation covering vehicles, personnel, and equipment; closer networking between mobile units and healthcare facilities; focus on information generated in this sub-system, thus facilitating planning; and maintaining and upgrading high qualifications for SAMU crews. The service is officially establishing, standardizing, and regulating a sub-system that is crucial for saving lives.

  19. Continuous controlled-infusion of hypertonic saline solution in traumatic brain-injured patients: a 9-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Description of a continuous hypertonic saline solution (HSS) infusion using a dose-adaptation of natremia in traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients with refractory intracranial hypertension (ICH). Methods We performed a single-center retrospective study in a surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Fifty consecutive TBI patients with refractory ICH treated with continuous HSS infusion adapted to a target of natremia. In brief, a physician set a target of natremia adapted to the evolution of intracranial pressure (ICP). Flow of NaCl 20% was a priori calculated according to natriuresis, and the current and target natremia that were assessed every 4 hours. Results The HSS infusion was initiated for a duration of 7 (5 to 10) (8 ± 4) days. ICP decreased from 29 (26 to 34) (31 ± 9) mm Hg at H0 to 20 (15 to 26) (21 ± 8) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). Cerebral perfusion pressure increased from 61 (50 to 70) (61 ± 13) mm Hg at H0 up to 67 (60 to 79) (69 ± 12) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). No rebound of ICH was reported after stopping continuous HSS infusion. Natremia increased from 140 (138 to 143) (140 ± 4) at H0 up to 144 (141 to 148) (144 ± 4) mmol/L at H4 (P < 0.05). Plasma osmolarity increased from 275 (268 to 281) (279 ± 17) mmol/L at H0 up to 290 (284 to 307) (297 ± 17) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). The main side effect observed was an increase in chloremia from 111 (107 to 119) (113 ± 8) mmol/L at H0 up to 121 (117 to 124) (121 ± 6) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). Neither acute kidney injury nor pontine myelinolysis was recorded. Conclusions Continuous HSS infusion adapted to close biologic monitoring enables long-lasting control of natremia in TBI patients along with a decreased ICP without any rebound on infusion discontinuation. PMID:22035596

  20. Pre-hospital midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial: A national observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Silbergleit, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Implementation of evidence-based treatment for pre-hospital status epilepticus can improve outcomes. We hypothesized that publication of a pivotal pre-hospital clinical trial (RAMPART), demonstrating superiority of intramuscular midazolam over intravenous lorazepam, altered the national utilization rates of midazolam for pre-hospital benzodiazepine-treated seizures, while upholding its safety and efficacy outside the trial setting. Methods and findings This is a retrospective, observational cohort study of pre-hospital patient encounters throughout the United States in the National Emergency Medicine Services Information System database, from January 2010 through December 2014. We compared the rates and odds of midazolam use as first-line treatment among all adult and pediatric benzodiazepine-treated seizures before and after RAMPART publication (February 2012). Secondary analyses were conducted for rates of airway interventions and rescue therapy, as proxies for safety and efficacy of seizure termination. 156,539 benzodiazepine-treated seizures were identified. Midazolam use increased from 26.1% in January 2010 to 61.7% in December 2014 (difference +35.6%, 95% CI, 32.7%-38.4%). The annual rate of midazolam adoption increased significantly from 5.9% per year to 8.9% per year after the publication of RAMPART (difference +3.0% per year; 95%CI, 1.6%-4.5% per year; adjusted OR 1.24; 95%CI, 1.17–1.32). Overall frequency of rescue therapy and airway interventions changed little after the publication of RAMPART. Conclusions These data are consistent with effective, ongoing, but incomplete clinical translation of the RAMPART results. The effects of the trial, however, cannot be isolated. The study was limited by broad inclusion of all benzodiazepine-treated seizures as well as a lack of information on route of drug of administration. The safety and effectiveness of midazolam for benzodiazepine-treated seizures in prehospital clinical practice appear consistent

  1. Hypertonicity regulates the function of human neutrophils by modulating chemoattractant receptor signaling and activating mitogen-activated protein kinase p38.

    PubMed Central

    Junger, W G; Hoyt, D B; Davis, R E; Herdon-Remelius, C; Namiki, S; Junger, H; Loomis, W; Altman, A

    1998-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil activation causes posttraumatic complications, which may be reduced with hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. We tested if this is because of modulated neutrophil function by HS. Clinically relevant hypertonicity (10-25 mM) suppressed degranulation and superoxide formation in response to fMLP and blocked the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1/2 and p38, but did not affect Ca2+ mobilization. HS did not suppress oxidative burst in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This indicates that HS suppresses neutrophil function by intercepting signal pathways upstream of or apart from PKC. HS activated p38 by itself and enhanced degranulation in response to PKC activation. This enhancement was reduced by inhibition of p38 with SB203580, suggesting that p38 up-regulation participates in HS-induced enhancements of degranulation. HS had similar effects on the degranulation of cells that were previously stimulated with fMLP, but had no effect on its own, suggesting that HS enhancement of degranulation requires another signal. We conclude that depending on other stimuli, HS can suppress neutrophil activation by intercepting multiple receptor signals or augment degranulation by enhancing p38 signaling. In patients HS resuscitation may reduce posttraumatic complications by preventing neutrophil activation via chemotactic factors released during reperfusion. PMID:9637711

  2. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Continuous Micro-Pump Infusion of 3% Hypertonic Saline combined with Furosemide to Control Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqian; Li, Zhihong; Li, Min; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Bao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xingye; Cheng, Hongyu; Fang, Wei; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Boliang; Gao, Guodong; Li, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure is one of the most common problems in patients with diverse intracranial disorders, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Effective management for increased intracranial pressure is based mainly on surgical and medical techniques with hyperosmolar therapy as one of the core medical treatments. The study aimed to explore the effects of continuous micro-pump infusions of 3% hypertonic saline combined with furosemide on intracranial pressure control. Material/Methods We analyzed data on 56 eligible participants with intracranial pressure >20 mmHg from March 2013 to July 2014. The target was to increase and maintain plasma sodium to a level between 145 and 155 mmol/L and osmolarity to a level of 310 to 320 mOsmol/kg. Results Plasma sodium levels significantly increased from 138±5 mmol/L at admission to 151±3 mmol/L at 24 h (P<0.01). Osmolarity increased from 282±11 mOsmol/kg at baseline to 311±8 mOsmol/kg at 24 h (P<0.01). Intracranial pressure significantly decreased from 32±7 mmHg to 15±6 mmHg at 24 h (P<0.01). There was a significant improvement in CPP (P<0.01). Moreover, central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale slightly increased. However, these changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Continuous infusion of 3% hypertonic saline + furosemide is effective and safe for intracranial pressure control. PMID:26082293

  4. Association between prehospital vitamin D status and hospital-acquired bloodstream infections123

    PubMed Central

    Quraishi, Sadeq A; Litonjua, Augusto A; Moromizato, Takuhiro; Gibbons, Fiona K; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward; Christopher, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alterations in immune function can predispose patients to nosocomial infections. Few studies have explored potentially modifiable host factors that may improve immune function and decrease risk of hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (HABSI). Vitamin D is a key regulator of innate and adaptive immune systems that may influence host susceptibility to infections. Objective: We investigated the association between prehospital serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and risk of HABSI. Design: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 2135 adult patients from 2 Boston teaching hospitals. All patients had 25(OH)D concentrations measured before hospitalization between 1993 and 2010. The main outcome measure was HABSI, which was defined as positive blood cultures from samples drawn 48 h after hospital admission. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates were not considered to be bloodstream infections. Associations between 25(OH)D groups and HABSI were estimated by using bivariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Adjusted ORs were estimated with the inclusion of covariate terms thought to plausibly interact with both 25(OH)D concentration and HABSI. Results: Compared with patients with 25(OH)D concentrations ≥30 ng/mL, patients with concentrations <30 ng/mL had higher odds of HABSI. For 25(OH)D concentrations <10 ng/mL, the OR was 2.33 (95% CI: 1.45, 3.74); for 25(OH)D concentrations from 10 to 19.9 ng/mL, the OR was 1.60 (95% CI: 1.04, 2.46); and for 25(OH)D concentrations from 20 to 29.9 ng/mL, the OR was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.84). After adjustment for age, sex, race (nonwhite compared with white), patient type (medical compared with surgical), and Deyo-Charlson index, the ORs of HABSI were 1.95 (95% CI: 1.22, 3.12), 1.36 (95% CI: 0.89, 2.07), and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.60, 1.62), respectively. Conclusions: The analysis of 2135 adult patients showed that 25(OH)D concentrations <10 ng/mL before hospitalization were associated with

  5. Characteristics and prognoses of patients treated by an anaesthesiologist-manned prehospital emergency care unit. A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lossius, Hans Morten; Toft, Palle; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2017-01-01

    Objective When planning and dimensioning an emergency medical system, knowledge of the population serviced is vital. The amount of literature concerning the prehospital population is sparse. In order to add to the current body of literature regarding prehospital treatment, thus aiding future public health planning, we describe the workload of a prehospital anaesthesiologist-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU) and the total population it services in terms of factors associated with mortality. Participants The study is a register-based study investigating all missions carried out by a MECU operating in a mixed urban/rural area in Denmark from 1 May 2006 to 31 December 2014. Information on missions was extracted from the local MECU registry and linked at the individual level to the Danish population-based databases, the National Patient Registry and the Civil Registration System. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measures were number of missions and number of patient contacts. Secondary patient variables were mortality and association between mortality and age, sex, comorbidity, prior admission to hospital and response time. Results The MECU completed 41 513 missions (mean 13.1 missions/day) having 32 873 patient contacts, corresponding to 19.2 missions and 15.2 patient encounters per 1000 patient years. Patient variables: the median age was 57 years (range 0–108 years), 42.8% (42.3% to 43.4%) were women. For patients admitted to hospital alive, 30-day mortality was 5.7% (5.4% to 6.0%); 90-day mortality was 8.1% (7.8% to 8.5%) while 2-year mortality was 16.4% (16.0% to 16.8%). Increasing age, male sex, comorbidity and prior admission to hospital but not response time were associated with mortality. Conclusions Mortality following an incident requiring the assistance of a MECU was high in the first 2 years following the incident. MECU response time assessed as a continuous parameter was not associated with patient outcome. PMID

  6. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion.

  7. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Avila, Alfonso; de Cerio, David Perez-Diaz

    2015-05-22

    This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN.

  8. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Avila, Alfonso; Perez-Diaz de Cerio, David

    2015-01-01

    This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN. PMID:26007741

  9. A rapid infusion pump driven by micro electromagnetic linear actuation for pre-hospital intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chong, Yinbao; Zhao, An; Lang, Lang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jiuling

    2015-02-01

    A rapid infusion pump with a maximum flow rate of 6 L/h was designed experimentally using a micro electromagnetic linear actuator, and its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing with that of a commercial Power Infuser under preset flow rates of 0.2, 2, and 6 L/h. The flow rate, air detection sensitivity, occlusion response time, quantitative determination of hemolysis, and power consumption of the infusion devices were extensively investigated using statistical analysis methods (p < 0.05). The experimental results revealed that the flow rate of the designed infusion pump was more stable and accurate, and the hemolysis was significantly less than that of the Power Infuser. The air detection sensitivity and the power consumption could be comparable to that of the Power Infuser except the occlusion response time. The favorable performance made the designed infusion pump a potential candidate for applications in pre-hospital fluid administration.

  10. Cross-sectional study of the prehospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Louise H; Shewan, Jane; Baldwin, Trevor; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Suspected seizures are a common reason for emergency calls to ambulance services. Prehospital management of these patients is an important element of good quality care. The aim of this study, conducted in a regional ambulance service in the UK, was to quantify the number of emergency telephone calls for suspected seizures in adults, the associated costs, and to describe the patients’ characteristics, their prehospital management and their immediate outcomes. Design Quantitative cross-sectional study using routinely collected data and a detailed review of the clinical records of a consecutive series of adult patients (≥16 years). Setting A regional ambulance service within the National Health Service in England. Participants Cross-sectional data from all 605 481 adult emergency incidents managed by the ambulance service from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013. We selected a consecutive series of 178 individual incidents from May 2012 for more detailed analysis (132 after exclusions and removal of non-seizure cases). Results Suspected seizures made up 3.3% of all emergency incidents. True medical emergencies were uncommon but 3.3% had partially occluded airways, 6.8% had ongoing seizure activity and 59.1% had clinical problems in addition to the seizure (29.1% involving injury). Emergency vehicles were dispatched for 97.2% of suspected seizures, the seizure had terminated on arrival in 93.2% of incidents, 75% of these patients were transported to hospital. The estimated emergency management cost per annum of suspected seizures in the English ambulance services is £45.2 million (€64.0 million, $68.6 million). Conclusions Many patients with suspected seizures could potentially be treated more effectively and at lower cost by modifying ambulance call handling protocols. The development of innovative care pathways could give call handlers and paramedics alternatives to hospital transportation. Increased adoption of care plans could reduce 999 calls and

  11. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  12. Altered plasma and pituitary arginine vasotocin and hypothalamic provasotocin expression in flounder (Platichthys flesus) following hypertonic challenge and distribution of vasotocin receptors within the kidney.

    PubMed

    Warne, J M; Bond, H; Weybourne, E; Sahajpal, V; Lu, W; Balment, R J

    2005-12-01

    Plasma AVT concentration, pituitary AVT content, hypothalamic provasotocin mRNA expression and other osmoregulatory parameters were measured in euryhaline flounder 4, 8, and 24 h after the hypertonic challenge of transfer from fresh water (FW) to seawater (SW). Osmolality and the concentration of major plasma ions, sodium and chloride, were significantly higher in fish transferred to SW by comparison with time matched controls, an effect evident within 4 h. By comparison with time matched controls, pituitary store of AVT was lower while plasma AVT concentration was higher 8 and 24 h after transfer to SW. Higher provasotocin mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was also seen at 4 and 8 h in flounder transferred from FW to SW compared with time matched controls. The lower pituitary store and higher circulating levels imply substantial AVT secretion occurs in the early phase response to this hypertonic challenge. Changes in the regulation of AVT synthesis and secretion appeared quickly following movement to SW, consistent with the rapid osmoregulatory response, including reduced urine production that fish require to accommodate the dehydrative water losses and salt loading on exposure to the new hyperosmotic environment. qPCR measures of whole kidney vasotocin receptor mRNA expression indicated similar levels in SW and FW. Immunohistochemistry for the vasotocin receptor in flounder kidney showed localisation on the afferent and efferent arterioles of the glomerulus and on the capillary bed that extends from the efferent arteriole to the smooth muscle surrounding the collecting duct. Localisation of the vasotocin receptor was comparable in SW and FW fish.

  13. Efficacy of conivaptan and hypertonic (3%) saline in treating hyponatremia due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone in a tertiary Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sridhar Nagepalli Venkatarami; Rangappa, Pradeep; Jacob, Ipe; Janakiraman, Rajeswari; Rao, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities encountered in clinical practice and has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The optimal management of hyponatremia is still evolving. Over the last decade, vaptans have been increasingly used in clinical practice with promising results. Materials and Methods: The study included eighty patients with symptomatic hyponatremia due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) admitted and treated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with either conivaptan or hypertonic (3%) saline. They were compared for time taken to achieve normal serum sodium, length of ICU and hospital stay, and adverse effects. Results: The demographic data and serum sodium levels at admission were comparable between the two groups. After initiating correction, sodium levels at 6, 12, and 24 h were similar between the two groups. However, at 48 h, patients in the conivaptan group (Group C) had higher sodium levels (133.0 ± 3.8 mEq/L) as compared to hypertonic saline group (Group HS) (128.9 ± 2.6 mEq/L), which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The length of ICU stay was less in the Group C (3.35 ± 0.89 days) when compared with the Group HS (4.61 ± 0.91 days) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality between the two groups. Conclusion: In patients with symptomatic hyponatremia due to SIADH, conivaptan with its aquaresis property can achieve a significantly better sodium correction, resulting in reduced ICU and hospital stay with no significant adverse effects. PMID:28149029

  14. Impact of on-site care, prehospital time, and level of in-hospital care on survival in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Sampalis, J S; Lavoie, A; Williams, J I; Mulder, D S; Kalina, M

    1993-02-01

    A sample of 360 severely injured patients was selected from a cohort of 8007 trauma victims followed prospectively from the time of injury to death or discharge. A case referent study was used to test the association between on-site care, total prehospital time, and level of care at the receiving hospital with short-term survival. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that use of Advanced Life Support (ALS) at the scene was not associated with survival, whereas treatment at a level I compatible hospital was associated with a 38% reduction in the odds of dying, which approached statistical significance. Total prehospital time over 60 minutes was associated with a statistically significant adjusted relative odds of dying (OR = 3.0). The results of this study support the need for regionalization of trauma care and fail to show a benefit associated with ALS.

  15. Effects of prehospital epinephrine during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial non-shockable rhythm: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Few clinical trials have provided evidence that epinephrine administration after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) improves long-term survival. Here we determined whether prehospital epinephrine administration would improve 1-month survival in OHCA patients. Methods We analyzed the data of 209,577 OHCA patients; the data were prospectively collected in a nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database between 2009 and 2010. Patients were divided into the initial shockable rhythm (n = 15,492) and initial non-shockable rhythm (n = 194,085) cohorts. The endpoints were prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), 1-month survival, and 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (cerebral performance category scale, category 1 or 2) after OHCA. We defined epinephrine administration time as the time from the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency medical services personnel to the first epinephrine administration. Results In the initial shockable rhythm cohort, the ratios of prehospital ROSC, 1-month survival, and 1-month favorable neurological outcomes in the non-epinephrine group were significantly higher than those in the epinephrine group (27.7% vs. 22.8%, 27.0% vs. 15.4%, and 18.6% vs. 7.0%, respectively; all P < 0.001). However, in the initial non-shockable rhythm cohort, the ratios of prehospital ROSC and 1-month survival in the epinephrine group were significantly higher than those in the non-epinephrine group (18.7% vs. 3.0% and 3.9% vs. 2.2%, respectively; all P < 0.001) and there was no significant difference between the epinephrine and non-epinephrine groups for 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (P = 0.62). Prehospital epinephrine administration for OHCA patients with initial non-shockable rhythms was independently associated with prehospital ROSC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 8.83, 6.18, 4.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.01-9.73, 5.82-6.56, 3.98-4.69; for epinephrine administration times ≤9 min, 10-19 min, and

  16. 'The first pulse you take is your own' - but don't forget your colleagues'. Emotion teamwork in pre-hospital emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Henckes, Nicolas; Nurok, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the way that intense emotions, both positive and negative, are collectively regulated at work by pre-hospital emergency teams. We analyse the collective strategies and solutions that are developed in daily medical work by teams and individuals with a view to furthering the action. After a review of the literature on emotion work in work collectives, we discuss the nature of pre-hospital emergency work and the role of emotions in this work. We then examine the collective management of both disruptive and desired emotions by teams during interventions. The last section reflects on the long-term management of emotions at work using Randall Collins' concepts of interaction ritual and emotional energy. This study relies on fieldwork performed in emergency medical services in New York and Paris.

  17. Retrospective observational case-control study comparing prehospital thrombolytic therapy for ST-elevation myocardial infarction with in-hospital thrombolytic therapy for patients from same area

    PubMed Central

    Chittari, M; Ahmad, I; Chambers, B; Knight, F; Scriven, A; Pitcher, D

    2005-01-01

    Design: Retrospective observational case-control study comparing patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treated with thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital environment with patients treated in hospital. Setting: Wyre Forest District and Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK. Participants: (A) All patients who received prehospital thrombolytic therapy for suspected AMI accompanied by electrocardiographic features considered diagnostic. (B) Patients who received thrombolytic therapy after arrival at hospital for the same indication, matched with group A by age, gender and postcode. Main outcome measures: 1. Call to needle time 2. Percentage of patients treated within one hour of calling for medical help 3. Appropriateness of thrombolytic therapy 4. Safety of thrombolytic therapy Results: 1. The median call to needle time for patients treated before arriving in hospital (n = 27) was 40 minutes with an inter-quartile range 25–112 (mean 43 minutes). Patients from the same area who were treated in hospital (n = 27) had a median time of 106 minutes with an inter-quartile range 50–285 (mean 126 minutes). This represents a median time saved by prehospital treatment of 66 minutes. 2. 60 minutes after medical contact, 96 % of patients treated before arrival in hospital had received thrombolytic therapy; this compares with 4% of patients from similar areas treated in hospital. 3. Myocardial infarction was confirmed in 92% (25/27) of patients who received prehospital thrombolytic therapy and similarly 92% (25/27) of those given in-hospital thrombolytic therapy. 4. No major bleeding occurred in either group. Group A suffered fewer in-hospital deaths than group B (1 versus 4). Cardiogenic shock (3 patients) and ventricular arrhythmia (5 patients) were seen only in group B. Conclusion: Paramedic-delivered thrombolytic therapy can be delivered appropriately, safely, and effectively. Time gains are substantial and can meet the national targets for early

  18. Is Limited Prehospital Resuscitation with Plasma More Beneficial than Using a Synthetic Colloid? An Experimental Study in Rabbits with Parenchymal Bleeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Is limited prehospital resuscitation with plasma more beneficial than using a synthetic colloid ? An experimental study in rabbits with parenchymal...with plasma more beneficial than using a synthetic colloid ? An experimental study in rabbits with parenchymal bleeding 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...subjects with active bleeding compared with a single plasma protein solution (5% albumin) or the synthetic colloid (Hextend) that is currently used on the

  19. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel: a 1-year follow-up from the European MULTIPRAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin; Danchin, Nicolas; Ramos, Yvonne; Goedicke, Jochen; Clemmensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim MULTIPRAC was designed to provide insights into the use and outcomes associated with prehospital initiation of antiplatelet therapy with either prasugrel or clopidogrel in the context of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After a previous report on efficacy and safety outcomes during hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06–0.89). Conclusion In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment with prasugrel as compared to clopidogrel was associated with a lower risk of CV death at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27143908

  20. Saving Lives on the Battlefield: A Joint Trauma System Review of Pre-Hospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operating Area - Afghanistan (CJOA-A)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-30

    What makes military medicine unique? 2. Why do military medical providers exist? 3. What is the leading cause of death on the battlefield? 4. Where do...the advocate for medics and pre-hospital battlefield trauma care? 13. Who owns battlefield medicine ? Unclassified 3 Unclassified SECTION II. EXECUTIVE...customized for use on the battlefield. [Maughon JS. An inquiry into the nature of wounds resulting in killed in action in Vietnam. Military Medicine 1970; 135

  1. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  2. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-08-01

    Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was principally

  3. In rat hepatocytes, the hypertonic activation of Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is mediated by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Heinzinger, H; van den Boom, F; Tinel, H; Wehner, F

    2001-11-01

    1. The initial event in the regulatory volume increase (RVI) of rat hepatocytes is an import of extracellular Na(+) via Na(+) conductance, Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport, and Na(+)-H(+) antiport. 2. Here, the protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (100 nmol l(-1)) and bis-indolyl-maleimide I (400 nmol l(-1)) were used to test for a possible contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) to the hypertonic activation of these transporters in confluent primary cultures. 3. Stimulation of Na(+) conductance was monitored: (i) by use of a differential approach based on Na(+) fluxes, (ii) by means of cable analysis, and (iii) in experiments with low Na(+) pulses. All three experimental protocols in concert demonstrated a block of the activation of Na(+) conductance by staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I. 4. In addition, both compounds significantly reduced the hypertonic activation of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport (quantified on the basis of furosemide-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake) to approximately 30 %. 5. In contrast, neither staurosporine nor bis-indolyl-maleimide I had any detectable effect on the hypertonicity-induced alkalinization of cell pH via Na(+)-H(+) antiport (determined fluorometrically). 6. Staurosporine and bis-indolyl-maleimide I completely blocked the RVI of rat hepatocytes (quantified by means of confocal laser-scanning microscopy). The high efficiency of the block suggests an additional inhibitory effect of both compounds on the activity of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (determined as ouabain-sensitive (86)Rb(+) uptake). 7. It is concluded that the hypertonic activation of rat hepatocyte Na(+) conductance and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) symport--but not Na(+)-H(+) antiport--is probably mediated by PKC.

  4. The Prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients` performed by the specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden – a phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse’s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses’ perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma. Methods This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton. Results The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one’s own leadership and Developing professional knowledge. Conclusions This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed. PMID:22985478

  5. Evaluation of prehospital and emergency department systolic blood pressure as a predictor of in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Lalezarzadeh, Fariborz; Wisniewski, Paul; Huynh, Katie; Loza, Maria; Gnanadev, Dev

    2009-10-01

    Hypotension is a trauma activation criterion validated by multiple studies. However, field systolic blood pressures (SBP) are still met with skepticism. How significant is the role of prehospital (PH) and emergency department (ED) SBP in the patient's overall condition? A review of the trauma registry over a 5-year period was conducted. PH SBPs were stratified into four categories: severe (SBP 80 mmHg or less), moderate (81-100 mmHg), mild hypotension (101-120 mmHg), and normotension (greater than 120 mmHg). These four groups were further subcategorized into the patients who were hypotensive, SBP 90 mmHg or less in the ED, versus those that were not (SBP greater than 90 mmHg). Data for 6964 patients were analyzed. Patients with PH SBP of 80 mmHg or less compared with patients who had PH SBP of greater than 80 mmHg had higher mortality (OR, 9; 95% CI, 6.45-12.84). Patients with both PH SBP 80 mmHg or less and ED SBP 90 mmHg or less had the highest risk of mortality (50%) and highest need for emergent operative intervention (54%). PH and ED hypotension is a strong predictor of in-hospital mortality and need for emergent surgical intervention in trauma patients. Field or ED blood pressures should serve as a significant marker of the patient's condition.

  6. Uncontrolled organ donation following prehospital cardiac arrest: a potential solution to the shortage of organ donors in the United Kingdom?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Keith J; Bramhall, Simon; Mayer, David; Muiesan, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    Uncontrolled donation after cardiac death (DCD) could increase the donor pool in the UK. Air ambulance (AA) teams may be well placed to recruit these donors. They cover large geographical areas, have short transfer times and tasked predominantly to life-threatening cases. The potential to recruit from this pool of donors was reviewed. Seventy-five month activity of an AA unit was analysed identifying patients who entered prehospital cardiac arrest (PHCA). Patients over 70 years of age were excluded as were those whose cardiac arrest was unwitnessed. A minimum potential donor pool was estimated based upon patients dying of medical causes. Rates of bystander resuscitation, mechanism of death and patient demographic data were observed. During 10,022 missions 534 patients entered PHCA. A total of 106 patients met inclusion criteria. There were 12 paediatric cases; 39 cases of 17-50 year olds and 55 cases of 50-70 year olds. Medical and traumatic causes of death accounted for 60 and 46 cases respectively. Bystander resuscitation efforts were provided in 47% of cases. A regional AA could contribute to a national uncontrolled DCD programme. Given that there are 31 AA's in England and Wales, we estimate that there could be a minimum of 300 additional potential donors annually.

  7. Comparison of the protoscolocidal effectiveness of hypertonic saline, povidone-iodine and albendazole solutions in an experimental lung hydatid cyst model.

    PubMed

    Durgun Yetim, T; Basoglu, A; Taslak Sengul, A; Yetim, I; Serdar Bekdemir, O; Hokelek, M

    2011-01-01

    Secondary hydatidosis is an important problem encountered during the surgical treatment of hydatid cysts. This study describes an experimental model of secondary hydatidosis by cyst inoculation, used to explore whether simultaneous inoculation of protoscolocidal agents could prevent secondary hydatidosis. Fertile cyst fluid was injected into the pleural space of rabbits alone (group 1, n = 8), and in combination with 2% albendazole solution (group 2, n = 8), 20% hypertonic saline (group 3, n = 8) or 10% povidone-iodine (group 4, n = 8). Computed tomography imaging of the thorax, indirect haemagglutination (IHA) titres and eosinophil counts were used to determine cyst development. After 16 months, three control rabbits had pneumothorax, seven had cysts and four had parenchymal nodules. Histopathological investigation of nodules revealed 87.5% cyst formation. Pleural thickening was observed in rabbits from all groups. Cyst formation rates, IHA titres and eosinophilia counts were higher in group 1 than in groups 2-4. This study demonstrated the experimental formation of secondary hydatidosis and found that topical protoscolocidal agents were beneficial in preventing cyst recurrence.

  8. Hypertonic Glucose Combined with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Prepare Wounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection for Skin Grafting: A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai; Hong, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Soft tissue losses from acute or chronic trauma are a challenge for surgeons. To explore a method to expedite granulation tissue formation in preparation for a split-thickness skin graft (STSG), the medical records of 3 patients - 2 adult men with wounds related to trauma injury and 1 infant with necrotizing fasciitis, all infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa - were reviewed. All wounds were surgically debrided and managed by applying gauze soaked in 50% glucose followed by continuous negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) before definitive skin grafting. NPWT pressure was applied at -80 mm Hg for the 2 adult males (ages 39 and 25 years) and -50 mm Hg for the 7-month-old male infant. The dressings were changed every 2 to 3 days. No adverse events occurred, and wounds were successfully closed with a STSG after an average of 7 days. In 1 case, NPWT was able to help affix dressings in a difficult-to-dress area (genital region). The combination of hypertonic glucose and hand-made, gauze-based NPWT was found to be safe, well-tolerated, and effective in preparing the wound bed for grafting. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to compare the safety, effectiveness, and efficacy of this method to other treatment approaches for P. aeruginosa-infected wounds.

  9. Comparison of effects of equiosmolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cottenceau, Vincent; Masson, Francoise; Mahamid, Eugenia; Petit, Laurent; Shik, Venyamin; Sztark, Francois; Zaaroor, Menashe; Soustiel, Jean Francois

    2011-10-01

    The potential superiority of hypertonic saline (HTS) over mannitol (MTL) for control of intracranial pressure (ICP) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still debated. Forty-seven severe TBI patients with increased ICP were prospectively recruited in two university hospitals and randomly treated with equiosmolar infusions of either MTL 20% (4 mL/kg; n=25 patients) or HTS 7.5% (2 mL/kg; n=22 patients). Serum sodium, hematocrit, ICP, arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), shear rate, global indices of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism were measured before, and 30 and 120 min following each infusion during the course of illness. Outcome was assessed at 6 months. Both HTS and MTL effectively and equally reduced ICP levels with subsequent elevation of CPP and CBF, although this effect was significantly stronger and of longer duration after HTS and correlated with improved rheological blood properties induced by HTS. Further, effect of HTS on ICP appeared to be more robust in patients with diffuse brain injury. In contrast, oxygen and glucose metabolic rates were left equally unaffected by both solutions. Accordingly, there was no significant difference in neurological outcome between the two groups. In conclusion, MTL was as effective as HTS in decreasing ICP in TBI patients although both solutions failed to improved cerebral metabolism. HTS showed an additional and stronger effect on cerebral perfusion of potential benefit in the presence of cerebral ischemia. Treatment selection should therefore be individually based on sodium level and cerebral hemodynamics.

  10. [Effect of incubation in sodium chloride hypertonic solutions on human blood lymphocyte DNA damage formation by long-wave UV-radiation].

    PubMed

    Smetanina, N M; Pustovalova, M V; Osipov, A N

    2013-01-01

    Effect of incubation in NaCl hypertonic solutions (0.2, 0.35 and 0.5 mol/L for 1 h at 4 degrees C) on the DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) and alkaline-labile site (ALS) yields induced by long-wave UV-radiation (365 +/- 10 nm) in human blood peripheral lymphocytes in vitro was investigated. It was shown that compared to the cells incubated in NaCl isotonic solution (0.14 mol/L) statistically significant increases in the yields of both spontaneous (-1.5-1.9 times) and UV-A radiation induced (-1.6-1.7 times) DNA damage was observed only at the NaCl concentration of 0.5 mol/L. It is assumed that at this concentration of NaCl, dissociation of the linker histone H1 occurs, the structure of chromatin is disrupted and the free radical-induced DNA damage output dramatically increases.

  11. Short-term hypertonic exposure enhances in vitro follicle growth and meiotic competence of enclosed oocytes while modestly affecting mRNA expression of aquaporin and steroidogenic genes in the domestic cat model.

    PubMed

    Songsasen, N; Thongkittidilok, C; Yamamizu, K; Wildt, D E; Comizzoli, P

    2017-03-01

    Using the domestic cat as a non-rodent, larger animal model, the objective was to determine the impact of a brief incubation in a hypertonic microenvironment on (1) ovarian follicle and oocyte growth in vitro, (2) developmental capacity of the resident oocyte, and (3) expression of aquaporin (AQP) genes in parallel with genes involved in regulation of folliculogenesis. In Study 1: Secondary or early antral follicles encapsulated in 0.5% alginate were allocated to one of three treatment groups: 1) culture in standard medium at 290 mOsm for 15 d (Control); 2) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 1 h followed by culture in standard medium for 15 d (Hypertonic-1h); or 3) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 24 h followed by incubation in standard medium for additional 14 d (Hypertonic-24h). After measuring follicle and oocyte diameters on Day 15, in vitro-grown oocytes were incubated for 24 h before assessing nuclear status. In Study 2: secondary or early antral follicles were subjected to one of the three treatments: 1) culture in standard medium at 290 mOsm for 48 h; 2) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 1 h followed by culture in standard medium for additional 47 h; or 3) incubation in 350 mOsm medium for 24 h followed by culture in standard medium for additional 24 h. At the end of the culture period, all follicles were assessed for mRNA level of Cyp17a1, Cyp19a1, Star, Aqp1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 as well as Fshr using qPCR. Freshly collected follicles also were subjected to gene expression analysis and served as the 'Non-cultured control'. Hypertonic-24h follicles grew larger (P < 0.05) than the control, whereas those in Hypertonic-1h group exhibited intermediate growth, especially when the culture started at the early antral stage. Oocytes in the Hypertonic-24h group were larger and resumed meiosis at a higher rate than in the other treatments. In vitro culture affected (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of Cyp19a1, Star, Aqp1, and Aqp7 in both the secondary and early

  12. An evaluation of the professional, social and demographic profile and quality of life of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tallo, Fernando Sabia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Baitello, André Luciano; Lopes, Renato Delascio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil and to evaluate their quality of life. METHODS: Both a semi-structured questionnaire with 57 questions and the SF-36 questionnaire were sent to research departments within SAMU in the Brazilian state capitals, the Federal District and inland towns in Brazil. RESULTS: Of a total of 902 physicians, including 644 (71.4%) males, 533 (59.1%) were between 30 and 45 years of age and 562 (62.4%) worked in a state capital. Regarding education level, 45.1% had graduated less than five years before and only 43% were specialists recognized by the Brazilian Medical Association. Regarding training, 95% did not report any specific training for their work at SAMU. The main weaknesses identified were psychiatric care and surgical emergencies in 57.2 and 42.9% of cases, respectively; traumatic pediatric emergencies, 48.9%; and medical emergencies, 42.9%. As for procedure-related skills, the physicians reported difficulties in pediatric advanced support (62.4%), airway surgical access (45.6%), pericardiocentesis (64.4%) and thoracentesis (29.9%). Difficulties in using an artificial ventilator (43.3%) and in transcutaneous pacing (42.2%) were also reported. Higher percentages of young physicians, aged 25-30 years (26.7 vs 19.0%; p<0.01), worked exclusively in prehospital care (18.0 vs 7.7%; p<0.001), with workloads >48 h per week (12.8 vs 8.6%; p<0.001), and were non-specialists with the shortest length of service (<1 year) at SAMU (30.1 vs 18.2%; p<0.001) who were hired without having to pass public service exams* (i.e., for a temporary job) (61.8 vs 46.2%; p<0.001). Regarding quality of life, the pain domain yielded the worst result among physicians at SAMU. CONCLUSIONS: The doctors in this sample were young and within a few years of graduation, and they had no specific training in prehospital emergencies. Deficiencies were mostly found in pediatrics and psychiatry

  13. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  14. Does a pre-hospital emergency pathway improve early diagnosis and referral in suspected stroke patients? – Study protocol of a cluster randomised trial [ISRCTN41456865

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Marica; De Luca, Assunta; Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Lori, Giuliano; Guasticchi, Gabriella

    2005-01-01

    Background Early interventions proved to be able to improve prognosis in acute stroke patients. Prompt identification of symptoms, organised timely and efficient transportation towards appropriate facilities, become essential part of effective treatment. The implementation of an evidence based pre-hospital stroke care pathway may be a method for achieving the organizational standards required to grant appropriate care. We performed a systematic search for studies evaluating the effect of pre-hospital and emergency interventions for suspected stroke patients and we found that there seems to be only a few studies on the emergency field and none about implementation of clinical pathways. We will test the hypothesis that the adoption of emergency clinical pathway improves early diagnosis and referral in suspected stroke patients. We designed a cluster randomised controlled trial (C-RCT), the most powerful study design to assess the impact of complex interventions. The study was registered in the Current Controlled Trials Register: ISRCTN41456865 – Implementation of pre-hospital emergency pathway for stroke – a cluster randomised trial. Methods/design Two-arm cluster-randomised trial (C-RCT). 16 emergency services and 14 emergency rooms were randomised either to arm 1 (comprising a training module and administration of the guideline), or to arm 2 (no intervention, current practice). Arm 1 participants (152 physicians, 280 nurses, 50 drivers) attended an interactive two sessions course with continuous medical education CME credits on the contents of the clinical pathway. We estimated that around 750 patients will be met by the services in the 6 months of observation. This duration allows recruiting a sample of patients sufficient to observe a 30% improvement in the proportion of appropriate diagnoses. Data collection will be performed using current information systems. Process outcomes will be measured at the cluster level six months after the intervention. We will

  15. In Situ Fluorescence Measurement of Tear Film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in Mice Shows Marked Hypertonicity in Aquaporin-5 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ederra, Javier; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tear film composition depends on water and ion transport across ocular surface epithelia and on fluid secretion by lacrimal glands. The purpose of this study was to establish in situ fluorescence methods to measure tear film ionic concentrations and pH in mice and to determine whether tear film composition is sensitive to deficiency of the major ocular surface aquaporin water channels. Methods Tear film ionic concentrations and pH were measured in anesthetized mice by ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy after topical application of ion/pH-sensing, dual-wavelength fluorescent indicators. [Na+], [K+], and [Cl−] were measured with membrane-impermeant indicators developed by our laboratory, and pH was measured with bis(carboxyethyl)-carboxyfluorescein fluorescence-conjugated dextran. Measurements were performed on wild-type mice and on knockout mice lacking aquaporins AQP1, AQP3, and AQP5. Results In wild-type mice, tear film [Na+] was 139 ± 8 mM, [K+] was 48 ± 1 mM, [Cl−] was 127 ± 4 mM, and pH was 7.59 ± 0.2 (SE; n = 5–8). pH did not differ significantly in the AQP knockout mice. [Na+] was increased by approximately twofold in AQP5 null mice (230 ± 20 mM) and was greatly reduced after exposure of the ocular surface to a humidified atmosphere. [K+] was mildly reduced in AQP1 null mice. Conclusions These results establish an in situ optical methodology to measure tear film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in living mice, without the need for fluid sampling. Tear film hypertonicity in AQP5 deficiency is likely caused by reduced transcorneal water secretion in response to evaporative water loss. PMID:19136711

  16. The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow during acute and chronic myocardial ischemia in anesthetized and awake intact dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, J T; Watson, J T; Hutton, I; Fixler, D E; Curry, G C; Templeton, G H

    1975-01-01

    The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow and ventricular performance was studied during acute myocardial ischemia in awake, unsedated and in anesthesized dogs and after myocardial infarction in awake unsedated dogs. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Generalized increases in regional myocardial blood flow occurred after mannitol in all of the different animal models studied. The increases in coronary blood flow after mannitol were just as impressive in the nonischemic regions as in the ischemic portion of the left ventricle in all of the different models that were examined in this study. Improvement in regional myocardial blood flow to the ischemic area of the left ventricle after mannitol was associated with a reduction in ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. The increases in regional myocardial flow after mannitol were also associated with increases in contractility, but the increases in flow appeared to be more impressive than the changes in contractility. The data obtained demonstrate that mannitol increases regional coronary blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in both anesthetized and awake, unsedated, intact dogs with acute and chronic myocardial ischemia and that mannitol reduces ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. Thus the results suggest that under these circumstances the increases in regional myocardial blood flow after mannitol are of physiological importance in reducing the extent of myocardial injury. Since coronary blood flow increased to nonischemic regions the increases in regional myocardial flow demonstrated in this study after mannitol cannot be entirely explained by the mechanism of reduction in ischemic cell swelling. PMID:1123427

  17. Timing of hypertonic saline and airway clearance techniques in adults with cystic fibrosis during pulmonary exacerbation: pilot data from a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Moran, Fidelma; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Bradbury, Ian; Downey, Damian G; Rendall, Jackie; Bradley, Judy M

    2017-01-01

    Background Streamlining the timing of treatments in cystic fibrosis (CF) is important to optimise adherence while ensuring efficacy. The optimal timing of treatment with hypertonic saline (HTS) and airway clearance techniques (ACT) is unknown. Objectives This study hypothesised that HTS before ACT would be more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by Lung Clearance Index (LCI). Methods Adults with CF providing written informed consent were randomised to a crossover trial of HTS before ACT or HTS during ACT on consecutive days. ACT treatment consisted of Acapella Duet. Patients completed LCI and spirometry at baseline and 90 min post treatment. Mean difference (MD) and 95% CIs were reported. Results 13 subjects completed the study (mean (SD) age 33 (12) years, forced expiratory volume in 1second % (FEV1%) predicted 51% (22), LCI (no. turnovers) 14 (4)). Comparing the two treatments (HTS before ACT vs HTS during ACT), the change from baseline to 90 min post treatment in LCI (MD (95% CI) −0.02 (−0.63 to 0.59)) and FEV1% predicted (MD (95% CI) −0.25 (−2.50 to 1.99)) was not significant. There was no difference in sputum weight (MD (95% CI) −3.0 (−14.9 to 8.9)), patient perceived ease of clearance (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.3) or satisfaction (MD (95% CI) 0.4 (−0.6 to 1.5)). The time taken for HTS during ACT was significantly shorter (MD (95% CI) 14.7 (9.8 to 19.6)). Conclusions In this pilot study, HTS before ACT was no more effective than HTS during ACT as measured by LCI. Trial registration number NCT01753869; Pre-results. PMID:28123751

  18. Immune-Inflammatory and Metabolic Effects of High Dose Furosemide plus Hypertonic Saline Solution (HSS) Treatment in Cirrhotic Subjects with Refractory Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Bellia, Chiara; Clemente, Giuseppe; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Vassallo, Valerio; Di Bona, Danilo; Gulotta, Eliana; Ciaccio, Marcello; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic liver diseases are usually thin as a result of hypermetabolism and malnutrition expressed by reduced levels of leptin and impairment of other adyponectins such as visfatin. Aims We evaluated the metabolic and inflammatory effects of intravenous high-dose furosemide plus hypertonic saline solutions (HSS) compared with repeated paracentesis and a standard oral diuretic schedule, in patients with cirrhosis and refractory ascites. Methods 59 consecutive cirrhotic patients with refractory ascites unresponsive to outpatient treatment. Enrolled subjects were randomized to treatment with intravenous infusion of furosemide (125–250mg⁄bid) plus small volumes of HSS from the first day after admission until 3 days before discharge (Group A, n:38), or repeated paracentesis from the first day after admission until 3 days before discharge (Group B, n: 21). Plasma levels of ANP, BNP, Leptin, visfatin, IL-1β, TNF-a, IL-6 were measured before and after the two type of treatment. Results Subjects in group A were observed to have a significant reduction of serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, ANP, BNP, and visfatin, thus regarding primary efficacy endpoints, in Group A vs. Group B we observed higher Δ-TNF-α, Δ-IL-1β, Δ-IL-6, Δ-ANP, Δ-BNP, Δ-visfatin, Δ-Leptin at discharge. Discussion Our findings underline the possible inflammatory and metabolic effect of saline overload correction in treatment of cirrhosis complications such as refractory ascites, suggesting a possible role of inflammatory and metabolic-nutritional variables as severity markers in these patients. PMID:27941973

  19. Hypertonic saline protects brain endothelial cells against hypoxia correlated to the levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate and interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Long; Deng, Yi-Yu; Wang, Qiao-Sheng; Han, Yong-Li; Jiang, Wen-Qiang; Fang, Ming; Hu, Bei; Wu, Zhi-Xin; Huang, Lin-Qiang; Zeng, Hong-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the protective effect of hypertonic saline (HS) on brain endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions and the relevant underlying mechanism. Methods: bEnd.3 cells were treated with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced injury. To measure HS performance, cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium salt assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase UTP nick-end labeling staining. RNA-seq was performed to assess the expression profiles and screen the candidate genes that participated in OGD-induced injury and the HS protective effect. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of candidate genes, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the level of interleukin (IL)-1β. Overexpression analyses were performed to confirm the functions of the differentially expressed genes. Results: HS with a concentration of 40 mmol/L NaCl had an obvious protective effect on bEnd.3 cells after OGD-induced injury, resulting in increased cell viability and a smaller percentage of apoptotic cells. According to the RNA-seq results, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was chosen as the differentially expressed gene target in this study. The qPCR and western blot analyses further confirmed that the levels of EGFR/phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor and IL-1β were enhanced after OGD-induced injury, but attenuated after treatment with 40 mmol/L of NaCl HS. Overexpressed EGFR reversed the protective effect of HS that caused low viability and high rates of apoptosis in cells. Conclusion: HS can protect endothelial cells against OGD-induced injury, but is affected by the expression of EGFR/p-EGFR and IL-1β. PMID:28072729

  20. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30-40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [-0.05-0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04-0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04-0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR - rather than CBF - could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI.

  1. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI.

  2. Impact of pre-hospital care on the outcome of children arriving with agonal breathing to a pediatric emergency service in South India

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Debasis Das; Mahathi, Krishna; Ghosh, Urmi; Agarwal, Indira; Chacko, Anila; Jacob, Ebor; Ebenezer, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on the prehospital interventions received by critically ill children at arrival to Paediatric Emergency Services (PES) is limited in developing countries. This study aims to describe the pre-hospital care scenario, transport and their impact on outcome in non-traumatic, acutely ill children presenting in PES with agonal breathing. Methods: Prospective observational study done on children aged below 15 years arriving in PES with agonal breathing due to non-trauma related causes. Results: Out of 75 children studied, 69% were infants. The duration of illness among 65% of them (75) was less than 3 days. Majority of them (81%) had received treatment prior to arrival. Government sector physicians (72%), half of them (51%) being pediatricians were the major treating doctors. 37% of the children had arrived to the Emergency in an ambulance. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) was given to 27% on arrival in PES. Other interventions included fluid boluses to correct shock (92%) and inotrope infusion (56%). Sepsis (24%) and pneumonia (24%) were the most common diagnoses. Out of 75, 57 (76%) children who were stabilized and shifted to PICU and among them 27 (47%) survived to discharge. Normal blood pressure (p=0.0410) and non-requirement of CPR (0.0047) and inotropic infusion (0.0459) in PES were associated with a higher chance of survival. Conclusion: 36% (27/75) of children who arrived to our PES with agonal breathing survived to hospital discharge. Survival was significantly better among those who did not need CPR. PMID:28217595

  3. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    PubMed Central

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Petroni, Gustavo J.; Ballarini, Nicolás M.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Depetris, María Alejandra; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Fabio, Anthony; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0–18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] < 13 or with GCS 14–15 and abnormal head CT scan within 48 hours of admission, and head AIS > 0). Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC). Results Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0) years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7%) of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients) were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73%) patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9%) TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours). Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%). For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]). There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC. Conclusion This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that

  4. Abdominal insufflation decreases blood loss without worsening the inflammatory response: implications for prehospital control of internal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Velmahos, George C; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Tabbara, Malek; Duggan, Michael; Li, Yongqing; De Moya, Marc; Alam, Hasan B

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal insufflation (AI) by carbon dioxide has been shown to decrease the rate of bleeding in different swine models of abdominal organ injuries. With development of appropriate tools, AI could be used to control bleeding temporarily in the prehospital setting. Concerns have been raised about the inflammatory response to AI, which could damage organs at a later stage despite initial hemostasis. We hypothesized that AI controls bleeding without inducing an unfavorable inflammatory response. An experimental splenic injury was caused in 28 Yorkshire pigs, which were randomized to: 1) standard resuscitation (n = 14) with crystalloids to a mean arterial pressure of 60 mm Hg, or 2) standard resuscitation and AI (n = 14) to an abdominal pressure of 20 cmH2O. The experiment lasted for 30 minutes, and intra-abdominal blood loss was measured. Blood serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), transforming growth factor beta1, and lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression were measured at 0, 15, and 30 minutes, as markers of the inflammatory response. All animals survived to the end of the experiment. Total blood loss was significantly less in the AI group compared with the other standard resuscitation animals (733 +/- 76 vs 1094 +/- 153 mL, P = 0.049). The pH at the end of the experiment was significantly lower in the AI group (7.28 +/- 0.02 vs 7.44 +/- 0.05, P < 0.01) but there was no difference in lactate levels (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.3, P = 0.7). Similarly, there was no difference in IL-1beta, transforming growth factor beta1, or lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression between the two groups at any time point, although there was a trend towards lower IL-1beta levels in the AI group. Our conclusion is that AI reduces blood loss from splenic injury without a measurable effect on the early inflammatory response in a clinically relevant animal model.

  5. A retrospective quality assessment of pre-hospital emergency medical documentation in motor vehicle accidents in south-eastern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated pre-hospital documentation quality. We retrospectively assessed emergency medical service (EMS) documentation of key logistic, physiologic, and mechanistic variables in motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). Methods Records from police, Emergency Medical Communication Centers (EMCC), ground and air ambulances were retrospectively collected for 189 MVAs involving 392 patients. Documentation of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), respiratory rate (RR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) was classified as exact values, RTS categories, clinical descriptions enabling post-hoc inference of RTS categories, or missing. The distribution of values of exact versus inferred RTS categories were compared (Chi-square test for trend). Results 25% of ground and 11% of air ambulance records were unretrieveable. Patient name, birth date, and transport destination was documented in >96% of ambulance records and 81% of EMCC reports. Only 54% of patient encounter times were transmitted to the EMCC, but 77% were documented in ground and 96% in air ambulance records. Ground ambulance records documented exact values of GCS in 48% and SBP in 53% of cases, exact RR in 10%, and RR RTS categories in 54%. Clinical descriptions made post-hoc inference of RTS categories possible in another 49% of cases for GCS, 26% for RR, and 20% for SBP. Air ambulance records documented exact values of GCS in 89% and SBP in 84% of cases, exact RR in 7% and RR RTS categories in 80%. Overall, for lower RTS categories of GCS, RR and SBP the proportion of actual documented values to inferred values increased (All: p < 0.001). Also, documentation of repeated assessment was more frequent for low RTS categories of GCS, RR, and SBP (All: p < 0.001). Mechanism of injury was documented in 80% of cases by ground and 92% of cases by air ambulance. Conclusion EMS documentation of logistic and mechanistic variables was adequate. Patient physiology was frequently documented only as descriptive text. Our

  6. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Timler, Dariusz; Sobczak, Renata; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Sekalski, Przemyslaw; Borkowska, Natalia; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Materials and methods This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolar-yngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH). The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software. Results In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency between using the guidewire and the occurrence of the hematomas and loss of mucosa was statistically significant (P<0.01). In nearly half (42%) of the patients the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was excessively inflated over 30 cm H2O, and in two cases, endotracheal tube displacement was observed on account of poor cuff inflation (<20 cm H2O). Conclusion The highest percentage of overfilled cuffs were observed in the

  7. Pre-hospital identification and post-recovery challenges of intoxication with synthetic cannabinoid containing legal high products such as 'Exodus Damnation'.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, David; O'Meara, Patrick; Cunningham, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    This short report describes the case of a young adult male who had smoked a synthetic cannabinoid legal high product called 'Exodus Damnation'. The patient's presentation was atypical from that described in the literature, with hypotension and hypoxaemia. Of note was the rapid recovery after pre-hospital intervention with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous fluids. The patient refused on-going care, despite repeated advice to attend the Emergency Department. The distinct lack of specialist support and referral to drug treatment for this patient population, with whom ambulance services are coming into contact with increasing frequency, is reported. For those patients with the capacity to refuse on-going care, ambulance services may be in an opportune position to actively promote referral to support services for these vulnerable individuals.

  8. Current status of establishing a venous line in CPA patients by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians in the prehospital setting in Japan and a proposal for intraosseous infusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction It is important to have a venous line in cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) patients as an emergency treatment measure in prehospital settings, but establishment of a peripheral venous line is difficult in such patients. This study aimed to investigate the current status of intravenous infusion (IVI) in CPA patients by Emergency Life-Saving Technicians (ELSTs) in Japan. We also considered alternative measures in case IVI was difficult or impossible. Methods We investigated a nationwide database between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2008. From a total of 431,968 CPA cases, we calculated the IVI success rate and related parameters. The Bone Injection Gun (BIG) and simulator legs (adult, pediatric, and infant) were used by 100 ELSTs selected for the study to measure the time required and the success rate for intraosseous infusion (IOI). Results The number of CPA patients, IVI, adrenaline administration, and the IVI success rate in adult CPA patients increased every year. However, the IVI success rate in pediatric CPA patients did not increase. Although adrenaline administration elevated the ROSC rate, there was no improvement in the 1-month survival rate. The time required for IOI with BIG was not different among the leg models. The success rates of IOI with BIG were 93%, 94%, and 84% (p < 0.05 vs. adult and pediatric) in adult, pediatric, and infant models, respectively. Conclusions The rate of success of IVI in adult CPA patients has been increased yearly in Japan. However, as establishing a peripheral venous line in pediatric patients (1-7 years old) by ELSTs is extremely difficult in prehospital settings, there was no increase in the IVI success rate in such patients. As the study findings indicated IOI with BIG was easy and rapid, it may be necessary to consider IOI with BIG as an alternative option in case IVI is difficult or impossible in adult and pediatric patients. PMID:22230330

  9. Hemoglobin-based Oxygen Carrier (HBOC-201) and Escalating Doses of Recombinant Factor VIla (rFVIIa) as a Novel Pre-hospital Resuscitation Fluid in a Swine Model of Severe Uncontrolled Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    past which further addition of rFVIIa may have not enhanced clotting kinetics in the absence of traumatic hypothermic coagulopathy and some plasma...possible tamponade effects in the closed abdomen are not consid- ered in this model. Third, animals were anesthetized when injured, thus abrogating the...A. D., Majetschak, M. & Proctor, K. G. (2006). Prehospital HBOC-20 1 after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in swine. J Trauma 61:46-56

  10. Prehospital rounds. Beyond SVT.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, O J

    2001-09-01

    This patient had a complex presentation, with many potential causes for his shock status. He was obviously in shock, with many signs of poor perfusion. He presented with very rapid heart and respiratory rates, and poor skin perfusion and oxygenation. The clinical presentation of the patient prompted the EMS crew to consider electrical cardioversion in hopes of addressing the unstable tachycardic rate. However, the crew opted to consider the patient's past medical history--i.e., the diarrhea, vomiting and lack of fluid intake--and instead treat the patient for hypovolemia. The picture had not improved by arrival at the ED, and had not been corrected with a fluid bolus.

  11. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  12. Blood oxygenation during hyperpressure intraperitoneal fluid administration in a rabbit model of severe liver injury: Evaluation of a novel concept for control of pre-hospital liver bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Noorbakhsh, Siavash; Azizi, Saeed; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Maham, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential part of the most important metabolic pathways in aerobic organisms. Oxygen delivery is merely dependent on blood, rendering blood loss a devastating event. Traumatic pre-hospital liver bleeding is a major cause of early trauma deaths in human and animals, with no established therapeutic method yet. Increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) has been shown to reduce liver bleeding by half. Although reduction of blood loss could be in favor of blood oxygen delivery, however, the complex interaction between increased IAP and respiratory mechanics during severe hemorrhagic shock remained unclear. We used a novel model of liver trauma in 16 rabbits and randomly assigned them to either normotensive abdomen group or increased IAP by fluid infusion (HA) groups (n=8 each). Liver size and the amount of liver injury were evaluated. Various blood oxygenation parameters were recorded. Both groups were identical in terms of the liver size and injury. The HA group had significantly lower shock index. Arterial oxygen capacity and oxygen content were higher in the HA group. No significant statistical difference was seen between groups in terms of abdominal perfusion pressure; alveolar pressure of oxygen; dissolved oxygen in blood plasma; alveolar to arterial oxygen tension gradient; arterial to alveolar oxygen pressure ratio; the ratio between partial pressure of arterial oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen; and respiratory index. In conclusion, the novel therapeutic method of increasing IAP by fluid infusion in a rabbit model of liver hemorrhage preserved blood oxygenation better than the classic therapeutic method.

  13. The effects of interprofessional education - Self-reported professional competence among prehospital emergency care nursing students on the point of graduation - A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Castrèn, M; Mäkinen, M; Nilsson, J; Lindström, V

    2017-03-16

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) during the educational program had an impact on prehospital emergency care nurses' (PECN) self-reported competence towards the end of the study program. A cross-sectional study using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale was conducted. A comparison was made between PECN students from Finland who experienced IPE and IPC in the clinical setting, and PECN students from Sweden with no IPE and a low level of IPC. Forty-one students participated (Finnish n=19, Swedish n=22). The self-reported competence was higher among the Swedish students. A statistically significant difference was found in one competence area; legislation in nursing and safety planning (p<0.01). The Finnish students scored significantly higher on items related to interprofessional teamwork. Both the Swedish and Finnish students' self-reported professional competence was relatively low according to the NPC Scale. Increasing IPC and IPE in combination with offering a higher academic degree may be an option when developing the ambulance service and the study program for PECNs.

  14. Data quality of a wearable vital signs monitor in the pre-hospital and emergency departments for enhancing prediction of needs for life-saving interventions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Darrah, Mark I; Salinas, Jose

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the quality of data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments when using a wearable vital signs monitor and examine the efficacy of a combined model of standard vital signs and respective data quality indices (DQIs) for predicting the need for life-saving interventions (LSIs) in trauma patients. It was hypothesised that prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients is associated with data quality. Also, a model utilizing vital signs and DQIs to predict the needs for LSIs would be able to outperform models using vital signs alone. Data from 104 pre-hospital trauma patients transported by helicopter were analysed, including means and standard deviations of continuous vital signs, related DQIs and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores for LSI and non-LSI patient groups. DQIs involved percentages of valid measurements and mean deviation ratios. Various multivariate logistic regression models for predicting LSI needs were also obtained and compared through receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Demographics of patients were not statistically different between LSI and non-LSI patient groups. In addition, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction of LSI needs in patients using heart rate and DQIs (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.86) than using heart rate alone (AUC of 0.73). Likewise, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction using heart rate, total GCS score and DQIs (AUC of 0.99) than using heart rate and total GCS score (AUC of 0.92). AUCs were statistically different (p < 0.05). This study showed that data quality could be used in addition to continuous vital signs for predicting the need for LSIs in trauma patients. Importantly, trauma systems should incorporate processes to regulate data quality of physiologic data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments. By doing so, data quality could be improved and lead to better prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients.

  15. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  16. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in prehospital emergency care – an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients’ exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001). At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes. Conclusions The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients’ thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress. PMID:26374468

  17. Comparison of Macintosh, McCoy and C-MAC D-Blade video laryngoscope intubation by prehospital emergency health workers: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ahmet; Kiraz, Hasan A; Ağaoğlu, İbrahim; Akdur, Okhan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the this study is to evaluate the intubation success rates of emergency medical technicians using a Macintosh laryngoscope (ML), McCoy laryngoscope (MCL), and C MAC D-Blade (CMDB) video laryngoscope on manikin models with immobilized cervical spines. This randomized crossover study included 40 EMTs with at least 2 years' active service in ambulances. All participating technicians completed intubations in three scenarios-a normal airway model, a rigid cervical collar model, and a manual in-line cervical stabilization model-with three different laryngoscopes. The scenario and laryngoscope model were determined randomly. We recorded the scenario, laryngoscope method, intubation time in seconds, tooth pressure, and intubation on a previously prepared study form. We performed Friedman tests to determine whether there is a significant change in the intubation success rate, duration of tracheal intubation, tooth pressure, and visual analog scale scores due to violations of parametric test assumptions. We performed the Wilcoxon test to determine the significance of pairwise differences for multiple comparisons. An overall 5 % type I error level was used to infer statistical significance. We considered a p value of less than 0.05 statistically significant. The CMDB and MCL success rates were significantly higher than the ML rates in all scenario models (p < 0.05). The CMDB intubation duration was significantly shorter when compared with ML and MCL in all models. CMDB and MCL may provide an easier, faster intubation by prehospital emergency health care workers in patients with immobilized cervical spines.

  18. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria.

  19. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Methods Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. Results 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), p<0.01, Number needed to treat =6. 338 patients met the modified definition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. Conclusions This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCS<9 receiving additional physician care (original definition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. Trial registration number NCT00112398. PMID:25795741

  20. Correlation of measured and calculated serum osmolality during mannitol or hypertonic saline infusion in patients after craniotomy: a study protocol and statistical analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Xu, Ming; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain oedema is a major complication after craniotomy. Hyperosmolar agents have been used as the medical treatment for this condition. Measurement and estimation of serum osmolality during hyperosmolar agent infusion is of clinical importance to evaluate clinical efficacy, adjust dosage and avoid side effects. However, several studies have shown that calculated serum osmolality may lead to a systematic bias compared with direct measurement. In the present study, mannitol or hypertonic saline (HS) will be used in patients after elective craniotomy. We aim to determine the accuracy of serum osmolality estimation during the application of hyperosmolar agent. Methods and analysis The study is a prospective, randomised, double-blinded, controlled, parallel-group design. Adult patients requiring the use of hyperosmolar agents for the prevention or treatment of postoperative brain oedema are enrolled and assigned randomly to one of the two treatment study groups, labelled as ‘M group’ and ‘HS group’. Patients in the M and HS groups receive intravenous infusion of 125 mL of either 20% mannitol or 3.1% sodium chloride solution, respectively. Data will be collected immediately before the infusion of study agents, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 min after the start of infusion of experimental agents, which includes serum osmolality, concentration of serum sodium, potassium, urea and glucose. Serum osmolality will be measured by means of freezing point depression. Estimated serum osmolality will also be calculated by using four formulas published previously. Osmole gap is calculated as the difference between the measured and the estimated values. The primary endpoint is the correlation of measured and estimated serum osmolality during hyperosmolar agent infusion. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the International Review Board (IRB) of Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University. Study findings will be disseminated through peer

  1. Prehospital cardiac care Cuban style.

    PubMed

    Báez, Amado Alejandro; Sadosty, Annie T

    2004-09-01

    The Cuban national Integrated Medical Emergeny System or "Sistema Integrado de Urgencias Medicas" (SIUM) was formed in 1997. In 1998, the SIUM began an active out-of-hospital thrombolysis program using Heberkinasa, the only streptokinase obtained through recombinant DNA techniques, produced by the Cuban Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology. An active community training program has also been implemented, standardizing training for the almost 20,000 members of the national emergency medical services.

  2. Oxygen Delivery and Demand in Conscious Pigs Subjected to Fixed-Volume Hemorrhage and Resuscitated with 7.5% NaCl in 6% Dextran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Hypertonic saline-dextran solutions for the prehospital management of traumatic hypotension: A preliminary report. Am J Surg (in press). 7. Maningas...1969. 24. Daniel AM, Pierce CH, Maclean LD, Shizgal HM: Lactate metabolism in the dog during shock from hemorrhage, cardiac tamponade or endotoxin

  3. Collider Bias in Trauma Comparative Effectiveness Research: The Stratification Blues for Systematic Reviews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    collider bias continues to plague trauma trials as well as observational studies. Collider bias is a type of selection bias that is often introduced...of treatment and outcome, plagues randomised and observational trauma research. Of the seven trials of prehospital hypertonic saline in dextran (HSD

  4. Case study and case-based research in emergency nursing and care: Theoretical foundations and practical application in paramedic pre-hospital clinical judgment and decision-making of patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie; Fry, Margaret; Curtis, Kate

    2017-02-01

    Generating knowledge through quality research is fundamental to the advancement of professional practice in emergency nursing and care. There are multiple paradigms, designs and methods available to researchers to respond to challenges in clinical practice. Systematic reviews, randomised control trials and other forms of experimental research are deemed the gold standard of evidence, but there are comparatively few such trials in emergency care. In some instances it is not possible or appropriate to undertake experimental research. When exploring new or emerging problems where there is limited evidence available, non-experimental methods are required and appropriate. This paper provides the theoretical foundations and an exemplar of the use of case study and case-based research to explore a new and emerging problem in the context of emergency care. It examines pre-hospital clinical judgement and decision-making of mental illness by paramedics. Using an exemplar the paper explores the theoretical foundations and conceptual frameworks of case study, it explains how cases are defined and the role researcher in this form of inquiry, it details important principles and the procedures for data gathering and analysis, and it demonstrates techniques to enhance trustworthiness and credibility of the research. Moreover, it provides theoretically and practical insights into using case study in emergency care.

  5. Presenting symptoms, pre-hospital delay time and 28-day case fatality in patients with peripheral arterial disease and acute myocardial infarction from the MONICA/KORA Myocardial Infarction Registry.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Inge; Amann, Ute; Heier, Margit; Kuch, Bernhard; Thilo, Christian; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christa

    2017-02-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who have a history of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have different characteristics and poorer outcomes than patients without PAD. However, data on short-term mortality are conflicting and it is unclear whether patients with PAD have a different scope of AMI symptoms or differences in pre-hospital delay time (PHDT) compared with patients without PAD. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between a history of PAD and presenting AMI symptoms, PHDT and 28-day case fatality in a population-based sample of patients with AMI. Design This was an observational study. Methods Information on history of PAD was obtained from the patients' medical records and their AMI symptoms were assessed by interviews with patients. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association of PAD with AMI symptoms and 28-day case fatality. A multivariable linear regression model was developed to examine the relations between PAD and PHDT. Results From the 5848 patients with AMI included in this study, 9.8% had a history of PAD. Patients with PAD were significantly less likely to report chest symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.66) or pain in the upper left extremity (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54-0.84) than patients without PAD. PAD was significantly related with longer PHDT in patients <69 years of age ( p = 0.0117) and men ( p = 0.0104). A significantly higher 28-day case fatality (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.47-2.96) was found in patients with PAD compared with patients without PAD. Conclusions Patients with PAD should receive comprehensive education on the possibility of atypical AMI symptoms and the need to call emergency medical services immediately.

  6. Prehospital Use of Plasma for Traumatic Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    pooling. In the PUPTH catchment area , our team initiated meetings with individuals who will gather data for PUPTH, especially EMS and coagulation lab...NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 15 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code...missing data will be handled in statistical analyses , an estimate ofthe amount of missing data anticipated, and an outline of steps that will be taken in

  7. Prehospital Use of Plasma for Traumatic Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    June 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013 has largely involved dealing with regulatory approvals that are required prior to enrolling patients . These have included...per region) we may initially miss potential patients but we wish not to waste products and not to tax the system until we see that we have a working...regulatory approvals to continue the study and anticipate that enrollment of patients will begin in early 2014 (quarter 3). Reportable Outcomes There

  8. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy.

  9. PUPTH Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMP) Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    organ failure, nosocomial infection, acute lung injury (ALI) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). 2. KEYWORDS: Provide a brief...toward the understanding, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and /or rehabilitation of a disease , injury or condition, or to improve the

  10. PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) overseas.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, W

    2001-05-01

    There are many names and places that space will not allow here. In the future, I hope to write about these places one at a time and give more detailed reports on the people all over the world who are our brothers and sisters in EMS, covering the places they work and how they provide care. In any event, with each opportunity, we learn about people, ourselves and how small a place the world has become. We are reminded not to approach people and places with belligerence, implying that we have all the answers. By considering the culture and environment in which care is provided, we learn to bring the same open-mindedness back home to help when addressing the problems we face every day. What our neighbors have to teach us may be the next big step in our development.

  11. Prehospital Use of Plasma for Traumatic Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply...TERMS Nothing Listed 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 139 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC UUa...discovered to be pregnant , under 18 years of age or prisoner, 5.3.4 at the time of discovery, s/he will be withdrawn from the study and the IRB notified of a

  12. Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for...19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified 19b. TELEPHONE...Avenue, Suite 303 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412 802 8270 sperryjl@upmc.edu B. Sub-Investigators and Key Study Personal at the University of

  13. Prehospital Burn Management in a Combat Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    body bag upon arrival to the CSH. Advanced pre- hospital airway was obtained in four casualties (8.3%). Of these, two underwent endotracheal intubation ...known resuscitation amounts and transport times), eight received escharo- tomies in theater (53.3%). Nine (60%) arrived intubated to the USAISR burn...escharotomies performed in theater. Thirteen (68.4%) arrived intubated to the USAISR, with an average of 10.9 days on the ventilator. Nine (47.4%) received a

  14. PUPTH Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMP) Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    completi atients as populatio ention in th ios improv ts: Seconda the Inflamm llaborative P egrant.org), between h C) transfusi rified a dose RBC ... RBCs from years before were used and put into the current box with the same letter series. This means that there is usually more than one box on...Responsibilities This DSMB will  Meet periodically (see DSMB Meetings) to review aggregate and individual subject data related to safety, data integrity

  15. A Clinical Approach to Antioxidant Therapy: Hypertonic Fluid Resuscitation Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    5 2. Experimental Section...limited forward surgical care and delayed evacuation.[9] 1.1.1 Current Fluid Resuscitation Standard of Care By virtue of clinical experience , low cost...bleeding, thereby potentially increasing mortality. Indeed, evidence from experimental animal studies suggests that small-volume hypotensive

  16. Hypertonic saline in the treatment of corneal jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Yu Yao, Hsin; Cho, Ta Hsiung; Lu, Ching Hsiang; Lin, Feng Chi; Horng, Chi Ting

    2016-02-01

    A 20-year-old male soldier was hit by the jellyfish. The ophthalmic examination revealed that epithelial keratitis and corneal oedema in the right eye. We prescribed 3% NaCl eyedrops and 0.3% Norfloxacin eyedrops in the treatment of the corneal jellyfish stings. Two weeks later, the cornea in the right eye healed. In this case report, 3% NaCl eyedrops was effective in the treatment of acute phase of jellyfish stings of the cornea.

  17. Neuroendocrine Responses to Hypertonic Saline/Dextran Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    serum of plasma norepinephrine by reverse-phase liquid chromatography. Anal Chen 1981;53:156-159. Wade et al.--13 16. Netter J, Wasserman W. Applied...Cardiovascular Physiology , edited by A.C. Guyton and J.E. Hall. Baltimore, MD: University Park, 1982, vol. IV, p. 189-242. 22. Reid IA, Ganong WF. Control of... physiological thresholds of metabolic and hemodynamic actions in man. J Clin Invest 1980;66:94-101. 25. Nahas GG, Ligou JC, Mehlman B. Effects of pH changes on 02

  18. Hyperinvasive approach to out-of hospital cardiac arrest using mechanical chest compression device, prehospital intraarrest cooling, extracorporeal life support and early invasive assessment compared to standard of care. A randomized parallel groups comparative study proposal. “Prague OHCA study”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a poor outcome. Recent non-randomized studies of ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in OHCA suggested further prospective multicenter studies to define population that would benefit from ECLS. We aim to perform a prospective randomized study comparing prehospital intraarrest hypothermia combined with mechanical chest compression device, intrahospital ECLS and early invasive investigation and treatment in all patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin compared to a standard of care. Methods This paper describes methodology and design of the proposed trial. Patients with witnessed OHCA without ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) after a minimum of 5 minutes of ACLS (advanced cardiac life support) by emergency medical service (EMS) team and after performance of all initial procedures (defibrillation, airway management, intravenous access establishment) will be randomized to standard vs. hyperinvasive arm. In hyperinvasive arm, mechanical compression device together with intranasal evaporative cooling will be instituted and patients will be transferred directly to cardiac center under ongoing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After admission, ECLS inclusion/exclusion criteria will be evaluated and if achieved, veno-arterial ECLS will be started. Invasive investigation and standard post resuscitation care will follow. Patients in standard arm will be managed on scene. When ROSC achieved, they will be transferred to cardiac center and further treated as per recent guidelines. Primary outcome 6 months survival with good neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1–2). Secondary outcomes will include 30 day neurological and cardiac recovery. Discussion Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study comparing a combined “hyperinvasive approach” to a standard of care in refractory OHCA. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers with available ECLS and

  19. [Emergency nurse faced with death in pre-hospital situations].

    PubMed

    Hugenschmitt, Delphine; Souquet, Marie-Laure; Lefort, Hugues; Bagur, Jacques; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of a death in the out-of-hospital environment is often brutal and the reactions of the deceased's family and friends, unprepared for this event, can be unpredictable. After the technical procedures have been carried out and within a limited period of intervention, the caregivers, and in particular the nurse of the mobile emergency and intensive care service, must provide the family and friends with support enabling them to begin the grieving process. To help the caregivers in this mission, a pedagogical tool remains to be developed.

  20. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    development of cerebral edema ...... 15 3.2 Overview of Hemostasis...and development of cerebral edema The development of cerebral edema is another important type of secondary brain injury. It is clear that the...formation of cerebral edema is a major factor leading to the high morbidity and mortality in patients with TBI.25 No new treatments have been developed in

  1. Practicality and accuracy of prehospital rapid venous blood glucose determination.

    PubMed

    Holstein, A; Kühne, D; Elsing, H G; Thiessen, E; Plaschke, A; Widjaja, A; Vogel, M Y; Egberts, E H

    2000-10-01

    Blood glucose testing plays an important role in emergency medicine. Although the use of visual reagent test strips is widely established in this setting, the accuracy of reflectometric blood glucose determinations under emergency conditions has rarely been investigated. In a prospective study, 522 of a total of 3,217 patients undergoing emergency blood glucose testing had parallel blood glucose measurements performed using a specific enzymatic method. These 522 patients (aged 61.4 years, 54% men, 90 cases of severe hypoglycemia) had an intravenous access placed at the scene of the emergency. Venous whole blood from the introducer needle of the access was applied to the test strip and the glucose measured with a GlucoTouch reflectometer (LifeScan, Inc.). A blood sample from the intravenous access was then immediately collected in a monovette for subsequent glucose determination in a chemical laboratory (hexokinase method) within 20 to 40 minutes. The emergency glucose measurements (mean: 7.3 mmol/L [95% confidence interval [CI] 6.9 to 7.7]; range: 0.55 to 27.7) correlated well with the reference laboratory results (Pearson's r = .98; linear regression analysis: slope 1.0, axial intercept 1.74). Error grid analysis also showed good agreement between corresponding measurements: zone A 96.7%, B 2.5%, C 0% and D 0.8%. The mean difference using the Bland-Altman method was 0.14 mmoVL; 2 SD 1.8 mmol/L; minimum -7.0 mmol/L; maximum 4.4 mmol/L. The accuracy of the rapid venous blood glucose determination by constantly changing emergency teams was high. Especially in 90 hypoglycemic patients, there were no deviations from the reference method that could have led to clinically relevant wrong decisions. The method of collecting whole blood directly from the venous access is simple and robust, and is independent of the hemodynamic status of the patient.

  2. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    determine the safety of TXA as measured by: 1.Thromboembolic events (cerebral ischemic events, MI, DVT , PE ) 2.Seizures To explore the mechanism of...study kits. A web data entry system to collect the patient data and check for errors (and a detailed Manual of Operations) is being beta tested ...reporting, monitoring Web programming is completed and the forms are being beta tested . Error checks are in place and being optimized as needed. The

  3. Prehospital Emergency Inguinal Clamp Controls Hemorrhage in Cadaver Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    temperature 4 hours before testing. The torso was rotated onto a wood block to intubate the aorta through a left thoracotomy incision. The thoracic aorta...30) was connected to an endotracheal tube (8-mm internal diame- ter with rubber piping and plumbing putty as a gasket) inserted 7 cm into the...field FIGURE 3. Photograph of the aorta instrumented. Rubber piping as a gasket overlies an endotracheal tube inserted into the descending thoracic aorta

  4. Telemedical support of prehospital emergency care in mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Plischke, M; Wolf, K H; Lison, T; Pretschner, D P

    1999-09-09

    In the German emergency medical service system (EMSS) medical treatment can be improved in most of mass casualty incidents (MCI). Currently, the incident commander who is responsible for classification of the victims (depending on their urgency and condition, the so called triage) and ordered transportation uses paper-based documentation. Triage tags are used to identify and classify patients and gather treatment information. This can cause problems in medical treatment and in transportation of injured victims. Object-oriented modelling, simulation, and visualisation of processes can show deficits in treatment and data processing and thereby help to optimise medical workflow and logistics. If documentation by paramedics and emergency physicians is done electronically, all patient records could be send to a telemedical centre for central data administration. A telemedical supported triage tag helps identifying victims and managing detailed identification protocols. The paper-based documentation in emergency would become obsolete, if hospitals can query all protocols, diagnoses, and findings from the telemedical centre. Safety and security aspects can be guaranteed. The complete medical treatment workflow can be supported by telemedicine. Therefore, in case of MCI, telemedicine can optimise medical treatment and exonerate the paramedics from unnecessary documentation.

  5. Prehospital Emergency Medical Services Departure Interval: Does Patient Age Matter?

    PubMed

    Schnegg, Bruno; Pasquier, Mathieu; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Yersin, Bertrand; Dami, Fabrice

    2016-12-01

    Introduction The concept of response time with minimal interval is intimately related to the practice of emergency medicine. The factors influencing this time interval are poorly understood. Problem In a process of improvement of response time, the impact of the patient's age on ambulance departure intervals was investigated.

  6. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services.

  7. Issues of Concern Regarding the Use of Hypertonic/Hyperoncotic Fluid Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Hypotension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    to dextran are about twice the rate for albumin, whereas the incidence of these reactions due to hydroxyethyl starch or gelatin is 2-fold and 6-fold...pressures, resulting in higher cerebral blood flow in HS, HSD, or HS-10% hydroxyethyl- starch -treated animals compared with controls (58, 68Y71). Hartl...dextran is half that of hetastarch, an incidence rate of 0.004Y0.008% could be possible. It should be noted that hydroxyethyl starch containing products

  8. Estradiol selectively reduces central neural activation induced by hypertonic NaCl infusion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexis B; Bass, Eryn E; Fan, Liming; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2012-09-10

    We recently reported that the latency to begin drinking water during slow, intravenous infusion of a concentrated NaCl solution was shorter in estradiol-treated ovariectomized rats compared to oil vehicle-treated rats, despite comparably elevated plasma osmolality. To test the hypothesis that the decreased latency to begin drinking is attributable to enhanced detection of increased plasma osmolality by osmoreceptors located in the CNS, the present study used immunocytochemical methods to label fos, a marker of neural activation. Increased plasma osmolality did not activate the subfornical organ (SFO), organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), or the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in either oil vehicle-treated rats or estradiol-treated rats. In contrast, hyperosmolality increased fos labeling in the area postrema (AP), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in both groups; however, the increase was blunted in estradiol-treated rats. These results suggest that estradiol has selective effects on the sensitivity of a population of osmo-/Na(+)-receptors located in the AP, which, in turn, alters activity in other central areas associated with responses to increased osmolality. In conjunction with previous reports that hyperosmolality increases blood pressure and that elevated blood pressure inhibits drinking, the current findings of reduced activation in AP, PVN, and RVLM-areas involved in sympathetic nerve activity-raise the possibility that estradiol blunts HS-induced blood pressure changes. Thus, estradiol may eliminate or reduce the initial inhibition of water intake that occurs during increased osmolality, and facilitate a more rapid behavioral response, as we observed in our recent study.

  9. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause temporary... doctor....

  10. Lower dose of hypertonic saline dextran reduces the risk of lethal rebleeding in uncontrolled hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Riddez, Louis; Drobin, Dan; Sjöstrand, Fredrik; Svensén, Christer; Hahn, Robert G

    2002-05-01

    To challenge whether the recommended dose of 4 mL/kg of 7.5% sodium chloride in 6% Dextran (HSD) is optimal for fluid resuscitation in uncontrolled hemorrhage, 30 anesthetized pigs were randomized to receive a 5-min intravenous infusion of either 1, 2, or 4 mL/kg of HSD beginning 10 min after inducing a 5-mm laceration in the infrarenal aorta. In addition to conventional hemodynamic monitoring, the blood loss was calculated as the difference in blood flow rates between flow probes placed proximal and distal to the injury. The results show that the bleeding stopped between 3 and 4 min after the injury and amounted to 338+/-92 mL (mean +/- SEM), which corresponds to 28.5%+/-6.6% of the estimated blood volume. After treatment with HSD was started, six rebleeding events occurred in the 1-mL group, 11 in the 2-mL group, and 16 in the 4-mL group. The amount of blood lost due to rebleeding increased significantly with the dose of HSD and was also associated with a fatal outcome. The total blood loss was 408 mL in the survivors and 630 mL in the nonsurvivors (median, P < 0.007). The mortality in the three groups was 20%, 50%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, infusing 4 mL/kg of HSD after uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage promoted rebleeding and increased the mortality, while a dose of 1 mL/kg appeared to be more suitable.

  11. Controlled fall in natremia and risk of seizures in hypertonic dehydration.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Brachet, E; Blum, D

    1979-03-01

    The aim of the study was to derive some practical measurements which might help in defining a "safe" infusion rate in order to avoid seizures during treatment of hypernatremic dehydration. Forty seven infants with hypernatremic dehydration were rehydrated on a 160 ml/kg/24 h basis: 9 developed seizures during treatment (group I), 22 matched for age did not convulse (group II). Nine subsequent cases were prescribed a 120 ml/kg/24 h regimen: none convulsed (group III). The three groups were comparable in many respects, including initial plasma Na and pH. Fluids were comparable regarding (Na), their rates of administration were respectively 216, 181 and 123 ml/kg/24 h. The rate of infusion affected slopes of decreases in natremia. It was suggested that the decrease in plasma Na should not exceed 0,5 mEq/1/h.

  12. Controlled fall in natremia in hypertonic dehydration: possible avoidance of rehydration seizures.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Blum, D; Casimir, G; Brachet, E

    1981-02-01

    This prospective study comprises 40 infants with severe hypernatremic dehydration due to gastroenteritis. During the first 24h, natremia was closely monitored and infusion rates were adjusted so as to keep the rate of fall in natremia below 0.5 mEq/l/h. This could be achieved by giving a 70 mEq/l Na solution at the rate of 120 ml/kg/24 h. Rehydration was uneventful in all cases, and no convulsions were observed.

  13. Hypertonic Saline Dextran (HSD) in a Complex Military Injury - A Preclinical Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    performed, the spleen contracted by topical application of adrenaline (up to 1.5 ml of a 1 mg.ml -1 solution) before removal. A surgical snare was...collapse in blood pressure prior to death. In the absence of blast injury all animals given HSD responded well and survived the duration of the

  14. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. Objectives: In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. Results: In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA. PMID:26587401

  15. [Case of hyperkalemia after the administration of hypertonic mannitol during craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Tobita, Kazuki; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of severe hyperkalemia which developed following administration of mannitol during craniotomy. The blood potassium levels rose from 4.8 mEq x l(-1) to 6.7 mEq x l(-1) 30 minutes after the infusion of mannitol 300 ml during the operation for brain tumor. Since the patient did not develop metabolic acidosis, the hyperkalemia was probably caused by a rise in plasma osmotic pressure resulting from mannitol infusion. The risk factors for hyperkalemia have not yet been determined, and it is necessary to monitor carefully the electrocardiogram and electrolyte levels during the infusion of mannitol.

  16. Comparison of Intraosseous and Intravenous Delivery of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran (HSD) in Anesthetized, Euvolemic Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    Biochemical Assays Total carbohydrate concentrations in plasma were determined by the anthrone reaction (16) following precipitation of serum protein with 10...concentrations of total carbohydrate. Assays for sodium, potassium, chloride and protein were also performed by the Analytical Chemistry Branch, LAIR...concentrations were determined by a commercial kit (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Nutley, NJ) and the Biuret method, respectively, both adapted for

  17. Management of Severe Hyponatremia: Infusion of Hypertonic Saline and Desmopressin or Infusion of Vasopressin Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Raj, Dominic S.; Murata, Glen H.; Glew, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Rapid correction of severe hyponatremia carries the risk of osmotic demyelination. Two recently introduced methods of correction of hyponatremia have diametrically opposite effects on aquaresis. Inhibitors of vasopressin V2 receptor (vaptans) lead to the production of dilute urine, whereas infusion of desmopressin causes urinary concentration. Identification of the category of hyponatremia that will benefit from one or the other treatment is critical. In general, vaptans are effective in hyponatremias presenting with concentrated urine and, with the exception of hypovolemic hyponatremia, can be used as their primary treatment. Desmopressin is effective in hyponatremias presenting with dilute urine or developing urinary dilution after saline infusion. In this setting, desmopressin infusion helps prevent overcorrection of the hyponatremia. Monitoring of the changes in serum sodium concentration as a guide to treatment changes is imperative regardless of the initial treatment of severe hyponatremia. PMID:25247759

  18. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  19. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  20. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  1. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  2. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  3. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  4. Hypervolemia During Drinking of ISO and Hypertonic Fluids by Men at Rest and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Wisherd, J. L.; Fung, P. P.; Erti, A. C.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.; Wong, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that drink composition is more important than osmolality (osm) for maintaining and increasing plasma vol. (PV, hypervolemia) at rest and exercise (21.8C Tdb, 50% rh), 6 men (22-39 vr) underwent six treatments while sitting for 90 min (0.39 l/min) followed by 70 min of sitting ergometer exercise (2.08 l/min, 70%vO2 peak). Resting, intermittent drinking (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) beverages were: P1 (20 mEq Na+, 365 mosmol/kg), P2 (40 mEq Na+. 791 mosm), P2G (40 mEq Na+, 80 ml glycerol, 1.392 mosm). AA (157 mEq Na+, 253 mosm), and 01 and 02 (nothing). The exercise drink (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) was P1 for all experiments, except 02 (nothing). Resting % delta PV (Hb-Hct) increased (P<0.05) by 3-6% only with P2 and AA, respectively, Exercise % delta PV was + 1 to + 3% (NS) with AA, -6% to 0% (KS) with P1, P2. P2G, and 01,and 8% to -5% (P<0.05) with 02- Thus, AA with 157 mEq Na+ and the lowest osmolality maintained PV at rest and exercise, while the other beverages with low Na+ and higher osmolality (365 to 1.382 mosm) did not.

  5. Early detection of oxacillin-resistant staphylococcal strains with hypertonic broth diluent for microdilution panels.

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, L K; Howe, S E

    1984-01-01

    A total of 292 coagulase-positive and 111 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains were tested in microdilution MIC panels containing 16 to 0.13 microgram of oxacillin per ml diluted in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth with and without an additional 2% NaCl. All strains were tested using the stationary-phase inoculum procedure with an incubation temperature of 35 degrees C. Test results were recorded after 16 to 20 h of incubation; staphylococcal strains susceptible to oxacillin (less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml) were reincubated for 20 to 24 h, and endpoints were determined again. Oxacillin resistance was found in 27 (9%) of the 292 coagulase-positive strains and 39 (35%) of the 111 coagulase-negative strains. Of these resistant strains, 5 (19%) of the 27 coagulase-positive strains and 13 (33%) of the 39 coagulase-negative strains were detected 24 h earlier in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth with 2% NaCl than in cation-supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth without the additional NaCl. However, 9 (33%) of the 27 resistant coagulase-positive strains and 10 (26%) of the 39 resistant coagulase-negative strains were detected only after an additional 24 h of incubation. Oxacillin MICs for the 265 coagulase-positive susceptible strains and 72 coagulase-negative susceptible strains were not affected by the additional 2% NaCl. These results support the utility of adding 2% NaCl to the broth diluent for the early detection of oxacillin-resistant staphylococcal strains and the necessity of extended incubation for those strains which initially appear to be susceptible to oxacillin after only 16 to 20 h of incubation. PMID:6562124

  6. The Use of Hypertonic Solutions to Resuscitate Animals from Hypovolemic Shock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-18

    volumes of isotonic salt solution is a highly successful and universally used initial treatment of hemorrhagic shock Hyperosmolar solutions may be...tolerated well by the sheep de- maintained these beneficial effects better than spite their being somewhat dehydrated after three other solutions . The...2400 mOsm hyper- this setting although futher study is necessary. tonic salt solutions appear safe and effective when used as a small volume infusion

  7. Comparison of prostaglandin F2alpha and hypertonic saline for induction of midtrimester abortion.

    PubMed

    Lauersen, N H; Wilson, K H; Beling, C G; Fuchs, F

    1974-12-01

    20 healthy women between 18-20 weeks of gestation and seeking abortion were studied to compare the effects of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2) with those of instillation of saline solution and intravenous oxytocin. 9 out of 10 patients in the prostaglandin group aborted completely in about 15.16 hours. In only one of the prostaglandin patients did abortion have to be completed surgically. All of the 10 patients in the saline solution-oxytocin group also aborted completely, but with a mean time of 22.34 hours, a difference not statistically significant. The complication rate was higher in patients aborted with PGF2, including postabortion lactation and gastrointestinal effects, especially vomiting. In terms of hormonal changes, the similarities between the 2 groups were more numerous than the differences, suggesting that the 2 mechanics of abortion may not be totally different. Comparative studies on a much larger group of patients are desirable.

  8. Diphenhydramine Overdose with Intraventricular Conduction Delay Treated with Hypertonic Sodium Bicarbonate and IV Lipid Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Amin; Rose, Emily; Levine, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diphenhydramine toxicity commonly manifests with antimuscarinic features, including dry mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, mydriasis, tachycardia, and encephalopathy. Severe toxicity can include seizures and intraventricular conduction delay. We present here a case of a 23-year-old male presenting with recurrent seizures, hypotension and wide complex tachycardia who had worsening toxicity despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate. The patient was ultimately treated with intravenous lipid emulsion therapy that was temporally associated with improvement in the QRS duration. We also review the current literature that supports lipid use in refractory diphenhydramine toxicity. PMID:25493135

  9. Benefit of Slow Infusion of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran (HSD) in Swine with Uncontrolled Aortotomy Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    with two points 5 mm apart approximately 10 cm proximal to the iliac artery bifurcation. A 4-0 surgical wire was threaded through the ventral aortic ...wall (24, 28). This caused a 5-mm slit-like tear in the long axis of the ventral abdominal aortic wall. Hemodynamic variables were measured 15 and 30...patients with coronary artery stenosis ]. Zentralbl Chir 118: 257 263; discussion 264 266, 1993. 23. Kien ND, Kramer GC, White DA: Acute hypotension caused

  10. Hypertonic Saline Dextran: Immunological and Hematological Effects Following Single and Multiple Doses in Dogs and Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    INDIVIDUAL 22b TELEPHONE (Include Area Code) I 22c OFFICE SYMBOL COL George J. Brown, MC, Commanding (415) 561-3600 ISGRD-ULZ DO Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous...Commanding UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Form ApprovedREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-01 1 ASSIFICATION Ib RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS...Detrick Presidio of San Francisco, CA Frederick, MD 21701-5012 94129-6800 Ba. NAME OF FUNDING ISPONSORING Bb. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT

  11. Plasma Dextran Concentrations in Trauma Patients Administered HSD (hypertonic Saline/Dextran)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    degree of hypernatremia and hypokalemia induced by the administration of HSD (1,4,5), as well as possible adverse effects of dextran administration...hypernatremia and hypokalemia are of major concern in the administration of the HSD resuscitation solution (1,4,5). While clinical hypernatremia was observed...in one of our patients, this has been reported to resolve within a short period of time (2). Hypokalemia was noted in two, 15%, of the patients. In one

  12. Acute Intravenous Toxicity Study of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran 70 (Trade Name) and its Constituents in New Zealand White Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    microscopy of Brain, Heart, Kidney, Liver, Lungs and Spleen. !I!. GROSS FINDINGS: PATHOLOGY TABLE 1 - Incidence Summary of all Gross Observations Gross lesions...HEMATOPOIESIS- PRESENCE OF ERYTHROID, MYELOID AND THROMBOCYTIC COLONIES IN THE RED PULP. 2. HEMOSIDEROSIS- PRESENCE OF MACROPHAGES CONTAINING VARIABLE

  13. Volume regulation in mammalian skeletal muscle: the role of sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporters during exposure to hypertonic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew; Trajcevski, Karin E; Hawke, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether mammalian skeletal muscle is capable of volume regulation in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity despite evidence that muscle fibres have the required ion transport mechanisms to transport solute and water in situ. We addressed this issue by studying the ability of skeletal muscle to regulate volume during periods of induced hyperosmotic stress using single, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres and intact muscle (soleus and EDL). Fibres and intact muscles were loaded with the fluorophore, calcein, and the change in muscle fluorescence and width (single fibres only) used as a metric of volume change. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle exposed to increased extracellular osmolarity would elicit initial cellular shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI) with the RVI dependent on the sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter (NKCC). We found that single fibres exposed to a 35% increase in extracellular osmolarity demonstrated a rapid, initial 27–32% decrease in cell volume followed by a RVI which took 10–20 min and returned cell volume to 90–110% of pre-stimulus values. Within intact muscle, exposure to increased extracellular osmolarity of varying degrees also induced a rapid, initial shrinkage followed by a gradual RVI, with a greater rate of initial cell shrinkage and a longer time for RVI to occur with increasing extracellular tonicities. Furthermore, RVI was significantly faster in slow-twitch soleus than fast-twitch EDL. Pre-treatment of muscle with bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor) or ouabain (Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor), increased the initial volume loss and impaired the RVI response to increased extracellular osmolarity indicating that the NKCC is a primary contributor to volume regulation in skeletal muscle. It is concluded that mouse skeletal muscle initially loses volume then exhibits a RVI when exposed to increases in extracellular osmolarity. The rate of RVI is dependent on the degree of change in extracellular osmolarity, is muscle specific, and is dependent on the functioning of the NKCC and Na+, K+-ATPase. PMID:21486779

  14. Local Irritation Toxicity Study of Hypertonic Saline/Dextran 70 (Trade Name) and Constituents in New Zealand White Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    sut -utaneous t-~eDE’X 70 sates 5, c 12 sa -e~ . ll b.7e’sna resolved by 24 a coF clinical observations. Accces idividua animal histories. -~bwe-ihts...H : E-4 U ~ N 0 0 e > ( ’ I’ (Y) C’, H 0 A ~1 Zaucha et al--i3 DISCUSSION obD ;ervations following the Jin t ra v oC, ,...~arerial, intramuscular, and...u co. *La : Au CO 0 0 * m o o ? U, H iW L C4 .. I LL *Ŕ 0. . - 0 - *~. a~ Lu., ~~v 0 : 0. .c K L) K’ Haz : mg u- U. * w to .. a ’i . uJu ofL C

  15. Fourteen-Day Subacute Intravenous Toxicity Study of Hypertonic Saline/ Dextran 70 and its Constituents in Beagle Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Skeletal Muscle -- Fasciitis , Chronic, with Mineralization: The epimysial fascia is fibrotic, mineralized, and infiltrated by macrophages and...ulcerated and covered by necrotic debris mixed with proteinaceous exudate. The dermis is infiltrated by neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes

  16. Responses of supraoptic neurones in the intact and deafferented rat hypothalamus to injections of hypertonic sodium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Dyball, R E; Prilusky, J

    1981-01-01

    1. Recordings were made from a total of fifty-three neurones in the supraoptic nuclei of four groups of rats: intact rats, animals in which the hypothalamus had been partly denervated by anteriorly or posteriorly placed semicircular cuts, and rats with a totally deafferented hypothalamus. 2. When first encountered, cells from intact animals fired at a mean rate of 5.08 +/- 0.78 spikes/sec, those from posteriorly isolated hypothalami at 3.93 +/- 0.63 spikes/sec, those from the anteriorly isolated hypothalami at 2.05 +/- 0.83 spikes/sec, and those from totally isolated hypothalami at 0.99 +/- 0.46 spikes/sec. 3. When stimulated osmotically by an intraperitoneal injection of ml. 1.5 M-NaCl, eight out of eight cells in intact rats showed a significant increase in firing rate between 20 and 30 min after the injection. Six out of nine cells in posteriorly isolated hypothalami showed significant but smaller responses. No increase in firing rate could be detected in seven cells from totally isolated hypothalami or from eight cells in hypothalami partly isolated by anterior cuts. 4. The results imply that under the conditions of these experiments by the spontaneous activity of the supraoptic nucleus in intact animals was maintained by an extrahypothalamic excitatory input, that partial hypothalamic isolation reduced its intensity, possibly by unmasking an inhibitory input, and that total isolation reduced it to an even greater extent. Osmotic activation of supraoptic cells was only possible when the anterior connexions of the hypothalamus were intact. Thus the cerebral osmo-receptors for vasopressin release may be situated outside the supraoptic nuclei. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7264977

  17. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection.

  18. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure*, **

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  19. Comparison of hypertonic and isotonic reference electrode junctions for measuring ionized calcium in whole blood: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Masters, P W; Payne, R B

    1993-06-01

    We measured ionized calcium concentrations in whole blood from 91 patients who had no clinical or biochemical evidence of disturbed calcium homeostasis and who had a wide range of serum albumin concentrations. We used both a standard Ciba-Corning 634 analyzer, which has a membrane-restricted saturated KCl reference electrode bridge, and a modified instrument with a 150 mmol/L NaCl bridge. After adjusting the externally standardized values from each instrument for their least-squares regressions on pH, there was a significant correlation between ionized calcium and albumin only with the standard analyzer. In contrast, only values from the modified instrument correlated with serum chloride; this was not explained by ionic strength or organic anion interferences. We conclude that there is unlikely to be any major advantage in using a membrane-restricted isotonic NaCl reference electrode for in vitro clinical measurements, although it may be of value for in vivo monitoring. The importance of measuring serum albumin when using most commercial ionized calcium analyzers is emphasized.

  20. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P<0.05), whereas heat hypoalgesia was not affected (P>0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P<0.05), while bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia was unaffected (P>0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively.

  1. Serum Immunoglobulin and Complement Responses to 6% Dextran-70/7.5% Hypertonic Saline Solution in Dogs and Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    immunoelectrophoretic patterns were examined qualitatively for absence, displacement, bowing, inhibition or thickness of the immunoprecipitin arcs. Radial ... Immunodiffusion . Ten 41 of diluted serum and purified antibody were added to pre-punched wells in pH 7.2 phosphate buffered 1% agarose double diffusion

  2. The response of arginine vasopressin to intravenous ethanol and hypertonic saline in man: the impact of aging.

    PubMed

    Helderman, J H; Vestal, R E; Rowe, J W; Tobin, J D; Andres, R; Robertson, G L

    1978-01-01

    The effect of age on the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-renal axis in normal man was determined by assaying plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) responses to inhibitory and to secretory stimuli. Nine young (21-49 years) and 13 old (54-92 years) subjects received IV ethanol (375 mg/m2 per min). AVP levels fell progressively during the infusion in the young group, but fell for only 30 min in the old group and then rose paradoxically despite the continuing increase in blood ethanol. Eight young (22-48 years) and 8 old (52-66 years) men were provided identical osmolal loads by a 2-hour IV infusion of 3% NaCl at 0.1 ml/kg per min. Serum AVP rose 2.5 times the baseline in the young and 4.5 times the baseline in the old men despite identical free water clearances. Osmoreceptor sensitivity (the slope of AVP on osmolality) was greater in the old subjects. The heightened sensitivity to hyperosomolality helps examine the paradoxical response to ethanol, since osmolality increased during that time. This increased AVP response may severe to compensate for the reduced renal ability to conserve salt and water in aging man.

  3. [The effect of lesions of the caudate nucleus on the development of hypertonic blood pressure dysregulation due to learning stress].

    PubMed

    Hecht, K; Garibjan, A A; Treptow, K

    1976-01-01

    Male albino rats were used to study the effect of excluding the nucleus caudatus upon the development of a hypertensive dysregulation induced by the load of learning (stress). A 3-week stress exposure considerably restricted learning and memory processes in all the animals with nucleus caudatus lesions. Systolic blood pressure values and adrenal weights were within the physiological range. In animals with intact brains, the same stress exposure caused a certain restriction of learning processes and a rise of blood pressure and adrenal weight. The results described here show that the lesions of nucleus caudatus structures, similar to the exclusion of circumscribed areas of the hippocampus and the reticular formation, prevents spreading of stress-induced emotional excitation into visceral functional areas.

  4. Volume regulation in mammalian skeletal muscle: the role of sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporters during exposure to hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    Lindinger, Michael I; Leung, Matthew; Trajcevski, Karin E; Hawke, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    Controversy exists as to whether mammalian skeletal muscle is capable of volume regulation in response to changes in extracellular osmolarity despite evidence that muscle fibres have the required ion transport mechanisms to transport solute and water in situ. We addressed this issue by studying the ability of skeletal muscle to regulate volume during periods of induced hyperosmotic stress using single, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibres and intact muscle (soleus and EDL). Fibres and intact muscles were loaded with the fluorophore, calcein, and the change in muscle fluorescence and width (single fibres only) used as a metric of volume change. We hypothesized that skeletal muscle exposed to increased extracellular osmolarity would elicit initial cellular shrinkage followed by a regulatory volume increase (RVI) with the RVI dependent on the sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter (NKCC). We found that single fibres exposed to a 35% increase in extracellular osmolarity demonstrated a rapid, initial 27–32% decrease in cell volume followed by a RVI which took 10-20 min and returned cell volume to 90–110% of pre-stimulus values. Within intact muscle, exposure to increased extracellular osmolarity of varying degrees also induced a rapid, initial shrinkage followed by a gradual RVI, with a greater rate of initial cell shrinkage and a longer time for RVI to occur with increasing extracellular tonicities. Furthermore, RVI was significantly faster in slow-twitch soleus than fast-twitch EDL. Pre-treatment of muscle with bumetanide (NKCC inhibitor) or ouabain (Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor), increased the initial volume loss and impaired the RVI response to increased extracellular osmolarity indicating that the NKCC is a primary contributor to volume regulation in skeletal muscle. It is concluded that mouse skeletal muscle initially loses volume then exhibits a RVI when exposed to increases in extracellular osmolarity. The rate of RVI is dependent on the degree of change in extracellular osmolarity, is muscle specific, and is dependent on the functioning of the NKCC and Na+, K+-ATPase.

  5. [Lightning strikes and lightning injuries in prehospital emergency medicine. Relevance, results, and practical implications].

    PubMed

    Hinkelbein, J; Spelten, O; Wetsch, W A

    2013-01-01

    Up to 32.2% of patients in a burn center suffer from electrical injuries. Of these patients, 2-4% present with lightning injuries. In Germany, approximately 50 people per year are injured by a lightning strike and 3-7 fatally. Typically, people involved in outdoor activities are endangered and affected. A lightning strike usually produces significantly higher energy doses as compared to those in common electrical injuries. Therefore, injury patterns vary significantly. Especially in high voltage injuries and lightning injuries, internal injuries are of special importance. Mortality ranges between 10 and 30% after a lightning strike. Emergency medical treatment is similar to common electrical injuries. Patients with lightning injuries should be transported to a regional or supraregional trauma center. In 15% of all cases multiple people may be injured. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to create emergency plans and evacuation plans in good time for mass gatherings endangered by possible lightning.

  6. Translation of the 'time is brain' concept into clinical practice: focus on prehospital stroke management.

    PubMed

    Ragoschke-Schumm, A; Walter, S; Haass, A; Balucani, C; Lesmeister, M; Nasreldein, A; Sarlon, L; Bachhuber, A; Licina, T; Grunwald, I Q; Fassbender, K

    2014-04-01

    Acute stroke is one of the main causes of death and chronic disability. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within the first hours after onset of symptoms is an effective therapeutic option for ischemic stroke. However, fewer than 2% to 7% of patients receive this treatment, primarily because most patients reach the hospital too late for the initiation of successful therapy. Several measures can reduce detrimental delay until treatment. It is of importance to use continual public awareness campaigns to reduce delays in patients' alarm of emergency medical services. Further relevant measures are repetitive education of emergency medical services teams to ensure the systematic use of scales designed for recognition of stroke symptoms and the proper triage of patients to stroke centers. A most important time-saving measure is prenotification of the receiving hospital by the emergency medical services team. In the future, treatment already at the emergency site may allow more than a small minority of patients to benefit from available treatment.

  7. Implementation phase of a multicentre prehospital telemedicine system to support paramedics: feasibility and possible limitations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legal regulations often limit the medical care that paramedics can provide. Telemedical solutions could overcome these limitations by remotely providing expert support. Therefore, a mobile telemedicine system to support paramedics was developed. During the implementation phase of this system in four German emergency medical services (EMS), the feasibility and possible limitations of this system were evaluated. Methods After obtaining ethical approval and providing a structured training program for all medical professionals, the system was implemented on three paramedic-staffed ambulances on August 1st, 2012. Two more ambulances were included subsequently during this month. The paramedics could initiate a consultation with EMS physicians at a teleconsultation centre. Telemedical functionalities included audio communication, real-time vital data transmission, 12-lead electrocardiogram, picture transmission on demand, and video streaming from a camera embedded into the ceiling of each ambulance. After each consultation, telephone-based debriefings were conducted. Data were retrieved from the documentation protocols of the teleconsultation centre and the EMS. Results During a one month period, teleconsultations were conducted during 35 (11.8%) of 296 emergency missions with a mean duration of 24.9 min (SD 12.5). Trauma, acute coronary syndromes, and circulatory emergencies represented 20 (57%) of the consultation cases. Diagnostic support was provided in 34 (97%) cases, and the administration of 50 individual medications, including opioids, was delegated by the teleconsultation centre to the paramedics in 21 (60%) missions (range: 1–7 per mission). No medical complications or negative interpersonal effects were reported. All applications functioned as expected except in one case in which the connection failed due to the lack of a viable mobile network. Conclusion The feasibility of the telemedical approach was demonstrated. Teleconsultation enabled early initiation of treatments by paramedics operating under the real-time medical direction. Teleconsultation can be used to provide advanced care until the patient is under a physician’s care; moreover, it can be used to support the paramedics who work alone to provide treatment in non-life-threatening cases. Non-availability of mobile networks may be a relevant limitation. A larger prospective controlled trial is needed to evaluate the rate of complications and outcome effects. PMID:23844941

  8. [Pre-hospital management of adults with life-threatening emergencies].

    PubMed

    Wattel, Francis; Dubois, François

    2012-01-01

    In France, acute life-threatening situations are handled by the French Secours a Personne (assistance to persons) and emergency medical facilities. An unequivocal success, this early management of life-threatening emergency situations relies upon centralized call reception, medical dispatching, and immediate on-site emergency medical care. We describe the different emergency care providers and steps involved in the response to emergency situations. Each call centre (Samu, phone number 15; Sapeurs-Pompiers, 18) provides a response tailored to the nature of incoming calls for assistance. A check-list of grounds for an "automatic response" by the SDIS (Service Départemental d'Incendie et de Secours--the French fire brigade) is in use, ensuring that firefighters are often the first on the spot, while the knowledge and skills of the dispatching physician are essential to ascertain the patient's needs, to preserve life and vital functions, and to ensure the patient is sent to the appropriate emergency healthcare facility. In life-threatening emergency situations, patients must be brought straight to the appropriate reference emergency healthcare facility, as quickly as possible, without prior admittance to an emergency department. This is the procedure for extremely acute emergency situations in the following areas: trauma (multiple trauma and/or uncontrolled bleeding, spinal cord trauma), delivery bleeding, other life-threatening situations such as ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrest (sudden death), cerebrovascular stroke and ensuing brain damage, some acute respiratory situations such as anaphylactic shock, foreign-body inhalation, electrocution, drowning, drug overdose, certain forms of poisoning, and conditions requiring initial hyperbaric oxygen (diving accidents, acute carbon monoxide and smoke poisoning). The reasons for suboptimal emergency care in life-threatening situations are currently a major issue, with medical facilities being reduced in some areas, fewer voluntary firemen, hospital reorganization, tight funding, difficulties of medical dispatching, and the varying skills of "first-on-the-scene "emergency workers. Grievances include late emergency responses, inappropriate medical care, and dispatching to the wrong facility. This raises the question of equal opportunity for all in a country with widely varying geographic features and population density. Improvement in the system's efficiency will require a series of objectives to be met in varied and complementary--Enhanced functional coordination, by speeding up the deployment of the ANTARES digital radio-frequency transmission network (Adaptation Nationale des Transmissions Aux Risques Et aux Secours).--Implementation of a network of emergency services with varying degrees of emergency healthcare management related to the technical nature of the facilities. Three levels of emergency healthcare must be made available: level 1 is provided by local hospitals, level 2 includes support facilities available in general hospitals (not necessarily the nearest hospital), and level 3 provides specialized healthcare in large and/or training hospitals with specialized departments. Life-threatening emergency situations are to be handled by level 2 or 3 facilities. Specific facilities must be selected as reference centers. In France, the ARS (Agences Régionales de Santé) is in charge of this procedure, as it provide funding for healthcare continuity--Reducing inequalities in access to emergency care. This will involve improving the network of SDIS brigades, making local medical facilities more responsive, delegating more medical procedures, on-site telemedicine, providing more helicopters equipped with healthcare facilities, more automated external defibrillators, and more dedicated neuro-vascular units.--First aid training must be made widely available. The French National Academy of Medicine has approved ten recommendations regarding organization and facilities.

  9. Prehospital Tourniquet Use in Operation Iraqi Freedom: Effect on Hemorrhage Control and Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    hematocrit), blood products required (packed red blood cells, fresh whole blood, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecip- itate, rFVIIa), disposition (death, return...the popliteal artery injury. Patient 7. A man of unknown age sustained a left grade IIIB open femur fracture and transection of profunda femoral artery...patient underwent external fixator placement of his femur and ligation of his profunda femoral artery. He required secondary amputation for the

  10. Heart Rate Variability and Its Association with Mortality in Prehospital Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    variability and spontaneous baroreflex sequences: implications for autonomic monitoring during hemorrhage. J Trauma. 2005;58:798–805. 4. Cooke WH, Ryan KL...routine would have to overcome signif- icant technical hurdles (the power spectral analysis that is used to generate the HF/LF measure is sensitive to

  11. [Prehospital emergency care injuries from external causes in a region of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rafael; Bastidas, Daniel; Arteaga, Everilda; Bastidas, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: a nivel mundial, anualmente mueren aproximadamente 3 500 000 personas como consecuencia de lesiones debidas a causas externas, lo que representa para Venezuela la tercera causa de morbilidad general. Sin embargo, no existen registros en el país de los aspectos que definen la atención de emergencia prehospitalaria como herramienta para afrontar este problema socio-sanitario, objeto de la presente investigación. Métodos: estudio descriptivo, transversal y de campo con base en la información registrada diariamente durante un año en emergencia prehospitalaria. Resultados: fueron en total 1493 los lesionados por causas externas, con edad promedio de 29.5 ± 12 años, 84.5% del género masculino. Las lesiones fueron, en su mayoría, de severidad menor-moderada (69.4%), debidas a accidentes de transporte terrestre (70.9%), ocurridos de día (75.9%), entre lunes y viernes (72.9%), atendidos en 20 minutos o menos, y trasladados en el 97.3% de los casos. Conclusiones: los hombres jóvenes, económicamente productivos, de las zonas con mayor densidad poblacional y urbanismos son los más afectados por lesiones por causas externas; en ambos géneros, los accidentes de transporte terrestre son las causas más frecuente de lesión, de severidad menor-moderada; asimismo, la atención de emergencia prehospitalaria puede considerarse adecuada.

  12. Triage decisions of prehospital emergency health care providers, using a multiple casualty scenario paper exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kilner, T

    2002-01-01

    Methods: A standardised 20 casualty paper exercise requiring each casualty to be prioritised for treatment was given to 100 doctors, 59 nurses, and 74 ambulance paramedics who could potentially be involved at the scene of a multiple casualty incident. Each paper was scored using the triage sieve algorithm. The paper contained descriptions of two casualties regarded as dead, six priority 1 casualties, six priority 2 casualties, and six priority 3 casualties. Results: There was no significant difference in the scores received by both doctors and nurses, but paramedics did significantly less well than both nurses and doctors (p<0.05) However, the actual difference in mean scores is only just over 1; both doctors and nurses had a mean score of 13.03 and paramedics a mean score of 11.83. All professional groups tended to over triage patients. While there was no significant difference between doctors and nurses there was a significant difference (p<0.001) between paramedics and both doctors and nurses. Conclusions: There is little difference in the accuracy of triage decision making between the professional groups, with doctors and nurses scoring marginally better than paramedics. The rates of over triage are high posing the risk of overwhelming available resources further. Under triage rates are also high, with potentially life threatening conditions going unrecognised. However, some margin of error may be accounted for by the untested validity of the triage sieve methodology. PMID:12101157

  13. Improving prehospital trauma management for skiers and snowboarders - need for on-slope triage?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injuries from skiing and snowboarding became a major challenge for emergency care providers in Switzerland. In the alpine setting, early assessment of injury and health status is essential for the initiation of adequate means of care and transport. Nevertheless, validated standardized protocols for on-slope triage are missing. This article can assist in understanding the characteristics of injured winter sportsmen and exigencies for future on-slope triage protocols. Methods Six-year review of trauma cases in a tertiary trauma centre. Consecutive inclusion of all injured skiers and snowboarders aged >15 (total sample) years with predefined, severe injury to the head, spine, chest, pelvis or abdomen (study sample) presenting at or being transferred to the study hospital. Descriptive analysis of age, gender and injury pattern. Results Amongst 729 subjects (total sample) injured from skiing or snowboarding, 401 (55%, 54% of skiers and 58% of snowboarders) suffered from isolated limb injury. Amongst the remaining 328 subjects (study sample), the majority (78%) presented with monotrauma. In the study sample, injury to the head (52%) and spine (43%) was more frequent than injury to the chest (21%), pelvis (8%), and abdomen (5%). The three most frequent injury combinations were head/spine (10% of study sample), head/thorax (9%), and spine/thorax (6%). Fisher's exact test demonstrated an association for injury combinations of head/thorax (p < 0.001), head/abdomen (p = 0.019), and thorax/abdomen (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data presented and the findings from previous investigations indicate the need for development of dedicated on-slope triage protocols. Future research must address the validity and practicality of diagnostic on-slope tests for rapid decision making by both professional and lay first responders. Thus, large-scale and detailed injury surveillance is the future research priority. PMID:21521524

  14. Comparison of Provider Types Who Performed Prehospital Lifesaving Interventions: A Prospective Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA...Disaster Coalition, New York, NY, 3Montefiore Medical Center , Bronx, NY, 4The Children’s Hospital At Montefiore, Bronx, NY Learning Objectives: A...hospital has a 16 bed medical surgical ICU. It is staffed by a 12 hour day Intensivist program with telemedicine cover- age at night. There is a

  15. [Modern methods of prehospital bleeding management based on the experience and standards of tactical medicine].

    PubMed

    Kluj, Przemysław; Aleksandrowicz, Dawid; Machała, Waldemar; Gaszyński, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Isolated limb hemorrhage represents 60% of avoidable deaths and remains the leading cause of death in combat zone. Ideal tourniquet must be light, durable and cheap. They should completely stop the flow of arterial blood in the limb, and their attachment should be quick and easy. Tourniquets applied in correct location save lives by stopping the bleeding. Their use in civil environment appear to be particularly relevant in the mass casualties events. Modern bandages used by the military, were designed mostly in the form of an elastic bandage, which attachment has to be easy and quick. Sequential wrapping of elastic dressing around the wound produces compressive force which aim is to stem the bleeding by pressing vessel from the outside. Dressings are made of materials which adhere well to the wound, causing the seal and leave no fragments in the injured tissue. The combination of all components enables fast and effective application of the dressing in the most demanding conditions.

  16. Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital Transport (STAAMP) Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    multiple organ failure , nosocomial infection, mortality, early seizures, pulmonary embolism and early resuscitation needs, reduce or prevent the early... cascade , improve clinical outcomes and provide insight into the underlying mechanisms responsible for and which maximize its benefit. Objective...multiple organ failure , nosocomial infection, mortality, early seizures, pulmonary embolism and early resuscitation needs, reduce or prevent the

  17. [From the hospital in white to the pre-hospital in red].

    PubMed

    Marchal, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Having started out in the hospital sector, Christian Marchal has had a rewarding and original career. His credo: emergency assistance and the interest of the victims. As part of the fire and rescue service nursing corps, he has acquired skills and trained as a supervisor.

  18. Using PAs in prehospital environments to reduce ED and EMS overuse.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Katherine M; Tozier, William L

    2017-04-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) and EDs in large cities are burdened with a significant number of patients with chronic disease who have limited options for receiving proper care. Despite their relatively small numbers, these "superusers" can have a significant effect on EMS, particularly in large cities. Additionally, EDs are not designed to provide chronic and continuous healthcare. This article describes how several organizations use physician assistants to manage these patients.

  19. Knowledge translation in the emergency medical services: a research agenda for advancing prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about knowledge translation in the practice of out-of-hospital medicine. It is generally accepted that much work is needed regarding "getting the evidence straight" in emergency medical services, given the substantial number of interventions that are performed regularly in the field but lack meaningful scientific support. Additional attention also needs to be given to "getting the evidence used," because there is some evidence that evidence-based practices are being incompletely or incorrectly applied in the field. In an effort to help advance a research agenda for knowledge translation in emergency medical services, nine recommendations are put forth to help address the problems identified.

  20. Prehospital Loss of R-to-R Interval Complexity is Associated With Mortality in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    angina pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures. Am J Cardiol. 1998;81:27–31. 35. Mandelbrot BB. Fractals, Form and Chance. San Francisco...associated with myocardial ischemia, manifested by angina .34 Thus, decreases in RRI complexity as measured by entropy appear to be associated with

  1. Heart-Rate Complexity for Prediction of Prehospital Lifesaving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    818 October 2008 23. Makikallio TH, Ristimae T, Airaksinen KE, Peng CK, Goldberger AL, Huikuri HV. Heart rate dynamics in patients with stable angina ... pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures. Am J Cardiol. 1998;81:27–31. 24. Peng CK, Havlin S, Stanley HE, Goldberger AL. Quantification

  2. A Comparison of Alerting Strategies for Hemorrhage Identification During Prehospital Emergency Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure ( SBP ), pulse pressure (PP), and respiratory rate (RR) [2]. The SPRT reduced the fraction of patients who...ECGs), and vital signs, such as HR, RR, SBP , and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). We collected clinical outcome data, including demographics...classifier [11] to assess whether the patient had hypovolemia based on HR, RR, SBP and pulse pressure (PP = SBP − DBP). The ensemble classifier is a set

  3. Reliability of a Swedish pre-hospital dispatch system in prioritizing patients.

    PubMed

    Ek, Bosse; Edström, Pontus; Toutin, Anders; Svedlund, Marianne

    2013-04-01

    The need of emergency help often begins with a call to a dispatch center. The operator uses a medical index to prioritize dispatches. Since the resources of ambulances are limited, it is important that the priority grading decided by the operator at the dispatch center is as adequate as possible. In the county of Jamtland in Sweden, a system for triage named METTS-A (Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System-A) has been in use since 2009, when the patient is coded according to priority level. The aim of this study was to analyse the sensitivity and specificity of the priority grading made by the dispatch center in comparison with the METTS-A priority assessed by the ambulance nurse. Statistics from a data-base in northern Sweden were analyzed. The material covered every ambulance that was dispatched, 6986 times during the period of data collecting. The results show a high sensitivity but low specificity in the dispatch system. The results also indicate that over prioritization exists since most of the patients with a high acute need of an ambulance are correctly identified, while many patients without that need are also given a high priority ambulance service. Therefore the conclusions were that both over- and under prioritizations were made.

  4. [Users' perceptions of urgency and reasons for using the mobile pre-hospital care service].

    PubMed

    de Abreu, Kelly Piacheski; Pelegrini, Alisia Helena Weis; Marques, Giselda Quintana; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2012-06-01

    The Mobile Emergency Care Services handle urgent situations of various types, and demand for this service occurs according to the perception of the user regarding what is urgent. The aim of the study was to analyze the perceptions of urgency by users who demand care from a Mobile Emergency Care Service in Porto Alegre and to identify the reasons for these requests. In this explomratory-descriptive study, with qualitative approach, data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted by telephone, during theperiod from February to April 2009. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the information. Users consider urgent life-threatening conditions, which require a quick response, and visible situations, such as bleeding, chronic diseases, and difficulties in transportation. Users themselves feel motivated to call the service due to it being rapid and free, and for transportation. The perceptions of users regarding urgency were diverse, sometimes consistent with the biomedical perspective of health providers and sometimes with their own social context.

  5. Neural Network Medical Decision Algorithms for Pre-Hospital Trauma Care. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    hundred were incomplete and were therefore discarded. We also excluded babies (< 2 years of age); this left a total of 3,628 complete patient exemplars as...contained 4,125 complete patient records, with babies (< 2 years old) and extremely old people (> 95 years old) excluded. Among the NCTR patients, 472...blood pressure. Blood flow is allocated preferentially to those vital organs, namely the heart, lungs, and brain , least tolerant of oxygen debt. At the

  6. EMS Provider Attitudes and Perceptions of Enrolling Patients without Consent in Prehospital Emergency Research.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Jamie; Fernandez, Antonio R; Schmidt, Terri A; Lerner, E Brooke

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes and opinions of a broad population of EMS providers on enrolling patients in research without consent. A survey was conducted in 2010 of all EMS providers who participated in the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) reregistration process, which included half of all registered providers. Each reregistration packet included our optional survey, which had nine 6-point Likert scale questions concerning their opinion of research studies without consent as well as 8 demographic questions. Responses were collapsed to agree and disagree and then analyzed using descriptive statistics with 99% confidence intervals. A total of 65,993 EMS providers received the survey and 23,832 (36%) participated. Most respondents agreed (98.4%, 99%CI: 98.2-98.6) that EMS research is important, but only 30.9% (99%CI: 30.1-31.6) agreed with enrolling patients without their consent when it is important to learn about a new treatment. Only 46.6% (99%Cl: 45.7-47.4) were personally willing to be enrolled in a study without their consent. A majority (68.5% [99%Cl: 67.7-69.3]) of respondents believed that EMS providers should have the individual right to refuse to enroll patients in EMS research. While the majority of respondents agreed that EMS research is important, considerably less agree with enrolling patients without consent and less than half would be willing to be enrolled in a study without their consent. Prior to starting an Exception from Informed Consent (EFIC) study, researchers should discuss with EMS providers their perceptions of enrolling patients without consent and address their concerns.

  7. Evolution of a new series of self-contained micromechanical ventilators for prehospital use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Smith, Dexter G.; Wenstrand, Douglas S.; Wiesmann, William P.

    2002-05-01

    Immediate medical care can dramatically reduce the number of fatalities sustained during military operations. However, the shift from large-scale regional conflicts to smaller peacekeeping and humanitarian missions has reduced the military medical support infrastructure. In the civilian emergency medical services arena, there has long been an emphasis on the golden hour during which a patient must receive definitive medical attention. Without on-scene medical support, injured soldiers must be transported significant distances before receiving definitive medical care, and rapid transport to a medical facility is not always a viable option. We reported here three years ago on the development of an early prototype portable ventilator with basic functionality. Since that time, four new prototypes with varying capabilities and sizes have been developed. Each of these fits a particular role in military or civilian use. The design goals and tradeoffs for each unit will be discussed, as well as the design implementation used to achieve those goals.

  8. Safety and Efficacy of Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl Citrate for Prehospital Pain Control on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    oximetry recorded an oxygen saturation of 88% to 90%, this patient responded readily to stimulation, 2 L to 4 L of oxygen administered by nasal cannula...2008;11:643 648. 43. Hillier RJ, Aboud A, Thind G, Clark DI. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate: a novel analgesic agent for use in retinal

  9. Tactical Combat Casualty Care 2007: Evolving Concepts and Battlefield Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    or thoracic) hemorrhage: no IV fluid resuscitation Head wound patient: Hespan at minimal flow to maintain infusion unless there is concurrent...airway obstruction: chin lift or jaw thrust, nasopharyngeal airway, place casualty in recovery position Surgical cricothyroidotomy (with lidocaine ...laryngeal mask airway /ILMA or Combitube or endotracheal intubation or surgical cricothyroidotomy (with lidocaine if conscious) Spinal immobilization is

  10. [Prehospital cardiac resuscitation in Queretaro, Mexico. Report of 3 cases. Importance of an integral emergency medical care system].

    PubMed

    Fraga-Sastrías, Juan Manuel; Aguilera-Campos, Andrea; Barinagarrementería-Aldatz, Fernando; Ortíz-Mondragón, Claudio; Asensio-Lafuente, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a health problem that represents 33,000 to 150,000 or more deaths per year. The few existent reports show mortality as high as 100% in contrast to some international reports that show higher survival rates. In Queretaro, during the last 5 years there were no successful resuscitation cases. However, in 2012 some patients were reported to have return of spontaneous circulation. We report in this article 3 cases with return of spontaneous circulation and pulse at arrival to the hospital. Two of the patients were discharged alive, one of them with poor cerebral performance category. Community cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and better emergency medical system response times, are related with survival. This poorly explored health problem in Queretaro could be increased with quality and good public education, bystander assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, police involvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, public access defibrillation programs and measurement of indicators and feedback for better results.

  11. Rwanda's Model Prehospital Emergency Care Service: A Two-year Review of Patient Demographics and Injury Patterns in Kigali.

    PubMed

    Enumah, Samuel; Scott, John W; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; D'Arc Nyinawankusi, Jeanne; Riviello, Robert; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Kabagema, Ignace; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Injury is responsible for nearly five million annual deaths worldwide, and nearly 90% of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Reliable clinical data detailing the epidemiology of injury are necessary for improved care delivery, but they are lacking in these regions.

  12. Prehospital Interventions Performed in a Combat Zone: A Prospective Multicenter Study of 1,003 Combat Wounded

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    being composed of endotracheal intubation , chest needle decompression, and hypotensive resuscitation. In contrast, tourniquet application had the lowest...underwent endotracheal intubation , and 15 (1.5%) had a surgical cricothyroidotomy performed. When evaluating chest interventions, 12 (1.1%) underwent a... endotracheal intubations , two surgical cricothyroidotomies, and two nasal/oral airway insertions.When evaluating tourniquet placement, 12 of 205 were placed

  13. [Prehospital emergency setting caused by hemorrhagic oropharyngeal bullae in a child with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa Hallopeau-Siemens].

    PubMed

    Ochsenfahrt, C; Maier, B; Konrad, F

    2004-01-01

    Two painful large hemorrhagic bullae developed within minutes of each other in a four-month-old infant with autosomal recessive inherited epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica Hallopeau-Siemens. There was no significant impairment of spontaneous respiration. The emergency physician sedated the infant with midazolam administered by the nasal route. A community pediatrician called for assistance opened a bulla, which impressively improved the symptoms and avoided the necessity of an admission to hospital. The presented case demonstrates the importance of exchange of information within the group of emergency physicians regarding rare diseases not only in rural areas. In our opinion its also helpful to involve colleagues in private practice into the emergency system.

  14. Expert validation of the knowledge base for E-CAD - a pre-hospital dispatch triage decision support system.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Muzna; Saini, Devashish; Brown, Todd B; Orthner, Helmuth F; Mazza, Giovanni; Battles, Marcie M

    2007-10-11

    The knowledge base (KB) for E-CAD (Enhanced Computer-Aided Dispatch), a triage decision support system for Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) of medical resources in trauma cases, is being evaluated. We aim to achieve expert consensus for validation and refinement of the E-CAD KB using the modified Delphi technique. Evidence-based, expert-validated and refined KB will provide improved EMD practice guidelines and may facilitate acceptance of the E-CAD by state-wide professionals.

  15. Prehospital management of sarin nerve gas terrorism in urban settings: 10 years of progress after the Tokyo subway sarin attack.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Kikuchi, Makiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Stein, Gerald H

    2006-02-01

    Chemical agents have been used previously in wartime on numerous occasions, from World War I to the Gulf War. In 1994 and 1995, sarin nerve gas was used first in peacetime as a weapon of terrorism in Japan. The Tokyo subway sarin attack was the first large-scale disaster caused by nerve gas. A religious cult released sarin gas into subway commuter trains during morning rush hour. Twelve passengers died and about 5500 people were harmed. Sarin is a highly toxic nerve agent that can be fatal within minutes to hours. It causes the clinical syndrome of cholinergic hyperstimulation by inhibition of the crucial enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Therapy of nerve agent toxicity is divided into three categories, decontamination, respiratory support, and antidotes. All of these therapies may be given simultaneously. This article reviews toxicology and management of this acute chemical emergency. To help minimize the possible catastrophic impact on the public, we make several recommendations based on analysis of the Tokyo subway sarin attack and systematically review the current scientific literature.

  16. Continuous Pre-hospital Data as a Predictor of Outcome Following Major Trauma: A Study Using Improved and Expanded Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT This study is designed to acquire near continuous physiologic measurements, beginning at the earliest practical...supports the hypothesis that ground EMS systems can provide earlier inception of data recording than helicopter services. A new physiological monitor...field data collection operations (using an “old” physiological monitor device during March 2006) were being completed. The reporting period concludes

  17. Pre-Hospital Dietary Intake Correlates with Muscle Mass at the Time of Fracture in Older Hip-Fractured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Riccardo; Martone, Anna Maria; Marzetti, Emanuele; Onder, Graziano; Savera, Giulia; Lorenzi, Maria; Serafini, Elisabetta; Bernabei, Roberto; Landi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Background: Failure to meet an adequate dietary intake is involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which in turn increase the risk for falls and fractures, respectively. Older people with hip fracture are often protein-malnourished at hospitalization. Whether low protein-energy intake is associated with muscle atrophy in hip-fractured patients is presently unknown. This information is necessary for the development of novel strategies to manage this especially vulnerable patient population. The aim of this study was, therefore, to explore the relationship between dietary intake and muscle mass in older hip-fractured patients. Methods: Analyses were conducted in hip-fractured elderly admitted to an orthopedic and trauma surgery ward (University Hospital). Muscle mass was estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis within 24 h from admission. Dietary information was collected via 24-h dietary recall and nutrient intake calculated by a nutrition software. Results: Among 62 hip-fractured patients (mean age 84.6 ± 7.6 years, 84% women), the average energy intake was 929.2 ± 170.3 Kcal day−1, with higher values reported by men (1.046.8 ± 231.4 Kcal day−1) relative to women (906.5 ± 148.3 Kcal day−1; p = 0.01). Absolute and normalized protein intake was 50.0 ± 13.5 g day−1 and 0.88 ± 0.27 g kg (body weight)–1 day–1, respectively, with no gender differences. A positive correlation was determined between total energy intake and muscle mass (r = 0.384; p = 0.003). Similarly, protein and leucine consumption was positively correlated with muscle mass (r = 0.367 and 0.311, respectively; p = 0.005 for both). Conclusion: A low intake of calories, protein, and leucine is associated with reduced muscle mass in hip-fractured elderly. Given the relevance of sarcopenia as a risk factor for adverse outcomes in this patient population, our findings highlight the importance of a comprehensive dietary assessment for the detection of nutritional deficits predisposing to or aggravating muscle atrophy. PMID:25477815

  18. Monitoring Trauma Patients in the Prehospital and Hospital Environments: The Need for Better Monitors and Advanced Automation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-05

    s s u r e , m m H g livedli diedi 0 20 40 60 80 100 A r t e r i a l O 2 S a t u r a t i o n , % A r t e r i a l O 2 S a t u r a t i o n...0 20 40 60 80 100 120 P u l s e R a t e , b p m P u l s e R a t e , b p m livedli diedi 4 Grouped Vital Signs Do Not Predict Need for Life

  19. The Potential Role of Recombinant Activated Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in Military Pre-Hospital Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    50]. Damage to the lungs may range from minimal hemorrhage to hemothorax and massive pulmonary hemorrhage. Acute respiratory distress may develop...175-6. 49. Hirshberg B, Oppenheim-Eden A, Pizov R, Sklair-Levi M, Rivkin A, Bardach E, et al. Recovery from blast lung injury: one -year follow-up...assessments will have to be based on data from civilian trauma. Paper presented at the RTO HFM Symposium on “Combat Casualty Care in Ground Based

  20. Role of thalamic nuclei in the modulation of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex during hypertonic saline-induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Lei, J; Ye, G; Xu, H; You, H-J

    2015-09-24

    It has been proposed that thalamic mediodorsal (MD) and ventromedial (VM) nuclei form thalamic 'nociceptive discriminators' in discrimination of nociceptive afferents, and specifically govern endogenous descending facilitation and inhibition. The present study conducted in rats was to explore the role of thalamic MD and VM nuclei in modulation of cerebral neuronal activities by means of detection of spatiotemporal variations of Fos expression within the cerebral cortex. Following a unilateral intramuscular injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, Fos expression within the bilateral, different areas of the cerebral cortex except S2 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Particularly, the increases in Fos expression within the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex occurred at 0.5h, 4h and reached the peak level at 4h, 16h, respectively. Electrolytic lesion of the contralateral thalamic MD and VM nuclei significantly blocked the 5.8% saline intramuscularly induced increases in Fos expression within the bilateral cingulate and insular cortices, respectively. Additionally, the 5.8% saline-induced Fos expression in the cingulate cortex and the insular cortex were dose-dependently attenuated by microinjection of μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride into the thalamic MD and VM nuclei. It is suggested that (1) the neural circuits of 'thalamic MD nucleus - cingulate cortex' and 'thalamic VM nucleus - insular cortex' form two distinct pathways in the endogenous control of nociception, (2) mirror or contralateral pain is hypothesized to be related to cross-talk of neuronal activities within the bilateral cerebral cortices modulated by μ-opioid receptors within the thalamic MD and VM nuclei.

  1. Blood Gas and Acid-Base Status of Conscious Pigs Subjected to Fixed- Volume Hemorrhage and Resuscitated with Hypertonic Saline Dextran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    This dIcurnent has been appro fLr p .,blis ’ c ~ and sale; its 1da.stnbution is unimitedL Circulatory Shock 32:19-29 (1990) AD-A233 250 Blood Gas and...volume. Blood gas and acid-base measurements were made at 38.5° C , the normal core temperature of domestic pigs [5], immediately after sample removal...hemorrhagic hypotension in the piglet. Pediatr Res 17:77-80, 1983. 15. Matsuda H, Raja TNK, Maeta H, John E, Fornel L, Vidyasagar D: Effect of acute

  2. Fourteen-Day Subacute Intravenous Toxicity Study of Hypertonic Saline/ Dextran 70 (Trade name) and its Constituents in New Zealand White Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    are attributed to protozoal infection (Encephalitozoon cuniculi). Zaucha et al.--771 Appendix I (cont.): PATHOLOGY REPORT Ii. Mammary tissue was...grouped into behavioral, general, respiratory, gastrointestinal , ocular, and skin categories. With the exception of hyperactivity, apprehension, and death...incidence among the treatment groups and controls. Gastrointestinal signs included loose stool (14 of 100), diarrhea (4 of 100), and mucus in the stool (2

  3. International Conference on Hypertonic Resuscitation (6th) (SALT 6), Held in Teton Village, Wyoming on 2-3 Jun 1994. Program and Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    Hetastarch significantly 200- T reduced isotonic fluid requirements by 65% 1. 50. T I and 50%, respectively, for the first 8 hours 100 , h ,-o.ac of...arterial pressure (MAP) After 2 h of hypotension, they received a 4 ml/kg bolus of a test solution and data were collected over 90 min. Results...Junger, Forrest C. Liu, William H . Loomis and David B. Hoyt Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma, Univeroity of California San Diego, San Diego

  4. Ca(2+)-dependent heat production by rat skeletal muscle in hypertonic media depends on Na(+)-Cl- co-transport stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chinet, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The rate of energy dissipation (E) in isolated, superfused soleus muscles from young rats was continuously measured under normosmotic and 100-mosM hyperosmotic conditions. The substantial increase of E with respect to basal level in hyperosmolarity (excess E), which is entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular sodium, was largely prevented or inhibited by bumetanide, a potent inhibitor of Na(+)-Cl- co-transport system, or by the removal of chloride from the superfusate (isethionate substitution). Bumetanide or the removal of chloride also acutely decreased basal E, by about 7%. 2. Bumetanide almost entirely suppressed the major, Ca(2+)-dependent part of excess E in hyperosmolarity, as well as the concomitant increase of 45Ca2+ efflux and small increase in resting muscle tension; in contrast, the part of excess E associated with stimulation of Na(+)-H+ exchange in hyperosmolarity was left unmodified. 3. Reduction of 22Na+ influx by bumetanide was more marked in hyperosmolarity than under control conditions, although stimulation of total 22Na+ influx by a 100-mosM stress was not statistically significant. Inhibition of Ca2+ release into the sarcoplasm using dantrolene sodium did not prevent the stimulation of bumetanide-sensitive 22Na+ influx, but rather increased it about fourfold. 4. It is concluded that the largest part of excess E in hyperosmolarity, which is Ca(2+)-dependent energy expenditure, is suppressed when steady-state stimulation of a Na(+)-Cl- co-transport system is inhibited either directly by bumetanide or the removal of extracellular chloride, or indirectly by the blocking of active Na(+)-K+ transport. How the stimulation of Na(+)-Cl- co-transport, by as little as 1 nmol s-1 (g wet muscle weight)-1 during a 100-mosM stress, enhances Ca(2+)-dependent heat by as much as 2.5 mW (g wet muscle weight)-1 remains to be clarified. PMID:8394429

  5. Use of Small Volume Hypertonic Acetate Dextran during Aortic Occlusion in Pigs: Assessment of Blood Flow and Antioxidant Status in Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    methods. Cardiovascular research. 2000;45(1):13-21. 21. Naito C, Kawamura M, Yamamoto Y. Lipid peroxides as the initiating factor of atherosclerosis ...Biol Med. 1999;220(1):39-45. 39. Piotrowski JJ, Hunter GC, Eskelson CD, Dubick MA, Bernhard VM. Evi- dence for Lipid-Peroxidation in Atherosclerosis

  6. Short-term cross-sensitizion of need-free sugar intake by combining sodium depletion and hypertonic NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Santos, Bruna M; de Andrade, Carina A F; Menani, José V; De Luca, Laurival A

    2016-12-01

    History of sodium depletion cross-sensitizes the effects of drugs of abuse. The objective of the present study was to find out if history of sodium depletion also cross-sensitizes a natural reward such as sugar intake in the rat. Sodium depletion was induced by furosemide combined with removal of ambient sodium for 24 h; it was repeated seven days later. The depletion was immediately followed by 0.3 M NaCl intake in a sodium appetite test (active sodium repletion). Seven days after the last depletion, hydrated and fed (need-free) sucrose-naïve animals were offered 10% sucrose in a first 2-h sucrose test. The sucrose test was repeated once a day in a series of five consecutive days. History of sodium depletion enhanced sucrose intake in the first and second tests; it had no effect from the third to fifth sucrose test. The effect on the initial sucrose intake tests disappeared if the rats did not ingest 0.3 M NaCl in the sodium appetite test. Prior experience with sucrose intake in need-free conditions had no effect on sodium appetite. History of intracellular dehydration transiently influenced sucrose intake in the first sucrose test. We found no evidence for thirst sensitization. We conclude that history of dehydration, particularly that resulting from sodium depletion, combined to active sodium repletion, produced short-term cross-sensitization of sucrose intake in sucrose-naïve rats. The results suggest that the cross-sensitization of sucrose intake related with acquisition of sugar as a novel nutrient rather than production of lasting effects on sugar rewarding properties.

  7. Development and Evaluation of Educational Materials for Pre-Hospital and Emergency Department Personnel on the Care of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle, John J.; Migyanka, Joann M.; Glor-Scheib, Susan J.; Cramer, Ryan; Fratangeli, Jeffrey J.; Hegde, Gajanan G.; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    With the rising prevalence of patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there has been an increase in the acute presentation of these individuals to the general health care system. Emergency medical services and emergency department personnel commonly address the health care needs of patients with ASD at times of crisis. Unfortunately, there…

  8. Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC-2): Trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Gavin D; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Nolan, Jerry P; Lall, Ranjit; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Cooke, Matthew; Lamb, Sarah E; Petrou, Stavros; Achana, Felix; Finn, Judith; Jacobs, Ian G; Carson, Andrew; Smyth, Mike; Han, Kyee; Byers, Sonia; Rees, Nigel; Whitfield, Richard; Moore, Fionna; Fothergill, Rachael; Stallard, Nigel; Long, John; Hennings, Susie; Horton, Jessica; Kaye, Charlotte; Gates, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Despite its use since the 1960s, the safety or effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest has never been comprehensively evaluated in a clinical trial. Although most studies have found that adrenaline increases the chance of return of spontaneous circulation for short periods, many studies found harmful effects on the brain and raise concern that adrenaline may reduce overall survival and/or good neurological outcome. The PARAMEDIC-2 trial seeks to determine if adrenaline is safe and effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This is a pragmatic, individually randomised, double blind, controlled trial with a parallel economic evaluation. Participants will be eligible if they are in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment and advanced life support is initiated. Exclusions are cardiac arrest as a result of anaphylaxis or life threatening asthma, and patient known or appearing to be under 16 or pregnant. 8000 participants treated by 5 UK ambulance services will be randomised between December 2014 and August 2017 to adrenaline (intervention) or placebo (control) through opening pre-randomised drug packs. Clinical outcomes are survival to 30 days (primary outcome), hospital discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months, health related quality of life, and neurological and cognitive outcomes (secondary outcomes). Trial registration (ISRCTN73485024).

  9. Early-Onset Pneumonia in Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with Special Focus on Prehospital Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Brand, Michael; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background More than half of all non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients die in the hospital. Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) has been described as one of the most common complications after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, the expanded use of alternative airway devices (AAD) might influence the incidence of EOP following OHCA. Material/Methods We analyzed data from all OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014. EOP was defined as proof of the presence of a pathogenic microorganism in samples of respiratory secretions within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Results There were 252 patients admitted: 155 men (61.5%) and 97 women (38.5%), with a mean age of 69.1±13.8 years. Of these, 164 patients (77.6%) were admitted with an endotracheal tube (ET) and 62 (27.4%) with an AAD. We found that 36 out of a total of 80 respiratory secretion samples (45.0%) contained pathogenic microorganisms, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most common bacteria. Neither bacterial detection (p=0.765) nor survival rates (p=0.538) differed between patients admitted with ET and those with AAD. Conclusions Irrespective of increasing use of AAD, the incidence of EOP remains high. PMID:27295123

  10. Point-of-injury Use of Reconstituted Freeze Dried Plasma as a Resuscitative Fluid: A Special Report for Prehospital Trauma Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Emergency department computed tomography dem- onstrated a bilateral ischial open pelvic fractures , vertebrae (L3, L4) compression fractures , and...perineal hematoma . Brain tomography result was normal. The patient’s admission he- moglobin was 13.7 g/dL, platelets count of 267 K, lactate of 3.74mmol/L

  11. Oslo government district bombing and Utøya island shooting July 22, 2011: The immediate prehospital emergency medical service response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background On July 22, 2011, a single perpetrator killed 77 people in a car bomb attack and a shooting spree incident in Norway. This article describes the emergency medical service (EMS) response elicited by the two incidents. Methods A retrospective and observational study was conducted based on data from the EMS systems involved and the public domain. The study was approved by the Data Protection Official and was defined as a quality improvement project. Results We describe the timeline and logistics of the EMS response, focusing on alarm, dispatch, initial response, triage and evacuation. The scenes in the Oslo government district and at Utøya island are described separately. Conclusions Many EMS units were activated and effectively used despite the occurrence of two geographically separate incidents within a short time frame. Important lessons were learned regarding triage and evacuation, patient flow and communication, the use of and need for emergency equipment and the coordination of helicopter EMS. PMID:22280935

  12. Airway Management in Disaster Response: A Manikin Study Comparing Direct and Video Laryngoscopy for Endotracheal Intubation by Prehospital Providers in Level C Personal Protective Equipment.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Sami; Machan, Jason T; Alaska, Yasser; Suner, Selim

    2017-03-20

    Introduction Airway management is one of many challenges that medical providers face in disaster response operations. The use of personal protective equipment (PPE), in particular, was found to be associated with higher failure rates and a prolonged time to achieve airway control. Hypothesis/Problem The objective of this study was to determine whether video laryngoscopy could facilitate the performance of endotracheal intubation by disaster responders wearing Level C PPE.

  13. What an ambulance nurse needs to know: a content analysis of curricula in the specialist nursing programme in prehospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Sjölin, Helena; Lindström, Veronica; Hult, Håkan; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kurland, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    In Sweden, ambulances must be staffed by at least one registered nurse. Twelve universities offer education in ambulance nursing. There is no national curriculum for detailed course content and there is a lack of knowledge about the educational content that deals with the ambulance nurse practical professional work. The aim of this study was to describe the content in course curricula for ambulance nurses. A descriptive qualitative research design with summative content analysis was used. Data were generated from 49 courses in nursing and medical science. The result shows that the course content can be described as medical, nursing and contextual knowledge with a certain imbalance with largest focus on medical knowledge. There is least focus on nursing, the registered nurses' main profession. This study clarifies how the content in the education for ambulance nurses in Sweden looks today but there are reasons to discuss the content distribution.

  14. Prehospital and in-hospital use of healthcare resources in patients surviving acute coronary syndromes: an analysis of the EPICOR registry

    PubMed Central

    Annemans, Lieven; Danchin, Nicolas; Van de Werf, Frans; Pocock, Stuart; Licour, Muriel; Medina, Jesús; Bueno, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this report is to provide insight into real-world healthcare resource use (HCRU) during the critical management of patients surviving acute coronary syndromes (ACS), using data from EPICOR (long-tErm follow-up of antithrombotic management Patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) (NCT01171404). Methods EPICOR was a prospective, multinational, observational study that enrolled 10 568 ACS survivors from 555 hospitals in 20 countries in Europe and Latin America, between September 2010 and March 2011. HCRU was evaluated in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS), with or without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multivariable analysis was performed to determine factors that affected resource use. Results Before hospitalisation, more patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had their first ECG (44.1% vs 36.4%, p<0.0001) and received antithrombotic medication (26.6% vs 15.2%, p<0.0001). Patients with NSTE-ACS with prior CVD were less likely than those without to be catheterised (73.1% vs 82.8%, p<0.0001). More patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had percutaneous coronary intervention (77.1% vs 54.9%, p<0.0001), but fewer underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (1.2% vs 3.7%, p<0.0001). Multivariable analysis showed that resource use, including length of hospital stay and coronary revascularisation, was significantly influenced by multiple factors, including ACS type, site characteristics and region (all p≤0.05). Conclusions In this large-scale, real-life study, findings were generally in line with clinical logic, although site characteristics and region still significantly affected resource use. Moreover, and unexpectedly, resource use tended to be slightly higher in patients without a history of CVD. Trial registration number NCT01171404 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:27127635

  15. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  16. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Intravenous Hydroxocobalamin Versus Whole Blood Transfusion Compared to No Treatment for Class III Hemorrhagic Shock Resuscitation in a Prehospital Swine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Drug Administration (FDA) for treat- ment of cyanide toxicity after efficacy was documented both in animal studies and in human case series in Europe...10 Hydroxocobalamin has been shown to effec- tively increase blood pressure in cyanide -induced car- diac arrest and endotoxin-induced hypotension.11–13...In previous studies examining the efficacy of hydroxoco- balamin to treat cyanide toxicity in a swine model of acute severe cyanide toxicity, it also

  17. Is Heart Period Variability Associated with the Administration of Lifesaving Interventions in Individual Prehospital Trauma Patients with Normal Standard Vital Signs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    an underlying traumatic injury and associated pain but also due to other stimuli potentially associated with the trauma setting, such as anxiety...Electronic evaluation of the fetal heart rate VIII. Patterns preceding fetal death, further observations. Am J Obstet Gy- necol 1963; 87:814–826 3...Haddad GG: Heart rate control in normal and aborted -SIDS in- fants. Am J Physiol 1993; 264:R638–R646 38. Peng CK, Havlin S, Stanley HE, et al: Quan

  18. Computer Support of Hemoglobin and Blood Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-21

    the interstitium and be taken up by the cells. Hypertonic saline solutions, now under study, act similarly but with a shorter half-time, 5-10 minutes...10 Hypertonicity and Hemorrhage................11 Toploading . . .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. ... ... 12 DISCUSSION...DBBF Reperfusion with Treatment of Hypertonicity . . . .. .. .. ... ... .. ... ... 19 5. Comparison of DBBF Reperfusion with Treatment of Hemorrhage

  19. Medicine in the heart of the Antarctic: 1908–2001

    PubMed Central

    Guly, H

    2002-01-01

    Prehospital care in the United Kingdom rarely lasts more than a few hours other than in exceptional circumstances (for example, mountain and cave rescue, oil rigs). In other parts of the world hospitals may be much more distant and in expeditions to remote areas, prehospital care may extend to days or even weeks. When this occurs, the boundaries between primary care and prehospital care blur. PMID:12101139

  20. Ektacytometry: Instrumentation and Applications in Red Blood Cell Preservation Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-10

    that it was necessary to maintain an isotonic environment, since the red blood cells respond differently to shear stress under hypertonic or...the red blood cells respond differently to shear stress under hypertonic or hypotonic conditions. The most unexpected observation was an absence of...required to compare samples analyzed the same day. 2. Treatment of Human Red Blood Cells With Hypotonic and Hypertonic Solutions and Glutaraldehyde

  1. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Logistic constraints on combat casualty care preclude traditional resuscitation strategies which can require volumes and weights 3 fold or greater than hemorrhaged volume. We present a review of quantitative analyses of clinical and animal data on small volume strategies using 1) hypertonic-hyperosmotic solutions (HHS); 2) hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and 3) closed-loop infusion regimens.Methods and Results: Literature searches and recent queries to industry and academic researchers have allowed us to evaluate the record of 81 human HHS studies (12 trauma trials), 19 human HBOCs studies (3trauma trials) and two clinical studies of closed-loop resuscitation.There are several hundreds animal studies and at least 82 clinical trials and reports evaluating small volume7.2%-7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) most often combined with colloids, e.g., dextran (HSD) or hetastarch(HSS). HSD and HSS data has been published for 1,108 and 392 patients, respectively. Human studies have documented volume sparing and hemodynamic improvements. Meta-analyses suggest improved survival for hypotensive trauma patients treated with HSD with significant reductions in mortality found for patients with blood pressure < 70 mmHg, head trauma, and penetrating injury requiring surgery. HSD and HSS have received regulatory approval in 14 and 3 countries, respectively, with 81,000+ units sold. The primary reported use was head injury and trauma resuscitation. Complications and reported adverse events are surprisingly rare and not significantly different from other solutions.HBOCs are potent volume expanders in addition to oxygen carriers with volume expansion greater than standard colloids. Several investigators have evaluated small volume hyperoncotic HBOCs or HS-HBOC formulations for hypotensive and normotensive resuscitation in animals. A consistent finding in resuscitation with HBOCs is depressed cardiac output. There is some evidence that HBOCs more efficiently unload

  2. The State of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Dixon, Julia M; Sefa, Nana; Yancey, Arthur; Hollong, Bonaventure G; Hagahmed, Mohamed; Ginde, Adit A; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-02-23

    Introduction Little is known about the existence, distribution, and characteristics of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa, or the corresponding epidemiology of prehospital illness and injury.

  3. Long Term Effects of Soft Splints on Stroke Patients and Patients With Disorders of Consciousness

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-29

    Brain Injuries; Disorder of Consciousness; Stroke; Spasticity as Sequela of Stroke; Contracture; Hypertonic Disorder; Central Nervous System Diseases; Pathologic Processes; Craniocerebral Trauma; Trauma, Nervous System; Neurocognitive Disorders

  4. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) - One Year Later: A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area-Afghanistan (CJOA-A)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    another location, a unit company grade commander would not allow medics to carry morphine outside the COP because “they are close enough to the aid...routinely issued and available to medics on patrol. 5. There are no published evidence-based studies regarding morphine intramuscular injection for...trauma patients. Morphine is NOT a recom- mended battlefield analgesic in the TCCC Guidelines. 6. Represents the use of non-TCCC Guideline systemic

  5. Emergency Tourniquets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    for prehospital care. The appropriate guidelines for military tourniquet use are outlined in the Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support ( PHTLS ) Manual: Mil...ation of the US Army one-handed tourniquet. Mil Med 2005; 170:776–781. 8. PHTLS : Basic and advanced prehospital trauma life support; mil- itary edition

  6. Needle versus Tube Thoracostomy in a Swine Model of Traumatic Tension Hemopneumothorax

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    hospital Trauma Life Support ( PHTLS ) training manual currently recommends NT.3 Based on current com- bat epidemiology, basic U.S. Army prehospital medi...Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. PHTLS : Prehospital Life Support: Military Version. 6th ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby, 2007. 4. Barton ED, Epperson

  7. A Special Report on the Chitosan-Based Hemostatic Dressing: Experience in Current Combat Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    high likelihood of failure with standard tech- niques. The use of this dressing is a standard component of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support ( PHTLS ...National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. PHTLS Basic and Advanced Prehospital Trauma Life Support. St. Louis: Mosby, 2003. 6. Alam HB, Chen Z

  8. Damage Control Resuscitation: Directly Addressing the Early Coagulopathy of Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    based resuscitation guidelines in prehospital trauma life sup- port ( PHTLS ) and advanced trauma life support (ATLS) may worsen the presenting acidosis and...eds. PHTLS Basic and Advanced Prehospital Trauma Life Support: Military Edition. 6th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2006. 56. Martini WZ, Pusateri AE

  9. Effects of changes in osmolarity on isolated human airways.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, R C; De Jongste, J C; Raatgeep, R C; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1990-04-01

    The effects of hypo- and hyperosmolarity on the function of isolated human airways were studied. Changes in osmolarity induced an increasing bronchoconstriction that was proportional to the magnitude of the change in osmolarity. Hypertonicity-induced airway narrowing resulted when buffer was made hypertonic with sodium chloride or mannitol but not with urea. The airways showed no tachyphylaxis to repetitive exposure to hypo- and hypertonic buffer of 200 and 600 mosM, respectively. The bronchoconstriction was not secondary to stimulation of H1 or leukotriene C4/D4 receptors or the release of prostaglandins in the preparation. The bronchoconstriction in hypotonic buffer was totally dependent on extracellular calcium, whereas in hypertonic buffer the bronchoconstriction seemed partially dependent on intracellular calcium release. Isoprenaline prevented the bronchoconstriction in hyper- or hypotonic buffer of 450 and 250 mosM but not in buffer of 600 and 150 mosM. It is concluded that hypo- and hypertonic buffers lead to bronchoconstriction via different mechanisms, which relate to influx of extracellular calcium in hyposmolar buffer and probably to release of calcium from intracellular stores in hypertonic buffer. In strongly hypertonic buffer, part of the bronchoconstriction may be due to osmotic shrinkage. The relevance of our data for the mechanism of bronchoconstriction after inhalation of hypo- or hypertonic saline depends on whether changes in osmolarity around the airway smooth muscle occur in asthmatics but not in normal subjects, and this has not yet been established.

  10. Parallel effects of freezing and osmotic stress on the ATPase activity and protein composition of the plasma membrane of winter rye seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Matsuo; Steponkus, P.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of freezing versus hypertonic stress on the ATPase activity and polypeptide profile of the plasma membrane of nonacclimated winter rye leaves (Secale cereale L. cv Puma). Exposure of leaves to hypertonic sorbitol solutions resulted in a similar extent of injury as did freezing to subzero temperatures that resulted in equivalent osmotic stresses. When isolated with a two-phase partition system of aqueous polymers, the plasma membrane fractions of control, frozen, or hypertonically stressed leaves were of similar purity as judged by the distribution of marker enzyme activities. When assayed in the presence of Triton X-100 (0.05% w/w), ATPase activity was decreased only slightly in plasma membrane fractions isolated from either frozen or hypertonically stressed leaves. In contrast, the specific ATPase activity of the plasma membrane fractions assayed in the absence of Triton X-100 increased following freezing or hypertonic stress. As a result, the Triton X-100 stimulation of the ATPase activity decreased significantly from sixfold in control leaves to threefold in lethally stressed leaves and reflects an increase in the permeability of the plasma membrane vesicles. The increased permeability was also manifested as a decrease in H{sup +}-transport following exposure to freezing or hypertonic stress. Both freezing and hypertonic exposure at subzero temperatures altered the polypeptide profile of the plasma membrane, but with the exception of one polypeptide, there was no difference between the two treatments.

  11. Characterization of the Proteostasis Roles of Glycerol Accumulation, Protein Degradation and Protein Synthesis during Osmotic Stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Choung-Hee Lee, Elaine; Deonarine, Andrew; Strange, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of C. elegans to hypertonic stress-induced water loss causes rapid and widespread cellular protein damage. Survival in hypertonic environments depends critically on the ability of worm cells to detect and degrade misfolded and aggregated proteins. Acclimation of C. elegans to mild hypertonic stress suppresses protein damage and increases survival under more extreme hypertonic conditions. Suppression of protein damage in acclimated worms could be due to 1) accumulation of the chemical chaperone glycerol, 2) upregulation of protein degradation activity, and/or 3) increases in molecular chaperoning capacity of the cell. Glycerol and other chemical chaperones are widely thought to protect proteins from hypertonicity-induced damage. However, protein damage is unaffected by gene mutations that inhibit glycerol accumulation or that cause dramatic constitutive elevation of glycerol levels. Pharmacological or RNAi inhibition of proteasome and lyosome function and measurements of cellular protein degradation activity demonstrated that upregulation of protein degradation mechanisms plays no role in acclimation. Thus, changes in molecular chaperone capacity must be responsible for suppressing protein damage in acclimated worms. Transcriptional changes in chaperone expression have not been detected in C. elegans exposed to hypertonic stress. However, acclimation to mild hypertonicity inhibits protein synthesis 50–70%, which is expected to increase chaperone availability for coping with damage to existing proteins. Consistent with this idea, we found that RNAi silencing of essential translational components or acute exposure to cycloheximide results in a 50–80% suppression of hypertonicity-induced aggregation of polyglutamine-YFP (Q35::YFP). Dietary changes that increase protein production also increase Q35::YFP aggregation 70–180%. Our results demonstrate directly for the first time that inhibition of protein translation protects extant proteins from damage

  12. EMS Systems in Lower-Middle Income Countries: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Suryanto; Plummer, Virginia; Boyle, Malcolm

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Prehospital care is one of the many issues that require addressing by lower-middle income countries (LMICs) where approximately 90% of global injuries occur. This may arise from more traffic in LMICs, poor road conditions, lack of public awareness of the importance of road safety, and the lack of ability to provide first aid to the victims. However, prehospital care in LMICs remains underdeveloped. Problem There is insufficient evidence regarding the development of prehospital care among LMICs. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the status of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in these countries.

  13. Crush injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Klimke A, Furin M. Prehospital immobilization. In: Roberts JR, Hedges JR, eds. Clinical Procedures in Emergency ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  14. Determining the Cellular Concentration and Osmotic Potential of Plant Tissues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ric; McFeeley, James C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment used to demonstrate the relationship among hypertonic, hypotonic, and isotonic solutions and provides and open-ended research opportunity for additional individual investigation by students. (Author/MA)

  15. Bullous Keratopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cloudy cornea with blisters on the surface. Treatment Salty eye drops Drugs to lower pressure in the ... and treatment—surgical and nonsurgical—of eye disorders). Salty eye drops (hypertonic saline) and salty ointments are ...

  16. Water intoxication and hyponatraemic convulsions in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Vanapruks, V; Prapaitrakul, K

    1989-01-01

    We studied two neonates fed diluted formula and excessive water who developed hyponatraemic convulsions; treatment included intravenous hypertonic saline and water restriction. Educating mothers is important to stop recurrences. PMID:2730130

  17. Automated Prediction of Early Blood Transfusion and Mortality in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    life-threatening injury or illness without available prehospital VSs. To avoid potential confusion with neurogenic shock, cervical spine injury patients...3 PPG features included the 25th percentile and 75th percentile of the PPG amplitude and the PPG amplitude interquartile range (25thY75th percentile...specificity of prediction are shown in Tables 1 to 3. Group 1 (prehospital HR only) AUROC for all post- admission time intervals ranged from 0.56 to

  18. Journal of Special Operations Medicine. Volume 5, Edition 4, Fall 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    to subscribe to the JSOM. We are working with the JSOU to have a SOCOM-SG medical site; we will keep you posted as that progresses. 5) The JSOM can... post exposure prophy- laxis in the remote prehospital environment. Prehospital Emergency Care. 6(2):232-235, April/May/June 2002. 42. Lee IK...antiparasitic agent, even for high risk expo- sures. The urge to empirically treat a presumed para- sitic infection in cases of chronic, post

  19. Osmotic tolerance of avian spermatozoa: Influence of time, temperature, cryoprotectant and membrane ion pump function on sperm viability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanco, J.M.; Long, J.A.; Gee, G.; Donoghue, A.M.; Wildt, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Potential factors influencing sperm survival under hypertonic conditions were evaluated in the Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) and turkey (Meleagridis gallopavo). Sperm osmotolerance (300-3000 mOsm/kg) was evaluated after: (1) equilibration times of 2, 10, 45 and 60 min at 4 ?C versus 21 ?C; (2) pre-equilibrating with dimethylacetamide (DMA) or dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) at either 4 ?C or 21 ?C; and (3) inhibition of the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ionic pumps. Sperm viability was assessed using the eosin-nigrosin live/dead stain. Species-specific differences occurred in response to hypertonic conditions with crane sperm remaining viable under extreme hypertonicity (3000 mOsm/kg), whereas turkey sperm viability was compromised with only slightly hypertonic (500 mOsm/kg) conditions. The timing of spermolysis under hypertonic conditions was also species-specific, with a shorter interval for turkey (2 min) than crane (10 min) sperm. Turkey sperm osmotolerance was slightly improved by lowering the incubation temperature from 21 to 4 ?C. Pre-equilibrating sperm with DMA reduced the incidence of hypertonic spermolysis only in the crane, at both room and refrigeration temperature. Inhibiting the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ion pumps did not impair resistance of crane and turkey spermatozoa to hypertonic stress; pump inhibition actually increased turkey sperm survival compared to control sperm. Results demonstrate marked species specificity in osmotolerance between crane and turkey sperm, as well as in the way temperature and time of exposure affect sperm survival under hypertonic conditions. Differences are independent of the role of osmotic pumps in these species.

  20. Temperature responses to infusion of electrolytes during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Brzezinska, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Past studies on the influence of various metal ions on heat regulation in mammals are reviewed, and results of a study on the effect of Na and citrate in isotonic and hypertonic concentrations on temperature elevation during exercise in dogs are presented. Hypertonic administration of Na before or during treadmill running and dosis of citrate during treadmill running significantly raised core temperature over controls and isotonic cases. Thus the higher the plasma Na-osmotic concentration, the greater the inhibition of heat dissipation.