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Sample records for prehospital hypertonic resuscitation-head

  1. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    PubMed Central

    Dubick, Michael A; Shek, Pang; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials. PMID:23778489

  2. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities.

  3. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    PubMed

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. PMID:22968983

  4. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  5. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  6. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  7. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  8. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  9. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  10. Imaging of prehospital stroke therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle P; Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant quality improvement efforts to streamline in-hospital acute stroke care in the conventional model, there remain inherent layers of treatment delays, which could be eliminated with prehospital diagnostics and therapeutics administered in a mobile stroke unit. Early diagnosis using Telestroke and neuroimaging while in the ambulance may enable targeted routing to hospitals with specialized care, which will likely improve patient outcomes. Key clinical trials in Telestroke, mobile stroke units with prehospital neuroimaging capability, prehospital ultrasound and co-administration of various classes of neuroprotectives, antiplatelets and antithrombin agents with intravenous thrombolysis are discussed in this article. PMID:26308602

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models. PMID:26437974

  12. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-10-05

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models.

  13. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  14. Hypertonic Saline Dextran Ameliorates Organ Damage in Beagle Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    You, Guo-xing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Gan; Wang, Quan; Zhang, Xi-gang; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong; He, Yue-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of hypertonic saline with 6% Dextran-70 (HSD) resuscitation on organ damage and the resuscitation efficiency of the combination of HSD and lactated ringers (LR) in a model of hemorrhage shock in dogs. Methods Beagles were bled to hold their mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 50±5 mmHg for 1 h. After hemorrhage, beagles were divided into three groups (n = 7) to receive pre-hospital resuscitation for 1 h (R1): HSD (4 ml/kg), LR (40 ml/kg), and HSD+LR (a combination of 4 ml/kg HSD and 40 ml/kg LR). Next, LR was transfused into all groups as in-hospital resuscitation (R2). After two hours of observation (R3), autologous blood was transfused. Hemodynamic responses and systemic oxygenation were measured at predetermined phases. Three days after resuscitation, the animals were sacrificed and tissues including kidney, lung, liver and intestinal were obtained for pathological analysis. Results Although the initial resuscitation with HSD was shown to be faster than LR with regard to an ascending MAP, the HSD group showed a similar hemodynamic performance compared to the LR group throughout the experiment. Compared with the LR group, the systemic oxygenation performance in the HSD group was similar but showed a lower venous-to-arterial CO2 gradient (Pv-aCO2) at R3 (p < 0.05). Additionally, the histology score of the kidneys, lungs and liver were significantly lower in the HSD group than in the LR group (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a superior hemodynamic response but higher extravascular lung water (EVLW) and lower arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) than the other groups (p < 0.05). The HSD+LR group showed a marginally improved systemic oxygenation performance and lower histology score than other groups. Conclusions Resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock with a bolus of HSD showed a similar hemodynamic response compared with LR at ten times the volume of HSD, but HSD showed superior efficacy in organ protection

  15. Pathophysiology of pelvic floor hypertonic disorders.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    The pelvic floor represents the neuromuscular unit that provides support and functional control for the pelvic viscera. Its integrity, both anatomic and functional, is the key in some of the basic functions of life: storage of urine and feces, evacuation of urine and feces, support of pelvic organs, and sexual function. When this integrity is compromised, the results lead to many of the problems seen by clinicians. Pelvic floor dysfunction can involve weakness and result in stress incontinence, fecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic floor dysfunction can also involve the development of hypertonic, dysfunctional muscles. This article discusses the pathophysiology of hypertonic disorders that often result in elimination problems, chronic pelvic pain, and bladder disorders that include bladder pain syndromes, retention, and incontinence. The hypertonic disorders are very common and are often not considered in the evaluation and management of patients with these problems.

  16. Small volume hypertonic resuscitation of circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Rocha-e-Silva, Mauricio; Poli de Figueiredo, Luiz F

    2005-04-01

    Small volume hypertonic resuscitation is a relatively new conceptual approach to shock therapy. It was originally based on the idea that a relatively large blood volume expansion could be obtained by administering a relatively small volume of fluid, taking advantage of osmosis. It was soon realized that the physiological vasodilator property of hypertonicity was a useful byproduct of small volume resuscitation in that it induced reperfusion of previously ischemic territories, even though such an effect encroached upon the malefic effects of the ischemia-reperfusion process. Subsequent research disclosed a number of previously unsuspected properties of hypertonic resuscitation, amongst them the correction of endothelial and red cell edema with significant consequences in terms of capillary blood flow. A whole set of actions of hypertonicity upon the immune system are being gradually uncovered, but the full implication of these observations with regard to the clinical scenario are still under study. Small volume resuscitation for shock is in current clinical use in some parts of the world, in spite of objections raised concerning its safety under conditions of uncontrolled bleeding. These objections stem mainly from experimental studies, but there are few signs that they may be of real clinical significance. This review attempts to cover the earlier and the more recent developments in this field. PMID:15880253

  17. Innovation possibilities for prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Galli, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The national interest in disaster management and a burgeoning technology field are leading to the development of new approaches to emergency evaluation, triage, and treatment in prehospital and all hospital arenas. The ability to bring "hands-on" expertise, both physically and technologically, as quickly as possible to the trauma patient brings the potential for real advancement in the field. This descriptive report presents several such concepts that are moving into reality.

  18. Pelvic floor hypertonic disorders: identification and management.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    Patients with hypertonic pelvic floor disorders can present with pelvic pain or dysfunction. Each of the various syndromes will be discussed including elimination disorders, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), vulvodynia, vaginismus, and chronic pelvic pain. The symptoms and objective findings on physical examination and various diagnostic studies will be reviewed. Therapeutic options including physical therapy, pharmacologic management, and trigger point injections, as well as botulinum toxin injections will be reviewed in detail.

  19. Prehospital Burn Care for Emergency Medical Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Robert A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development, objectives, content, and evaluation of a unique, 60-minute, synchronized slide/tape program on prehospital burn care for emergency medical technicians; and presents a design for valid content-reference formative evaluation. (Author/VT)

  20. Hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: worth its salt?

    PubMed

    Goralski, Jennifer L; Donaldson, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Airway dehydration in cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to chronic inflammation, ongoing infection and progressive lung disease. Restoration of airway hydration by inhalation of an osmotic agent (hypertonic saline) has been shown to be safe, effective and well-tolerated in adults with CF. Although the safety of hypertonic saline in infants and young children with CF has also been established, recent studies have reported inconclusive evidence about its efficacy. In this editorial, we discuss the evidence behind hypertonic saline use for adults, children and infants with CF.

  1. Prehospital management of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Stiver, Shirley I; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current protocols of prehospital practice and their impact on outcome in the management of traumatic brain injury. A literature review of the National Library of Medicine encompassing the years 1980 to May 2008 was performed. The primary impact of a head injury sets in motion a cascade of secondary events that can worsen neurological injury and outcome. The goals of care during prehospital triage, stabilization, and transport are to recognize life-threatening raised intracranial pressure and to circumvent cerebral herniation. In that process, prevention of secondary injury and secondary insults is a major determinant of both short- and longterm outcome. Management of brain oxygenation, blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and raised intracranial pressure in the prehospital setting are discussed. Patient outcomes are dependent upon an organized trauma response system. Dispatch and transport timing, field stabilization, modes of transport, and destination levels of care are addressed. In addition, special considerations for mass casualty and disaster planning are outlined and recommendations are made regarding early response efforts and the ethical impact of aggressive prehospital resuscitation. The most sophisticated of emergency, operative, or intensive care units cannot reverse damage that has been set in motion by suboptimal protocols of triage and resuscitation, either at the injury scene or en route to the hospital. The quality of prehospital care is a major determinant of long-term outcome for patients with traumatic brain injury.

  2. The prehospital management of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Scott A; Rojanasarntikul, Dhanadol; Jagoda, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of death and disability, particularly in younger populations. The prehospital evaluation and management of TBI is a vital link between insult and definitive care and can have dramatic implications for subsequent morbidity. Following a TBI the brain is at high risk for further ischemic injury, with prehospital interventions targeted at reducing this secondary injury while optimizing cerebral physiology. In the following chapter we discuss the prehospital assessment and management of the brain-injured patient. The initial evaluation and physical examination are discussed with a focus on interpretation of specific physical examination findings and interpretation of vital signs. We evaluate patient management strategies including indications for advanced airway management, oxygenation, ventilation, and fluid resuscitation, as well as prehospital strategies for the management of suspected or impending cerebral herniation including hyperventilation and brain-directed hyperosmolar therapy. Transport decisions including the role of triage models and trauma centers are discussed. Finally, future directions in the prehospital management of traumatic brain injury are explored.

  3. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance.

  4. Hypertonic Dextrose Injection for The Treatment of a Baker's Cyst.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Ferdi; Kibar, Sibel; Balaban, Birol

    2016-02-01

    We present extremely rare and interesting case of a Baker's cyst treated with hypertonic dextrose injection. A 54-year-old female patient had a Baker's cyst which was diagnosed by an ultrasonography. After the failure of the two-weekly conservative treatment, we injected hypertonic dextrose (25%) into her right knee joint for the treatment of a Baker's cyst. Two weeks after the injection, the patient reported improvement in posterior knee pain, and an US showed a resolution of the posterior knee cyst. Certainly hypertonic dextrose injection for the treatment of a Baker's cyst appears to be a reasonable treatment option. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the efficacy of hypertonic dextrose injection in the treatment of Baker's cysts.

  5. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Huabing; Lu, Huizhi

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran) after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  6. Commercial filming of prehospital patient care

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, P D; Henning, J D

    2007-01-01

    Commercial filming of patients in the hospital and now the prehospital environment is becoming increasingly common. Television programmes that focus on medical emergencies with real footage of events remain highly successful and can make compelling viewing for both medical professionals and the general public alike. Recently several commentators have questioned the ethical aspects of filming in hospital emergency departments, and noted the lack of available evidence. This article reviews commercial filming and its impact in the prehospital environment and examines the ethical implications and current guidance in this unique setting. PMID:18029523

  7. Drug uptake into everted intestinal sacs. I. Enhancement by hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, A; Gutman, Y

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of the cationic drugs, pralidoxime (PAM) and tetraethylammonium, and anionic ampicillin from the mucosal-to-serosal sides of everted rat jejunal sacs is enhanced by mucosal hypertonicity. PAM uptake, which is proportional to initial mucosal concentrations up to 2.3 mM, is enhanced by mucosal hypertonicity due to addition of sodium, potassium, lithium and choline chloride, sodium sulfate, and the nonionic solutes, urea, sucrose, and mannitol. Bicarbonate, Tris, or phosphate buffer and the presence of magnesium and calcium do not affect this hypertonicity-induced acceleration of PAM passage. Serosal osmolality has no effect on transfer and mucosal hypertonicity is equally effective in the presence and absence of a transmural osmotic gradient. This observation and minimal changes in the concentration of inulin placed in the sacs suggest that fluid shifts and solvent drag are not responsible for the enhanced mucosal-to-serosal transfer of PAM from hypertonic buffer. Mucosal hypertonicity at 450 mosmol/kg causes reversible enhancement of PAM transfer, whereas the effect of 600 mosmol/kg cannot be reversed by replacing the tissue in isotonic buffer. The effect of osmotic manipulation on PAM transfer across the intestine thus differs from its effect on the passage of other ionized species and drugs across other epithelia. PMID:434150

  8. Rat supraoptic neurones: the effects of locally applied hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Leng, G

    1980-07-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from supraoptic neurones in lactating, urethane-anaesthetized rats. A microtap was used to apply a very small volume (about 10(-7) ml.) of hypertonic saline (1-4 M-NaCl) to the immediate neighbourhood of these units over about 1 min.2. Twenty-five of twenty-seven supraoptic neurones were excited by this local osmotic stimulus. The response of individual units was reversible and repeatable. Microtap applications of isotonic saline to supraoptic neurones were without observed effect.3. Continuously firing supraoptic neurones responded to hypertonic saline with a smooth acceleration in firing rate. Phasic neurones showed an increase in the over-all level of activity, and in particular, a prolongation of the active phases. Slow, irregularly firing cells responded either with a smooth acceleration in firing rate, or with phasic behaviour.4. The response to local hypertonic saline appears to be reasonably specific to the supraoptic nucleus. Of thirty-five neurones recorded close to the supraoptic nucleus but which were not antidromically activated from stimulation of the neural stalk, only nine responded to the local application of hypertonic saline.5. Similarities between the manner of response of supraoptic neurones to local application of hypertonic saline and the manner of their response to systemic increases in the osmotic pressure of blood plasma support the hypothesis that supraoptic neurones are osmosensitive. PMID:7441542

  9. Hypertonicity augments bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Namie; Higure, Yoko; Mashiyama, Kazunori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2012-06-01

    The tonicity of taste stimulating solutions has been usually ignored, though taste substances themselves yielded the tonicity. We investigated the effect of hypertonicity on bullfrog taste nerve responses to inorganic salts by adding nonelectrolytes such as urea and sucrose that elicited no taste nerve responses. Here, we show that hypertonicity alters bullfrog taste nerve-response magnitude and firing pattern. The addition of urea or sucrose enhances the taste nerve-response magnitude to NaCl and shifts the concentration-response curve to the left. The effect of hypertonicity on responses to CaCl(2) is bimodal; hypertonicity suppresses CaCl(2) responses at concentrations less than ~30 mM and enhances them at concentrations greater than ~30 mM. The hypertonicity also enhances response magnitude to other monovalent salts. The extent of the enhancing effects depends on the difference between the mobility of the cation and anion in the salt. We quantitatively suggest that both the enhancing and suppressing effects result from the magnitude and direction of local circuit currents generated by diffusion potentials across tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells. PMID:22422087

  10. Hypertonic resuscitation after severe injury: is it of benefit?

    PubMed

    Bulger, Eileen M; Hoyt, David B

    2012-01-01

    There is a wealth of preclinical data suggesting potential benefit from the administration of hypertonic solutions after severe injury with hypovolemic shock, including improved tissue perfusion, improved flow through the microcirculation, and modulation of the inflammatory response, which may mitigate subsequent organ failure. However, despite these potential advantages, clinical trials of hypertonic resuscitation early after injury have failed to demonstrate significant benefit for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock, and although there is no difference in overall mortality, there appears to be a trend toward earlier mortality among those receiving hypertonic fluids. Likewise, for TBI there are data suggesting that hypertonic fluids should support cerebral perfusion and mitigate intracranial hypertension, yet the clinical trials of early administration to these patients have also failed to show benefit. Further study is warranted in this patient population, as a longer period of hypertonicity may be required to show a clinical effect. Assessment of long-term neurologic outcome in this patient population remains the gold standard in determining benefit.

  11. Hypertonic saline in elevated intracranial pressure: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Surani, Salim; Lockwood, Geoff; Macias, Melissa Y; Guntupalli, Bharat; Varon, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic Saline (HS) has been a proven and effective therapy and a safe alternative to mannitol in patients with increase intracranial pressure (ICP). We hereby present a case of 25-year-old women with intracranial bleed secondary to right parietal arteriovenous malformation. Patient underwent surgery for evacuation of hematoma and resection of arteriovenous malformation. Post- operative course was complicated by recurrent episodes of elevated ICP. She received total of 17 doses of 23.4% HS and 30 doses of mannitol with good outcome. Despite reluctance from some clinicians to use HS, hypertonic saline seems to be a safe and effective therapy.

  12. Prehospital ACLS--does it work?

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Alok; Mehrotra, Avanti; Gupta, Anoop K; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2002-11-01

    Cardiac disease is the most common cause of death in the United States, and sudden cardiac arrest frequently claims the lives of men and women during their most productive years. It is believed that much better survival rates can be achieved for victims of cardiac arrest through optimizing the "chain of survival" as described by the American Heart Association. The relative and incremental benefit of full prehospital ACLS over basic life support and defibrillation is unproven, however. This is an important issue in this era of cost containment. Some of the ongoing studies including the OPALS study may clarify the cost effectiveness and relative efficacy of rapid defibrillation and full ACLS programs for victims of prehospital cardiac arrest [6].

  13. Prehospital airway management: A prospective case study.

    PubMed

    Wilbers, N E R; Hamaekers, A E W; Jansen, J; Wijering, S C; Thomas, O; Wilbers-van Rens, R; van Zundert, A A J

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a one-year prospective study involving a prehospital Emergency Medical Service in the Netherlands to investigate the incidence of failed or difficult prehospital endotracheal intubation. During the study period the paramedics were asked to fill in a registration questionnaire after every endotracheal intubation. Of the 26,271 patient contacts, 256 endotracheal intubations were performed by paramedics in one year. Endotracheal intubation failed in 12 patients (4.8%). In 12.0% of 249 patients, a Cormack and Lehane grade III laryngoscopy was reported and a grade IV laryngoscopy was reported in 10.4%. The average number of endotracheal intubations per paramedic in one year was 4.2 and varied from zero to a maximum of 12. The median time between arrival on the scene and a positive capnograph was 7 min.38 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade I laryngoscopy and 14 min.58 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade 4 laryngoscopy. The incidence of endotracheal intubations performed by Dutch paramedics in one year was low, but endotracheal intubation was successful in 95.2%, which is comparable with findings in international literature. Early capnography should be used consistently in prehospital airway management. PMID:21612142

  14. Phosphoinositolphosphate (PIP) cascade induction by hypertonic stress of plant tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Jacoby, B. )

    1989-04-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) was determined by competition with ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 3} for binding to an IP{sub 3} specific protein. A hypertonic mannitol, sorbitol or lactose shock induced an increase in the rate of K{sup +} uptake and raised the IP{sub 3} content of Beta vulgaris slices, excised Vigna mungo and Sorghum bicolor roots, as well as attached V. mungo roots. Increased K{sup +} uptake could also be induced by compounds that artificially induce the PIP cascade, or mimic it's products. A hypertonic shock, administered to intact B. vulgaris slices, further enhanced the phosphorylation of a 20 kD protein in the plasmalemma. Maximal IP{sub 3} content was found 10 min after hypertonic induction and maximal K{sup +} uptake was obtained 10 min later. The effect of a continuous hypertonic treatment on IP{sub 3} content, but not on K{sup +} uptake, was transient. Li{sup +} decreased the rate of IP{sub 3} metabolism.

  15. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients §...

  16. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients §...

  17. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients §...

  18. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients §...

  19. 21 CFR 349.16 - Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic hypertonicity agent. 349.16 Section 349.16 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE OPHTHALMIC DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients §...

  20. Pre-hospital spinal immobilisation: an initial consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Connor, D; Greaves, I; Porter, K; Bloch, M

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews the current evidence available on the practice of spinal immobilisation in the prehospital environment. Following this, initial conclusions from a consensus meeting held by the Faculty of Pre-hospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in March 2012 are presented.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Prehospital Diltiazem

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Jeffrey H.; Walsh, Brian; Yasbin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Very few studies exist on the use of diltiazem in the prehospital setting. Some practitioners believe this medication is prone to causing hypotension in this setting. Our goals were to determine whether the prehospital administration of diltiazem induced hypotension and to evaluate the efficacy of the drug. Methods: Our two-tiered system is located in a suburban region of New Jersey with advanced life support (ALS) care provided by fly-car units. The ALS units do not transport patients, and all of them are hospital based. The ALS providers are employed by the hospital system. In New Jersey, all ALS care requires online medical control, including the administration of diltiazem. We retrospectively reviewed patient care records for those who were believed to be in rapid atrial fibrillation and were given diltiazem in a suburban emergeny medical services system over a 22-month period. We examined the differences between heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) on the initial evaluation and on arrival to the emergency department (ED). A hypotensive response was defined as a final systolic BP (SBP) less than 90 mmHg and a drop in SBP of at least 10 mmHg. Diltiazem was considered effective if the ED HR was <100 beats per minute (bpm) or if it decreased ≥20%. Results: During the study period, 26,979 patients were transported. Of these patients, 2,488 had a documented rhythm of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Of the 320 patients who received diltiazem, 42 patient encounters were excluded for incomplete data, yielding 278 patients for analysis. The average initial SBP was 139 mmHg and the average diastolic BP was 84 mmHg. The average diltiazem dosage was 16.7 mg. Two patients became hypotensive. The average initial HR was 154 bpm. On arrival to the ED, 33% of the patients had an HR < 100 bpm and 69% had a drop in HR ≥ 20%. The overall efficacy of prehospital diltiazem was 73%. Conclusion: In the prehospital setting, diltiazem is associated with a

  2. Controlled aquaporin-2 expression in the hypertonic environment.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Udo

    2009-04-01

    The corticomedullary osmolality gradient is the driving force for water reabsorption occurring in the kidney. In the collecting duct, this gradient allows luminal water to move across aquaporin (AQP) water channels, thereby increasing urine concentration. However, this same gradient exposes renal cells to great osmotic challenges. These cells must constantly adapt to fluctuations of environmental osmolality that challenge cell volume and incite functional change. This implies profound alterations of cell phenotype regarding water permeability. AQP2 is an essential component of the urine concentration mechanism whose controlled expression dictates apical water permeability of collecting duct principal cells. This review focuses on changes of AQP2 abundance and trafficking in hypertonicity-challenged cells. Intracellular mechanisms governing these events are discussed and the biological relevance of altered AQP2 expression by hypertonicity is outlined. PMID:19211910

  3. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  4. [Effect of hypertonic saline solution on delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, S; Ogata, H; Masawa, N

    1994-04-01

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether hypertonic saline has a preventive effect on delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Twenty gerbils were used, and after being anesthetized by inhalation of 1% halothane, both common carotid arteries were occluded for 2.5 min. The animals were injected intravenously with 2 ml/kg of 10% NaCl immediately after reperfusion, and 2 ml/kg of physiological saline solution was used in the same manner in a control group. Five days later, histopathological changes in the CA1 subfield were observed by staining with hematoxylin-eosin and examining sections of the brain under a light microscope. Degenerative or necrotic pyramidal cells exhibited cell shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis, dark staining of the cytoplasm vacuolation and disappearance of the radial striated zone. The pyramidal cell degeneration rate in a 1 mm length of CA1 subfield was 95.6 +/- 1.6% in the ischemia-reperfusion-saline group and 7.1 +/- 3.0% in ischemia-reperfusion-hypertonic saline group, and the difference was statistically significant. This study verified that hypertonic saline prevented delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of hippocampal area after ischemia-reperfusion.

  5. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF.

  6. Oral hypertonic saline causes transient fall of vasopressin in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Seckl, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.

    1986-08-01

    After dehydration, oral rehydration causes a fall in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) that precedes changes in plasma osmolality. To investigate further the stimulus for this effect, its specificity, and association with thirst, six volunteers were deprived of water for 24 h and given a salt load on two separate occasions. On each study day they then drank rapidly 10 ml/kg of either tap water or hypertonic saline (360 mosmol/kg). There was a significant fall in plasma AVP from 2.0 +/- 0.3 to 1.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/l 5 min after drinking water and from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 pmol/l after hypertonic saline. Plasma osmolality fell 30-60 min after water and was unchanged after saline. Plasma renin activity, oxytocin, and total protein all remained unchanged. All subjects reported diminished thirst after hypertonic saline. Gargling with water reduced thirst but did not affect plasma AVP. There appears to be a drinking-mediated neuroendocrine reflex that decreases plasma AVP irrespective of the osmolality of the liquid consumed. The sensation of thirst did not correlate with plasma osmolality and was not always related to plasma AVP concentration. AVP was measured by radioimmunoassay.

  7. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  8. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  9. Hypertonic challenge to porcine vocal folds: Effects on epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Erickson, Elizabeth; Rosenblatt, Mark; Branski, Ryan C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Dehydration challenges can increase the chemical composition of surface fluid overlying vocal fold epithelia (hypertonic surface fluid). The vocal fold epithelium is posited to act as a barrier, shielding the lamina propria from perturbations in the airway lumen. However, the effects of hypertonic surface fluid on the barrier functions of vocal fold epithelia have not been quantified. We, therefore, sought to investigate whether hypertonic surface fluid compromises epithelial barrier function. We examined the effects of hypertonic surface fluid on vocal fold epithelial resistance, paracellular pathway morphology, and tight junction protein integrity. Study Design Ex vivo, between group design. Setting Laboratory. Methods Porcine vocal folds (n = 24) were exposed to hypertonic or isotonic challenge and examined by electrophysiology, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analyses. Results Hypertonic, but not isotonic, challenge significantly reduced transepithelial resistance. This decrease in resistance was observed immediately after the challenge and was consistent with the appearance of dilated paracellular pathway morphology. However, hypertonic challenge did not alter protein levels of occludin, zona occludens-1, E-cadherin, or β-catenin. Conclusion Hypertonic surface fluid alters epithelial barrier function in the vocal folds. Specifically, exposure to hypertonic challenges increases epithelial permeability. Given the important role of the vocal fold epithelium in shielding the underlying mucosa from inhaled pathogens and pollutants, our data provide the impetus for future studies on pharmacological treatments aimed at restoring the hydration level and chemical composition of vocal fold surface fluid. PMID:20096227

  10. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  11. Current pre-hospital traumatic brain injury management in China

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Kou; Hou, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jian-dong; Chu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with most trauma-related deaths. Secondary brain injury is the leading cause of in-hospital deaths after traumatic brain injury. By early prevention and slowing of the initial pathophysiological mechanism of secondary brain injury, pre-hospital service can significantly reduce case-fatality rates of TBI. In China, the incidence of TBI is increasing and the proportion of severe TBI is much higher than that in other countries. The objective of this paper is to review the pre-hospital management of TBI in China. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was conducted in January 2014 using the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Articles on the assessment and treatment of TBI in pre-hospital settings practiced by Chinese doctors were identified. The information on the assessment and treatment of hypoxemia, hypotension, and brain herniation was extracted from the identified articles. RESULTS: Of the 471 articles identified, 65 met the selection criteria. The existing literature indicated that current practices of pre-hospital TBI management in China were sub-optimal and varied considerably across different regions. CONCLUSION: Since pre-hospital care is the weakest part of Chinese emergency care, appropriate training programs on pre-hospital TBI management are urgently needed in China. PMID:25548596

  12. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines.

  13. Chapter 9 prehospital tourniquets: review, recommendations, and future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    The tourniquet is a simple device that has been used since the Middle Ages. Although different variations have been designed throughout its history, the simplicity of design has remained. The history of tourniquets follows two distinct paths--the operating room and the prehospital setting. From the earliest recorded history, tourniquets have been used for surgical procedures which were originally to amputate war-ravaged limbs and then to create a bloodless field for routine limb surgery. This history has continued uninterrupted since the early 1900s with continued research to foster advances in knowledge. The history of tourniquets in the prehospital setting, however, has not progressed as smoothly. The debate regarding the use of a tourniquet to save a life from excessive limb hemorrhage began in the 1600s, and continues to this day. This chapter will explore the prehospital use of tourniquets, which may shed some light on where this debate originated. The current state of the knowledge regarding tourniquets will then be discussed with a focus on prehospital use, using the operating room literature when needed to fill knowledge gaps. The chapter will conclude with recommendations for prehospital tourniquet use and some areas for future research. Tourniquets are used for operative procedures within accepted clinical guidelines throughout the world as the standard of care. Current science supports a similar stance for the use of prehospital tourniquets within clinical guidelines. PMID:25222543

  14. Inadvertent subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline solution during lipofilling.

    PubMed

    Kerfant, N; Philandrianos, C; Alliez, A; Casanova, D

    2013-08-01

    Subcutaneous infiltration with a mixture of plain saline and adrenaline is a useful option in lipoharvesting for autologous fat grafting. This report presents the case of 34-year-old woman who experienced inadvertent subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline solution during body fat harvesting. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. The Response of Duck Erythrocytes to Hypertonic Media

    PubMed Central

    Kregenow, Floyd M.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of a hypertonic bathing medium to duck erythrocytes results in an initial instantaneous phase of osmotic shrinkage and, when the [K]o of the hypertonic solution is larger than "normal," in a second, more prolonged phase, the volume regulatory phase. During the latter, which also requires extracellular Na, the cells swell until they approach their initial isotonic volume. The increase in cell volume during the volume regulatory phase is accomplished by a gain in the cell content of K, Cl, and H2O. There is also a smaller increase in the Na content of the cell. Potassium is accumulated against an electrochemical gradient and is therefore actively transported into the cell. This accumulation is associated with an increase, although dissimilar, in both K influx and efflux. Changes in cell size during the volume regulatory phase are not altered by 10-4 M ouabain, although this concentration of ouabain does change the cellular cation content. The response is independent of any effect of norepinephrine. The changes in cell size during the volume regulatory phase are discussed as the product of a volume controlling mechanism identical in principle to the one reported in the previous paper which controls cell volume in hypotonic media. Similarly, this mechanism can regulate cell size, when the Na-K exchange, ouabain-inhibitable pump mechanism is blocked. PMID:5112658

  16. Architecture of a prehospital emergency patient care report system (PEPRS).

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Stöhr, Mark R; Röhrig, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, prehospital emergency care adapted to the technology shift towards tablet computers and mobile computing. In particular, electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems gained considerable attention and adoption in prehospital emergency medicine [1]. On the other hand, hospital information systems are already widely adopted. Yet, there is no universal solution for integrating prehospital emergency reports into electronic medical records of hospital information systems. Previous projects either relied on proprietary viewing workstations or examined and transferred only data for specific diseases (e.g. stroke patients[2]). Using requirements engineering and a three step software engineering approach, this project presents a generic architecture for integrating prehospital emergency care reports into hospital information systems. Aim of this project is to describe a generic architecture which can be used to implement data transfer and integration of pre hospital emergency care reports to hospital information systems. In summary, the prototype was able to integrate data in a standardized manner. The devised methods can be used design generic software for prehospital to hospital data integration. PMID:23920925

  17. Prehospital use of plasma: the blood bankers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Hervig, Tor; Doughty, Heidi; Ness, Paul; Badloe, John F; Berseus, Olle; Glassberg, Elon; Heier, Hans E

    2014-05-01

    At the 2013 Traumatic Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network's Remote Damage Control Resuscitation symposium, a panel of senior blood bankers with both civilian and military background was invited to discuss their willingness and ability to supply prehospital plasma for resuscitation of massively bleeding casualties and to comment on the optimal preparations for such situations. Available evidence indicates that prehospital use of plasma may improve remote damage control resuscitation, although level I evidence is lacking. This practice is well established in several military services and is also being introduced in civilian settings. There are few, if any, clinical contraindications to the prehospital use of plasma, except for blood group incompatibility and the danger of transfusion-induced acute lung injury, which can be circumvented in various ways. However, the choice of plasma source, plasma preparation, and logistics including stock management require consideration. Staff training should include hemovigilance and traceability as well as recognition and management of eventual adverse effects. Prehospital use of plasma should occur within the framework of clinical algorithms and prospective clinical studies. Clinicians have an ethical responsibility to both patients and donors; therefore, the introduction of new clinical capabilities of transfusion must be safe, efficacious, and sustainable. The panel agreed that although these problems need further attention and scientific studies, now is the time for both military and civilian transfusion systems to prepare for prehospital use of plasma in massively bleeding casualties.

  18. Acute chest pain emergencies - spouses' prehospital experiences.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Quell, Robin; Sørlie, Venke

    2008-10-01

    The call to the Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre is often a person's first contact with the health-care system in cases of acute illness or injury and acute chest pain is a common reason for calling. The aim was to illuminate how spouses to persons with acute chest pain experienced the alarm situation, the emergency call and the prehospital emergency care. Interviews were conducted with nineteen spouses. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analyses. The themes responsibility and uneasiness emerged as well as an overall theme of aloneness. Being a spouse to a person in need of acute medical and nursing assistance was interpreted as "Being responsible and trying to preserve life" and "Being able to manage the uneasiness and having trust in an uncertain situation." When their partners' life was at risk the spouses were in an escalating spiral of worry, uncertainty, stress, fear of loss, feeling of loneliness and desperation. They had to manage emotional distress and felt compelled to act to preserve life, a challenging situation. PMID:18929341

  19. Theater Blood Support in the Prehospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Audra L; Corley, Jason B

    2016-01-01

    The Army Blood Program (ABP) is charged with the responsibility of supporting the Warfighter on the battlefield, in addition to meeting garrison hospital blood requirements on a daily basis. Blood support concepts developed in response to Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom combat operations are the cornerstone to maintaining current capabilities and shaping future endeavors.. The ABP is actively engaged with research, advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy for both our conventional and operational forces. The feasibility of frozen/deglycerolized red blood cell use in theater has been demonstrated. The use of Blood Group A plasma in the place of Blood Group AB plasma has been successful. Placement of cryoprecipitate at Role 2 medical facilities and the placement of blood products on MEDEVAC (Vampire Program missions) have proven invaluable in moving transfusion therapy closer to the point of Injury. The improved patient outcomes from earlier transfusion of blood products has driven the requirement for far-forward blood support. Now (more than ever), there are products and processes in place to meet the requirements for blood use in the prehospital setting. PMID:27215865

  20. Effect of extreme temperatures on drugs for prehospital ACLS.

    PubMed

    Johansen, R B; Schafer, N C; Brown, P I

    1993-09-01

    Advanced cardiac life support drugs undergo a wide range of temperature exposures in the prehospital setting. Although manufacturers place temperature restrictions for drug stability on their products, it has been shown that these limits are often exceeded in the prehospital environment. We exposed four different drugs to temperatures of -20 degrees C (-6 degrees F) and 70 degrees C (150 degrees F) and subsequently performed assays to determine their respective chemical stability compared with that of control samples. We determined that no significant difference in chemical structure occurred between the standard sample and the four drugs exposed to extreme temperatures (P > .05). This information has obvious implications in making further recommendations for drug storage. More work to determine bioactivity of temperature-exposed drugs may show results with implications for success in prehospital cardiac resuscitation.

  1. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings. PMID:26050779

  2. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Anas M; Turner, Michael R; Mager, Donald E; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-03-01

    The subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after s.c. administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyperosmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as the animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and O-phospho-L-serine (OPLS) on the plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after s.c. administration. An increase was observed in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, compared with isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to the improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph nodes in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatics, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05% in isotonic buffer to 13% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. The data suggest that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option for improving s.c. bioavailability.

  3. Effects of hypertonic buffer composition on lymph node uptake and bioavailability of rituximab, after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Turner, Michael R.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of biologics is highly desirable; however, incomplete bioavailability after sc administration remains a major challenge. In this work we investigated the effects of excipient dependent hyper-osmolarity on lymphatic uptake and plasma exposure of rituximab as a model protein. Using Swiss Webster (SW) mice as our animal model, we compared the effects of NaCl, mannitol and, O-Phospho-L-Serine (OPLS) on plasma concentration of rituximab over 5 days after sc administration. We observed an increase in plasma concentrations in animals administered rituximab in hypertonic buffer solutions, as compared to isotonic buffer. Bioavailability, as estimated by our pharmacokinetic model, increased from 29% in isotonic buffer to 54% in hypertonic buffer containing NaCl, to almost complete bioavailability in hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS or mannitol. This improvement in plasma exposure is due to improved lymphatic trafficking as evident from the increase in the fraction of dose trafficked through the lymph node in the presence of hypertonic buffers. The fraction of the dose trafficked through the lymphatic, as estimated by the model, increased from 0.05 % in isotonic buffer to 13% in hyper-tonic buffer containing NaCl to about 30% for hypertonic buffers containing high dose OPLS and mannitol. Our data suggests that hypertonic solutions may be a viable option to improve sc bioavailability. PMID:25377184

  4. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  5. Hypertonic stress induces rapid and widespread protein damage in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Burkewitz, Kris; Choe, Keith; Strange, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    Proteostasis is defined as the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain the function of all cytoplasmic proteins. We recently demonstrated that the capacity of the proteostasis network is a critical factor that defines the limits of cellular and organismal survival in hypertonic environments. The current studies were performed to determine the extent of protein damage induced by cellular water loss. Using worm strains expressing fluorescently tagged foreign and endogenous proteins and proteins with temperature-sensitive point mutations, we demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes aggregation and misfolding of diverse proteins in multiple cell types. Protein damage is rapid. Aggregation of a polyglutamine yellow fluorescent protein reporter is observable with <1 h of hypertonic stress, and aggregate volume doubles approximately every 10 min. Aggregate formation is irreversible and occurs after as little as 10 min of exposure to hypertonic conditions. To determine whether endogenous proteins are aggregated by hypertonic stress, we quantified the relative amount of total cellular protein present in detergent-insoluble extracts. Exposure for 4 h to 400 mM or 500 mM NaCl induced a 55-120% increase in endogenous protein aggregation. Inhibition of insulin signaling or acclimation to mild hypertonic stress increased survival under extreme hypertonic conditions and prevented aggregation of endogenous proteins. Our results demonstrate that hypertonic stress causes widespread and dramatic protein damage and that cells have a significant capacity to remodel the network of proteins that function to maintain proteostasis. These findings have important implications for understanding how cells cope with hypertonic stress and other protein-damaging stressors. PMID:21613604

  6. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  7. The Parkmedic Program: prehospital care in the national parks.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, T I; Knopp, R; Webster, T

    1981-03-01

    The Parkmedic Program provides training and on-going supervision of national park rangers involved in advanced prehospital medical care in Yosemite, Kings Canyon, and Sequoia National Parks in California. This includes intravenous catheterization and drug administration in emergency situations. Course structure, experience to date, and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  8. What are the effects of hypertonic saline plus furosemide in acute heart failure?

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Patricio; Rain, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Paola

    2015-08-27

    In search of new therapies to solve diuretic resistance in acute heart failure, the addition of hypertonic saline has been proposed. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews including nine pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded hypertonic saline associated with furosemide probably decrease mortality, length of hospital stay and hospital readmission in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

  9. Comparison of Normal Saline, Hypertonic Saline Albumin and Terlipressin plus Hypertonic Saline Albumin in an Infant Animal Model of Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In series of cases and animal models suffering hemorrhagic shock, the use of vasopressors has shown potential benefits regarding hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Terlipressin is an analogue of vasopressin with a longer half-life that can be administered by bolus injection. We have previously observed that hypertonic albumin improves resuscitation following controlled hemorrhage in piglets. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether the treatment with the combination of terlipressin and hypertonic albumin can produce better hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters than normal saline or hypertonic albumin alone at early stages of hemorrhagic shock in an infant animal model. Methods Experimental, randomized animal study including 39 2-to-3-month-old piglets. Thirty minutes after controlled 30 ml/kg bleed, pigs were randomized to receive either normal saline (NS) 30 ml/kg (n = 13), 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline (AHS) 15 ml/kg (n = 13) or single bolus of terlipressin 15 μg/kg i.v. plus 5% albumin plus 3% hypertonic saline 15 ml/kg (TAHS) (n = 13) over 30 minutes. Global hemodynamic and tissular perfusion parameters were compared. Results After controlled bleed a significant decrease of blood pressure, cardiac index, central venous saturation, carotid and peripheral blood flow, brain saturation and an increase of heart rate, gastric PCO2 and lactate was observed. After treatment no significant differences in most hemodynamic (cardiac index, mean arterial pressure) and perfusion parameters (lactate, gastric PCO2, brain saturation, cutaneous blood flow) were observed between the three therapeutic groups. AHS and TAHS produced higher increase in stroke volume index and carotid blood flow than NS. Conclusions In this pediatric animal model of hypovolemic shock, albumin plus hypertonic saline with or without terlipressin achieved similar hemodynamics and perfusion parameters than twice the volume of NS. Addition of terlipressin did not

  10. Prehospital and in-hospital delays in acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Evenson, K R; Rosamond, W D; Morris, D L

    2001-05-01

    Current guidelines emphasize the need for early stroke care. However, significant delays occur during both the prehospital and in-hospital phases of care, making many patients ineligible for stroke therapies. The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize the existing scientific literature reporting prehospital and in-hospital stroke delay times in order to assist future delivery of effective interventions to reduce delay time and to raise several key issues which future studies should consider. A comprehensive search was performed to find all published journal articles which reported on the prehospital or in-hospital delay time for stroke, including intervention studies. Since 1981, at least 48 unique reports of prehospital delay time for patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms were published from 17 different countries. In the majority of studies which reported median delay times, the median time from symptom onset to arrival in the emergency department was between 3 and 6 h. The in-hospital times from emergency department arrival to being seen by an emergency department physician, initiation and interpretation of a computed tomography (CT) scan, and being seen by a neurologist were consistently longer than recommended. However, prehospital delay comprised the majority of time from symptom onset to potential treatment. Definitions and methodologies differed across studies, making direct comparisons difficult. This review suggests that the majority of stroke patients are unlikely to arrive at the emergency department and receive a diagnostic evaluation in under 3 h. Further studies of stroke delay and corresponding interventions are needed, with careful attention to definitions and methodologies. PMID:11359072

  11. Are pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury preventable?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L. M.; Redmond, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine what proportion of pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury--deaths at the scene of the accident and those that occur before the person has reached hospital--are preventable. DESIGN--Retrospective study of all deaths from accidental injury that occurred between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1990 and were reported to the coroner. SETTING--North Staffordshire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Injury severity score, probability of survival (probit analysis), and airway obstruction. RESULTS--There were 152 pre-hospital deaths from accidental injury (110 males and 42 females). In the same period there were 257 deaths in hospital from accidental injury (136 males and 121 females). The average age at death was 41.9 years for those who died before reaching hospital, and their average injury severity score was 29.3. In contrast, those who died in hospital were older and equally likely to be males or females. Important neurological injury occurred in 113 pre-hospital deaths, and evidence of airway obstruction in 59. Eighty six pre-hospital deaths were due to road traffic accidents, and 37 of these were occupants in cars. On the basis of the injury severity score and age, death was found to have been inevitable or highly likely in 92 cases. In the remaining 60 cases death had not been inevitable and airway obstruction was present in up to 51 patients with injuries that they might have survived. CONCLUSION--Death was potentially preventable in at least 39% of those who died from accidental injury before they reached hospital. Training in first aid should be available more widely, and particularly to motorists as many pre-hospital deaths that could be prevented are due to road accidents. PMID:8173428

  12. The effect of 3% and 6% hypertonic saline in viral bronchiolitis: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Jasmijn; Hochs, Anne H J; Vaessen-Verberne, Anja; Boehmer, Annemie L M; Smeets, Carien C J M; Brackel, Hein; van Gent, René; Wesseling, Judith; Logtens-Stevens, Danielle; de Moor, Ronald; Rosias, Philippe P R; Potgieter, Steph; Faber, Marianne R; Hendriks, Han J E; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G; Loza, Bettina F

    2014-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common disorder in young children that often results in hospitalisation. Except for a possible effect of nebulised hypertonic saline (sodium chloride), no evidence-based therapy is available. This study investigated the efficacy of nebulised 3% and 6% hypertonic saline compared with 0.9% hypertonic saline in children hospitalised with viral bronchiolitis. In this multicentre, double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, children hospitalised with acute viral bronchiolitis were randomised to receive either nebulised 3%, 6% hypertonic saline or 0.9% normal saline during their entire hospital stay. Salbutamol was added to counteract possible bronchial constriction. The primary endpoint was the length of hospital stay. Secondary outcomes were need for supplemental oxygen and tube feeding. From the 292 children included in the study (median age 3.4 months), 247 completed the study. The median length of hospital stay did not differ between the groups: 69 h (interquartile range 57), 70 h (IQR 69) and 53 h (IQR 52), for 3% (n=84) and 6% (n=83) hypertonic saline and 0.9% (n=80) normal saline, respectively, (p=0.29). The need for supplemental oxygen or tube feeding did not differ significantly. Adverse effects were similar in the three groups. Nebulisation with hypertonic saline (3% or 6% sodium chloride) although safe, did not reduce the length of stay in hospital, duration of supplemental oxygen or tube feeding in children hospitalised with moderate-to-severe viral bronchiolitis.

  13. Pediatric Anaphylaxis Management in the Prehospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Linda; Cone, David C.; Langhan, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening systemic allergic reaction that occurs after contact with an allergy-causing substance. Timely administration of intramuscular epinephrine is the treatment of choice for controlling symptoms and decreasing fatalities. Our purpose was to investigate the prehospital management of anaphylaxis among patients receiving care in an urban tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review from May, 2008 to January, 2010 of patients 18 years or younger who received care in the PED for anaphylaxis. Data were extracted by one investigator and included demographic information, patient symptoms, past medical history, medications administered (including route and provider), and final disposition. Results We reviewed 218 cases of anaphylaxis in 202 children. Mean age of patients was 7.4 years; 56% of patients were male. Two hundred and fourteen (98%) manifested symptoms in the skin/mucosal system, 68% had respiratory symptoms, 44% had gastrointestinal symptoms, and 2% had hypotension. Sixty-seven percent had a previous history of allergic reaction and 38% had a history of asthma. Seventy-six percent of the patients presented with anaphylaxis to food products, 8% to medications, 1% to stings, and 16% to unknown allergens. Reactions occurred at home or with family members 87% of the time, and at school 12% of the time. Only 36% of the patients who met criteria for anaphylaxis had epinephrine administered by emergency medical services (EMS). Among 26 patients with anaphylactic reactions at school, 69% received epinephrine by the school nurse. Of the 117 patients with known allergies who were with their parents at the time of anaphylactic reaction, 41% received epinephrine. Thirteen patients were seen by a physician prior to coming to the PED; all received epinephrine at the physician’s office. In total, epinephrine was given to 41% (89) of the 218 cases prior to coming to the PED

  14. Selecting cases for feedback to pre-hospital clinicians - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brichko, Lisa; Jennings, Paul; Bain, Christopher; Smith, Karen; Mitra, Biswadev

    2016-06-01

    Background There are currently limited avenues for routine feedback from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians aimed at improvements in clinical practice. Objective The aim of this study was to pilot a method for selectively identifying cases where there was a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses that could have led to a difference in pre-hospital patient care. Methods This was a single-centre retrospective study involving cases randomly selected through informatics extraction of final diagnoses at hospital discharge. Additional data on demographics, triage and diagnoses were extracted by explicit chart review. Blinded groups of pre-hospital and in-hospital clinicians assessed data to detect clinically significant differences between pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Results Most (96.9%) patients were of Australasian Triage Scale category 1-3 and in-hospital mortality rate was 32.9%. Of 353 cases, 32 (9.1%; 95% CI: 6.1-12.1) were determined by both groups of clinical assessors to have a clinically significant difference between the pre-hospital and final in-hospital diagnoses, with moderate inter-rater reliability (kappa score 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5-0.7). Conclusion A modest proportion of cases demonstrated discordance between the pre-hospital and in-hospital diagnoses. Selective case identification and feedback to pre-hospital services using a combination of informatics extraction and clinician consensus approach can be used to promote ongoing improvements to pre-hospital patient care. What is known about the topic? Highly trained pre-hospital clinicians perform patient assessments and early interventions while transporting patients to healthcare facilities for ongoing management. Feedback is necessary to allow for continual improvements; however, the provision of formal selective feedback regarding diagnostic accuracy from hospitals to pre-hospital clinicians is currently not routine. What does this paper add? For a

  15. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  16. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  17. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  18. Environmental hypertonicity causes induction of gluconeogenesis in the air-breathing singhi catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Das, Manas; Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2013-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by different environmental insults such as hyper-ammonia, dehydration and osmotic stresses in their natural habitats throughout the year. The present study investigated the effect of hyperosmotic stress, due to exposure to hypertonic environment (300 mM mannitol) for 14 days, on gluconeogenesis in this catfish. In situ exposure to hypertonic environment led to significant stimulation of gluconeogenic fluxes from the perfused liver after 7 days of exposure, followed by further increase after 14 days in presence of three different potential gluconeogenic substrates (lactate, pyruvate and glutamate). Environmental hypertonicity also caused a significant increase of activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes, namely phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase by about 2-6 fold in liver, and 3-6 fold in kidney tissues. This was accompanied by more abundance of enzyme proteins by about 1.8-3.7 fold and mRNAs by about 2.2-5.2 fold in both the tissues with a maximum increase after 14 days of exposure. Hence, the increase in activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes under hypertonic stress appeared to be as a result of transcriptional regulation of genes. Immunocytochemical analysis further confirmed the tissue specific localized expression of these enzymes in both the tissues with the possibility of expressing more in the same localized places. The induction of gluconeogenesis during exposure to environmental hypertonicity possibly occurs as a consequence of changes in hydration status/cell volume of different cell types. Thus, these adaptational strategies related to gluconeogenesis that are observed in this catfish under hypertonic stress probably help in maintaining glucose homeostasis and also for a proper energy supply to support metabolic demands mainly for ion transport and other altered metabolic processes under various environmental

  19. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study: rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Lyver, M B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Dagnone, E; Maloney, J P; Jones, G R; Luinstra, L G; Jermyn, B D; Ward, R; DeMaio, V J

    1998-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period. The study will evaluate the incremental benefit of rapid defibrillation and prehospital Advanced Cardiac Life Support measures for cardiac arrest survival and the benefit of Advanced Life Support for patients with traumatic injuries and other critically ill prehospital patients. This article describes the OPALS study with regard to the rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

  20. Mannitol versus hypertonic saline: Safety and efficacy of mannitol and hypertonic saline in sputum induction and bronchial hyperreactivity assessment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Puebla, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Almudevar, E; Echegoyen, A A; Vela, C; de Esteban, B

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic asthma phenotype predicts good response to corticosteroids and associates to asthmatic exacerbations. Sputum induction by hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation is technically demanding. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to osmotic agents indirectly mirrors active airway inflammation. We compared the safety and ability of HS and mannitol to induce sputum and measure BHR. We evaluated the stability of inflammatory phenotypes. We studied 35 non-smoking asthmatics randomized to undergo HS and mannitol challenges on 2 days 1 week apart. Sputum was sampled for cell analysis and phenotyped as eosinophilic (≥3% eosinophils) and non-eosinophilic (<3%) asthma. Nineteen subjects had BHR to mannitol and nine of them also had BHR to HS. Drops in forced expiratory volume in 1 s were higher from HS challenge than from mannitol challenge. Adequate sputum samples were obtained from 80% subjects (68% mannitol and 71% HS). Eosinophils and macrophages from both challenges correlated. Neutrophils were higher in sputum from HS. Ninety percent samples were equally phenotyped with HS and mannitol. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and BHR correlated in both challenges. HS and mannitol showed similar capacity to produce valuable sputum samples. BHR to both osmotic stimuli partially resembled airway eosinophilic inflammation but mannitol was more sensitive than HS to assess BHR. Eosinophilic phenotype remained stable in most patients with both stimuli.

  1. [Pre-hospital medicine and medical control system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Seizan

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to treat the patient from the site of the emergency to raise a lifesaving rate of the patient. As a prime example would be out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Once you start the treatment after hospital arrival, cardiac arrest patient can't be life-saving. It is necessary to start the chest compression, etc. from the site of the emergency. Medical care to be carried out on the scene of emergency is the pre-hospital care. In recent years, improvement of the pre-hospital care is remarkable in Japan. It is because of that the quantity and quality of the emergency life-saving technician are being enhanced. And also doctor-helicopter system have been enhanced. Medical control is a critical component of the improvement. PMID:26915258

  2. A dramatic drop in blood pressure following prehospital GTN administration.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Malcolm J

    2007-03-01

    A male in his sixties with no history of cardiac chest pain awoke with chest pain following an afternoon sleep. The patient did not self medicate. The patient's observations were within normal limits, he was administered oxygen via a face mask and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Several minutes after the GTN the patient experienced a sudden drop in blood pressure and heart rate, this was rectified by atropine sulphate and a fluid challenge. There was no further deterioration in the patient's condition during transport to hospital. There are very few documented case like this in the prehospital scientific literature. The cause appears to be the Bezold-Jarish reflex, stimulation of the ventricular walls which in turn decreases sympathetic outflow from the vasomotor centre. Prehospital care providers who are managing any patient with a syncopal episode that fails to recover within a reasonable time frame should consider the Bezold-Jarisch reflex as the cause and manage the patient accordingly.

  3. Advanced communication infrastructure for pre-hospital EMS care.

    PubMed

    Orthner, Helmuth; Mazza, Giovanni; Mazza, Giovanni Giorgio; Shenvi, Rohit; Battles, Marcie

    2008-11-06

    The traditional communication infrastructure of the pre-hospital Emergency Medical System (EMS) is limited to voice communication using radio or cell phone technologies. With the emergence of 3rd Generation wireless networks (3G) and enhanced mobile devices capable of data communication (e.g., mobile tablets, PDAs with cell phones, or cell phones with PDA capabilities), the voice communication can be enhanced with interactive data messaging and perhaps even with interactive video communication. However, video requires substantially more bandwidth which 4th Generation (4G) systems are promising. However, their availability is limited. We present an infrastructure that allows dynamic selection of the best data transport mode in the pre-hospital EMS environment.

  4. Availability and quality of prehospital care on pakistani interurban roads.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Junaid A; Waseem, Hunniya; Razzak, Junaid A; Shiekh, Naeem-Ul-Lah; Khoso, Ajmal Khan; Salmi, L-Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Interurban road crashes often result in severe Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Prehospital emergency care on interurban roads was rarely evaluated in the low- and middle-income countries. The study highlighted the availability and quality of prehospital care facilities on interurban roads in Pakistan, a low-income country. The study setting was a 592-km-long National highway in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Using the questionnaires adapted from the World Health Organization prehospital care guidelines [Sasser et al., 2005], managers and ambulance staff at the stations along highways were interviewed regarding the process of care, supplies in ambulances, and their experience of trauma care. Ambulance stations were either managed by the police or the Edhi Foundation (EF), a philanthropic organization. All highway stations were managed by the EF; the median distance between highway stations was 38 km (Interquartile Range [IQR]=27-46). We visited 14 stations, ten on the highway section, and four in cities, including two managed by the police. Most highway stations (n=13) received one RTI call per day. Half of stations (n=5) were inside highway towns, usually near primary or secondary-level healthcare facilities. Travel time to the nearest tertiary healthcare facility ranged from 31 to 70 minutes (median=48 minutes; IQR=30-60). Other shortcomings noted for stations were not triaging RTI cases (86%), informing hospitals (64%), or recording response times (57%). All ambulances (n=12) had stretchers, but only 58% had oxygen cylinders. The median schooling of ambulance staff (n=13) was 8 years (IQR=3-10), and the median paramedic training was 3 days (IQR=2-3). Observed shortcomings in prehospital care could be improved by public-private partnerships focusing on paramedic training, making available essential medical supplies, and linking ambulance stations with designated healthcare facilities for appropriate RTI triage.

  5. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible. PMID:26643236

  6. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  7. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  8. Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation

    PubMed Central

    Leech, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prehospital emergency amputation is a rare procedure, which may be necessary to free a time-critical patient from entrapment. This study aimed to evaluate four techniques of cadaveric lower limb prehospital emergency amputation. Method A guillotine amputation of the distal femur was undertaken in fresh frozen self-donated cadavers. A prehospital doctor conducted a surgical amputation with Gigli saw or hacksaw for bone cuts and firefighters carried out the procedure using the reciprocating saw and Holmatro device. The primary outcome measures were time to full amputation and the number of attempts required. The secondary outcomes were observed quality of skin cut, soft tissue cut and CT assessment of the proximal bone. Observers also noted the potential risks to the rescuer or patient during the procedure. Results All techniques completed amputation within 91 s. The reciprocating saw was the quickest technique (22 s) but there was significant blood spattering and continuation of the cut to the surface under the leg. The Holmatro device took less than a minute. The quality of the proximal femur was acceptable with all methods, but 5 cm more proximal soft tissue damage was made by the Holmatro device. Conclusions Emergency prehospital guillotine amputation of the distal femur can effectively be performed using scalpel and paramedic shears with bone cuts by the Gigli saw or fire service hacksaw. The reciprocating saw could be used to cut bone if no other equipment was available but carried some risks. The Holmatro cutting device is a viable option for a life-threatening entrapment where only firefighters can safely access the patient, but would not be a recommended primary technique for medical staff. PMID:27280425

  9. Hypertonicity-induced Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability in Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells: Protective Role of Osmolytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhonghai; Moeckel, Gilbert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperosmotic stress causes cell death through activation of apoptotic pathways if the protective osmolyte response is impaired. In this study we attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hypertonicity-induced apoptosis and the effect of major organic osmolytes upon those. Methods Hypertonicity-induced changes in Bcl2-family protein abundance and the presence of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in the cytoplasm, were measured using western blot and immunofluorescence labeling. To determine dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) though the permeability transition pore (PTP), the lipophilic cationic carbocyanine fluorescence probe JC-1 and TMRM fluorescence probes were used. Results Hypertonic culture conditions increase the abundance of proapoptotic Bax and the concentration of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in the cytoplasm. These changes are associated with a dissipation of Δψ and increased permeability of the PTP. We further show that organic osmolytes stabilize the Δψ and decrease the concentration of cytochrome c and AIF in the cytoplasm. Conclusion Our study shows that organic osmolytes prevent hypertonicity-induced apoptosis by preventing dissipation of Δψ through stabilization of the PTP. These findings further support the important role of organic osmolytes in preventing hypertonicity-mediated cell death in medullary kidney cells. PMID:20511721

  10. Effect of hypertonicity and X radiation on DNA synthesis in normal and ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, R.B.; Young, B.R.

    1982-12-01

    Normal human cells and cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) were exposed to culture medium made hypertonic by raising the NaCl concentration. The rate of DNA synthesis in both types of cells was depressed as a function of increasing hypertonicity. When cells of both types were exposed to X radiation and incubated in hypertonic medium, DNA synthesis appeared to be more radioresistant than in cells incubated in normal medium. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed that this was due to a hypertonicity-induced inhibition of replicon initiation, which is the same process affected by X radiation, indicating that the two treatments were not additive. After a 5-hr incubation in hypertonic medium, there was a new steady state of replicon initiation and elongation similar to that existing in cells grown in normal medium, except that fewer replicons were participating. At this time DNA synthesis in each type of cell had a characteristic response to radiation, i.e., radiosenstivie in normal cells and radioresistant in A-T cells. These results suggest that radioresistant DNA synthesis in A-T cells is not due to increased condensation of chromatin.

  11. [A historical retrospect of Pre-hospital emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Cui, Yong-Ying; Wang, Zhen-E

    2013-07-01

    In 1240, the first organization of first aid medical service for rescuing and transferring the wounded in the world was established at Florence, Italy. The stations of Air Ambulances were set up in most of the developed countries at the end of the 1960s. In the middle of the 1970s, the International Red Cross put forward the principles of internationalization, international cooperation and its standardization, thus, promoting the development of pre-hospital emergency treatment. In 1972, the first Emergency Medical Service Center was established and in 1973, Congress of the United States passed the Emergency Medical Services Act (EMSS). In 1976, the legislative procedure was finished and the National Emergency Network was formed, afterwards, pre-hospital emergency treatment, on-site rescue and transfer care, patient monitoring system of ICU-CCU were set up successively. Since the first rescue group of "three failure" (heart failure, lung failure and renal failure) was first formed at Tianjin First Center Hospital in August 1974, the pre-hospital emergency of China had been developing gradually. PMID:24345547

  12. Understanding prehospital delay behavior in acute myocardial infarction in women.

    PubMed

    Waller, Cynthia G

    2006-12-01

    Studies demonstrate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality can be reduced if reperfusion therapy is initiated within 1 hour of AMI symptom onset. However, a considerable number of men and women arrive at the emergency department outside of the time frame for thrombolytic and angioplasty effectiveness. This is especially true for women who have been shown to delay longer than men due to their prehospital decision-making process utilized. With a mean total delay time greater than 4 hours, the time interval from symptom onset to transport activation to the hospital consumes the majority of the prehospital phase of emergency cardiac care. The health belief model, self-regulation model, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior have all been used to describe the prehospital decision-making process of both men and women with an AMI and the variables that impact that process. These models have identified the importance of symptom attribution to cardiac-related causes as a target variable for research and interventions related to care-seeking behavior.

  13. Understanding prehospital delay behavior in acute myocardial infarction in women.

    PubMed

    Waller, Cynthia G

    2006-12-01

    Studies demonstrate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality can be reduced if reperfusion therapy is initiated within 1 hour of AMI symptom onset. However, a considerable number of men and women arrive at the emergency department outside of the time frame for thrombolytic and angioplasty effectiveness. This is especially true for women who have been shown to delay longer than men due to their prehospital decision-making process utilized. With a mean total delay time greater than 4 hours, the time interval from symptom onset to transport activation to the hospital consumes the majority of the prehospital phase of emergency cardiac care. The health belief model, self-regulation model, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior have all been used to describe the prehospital decision-making process of both men and women with an AMI and the variables that impact that process. These models have identified the importance of symptom attribution to cardiac-related causes as a target variable for research and interventions related to care-seeking behavior. PMID:18340239

  14. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  15. Understanding Safety in Prehospital Emergency Medical Services for Children

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Erika K.; O’Brien, Kerth; Curry, Merlin; Meckler, Garth D.; Engle, Philip P.; Jui, Jonathan; Summers, Caitlin; Lambert, William; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective For over a decade, the field of medicine has recognized the importance of studying and designing strategies to prevent safety issues in hospitals and clinics. However, there has been less focus on understanding safety in prehospital emergency medical services, particularly in regard to children. Roughly 27.7 million (or 27%) of the annual ED visits are by children under the age of 19, and about 2 million of these children reach the hospital via EMS. This paper adds to our qualitative understanding of the nature and contributors to safety events in the prehospital emergency care of children. Methods We conducted four 8–12 person focus groups among paid and volunteer Emergency Medical Services providers to understand: 1) patient safety issues that occur in the prehospital care of children, and 2) factors that contribute to these safety issues (e.g. patient, family, systems, environmental, or individual provider factors). Focus groups were conducted in rural and urban settings. Interview transcripts were coded for overarching themes. Results Key factors and themes identified in the analysis were grouped into categories using an ecological approach that distinguishes between systems, team, child and family, and individual provider level contributors. At the systems level, focus group participants cited challenges such as lack of appropriately sized equipment or standardized pediatric medication dosages, insufficient human resources, limited pediatric training and experience, and aspects of emergency medical services culture. EMS team level factors centered on communication with other EMS providers (both prehospital and hospital). Family and child factors included communication barriers and challenging clinical situations or scene characteristics. Finally, focus group participants highlighted a range of provider level factors including heightened levels of anxiety, insufficient experience and training with children and errors in assessment and decision

  16. Excessive Hyperthermic Necrosis of a Pulmonary Lobe after Hypertonic Saline-Enhanced Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Sung Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Hojoong

    2006-02-15

    Although there has been a feasibility study of saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of the lung in rabbits, there has been no report on hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of human pulmonary tumors or its complication. We report a case in which a large necrotic cavity was produced in the lung after hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation of recurrent metastatic tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma. Although hypertonic saline-enhanced radiofrequency ablation is powerful and efficient in local ablation, it is difficult to predict the exact extent of ablation, especially in the lungs. This can be dangerous, as there is a high chance of producing an ablation area much larger than expected and, hence, major complications. Special attention is required not to overablate while using this technique.

  17. Prehospital diagnosis of massive ethylene glycol poisoning and use of an early antidote.

    PubMed

    Amathieu, Roland; Merouani, Medhi; Borron, Stephen W; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Smail, Nadia; Adnet, Frédéric

    2006-08-01

    We report the case of a patient suspected of voluntary massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. Prehospital diagnosis was established by portable blood analyser and an early antidote with 4 MP treatment initiated in out-of-hospital setting. Use of portable blood analyser in prehospital care should be considered in case of suspected massive poisoning by ethylene glycol. PMID:16808995

  18. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  19. [Pre-hospital management of acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Fradin, Jordan; Blgnand, Michel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The medical management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) follows the recommendations of international medical societies. The call to the emergency services by the patient triggers a race against the clock in pre-hospital care. It is essential to reduce the duration of the inadequate perfusion of the heart in order to limit its consequences. An effective reperfusion strategy must be planned in advance taking into account the logistical constraints. It is crucial that the general public is educated to recognise the signs of ACS and to call the emergency services immediately (such as 15, 112 or 991). PMID:26040140

  20. Subfornical organ disconnection and Fos-like immunoreactivity in hypothalamic nuclei after intragastric hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, Elizabeth M; Fitts, Douglas A

    2002-10-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) may act as a sodium- or osmoreceptor that drives hypothalamic and other nuclei to secrete vasopressin and to elicit drinking. However, in response to mild doses of hypertonic saline, Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) is absent in the SFO whereas it is well expressed in the hypothalamic supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. This suggests that the hypothalamus may be activated in advance of the SFO. In this study, the fibers connecting the SFO and hypothalamus were disconnected by a wire knife cut so that Fos-ir could be examined in both the SFO and hypothalamus after an intragastric (ig) load of 0.5% of body weight of 0.6 M NaCl. Compared with Fos-ir in isotonic-loaded rats, Fos-ir after the hypertonic load was not significantly elevated in the SFO or median preoptic nucleus in sham-cut or knife-cut rats and was only slightly elevated in the OVLT in sham-cut rats. However, the hypertonic load in sham-cut rats greatly elevated Fos-ir in the SON and in the entire PVN, but this expression was reduced significantly by 30-50% in knife-cut rats. Thus, the connectivity between SFO and the hypothalamus is critical for the full expression of Fos-ir in the hypothalamus during moderate ig hypertonic saline loading even when the SFO itself does not yet express Fos-ir. PMID:12270498

  1. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  2. In vitro increase of mean corpuscular volume difference (dMCV) as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Jennifer M; Yancey, Misty R; Pohlman, Lisa M; Schermerhorn, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Spurious increase in erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume (MCV) on automated cell analyzers is a well-characterized lab error in hypertonic patients. A difference between automated and manual MCV (dMCV) greater than 2 fl has been shown to predict hypertonicity in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate dMCV as a marker for serum hypertonicity in dogs and to examine the relationship between dMCV and three methods of estimating serum tonicity: measured (OsMM), calculated (OsMC), and calculated effective (OsMCE) osmolalities. OsMC, OsMCE, and dMCV were calculated from routine blood values and OsMM was directly measured in 121 dogs. The dMCV of hypertonic dogs was significantly larger than that of normotonic dogs for all three osmolality methods. dMCV predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMM better than it predicted hypertonicity as estimated by OsMC and OsMCE. A cutoff of 2.96 fl yielded the best sensitivity (76%) and specificity (71%) for hypertonicity estimated by OsMM. PMID:24656345

  3. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elaine C.; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L.; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs. PMID:27111894

  4. Abnormal Osmotic Avoidance Behavior in C. elegans Is Associated with Increased Hypertonic Stress Resistance and Improved Proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine C; Kim, Heejung; Ditano, Jennifer; Manion, Dacie; King, Benjamin L; Strange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Protein function is controlled by the cellular proteostasis network. Proteostasis is energetically costly and those costs must be balanced with the energy needs of other physiological functions. Hypertonic stress causes widespread protein damage in C. elegans. Suppression and management of protein damage is essential for optimal survival under hypertonic conditions. ASH chemosensory neurons allow C. elegans to detect and avoid strongly hypertonic environments. We demonstrate that mutations in osm-9 and osm-12 that disrupt ASH mediated hypertonic avoidance behavior or genetic ablation of ASH neurons are associated with enhanced survival during hypertonic stress. Improved survival is not due to altered systemic volume homeostasis or organic osmolyte accumulation. Instead, we find that osm-9(ok1677) mutant and osm-9(RNAi) worms exhibit reductions in hypertonicity induced protein damage in non-neuronal cells suggesting that enhanced proteostasis capacity may account for improved hypertonic stress resistance in worms with defects in osmotic avoidance behavior. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes that play roles in managing protein damage are upregulated in osm-9(ok1677) worms. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work demonstrating that intercellular communication between neuronal and non-neuronal cells plays a critical role in integrating cellular stress resistance with other organismal physiological demands and associated energy costs.

  5. Would a prehospital practitioner model improve patient care in rural Australia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, P

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Soft systems methodology was used to develop and critically appraise the prehospital practitioner model as an alternative to existing models. This approach started from the philosophical viewpoint that prehospital services should be patient centred. Soft systems methodology was used to structure the elements of prehospital systems and the relations between them into metaphors and pictures that could be analysed. Results: This analysis showed that the most powerful reason for advocating the prehospital practitioner model is that it places prehospital systems within a symbiotic relationship with the healthcare system. Unlike the existing emergency service models or the "chain of survival" model, it is an integrated system that provides a range of services at multiple points during the patient care cycle. Thus, the prehospital practitioner would have roles in the prevention of injury and illness, responding to emergencies, facilitating recovery, and planning future strategies for a healthy community. Conclusions: Implementing this new model would see the prehospital system using its available capacity more effectively to fulfill broader public health and primary care outreach roles than is currently the case. Patients would be referred or transported to the most appropriate and cost effective facility as part of a seamless system that provides patients with well organised and high quality care. PMID:12642545

  6. Palliative care and prehospital emergency medicine: analysis of a case series.

    PubMed

    Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Dami, Fabrice; Diawara, Fatoumata; Hurst, Samia; Hugli, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Palliative care, which is intended to keep patients at home as long as possible, is increasingly proposed for patients who live at home, with their family, or in retirement homes. Although their condition is expected to have a lethal evolution, the patients-or more often their families or entourages-are sometimes confronted with sudden situations of respiratory distress, convulsions, hemorrhage, coma, anxiety, or pain. Prehospital emergency services are therefore often confronted with palliative care situations, situations in which medical teams are not skilled and therefore frequently feel awkward.We conducted a retrospective study about cases of palliative care situations that were managed by prehospital emergency physicians (EPs) over a period of 8 months in 2012, in the urban region of Lausanne in the State of Vaud, Switzerland.The prehospital EPs managed 1586 prehospital emergencies during the study period. We report 4 situations of respiratory distress or neurological disorders in advanced cancer patients, highlighting end-of-life and palliative care situations that may be encountered by prehospital emergency services.The similarity of the cases, the reasons leading to the involvement of prehospital EPs, and the ethical dilemma illustrated by these situations are discussed. These situations highlight the need for more formal education in palliative care for EPs and prehospital emergency teams, and the need to fully communicate the planning and implementation of palliative care with patients and patients' family members.

  7. Idiopathic hypertonicity as a cause of stiffness after surgery for developmental dysplasia of the hip☆

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Turgut; Göksan, Süleyman Bora; Eren, İlker

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There are various complications reported with surgical treatment of DDH. Most studied complication is avascular necrosis of the femoral head and hip stiffness. The purpose of this report was to describe a case with severe stiffness of the hip due to hypertonicity in periarticular muscles after it was treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). PRESENTATION OF CASE Three-year-old patient referred to our institution with bilateral DDH. Two hips were operated separately in one year with anterior open reduction, femoral shortening osteotomy. Third month after last surgery, limited right hip range of motion and limb length discrepency identified. Clinical examination revealed that patient had limited range of motion (ROM) in the right hip and compensated this with pelvis obliquity. Gluteus medius, sartorius and iliofemoral band release performed after examination under general anesthesia. Symptoms were persisted at 3rd week control and examination of the patient in general anesthesia revealed full ROM without increased tension. For the identified hypertonicity, ultrasound guided 100 IU botulinum toxin A injection performed to abductor group and iliopsoas muscles. Fifth month later, no flexor or abductor tension observed, and there was no pelvic obliquity. DISCUSSION Stiffness as a complication is rare and is usually resolved without treatment or simple physical therapy. Usually it is related with immobilization or surgery associated joint contracture, and spontaneous recovery reported. Presented case is diagnosed as hip stiffness due to underlying local hypertonicity. That is resolved with anesthesia and it was treated after using botulinum toxin A injection. CONCLUSION Hypertonicity with hip stiffness after surgical treatment of DDH differ from spontaneous recovering hip range of motion limitation and treatment can only be achieved by reduction of the muscle hypertonicity by neuromuscular junction blockage. PMID:24568944

  8. Hypertonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock: a prospective randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Frank M P; Sleigh, James; Boerma, E Christiaan; La Pine, Mary; Bahr, Mohamed; Pickkers, Peter; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2012-03-01

    We assessed the short-term effects of hypertonic fluid versus isotonic fluid administration in patients with septic shock. This was a double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trial in a 15-bed intensive care unit. Twenty-four patients with septic shock were randomized to receive 250 mL 7.2% NaCl/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HT group) or 500 mL 6% hydroxyethyl starch (IT group). Hemodynamic measurements included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), central venous pressure, stroke volume index, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index, gastric tonometry, and sublingual microcirculatory flow as assessed by sidestream dark field imaging. Systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities of the medial mitral annulus were measured using echocardiography to assess left ventricular contractility. Log transformation of the ratio MAP divided by the norepinephrine infusion rate (log MAP/NE) quantified the combined effect on both parameters. Compared with the IT group, hypertonic solution treatment resulted in an improvement in log MAP/NE (P = 0.008), as well as an increase in systolic tissue Doppler imaging velocities (P = 0.03) and stroke volume index (P = 0.017). No differences between the groups were found for preload parameters (central venous pressure, stroke volume variation, intrathoracic blood volume index) or for afterload parameters (systemic vascular resistance index, MAP). Hypertonic solution treatment decreased the need for ongoing fluid resuscitation (P = 0.046). No differences between groups were observed regarding tonometry or the sublingual microvascular variables. In patients with septic shock, hypertonic fluid administration did not promote gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion or sublingual microcirculatory blood flow in comparison to isotonic fluid. Independent of changes in preload or afterload, hypertonic fluid administration improved the cardiac contractility and vascular tone compared with isotonic fluid. The need for ongoing fluid

  9. Inhibition of Neutrophils by Hypertonic Saline Involves Pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and Other Ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. Hypertonic saline blocks PMNs by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here, we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mmol/L beyond isotonic levels). Adenosine triphosphate release was measured with a luciferase assay. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. Hypertonic saline blocked N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation.

  10. Trigeminal pathways for hypertonic saline- and light-evoked corneal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Okamoto, K; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2014-09-26

    Cornea-evoked eyeblinks maintain tear film integrity on the ocular surface in response to dryness and protect the eye from real or potential damage. Eyelid movement following electrical stimulation has been well studied in humans and animals; however, the central neural pathways that mediate protective eyeblinks following natural nociceptive signals are less certain. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) junction regions on orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OOemg) activity evoked by ocular surface application of hypertonic saline or exposure to bright light in urethane anesthetized male rats. The Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions are the main sites of termination for trigeminal afferent nerves that supply the ocular surface, while hypertonic saline (saline=0.15-5M) and bright light (light=5k-20klux) selectively activate ocular surface and intraocular trigeminal nerves, respectively, and excite second-order neurons at the Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions. Integrated OOemg activity, ipsilateral to the applied stimulus, increased with greater stimulus intensities for both modalities. Lidocaine applied to the ocular surface inhibited OOemg responses to hypertonic saline, but did not alter the response to light. Lidocaine injected into the trigeminal ganglion blocked completely the OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and light indicating a trigeminal afferent origin. Synaptic blockade by cobalt chloride of the Vi/Vc or Vc/C1 region greatly reduced OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and bright light. These data indicate that OOemg activity evoked by natural stimuli known to cause irritation or discomfort in humans depends on a relay in both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions.

  11. Wireless local area network in a prehospital environment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongquan; Soong, Seng-jaw; Grimes, Gary J; Orthner, Helmuth F

    2004-01-01

    Background Wireless local area networks (WLANs) are considered the next generation of clinical data network. They open the possibility for capturing clinical data in a prehospital setting (e.g., a patient's home) using various devices, such as personal digital assistants, laptops, digital electrocardiogram (EKG) machines, and even cellular phones, and transmitting the captured data to a physician or hospital. The transmission rate is crucial to the applicability of the technology in the prehospital setting. Methods We created two separate WLANs to simulate a virtual local are network environment such as in a patient's home or an emergency room (ER). The effects of different methods of data transmission, number of clients, and roaming among different access points on the file transfer rate were determined. Results The present results suggest that it is feasible to transfer small files such as patient demographics and EKG data from the patient's home to the ER at a reasonable speed. Encryption, user control, and access control were implemented and results discussed. Conclusions Implementing a WLAN in a centrally managed and multiple-layer-controlled access control server is the key to ensuring its security and accessibility. Future studies should focus on product capacity, speed, compatibility, interoperability, and security management. PMID:15339336

  12. Hypertonic saline is more effective than normal saline in seasonal allergic rhinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, P; Varricchio, A; Baggi, E; Bianchini, S; Capasso, M E; Torretta, S; Capaccio, P; Gasparini, C; Patria, F; Esposito, S; Principi, N

    2012-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a very common childhood disease that is associated with a significant reduction in the patients' quality of life. Its treatment combines educating the patients and their parents, immunotherapy and drug administration. However, even the best approach does not relieve the symptoms of a number of patients. Alternative therapies are particularly needed for children because the fear of adverse events frequently reduces parental compliance to the prescribed drugs, and immunotherapy is less easy to administer than in adults. In this prospective investigator-blinded study we evaluated whether children, with a documented history of seasonal grass pollen-related AR, benefit from nasal irrigation by assessing the effects on nasal signs and symptoms, on middle ear effusion and on adenoidal hypertrophy. We randomized children aged 5 to 9 years (median age 82 months) to normal saline or hypertonic saline (a 2.7% sodium chloride solution), administered twice-daily using a disposable 20 ml syringe, or no treatment. Nasal symptoms (rhinorrhea, itching, sneezing, nasal obstruction), swelling of turbinates, adenoid hypertrophy or middle ear effusion were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. Two hundred and twenty children (normal saline: 80; hypertonic saline: 80; no treatment: 60) completed the study. After four weeks, all the considered items were significantly reduced in the group receiving hypertonic saline (P < 0.0001), whereas in the group receiving normal saline only rhinorrhea (P = 0.0002) and sneezing (P = 0.002) were significantly reduced. There was no significant change in any of the items in the control group. The duration of oral antihistamines was significantly lower in the children receiving hypertonic saline than in those treated with normal saline or in controls. No adverse events were reported and parental satisfaction and compliance with the procedure were globally very good, regardless of the solution used. Using our

  13. Small volume resuscitation with hypertonic sodium chloride solution in cattle undergoing surgical correction of abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sickinger, M; Doll, K; Roloff, N C; Halekoh, U

    2014-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of rapid intravenous (IV) infusion of a 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with that of continuous application of an isotonic solution in stabilizing the circulation of cows with abomasal volvulus. Cattle treated with hypertonic saline had a significantly greater reduction in volume deficit within the first 10 min of therapy than cows treated with isotonic saline (from 5.9 ± 4.8 to 2.1 ± 4.4 L/100 kg vs. 7.0 ± 4.5 to 4.9 ± 3.8 L/100 kg, respectively). The central venous pressure (CVP) of the cows given the hypertonic saline rose within the first 10 min of therapy from 7.3 ± 3.5 to 10.8 ± 3.4 cm H2O, while the CVP of the cattle treated with isotonic saline did not increase significantly during this time. Sixty minutes after the start of the infusion, the CVP of the isotonic group was still significantly lower than that of the hypertonic group (9.5 ± 2.1 vs. 10.3 ± 3.3 cm H2O, respectively). Within the first 60 min, the base excess decreased from 5.5 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 6.2 mmol/L in the hypertonic group whereas it increased from 5.6 ± 5.7 to 6.8 ± 5.4 mmol/L in the isotonic group. These results suggest that for cows with abomasal volvulus, IV therapy with hypertonic saline may improve the haemodynamic and circulatory situation considerably faster and more effectively than continuous infusion with isotonic saline.

  14. Prehospitalization Preparation for Institutionalized People with Mental Retardation: A Nursing Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Diane M.

    1986-01-01

    A program developed by the nursing department at Fernald State School (Massachusetts) prepares nurses to develop prehospital admission teaching programs for mentally retarded persons. Two case studies indicate that the program's emphasis on an interdisciplinary team approach is successful. (CB)

  15. The Swiss bus accident on 13 March 2012: lessons for pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; Sanders, Jon

    2012-07-11

    The recent bus crash in Switzerland involving many children provides several lessons for the pre-hospital care community. The use of multiple helicopters that are capable of flying at night and that carry advanced medical pre-hospital teams undoubtedly saved lives following the tragedy. We describe the medical response to the incident and the lessons that can be learned for emergency medical services.

  16. Time-dependent expression of hypertonic effects on bullfrog taste nerve responses to salts and bitter substances.

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Kazunori; Nozawa, Yuhei; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-03-27

    We previously showed that the hypertonicity of taste stimulating solutions modified tonic responses, the quasi-steady state component following the transient (phasic) component of each integrated taste nerve response. Here we show that the hypertonicity opens tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells in a time-dependent manner and modifies whole taste nerve responses in bullfrogs. We increased the tonicity of stimulating solutions with non-taste substances such as urea or ethylene glycol. The hypertonicity enhanced phasic responses to NaCl>0.2M, and suppressed those to NaCl<0.1M, 1mM CaCl2, and 1mM bitter substances (quinine, denatonium and strychnine). The hypertonicity also enhanced the phasic responses to a variety of 0.5M salts such as LiCl and KCl. The enhancing effect was increased by increasing the difference between the ionic mobilities of the cations and anions in the salt. A preincubation time >20s in the presence of 1M non-taste substances was needed to elicit both the enhancing and suppressing effects. Lucifer Yellow CH, a paracellular marker dye, diffused into bullfrog taste receptor organs in 30s in the presence of hypertonicity. These results agreed with our proposed mechanism of hypertonic effects that considered the diffusion potential across open tight junctions. PMID:24513402

  17. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jeffrey; El-Chaar, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy.

  18. Urea minimizes brain complications following rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia compared with vasopressin antagonist or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Gankam Kengne, Fabrice; Couturier, Bruno S; Soupart, Alain; Decaux, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte disorder that carries significant morbidity and mortality. However, severe chronic hyponatremia should not be corrected rapidly to avoid brain demyelination. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (vaptans) are now being widely used for the treatment of hyponatremia along with other alternatives like hypertonic saline. Previous reports have suggested that, in some cases, urea can also be used to correct hyponatremia. Correction of severe hyponatremia with urea has never been compared to treatment with a vaptan or hypertonic saline with regard to the risk of brain complications in the event of a too rapid rise in serum sodium. Here, we compared the neurological outcome of hyponatremic rats corrected rapidly with urea, lixivaptan, and hypertonic saline. Despite similar increase in serum sodium obtained by the three drugs, treatment with lixivaptan or hypertonic saline resulted in a higher mortality than treatment with urea. Histological analysis showed that treatment with urea resulted in less pathological change of experimental osmotic demyelination than was induced by hypertonic saline or lixivaptan. This included breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, microglial activation, astrocyte demise, and demyelination. Thus, overcorrection of hyponatremia with urea resulted in significantly lower mortality and neurological impairment than the overcorrection caused by lixivaptan or hypertonic saline.

  19. Time-dependent expression of hypertonic effects on bullfrog taste nerve responses to salts and bitter substances.

    PubMed

    Mashiyama, Kazunori; Nozawa, Yuhei; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka; Kumazawa, Takashi; Yoshii, Kiyonori

    2014-03-27

    We previously showed that the hypertonicity of taste stimulating solutions modified tonic responses, the quasi-steady state component following the transient (phasic) component of each integrated taste nerve response. Here we show that the hypertonicity opens tight junctions surrounding taste receptor cells in a time-dependent manner and modifies whole taste nerve responses in bullfrogs. We increased the tonicity of stimulating solutions with non-taste substances such as urea or ethylene glycol. The hypertonicity enhanced phasic responses to NaCl>0.2M, and suppressed those to NaCl<0.1M, 1mM CaCl2, and 1mM bitter substances (quinine, denatonium and strychnine). The hypertonicity also enhanced the phasic responses to a variety of 0.5M salts such as LiCl and KCl. The enhancing effect was increased by increasing the difference between the ionic mobilities of the cations and anions in the salt. A preincubation time >20s in the presence of 1M non-taste substances was needed to elicit both the enhancing and suppressing effects. Lucifer Yellow CH, a paracellular marker dye, diffused into bullfrog taste receptor organs in 30s in the presence of hypertonicity. These results agreed with our proposed mechanism of hypertonic effects that considered the diffusion potential across open tight junctions.

  20. Hypertonic Saline for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis in Infants and Young Children: A Critical Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bronchiolitis, an infection of the lower respiratory tract, is the leading cause of infant and child hospitalization in the United States. Therapeutic options for management of bronchiolitis are limited. Hypertonic saline inhalation therapy has been studied in numerous clinical trials with mixed results. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published updated guidelines on the diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis, which include new recommendations on the use of hypertonic saline. We reviewed all published clinical trials mentioned in the 2014 AAP guidelines, as well as additional trials published since the guidelines, and critically evaluated each trial to determine efficacy, safety, and expectations of hypertonic saline inhalation therapy. A total of 2682 infants were studied over the course of 22 clinical trials. Nine trials were carried out in the outpatient/clinic/emergency department and 13 in the inpatient setting. We agree with the AAP guidelines regarding the recommendation to use nebulized hypertonic saline for infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with the expectation of reducing bronchiolitis scores and length of stay when it is expected to last more than 72 hours. However, we also believe there might be an advantage for hypertonic saline in reducing admission rates from the emergency department, based on close examination of the results of recent trials. This review also highlights important gaps in the available literature that need to be addressed in order to define the role of inhaled hypertonic saline therapy. PMID:26997926

  1. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26123882

  2. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

  3. Identification of adults with sepsis in the prehospital environment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early identification of sepsis could enable prompt delivery of key interventions such as fluid resuscitation and antibiotic administration which, in turn, may lead to improved patient outcomes. Limited data indicate that recognition of sepsis by paramedics is often poor. We systematically reviewed the literature on prehospital sepsis screening tools to determine whether they improved sepsis recognition. Design Systematic review. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed were systematically searched up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. Setting Prehospital/emergency medical services (EMS). Study selection All studies addressing identification of sepsis (including severe sepsis and septic shock) among adult patients managed by EMS. Outcome measures Recognition of sepsis by EMS clinicians. Results Owing to considerable variation in the methodological approach adopted and outcome measures reported, a narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Three studies addressed development of prehospital sepsis screening tools. Six studies addressed paramedic diagnosis of sepsis with or without use of a prehospital sepsis screening tool. Conclusions Recognition of sepsis by ambulance clinicians is poor. The use of screening tools, based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign diagnostic criteria, improves prehospital sepsis recognition. Screening tools derived from EMS data have been developed, but they have not yet been validated in clinical practice. There is a need to undertake validation studies to determine whether prehospital sepsis screening tools confer any clinical benefit. PMID:27496231

  4. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  5. Early Implementation of THAM for ICP Control: Therapeutic Hypothermia Avoidance and Reduction in Hypertonics/Hyperosmotics

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.; Gillman, L. M.; Teitelbaum, J.; West, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tromethamine (THAM) has been demonstrated to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP). Early consideration for THAM may reduce the need for other measures for ICP control. Objective. To describe 4 cases of early THAM therapy for ICP control and highlight the potential to avoid TH and paralytics and achieve reduction in sedation and hypertonic/hyperosmotic agent requirements. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 4 patients treated with early THAM for ICP control. Results. We identified 2 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 2 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) receiving early THAM for ICP control. The mean time to initiation of THAM therapy was 1.8 days, with a mean duration of 5.3 days. In all patients, after 6 to 12 hours of THAM administration, ICP stability was achieved, with reduction in requirements for hypertonic saline and hyperosmotic agents. There was a relative reduction in mean hourly hypertonic saline requirements of 89.1%, 96.1%, 82.4%, and 97.0% for cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, comparing pre- to post-THAM administration. Mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and paralytics were avoided in all patients. Conclusions. Early administration of THAM for ICP control could potentially lead to the avoidance of other ICP directed therapies. Prospective studies of early THAM administration are warranted. PMID:25544901

  6. Hypertonic stress promotes the upregulation and phosphorylation of zonula occludens 1.

    PubMed

    Then, Cornelia; Bergler, Tobias; Jeblick, Roland; Jung, Bettina; Banas, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K

    2011-01-01

    Tight junction molecules form a barrier between adjacent cells and mediate the cells' ability to develop membranes that constitute boundaries of different compartments within the body. Membranes with selective ion and water passage are important for the electrolyte and water homeostasis in the kidney. Due to their role in the urinary concentration process, renal medullary cells are exposed to hyperosmotic stress. Therefore, we were interested in the question of how mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD3) manage to maintain their cell-cell contacts, despite hypertonicity-induced cell shrinkage. Employing mRNA expression analysis, we found that the zonula occludens type 1 (Zo-1), multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) and cortactin mRNA levels were upregulated in a tonicity-dependent manner. Using Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, we show that the Zo-1 protein is upregulated, phosphorylated and linked to the actin cytoskeleton in response to hypertonic stress. After cell exposure to hypertonicity, rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton resulted in a stronger colocalization of actin fibres with Zo-1. Urea, which generates hyperosmolality, but no transcellular gradient, did not induce changes in Zo-1 protein expression or actin rearrangement. This data indicates that Zo-1 is a response protein to inner medullary tonicity and that extracellular stressors can promote Zo-1 protein expression, tyrosine phosphorylation and cytoskeleton association. PMID:21734410

  7. Biochemical and histochemical features of human cultured cells (EUE) adapted to hypertonic medium.

    PubMed

    Bolognani, L; Fantin, A M; Conti, A M; Gervaso, M V; Salè, M F

    1978-01-01

    EUE cells from a human heteroploid line cultured in hypertonic medium (0.274 M NaCl) modify their lipid pattern: sulfolipid concentration reaches 86 to 90 microgram/mg protein whilst it ranges between 19 to 32 microgram/mg in cells cultured in isotonic medium. Ganglioside concentration reaches 2.6 nmoles of sialic acid/mg protein (after 75 days) and 13 (after 85 days) in hypertonic saline medium. Whilst it is 0.5 in isotonic medium. Phospholipid concentration does not show any similar change. Cytoenzymatic analysis reveals that dehydrogenases (lactate, G-6-P dehydrogenases, tetrahydrofolate reductase and NADH diaphorase) appear strongly enhanced in cells grown on hypertonic medium. On the contrary higher acid phosphatase and ATPase activity was demonstrable in cells grown on isotonic medium. These results are similar (except for ATPase activity) to those observed in salt secreting glands involved in strong osmotic work. The results are discussed in relation to the problem of energy supply in cells performing osmotic work. PMID:151474

  8. Hypertonic saline monotherapy in children with perennial allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Barberi, S; D'Auria, E; Bernardo, L; Ferrara, F; Pietra, B; Pinto, F; Ferrero, F; Ciprandi, G

    2016-01-01

    Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) is very common in children and has a relevant impact on their families. House dust mites (HDM) are the most relevant cause of PAR. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate whether hypertonic saline (3%) nasal spray as monotherapy is able to improve: nasal symptom severity and parental perception of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance in HDM-mono-sensitized children with PAR. Globally, 25 children (13 males and 12 females; mean age 9.5±3.1 years) were treated for 3 weeks. They were visited at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after a 2-week follow-up. Hypertonic saline significantly reduced total symptom score, and improved the perception, according to their parents, of rhinitis control, sleep, and school performance. In conclusion, the present pilot study provided the first evidence that 3% hypertonic saline monotherapy was able to relieve nasal symptoms and parental perception of PAR impact as well as being safe and well tolerated.

  9. Effects of SFO lesion or captopril on drinking induced by intragastric hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, E M; Fitts, D A

    1998-06-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a circumventricular organ with both osmosensitive elements and dipsogenic receptors for circulating angiotensin (ANG) II, is important for the water drinking response that follows an intragastric (ig) load of hypertonic NaCl. A 2-ml saline load was administered ig at 300, 900, or 1200 mOsm/kg to rats with sham lesions or lesions of the SFO, and intake was measured periodically for 2 h. Hypertonic loads caused sham-lesioned rats, but not SFO-lesioned rats, to drink earlier in the test or to drink more water than did the isotonic load. Inhibition of ANG II synthesis in unoperated rats with 100 mg/kg of captopril reduced water intake only during the initial 15 min after a gavage of 1200 mOsm/kg saline. Loads of 900 and 1200 mOsm/kg both increased plasma osmolality and sodium concentration by 15 min after gavage without greatly affecting hematocrit or plasma protein concentration. Thus, the SFO is important for the osmotically-induced water drinking response after acute ig administration of hypertonic saline. With the possible exception of the first 15 min, this drinking response is independent of the peripheral synthesis of ANG II. PMID:9622590

  10. Renal excretory responses of taurine-depleted rats to hypotonic and hypertonic saline infusion.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, M S; Warren, B K; Azuma, J; Schaffer, S W

    1998-01-01

    Male Wistar-Kyoto rats were given either tap water (control) or 3% beta-alanine (taurine-depleted) for three weeks. To prepare for the kidney function studies, the animals were then implanted with femoral vessels and bladder catheters. Two days after surgery, each rat was given an intravenous infusion of saline at the rate of 50 microliter/min and urine samples were collected at specific time intervals. An isotonic saline solution (0.9% NaCl) was infused for determination of baseline parameters and was followed by the infusion of a hypotonic saline solution (0.45% NaCl). Two days later, the infusion protocol was repeated in the same animals; however, a hypertonic saline solution (1.8% NaCl) was substituted for the hypotonic saline solution. Renal excretion of fluid and sodium increased in the control, but not taurine-depleted, rats during the hypotonic saline infusion. Interestingly, diuretic and natriuretic responses were similar between the groups during hypertonic saline infusion. The results suggest that taurine-depletion in rats affects renal excretory responses to a hypotonic, but not a hypertonic, saline solution.

  11. Acute Hypertonicity Alters Aquaporin-2 Trafficking and Induces a MAPK-dependent Accumulation at the Plasma Membrane of Renal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Udo; Nunes, Paula; Bouley, Richard; Lu, Hua A. J.; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    The unique phenotype of renal medullary cells allows them to survive and functionally adapt to changes of interstitial osmolality/tonicity. We investigated the effects of acute hypertonic challenge on AQP2 (aquaporin-2) water channel trafficking. In the absence of vasopressin, hypertonicity alone induced rapid (<10 min) plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2 in rat kidney collecting duct principal cells in situ, and in several kidney epithelial lines. Confocal microscopy revealed that AQP2 also accumulated in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) following hypertonic challenge. AQP2 mutants that mimic the Ser256-phosphorylated and -nonphosphorylated state accumulated at the cell surface and TGN, respectively. Hypertonicity did not induce a change in cytosolic cAMP concentration, but inhibition of either calmodulin or cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activity blunted the hypertonicity-induced increase of AQP2 cell surface expression. Hypertonicity increased p38, ERK1/2, and JNK MAPK activity. Inhibiting MAPK activity abolished hypertonicity-induced accumulation of AQP2 at the cell surface but did not affect either vasopressin-dependent AQP2 trafficking or hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation in the TGN. Finally, increased AQP2 cell surface expression induced by hypertonicity largely resulted from a reduction in endocytosis but not from an increase in exocytosis. These data indicate that acute hypertonicity profoundly alters AQP2 trafficking and that hypertonicity-induced AQP2 accumulation at the cell surface depends on MAP kinase activity. This may have important implications on adaptational processes governing transcellular water flux and/or cell survival under extreme conditions of hypertonicity. PMID:18664568

  12. Hypertonicity increases NO production to modulate the firing rate of magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M P; Ventura, R R; Varanda, W A

    2013-10-10

    Increases in plasma osmolality enhance nitric oxide (NO) levels in magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and modulate the secretion of both vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT). In this paper, we describe the effects of hypertonicity on the electrical properties of MNCs by focusing on the nitrergic modulation of their activity in this condition. Membrane potentials were measured using the patch clamp technique, in the presence of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission blockers, in coronal brain slices of male Wistar rats. The recordings were first made under a control condition (295 mosm/kg H2O), then in the presence of a hypertonic stimulus (330 mosm/kg H2O) and, finally, with a hypertonic stimulus plus 500 μM L-Arginine or 100 μM N-nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Hypertonicity per se increased the firing frequency of the neurons. L-Arginine prevented the increase in fire frequency induced by hypertonic stimulus, and L-NAME (inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) induced an additional increase in frequency when applied together with the hypertonic solution. Moreover, L-Arginine hyperpolarizes the resting potential and decreases the peak value of the after-hyperpolarization; both effects were blocked by L-NAME and hypertonicity and/or L-NAME reduced the time constant of the rising phase of the after-depolarization. These results demonstrate that an intrinsic nitrergic system is part of the mechanisms controlling the excitability of MNCs of the SON when the internal fluid homeostasis is disturbed. PMID:23850590

  13. Prehospital risk factors of mortality and impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health concern and a major burden for society. The period between trauma event and hospital admission in an emergency department (ED) could be a determinant for secondary brain injury and early survival. The aim was to investigate the relationship between prehospital factors associated with secondary brain injury (arterial hypotension, hypoxemia, hypothermia) and the outcomes of mortality and impaired consciousness of survivors at 14 days. Methods A multicenter, prospective cohort study was performed in dedicated trauma centres of Switzerland. Adults with severe TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale score of head region (HAIS) >3) were included. Main outcome measures were death and impaired consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤13) at 14 days. The associations between risk factors and outcome were assessed with univariate and multivariate regression models. Results 589 patients were included, median age was 55 years (IQR 33, 70). The median GCS in ED was 4 (IQR 3-14), with abnormal pupil reaction in 167 patients (29.2%). Median ISS was 25 (IQR 21, 34). Three hundred seven patients sustained their TBI from falls (52.1%) and 190 from a road traffic accidents (32.3%). Median time from Out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service (OHEMS) departure on scene to arrival in ED was 50 minutes (IQR 37-72); 451 patients had a direct admission (76.6%). Prehospital hypotension was observed in 24 (4.1%) patients, hypoxemia in 73 (12.6%) patients and hypothermia in 146 (24.8%). Prehospital hypotension and hypothermia (apart of age and trauma severity) was associated with mortality. Prehospital hypoxemia (apart of trauma severity) was associated with impaired consciousness; indirect admission was a protective factor. Conclusion Mortality and impaired consciousness at 14 days do not have the same prehospital risk factors; prehospital hypotension and hypothermia is associated with mortality, and prehospital hypoxemia with

  14. Pre-Hospital Trauma Care in Road Traffic Accidents in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Paravar, Mohammad; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Salehi, Shayesteh; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Shojaee, Abolfazl; Akbari, Hossein; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat

    2013-01-01

    Background Iran has one of the highest rates of road traffic accidents (RTAs) worldwide. Pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize many instances of traffic-related mortality and morbidity. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of pre-hospital care in patients who were injured in RTAs, admitted to hospital. The focus was mainly directed at evaluating pre-hospital trauma care provided in city streets and roads out of the city. Patients and Methods This retrospective study was carried out on all trauma patients, transported by the emergency medical service (EMS) system, who were admitted to Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital during the period from March 2011 to March 2012. The patients’ demographic data, location of accident, damaged organs, mechanism of injury, injury severity, pre-hospital times (response, scene, transport), pre-hospital interventions and outcomes, were extracted from the data registry and analyzed through descriptive statistics using SPSS 18 software. Results Findings of this study showed that, 75% of RTAs occurred on city streets (n = 1 251). Motor-car accidents were the most frequent mechanism of RTA on city streets (n = 525) (42%), while car rollover was the most frequent mechanism of RTA on roads out of the city (n = 155) (44.4%). The mean pre-hospital time intervals (min); response, scene, and transport for all patients were 6.6 ± 3.1, 10.7 ± 5 and 13 ± 9.8, respectively. The mean pre-hospital time intervals (response, scene, transport) in roads out of the city were higher than those in city streets. There was a significant difference (P = 0.04) in the mortality rates due to RTAs between city streets (n = 46) and roads out of the city (n = 32). Conclusions In comparison with road traffic accidents on city streets, trauma patients in RTAs on roads out of the city have longer pre-hospital time intervals and more severe injuries; therefore, this group needs more pre-hospital resuscitation interventions. PMID

  15. Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice. Methods An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context. Results The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage. Conclusion Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of

  16. Hypertonic Saline (NaCl 7.5%) Reduces LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Ricardo Costa; Biselli, Paolo Jose Cesare; de Lima, Thais Martins; Theobaldo, Mariana Cardillo; Caldini, Elia Tamaso; Pimentel, Rosângela Nascimento; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Kubo, Suely Ariga; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe lung inflammatory manifestation and has no effective therapy nowadays. Sepsis is one of the main illnesses among ARDS causes. The use of fluid resuscitation is an important treatment for sepsis, but positive fluid balance may induce pulmonary injury. As an alternative, fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline ((HS) NaCl 7.5%) has been described as a promising therapeutical agent in sepsis-induced ARDS by the diminished amount of fluid necessary. Thus, we evaluated the effect of hypertonic saline in the treatment of LPS-induced ARDS. We found that hypertonic saline (NaCl 7.5%) treatment in rat model of LPS-induced ARDS avoided pulmonary function worsening and inhibited type I collagen deposition. In addition, hypertonic saline prevented pulmonary injury by decreasing metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) activity in tissue. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation was reduced in HS group as well as neutrophil infiltration, NOS2 expression and NO content. Our study shows that fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline decreases the progression of LPS-induced ARDS due to inhibition of pulmonary remodeling that is observed when regular saline is used.

  17. Hypertonicity compromises renal mineralocorticoid receptor signaling through Tis11b-mediated post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Viengchareun, Say; Lema, Ingrid; Lamribet, Khadija; Keo, Vixra; Blanchard, Anne; Cherradi, Nadia; Lombès, Marc

    2014-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates the Na(+)-retaining action of aldosterone. MR is highly expressed in the distal nephron, which is submitted to intense variations in extracellular fluid tonicity generated by the corticopapillary gradient. We previously showed that post-transcriptional events control renal MR abundance. Here, we report that hypertonicity increases expression of the mRNA-destabilizing protein Tis11b, a member of the tristetraprolin/ZFP36 family, and thereby, decreases MR expression in renal KC3AC1 cells. The 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of human and mouse MR mRNA, containing several highly conserved adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs), were cloned downstream of a reporter gene. Luciferase activities of full-length or truncated MR Luc-3'-UTR mutants decreased drastically when cotransfected with Tis11b plasmid, correlating with an approximately 50% shorter half-life of ARE-containing transcripts. Using site-directed mutagenesis and RNA immunoprecipitation, we identified a crucial ARE motif within the MR 3'-UTR, to which Tis11b must bind for destabilizing activity. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that endogenous Tis11b physically interacts with MR mRNA in KC3AC1 cells, and Tis11b knockdown prevented hypertonicity-elicited repression of MR. Moreover, hypertonicity blunted aldosterone-stimulated expression of glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein and the α-subunit of the epithelial Na(+) channel, supporting impaired MR signaling. Challenging the renal osmotic gradient by submitting mice to water deprivation, diuretic administration, or high-Na(+) diet increased renal Tis11b and decreased MR expression, particularly in the cortex, thus establishing a mechanistic pathway for osmotic regulation of MR expression in vivo. Altogether, we uncovered a mechanism by which renal MR expression is regulated through mRNA turnover, a post-transcriptional control that seems physiologically relevant. PMID:24700863

  18. Nebulised 7% hypertonic saline improves lung function and quality of life in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Kellett, Fiona; Robert, Niven M

    2011-12-01

    Sputum retention is a distressing feature of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and has been shown to contribute to the vicious cycle of infection seen in this disease. In a previous study we demonstrated that nebulised 7% hypertonic saline was both safe and effective in this patient population. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, confirmed by HRCT, were entered into a randomised single blind cross-over study to evaluate 0.9% sodium chloride (IS) and 7% hypertonic saline (HS). Following a 4 week run in patients received a random order active HS or IS daily for 3 months. A 4 week wash-out phase was included between phases. We report lung function, quality of life, and health care utilisation responses. 32 patients mean age 56.6 years (SD 14.6), 16 male, were recruited of which 28 were randomised and completed the study. Lung function (%change from baseline) improved in HS vs. IS (FEV(1): 15.1, 1.8 p<0.01; FVC: 11.2, 0.7 p<0.01. SGRQ improved significantly from baseline (HS 6.0, IS 1.2; p<0.05). There were reductions in annualised antibiotic usage (HS 2.4, IS 5.4 courses per patient per year), annualised emergency health care utilisation visits were reduced (HS 2.1, IS 4.9 events per patient per year). There were also improvements in sputum viscosity and ease of expectoration (visual analogue scale). Regular use of 7% hypertonic saline improves lung function, quality of life and health care utilisation in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients. PMID:22018993

  19. Inhibition of neutrophils by hypertonic saline involves pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce PMN activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. HS blocks PMNs by ATP release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mM beyond isotonic levels). ATP release was measured with a luciferase assay. PMN activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor 10panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. HS blocked fMLP-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by 10panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation. PMID:26009814

  20. Sequence of Fibrinogen Proteolysis and Platelet Release after Intrauterine Infusion of Hypertonic Saline

    PubMed Central

    Nossel, H. L.; Wasser, J.; Kaplan, K. L.; Lagamma, K. S.; Yudelman, I.; Canfield, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma fibrinopeptide B (Bβ1-14 or FPB) immunoreactivity was studied by radioimmunoassay in patients who received intrauterine infusion of hypertonic saline to terminate pregnancy. FPB immunoreactivity increased with thrombin treatment (TIFPB) suggesting the presence of a larger FPB-containing peptide, since purified FPB is not altered by thrombin, whereas thrombin increases the immunoreactivity of Bβ1-42 (which includes FPB) 10-fold. TIFPB immunoreactivity in plasma, drawn 4 h after hypertonic saline infusion eluted from Sephadex G-50 similarly to isolated Bβ1-42. Streptokinase, incubated with normal plasma progressively generated TIFPB immunoreactivity, which showed a major component which eluted from Sephadex G-50 similarly to Bβ1-42. Streptokinase generated TIFPB much more rapidly in reptilase-treated plasma that contains fibrin I, (which still includes FPB), indicating that fibrin I is preferred over fibrinogen as a substrate for plasmin cleavage of arginine (Bβ42)-alanine (Bβ43). Serial studies were then made in 10 patients receiving intrauterine hypertonic saline. Fibrinopeptide A (FPA) levels rose immediately, reached a peak between 1 and 2 h, were declining at 4 h, and were normal at 24 and 48 h. TIFPB levels rose slightly in the 1st h, reached a peak at 4 h, and had returned to base-line values at 24 h. Serum fibrinogen degradation product levels were unchanged at 1 h, reached their highest level at 4 h, and were still markedly elevated at 24 and 48 h. Fibrinogen levels dropped slightly being lowest at 4 and 24 h. Platelet counts declined in parallel with the fibrinogen levels over the first 4 h, but continued to decrease through 48 h. Beta thromboglobulin (βTG) levels generally paralleled FPA levels whereas platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels showed only slight changes. The data indicate that immediately after intrauterine hypertonic saline infusion thrombin is formed that cleaves FPA from fibrinogen to produce fibrin I and releases βTG and PF4 from

  1. End tidal carbon dioxide monitoring in prehospital and retrieval medicine: a review

    PubMed Central

    Donald, M J; Paterson, B

    2006-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring is the non‐invasive measurement of exhaled CO2. The Intensive Care Society guidelines include (ETCO2) monitoring as one of the objective standards required for monitoring patients in transport, and the American Heart Association recommends that all intubations must be confirmed by some form of ETCO2 measurement. The physiological principles and technology underlying ETCO2 measurement and the clinical indication for its use in the prehospital environment are reviewed. ETCO2 monitoring has been widely established in the prehospital environment and is of particular use for verification of endotracheal tube placement. It is non‐invasive and easy to apply to breathing circuits. The units now available are compact and rugged, with extended battery operating times, which are ideally suited for prehospital use and should be considered as an essential item for advanced airway management. PMID:16921096

  2. The internationalisation of prehospital education: a merging of ideologies between Australia and the USA.

    PubMed

    Williams, B; Upchurch, J

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project was to promote internationalisation of prehospital education collaboratively between students and teachers from EMS Education and Training, Montana, USA, and Monash University Centre for Ambulance and Paramedic Studies (MUCAPS), Victoria, Australia. The project required students and teachers to engage in a series of face to face lectures, which was reinforced through distance education strategies, such as online learning. The overall project aim was to establish an objective and descriptive view of the internationalisation of prehospital and community based emergency health education using e-learning as the educational approach. A cross sectional survey design using paper based evaluation was adopted in this project. Results revealed a positive student reaction, with flexible pedagogical processes broadening student learning and facilitating an international dimension otherwise not achievable. Given the current state of globalisation, internationalisation has the capacity to improve educational standards, quality, student interactions and specific learning outcomes in prehospital education.

  3. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating.

  4. Comparison of equiosmolar concentrations of hypertonic saline and mannitol for intraoperative lax brain in patients undergoing craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Raghava, A.; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi; Prakash, M. V. S. Satya; Hemavathy, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osmotherapy is the frequently used for the treatment of intracranial pressure. The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of equiosmolar solution of 3% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on brain relaxation in supratentorial tumor surgery. Methods: After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 50 patients aged >18, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) >13 with ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 scheduled to undergo craniotomy for supratentorial tumors were enrolled in this prospective, randomized study. Patients received 5 ml/kg of either 3% hypertonic saline (n = 25) or 20% mannitol (n = 25). Hemodynamic variables (heart rate [HR], SBP, DBP, MBP, and central venous pressure [CVP]), serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urine output, and fluid balance were measured. The surgeon assessed the brain condition on four point scale (1 = perfectly relaxed, 2 = satisfactorily relaxed, 3 = firm brain, and 4 = bulging brain), who was blinded to study drug. Results: Brain relaxation was comparable in two groups and there was no significant difference (P = 0.633). The number of brain conditions classified as perfectly relaxed, satisfactorily relaxed, firm brain, and bulging brain in the HS group was 8, 13, 3, and 1, respectively, whereas it was 5, 17, 3, and 0, respectively, in the M group. There was no significant difference in hemodynamic variables between the two groups except CVP at 30 min (P = 048). Compared with mannitol, hypertonic saline caused increase in the serum osmolality at 120 min (P = 0.008) and in serum sodium at 120 min (P = 0.001). Urine output was higher with mannitol than hypertonic saline (P = 0.001). Conclusion: 3% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol are equally effective for brain relaxation in elective supratentorial tumor surgery and compared with mannitol, hypertonic saline was associated with less diuretic effect. PMID:25984387

  5. Serotonin, glutamate and glycerol are released after the injection of hypertonic saline into human masseter muscles – a microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myalgia is associated with higher muscle levels of certain algesic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to investigate if hypertonic saline-induced jaw myalgia also leads to release of such biomarkers and if there were any sex differences in this respect. Methods Healthy participants, 15 men and 15 aged-matched women (25.7 ± 4.3 years) participated. Intramuscular microdialysis into masseter muscles was performed to sample serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerol. After 2 hours 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (58.5 mg/mL) was injected into the masseter on one side and 0.2 mL isotonic saline (9 mg/mL) into the contralateral masseter close to the microdialysis catheter. Microdialysis continued for 1 hour after the injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pain were assessed before and after injections. Results The median (IQR) peak pain intensity (0–100 visual analogue scale) after hypertonic saline was 52.5 (38.0) and after isotonic saline 7.5 (24.0) (p < 0.05). 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after hypertonic saline injection (p < 0.05). Lactate, pyruvate and glucose showed no change. PPT after microdialysis was reduced on both sides (p < 0.05) but without side differences. Pain after hypertonic saline injection correlated positively to 5-HT (p < 0.05) and negatively to glycerol (p < 0.05). Conclusions 5-HT, glutamate and glycerol increased after a painful hypertonic saline injection into the masseter muscle, but without sex differences. Since increased levels of 5-HT and glutamate have been reported in chronic myalgia, this strengthens the validity of the pain model. Glycerol warrants further investigations. PMID:25519464

  6. Hypertonic conditions trigger transient plasmolysis, growth arrest and blockage of transporter endocytosis in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bitsikas, Vassilis; Karachaliou, Mayia; Gournas, Christos; Diallinas, George

    2011-01-01

    By using Aspergillus nidulans strains expressing functional GFP-tagged transporters under hypertonic conditions, we noticed the rapid appearance of cortical, relatively static, fluorescent patches (0.5-2.3 μm). These patches do not correspond to transporter microdomains as they co-localize with other plasma membrane-associated molecules, such as the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and the SsoA t-Snare, or the lipophilic markers FM4-64 and filipin. In addition, they do not show characteristics of lipid rafts, MCCs or other membrane microdomains. Deconvoluted microscopic images showed that fluorescent patches correspond to plasma membrane invaginations. Transporters remain fully active during this phenomenon of localized plasmolysis. Plasmolysis was however associated with reduced growth rate and a dramatic blockage in transporter and FM4-64 endocytosis. These phenomena are transient and rapidly reversible upon wash-out of hypertonic media. Based on the observation that block in endocytosis by hypertonic treatment altered dramatically the cellular localization of tropomyosin (GFP-TpmA), although it did not affect the cortical appearance of upstream (SlaB-GFP) or downstream (AbpA-mRFP) endocytic components, we conclude that hypertonicity modifies actin dynamics and thus acts indirectly on endocytosis. This was further supported by the effect of latrunculin B, an actin depolymerization agent, on endocytosis. We show that the phenomena observed in A. nidulans also occur in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they constitute basic homeostatic responses of ascomycetes to hypertonic shock. Finally, our work shows that hypertonic treatments can be used as physiological tools to study the endocytic down-regulation of transporters in A. nidulans, as non-conditional genetic blocks affecting endocytic internalization are lethal or severely debilitating. PMID:20919858

  7. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  8. Suspicion and treatment of severe sepsis. An overview of the prehospital chain of care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sepsis is a life-threatening condition where the risk of death has been reported to be even higher than that associated with the major complications of atherosclerosis, i.e. myocardial infarction and stroke. In all three conditions, early treatment could limit organ dysfunction and thereby improve the prognosis. Aim To describe what has been published in the literature a/ with regard to the association between delay until start of treatment and outcome in sepsis with the emphasis on the pre-hospital phase and b/ to present published data and the opportunity to improve various links in the pre-hospital chain of care in sepsis. Methods A literature search was performed on the PubMed, Embase (Ovid SP) and Cochrane Library databases. Results In overall terms, we found a small number of articles (n = 12 of 1,162 unique hits) which addressed the prehospital phase. For each hour of delay until the start of antibiotics, the prognosis appeared to become worse. However, there was no evidence that prehospital treatment improved the prognosis. Studies indicated that about half of the patients with severe sepsis used the emergency medical service (EMS) for transport to hospital. Patients who used the EMS experienced a shorter delay to treatment with antibiotics and the start of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). Among EMS-transported patients, those in whom the EMS staff already suspected sepsis at the scene had a shorter delay to treatment with antibiotics and the start of EGDT. There are insufficient data on other links in the prehospital chain of care, i.e. patients, bystanders and dispatchers. Conclusion Severe sepsis is a life-threatening condition. Previous studies suggest that, with every hour of delay until the start of antibiotics, the prognosis deteriorates. About half of the patients use the EMS. We need to know more about the present situation with regard to the different links in the prehospital chain of care in sepsis. PMID:22738027

  9. Designing a prehospital system for a developing country: estimated cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Hauswald, M; Yeoh, E

    1997-10-01

    Many of the costs associated with prehospital care in developed countries are covered in budgets for fire suppression, police services, and the like. Determining these costs is therefore difficult. The costs and benefits of developing a prehospital care system for Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, which now has essentially no emergency medical services (EMS) system, were estimated. Prehospital therapies that have been suggested to decrease mortality were identified. A minimal prehospital system was designed to deliver these treatments in Kuala Lumpur. The potential benefit of these therapies was calculated by using statistics from the United States corrected for demographic differences between the United States and Malaysia. Costs were extrapolated from the current operating budget of the Malaysian Red Crescent Society. Primary dysrhythmias are responsible for almost all potentially survivable cardiac arrests. A system designed to deliver a defibrillator to 85% of arrests within 6 minutes would require an estimated 48 ambulances. Kuala Lumpur has approximately 120 prehospital arrhythmic deaths per year. A 6% resuscitation rate was chosen for the denominator, resulting in seven survivors. Half of these would be expected to have significant neurological damage. Ambulances cost $53,000 (US dollars) to operate per year in Kuala Lumpur; 48 ambulances would cost a total of $2.5 million. Demographic factors and traffic problems would significantly increase the cost per patient. Other therapies, including medications, airway management, and trauma care, were discounted because both their additional cost and their benefit are small. Transport of patients (including trauma) is now performed by police or private vehicle and would probably take longer by ambulance. A prehospital system for Kuala Lumpur would cost approximately $2.5 million per year. It might save seven lives, three of which would be marred by significant neurological injury. Developing countries would do well to

  10. What is happening to the patient during pre-hospital trauma care?

    PubMed

    Hu, Peter; Defouw, Gregory; Mackenzie, Colin; Handley, Christopher; Seebode, Steven; Davies, Phil; Floccare, Douglas; Xiao, Yan

    2006-01-01

    We report a PDA based in-flight (pre-hospital) patient vital signs data recorder (VSDR) system which captures both numerical and continuous waveforms from a patient monitor in real-time. Nine pre-hospital Life-Saving-Intervention (LSI) event markers were configured for rapid real-time event documentation. A VSDR data set from first field encounter through hospital arrival could be wirelessly downloaded to a secure server and displayed on the VSDR-Viewer. Preliminary in-flight patient runs demonstrated the VSDR concept and future potential.

  11. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R; Aisiku, Imoigele P

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  12. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  13. Symptomatic Abdominal Simple Cysts: Is Percutaneous Sclerotherapy with Hypertonic Saline and Bleomycin a Treatment Option?

    PubMed Central

    Souftas, V. D.; Kosmidou, M.; Karanikas, M.; Souftas, D.; Menexes, G.; Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous sclerotherapy of symptomatic simple abdominal cysts, using hypertonic saline and bleomycin, as an alternative to surgery. Materials and Methods. This study involved fourteen consecutive patients (ten women, four men, mean age: 59.2 y) with nineteen symptomatic simple cysts (liver n = 14, kidney n = 3, and adrenal n = 2) treated percutaneously using a modified method. Initially CT-guided drainage was performed; the next day the integrity of the cyst/exclusion of extravasation or communications was evaluated under fluoroscopy, followed by two injections/reabsorptions of the same quantity of hypertonic NaCl 15% solution and three-time repetition of the same procedure with the addition of bleomycin. The catheter was then removed; the patients were hospitalized for 12 hours and underwent follow-ups on 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th months. Cyst's volumes and the reduction rate (%) were calculated in each evaluation. Results. No pain or complications were noted. A significant cyst's volume reduction was documented over time (P < 0.001). On the 12th month 17 cysts disappeared and two displayed a 98.7% and 68.9% reduction, respectively. Conclusion. This percutaneous approach constitutes a very promising nonsurgical alternative for patients with symptomatic simple cyst, without complications under proper precautions, leading to eliminating the majority of cysts. PMID:25878660

  14. The effect of hypertonic saline dextran solutions on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in anaesthetised piglets.

    PubMed

    Bellezza, M; Kerbaul, F; Roussel, L; Imbert, M; Guidon, C

    2002-10-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a regulatory mechanism by which blood is diverted from poorly ventilated to better ventilated areas of the lung. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent to which hypertonic saline dextran and dextran solutions modify the magnitude of HPV during isovolumic haemodilution in intact acutely instrumented piglets. Eighteen large white piglets were anesthetised and assigned to two groups. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) and cardiac output (Q), systemic arterial pressure and left arterial pressure (LAP) were measured. A decrease in Q was obtained by reducing venous return. This enabled measurement of transpulmonary pressures (mean PAP minus LAP) at four levels of Q in hyperoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2)=0.4) then in hypoxia (Fi,O2=0.1) in the two groups before blood soustraction (10 mL x kg(-1)) and after loading with sodium chloride (NaCl) 7.5% and dextran 6% or with dextran 6% alone. Dextran alone led to a decrease in mean PAP-LAP/Q values, and NaCl with dextran was associated with a significant shift of mean PAP-LAP/Q plots to higher pressures in hypoxia. Hypertonic saline dextran solution, as replacement fluid in isovolaemic haemodilution increased the magnitude of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas dextran solution reduced it.

  15. A clinical experience with dantrolene sodium for external urinary sphincter hypertonicity in spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Hackler, R H; Broecker, B H; Klein, F A; Brady, S M

    1980-07-01

    Significant bladder residual urine is secondary to pelvic floor skeletal muscle hypertonicity in some spinal cord injury patients with suprasacral or mixed lesions. Fifteen patients with residual urine volumes greater than 150 cc were treated with dantrolene sodium because of its ability to decrease skeletal muscle contractibility. All of the patients had urethral closure pressures greater than 100 cm. water. Of the 15 patients 8 benefited from dantrolene sodium therapy and were maintained on external condom urinary drainage. Five of these 8 patients required up to 600 mg. dantrolene sodium daily to affect this result. The residual urine volume decreased to less than 100 cc and the post-therapy decrease in urethral pressure averaged 77 cm. water (49 per cent). The patients in the failure group (residual urine greater than 150 cc) had an average decrease in urethral pressure of 21 cm. water (16 per cent). Detrusor hyporeflexia possibly contributed to the failure rate. In summary, dantrolene sodium seems to be beneficial in some patients with external urinary sphincter hypertonicity. However, it will not supplant external sphincterotomy in the more complete male spinal cord injury patient in whom reflex incontinence is of minimal concern. Dantrolene sodium could be an ideal treatment of patients with incomplete neurologic lesions in whom continence might be preserved. The drug will have to be effective at low doses to obviate the major side effect of over-all muscle weakness.

  16. Hypertonic stress regulates T cell function via pannexin-1 hemichannels and P2X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Tobias; Yip, Linda; Manohar, Monali; Sumi, Yuka; Yao, Yongli; Chen, Yu; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation increases T cell function and inhibits posttraumatic T cell anergy, which can reduce immunosuppression and sepsis in trauma patients. We have previously shown that HS induces the release of cellular ATP and enhances T cell function. However, the mechanism by which HS induces ATP release and the subsequent regulation of T cell function by ATP remain poorly understood. In the present study, we show that inhibition of the gap junction hemichannel pannexin-1 (Panx1) blocks ATP release in response to HS, and HS exposure triggers significant changes in the expression of all P2X-type ATP receptors in Jurkat T cells. Blocking or silencing of Panx1 or of P2X1, P2X4, or P2X7 receptors blunts HS-induced p38 MAPK activation and the stimulatory effects of HS on TCR/CD28-induced IL-2 gene transcription. Moreover, treatment with HS or agonists of P2X receptors overcomes T cell suppression induced by the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These findings indicate that Panx1 hemichannels facilitate ATP release in response to hypertonic stress and that P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7 receptor activation enhances T cell function. We conclude that HS and P2 receptor agonists promote T cell function and thus, could be used to improve T cell function in trauma patients. PMID:20884646

  17. Hypertonic stress regulates amino acid transport and cell cycle proteins in chick embryo hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bruscalupi, Giovannella; Massimi, Mara; Spagnuolo, Silvana; Fiore, Anna Maria; Leoni, Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Hyperosmotic stress affects cell growth, decreasing cell volume and increasing the uptake of organic osmolytes. However, the sensitivity of embryonic cells to osmotic treatment remains to be established. We have analysed some aspects of cell-cycle control and amino-acid transport in hypertonic conditions during prenatal life. The effects of hyperosmotic stress on amino-acid uptake mediated by system A, (3)H-thymidine incorporation, and regulation of cell-cycle proteins were analysed in chick embryo hepatocytes. Hypertonic stress increased system A activity and caused cell-cycle delay. Effects on amino-acid transport involved p38 kinase activation and new carrier synthesis. Cyclin D1, cdk4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) and PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) levels decreased, whereas cyclin E, p21 and p53 levels were unchanged. Incorporation of (3)H-leucine indicated decreased synthesis of cyclin D1. In contrast, analysis of mRNA by qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) showed a net increase of cyclin D1 transcripts, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. The data show that chick embryo hepatocytes respond to hyperosmotic conditions by arresting cell growth to prevent DNA damage and increasing osmolyte uptake to regulate cell volume, indicating that the adaptive response to environmental stress exists during prenatal life.

  18. Ghrelin reduces hypertonic saline intake in a variety of natriorexigenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mietlicki, Elizabeth G; Daniels, Derek

    2011-10-01

    Ghrelin is a gut peptide that has been studied extensively for its role in food intake and energy balance. More recent studies show that ghrelin reduces water intake in rats and some non-mammalian species. Despite the importance of the regulation of NaCl intake in body fluid homeostasis, the effects of ghrelin on saline intake have not been investigated. Accordingly, we tested the effect of ghrelin on water and 1.8% NaCl intake in two-bottle test conditions with the following five stimuli that increase hypertonic saline intake: central angiotensin II administration; 24 h fluid deprivation; water deprivation followed by partial rehydration; dietary sodium deficiency; and polyethylene glycol administration combined with dietary sodium deficiency. We found that ghrelin attenuated saline intake stimulated by angiotensin II, by water deprivation followed by partial rehydration and by dietary sodium deficiency. We did not detect an effect of ghrelin on saline intake after 24 h fluid deprivation without partial rehydration or after the combination of polyethylene glycol and dietary sodium deficiency. The finding that ghrelin reduced hypertonic saline intake in some, but not all, natriorexigenic conditions mirrors the previously published findings that in one-bottle tests of drinking, ghrelin reduces water intake in only some conditions. The results provide evidence for a new role for ghrelin in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis.

  19. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  20. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lucas A.; Gallet, Charles G.; Kolb, Logan J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Russi, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI) by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Methods We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth). We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%). A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03). A small tube (≤7.0 inches) was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches) (OR, 4.25; p=0.01). After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001) and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001) increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used. PMID:27625734

  1. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lucas A.; Gallet, Charles G.; Kolb, Logan J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Russi, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI) by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Methods We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth). We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%). A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03). A small tube (≤7.0 inches) was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches) (OR, 4.25; p=0.01). After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001) and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001) increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used.

  2. Prehospital Identification of Stroke Subtypes in Chinese Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hai-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Chao; Sun, Yong-An; Lyu, Pu; Cui, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differentiating intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from cerebral infarction as early as possible is vital for the timely initiation of different treatments. This study developed an applicable model for the ambulance system to differentiate stroke subtypes. Methods: From 26,163 patients initially screened over 4 years, this study comprised 1989 consecutive patients with potential first-ever acute stroke with sudden onset of the focal neurological deficit, conscious or not, and given ambulance transport for admission to two county hospitals in Yutian County of Hebei Province. All the patients underwent cranial computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the final diagnosis based on stroke criteria. Correlation with stroke subtype clinical features was calculated and Bayes’ discriminant model was applied to discriminate stroke subtypes. Results: Among the 1989 patients, 797, 689, 109, and 394 received diagnoses of cerebral infarction, ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and other forms of nonstroke, respectively. A history of atrial fibrillation, vomiting, and diabetes mellitus were associated with cerebral infarction, while vomiting, systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg, and age <65 years were more typical of ICH. For noncomatose stroke patients, Bayes’ discriminant model for stroke subtype yielded a combination of multiple items that provided 72.3% agreement in the test model and 79.3% in the validation model; for comatose patients, corresponding agreement rates were 75.4% and 73.5%. Conclusions: The model herein presented, with multiple parameters, can predict stroke subtypes with acceptable sensitivity and specificity before CT scanning, either in alert or comatose patients. This may facilitate prehospital management for patients with stroke. PMID:27098788

  3. AMPK potentiates hypertonicity-induced apoptosis by suppressing NFκB/COX-2 in medullary interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Qifei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xue, Rui; Yang, Hang; Zhou, Yunfeng; Kong, Xiaomu; Zhao, Pan; Li, Jing; Yang, Jichun; Zhu, Yi; Guan, Youfei

    2011-10-01

    Cells residing in the hypertonic, hypoxic renal medulla depend on dynamic adaptation mechanisms to respond to changes in energy supply and demand. The serine/threonine kinase 5'-AMP protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status, but whether it contributes to the survival of cells in the renal medulla is unknown. Here, hypertonic conditions induced a decrease in AMPK phosphorylation within 12 hours in renal medullary interstitial cells (RMIC), followed by a gradual return to baseline levels. Activation of AMPK markedly increased hypertonicity-induced apoptosis of RMICs and suppressed both hypertonicity-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activation; overexpression of COX-2 significantly attenuated these effects. AMPK activation also markedly reduced generation of reactive oxygen species and nuclear expression of tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein, which prevented upregulation of osmoprotective genes. In vivo, pharmacologic activation of AMPK led to massive apoptosis of RMICs and renal dysfunction in the setting of water deprivation in mice. Taken together, these results identify a critical role for AMPK in the maintenance of RMIC viability and suggest that AMPK modulates the NFκB-COX-2 survival pathway in the renal medulla. Furthermore, this study raises safety concerns for the development of AMPK activators as anti-diabetic drugs, especially for patients prone to dehydration. PMID:21903993

  4. Hypertonicity sensing in organum vasculosum lamina terminalis neurons: a mechanical process involving TRPV1 but not TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2011-10-12

    Primary osmosensory neurons in the mouse organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) transduce hypertonicity via the activation of nonselective cation channels that cause membrane depolarization and increased action potential discharge, and this effect is absent in mice lacking expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1) gene (Ciura and Bourque, 2006). However other experiments have indicated that channels encoded by Trpv4 also contribute to central osmosensation in mice (Liedtke and Friedman, 2003; Mizuno et al., 2003). At present, the mechanism by which hypertonicity modulates cation channels in OVLT neurons is unknown, and it remains unclear whether Trpv1 and Trpv4 both contribute to this process. Here, we show that physical shrinking is necessary and sufficient to mediate hypertonicity sensing in OVLT neurons isolated from adult mice. Steps coupling progressive decreases in cell volume to increased neuronal activity were quantitatively equivalent whether shrinking was evoked by osmotic pressure or mechanical aspiration. Finally, modulation of OVLT neurons by tonicity or mechanical stimulation was unaffected by deletion of trpv4 but was abolished in cells lacking Trpv1 or wild-type neurons treated with the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. Thus, hypertonicity sensing is a mechanical process requiring Trpv1, but not Trpv4. PMID:21994383

  5. Hypertonic enhancement of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals: Ca2+ independence and role of integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A. H.; Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperosmotic solutions cause markedly enhanced spontaneous quantal release of neurotransmitter from many nerve terminals. The mechanism of this enhancement is unknown. We have investigated this phenomenon at the frog neuromuscular junction with the aim of determining the degree to which it resembles the modulation of release by stretch, which has been shown to be mediated by mechanical tension on integrins.The hypertonicity enhancement, like the stretch effect, does not require Ca2+ influx or release from internal stores, although internal release may contribute to the effect. The hypertonicity effect is sharply reduced (but not eliminated) by peptides containing the RGD sequence, which compete with native ligands for integrin bonds.There is co-variance in the magnitude of the stretch and osmotic effects; that is, individual terminals exhibiting a large stretch effect also show strong enhancement by hypertonicity, and vice versa. The stretch and osmotic enhancements also can partially occlude each other.There remain some clear-cut differences between osmotic and stretch forms of modulation: the larger range of enhancement by hypertonic solutions, the relative lack of effect of osmolarity on evoked release, and the reported higher temperature sensitivity of osmotic enhancement. Nevertheless, our data strongly implicate integrins in a significant fraction of the osmotic enhancement, possibly acting via the same mechanism as stretch modulation.

  6. Simplifying prehospital analgesia. Why certain medications should or should not be used for pain management in the field.

    PubMed

    Bledsoe, Bryan; Braude, Darren; Dailey, Michael W; Myers, Jeff; Richards, Mike; Wesley, Keith

    2005-07-01

    Prehospital analgesia can be safely provided with only three agents: fentanyl, morphine and the mixed-gas nitrous oxide/oxygen. Of these three, fentanyl is by far the best agent for general EMS analgesic therapy by paramedics. However, to initiate prehospital analgesia earlier in the EMS response time frame, EMT's should administer nitrous oxide/oxygen. This protocol can easily be added to the EMT education program or through a continuing education session. All of the other agents discussed have absolutely no role in modern prehospital care. PMID:16027666

  7. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  8. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  9. Prehospital coagulation monitoring of resuscitation with point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    A variety of point-of-care monitors for the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood gas with electrolytes, and lactate can be used also in the prehospital setting for optimizing and individualizing trauma resuscitation. Point-of-care coagulation testing with activated prothrombin test, prothrombin test, and activated coagulation/clotting time tests is available for prehospital use. Although robust, battery driven, and easy to handle, many devices lack documentation for use in prehospital care. Some of the devices correspond poorly to corresponding laboratory analyses in acute trauma coagulopathy and at lower hematocrits. In trauma, viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography can rapidly detect acute trauma coagulopathy and give an overall dynamic picture of the hemostatic system and the interaction between its different components: coagulation activation, fibrin polymerization, fibrin platelet interactions within the clot, and fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry is shock resistant and has the potential to be used outside the hospital setting to guide individualized coagulation factor and blood component therapies. Sonoclot and Rheorox are two small viscoelastic instruments with one-channel options, but with less documentation. The point-of-care market for coagulation tests is quickly expanding, and new devices are introduced all the time. Still they should be better adopted to prehospital conditions, small, robust, battery charged, and rapid and use small sample volumes and whole blood.

  10. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI). PMID:27130042

  11. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  12. Prehospital Lactate Measurement by Emergency Medical Services in Patients Meeting Sepsis Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Lori L.; Hokanson, Jonathan S.; Fernstrom, Karl M.; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Lick, Charles J.; Satterlee, Paul A.; LaCroix, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to pilot test the delivery of sepsis education to emergency medical services (EMS) providers and the feasibility of equipping them with temporal artery thermometers (TATs) and handheld lactate meters to aid in the prehospital recognition of sepsis. Methods This study used a convenience sample of prehospital patients meeting established criteria for sepsis. Paramedics received education on systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, were trained in the use of TATs and hand-held lactate meters, and enrolled patients who had a recent history of infection, met ≥ 2 SIRS criteria, and were being transported to a participating hospital. Blood lactate was measured by paramedics in the prehospital setting and again in the emergency department (ED) via usual care. Paramedics entered data using an online database accessible at the point of care. Results Prehospital lactate values obtained by paramedics ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 mmol/L, and an elevated lactate (i.e. ≥ 4.0) was documented in 13 of 112 enrolled patients (12%). The unadjusted correlation of prehospital and ED lactate values was 0.57 (p< 0.001). The median interval between paramedic assessment of blood lactate and the electronic posting of the ED-measured lactate value in the hospital record was 111 minutes. Overall, 91 patients (81%) were hospitalized after ED evaluation, 27 (24%) were ultimately diagnosed with sepsis, and 3 (3%) died during hospitalization. Subjects with elevated prehospital lactate were somewhat more likely to have been admitted to the intensive care unit (23% vs 15%) and to have been diagnosed with sepsis (38% vs 22%) than those with normal lactate levels, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion In this pilot, EMS use of a combination of objective SIRS criteria, subjective assessment of infection, and blood lactate measurements did not achieve a level of diagnostic accuracy for sepsis that would warrant hospital prenotification

  13. Use of prehospital ultrasound in North America: a survey of emergency medical services medical directors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in ultrasound imaging technology have made it more accessible to prehospital providers. Little is known about how ultrasound is being used in the prehospital environment and we suspect that it is not widely used in North America at this time. We believe that EMS system characteristics such as provider training, system size, population served, and type of transport will be associated with use or non-use of ultrasound. Our study objective was to describe the current use of prehospital ultrasound in North America. Methods This study was a cross-sectional survey distributed to EMS directors on the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) mailing list. Respondents had the option to complete a paper or electronic survey. Results Of the 755 deliverable surveys we received 255 responses from across Canada and the United states for an overall response rate of 30%. Of respondents, 4.1% of EMS systems (95% CI 1.9, 6.3) reported currently using ultrasound and an additional 21.7% (95% CI 17, 26.4) are considering implementing ultrasound. EMS services using ultrasound have a higher proportion of physicians (p < 0.001) as their highest trained prehospital providers when compared to the survey group as a whole. The most commonly cited current and projected applications are Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST) and assessment of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. The cost of equipment and training are the most significant barriers to implementation of ultrasound. Most medical directors want evidence that prehospital ultrasound improves patient outcomes prior to implementation. Conclusions Prehospital ultrasound is infrequently used in North America and there are a number of barriers to its implementation, including costs of equipment and training and limited evidence demonstrating improved outcomes. A research agenda for prehospital ultrasound should focus on patient-important outcomes such as morbidity and mortality. Two commonly

  14. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. Results 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p < 0.001) more deficits in their professional training than paramedics. 80% of the paramedics affirmed to have had adequate training with respect to prehospital trauma care, all physicians claimed not to have had sufficient training for prehospital trauma care situations at Medical School. Physicians were statistically most significant dissatisfied then paramedics (p < 0.001). While most participants gave positive feedback, anesthetists were less convinced of PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn’t benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p < 0.001). After PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. Conclusion The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital

  15. Immediate prehospital hypothermia protocol in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Laure; Vitrat, François; Savary, Dominique; Debaty, Guillaume; Santre, Charles; Durand, Michel; Dessertaine, Geraldine; Timsit, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves the outcomes of cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of an immediate prehospital cooling procedure implemented just after the return of spontaneous circulation with a prehospital setting. During 30 months, the case records of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital CA presumably due to a cardiac disease were studied. A routine protocol of immediate postresuscitation cooling had been tested by an emergency team, which consisted of an infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline. We decided to assess the efficacy and tolerance of this procedure. A total of 99 patients were studied; 22 were treated with prehospital TH, and 77 consecutive patients treated with prehospital standard resuscitation served as controls. For all patients, TH was maintained for 12 to 24 hours. The demographic, clinical, and biological characteristics of the patients were similar in the 2 groups. The rate of patients with a body temperature of less than 35 degrees C upon admission was 41% in the cooling group and 18% in the control group. Rapid infusion of fluid was not associated with pulmonary edema. After 1 year of follow-up, 6 (27%) of 22 patients in the cooling group and 30 (39%) of 77 patients in the control group had a good outcome. Our preliminary observation suggests that in comatose survivors of CA, prehospital TH with infusion of large-volume, ice-cold intravenous saline is feasible and can be used safely by mobile emergency and intensive care units. PMID:19497463

  16. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  17. Intramuscular versus Intravenous Therapy for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Silbergleit, Robert; Durkalski, Valerie; Lowenstein, Daniel; Conwit, Robin; Pancioli, Arthur; Palesch, Yuko; Barsan, William

    2012-01-01

    . Adverse-event rates were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS For subjects in status epilepticus, intramuscular midazolam is at least as safe and effective as intravenous lorazepam for prehospital seizure cessation. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00809146.) PMID:22335736

  18. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  19. The transport systems of Ventricaria ventricosa: hypotonic and hypertonic turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Bisson, M A; Beilby, M J

    2002-11-01

    The time course of hypertonic and hypotonic turgor regulation was studied in Ventricaria (Valonia) using pressure probe and I/V(current-voltage) analysis. Of 11 cells, 9 exhibited hypertonic turgor regulation, ranging from 100% regulation in 150 min to 14% regulation (14% recovery of the decrease in turgor) in 314 min. Some cells began regulating immediately, others took up to 90 min to begin. The resting PD (potential difference) became more positive in most cells. The I/V characteristics became more nonlinear with high resistance between -150 and -20 mV and negative conductance region near -70 mV. Prolonged (16 sec) voltage clamps to negative levels (-100 to -150 mV) showed progressively more rapid current turn-off, but subsequent I/V characteristics were not affected. Clamping to +150 mV, however, abolished the high conductance between -50 and +100 mV to yield a uniform high resistance I/V characteristic, similar to that in high [K+]o. Decreasing illumination from 2.02 micromol sec(-1) m(-2) to 0.5 micromol sec(-1)1 m(-2) had a similar effect. Two out of a total of three cells exhibited hypotonic turgor regulation. Both cells started regulating within minutes and achieved near 50% regulation within 50 min. The PD became more negative. The I/V curves exhibited high resistance between +50 and +150 mV. The characteristics were similar to those in cells exposed to low [K+]o. Prolonged voltage clamps to both negative and positive levels showed slow current increase. Decreased illumination increased the membrane resistance. PMID:12422271

  20. Axial hypertonicity in Parkinson’s disease: Direct measurements of trunk and hip torque

    PubMed Central

    Wright, W.G.; Gurfinkel, V.S.; Nutt, J.; Horak, F.B.; Cordo, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    A cardinal feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is muscle hypertonicity, i.e. rigidity. Little is known about the axial tone in PD or the relation of hypertonia to functional impairment. We quantified axial rigidity to assess its relation to motor symptoms as measured by UPDRS and determine whether rigidity is affected by levodopa treatment. Axial rigidity was measured in 12 PD and 14 age-matched controls by directly measuring torsional resistance of the longitudinal axis to twisting (±10°). Feet were rotated relative to fixed hips (Hip Tone) or feet and hips were rotated relative to fixed shoulders (Trunk Tone). To assess tonic activity only, low constant velocity rotation (1°/s) and low acceleration (<12°/s2) were used to avoid eliciting phasic sensorimotor responses. Subjects stood during testing without changing body orientation relative to gravity. Body parts fixed against rotation could translate laterally within the boundaries of normal postural sway, but could not rotate. PD OFF-medication had higher axial rigidity (p<0.05) in hips (5.07 Nm) and trunk (5.30 Nm) than controls (3.51 Nm and 4.46 Nm, respectively), which didn’t change with levodopa (p>0.10). Hip-to-trunk torque ratio was greater in PD than controls (p<0.05) and unchanged by levodopa (p=0.28). UPDRS scores were significantly correlated with hip rigidity for PD OFF-medication (r=0.73, p<0.05). Torsional resistance to clockwise versus counter-clockwise axial rotation was more asymmetrical in PD than controls (p<0.05), however, there was no correspondence between direction of axial asymmetry and side of disease onset. In conclusion, these findings concerning hypertonicity may underlie functional impairments of posture and locomotion in PD. The absence of a levodopa effect on axial tone suggests axial and appendicular tone are controlled by separate neural circuits. PMID:17692315

  1. Collaboration between prehospital emergency medical teams and palliative care networks allows a better respect of a patient's will.

    PubMed

    Burnod, Alexis; Lenclud, Gaëlle; Ricard-Hibon, Agnès; Juvin, Philippe; Mantz, Jean; Duchateau, François-Xavier

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether patient's wishes were respected by prehospital emergency medical teams after implementing collaboration and a standardized process between a community-based palliative network and the Emergency Medical Service system. Forty patients were included. In 75% of cases, the doctor of the prehospital emergency team decided in collaboration with the network's doctor according to the established procedure. This has enabled a respect of the care plan in 83% of cases. Without collaboration with the palliative care network, through the ignorance of its existence or through the wish of the prehospital emergency medical teams for taking decisions alone, the care plan was only respected in 40% of cases, P=0.025. Collaboration between prehospital emergency medical teams and community-based palliative care networks seems to enable a better respect of the care plan in the event of emergency situations affecting the patient in a palliative situation.

  2. Hypertonic saline in paediatric traumatic brain injury: a review of nine years' experience with 23.4% hypertonic saline as standard hyperosmolar therapy.

    PubMed

    Piper, B J; Harrigan, P W

    2015-03-01

    We describe the protocolised use of 23.4% hypertonic saline solution (HTS) for intracranial hypertension in the context of traumatic brain injury in the paediatric population. This study represents the largest published data on the use of 23.4% HTS in the paediatric population. In this retrospective cohort, we focus on the efficacy, biochemical and metabolic consequences of 23.4% HTS administration in a Level 1 paediatric trauma centre. Mortality in the first seven days was 6% (2/32) with a mean intensive care unit length-of-stay of ten days (range 2 to 25, standard deviation [SD] 6). All-cause hospital mortality was 6%, with no deaths after the seven-day study period. Mean intracranial pressure (ICP) response to HTS was 10 mmHg (range 1 to 30, SD 8). For biochemistry data, the mean highest daily serum sodium was 148 mmol/l (139 to 161, SD 6), mean highest serum chloride was 115 mmol/l (range 101 to 132, SD 8) with matched mean serum base excess of -1.5 mmol/l (range 2 to -8, SD 3) and mean peak serum creatinine was 73 mmol/l (range 32 to 104, SD 32). Glasgow outcome scores of >3 (independent function) were achieved in 74% of patients. We describe the use of 23.4% HTS, demonstrating it to be a practical and efficacious method of delivering osmoles and may be advantageous in minimising total fluid volume. Thus, the bolus versus infusion debate may best be served via combining both approaches. PMID:25735686

  3. Hypertonic saline in paediatric traumatic brain injury: a review of nine years' experience with 23.4% hypertonic saline as standard hyperosmolar therapy.

    PubMed

    Piper, B J; Harrigan, P W

    2015-03-01

    We describe the protocolised use of 23.4% hypertonic saline solution (HTS) for intracranial hypertension in the context of traumatic brain injury in the paediatric population. This study represents the largest published data on the use of 23.4% HTS in the paediatric population. In this retrospective cohort, we focus on the efficacy, biochemical and metabolic consequences of 23.4% HTS administration in a Level 1 paediatric trauma centre. Mortality in the first seven days was 6% (2/32) with a mean intensive care unit length-of-stay of ten days (range 2 to 25, standard deviation [SD] 6). All-cause hospital mortality was 6%, with no deaths after the seven-day study period. Mean intracranial pressure (ICP) response to HTS was 10 mmHg (range 1 to 30, SD 8). For biochemistry data, the mean highest daily serum sodium was 148 mmol/l (139 to 161, SD 6), mean highest serum chloride was 115 mmol/l (range 101 to 132, SD 8) with matched mean serum base excess of -1.5 mmol/l (range 2 to -8, SD 3) and mean peak serum creatinine was 73 mmol/l (range 32 to 104, SD 32). Glasgow outcome scores of >3 (independent function) were achieved in 74% of patients. We describe the use of 23.4% HTS, demonstrating it to be a practical and efficacious method of delivering osmoles and may be advantageous in minimising total fluid volume. Thus, the bolus versus infusion debate may best be served via combining both approaches.

  4. Prehospital trauma care reduces mortality. Ten-year results from a time-cohort and trauma audit study in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Blunt implementation of Western trauma system models is not feasible in low-resource communities with long prehospital transit times. The aims of the study were to evaluate to which extent a low-cost prehospital trauma system reduces trauma deaths where prehospital transit times are long, and to identify specific life support interventions that contributed to survival. Methods In the study period from 1997 to 2006, 2,788 patients injured by land mines, war, and traffic accidents were managed by a chain-of-survival trauma system where non-graduate paramedics were the key care providers. The study was conducted with a time-period cohort design. Results 37% of the study patients had serious injuries with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9. The mean prehospital transport time was 2.5 hours (95% CI 1.9 - 3.2). During the ten-year study period trauma mortality was reduced from 17% (95% CI 15 -19) to 4% (95% CI 3.5 - 5), survival especially improving in major trauma victims. In most patients with airway problems, in chest injured, and in patients with external hemorrhage, simple life support measures were sufficient to improve physiological severity indicators. Conclusion In case of long prehospital transit times simple life support measures by paramedics and lay first responders reduce trauma mortality in major injuries. Delegating life-saving skills to paramedics and lay people is a key factor for efficient prehospital trauma systems in low-resource communities. PMID:22304808

  5. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  6. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases. PMID:27213656

  7. Hypertonic-induced lamin A/C synthesis and distribution to nucleoplasmic speckles is mediated by TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Favale, Nicolas O.; Sterin Speziale, Norma B.; Fernandez Tome, Maria C.

    2007-12-21

    Lamin A/C is the most studied nucleoskeletal constituent. Lamin A/C expression indicates cell differentiation and is also a structural component of nuclear speckles, which are involved in gene expression regulation. Hypertonicity has been reported to induce renal epithelial cell differentiation and expression of TonEBP (NFAT5), a transcriptional activator of hypertonicity-induced gene transcription. In this paper, we investigate the effect of hypertonicity on lamin A/C expression in MDCK cells and the involvement of TonEBP. Hypertonicity increased lamin A/C expression and its distribution to nucleoplasm with speckled pattern. Microscopy showed codistribution of TonEBP and lamin A/C in nucleoplasmic speckles, and immunoprecipitation demonstrated their interaction. TonEBP silencing caused lamin A/C redistribution from nucleoplasmic speckles to the nuclear rim, followed by lamin decrease, thus showing that hypertonicity induces lamin A/C speckles through a TonEBP-dependent mechanism. We suggest that lamin A/C speckles could serve TonEBP as scaffold thus favoring its role in hypertonicity.

  8. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases.

  9. [Pre-hospital care for wounded in military conflicts: state and prospects].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Reva, V A

    2015-10-01

    Pre-hospital care is one of the most important links in a chain of the military medical tenet. A survival of the most of severe casualties at the scene depends on a good quality and well-timed first aid and paramedic care. Based on the current state of medical equipment and training of the soldiers of the Russian and foreign armies, we summarized the data about the main medical products designed for pre-hospital care, briefly analyzed and compared their effectiveness to the foreign analogues. It is currently obvious, that fundamental changes in First aid kit modification and Medical Bags are warranted according to the reality and soldier's demands in combat operations. Proposals for modernization of military medical equipment were put forward. PMID:26827503

  10. Effect of hypertonic saline infusion on the level of immunoreactive dynorphin in extracted human plasma.

    PubMed

    Margioris, A N; Brockmann, G; Kalogeras, K T; Fjellestad-Paulsen, A; Stratakis, C A; Vamvakopoulos, N; Chrousos, G P

    1990-08-01

    Dynorphin-A and its related peptides are derived from prodynorphin, one of the three known endogenous opioid precursors. The prodynorphin gene is expressed in the vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamus, while its peptide products are present in the vasopressin (AVP) neurosecretory vesicles of the neurohypophysis. The concentration of immunoreactive (IR) dynorphin is orders of magnitude higher in the neurohypophysis than in any other tissue, suggesting that perhaps the prodynorphin-derived peptides are secreted from the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal unit into the general circulation. Experiments in rats have shown that osmotic stimuli increase both AVP and prodynorphin in the hypothalamus. To determine whether human hypothalamic prodynorphin is also under osmotic regulation, we measured plasma IR-dynorphin, plasma IR-AVP, and serum sodium immediately before and during the infusion of normal or hypertonic saline in normal human volunteers. Because of the unusual susceptibility of the prodynorphin-derived peptides to cleavage by endopeptidases, we also developed an appropriate plasma dynorphin extraction technique. We found that the IR-dynorphin present in human plasma was composed of 6K- and 4K-sized peptides and that no larger than 6K or smaller than 4K dynorphins were present. The infusion of normal saline did not have any significant effect on plasma IR-dynorphin, while 3% hypertonic saline increased its plasma levels. Thus, the mean IR-dynorphin level in the plasma of the volunteers infused with normal saline was 40.3 +/- 6.4 fmol/mL (mean +/- SE; n = 6) at zero time; after 30 min of infusion, plasma IR-dynorphin was 36.0 +/- 6.3, after 60 min it was 29.9 +/- 5, after 90 min it was 36.0 +/- 4.7, after 120 min it was 36.8 +/- 3.2, and after 150 min it was 36.0 +/- 6.1. The plasma IR-dynorphin level in the volunteers infused with hypertonic saline was 31.7 +/- 3.5 fmol/mL (mean +/- SE; n = 10) at zero time. After 30 min of infusion it increased

  11. Hypertonic saline solutions do not influence the solubility of sputum from secretor and non-secretor cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Marcelo A.I.; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara C.; Ferreira, Ana Iara C.; Barja, Paulo R.; Santos de Faria Junior, Newton; de Oliveira, Luís Vicente F.; de Mattos, Luiz C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Functional alterations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) increase the viscoelasticity of pulmonary secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and require the use of therapeutic aerosols. The biochemical properties of exocrine secretions are influenced by the expression of the FUT2 gene which determine the secretor and non-secretor phenotypes of the ABH glycoconjugates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of secretor and non-secretor phenotypes by means of photoacoustic analysis, both the typical interaction time (t 0) and the solubilization interval (Δt) of the sputum of secretor and non-secretor CF patients nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations. Material and methods Sputum samples were obtained by spontaneous expectoration from 6 secretor and 4 non-secretor patients with CF. Each sample was nebulized with 3%, 6%, and 7% hypertonic saline solutions in a photoacoustic cell. The values of t 0 and Δt were determined using the Origin 7.5® computer program (Microcal Software Inc.). The t-test was employed using the GraphPad Instat 3.0® computer program to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each parameter. Results For all hypertonic saline solutions tested, the mean values of t 0 and Δt do not show statistically significant differences between secretor and non-secretor patients. Conclusions The secretor and non-secretor phenotypes do not influence the in vitro solubilization of the sputum nebulized by hypertonic saline solutions at different concentrations when analysed by photoacoustic technique. PMID:22291775

  12. Osmotic injury of PC-3 cells by hypertonic NaCl solutions at temperatures above 0 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Zawlodzka, Sylwia; Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Cell injury due to osmotic dehydration, which is regarded as a major cause of injury during freeze-thaw processes, was examined closely using a perfusion microscope. Human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3), which were put in a chamber, were subjected to hyperosmotic stresses by perfusing NaCl solutions of varying concentrations into the chamber. Cells were exposed to 2.5 and 4.5M NaCl solutions for 1-60 min by changing the concentrations at 0.2, 1, and 10 M/min. Decrease in cell viability was biphasic: the viability decreased first after the increase in NaCl concentration due to dehydration and then after return to isotonic conditions due to rehydration. Rehydration was substantially more responsible for cell injury than dehydration, which was marked at lower NaCl concentrations and lower temperatures. Injury resulting from contraction was negligible at the 2.5 M NaCl solution. While the hypertonic cell survival, which was determined without a return to isotonic conditions, was almost independent of time of exposure to hyperosmotic concentrations, the post-hypertonic survival after returning to isotonic conditions decreased with increasing exposure time, suggesting that the rehydration-induced injury was a consequence of time-dependent alteration of the plasma membrane. The post-hypertonic survival was lower for higher NaCl concentrations and higher temperatures, which was qualitatively consistent with previous studies. Effects of the rate of concentration change on the post-hypertonic cell survival were observed at 4.5 M; the highest rate of survival was obtained by slower increase and faster decrease in the NaCl concentration. However, the effect was negligible at 2.5 M. PMID:15710370

  13. Small-volume fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline prevents inflammation but not mortality in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Soheyl; Zimmermann, Klaus; Szelényi, Zoltán; Hamar, János; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Redl, Heinz; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2006-03-01

    Hemorrhage remains a primary cause of death in civilian and military trauma. Permissive hypotensive resuscitation is a possible approach to reduce bleeding in patients until they can be stabilized in an appropriate hospital setting. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) is of particular interest because it allows one to modulate the inflammatory response to hemorrhage and trauma. Here, we tested the utility of permissive hypotensive resuscitation with hypertonic fluids in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Animals were subjected to massive hemorrhage [mean arterial pressure (MAP) = 30 - 35 mmHg for 2 h until decompensation] and partially resuscitated with a bolus dose of 4 mL/kg of 7.5% NaCl (HS), hypertonic hydroxyl ethyl starch (HHES; hydroxyl ethyl starch + 7.5% NaCl), or normal saline (NS) followed by additional infusion of Ringer solution to maintain MAP at 40 to 45 mmHg for 40 min (hypotensive state). Finally, animals were fully resuscitated with Ringer solution and the heparinized shed blood. Hypotensive resuscitation with NS caused a significant increase in plasma interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-2, interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). This increase was blocked by treatment with HS. HHES treatment significantly reduced the increase of IL-1beta and IL-2 but not that of the other cytokines studied. Despite the strong effects of HS and HHES on cytokine production, both treatments had little effect on plasma lactate, base excess (BE), white blood cell (WBC) count, myeloperoxidase (MPO) content, and the wet/dry weight ratio of the lungs. Moreover, on day 7 after shock, the survival rate in rats treated with HS was markedly, but not significantly, lower than that of NS-treated animals (47% vs. 63%, respectively). In summary, hypotensive resuscitation with hypertonic fluids reduces the inflammatory response but not lung tissue damage or mortality after severe hemorrhagic shock.

  14. Epithelial restitution and cellular proliferation after gastric mucosal damage caused by hypertonic NaCl in rats.

    PubMed

    Sørbye, H; Svanes, C; Stangeland, L; Kvinnsland, S; Svanes, K

    1988-01-01

    Hypertonic NaCl enhances gastric cancer in rats induced by N-nitroso compounds. This study was designed to examine the structural changes and alterations in mitotic activity occurring after mucosal exposure to hypertonic NaCl. Wistar rats were given one ml of 4.5 M NaCl by gastric tube and groups of 4-5 animals were sacrificed at different time intervals up to 120 h. An i.p. injection of thymidine was given 1 h before death. Samples of antral and corpus mucosa were prepared for microscopy and autoradiography. Hypertonic NaCl caused uniform destruction of surface mucous cells and pits in the corpus and antrum. Epithelial restitution with the formation of a thin epithelial layer occurred within one h of damage. The mucosa changed towards normal within 24-48 h. The distance between mucosal surface and the replicating cells decreased during the first 2 h. The proliferation zone remained in the middle of the glandular layer throughout the experiment. The proliferative activity increased during the first 24 h after mucosal damage. The number of labelled cells per unit area of mucosa was somewhat larger in the corpus than the antrum, but in the corpus the distance between proliferating cells and mucosal surface was double that of the antrum. Hypertonic NaCl causes a series of changes in the gastric mucosa. The increased mitotic activity can only partly explain the cocarcinogenic effect, since N-nitroso-induced adenocarcinomas occur predominantly in the antrum while the mitotic activity is maximal in the corpus.

  15. Sensory findings after stimulation of the thoracolumbar fascia with hypertonic saline suggest its contribution to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Magerl, Walter; Benrath, Justus; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline into deep tissues of the back (subcutis, muscle, or the surrounding fascia) can induce acute low back pain (LBP). So far, no study has analyzed differences in temporal, qualitative, and spatial pain characteristics originating from these tissues. The current study aimed to investigate the role of the thoracolumbar fascia as a potential source of LBP. In separate sessions, 12 healthy subjects received ultrasound-guided bolus injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) or hypertonic saline (5.8%) into the erector spinae muscle, the thoracolumbar fascia (posterior layer), and the overlying subcutis. Subjects were asked to rate pain intensity, duration, quality, and spatial extent. Pressure pain thresholds were determined pre and post injection. Injections of hypertonic saline into the fascia resulted in significantly larger area under the curve of pain intensity over time than injections into subcutis (P<0.01) or muscle (P<0.001), primarily based on longer pain durations and, to a lesser extent, on higher peak pain ratings. Pressure hyperalgesia was only induced by injection of hypertonic saline into muscle, but not fascia or subcutis. Pain radiation and pain affect evoked by fascia injection exceeded those of the muscle (P<0.01) and the subcutis significantly (P<0.05). Pain descriptors after fascia injection (burning, throbbing, and stinging) suggested innervation by both A- and C-fiber nociceptors. These findings show that the thoracolumbar fascia is the deep tissue of the back that is most sensitive to chemical stimulation, making it a prime candidate to contribute to nonspecific LBP but not to localized pressure hyperalgesia. PMID:24076047

  16. Sensory findings after stimulation of the thoracolumbar fascia with hypertonic saline suggest its contribution to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Andreas; Hoheisel, Ulrich; Magerl, Walter; Benrath, Justus; Klein, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2014-02-01

    Injection of hypertonic saline into deep tissues of the back (subcutis, muscle, or the surrounding fascia) can induce acute low back pain (LBP). So far, no study has analyzed differences in temporal, qualitative, and spatial pain characteristics originating from these tissues. The current study aimed to investigate the role of the thoracolumbar fascia as a potential source of LBP. In separate sessions, 12 healthy subjects received ultrasound-guided bolus injections of isotonic saline (0.9%) or hypertonic saline (5.8%) into the erector spinae muscle, the thoracolumbar fascia (posterior layer), and the overlying subcutis. Subjects were asked to rate pain intensity, duration, quality, and spatial extent. Pressure pain thresholds were determined pre and post injection. Injections of hypertonic saline into the fascia resulted in significantly larger area under the curve of pain intensity over time than injections into subcutis (P<0.01) or muscle (P<0.001), primarily based on longer pain durations and, to a lesser extent, on higher peak pain ratings. Pressure hyperalgesia was only induced by injection of hypertonic saline into muscle, but not fascia or subcutis. Pain radiation and pain affect evoked by fascia injection exceeded those of the muscle (P<0.01) and the subcutis significantly (P<0.05). Pain descriptors after fascia injection (burning, throbbing, and stinging) suggested innervation by both A- and C-fiber nociceptors. These findings show that the thoracolumbar fascia is the deep tissue of the back that is most sensitive to chemical stimulation, making it a prime candidate to contribute to nonspecific LBP but not to localized pressure hyperalgesia.

  17. Prehospital transport practices prevalent among patients presenting to the pediatric emergency of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Jhuma; Singh, Archana; Narsaria, Praveen; Dev, Nishanth; Singh, Pradeep; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the emergency are under-reported. Our objectives were to evaluate the prehospital transport practices prevalent among children presenting to the pediatric emergency and their subsequent clinical course and outcome. Methods: In this prospective observational study we enrolled all children ≤17 years of age presenting to the pediatric emergency (from January to June 2013) and recorded their demographic data and variables pertaining to prehospital transport practices. Data was entered into Microsoft Excel and analyzed using Stata 11 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Results: A total of 319 patients presented to the emergency during the study period. Acute gastroenteritis, respiratory tract infection and fever were the most common reasons for presentation to the emergency. Seventy-three (23%) children required admission. Most commonly used public transport was auto-rickshaw (138, 43.5%) and median time taken to reach hospital was 22 min (interquartile range: 5, 720). Twenty-six patients were referred from another health facility. Of these, 25 were transported in ambulance unaccompanied. About 8% (25) of parents reported having difficulties in transporting their child to the hospital and 57% (181) of parents felt fellow passengers and drivers were unhelpful. On post-hoc analysis, only time taken to reach the hospital (30 vs. 20 min; relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 1.02 [1.007, 1.03], P = 0.003) and the illness nature were significant (45% vs. 2.6%; 0.58 [0.50, 0.67], P ≤ 0.0001) on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: In relation to prehospital transport among pediatric patients we observed that one-quarter of children presenting to the emergency required admission, the auto-rickshaw was the commonest mode of transport and that there is a lack of prior communication before referring patients for further management. PMID:26321808

  18. Adherence to guidelines and protocols in the prehospital and emergency care setting: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Remco H A; Vloet, Lilian C M; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Meijer, Sanne; Mintjes-de Groot, Joke A J; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    A gap between guidelines or protocols and clinical practice often exists, which may result in patients not receiving appropriate care. Therefore, the objectives of this systematic review were (1) to give an overview of professionals' adherence to (inter)national guidelines and protocols in the emergency medical dispatch, prehospital and emergency department (ED) settings, and (2) to explore which factors influencing adherence were described in studies reporting on adherence. PubMed (including MEDLINE), CINAHL, EMBASE and the Cochrane database for systematic reviews were systematically searched. Reference lists of included studies were also searched for eligible studies. Identified articles were screened on title, abstract and year of publication (≥1990) and were included when reporting on adherence in the eligible settings. Following the initial selection, articles were screened full text and included if they concerned adherence to a (inter)national guideline or protocol, and if the time interval between data collection and publication date was <10 years. Finally, articles were assessed on reporting quality. Each step was undertaken by two independent researchers. Thirty-five articles met the criteria, none of these addressed the emergency medical dispatch setting or protocols. Median adherence ranged from 7.8-95% in the prehospital setting, and from 0-98% in the ED setting. In the prehospital setting, recommendations on monitoring came with higher median adherence percentages than treatment recommendations. For both settings, cardiology treatment recommendations came with relatively low median adherence percentages. Eight studies identified patient and organisational factors influencing adherence. The results showed that professionals' adherence to (inter)national prehospital and emergency department guidelines shows a wide variation, while adherence in the emergency medical dispatch setting is not reported. As insight in influencing factors for adherence in the

  19. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  20. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. Method In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Results Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic “bubble-wrap” were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. Conclusion The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic “bubble wrap”, and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units. PMID:23938145

  1. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scheppke, Kenneth A.; Braghiroli, Joao; Shalaby, Mostafa; Chait, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52) were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. PMID:25493111

  2. Determination of fluid extraction and osmotic conductance sigma K in the lung with hypertonic NaCl infusion. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M; Lee, J

    1992-11-01

    A dispersion and extraction model of the lung is developed to assess how the infusion of hypertonic saline into the pulmonary artery changes the gravimetric density of pulmonary venous blood. The dispersion analysis is built on the indicator dilution curve measured for the pulmonary circulation. The extraction model consists of microvascular and interstitial compartments separated by a permeable pulmonary endothelium. Because the density of fluid extracted by the hypertonic disturbance is lower than the blood density, the extraction leads to a decrease in blood density. Two cases of fluid extraction are analyzed, a hypertonic infusion to elevate the osmotic pressure in the pulmonary arterial blood in the form of a step function and an infusion performed over a period of 1 sec. Both cases show that the dispersion significantly attenuates the changes in osmotic pressure and density as they are transported by the blood along the pulmonary vasculature. Because the model has taken into account the effect of dispersion and pulmonary blood flow, the equations developed here provide the basis to calculate from the density change in pulmonary venous blood the characteristics of osmotic extraction intrinsic to the lung.

  3. Interaction function gamma(x) for Chinese hamster cells treated with hypertonic phosphate-buffered saline after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoi, M.; Kanai, T.

    1988-12-01

    The repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) in stationary-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells, which was expressible by a postirradiation treatment with hypertonic (0.5 M NaCl) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), was analyzed within the framework of the theory of dual radiation action. The interaction function gamma(x) was estimated for cells permitted to repair PLD for various intervals of time. The experimental data indicated that 50-60% of the lethal lesions produced at the time of irradiation were repaired in 120 min. The repair of PLD was implicitly involved in the probability of the interaction of sublesions. That is, g(x,trep) was defined as the probability that two sublesions separated by distance x interact to produce a lethal lesion which will not be repaired until the fixation by treatment with hypertonic PBS at time trep after irradiation. It is concluded that the time dependence of the repair of PLD is not independent of the interaction distance x. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) The repair of a lesion produced by a long distance interaction is not detectable by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic PBS. (2) A lesion produced by a short distance interaction is rapidly repaired in about 20 min. (3) A lesion produced by the interaction of sublesions separated by a distance of about 100 nm is repaired slowly.

  4. Opposite effects of oxytocin on water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or polyethylene glycol administration.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Antonio; Mahía, Javier; Mediavilla, Cristina; Puerto, Amadeo

    2015-03-15

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohormone, has been related to natriuretic and diuretic effects and also to water intake and sodium appetite. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of subcutaneous OT administration on water intake and urine-related measures induced by the administration of hypertonic NaCl (experiment 1) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) (experiment 2). Experiment 1 showed that OT administration increases the urine volume, urinary sodium concentration, and natriuresis and reduces the water intake, water and sodium balances, and estimated plasma sodium concentration induced by hypertonic NaCl administration. Conversely, experiment 2 showed that OT administration increases the water intake and the antidiuretic response induced by PEG administration. These results show that the opposite effects of OT on the water intake induced by hypertonic NaCl or PEG administration are accompanied by differential regulatory effects, enhancing a natriuretic response in the first experiment and generating an antidiuretic reaction in the second experiment. This study suggests a differential regulatory effect of OT during states of intra- and extracellular thirst.

  5. Back strength and flexibility of EMS providers in practicing prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Crill, Matthew T; Hostler, David

    2005-06-01

    In the execution of prehospital care duties, an EMS provider may be required to carry equipment and patients over long distances or over multiple flights of stairs at any time of the day. At a minimum, a prehospital provider must have sufficient lower back strength and hamstring flexibility to prevent musculoskeletal injury while lifting. This study administered fitness assessments related to the occupational activities of the prehospital provider with the purpose of describing the incidence of occupational back injury and percentage of providers with known risk factors for back injury. Ninety subjects were tested during a regional EMS conference. Men were significantly taller and heavier than women and had significantly less hamstring flexibility. Body Mass Index was 30.7 +/- 7.2 in men and 28 +/- 5.7 in women. However, no significant differences were noted in an extension test of back strength. When surveyed, 47.8% of subjects reported a back injury in the previous 6 months but only 39.1% of these injuries were sustained while performing EMS duties. While only 13% of these injuries resulted in missed work, 52.2% reported their injury interfered with their daily activities. In spite of the physical nature of the profession, EMS providers in our sample were significantly overweight according to their Body Mass Index and may lack sufficient back strength and flexibilityfor safe execution of their duties. This group of professionals may be at risk for occupational injury and should be targeted for interventions to improve strength and flexibility.

  6. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  7. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physician-staffed pre-hospital units are employed in many Western emergency medical services (EMS) systems. Although these services usually integrate well within their EMS, little is known about the quality of care delivered, the precision of dispatch, and whether the services deliver a higher quality of care to pre-hospital patients. There is no common data set collected to document the activity of physician pre-hospital activity which makes shared research efforts difficult. The aim of this study was to develop a core data set for routine documentation and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. Methods Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary meeting in Stavanger, Norway. Results The core data set was divided into 5 sections: "fixed system variables", "event operational descriptors", " patient descriptors", "process mapping", and "outcome measures and quality indicators". After the initial round, a total of 361 variables were proposed by the experts. Subsequent rounds reduced the number of core variables to 45. These constituted the final core data set. Emphasis was placed on the standardisation of reporting time variables, chief complaints and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions Using a modified nominal group technique, we have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care. PMID:22107787

  8. Hypertonic Stress Induces VEGF Production in Human Colon Cancer Cell Line Caco-2: Inhibitory Role of Autocrine PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Luciana B.; Piva, Bruno; Diaz, Bruno L.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG)E2 are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE2 generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE2 generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE2 production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE2 on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA2 (ATK) and COX-2 (NS-398) inhibitors, that completely block PGE2 generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE2 receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE2 or selective EP2 receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE2 appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl2 was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE2 generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE2 plays an inhibitory role on VEGF production by

  9. The Need for More Prehospital Research on Language Barriers: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Ramsey C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite evidence from other healthcare settings that language barriers negatively impact patient outcomes, the literature on language barriers in emergency medical services (EMS) has not been previously summarized. The objective of this study is to systematically review existing studies of the impact of language barriers on prehospital emergency care and identify opportunities for future research. Methods A systematic review with narrative synthesis of publications with populations specific to the prehospital setting and outcome measures specific to language barriers was conducted. A four-prong search strategy of academic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, and Clinical Key) through March 2015, web-based search for gray literature, search of citation lists, and review of key conference proceedings using pre-defined eligibility criteria was used. Language-related outcomes were categorized and reported as community-specific outcomes, EMS provider-specific outcomes, patient-specific outcomes, or health system-specific outcomes. Results Twenty-two studies met eligibility criteria for review. Ten publications (45%) focused on community-specific outcomes. Language barriers are perceived as a barrier by minority language speaking communities to activating EMS. Eleven publications (50%) reported outcomes specific to EMS providers, with six of these studies focused on EMS dispatch. EMS dispatchers describe less accurate and delayed dispatch of resources when confronted with language discordant callers, as well as limitations in the ability to provide medical direction to callers. There is a paucity of research on EMS treatment and transport decisions, and no studies provided patient-specific or health system-specific outcomes. Key research gaps include identifying the mechanisms by which language barriers impact care, the effect of language barriers on EMS utilization and clinically significant outcomes, and the cost implications of addressing language

  10. Muscular hypertonicity: a suspected contributor to rheumatological manifestations observed in ambulatory practice

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Kamat, Sona; Gajdosik, Richard; Ahmad, Naila; Aldag, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this retrospective study of non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients was to investigate if the individuals clinically identified with muscular hypertonicity (MHT) had increased clinical manifestations compared with those of age- and gender-matched patients with the same disorders. Material and Methods The MHT status was clinically identified in the rheumatologist’s myofascial protocol examination as relatively increased passive resistance of relaxed muscle on a slow gentle stretch. Clinical and laboratory data were abstracted on a pre-coded form, including symptom and physical examination features, serum assays, and medications. Results The 19 MHT cases complained of greater subjective stiffness (p=0.010) and tiredness (p=0.018) at initial encounters and increased aching pain (p=0.049) and were prescribed more (p=0.003) mild narcotic analgesics than the 19 comparison patients. The cases had higher (p=0.027) serum creatine kinase levels, and patients with diffuse MHT had greater frequency of heavy (30+pack-years) cigarette smoking (p=0.002) than comparison subjects. Narcotic usage was also greater in cases with diffuse involvement. Conclusion Non-inflammatory rheumatic disease patients with MHT had an overall similar profile as that of comparison patients but had greater musculoskeletal complaints, and those with diffuse involvement had greater narcotic usage. Further research, including quantitative measurements of muscle stiffness, are required to determine whether MHT is a documented entity associated with increased rheumatological manifestations. PMID:27708929

  11. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  12. Hypertonic fluids are secreted by medial and lateral segments in duck (Anas platyrhynchos) nasal salt glands.

    PubMed

    Butler, David G

    2002-05-01

    Indwelling catheters were used to collect fluid directly from the medial and lateral segments of duck nasal salt glands showing, for the first time, that the secretions are fully hypertonic before reaching the medial and lateral drainage ducts. Using this method it was possible to show that (a) there is a functional symmetry between the left and right salt glands, (b) the medial segment always secretes fluid at approximately twice the rate of the lateral segment and (c) fluid secreted by the medial segment has the same ionic composition but variable ion concentrations when compared with fluid from the lateral segment. A 12 % increase in post-segmental fluid osmolality was probably due to the evaporation of water from epithelial surfaces in the nasal cavities during breathing. A post-segmental outflux of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Cl(-) in the medial and lateral collecting ducts and/or nasal epithelium may be of adaptive significance when birds inhabit calcium- and magnesium-rich marine environments. PMID:11986388

  13. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity. PMID:26055957

  14. Hypertonic saline infusion in traumatic brain injury increases the incidence of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Coritsidis, George; Diamond, Nechama; Rahman, Aleef; Solodnik, Paul; Lawrence, Kayode; Rhazouani, Salwa; Phalakornkul, Suganda

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the incidence of electrolyte abnormalities, acute kidney injury (AKI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and infections in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated with hypertonic saline (HTS) as osmolar therapy. We retrospectively studied 205 TBI patients, 96 with HTS and 109 without, admitted to the surgical/trauma intensive care unit between 2006 and 2012. Hemodynamics, electrolytes, length of stay (LOS), acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), injury severity scores (ISS) and mortality were tabulated. Infection, mechanical ventilation, DVT and AKI incidence were reviewed. HTS was associated with increased LOS and all infections (p=0.0001). After correction for the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and ventilator need, pulmonary infections (p=0.001) and LOS remained higher with HTS (p=0.0048). HTS did not result in increased blood pressure, DVT, AKI or neurological benefits. HTS significantly increased the odds for all infections, most specifically pulmonary infections, in patients with GCS<8. Due to these findings, HTS in TBI should be administered with caution regardless of acuity.

  15. Hypertonic saline for the management of raised intracranial pressure after severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Halinder S; Härtl, Roger

    2015-05-01

    Hyperosmolar agents are commonly used as an initial treatment for the management of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). They have an excellent adverse-effect profile compared to other therapies, such as hyperventilation and barbiturates, which carry the risk of reducing cerebral perfusion. The hyperosmolar agent mannitol has been used for several decades to reduce raised ICP, and there is accumulating evidence from pilot studies suggesting beneficial effects of hypertonic saline (HTS) for similar purposes. An ideal therapeutic agent for ICP reduction should reduce ICP while maintaining cerebral perfusion (pressure). While mannitol can cause dehydration over time, HTS helps maintain normovolemia and cerebral perfusion, a finding that has led to a large amount of pilot data being published on the benefits of HTS, albeit in small cohorts. Prophylactic therapy is not recommended with mannitol, although it may be beneficial with HTS. To date, no large clinical trial has been performed to directly compare the two agents. The best current evidence suggests that mannitol is effective in reducing ICP in the management of traumatic intracranial hypertension and carries mortality benefit compared to barbiturates. Current evidence regarding the use of HTS in severe TBI is limited to smaller studies, which illustrate a benefit in ICP reduction and perhaps mortality.

  16. The Effect of Hypertonic Media on Water Permeability of Frog Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ripoche, P.; Bourguet, J.; Parisi, M.

    1973-01-01

    The frog urinary bladder undergoes, in some conditions, a marked increase of its water permeability when incubated in hypertonic media. This increase was observed with various nonpermeant solutes. It seems to result from the shrinkage of an osmo-sensitive compartment of the tissue, probably the epithelial cells. Many similarities were found between this effect and the physiological increase in water permeability (hydrosmotic response) elicited by antidiuretic hormone (ADH): both were dependent on the physiological state of the animals, and although the response was slower after hyperosmolar than after hormonal challenge, the patterns of response were similar, and in both cases markedly dependent on bathing solution temperature. Norepinephrine and prostaglandin E1, which in this tissue reduce the hydrosmotic action of ADH, presumably by inhibiting the adenyl cylase also reduced the effect of hyperosmolarity. Conversely this effect was potentiated by incubation in the presence of oxytocin, exogenous cyclic AMP, and theophylline, conditions in which the intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP is increased. These data demonstrate that the response to hyperosmolarity is elicited, at least partly, by mechanisms also involved in the physiological hydrosmotic response to ADH. PMID:4345637

  17. Hypertonic fluids are secreted by medial and lateral segments in duck (Anas platyrhynchos) nasal salt glands

    PubMed Central

    Butler, David G

    2002-01-01

    Indwelling catheters were used to collect fluid directly from the medial and lateral segments of duck nasal salt glands showing, for the first time, that the secretions are fully hypertonic before reaching the medial and lateral drainage ducts. Using this method it was possible to show that (a) there is a functional symmetry between the left and right salt glands, (b) the medial segment always secretes fluid at approximately twice the rate of the lateral segment and (c) fluid secreted by the medial segment has the same ionic composition but variable ion concentrations when compared with fluid from the lateral segment. A 12 % increase in post-segmental fluid osmolality was probably due to the evaporation of water from epithelial surfaces in the nasal cavities during breathing. A post-segmental outflux of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl− in the medial and lateral collecting ducts and/or nasal epithelium may be of adaptive significance when birds inhabit calcium- and magnesium-rich marine environments. PMID:11986388

  18. Influence of environmental hypertonicity on the induction of ureogenesis and amino acid metabolism in air-breathing walking catfish (Clarias batrachus, Bloch).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bodhisattwa; Bhuyan, Gitalee; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2014-07-01

    Effect of environmental hypertonicity, due to exposure to 300 mM mannitol solution for 7 days, on the induction of ureogenesis and also on amino acid metabolism was studied in the air-breathing walking catfish, C. batrachus, which is already known to have the capacity to face the problem of osmolarity stress in addition to other environmental stresses in its natural habitats. Exposure to hypertonic mannitol solution led to reduction of ammonia excretion rate by about 2-fold with a concomitant increase of urea-N excretion rate by about 2-fold. This was accompanied by significant increase in the levels of both ammonia and urea in different tissues and also in plasma. Further, the environmental hypertonicity also led to significant accumulation of different non-essential free amino acids (FAAs) and to some extent the essential FAAs, thereby causing a total increase of non-essential FAA pool by 2-3-fold and essential FAA pool by 1.5-2.0-fold in most of the tissues studied including the plasma. The activities of three ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) enzymes such as carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase in liver and kidney tissues, and four key amino acid metabolism-related enzymes such as glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase (reductive amination), alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransaminase were also significantly up-regulated in different tissues of the fish while exposing to hypertonic environment. Thus, more accumulation and excretion of urea-N observed during hypertonic exposure were probably associated with the induction of ureogenesis through the induced OUC, and the increase of amino acid pool was probably mainly associated with the up-regulation of amino acid synthesizing machineries in this catfish in hypertonic environment. These might have helped the walking catfish in defending the osmotic stress and to acclimatize better under hypertonic environment, which is very much uncommon among

  19. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg(-1) min(-1)), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (P time < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited.

  20. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  1. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  2. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Van Dillen, Christine M; Tice, Matthew R; Patel, Archita D; Meurer, David A; Tyndall, Joseph A; Elie, Marie Carmelle; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88-1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25-1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43-1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  3. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  4. Taking the Blood Bank to the Field: The Design and Rationale of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) Trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joshua B; Guyette, Francis X; Neal, Matthew D; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Daley, Brian J; Harbrecht, Brian G; Miller, Richard S; Phelan, Herb A; Adams, Peter W; Early, Barbara J; Peitzman, Andrew B; Billiar, Timothy R; Sperry, Jason L

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage and trauma induced coagulopathy remain major drivers of early preventable mortality in military and civilian trauma. Interest in the use of prehospital plasma in hemorrhaging patients as a primary resuscitation agent has grown recently. Trauma center-based damage control resuscitation using early and aggressive plasma transfusion has consistently demonstrated improved outcomes in hemorrhaging patients. Additionally, plasma has been shown to have several favorable immunomodulatory effects. Preliminary evidence with prehospital plasma transfusion has demonstrated feasibility and improved short-term outcomes. Applying state-of-the-art resuscitation strategies to the civilian prehospital arena is compelling. We describe here the rationale, design, and challenges of the Prehospital Air Medical Plasma (PAMPer) trial. The primary objective is to determine the effect of prehospital plasma transfusion during air medical transport on 30-day mortality in patients at risk for traumatic hemorrhage. This study is a multicenter cluster randomized clinical trial. The trial will enroll trauma patients with profound hypotension (SBP ≤ 70 mmHg) or hypotension (SBP 71-90 mmHg) and tachycardia (HR ≥ 108 bpm) from six level I trauma center air medical transport programs. The trial will also explore the effects of prehospital plasma transfusion on the coagulation and inflammatory response following injury. The trial will be conducted under exception for informed consent for emergency research with an investigational new drug approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration utilizing a multipronged community consultation process. It is one of three ongoing Department of Defense-funded trials aimed at expanding our understanding of the optimal therapeutic approaches to coagulopathy in the hemorrhaging trauma patient.

  5. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  6. Evidence for subnucleus interpolaris in craniofacial muscle pain mechanisms demonstrated by intramuscular injections with hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    1999-09-18

    The subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) has been identified as a major recipient for trigeminal ganglionic input from jaw muscles, and contains neurons with nociceptive properties similar to those in the subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Therefore, Vi may be another important site for processing craniofacial muscle nociception. The aims of present study were to define functional properties of Vi neurons that receive input from masseter muscle afferents by characterizing their responses to electrical, mechanical, and to chemical stimulation of the muscle. Ninety cells were identified as masseter muscle units in 11 adult cats. Most of these units (79%) received additional inputs from orofacial skin. Following the intramuscular injection of 5% hypertonic saline, 49% of the cells showed a significant modulation of either the resting discharge and/or responses to innocuous mechanical stimulation on their cutaneous receptive fields (RFs). The most common response to saline injection was an induction or facilitation of resting discharge which declined as an exponential decay function, returning to pre-injection level within 3-4 min. Forty-five percent of the muscle units that were tested with mechanical stimulation (13/29) showed a prolonged inhibition of mechanically-evoked responses. In most cases (8/13), the inhibitory response was accompanied by initial facilitation. The observations that Vi contained a population of neurons that receive small diameter muscle afferent inputs, responded to noxious mechanical stimulation on the muscle and to a chemical irritant that is known to produce pain in humans provide compelling evidence for the involvement of Vi in craniofacial muscle pain mechanisms.

  7. K(+) channels of squid giant axons open by an osmotic stress in hypertonic solutions containing nonelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Fumio

    2011-08-01

    In hypertonic solutions made by adding nonelectrolytes, K(+) channels of squid giant axons opened at usual asymmetrical K(+) concentrations in two different time courses; an initial instantaneous activation (I (IN)) and a sigmoidal activation typical of a delayed rectifier K(+) channel (I (D)). The current-voltage relation curve for I (IN) was fitted well with Goldman equation described with a periaxonal K(+) concentration at the membrane potential above -10 mV. Using the activation-voltage curve obtained from tail currents, K(+) channels for I (IN) are confirmed to activate at the membrane potential that is lower by 50 mV than those for I (D). Both I (IN) and I (D) closed similarly at the holding potential below -100 mV. The logarithm of I (IN)/I (D) was linearly related with the osmolarity for various nonelectrolytes. Solute inaccessible volumes obtained from the slope increased with the nonelectrolyte size from 15 to 85 water molecules. K(+) channels representing I (D) were blocked by open channel blocker tetra-butyl ammonium (TBA) more efficiently than in the absence of I (IN), which was explained by the mechanism that K(+) channels for I (D) were first converted to those for I (IN) by the osmotic pressure and then blocked. So K(+) channels for I (IN) were suggested to be derived from the delayed rectifier K(+) channels. Therefore, the osmotic pressure is suggested to exert delayed-rectifier K(+) channels to open in shrinking rather hydrophilic flexible parts outside the pore than the pore itself, which is compatible with the recent structure of open K(+) channel pore.

  8. Small-volume hypertonic saline/pentastarch improves ileal mucosal microcirculation in experimental peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Assadi, Abdelnasser; Desebbe, Olivier; Rimmelé, Thomas; Florence, Arnal; Goudable, Joëlle; Chassard, Dominique; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effects of hypertonic saline 7.2%/6% hydroxyethyl starch (HSS-HES) and isotonic saline 0.9%/6% hydroxyethyl starch (ISS-HES) on ileal microcirculatory blood flow (MBF) at the initial phase of septic shock. Pigs were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Catheters were inserted into right atrium, pulmonary artery, carotid artery, and portal vein for hemodynamic measurements and for blood sampling. Ileal mucosal and muscularis MBF was continuously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Septic shock was obtained 240 min after induction of fecal peritonitis; then animals were randomized to receive 10 mL.kg−1 during 10 min of either HSS-HES or ISS-HES. Systemic and microcirculatory blood flow as well as systemic metabolism were assessed. Fecal peritonitis promoted a hypodynamic septic shock, with significant reduction of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cardiac index (CI). Ileal mucosal MBF (−34%) and ileal muscularis MBF (−54%) significantly diminished from baseline. Contrary to ISS-HES group, mucosal MBF significantly augmented after HSS-HES (+192% at min 150 post-shock) despite low blood pressure. There was weak correlation with CI (r2= 0.2, P=0.01) . Muscularis MBF didn't change. HSS-HES-treated animals had a significantly higher osmolarity and sodium concentration than ISS-HES group. Other variables did not change. Small-volume resuscitation with HSS-HES, but not ISS-HES, improved ileal microcirculatory impairment in experimental peritonitis model of septic shock even when MAP was low. This beneficial microcirculatory effect could be valuable in the management of early severe sepsis. PMID:24470929

  9. Comparison of 3% and 7.5% Hypertonic Saline in Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock.

    PubMed

    Han, Juan; Ren, Hui-Qin; Zhao, Qing-Bo; Wu, You-Liang; Qiao, Zhuo-Yi

    2015-03-01

    Hypertonic saline solutions (HSSs) (7.5%) are useful in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock because they provide immediate intravascular volume expansion via the delivery of a small volume of fluid, improving cardiac function. However, the effects of using 3% HSS in hypovolemic shock resuscitation are not well known. This study was designed to compare the effects of and complications associated with 3% HSS, 7.5% HSS, and standard fluid in resuscitation. In total, 294 severe trauma patients were enrolled from December 2008 to February 2012 and subjected to a double-blind randomized clinical trial. Individual patients were treated with 3% HSS (250 mL), 7.5% HSS (250 mL), or lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) (250 mL). Mean arterial pressure, blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored and recorded before fluid infusion and at 10, 30, 45, and 60 min after infusion, and the incidence of complications and survival rate were analyzed. The results indicate that 3% and 7.5% HSSs rapidly restored mean arterial pressure and led to the requirement of an approximately 50% lower total fluid volume compared with the LRS group (P < 0.001). However, a single bolus of 7.5% HSS resulted in an increase in heart rate (mean of 127 beats/min) at 10 min after the start of resuscitation. Higher rates of arrhythmia and hypernatremia were noted in the 7.5% HSS group, whereas higher risks of renal failure (P< 0.001), coagulopathy (P < 0.001), and pulmonary edema (P < 0.001) were observed in the LRS group. Neither severe electrolyte disturbance nor anaphylaxis was observed in the HSS groups. It is notable that 3% HSS had similar effects on resuscitation because both the 7.5% HSS and LRS groups but resulted in a lower occurrence of complications. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of 3% HSS in the resuscitation of patients with hypovolemic shock.

  10. Duration of action of hypertonic saline on mucociliary clearance in the normal lung.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W D; Wu, J; Fuller, F; Balcazar, J R; Zeman, K L; Duckworth, H; Donn, K H; O'Riordan, T G; Boucher, R C; Donaldson, S H

    2015-06-15

    Inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS) acutely enhances mucociliary clearance (MC) in both health and disease. In patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), repeated use of HS causes a sustained improvement in MC as well as clinical benefit. The pharmacodynamic duration of activity on MC may be an important determinant of its therapeutic potential in other airways diseases. Before moving toward testing the clinical benefits of HS for non-CF indications, we sought to assess the duration of pharmacodynamic effects of HS in healthy subjects by performing radiotracer clearance studies at baseline, 30-min post-HS administration, and 4-h post-HS administration. Indeed, acceleration of MC was observed when measured 30 min after HS inhalation. This acceleration was most pronounced in the first 30 min after inhaling the radiotracer in the central lung region (mean Ave30Clr = 15.5 vs. 8.6% for 30-min post-HS treatment vs. mean baseline, respectively, P < 0.005), suggesting that acute HS effects were greatest in the larger bronchial airways. In contrast, when MC was measured 4 h after HS administration, all indices of central lung region MC were slower than at baseline: Ave30Clr = 5.9% vs. 8.6% (P = 0.10); Ave90Clr = 12.4% vs. 16.8% (P < 0.05); clearance through 3 h = 29.4 vs. 43.7% (P < 0.002); and clearance through 6 h = 39.4 vs. 50.2% (P < 0.02). This apparent slowing of MC in healthy subjects 4-h post-HS administration may reflect depletion of airway mucus following acute HS administration.

  11. Intracarotid hypertonic sodium chloride differentially modulates sympathetic nerve activity to the heart and kidney.

    PubMed

    Frithiof, Robert; Xing, Tao; McKinley, Michael J; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-04-15

    Hypertonic NaCl infused into the carotid arteries increases mean arterial pressure (MAP) and changes sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) via cerebral mechanisms. We hypothesized that elevated sodium levels in the blood supply to the brain would induce differential responses in renal and cardiac SNA via sensors located outside the blood-brain barrier. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured renal and cardiac SNA simultaneously in conscious sheep during intracarotid infusions of NaCl (1.2 M), sorbitol (2.4 M), or urea (2.4 M) at 1 ml/min for 4 min into each carotid. Intracarotid NaCl significantly increased MAP (91 ± 2 to 97 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) without changing heart rate (HR). Intracarotid NaCl was associated with no change in cardiac SNA (11 ± 5.0%), but a significant inhibition of renal SNA (-32.5 ± 6.4%, P < 0.05). Neither intracarotid sorbitol nor urea changed MAP, HR, central venous pressure, cardiac SNA, and renal SNA. The changes in MAP and renal SNA were completely abolished by microinjection of the GABA agonist muscimol (5 mM, 500 nl each side) into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Infusion of intracarotid NaCl for 20 min stimulated a larger increase in water intake (1,100 ± 75 ml) than intracarotid sorbitol (683 ± 125 ml) or intracarotid urea (0 ml). These results demonstrate that acute increases in blood sodium levels cause a decrease in renal SNA, but no change in cardiac SNA in conscious sheep. These effects are mediated by cerebral sensors located outside the blood-brain barrier that are more responsive to changes in sodium concentration than osmolality. The renal sympathoinhibitory effects of sodium are mediated via a pathway that synapses in the PVN.

  12. Salt appetite is reduced by a single experience of drinking hypertonic saline in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael P; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  13. Physicochemical compatibility of nebulizable drug admixtures containing budesonide and colistimethate or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Klemmer, Anja; Krämer, Irene; Kamin, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the physicochemical compatibility of admixtures of nebulizable drugs is an important issue. In this article, the results of our recent study dealing with the compatibility of drug admixtures containing budesonide and colistin methanesulfonate (brand name Colistin CF) or budesonide and 5.85% sodium chloride solution are presented, as well as the up-to-date version of our compatibility table. Admixtures were prepared by mixing 2.0 mL Pulmicort either with 3.0 mL Colistin CF or 4.0 mL 5.85% sodium chloride solution. Test solutions were stored for 24 hours at room temperature under ambient light conditions. Physical compatibility was determined by measuring pH and osmolality. Concentrations of budesonide were measured by a high-performance liquid chromatography assay. The antibiotic activity of colistin methanesulfonate was determined in comparison to standard solutions using a microbiological assay. No loss in drug concentration of budesonide and no change in antibiotic activity of colistin methanesulfonate were detected over a test period of 24 hours. Osmolality remained unchanged in both types of admixtures. In admixtures of budesonide with colistin methanesulfonate, pH increased during the first 4 hours of storage, while in admixtures of budesonide and hypertonic saline pH remained unchanged. No visible changes could be detected. Due to these results admixtures of budesonide and colistin methanesulfonate or 5.85% sodium chloride solution are designated to be compatible, but it is recommended that mixing should take place immediately before administration. Further investigations are needed to determine whether or not drug delivery is affected by mixing the drugs and to ensure simultaneous nebulization is recommendable. PMID:24046941

  14. [Protocols for trauma care and the missing of injuries in severely injured accident victims during the prehospital phase].

    PubMed

    van Vugt, A B

    2006-10-01

    Standardizing trauma care according to internationally accepted life-support principles is being increasingly implemented in the prehospital as well as the intramural setting. In the primary survey it is important to distinguish between aspects of major and minor importance, without losing sight of details. In prehospital care it is of little use to be focused on the complete diagnoses and the approach should be related to signs and symptoms. First attention should be paid to the mechanism of injury, related potential vital impairment and obvious visible injuries. The goal should be effective treatment, focused on the stabilization of vital functions and triage related to the choice of facility necessary for definitive care.

  15. Effects of prehospital hypothermia on transfusion requirements and outcomes: a retrospective observatory trial

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Nora; Gräff, Ingo; Fleischer, Andreas; Boehm, Olaf; Guttenthaler, Vera; Baumgarten, Georg; Meybohm, Patrick; Wittmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Prehospital hypothermia is defined as a core temperature <36.0°C and has been shown to be an independent risk factor for early death in patients with trauma. In a retrospective study, a possible correlation between the body temperature at the time of admission to the emergency room and subsequent in-hospital transfusion requirements and the in-hospital mortality rate was explored. Setting This is a retrospective single-centre study at a primary care hospital in Germany. Participants 15 895 patients were included in this study. Patients were classified by admission temperature and transfusion rate. Excluded were ambulant patients and patients with missing data. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome values were length of stay (LOS) in days, in-hospital mortality, the transferred amount of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), and admission to an intensive care unit. Secondary influencing variables were the patient's age and the Glasgow Coma Scale. Results In 22.85% of the patients, hypothermia was documented. Hypothermic patients died earlier in the course of their hospital stay than non-hypothermic patients (p<0.001). The administration of 1–3 PRBC increased the LOS significantly (p<0.001) and transfused patients had an increased risk of death (p<0.001). Prehospital hypothermia could be an independent risk factor for mortality (adjusted OR 8.521; p=0.001) and increases the relative risk for transfusion by factor 2.0 (OR 2.007; p=0.002). Conclusions Low body temperature at hospital admission is associated with a higher risk of transfusion and death. Hence, a greater awareness of prehospital temperature management should be established. PMID:27029772

  16. A consensus based template for reporting of pre-hospital major incident medical management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Structured reporting of major incidents has been advocated to improve the care provided at future incidents. A systematic review identified ten existing templates for reporting major incident medical management, but these templates are not in widespread use. We aimed to address this challenge by designing an open access template for uniform reporting of data from pre-hospital major incident medical management that will be tested for feasibility. Methods An expert group of thirteen European major incident practitioners, planners or academics participated in a four stage modified nominal group technique consensus process to design a novel reporting template. Initially, each expert proposed 30 variables. Secondly, these proposals were combined and each expert prioritized 45 variables from the total of 270. Thirdly, the expert group met in Norway to develop the template. Lastly, revisions to the final template were agreed via e-mail. Results The consensus process resulted in a template consisting of 48 variables divided into six categories; pre-incident data, Emergency Medical Service (EMS) background, incident characteristics, EMS response, patient characteristics and key lessons. Conclusions The expert group reached consensus on a set of key variables to report the medical management of pre-hospital major incidents and developed a novel reporting template. The template will be freely available for downloading and reporting on http://www.majorincidentreporting.org. This is the first global open access database for pre-hospital major incident reporting. The use of a uniform dataset will allow comparative analysis and has potential to identify areas of improvement for future responses. PMID:24517242

  17. A Randomized Clinical Trial to Reduce Patient Prehospital Delay to Treatment in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dracup, Kathleen; McKinley, Sharon; Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K.; Meischke, Hendrika; Doering, Lynn V.; Davidson, Patricia; Paul, Steven M.; Baker, Heather; Pelter, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Background Delay from onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) symptoms to hospital admission continues to be prolonged. To date community education campaigns on the topic have had disappointing results. Therefore, we conducted a clinical randomized trial to test whether an intervention tailored specifically for patients with ACS and delivered one-on-one would reduce pre-hospital delay time. Methods and Results Participants (N=3522) with documented coronary heart disease were randomized to experimental (n=1777) or control (n=1745) groups. Experimental patients received education and counseling about ACS symptoms and actions required. Patients were mean age 67±11 years and 68% were male. Over the two years of follow-up, 565 patients (16.0%) were admitted to an emergency department with ACS symptoms a total of 842 times. Neither median prehospital delay time (experimental 2.20 vs. control 2.25 hours) nor emergency medical system use (experimental 63.6% vs. control 66.9%) was different between groups, although experimental patients were more likely than control to call the emergency medical system if the symptoms occurred within the first 6 months following the intervention (p=0.036). Experimental patients were significantly more likely to take aspirin following symptom onset than control patients (experimental 22.3% vs. control 10.1%, p=0.02). The intervention did not result in an increase in emergency department utilization (experimental 14.6% vs. control 17.5%) Conclusions The education and counseling intervention did not lead to reduced pre-hospital delay or increased ambulance use. Reducing the time from onset of acute coronary syndrome symptoms to arrival at the hospital continues to be a significant public health challenge. PMID:20031889

  18. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error.

  19. Intramuscular midazolam versus intravenous lorazepam for the prehospital treatment of status epilepticus in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Robert D.; Nicholas, Katherine; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie L.; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Conwit, Robin; Mahajan, Prashant V.; Lewandowski, Christopher; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine the effectiveness of intramuscular (IM) midazolam versus intravenous (IV) lorazepam for the treatment of pediatric patients with status epilepticus (SE) in the prehospital care setting. Methods This multicenter clinical trial randomized patients diagnosed with SE to receive either IM midazolam or IV lorazepam administered by paramedics in the prehospital care setting. Included in this secondary analysis were only patients younger than 18 years of age. Evaluated were the associations of the treatment group (IM vs. IV) with the primary outcome, defined as seizure cessation prior to emergency department (ED) arrival, and with patient characteristics, time to important events, and adverse events. Descriptive statistics and 99% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for the analysis. Results Of 893 primary study subjects, 120 met criteria for this study (60 in each treatment group). There were no differences in important baseline characteristics or seizure etiologies between groups. The primary outcome was met in 41 (68.3%) and 43 (71.7%) of subjects in the IM and IV groups, respectively (risk difference [RD] −3.3%, 99% CI −24.9% to 18.2%). Similar results were noted for those younger than 11 years (RD −1.3%, 99% CI −25.7% to 23.1%). Time from initiating the treatment protocol was shorter for children who received IM midazolam, mainly due to the shorter time to administer the active treatment. Safety profiles were similar. Significance IM midazolam can be rapidly administered and appears to be safe and effective for the management of children with SE treated in the prehospital setting. The results must be interpreted in the context of the secondary analysis design and sample size of the study. PMID:25597369

  20. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  1. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  2. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  3. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction. PMID:26182699

  4. Communicative Management in Ambulatory Services: Prehospital Management Communication--Limits and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Poor management communication in healthcare services affects employees' motivation, commitment, and, in the final instance, organizational performance and the quality of patient care. In any area of health management, good communication is, therefore, key to successful management. This article discusses how managers of ambulance stations should secure communication with their paramedic crews. The first part uses ethical concepts to analyze communicative disagreement in interactive dialogue between managers and paramedics. The second part outlines basic communication principles that can serve as conceptual tools for avoiding misinterpretation in prehospital manager-employee interaction.

  5. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  6. Comparison of equimolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline for the treatment of elevated intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Chen, Tao; Chen, Shu-da; Cai, Jing; Hu, Ying-Hong

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the effectiveness of mannitol and hypertonic saline for reducing intracranial pressure (ICP) after traumatic brain injury (TBI).PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were searched until July 3, 2014 using the terms intracranial hypertension, mannitol, and hypertonic saline. Randomized controlled trials and 2-arm prospective studies in which elevated ICP was present after TBI treated with mannitol or hypertonic saline were included. The primary outcome was the change of ICP from baseline to termination of the infusion, while the secondary outcomes were change from baseline to 30, 60, and 120 minutes after terminating the infusion and change of osmolarity from baseline to termination.A total 7 studies with 169 patients were included. The mean age of patients receiving mannitol ranged from 30.8 to 47 years, and for patients receiving hypertonic saline ranged from 35 to 47 years. A pooled difference in means = -1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.95 to -0.44, P = 0.008) indicated that hypertonic saline reduced ICP more effectively than mannitol when compared from the baseline value to the last measurement after treatment. At 30 minutes after intervention, there was no difference in the mean ICP change between the groups, whereas at 60 minutes after intervention (pooled difference in means = -2.58, 95% CI: -4.37 to -0.80, P = .005) and 120 min after intervention (pooled difference in means = -4.04, 95% CI: -6.75 to -1.32, P = .004) hypertonic saline resulted in a significantly greater decrease in ICP. The pooled difference in means = 1.84 (95% CI: -1.64 to 5.31, P = .301) indicated no difference in serum osmolarity between patients treated with hypertonic saline or mannitol.Hypertonic saline is more effective than mannitol for reducing ICP in cases of TBI.

  7. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Antagonism Inhibits Bronchoconstriction in Respose to Hypertonic Saline Inhalation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kazani, Shamsah; Sadeh, Jonathan; Bunga, Sreedhar; Wechsler, Michael E; Israel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    Background In asthma, cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) play varying roles in the bronchomotor response to multiple provocative stimuli. The contribution of CysLTs on the airway's response to hypertonic saline (HS) inhalation in asthma is unknown. Whether polymorphisms in the leukotriene biosynthetic pathway affect the contribution of CysLTs to this response is also unknown. Methods In a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study, mild and moderate asymptomatic asthmatics underwent inhaled 3% HS challenge by doubling the duration of nebulization (0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 min) two hours after one dose of montelukast (a CysLT receptor 1 [CysLTR1] antagonist) or placebo, and after three week courses. We examined the effect of the leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) polymorphism (A-444C) on the efficacy of montelukast against HS inhalation in an exploratory manner. Results In 37 subjects, two hours after administration of montelukast, the mean provocative dose of HS required to cause a 20% drop in FEV1 (HS-PD20) increased by 59% (9.17 after placebo vs. 14.55 ml after montelukast, p = 0.0154). Three weeks of cysLTR1 antagonism increased the HS-PD20 by 84% (10.97 vs. 20.21 ml, p = 0.0002). Three weeks of CysLTR1 antagonism appeared to produce greater effects on blocking bronchial hyper responsiveness (two hour vs. three week HS-PD20 values 14.55 vs. 20.21 ml respectively, p = 0.0898). We did not observe an effect of the LTC4S polymorphism on the response to CysLTR1 antagonism in this cohort. Conclusions A significant proportion of HS-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated by release of leukotrienes as evidenced by substantial acute inhibition with a CysLTR1 antagonist. There was a trend toward greater inhibition of bronchial responsiveness with three weeks of therapy as opposed to acute CysLTR1 antagonism. PMID:21169002

  8. Effect of Atractylodes macrocephala on Hypertonic Stress-Induced Water Channel Protein Expression in Renal Collecting Duct Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Pyo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Hye Yoom; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Edema is a symptom that results from the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the body. The cause of edema is related to the level of aquaporin (AQP)2 protein expression, which regulates the reabsorption of water in the kidney. Edema is caused by overexpression of the AQP2 protein when the concentration of Na(+) in the blood increases. The rhizome of Atractylodes macrocephala has been used in traditional oriental medicine as a diuretic drug; however, the mechanism responsible for the diuretic effect of the aqueous extract from A. macrocephala rhizomes (AAMs) has not yet been identified. We examined the effect of the AAM on the regulation of water channels in the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-3 cells under hypertonic stress. Pretreatment of AAM attenuates a hypertonicity-induced increase in AQP2 expression as well as the trafficking of AQP2 to the apical plasma membrane. Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is a transcription factor known to play a central role in cellular homeostasis by regulating the expression of some proteins, including AQP2. Western immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the protein and mRNA expression levels of TonEBP also decrease after AAM treatment. These results suggest that the AAM has a diuretic effect by suppressing water reabsorption via the downregulation of the TonEBP-AQP2 signaling pathway. PMID:23258995

  9. Shape of dose-survival curves for mammalian cells and repair of potentially lethal damage analyzed by hypertonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlit, W.; Heyder, I.R.

    1981-09-01

    During the usual procedure of testing cell survival by colony-forming ability, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) takes place. By incubating the cells in hypertonic suspension a certain part of this repair can be inhibited, leading to an exponential dose-survival curve as expected from the Poisson distribution of lethal events in the cells. If such a hypertonic treatment is performed after increasing intervals following irradiation with x rays, curves with increasing shoulder length are obtained. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of this repair shows that PLD is repaired for about 1 h after irradiation by a saturated repair system which eliminates about one lesion per 15 min per cell independent of the applied absorbed dose. PLD not eliminated by this last system is repaired by an unsaturated system with a time constant of several hours. Repair of PLD after x irradiation proceeds quantitatively in this way in plateau-phase cells suspended in a conditioned medium, which seems optimal for such repair. If these cells are suspended after irradiation in normal nutrient medium a certain fraction of the PLD is transformed into irreparable damage. The final survival after repair in nutrient medium is then identical with that obtained by the usual measurement of colony-forming ability on nutrient agar. This indicates that the shoulder in dose-survival curves for plateau phase cells ispartly due to repair of PLD and partly due to manifestation of this damage during repair time.

  10. Pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of severe injuries: changes and trends.

    PubMed

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lendemans, Sven

    2014-10-01

    The pre-hospital and early in-hospital management of most severely injured patients has dramatically changed over the last 20 years. In this context, the factor time has gained more and more attention, particularly in German-speaking countries. While the management in the early 1990s aimed at comprehensive and complete therapy at the accident site, the premise today is to stabilise trauma patients at the accident site and transfer them into the hospital rapidly. In addition, the introduction of training and education programmes such as Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS(®)), Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) concept or the TEAM(®) concept has increased the quality of treatment of most severely injured trauma patients both in the preclinical field and in the emergency trauma room. Today, all emergency surgical procedures in severely injured patients are generally performed in accordance with the Damage Control Orthopaedics (DCO) principle. The advancements described in this article provide examples for the improved quality of the management of severely injured patients in the preclinical field and during the initial in-hospital treatment phase. The implementation of trauma networks, the release of the S3 polytrauma guidelines, and the DGU "Weißbuch" have contributed to a more structured management of most severely injured patients.

  11. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  12. Prehospital delay in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Sultana, Papia; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Chan, Kim Poh; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2011-10-01

    To characterize prehospital delays in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Asia. A retrospective review of 273 patients with diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; symptom to door (S2D) time was described in two ways, time from first onset of symptoms; and time from the onset of the worst episode to presentation at emergency department. The median first onset S2D time was 173 min (interquartile range 80-350 min); and median worst episode S2D time was 131 min (interquartile range 70-261 min). Patients with prehospital delay tended to use their own transport compared with the no delay group (P=0.026, 95% confidence interval=0.02-0.24). There was no difference in S2D times for typical compared with atypical symptoms. A large proportion of patients experienced delay in seeking medical care after the onset of acute coronary symptoms. Self-transport was associated with delay. PMID:21317785

  13. A Novel Approach to Improve Time to First Shock in Prehospital STEMI Complicated by Ventricular Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Ampofo, Maxwell; Cheskes, Sheldon; Byers, Adam; Drennan, Ian R; Buick, Jason E; Verbeek, P Richard

    2016-01-01

    Lethal cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pVT) complicate up to 6% of all out-of-hospital STEMIs. Typically, paramedics respond to this by applying defibrillation pads and delivering a shock as soon as possible. A recently introduced "pads-on" protocol directed paramedics to apply defibrillation pads to all STEMI patients (regardless of clinical stability) with the aim of decreasing time to first shock. In this article we present two cases of prehospital STEMI complicated by VF to illustrate times to first shock for the two different protocols. One case each of a STEMI complicated by VF before implementation of the pads-on protocol and after the implementation of the protocol is presented. An important difference in the time to first shock is noted between the two patients with STEMI complicated by VF. While it took 2 min 43 s for the pads-off patient to be defibrillated, only 27 s elapsed before the pads-on patient was defibrillated. These two cases demonstrate that the application of defibrillation pads immediately following the diagnosis of prehospital STEMI has the potential to decrease the time to shock in patients suffering VF/pVT.

  14. Paramedic Recognition of Sepsis in the Prehospital Setting: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Andrew H.; Cain, Edward; Campbell, Samuel G.; Jensen, Jan L.; Petrie, David A.; Erdogan, Mete; Patrick, Gredi; Patrick, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with sepsis benefit from early diagnosis and treatment. Accurate paramedic recognition of sepsis is important to initiate care promptly for patients who arrive by Emergency Medical Services. Methods. Prospective observational study of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) transported by paramedics to the emergency department (ED) of a Canadian tertiary hospital. Paramedic identification of sepsis was assessed using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool developed by the study team and compared to blind, independent documentation of ED diagnoses by attending emergency physicians (EPs). Specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Overall, 629 patients were included in the analysis. Sepsis was identified by paramedics in 170 (27.0%) patients and by EPs in 71 (11.3%) patients. Sensitivity of paramedic sepsis identification compared to EP diagnosis was 73.2% (95% CI 61.4–83.0), while specificity was 78.8% (95% CI 75.2–82.2). The accuracy of paramedic identification of sepsis was 78.2% (492/629, 52 true positive, 440 true negative). Positive and negative predictive values were 30.6% (95% CI 23.8–38.1) and 95.9% (95% CI 93.6–97.5), respectively. Conclusion. Using a novel prehospital sepsis screening tool, paramedic recognition of sepsis had greater specificity than sensitivity with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27051533

  15. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  16. Review on pharmacological pain management in trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, B M; Berben, S A A; van Dongen, R T M; Schoonhoven, L

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the main complaints of trauma patients in (pre-hospital) emergency medicine. Significant deficiencies in pain management in emergency medicine have been identified. No evidence-based protocols or guidelines have been developed so far, addressing effectiveness and safety issues, taking the specific circumstances of pain management of trauma patients in the chain of emergency care into account. The aim of this systematic review was to identify effective and safe initial pharmacological pain interventions, available in the Netherlands, for trauma patients with acute pain in the chain of emergency care. Up to December 2011, a systematic search strategy was performed with MeSH terms and free text words, using the bibliographic databases CINAHL, PubMed and Embase. Methodological quality of the articles was assessed using standardized evaluation forms. Of a total of 2328 studies, 25 relevant studies were identified. Paracetamol (both orally and intravenously) and intravenous opioids (morphine and fentanyl) proved to be effective. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) showed mixed results and are not recommended for use in pre-hospital ambulance or (helicopter) emergency medical services [(H)EMS]. These results could be used for the development of recommendations on evidence-based pharmacological pain management and an algorithm to support the provision of adequate (pre-hospital) pain management. Future studies should address analgesic effectiveness and safety of various drugs in (pre-hospital) emergency care. Furthermore, potential innovative routes of administration (e.g., intranasal opioids in adults) need further exploration. PMID:23737462

  17. Ca2+-dependent cessation of cytoplasmic streaming induced by hypertonic treatment in Vallisneria mesophyll cells: possible role of cell wall-plasma membrane adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2003-10-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, a rapid and transient inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming was induced by hypertonic treatment with sorbitol. Higher concentrations of sorbitol induced the response more rapidly and in more cells. The response to hypertonic treatment was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ and was sensitive to Ca2+-channel blockers, including the stretch-activated Ca2+-channel blocker Gd3+. Deplasmolyzed cells never responded to a second hypertonic treatment administered immediately after plasmolysis and subsequent deplasmolysis. Responsiveness was gradually recovered during 24 h of incubation; however, cycloheximide, cordycepin, and trypsin completely suppressed the recovery. Although an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) hexapeptide markedly disturbed the pattern of cytoplasmic streaming, it exhibited no specific effects on the response to hypertonic treatment or on the recovery of responsiveness. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leaf mesophyll cells in a multicellular plant can respond to mechanical stimuli and that a Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated Ca2+ channels plays an indispensable role in the response. Furthermore, the possible involvement of RGD-insensitive but trypsin-sensitive protein factor(s), whose function is impaired by detachment of the plasma membrane from the cell wall, is suggested. PMID:14581627

  18. Cultured cells from a severe combined immunodeficient mouse have a slower than normal rate of repair of potentially lethal damage sensitive to hypertonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, H.; Terado, T.; Ikebuchi, M.; Aoyama, T.; Komatsu, K.; Nozawa, A.

    1995-05-01

    The effects of hypertonic 0.5 M NaCl treatment after irradiation on the repair of DNA damage were examined in fibroblasts of the severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse. These cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation because of a deficiency in the repair of double-strand breaks. Hypertonic treatment caused radiosensitization due to a fixation of potentially lethal damage (PLD) in scid cells, demonstrating that scid cells normally repair PLD. To assess the kinetics of the repair of PLD, hypertonic treatment was delayed for various times after irradiation. Potentially lethal damage was repaired during these times in isotonic medium at 37{degrees}C. It was found that the rate of repair of PLD was much slower in scid cells than in BALB/c 3T3 cells, which have a {open_quotes}wild-type{close_quotes} level of radiosensitivity. This fact indicates that the scid mutation affects the type of repair of PLD that is sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl treatment. In scid hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8, which complements the radiosensitivity of the scid cells, the rate of repair was restored to a normal level. An enzyme encoded by a gene on chromosome 8 may also be connected with PLD which is sensitive to hypertonic treatment. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Impact of Time on Fluid Resuscitation with Hypertonic Saline (NaCl 7.5%) in Rats with LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Ricardo Costa; Biselli, Paolo Jose Cesare; Lima, Thais Martins de; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication associated with septic shock that directly influences the prognosis of sepsis patients. Currently, one of the main supportive treatment modalities for septic shock is fluid resuscitation. The use of hypertonic saline (HS: 7.5% NaCl) for fluid resuscitation has been described as a promising therapy in experimental models of sepsis-induced ALI, but it has failed to produce similar results in clinical practice. Thus, we compared experimental timing versus clinical timing effectiveness (i.e., early vs. late fluid resuscitation) after the inflammatory scenario was established in a rat model of bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI. We found that late fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline (NaCl 7.5%) did not reduce the mortality rates of animals compared with the mortality late associated with early treatment. Late fluid resuscitation with both hypertonic and normal saline increased pulmonary inflammation, decreased pulmonary function, and induced pulmonary injury by elevating metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 activity and collagen deposition in the animals, unlike early treatment. The animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI that received late resuscitation with any kind of fluids demonstrated aggravated pulmonary injury and respiratory function. Moreover, we showed that the therapeutic window for a beneficial effect of fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline is very narrow.

  20. German critical incident reporting system database of prehospital emergency medicine: Analysis of reported communication and medication errors between 2005–2015

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein, Christian; Fleischmann, Thomas; Rupp, Peter; Hempel, Dorothea; Wilk, Sophia; Winning, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication failure in prehospital emergency medicine can affect patient safety as it does in other areas of medicine as well. We analyzed the database of the critical incident reporting system for prehospital emergency medicine in Germany retrospectively regarding communication errors. METHODS: Experts of prehospital emergency medicine and risk management screened the database for verbal communication failure, non-verbal communication failure and missing communication at all. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2015, 845 reports were analyzed, of which 247 reports were considered to be related to communication failure. An arbitrary classification resulted in six different kinds: 1) no acknowledgement of a suggestion; 2) medication error; 3) miscommunication with dispatcher; 4) utterance heard/understood improperly; 5) missing information transfer between two persons; and 6) other communication failure. CONCLUSION: Communication deficits can lead to critical incidents in prehospital emergency medicine and are a very important aspect in patient safety. PMID:27313802

  1. Randomised clinical study comparing the effectiveness and physiological effects of hypertonic and isotonic polyethylene glycol solutions for bowel cleansing

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Hiro-o; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Takagi, Ryo; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakaoka, Michiko; Himori, Ryogo; Yoshida, Yuko; Satou, Kentarou; Imai, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bowel cleansing is necessary before colonoscopy, but is a burden to patients because of the long cleansing time and large dose volume. A low-volume (2 L) hypertonic polyethylene glycol-ascorbic acid solution (PEG-Asc) has been introduced, but its possible dehydration effects have not been quantitatively studied. We compared the efficacy and safety including the dehydration risk between hypertonic PEG-Asc and isotonic PEG regimens. Design This was an observer-blinded randomised study. Participants (n=310) were allocated to receive 1 of 3 regimens on the day of colonoscopy: PEG-Asc (1.5 L) and water (0.75 L) dosed with 1 split (PEG-Asc-S) or 4 splits (PEG-Asc-M), or PEG-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES; 2.25 L) dosed with no split. Dehydration was analysed by measuring haematocrit (Ht). Results The cleansing time using the hypertonic PEG-Asc-S (3.33±0.48 hours) was significantly longer than that with isotonic PEG-ES (3.05±0.56 hours; p<0.001). PEG-Asc-M (3.00±0.53 hours) did not have this same disadvantage. Successful cleansing was achieved in more than 94% of participants using each of the 3 regimens. The percentage changes in Ht from baseline (before dosing) to the end of dosing with PEG-Asc-S (3.53±3.32%) and PEG-Asc-M (4.11±3.07%) were significantly greater than that with PEG-ES (1.31±3.01%). Conclusions These 3 lower volume regimens were efficacious and had no serious adverse effects. Even patients cleansed with isotonic PEG-ES showed significant physiological dehydration at the end of dosing. The four-split PEG-Asc-M regimen is recommended because of its shorter cleansing time without causing serious nausea. Trial registration number UMIN000013103; Results. PMID:27547443

  2. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  3. Probabilistic Linkage of Prehospital and Outcomes Data in Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn E.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Danielsen, Beate; Holmes, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lack of longitudinal patient outcome data is an important barrier in emergency medical services (EMS) research. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of linking prehospital data from the California EMS Information Systems (CEMSIS) database to outcomes data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) database for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods We included patients age 18 years or older who sustained non-traumatic OHCA and were included in the 2010–2011 CEMSIS databases. The CEMSIS database is a unified EMS data collection system for California. The OSHPD database is a comprehensive data collection system for patient-level inpatient and emergency department encounters in California. OHCA patients were identified in the CEMSIS database using cardiac rhythm, procedures, medications, and provider impression. Probabilistic linkage blocks were created using in hospital death or one of the following primary or secondary diagnoses (I CD-9-CM) in the OSHPD databases: cardiac arrest (427.5), sudden death (798), ventricular tachycardia (427.1), ventricular fibrillation (427.4), and acute myocardial infarction (410.xx). Blocking variables included incident date, gender, date of birth, age, and/or destination facility. Due to the volume of cases, match thresholds were established based on clerical record review for each block individually. Match variables included incident date, destination facility, date of birth, sex, race, and ethnicity. Results Of the 14,603 cases of OHCA we identified in the prehospital databases, 91 (0.6%) duplicate records were excluded. Overall, 46% of the data used in the linkage algorithm were missing in CEMSIS. We linked 4,961/14,512 (34.2%) records. Linkage rates varied significantly by local EMS agency, ranging from 1.4% to 61.1% (OR for linkage 0.009–0.76; p<0.0001). After excluding the local EMS agency with the outlying low linkage rate, we linked 4,934/12,596 (39

  4. Neurological outcomes in patients transported to hospital without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in Japan are not allowed to perform termination of resuscitation in the field, most patients experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) are transported to hospitals without a prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). As the crucial prehospital factors for outcomes are not clear in patients who had an OHCA without a prehospital ROSC, we aimed to determine the prehospital factors associated with 1-month favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2 (CPC 1–2)). Methods We analyzed the data of 398,121 adult OHCA patients without a prehospital ROSC from a prospectively recorded nationwide Utstein-style Japanese database from 2007 to 2010. The primary endpoint was 1-month CPC 1–2. Results The rate of 1-month CPC 1–2 was 0.49%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the independent variables associated with CPC 1–2 were the following nine prehospital factors: (1) initial non-asystole rhythm (ventricular fibrillation (VF): adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 9.37; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.71 to 11.4; pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT): aOR, 8.50; 95% CI, 5.36 to 12.9; pulseless electrical activity (PEA): aOR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.40 to 3.15), (2) age <65 years (aOR, 3.90; 95% CI, 3.28 to 4.67), (3) arrest witnessed by EMS personnel (aOR, 2.82; 95% CI, 2.48 to 3.19), (4) call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes (aOR, 2.58; 95% CI, 2.22 to 3.01), (5) arrest witnessed by any layperson, (6) physician-staffed ambulance, (7) call-to-response time <5 minutes, (8) prehospital shock delivery, and (9) presumed cardiac cause. When four crucial key factors (with an aOR >2.0 in the regression model: initial non-asystole rhythm, age <65 years, EMS-witnessed arrest, and call-to-hospital arrival time <24 minutes) were present, the rates of 1-month CPC 1–2 and 1-month survival were 16.1% and 23.2% in initial VF, 8.3% and 16.7% in pulseless VT, and 3

  5. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  6. [Cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine - retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Claas T; Kleber, Christian; Tsokos, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Hess, Thorsten; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Emergency medical research is subject to special conditions. Emergency patients e.g. are generally considered to be non-capable of giving consent. This results in sparse emergency medical data when compared to clinical observation studies under controlled conditions. After emergency medical treatment, deceased patients are not rarely subject to forensic investigation. The cooperation between emergency and forensic medicine has not only emergency medical training potential in individual cases, but also scientific innovation potential especially with respect to the retrospective evaluation of pre-hospital emergency measures. Such partnerships (like in Berlin at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin between the Institute of Legal Medicine and the Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery or in Hamburg between the Institute for Legal Medicine at the University Hospital and the Municipal Fire Brigade with the Emergency Medical Service) are yet exceptional in Germany.

  7. An eight-month evaluation of prehospital 12-lead electrocardiogram monitoring in Baltimore County.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to determine if a prehospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) led to a delay in transportation when compared to non-12-lead ECG, and if it led to improved "door to drug" time. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare on-scene times for suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients; a comparison was made between advanced life support (ALS) units without 12-lead ECG and those who were augmented by equipped EMS district officer units. Our control group had an on-scene time of 22.05 minutes; the mean on-scene time for the experimental group was 21.85 minutes. The results of this study indicated that 12-lead ECG acquisition by district officers did not extend the on-scene time.

  8. NATO Blood Panel perspectives on changes to military prehospital resuscitation policies: current and future practice.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Tom; Badloe, John; Bohonek, Milos; Taylor, Audra L; Erik Heier, Hans; Doughty, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Blood Panel exists to promote interoperability of transfusion practice between NATO partners. However, it has served as an important forum for the development of prehospital transfusion and transfusion in the austere environment. There are synergies with the trauma hemostasis and oxygen research community especially in the areas of innovation and research. Four presentations are summarized together with a review of some scientific principles. The past decade has already seen significant changes in early transfusion support. Sometimes practice has preceded the evidence and has stretched regulatory and logistic constraints. Ethical and philosophical issues are also important and require us to question "should we" and not just "could we." The challenge for the combined communities is to continue to optimize transfusion support underpinned by evidence-based excellence. PMID:27100759

  9. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. PMID:26262065

  10. [Intervention in situations of psychic crisis: challenges and suggestions of a prehospital care staff].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Alexsandro Barreto; do Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira; Rodrigues, Jeferson; Schweitzer, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative and descriptive research, aimed at knowing how the pre-hospital care professionals perceive the interventions towards people in mental crisis. The study was developed in Santa Catarina with four teams of basic life support units of the Department of Mobile Emergency Care, during April to June 2011. The Collective Subject Discourse was used as the method of analysis. Two themes emerged: Awareness of the difficulties in meeting a person in mental crisis and Suggestions in the search for a closer attention to the person in mental crisis. The difficulties mentioned were related to the lack of training and a local to forward the patients, suggesting a better training and systematization of care. We conclude that it is necessary to invest in the educational process, based on new care strategies guided by the principles of SUS and of the psychosocial paradigm, and revisit the strategy of protocols as guidelines and not as standardizing systems.

  11. Ouabain-insensitive salt and water movements in duck red cells. I. Kinetics of cation transport under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt III, WF; McManus, TJ

    1977-01-01

    Duck red cells in hypertonic media experience rapid osmotic shrinkage followed by gradual reswelling back toward their original volume. This uptake of salt and water is self limiting and demands a specific ionic composition of the external solution. Although ouabain (10(-4)M) alters the pattern of cation accumulation from predominantly potassium to sodium, it does not affect the rate of the reaction, or the total amount of salt or water taken up. To study the response without the complications of active Na-K transport, ouabain was added to most incubations. All water accumulated by the cells can be accounted for by net salt uptake. Specific external cation requirements for reswelling include: sufficient sodium (more than 23 mM), and elevated potassium (more than 7 mM). In the absence of external potassium cells lose potassium without gaining sodium and continue to shrink instead of reswelling. Adding rubidium to the potassium- free solution promotes an even greater loss of cell potassium, yet causes swelling due to a net uptake of sodium and rubidium followed by chloride. The diuretic furosemide (10(-3)M) inhibits net sodium uptake which depends on potassium (or rubidium), as well as inhibits net sodium uptake which depends on sodium. As a result, cell volume is stabilized in the presence of this drug by inhibition of shrinkage, at low, and of swelling at high external potassium. The response has a high apparent energy of activation (15-20 kcal/mol). We propose that net salt and water movements in hypertonic solutions containing ouabain are mediated by direct coupling or cis-interaction, between sodium and potassium so that the uphill movement of one is driven by the downhill movement of the other in the same direction. PMID:894251

  12. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  13. Pre-hospital assessment with ultrasound in emergencies: implementation in the field

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Kevin P.; Lahham, Sari; Lahham, Shadi; Anderson, Craig L.; Bledsoe, Bryan; Sloane, Bryan; Joseph, Linda; Osborn, Megan B.; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (US) is a proven diagnostic imaging tool in the emergency department (ED). Modern US devices are now more compact, affordable and portable, which has led to increased usage in austere environments. However, studies supporting the use of US in the prehospital setting are limited. The primary outcome of this pilot study was to determine if paramedics could perform cardiac ultrasound in the field and obtain images that were adequate for interpretation. A secondary outcome was whether paramedics could correctly identify cardiac activity or the lack thereof in cardiac arrest patients. METHODS: We performed a prospective educational study using a convenience sample of professional paramedics without ultrasound experience. Eligible paramedics participated in a 3-hour session on point-of-care US. The paramedics then used US during emergency calls and saved the scans for possible cardiac complaints including: chest pain, dyspnea, loss of consciousness, trauma, or cardiac arrest. RESULTS: Four paramedics from two distinct fire stations enrolled a total of 19 unique patients, of whom 17 were deemed adequate for clinical decision making (89%, 95%CI 67%–99%). Paramedics accurately recorded 17 cases of cardiac activity (100%, 95%CI 84%–100%) and 2 cases of cardiac standstill (100%, 95%CI 22%–100%). CONCLUSION: Our pilot study suggests that with minimal training, paramedics can use US to obtain cardiac images that are adequate for interpretation and diagnose cardiac standstill. Further large-scale clinical trials are needed to determine if prehospital US can be used to guide care for patients with cardiac complaints. PMID:27313806

  14. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic.

  15. [Influence of prehospital response times in the survival of trauma patients in Navarre].

    PubMed

    Ali Ali, B; Fortún Moral, M; Belzunegui Otano, T; Teijeira Álvarez, R; Reyero Díez, D; Cabodevilla Górriz, A

    2015-01-01

    The relation between response times and mortality of polytrauma patients in the so-called "golden hour" continues to be a subject of debate. The purpose of this study is to determine the variables related to mortality in these patients and the influence of response times of the Emergency Medical Services in this mortality. To this end, the data in the "Major Trauma of Navarre" Register (retrospective cohort of polytrauma patients attended to by the Navarre Health Service) were analyzed for the four year period between 2010 and 2013. Of the 217 trauma cases available for the analysis, 42 (19%) died. No significant association was found in the multi-variate analysis between the different response times and mortality: arrival at the scene (odds ratio (OR) 1.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) from 0.99 to 1.01), in the scenario (OR 1.00; 95% CI from 0.98 to 1.02) and total time (OR 1.00; 95% CI from 0.99 to 1.01). The variables that influenced mortality are patient age and severity of injuries measured by the prehospital Triage-Revised Trauma Score (T-RTS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mortality of polytrauma patients attended to by the emergency system in our region is influenced by age and by the intensity of the aggression suffered, determined by the prehospital T-RTS and by the NISS. The response times of the hospital do not have a significant influence. PMID:26486533

  16. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic. PMID:26629337

  17. Terrorism involving cyanide: the prospect of improving preparedness in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Keim, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The potential for domestic or international terrorism involving cyanide has not diminished and in fact may have increased in recent years. This paper discusses cyanide as a terrorist weapon and the current state of readiness for a cyanide attack in the United States. Many of the factors that render cyanide appealing to terrorists are difficult to modify sufficiently to decrease the probability of a cyanide attack. For example, the relative ease with which cyanide can be used as a weapon without special training, its versatile means of delivery to intended victims, and to a large degree, its ready availability cannot be significantly modified through preparedness efforts. On the other hand, the impact of an attack can be mitigated through preparedness measures designed to minimize the physical, psychological, and social consequences of cyanide exposure. Although the nation remains ill-equipped to manage a cyanide disaster, significant progress is being realized in some aspects of preparedness. Hydroxocobalamin-a cyanide antidote that may be appropriate for use in the prehospital setting for presumptive cases of cyanide poisoning-currently is under development for potential introduction in the US. If it becomes available in the US, hydroxocobalamin could enhance the role of the prehospital emergency responder in providing care to victims of a cyanide disaster. Additional progress is required in the areas of ensuring local and regional availability of antidotal treatment and supportive interventions, educating emergency healthcare providers about cyanide poisoning and its management, and raising public awareness of the potential for a cyanide attack and how to respond.

  18. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. Results The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. Conclusions In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders. PMID:24886096

  19. Establishing a successful pre-hospital emergency service in a developing country: experience from Rescue 1122 service in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Hunniya; Naseer, Rizwan; Razzak, Junaid Abdul

    2011-06-01

    As in many other developing countries, emergency medical services, especially pre-hospital emergency care, has long been neglected in Pakistan. Consequently, patients are brought to the emergency departments by relatives or bystanders in private cars, taxis or any other readily available mode of transportation. Ambulances, where they exist, have barely a stretcher and arrangements for oxygen supply. Modern emergency services are considered too costly for many countries. A model of pre-hospital emergency services, called Rescue 1122 and established in Punjab province of Pakistan, is presented. The system is supported by government funding and provides a quality service. The article describes the process of establishment of the service, the organisational structure, the scope of services and the role it is currently playing in the healthcare of the region it serves.

  20. The Impact of Pre-Hospital Administration of Lactated Ringer's Solution versus Normal Saline in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Susan E; Fair, Kelly A; Barbosa, Ronald R; Watters, Jennifer M; Bulger, Eileen M; Holcomb, John B; Cohen, Mitchell J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Fox, Erin E; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    Lactated Ringer's (LR) and normal saline (NS) are both used for resuscitation of injured patients. NS has been associated with increased resuscitation volume, blood loss, acidosis, and coagulopathy compared with LR. We sought to determine if pre-hospital LR is associated with improved outcome compared with NS in patients with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI). We included patients receiving pre-hospital LR or NS from the PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. Patients with TBI (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] head ≥3) and without TBI (AIS head ≤2) were compared. Cox proportional hazards models including Injury Severity Score (ISS), AIS head, AIS extremity, age, fluids, intubation status, and hospital site were generated for prediction of mortality. Linear regression models were generated for prediction of red blood cell (RBC) and crystalloid requirement, and admission biochemical/physiological parameters. Seven hundred ninety-one patients received either LR (n = 117) or NS (n = 674). Median ISS, AIS head, AIS extremity, and pre-hospital fluid volume were higher in TBI and non-TBI patients receiving LR compared with NS (p < 0.01). In patients with TBI (n = 308), LR was associated with higher adjusted mortality compared with NS (hazard rate [HR] = 1.78, confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.04, p = 0.035). In patients without TBI (n = 483), no difference in mortality was demonstrated (HR = 1.49, CI 0.757-2.95, p = 0.247). Fluid type had no effect on admission biochemical or physiological parameters, 6-hour RBC, or crystalloid requirement in either group. LR was associated with increased mortality compared with NS in patients with TBI. These results underscore the need for a prospective randomized trial comparing pre-hospital LR with NS in patients with TBI.

  1. Prehospital Evaluation of Effusion, Pneumothorax, and Standstill (PEEPS): Point-of-care Ultrasound in Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sundeep R.; Johnson, David A.; Pierog, Jessica E.; Zaia, Brita E.; Williams, Sarah R.; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, there are limited studies regarding use of prehospital ultrasound (US) by emergency medical service (EMS) providers. Field diagnosis of life-threatening conditions using US could be of great utility. This study assesses the ability of EMS providers and students to accurately interpret heart and lung US images. Methods We tested certified emergency medical technicians (EMT-B) and paramedics (EMT-P) as well as EMT-B and EMT-P students enrolled in prehospital training programs within two California counties. Participants completed a pre-test of sonographic imaging of normal findings and three pathologic findings: pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill. A focused one-hour lecture on emergency US imaging followed. Post-tests were given to all EMS providers immediately following the lecture and to a subgroup one week later. Results We enrolled 57 prehospital providers (19 EMT-B students, 16 EMT-P students, 18 certified EMT-B, and 4 certified EMT-P). The mean pre-test score was 65.2%±12.7% with mean immediate post-test score of 91.1%±7.9% (95% CI [22%–30%], p<0.001). Scores significantly improved for all three pathologic findings. Nineteen subjects took the one-week post-test. Their mean score remained significantly higher: pre-test 65.8%±10.7%; immediate post-test 90.5%±7.0% (95% CI [19%–31%], p<0.001), one-week post-test 93.1%±8.3% (95% CI [21%–34%], p<0.001). Conclusion Using a small sample of EMS providers and students, this study shows the potential feasibility for educating prehospital providers to accurately identify images of pericardial effusion, pneumothorax, and cardiac standstill after a focused lecture. PMID:26265961

  2. Between professional values and the social valuation of patients: the fluctuating economy of pre-hospital emergency work.

    PubMed

    Nurok, Michael; Henckes, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    A number of authors have shown how medical decisions are influenced by social values; others have minimized the putative influence of values and have argued that medical decisions are predominantly constrained by the organization of medical work. Based on fieldwork in France and the USA observing pre-hospital resuscitations, we seek to resolve these views by showing that while judgments about the social value of a patient do influence professional decisions, so do judgments about the work that must be accomplished to manage a case. Pre-hospital emergency work has many facets that are variably valued by different professionals at different moments of an emergency's trajectory. These values compete with each other in what we call a "fluctuating economy". This article analyses the role of social, technical, medical or surgical, heroic, and competence values in the course of pre-hospital emergency work. We show how these values may conflict or align with each other, forcing professionals to constantly establish priorities during an emergency trajectory. PMID:19062149

  3. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin release from posterior pituitary lobe incubated in situ after intracarotid injections of hypertonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Traczyk, W Z; Strumillo-Dyba, E

    1977-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, drinking 2% NaCl solution ad libitum for 12 days instead of tap water. The pituitary gland was exposed by the transpharyngeal approach under urethane-chloralose anaesthesia. The posterior lobe remained in neural and partial vascular connection with the hypothalamus, whereas the anterior lobe was entirely removed. Samples of the outflow medium from the incubated in situ rat posterior pituitary lobe were collected during 30 min intervals. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin activities were assayed by the biological tests. Injections of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery did not change vasopressin release, but induced an increase in Substance P release from the posterior pituitary lobe into the incubation medium. Under conditions of unexcitability of the osmosensitive cells, triggering vasopressin release, the injection of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery stimulated the Substance P-like peptides release from the posterior pituitary lobe. PMID:22985

  4. Comparison of Fentanyl and Morphine in the Prehospital Treatment of Ischemic Type Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Erin R; Ariano, Robert E; Grierson, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, reduction of sympathetic stress and catecholamine release is an important therapeutic goal. One method used to achieve this goal is pain reduction through the systemic administration of analgesia. Historically, morphine has been the analgesic of choice in ischemic cardiac pain. This randomized double-blind controlled trial seeks to prove the utility of fentanyl as an alternate first-line analgesic for ischemic-type chest pain in the prehospital setting. Successive patients who were treated for suspected ischemic chest pain in the emergency medical services system were considered eligible. Once chest pain was confirmed, patients received oxygen, aspirin, and nitroglycerin therapy. If the ischemic-type chest pain continued the patient was randomized in a double-blinded fashion to treatment with either morphine or fentanyl. Pain scale scores, necessity for additional dosing, and rate of adverse events between the groups were assessed every 5 minutes and were compared using t-testing, Fisher's Exact test, or Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) where appropriate. The primary outcome of the study was incidence of hypotension and the secondary outcome was pain reduction as measured by the visual analog score and numeric rating score. A total of 207 patients were randomized with 187 patients included in the final analysis. Of the 187 patients, 99 were in the morphine group and 88 in the fentanyl group. No statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to hypotension was found (morphine 5.1% vs. fentanyl 0%, p = 0.06). Baseline characteristics, necessity for additional dosing, and other adverse events between the two groups were not statistically different. There were no significant differences between the changes in visual analog scores and numeric rating scale scores for pain between the two groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.15, respectively). This study supports that fentanyl and morphine are comparable in

  5. Prehospitalization Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury during Hospitalization for Serious Infections in the REGARDS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Powell, T. Clark; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Griffin, Russell; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs in hospitalized patients. In this study, we determined prehospitalization characteristics associated with AKI in community-dwelling adults hospitalized for a serious infection. Methods We used prospective data from 30,239 participants of the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study, a national cohort of community-dwelling adults ≥45 years old. We identified serious infection hospitalizations between 2003 and 2012. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria, we defined AKI as an increase in serum creatinine (sCr) ≥0.3 mg/dl from the first inpatient sCr measurement during the first 7 hospitalization days. We excluded individuals with a history of renal transplant or preexisting end-stage renal disease as well as individuals with <2 sCr measurements. We identified baseline characteristics (sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions, biomarkers, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medication use) independently associated with AKI events using multivariable generalized estimating equations. Results Over a median follow-up of 4.5 years (interquartile range 2.4-6.3), we included 2,074 serious infection hospitalizations among 1,543 individuals. AKI occurred in 296 of 2,074 hospitalizations (16.5%). On multivariable analysis, prehospitalization characteristics independently associated with AKI among individuals hospitalized for a serious infection included a history of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 1.38; 95% CI 1.02-1.89], increased cystatin C (OR 1.73 per SD; 95% CI 1.20-2.50), and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (OR 1.19 per SD; 95% CI 1.007-1.40). Sex, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, estimated glomerular filtration rate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, statin, or antihypertensive medications were not associated with AKI. Conclusions

  6. Influences of hypertonic and hypovolemic treatments on vasopressin response in propylthiouracil (PTU) induced hypothyroid rat and effect on supplementation with L-thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Leyla; Mogulkoc, R; Baltaci, A K

    2010-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of L-thyroxine treatment on plasma vasopressin (AVP) levels in rats with hypothyroidism induced by propylthiouracil (PTU). Animals were separated into three groups each having 6 rats: control, PTU, PTU+L-thyroxine groups. Then, the groups were further divided into 3 sub-groups including 6 rats (a; basal, b; hypertonic stimulated and c; hypovolemic stimulated). At the end of the experiments all rats were decapitated in order to obtain plasma samples for analysis in terms of Hct, osmolality, TT 3 , TT 4 and vasopressin. Haematocrit (Hct) levels were the highest in hypovolemic stimulated sub-group (P < 0.001). Osmolality levels were higher in hypertonic stimulated sub-groups (P < 0.001). Total T 3 and T 4 values were the lowest in the PTU group and the highest in the L-thyroxine treated group (P < 0.001). Plasma AVP levels were reduced by hypothyroidism. However, L-thyroxine treatment after the hypothyroidism prevented this reduction (P < 0.001). Vasopressin responses to basal, hypovolemic and hypertonic stimulations were the lowest in the PTU group (P < 0.001). The results of the present study show that basal and stimulated plasma vasopressin levels are reduced in PTU-induced hypothyroidism. However, L-thyroxine treatment following hypothyroidism prevents this reduction.

  7. Comparison of bronchial challenge with ultrasonic nebulized distilled water and hypertonic saline in children with mild-to-moderate asthma.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowski, C; Storm Van's Gravesande, K; Riedler, J; Eichler, I; Gartner, C; Frischer, T

    1996-09-01

    There is still controversy about the most suitable method to measure bronchial hyperresponsiveness in children. In epidemiological surveys, nonisotonic aerosols are being used increasingly for bronchial provocation testing. Our aim was to study the acceptability, safety and correlation between two published bronchial challenge tests. Two standardized protocols--the inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS) and ultrasonically-nebulized distilled water (UNDW)--were performed in 36 children: 19 patients with the clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate asthma (7-12 yrs of age), and 17 control subjects (8-18 yrs of age). HS challenge involved stepwise inhalation of 4.5% saline (for 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 min), whereas challenge with UNDW was performed as a single step protocol with 10 min inhalation of cold UNDW. Asthma medication was withheld prior to challenge testing. Thirty five subjects completed both challenge tests (one asthmatic patient did not return after UNDW challenge) in random order within a 7 day time interval. For HS a > or = 15% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) from baseline was considered a positive response, and for UNDW a > or = 10% decrease. In 13 of the 19 asthmatic patients, but in none of the controls, a positive response was observed for UNDW. Fifteen out of 18 patients and one control subject had a positive response to HS. Twelve out of 18 asthmatic children responded to both challenges, three responded only to HS and three had no response to either challenge. There was a negative correlation between log provocative dose causing a 15% reduction in FEV1 (PD15) after HS and the maximum fall in FEV1 after UNDW (rs = -0.63; p < 0.005). The HS challenge had a lower acceptability than challenge with UNDW due to the unpleasant salty taste of HS. However, this did not inhibit the completion of the tests in any subject. The results of this study suggest a good correlation between response to hypertonic saline and ultrasonically

  8. Body water handling in response to hypertonic-saline induced diuresis in fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Rudy M.; Wade, Charles E.; Ortiz, C. Leo

    2003-01-01

    During natural fasting conditions in postweaned northern elephant seal (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) pups, urinary water loss is minimized and percent total body water (TBW) is maintained constant. However, following infusion of hypertonic saline, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine output increased in fasting pups. Therefore, we quantified the magnitude of the hypernatremia-induced diuresis relative to the animal's total body water (TBW) pool and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed. Following a 24 h control period, naturally fasting NES pups (n=7) were infused (4 ml min(-1)) with hypertonic saline (16.7%) at a dose of 3 mmol NaCl kg(-1) body mass. Total body water was estimated prior to infusion by tritium dilution, GFR was estimated by standard creatinine clearance, and urine output (V) was measured for 24 h during the control and post infusion periods. Percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was calculated as (1-(V/GFR))x100. Twenty-four hours following the infusion, GFR (control: 69+/-12 ml min(-1) and post-infusion: 118+/-19 ml min(-1); mean+/-S.E.) increased 77+/-28% above control and the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed was decreased 0.4+/-0.1%. The increase in urine output (control: 218+/-47 ml d(-1) and post-infusion: 883+/-92 ml d(-1)) accounted for 1.7+/-0.2% of the pups' TBW. The hypernatremia-induced diuresis was accompanied by the loss of body water indicating the lack of water retention. Although the 77% increase in GFR was only associated with a 0.4% decrease in the percentage of filtered water reabsorbed, this decrease was significant enough to result in a 4-fold increase in urine output. Despite the observed diuresis, fasting NES pups appear to possess an efficient water recycling mechanism requiring only a small percentage of body water to excrete an excess salt load. This water recycling mechanism may allow pups to avoid negative perturbations in body water as they initiate feeding in a marine environment following the

  9. The efficacy of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicholas S; Spinks, Anneliese; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the supporting evidence for the clinical use of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting. Two authors searched three databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and The Cochrane Library) for relevant English language articles published through September 2014. Reference lists, conference proceedings and non-indexed academic journals were manually searched. A separate search was conducted using the Internet search engine Google to source additional studies from burns advisory agencies, first aid bodies, military institutions, manufacturer and paramedic websites. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and relevance of non-traditional data forms for inclusion. Studies were independently assessed and included if Hydrogel-based burn dressings (HBD) were examined in first aid practices in the pre-hospital setting. A total of 129 studies were considered for inclusion, of which no pre-hospital studies were identified. The review highlights that current use of HBD in the pre-hospital setting appears to be driven by sources of information that do not reflect the paramedic environment. We recommend researchers in the pre-hospital settings undertake clinical trials in this field. More so, the review supports the need for expert consensus to identify key demographic, clinical and injury outcomes for clinicians and researchers undertaking further research into the use of dressings as a first aid measure.

  10. The efficacy of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicholas S; Spinks, Anneliese; Wasiak, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the supporting evidence for the clinical use of hydrogel dressings as a first aid measure for burn wound management in the pre-hospital setting. Two authors searched three databases (Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and The Cochrane Library) for relevant English language articles published through September 2014. Reference lists, conference proceedings and non-indexed academic journals were manually searched. A separate search was conducted using the Internet search engine Google to source additional studies from burns advisory agencies, first aid bodies, military institutions, manufacturer and paramedic websites. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and relevance of non-traditional data forms for inclusion. Studies were independently assessed and included if Hydrogel-based burn dressings (HBD) were examined in first aid practices in the pre-hospital setting. A total of 129 studies were considered for inclusion, of which no pre-hospital studies were identified. The review highlights that current use of HBD in the pre-hospital setting appears to be driven by sources of information that do not reflect the paramedic environment. We recommend researchers in the pre-hospital settings undertake clinical trials in this field. More so, the review supports the need for expert consensus to identify key demographic, clinical and injury outcomes for clinicians and researchers undertaking further research into the use of dressings as a first aid measure. PMID:26177570

  11. Patient-controlled inhalational analgesia in prehospital care: a study of side-effects and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R D; Paris, P M; Stoy, W A; Cannon, G

    1983-11-01

    A clinical trial of a 50:50 mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen for pain relief was carried out to determine the feasibility of its use in a field setting and the side-effects produced by this sedative/analgesic. The gas mixture was delivered from a single-tank system using a demand-valve apparatus which was triggered by the patient's inspiratory effort. This "patient-controlled" sedation/analgesia was provided to 1243 patients over a period of 18 months. Of the 1201 patients evaluated, 20.6% reported minor side-effects consisting of nausea or vomiting (5.7%), dizziness or lightheadedness (10.3%), excitement (3.7%), and numbness (0.3%). Ninety-one (7.6%) patients became drowsy or fell into a light sleep but all were readily aroused by verbal command. All retained the ability to cough or swallow on command. No consistent or clinically adverse changes were found in BP or pulse rates. The trial supports the concept that this agent is a promising sedative/analgesic for the relief of mild to moderate pain and anxiety. Because of its safety, it is particularly suited to use in prehospital emergency care.

  12. The methodology of the Australian Prehospital Outcomes Study of Longitudinal Epidemiology (APOStLE) Project.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C; Irvine, Katrina A; Middleton, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of a large emergency medical services (EMS) data linkage research project currently under way in the statewide EMS system of New South Wales, Australia. The paper is intended to provide the reader with an understanding of how linkage techniques can be used to facilitate EMS research. This project, the Australian Prehospital Outcomes Study of Longitudinal Epidemiology (APOStLE) Project, links data from six statewide sources (computer-assisted dispatch, EMS patient health care reports, emergency department data, inpatient data, and two death registries) to enable researchers to examine the patient's entire journey through the health care system, from the emergency 0-0-0 call to the emergency department and inpatient setting, through to discharge or death, for approximately 2.6 million patients transported by the Ambulance Service of New South Wales to emergency departments between June 2006 and July 2009. Manual, deterministic, and probabilistic data linkages are described, and potential applications of linked data in EMS research are outlined.

  13. A prehospital acute coronary syndrome in a cocaine user: an unstable clinical situation.

    PubMed

    Franchitto, Nicolas; Cabot, Claudine; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Bounes, Vincent; Pathak, Atul; Rougé, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Chest pain is a common reason why cocaine-addicted patients call the emergency department, and acute coronary syndromes are difficult to diagnose in these situations. A 30-year-old cocaine-user patient contacts the Emergency Medical Assistance Service with constrictive chest pain. A doctor is sent out to the patient at home. The initial ECG is normal. No other aetiology of chest pain is revealed, except nicotine and cocaine addictions. First, a coronary artery spasm is suggested, caused by the injection of cocaine. During the journey, the patient indicates that the chest pain has returned. A 12-lead ECG shows repolarisation abnormality in the form of a subepicardial ischaemia. Fibrinolysis is not prescribed in view of the patient's history and of the proximity of the interventional cardiology team. The coronary angiogram enables the diagnosis of myocardial bridging in the middle anterior interventricular artery, and no significant lesion of the coronary arteries is noted. A particular feature of prehospital management in France is that medical care can be given in the early stages by a physician who is called by the patient. This case report discusses the specific care requirements of which the emergency physician needs to be aware in the context of this unstable clinical situation due to the urgency associated with the difficulties of ECG diagnosis of ST-segment elevation in cocaine users.

  14. [Determinant factors and conduct in post-accident with biological material among pre-hospital professionals].

    PubMed

    Paiva, Maria Henriqueta Rocha Siqueira; Oliveira, Adriana Cristina

    2011-01-01

    This transversal study was carried out with a multiprofessional team in the pre-hospital care in Minas Gerais, Brazil. It aimed to estimate the incidence of occupational accidents by exposure to biological material and post-accidents conductsta. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were used. Incidence of accidents was 19.8%: 39,1% perforating-cutting materials and 56.5% body fluids. Doctors (33.3%) and drivers (24.0%) were most involved. Inadequate subsequent measures were highly prevalent: no medical assessment (69.6%), no work accident communication issued (91.3%), no measures (52.2%) and no serological follow-up (52.2%). Variables associated with accidents were: age >31 years old (OR = 3,02; IC95%: 1,25 - 7,33; p = 0,014) and working in basic support units (OR = 5,36; IC95%: 1,51 19,08; p = 0,010). The implementation of post-accidents protocols is suggested in order to reduce accidents and under-notification, and increase post-accident follow-up.

  15. Systematic literature review of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, Sabina; Rehn, Marius; Reierth, Eirik; Wisborg, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify and describe the content of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management. Design Systematic literature review according to PRISMA guidelines. Data sources PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Grey literature was also searched. Eligibility criteria for selected studies Templates published after 1 January 1990 and up to 19 March 2012. Non-English language literature, except Scandinavian; literature without an available abstract; and literature reporting only psychological aspects were excluded. Results The main database search identified 8497 articles, among which 8389 were excluded based on title and abstract. An additional 96 were excluded based on the full-text. The remaining 12 articles were included in the analysis. A total of 107 articles were identified in the grey literature and excluded. The reference lists for the included articles identified five additional articles. A relevant article published after completing the search was also included. In the 18 articles included in the study, 10 different templates or sets of data are described: 2 methodologies for assessing major incident responses, 3 templates intended for reporting from exercises, 2 guidelines for reporting in medical journals, 2 analyses of previous disasters and 1 Utstein-style template. Conclusions More than one template exists for generating reports. The limitations of the existing templates involve internal and external validity, and none of them have been tested for feasibility in real-life incidents. Trial registration The review is registered in PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42012002051). PMID:23906946

  16. Mobile prehospital emergency care: an analysis of implementation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Alves, Renan Paes; Salvador, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-06-01

    Mobile prehospital care is a key component of emergency care. The aim of this study was to analyze the implementation of the State of Rio de Janeiro's Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU, acronym in Portuguese). The methodology employed included document analysis, visits to six SAMU emergency call centers, and semistructured interviews conducted with 12 local and state emergency care coordinators. The study's conceptual framework was based on Giddens' theory of structuration. Intergovernmental conflicts were observed between the state and municipal governments, and between municipal governments. Despite the shortage of hospital beds, the SAMUs in periphery regions were better integrated with the emergency care network than the metropolitan SAMUs. The steering committees were not very active and weaknesses were observed relating to the limited role played by the state government in funding, management, and monitoring. It was concluded that the SAMU implementation process in the state was marked by political tensions and management and coordination weaknesses. As a result, serious drawbacks remain in the coordination of the SAMU with the other health services and the regionalization of emergency care in the state.

  17. Exploration of key stakeholders' preferences for pre-hospital physiologic monitoring by emergency rescue services.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Rushworth, Gordon F

    2013-12-01

    To gather preferences for novel pre-hospital physiologic monitoring technologies from emergency rescue services. Qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with three groups from UK Search and Rescue (SAR); (1) Extractors (e.g. SAR teams), (2) Transporters (personnel primarily responsible for casualty transport), and (3) Treaters (e.g. Emergency Department doctors). Three themes were defined; SAR casualty management, novel physiologic monitor potential, and physiologic monitor physical properties. Some SAR groups already employed physiologic monitoring but there was no consensus on which monitor(s) to carry or what to monitor and how frequently. Existing monitors also tended to be bulky and heavy and could be unreliable in an unstable environment or if the casualty was cold. Those performing monitoring tended to have only basic first-aid training, and their workload was often high particularly if there was more than one casualty. The potential benefits of employing a novel monitor were strategic and clinical; an opportunity for transmitting data off-scene in order to facilitate monitoring or generate advice (i.e. telemedicine) was also voiced. A range of more intuitive, physical properties was also raised (e.g. small/compact, lightweight). SAR-specific technology should be simple to operate by those with less medical training, which means that clinical data interpretation and presentation should be carefully considered. It would be beneficial if novel monitors carried out a majority of the interpretation, allowing rescuers to proceed with their priority task of removing the casualty to safety.

  18. Being first on the scene of an accident--experiences of 'doing' prehospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Elmqvist, Carina; Brunt, David; Fridlund, Bengt; Ekebergh, Margaretha

    2010-06-01

    Prehospital emergency care includes the care and treatment of patients prior to them reaching hospital. This is generally a field for the ambulance services, but in many cases firemen or police can be the ones to provide the first responses. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident, as described by policemen, firemen and ambulance staff. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations from southern Sweden. The data consisted of 13 unstructured interviews with first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident is expectations of doing a systematic course of action, dressed in the role of a hero, and at the same time being genuine in an interpersonal encounter. This entails a continuous movement between 'being' and 'doing'. It is not a question of either - or, instead everything is to be understood in relation to each other at the same time. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon; a feeling of security in the uncertainty, a distanced closeness to the injured person, one moment in an eternity, cross-border cooperation within distinct borders and a need to make the implicit explicit. This finding highlights the importance of using policemen and firemen in doing life support measures while waiting for the ambulance staff, and would in turn increase the importance of the relationship between the different professionals on the scene of an accident. PMID:19732398

  19. Determination of fluid extraction and osmotic conductance sigma K in the lung with hypertonic NaCl infusion. II. Experiments.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M; Lee, J

    1992-11-01

    The change in venous blood density in an in vitro rabbit lung preparation was measured after the osmolarity of the blood was elevated 17 to 50 mosmol/liter by a constant arterial infusion of hypertonic saline. We observed a transient density decrease of the blood flowing from the lung and then a return to the preinfusion density within 10 sec, an indication of the rapid completion of fluid extraction from the interstitia by the elevation in osmotic pressure. By fitting the time course of the density change with the prediction of an extraction model, we obtained the osmotic conductance sigma K (the product of the reflection and filtration coefficient) of the lung due to the increase in NaCl osmotic pressure as 1.33 +/- 0.18 ml/[hr.(mosmol/liter).g wet lung tissue] (mean +/- SEM), the interstitial volume participating in the extraction process as 0.27 +/- 0.04 ml/g of lung tissue, and the volume of fluid extracted as 1.12 +/- 0.16 microliter/g tissue for every mosmol/liter elevation. Since we also found no significant difference between the osmotic extraction parameters determined in blood-perfused lungs and those determined in plasma-perfused lungs, we concluded that the rapid density change is the result of the fluid extraction and not the flow impediment of red blood cells caused by the increase in osmolarity. PMID:1479932

  20. Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Regina WS; Chung, Vincent CH; Reeves, Kenneth D.; Rabago, David; Chan, Keith KW; Chan, Dicken CC; Wu, Xinyin; Ho, Robin ST; Wong, Samuel YS

    2016-01-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) is an emerging treatment for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) but its efficacy is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to synthesize clinical evidence on the effect of prolotherapy for knee OA. Fifteen electronic databases were searched from their inception to September 2015. The primary outcome of interest was score change on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moderate risk of bias and one quasi–randomized trial were included, with data from a total of 258 patients. In the meta-analysis of two eligible studies, prolotherapy is superior to exercise alone by a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.18 to 1.45, p = 0.012), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.25 to 1.30, p = 0.001) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.04 to 1.20, p = 0.035) on the WOMAC composite scale; and WOMAC function and pain subscale scores respectively. Moderate heterogeneity exists in all cases. Overall, prolotherapy conferred a positive and significant beneficial effect in the treatment of knee OA. Adequately powered, longer-term trials with uniform end points are needed to better elucidate the efficacy of prolotherapy. PMID:27146849

  1. G-CSF Administration after the Intraosseous Infusion of Hypertonic Hydroxyethyl Starches Accelerating Wound Healing Combined with Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Tong, Chuan; Ti, Dongdong; Liu, Huiling; Song, Haijing; Jiang, Chaoguang; Fu, Xiaobing; Han, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of G-CSF administration after intraosseous (IO) resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury rats. Methods. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) HS with resuscitation (blank), (2) HS with resuscitation + G-CSF (G-CSF, 200 μg/kg body weight, subcutaneous injection), (3) HS with resuscitation + normal saline solution injection (normal saline), and (4) HS + G-CSF injection without resuscitation (Unres/G-CSF). To estimate the treatment effects, the vital signs of alteration were first evaluated, and then wound closure rates and homing of MSCs and EPCs to the wound skins and vasculogenesis were measured. Besides, inflammation and vasculogenesis related mRNA expressions were also examined. Results. IO infusion hypertonic hydroxyethyl starch (HHES) exhibited beneficial volume expansion roles and G-CSF administration accelerated wound healing 3 days ahead of other groups under hemorrhagic shock. Circulating and the homing of MSCs and EPCs at wound skins were significantly elevated at 6 h after G-CSF treatment. Inflammation was declined since 3 d while angiogenesis was more obvious in G-CSF treated group on day 9. Conclusions. These results suggested that the synergistical application of HHES and G-CSF has life-saving effects and is beneficial for improving wound healing in HS combined with cutaneous injury rats. PMID:26989687

  2. Inhaled hypertonic saline for cystic fibrosis: Reviewing the potential evidence for modulation of neutrophil signalling and function

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Emer P; McCarthy, Cormac; McElvaney, Oliver J; Vijayan, Maya Sakthi N; White, Michelle M; Dunlea, Danielle M; Pohl, Kerstin; Lacey, Noreen; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem disorder with significantly shortened life expectancy. The major cause of mortality and morbidity is lung disease with increasing pulmonary exacerbations and decline in lung function predicting significantly poorer outcomes. The pathogenesis of lung disease in CF is characterised in part by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. This leads to accumulation of viscous mucus in the CF airway, providing an ideal environment for bacterial pathogens to grow and colonise, propagating airway inflammation in CF. The use of nebulised hypertonic saline (HTS) treatments has been shown to improve mucus clearance in CF and impact positively upon exacerbations, quality of life, and lung function. Several mechanisms of HTS likely improve outcome, resulting in clinically relevant enhancement in disease parameters related to increase in mucociliary clearance. There is increasing evidence to suggest that HTS is also beneficial through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce bacterial activity and biofilm formation. This review will first describe the use of HTS in treatment of CF focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The emphasis will then change to the potential benefits of aerosolized HTS for the attenuation of receptor mediated neutrophil functions, including down-regulation of oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecule expression, and the suppression of neutrophil degranulation of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:26261770

  3. The Estrogen-Related Receptor Alpha Upregulates Secretin Expressions in Response to Hypertonicity and Angiotensin II Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vien H. Y.; Lam, Ian P. Y.; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Chow, Billy K. C.; Lee, Leo T. O.

    2012-01-01

    Osmoregulation via maintenance of water and salt homeostasis is a vital process. In the brain, a functional secretin (SCT) and secretin receptor (SCTR) axis has recently been shown to mediate central actions of angiotensin II (ANGII), including initiation of water intake and stimulation of vasopressin (VP) expression and release. In this report, we provide evidence that estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, NR3B1), a transcription factor mainly involved in metabolism, acts as an upstream activator of the SCT gene. In vitro studies using mouse hypothalamic cell line N-42 show that ERRα upregulates SCT promoter and gene expression. More importantly, knockdown of endogenous ERRα abolishes SCT promoter activation in response to hypertonic and ANGII stimulations. In mouse brain, ERRα coexpresses with SCT in various osmoregulatory brain regions, including the lamina terminalis and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and its expression is induced by hyperosmotic and ANGII treatments. Based on our data, we propose that both the upregulation of ERRα and/or the increased binding of ERRα to the mouse SCT promoter are two possible mechanisms for the elevated SCT expression upon hyperosmolality and central ANGII stimulation. PMID:22761926

  4. Diagnosis and outcome in a prehospital cohort of patients with bundle branch block and suspected acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Stengaard, Carsten; Sørensen, Christina Ankjær; Thygesen, Kristian; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Thuesen, Leif; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immediate revascularization is beneficial in patients with presumed new-onset bundle branch block myocardial infarction (BBBMI). In the prehospital setting, it is a challenge to diagnose new-onset BBBMI and triage accordingly. Methods: ECG, final diagnosis, and mortality were assessed in a prehospital cohort of 4905 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Bundle branch block (BBB) was defined as QRS duration ≥120 ms caused by delayed intraventricular conduction. Mortality and angiography data were obtained from the Central Office of Civil Registration and the Western Denmark Heart Registry. Definite diagnosis of AMI and the onset of BBB were determined by expert consensus. Patients were divided into four groups: with or without AMI and with or without BBB. Mortality was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier plots and compared using log-rank statistics. Results: AMI was diagnosed in 954 patients, of whom 118 had BBB. In 3951 patients without AMI, 436 had BBB. Patients with BBBMI were less often revascularized than patients with AMI without BBB (24 vs. 54%, p<0.001). BBBMI was categorized as new onset in 43 patients of whom two were triaged for acute angioplasty. One-year mortality was 47.2, 17.5, 20.8, and 8.6% (log-rank <0.001) in patients with BBBMI, patients with AMI without BBB, patients with BBB without AMI, and patients without AMI or BBB, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with BBBMI have a high mortality. Less than 25% undergo revascularization and only very few patients with new-onset BBBMI are transferred for urgent revascularization. Focus on improving triage and prehospital identification of high-risk patients with BBB and chest pain could improve outcome. PMID:24222828

  5. Insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4 to the plasma membrane of muscle cells by using N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-dependent SNARE mechanisms but different v-SNAREs: role of TI-VAMP.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Thong, Farah S L; Lim, Dawn Y; Li, Dailin; Garg, Rami R; Rudge, Rachel; Galli, Thierry; Rudich, Assaf; Klip, Amira

    2004-12-01

    Insulin and hypertonicity each increase the content of GLUT4 glucose transporters at the surface of muscle cells. Insulin enhances GLUT4 exocytosis without diminishing its endocytosis. The insulin but not the hypertonicity response is reduced by tetanus neurotoxin, which cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)2 and VAMP3, and is rescued upon introducing tetanus neurotoxin-resistant VAMP2. Here, we show that hypertonicity enhances GLUT4 recycling, compounding its previously shown ability to reduce GLUT4 endocytosis. To examine whether the canonical soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) mechanism is required for the plasma membrane fusion of the tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive GLUT4 vesicles, L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (GLUT4myc) were transiently transfected with dominant negative N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (DN-NSF) or small-interfering RNA to tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP siRNA). Both strategies markedly reduced the basal level of surface GLUT4myc and the surface gain of GLUT4myc in response to hypertonicity. The insulin effect was abolished by DN-NSF, but only partly reduced by TI-VAMP siRNA. We propose that insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4myc from partly overlapping, but distinct sources defined by VAMP2 and TI-VAMP, respectively.

  6. Insulin and Hypertonicity Recruit GLUT4 to the Plasma Membrane of Muscle Cells by Using N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor-dependent SNARE Mechanisms but Different v-SNAREs: Role of TI-VAMP

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Varinder K.; Thong, Farah S.L.; Lim, Dawn Y.; Li, Dailin; Garg, Rami R.; Rudge, Rachel; Galli, Thierry; Rudich, Assaf; Klip, Amira

    2004-01-01

    Insulin and hypertonicity each increase the content of GLUT4 glucose transporters at the surface of muscle cells. Insulin enhances GLUT4 exocytosis without diminishing its endocytosis. The insulin but not the hypertonicity response is reduced by tetanus neurotoxin, which cleaves vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)2 and VAMP3, and is rescued upon introducing tetanus neurotoxin-resistant VAMP2. Here, we show that hypertonicity enhances GLUT4 recycling, compounding its previously shown ability to reduce GLUT4 endocytosis. To examine whether the canonical soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) mechanism is required for the plasma membrane fusion of the tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive GLUT4 vesicles, L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4 (GLUT4myc) were transiently transfected with dominant negative N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (DN-NSF) or small-interfering RNA to tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive VAMP (TI-VAMP siRNA). Both strategies markedly reduced the basal level of surface GLUT4myc and the surface gain of GLUT4myc in response to hypertonicity. The insulin effect was abolished by DN-NSF, but only partly reduced by TI-VAMP siRNA. We propose that insulin and hypertonicity recruit GLUT4myc from partly overlapping, but distinct sources defined by VAMP2 and TI-VAMP, respectively. PMID:15469990

  7. Prehospital Electronic Patient Care Report Systems: Early Experiences from Emergency Medical Services Agency Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Lee, Christopher H.; Sasson, Comilla; Van Gelder, Carin M.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the United States embraces electronic health records (EHRs), improved emergency medical services (EMS) information systems are also a priority; however, little is known about the experiences of EMS agencies as they adopt and implement electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems. We sought to characterize motivations for adoption of e-PCR systems, challenges associated with adoption and implementation, and emerging implementation strategies. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews with EMS agency leaders. Participants were recruited through a web-based survey of National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) members, a didactic session at the 2010 NAEMSP Annual Meeting, and snowball sampling. Interviews lasted approximately 30 minutes, were recorded and professionally transcribed. Analysis was conducted by a five-person team, employing the constant comparative method to identify recurrent themes. Results Twenty-three interviewees represented 20 EMS agencies from the United States and Canada; 14 EMS agencies were currently using e-PCR systems. The primary reason for adoption was the potential for e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts. Challenges to e-PCR system adoption included those common to any health information technology project, as well as challenges unique to the prehospital setting, including: fear of increased ambulance run times leading to decreased ambulance availability, difficulty integrating with existing hospital information systems, and unfunded mandates requiring adoption of e-PCR systems. Three recurring strategies emerged to improve e-PCR system adoption and implementation: 1) identify creative funding sources; 2) leverage regional health information organizations; and 3) build internal information technology capacity. Conclusion EMS agencies are highly motivated to adopt e-PCR systems to support quality assurance efforts; however, adoption and implementation of e

  8. Pre-Hospital Triage of Trauma Patients Using the Random Forest Computer Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Scerbo, Michelle; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Cotton, Bryan; Dua, Anahita; Del Junco, Deborah; Wade, Charles; Holcomb, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over-triage not only wastes resources but displaces the patient from their community and causes delay of treatment for the more seriously injured. This study aimed to validate the Random Forest computer model (RFM) as means of better triaging trauma patients to Level I trauma centers. Methods Adult trauma patients with “medium activation” presenting via helicopter to a Level I Trauma Center from May 2007 to May 2009 were included. The “medium activation” trauma patient is alert and hemodynamically stable on scene but has either subnormal vital signs or an accumulation of risk factors that may indicate a potentially serious injury. Variables included in the RFM computer analysis including demographics, mechanism of injury, pre-hospital fluid, medications, vitals, and disposition. Statistical analysis was performed via the Random Forest Algorithm to compare our institutional triage rate to rates determined by the RFM. Results A total of 1,653 patients were included in this study of which 496 were used in the testing set of the RFM. In our testing set, 33.8% of patients brought to our Level I trauma center could have been managed at a Level III trauma center and 88% of patients that required a Level I trauma center were identified correctly. In the testing set, there was an over-triage rate of 66% while utilizing the RFM we decreased the over-triage rate to 42% (p<0.001). There was an under-triage rate of 8.3%. The RFM predicted patient disposition with a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 42%, negative predictive value of 92% and positive predictive value of 34%. Conclusion While prospective validation is required, it appears that computer modeling potentially could be used to guide triage decisions, allowing both more accurate triage and more efficient use of the trauma system. PMID:24484906

  9. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p < 0.001). Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p < 0.001, all comparisons). RTS scores were statistically lower in the alcohol group (p < 0.001), although the clinical significance of this is unclear. Controlling for sex, acute alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p < 0.001). Acute alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients. PMID:27002348

  10. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FOR ELDERLY POPULATION IN TBILISI.

    PubMed

    Dalakishvili, S; Bakuradze, N; Gugunishvili, M; Jojua, R; Eremashvili, M

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the issue is determined by the current demographic situation in Georgia and the world in general. The trend of growing the number of older people and the increase of the life span is obvious. At the same time in the number of countries, particularly in the developed western countries and Japan, the decrease of birth rate is noticed. Similar processes are taking place in Georgia; this logically increases the number of sick and weakened people, which means that taking care of them becomes more acute problem. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was the study of the situation of the pre-hospital emergency medical services in the Georgian capital Tbilisi during the period of 2012-2014. For this reason, the data provided by the Tbilisi Emergency Medical Service were used. Besides, we have also looked for the statistics of the different countries, including the US, Japan and South-East Asian countries. Attention was paid to the recommendations proposed because of the Monitoring of the European Union Mission in Georgia, which focuses on the social and economic protection of elderly. The tables and diagrams, describing the current conditions are provided. Since 2012, there has been launched the state health care program for the elderly in Georgia, but based on research conducted, it does not cover home care services while, the majority of the elderly are chronically sick people and suffer from the number of diseases. Results of the study can be used for improving quality of the Emergency Medical Service model in Georgia and finding the possible ways for its reforms. PMID:27249441

  11. The 60-Day Temperature-Dependent Degradation of Midazolam and Lorazepam in the Prehospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Jason T.; Pinnawin, Ashley; Jones, Elizabeth; Denninghoff, Kurt; Siewart, Nicholas; Spaite, Daniel W.; Zaleski, Erin; Silbergleit, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background The choice of the optimal benzodiazepine to treat prehospital status epilepticus is unclear. Lorazepam is preferred in the emergency department, but concerns about nonrefrigerated storage limits emergency medical services (EMS) use. Midazolam is increasingly popular, but its heat stability is undocumented. Objective This study evaluated temperature-dependent degradation of lorazepam and midazolam after 60 days in the EMS environment. Methods Lorazepam or midazolam samples were collected prior to (n = 139) or after (n = 229) 60 days of EMS deployment during spring–summer months in 14 metropolitan areas across the United States. Medications were stored in study boxes that logged temperature every minute and were stored in EMS units per local agency policy. Mean kinetic temperature (MKT) exposure was derived for each sample. Drug concentrations were determined in a central laboratory by high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentration as a function of MKT was analyzed by linear regression. Results Prior to deployment, measured concentrations of both benzodiazepines were 1.0 relative to labeled concentration. After 60 days, midazolam showed no degradation (mean relative concentration 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.00) and was stable across temperature exposures (adjusted R2 –0.008). Lorazepam experienced little degradation (mean relative concentration 0.99, 95% CI 0.98–0.99), but degradation was correlated to increasing MKT (adjusted R2 0.278). The difference between the temperature dependence of degradation of midazolam and lorazepam was statistically significant (T = −5.172, p < 0.001). Conclusions Lorazepam experiences small but statistically significant temperature-dependent degradation after 60 days in the EMS environment. Additional study is needed to evaluate whether clinically significant deterioration occurs after 60 days. Midazolam shows no degradation over this duration, even in high-heat conditions. PMID:23148574

  12. Comparison of three different prehospital wrapping methods for preventing hypothermia - a crossover study in humans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidental hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. Various methods for insulating and wrapping hypothermic patients are used worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the thermal insulating effects and comfort of bubble wrap, ambulance blankets / quilts, and Hibler's method, a low-cost method combining a plastic outer layer with an insulating layer. Methods Eight volunteers were dressed in moistened clothing, exposed to a cold and windy environment then wrapped using one of the three different insulation methods in random order on three different days. They were rested quietly on their back for 60 minutes in a cold climatic chamber. Skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption were measured, and metabolic heat production was calculated. A questionnaire was used for a subjective evaluation of comfort, thermal sensation, and shivering. Results Skin temperature was significantly higher 15 minutes after wrapping using Hibler's method compared with wrapping with ambulance blankets / quilts or bubble wrap. There were no differences in core temperature between the three insulating methods. The subjects reported more shivering, they felt colder, were more uncomfortable, and had an increased heat production when using bubble wrap compared with the other two methods. Hibler's method was the volunteers preferred method for preventing hypothermia. Bubble wrap was the least effective insulating method, and seemed to require significantly higher heat production to compensate for increased heat loss. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a combination of vapour tight layer and an additional dry insulating layer (Hibler's method) is the most efficient wrapping method to prevent heat loss, as shown by increased skin temperatures, lower metabolic rate and better thermal comfort. This should then be the method of choice when wrapping a wet patient at risk of developing hypothermia in prehospital environments. PMID:21699720

  13. Factors affecting the voluntary intake of food by sheep. 5. The inhibitory effect of hypertonicity in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Carter, R R; Grovum, W L

    1990-07-01

    The site where osmotically active substances act to depress food intake was determined in sheep. After 5.5 h of food deprivation, solutions of sodium chloride or polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200) were added to either the reticulo-rumen or the abomasum. The sheep were then immediately offered pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa). Water was withheld during the first 60 min of feeding but was available from 60 to 90 min. There was a linear inhibition in food intake in the first 10 min after loading 2.37, 6.25, 12.5, 25.0 or 50.0 g NaCl into the rumen according to a 5 x 5 Latin square design (P = 0.0001). The intake reduction was 3.49 g food/g NaCl. An osmotic load of PEG-200 equivalent to 50 g NaCl also significantly inhibited food intake in the first 10 min of the meal compared with a control treatment. The inhibition of food intake after loading 55 g NaCl into the rumen was not affected by injecting lidocaine hydrochloride into the reticulum immediately before NaCl loading. NaCl injected into the abomasum did not significantly affect food intake in the first 10 min of feeding even though the tonicity of abomasal digesta was increased to unphysiological levels. There was no consistent relationship between food intake and the change in the tonicity of jugular plasma following solute loading and drinking. The sensing site of hypertonicity was localized to the wall of the reticulo-rumen where neuronal receptors appear to be capable of detecting osmotic pressure within the physiological range to depress food intake. These receptors should be identified and characterized because of their possible significance in limiting food intake by ruminants.

  14. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  15. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  16. Reduction of Tendon Adhesions following Administration of Adaprev, a Hypertonic Solution of Mannose-6-Phosphate: Mechanism of Action Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K. F.; Metcalfe, Anthony D.; Wong, Richard; Bush, Jim; Platt, Chris; Garcon, Arnaud; Goldspink, Nick; McGrouther, Duncan A.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Repaired tendons may be complicated by progressive fibrosis, causing adhesion formation or tendon softening leading to tendon rupture and subsequent reduced range of motion. There are few therapies available which improve the gliding of damaged tendons in the hand. We investigate the role of Mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) in a 600 mM hypertonic solution (Adaprev) on tendon adhesion formation in vivo using a mouse model of severed tendon in conjunction with analysis of collagen synthesis, cellular proliferation and receptors involved in TGF beta signalling. Cytotoxicity was assessed by measuring tissue residency, mechanical strength and cell viability of tendons after treatment with Adaprev. To elicit potential modes of action, in vitro and ex vivo studies were performed investigating phosphorylation of p38, cell migration and proliferation. Adaprev treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the development of adhesions and improved collagen organisation without reducing overall collagen synthesis following tendon injury in vivo. The bioavailability of Adaprev saw a 40% reduction at the site of administration over 45 minutes and tendon fibroblasts tolerated up to 120 minutes of exposure without significant loss of cell viability or tensile strength. These favourable effects were independent of CI-MPR and TGF-β signalling and possibly highlight a novel mechanism of action related to cellular stress demonstrated by phosphorylation of p38. The effect of treatment reduced tendon fibroblast migration and transiently halted tendon fibroblast proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. Our studies demonstrate that the primary mode of action for Adaprev is potentially via a physical, non-chemical, hyperosmotic effect. PMID:25383548

  17. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  18. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  19. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mingtao; Tang, Hao; Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  20. Effectiveness of 3% hypertonic saline nebulization in acute bronchiolitis among Indian children: A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harsh V.; Gupta, Vivek V.; Kaur, Gurmeet; Baidwan, Amitoz S.; George, Pardeep P.; Shah, Jay C.; Shinde, Kushal; Malik, Ruku; Chitkara, Neha; Bajaj, Krushnan V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) and 0.9% normal saline with nebulized 0.9% normal saline with salbutamol in patients of acute viral bronchiolitis. Materials and Methods: Participants were divided into three groups, that is, 3% HS group, 0.9% normal saline group and 0.9% saline with salbutamol group. Four doses at interval of 6 h were given daily until discharge. Average CS score and length of hospital stay were compared. One-way analysis of variance paired t-test and Chi-square test were utilized for statistical analysis. Results: The mean ages of the patients in three groups were 6.03 ± 3.71, 5.69 ± 3.34 and 5.48 ± 3.35 respectively. The 3rd day CS scores for all the groups were 1.0 ± 1.1, 1.9 ± 1.1 and 3.3 ± 0.5 respectively (P = 0.000). The average length of hospital stay was 3.4 ± 1.7, 3.7 ± 1.9 and 4.9 ± 1.4 days respectively (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The present study concludes that 3% HS nebulization (without additional bronchodilators) is an effective and safe treatment for nonasthmatic, moderately ill patients of acute bronchiolitis. The economic benefit of this comparably priced modality of treatment can be enormous in terms of hospital costs with parents returning to work sooner. PMID:27141475

  1. The effects of hypertonic saline and nicotinamide on sensorimotor and cognitive function following cortical contusion injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Andrea; Tan, Arlene A; Hoane, Michael R

    2009-12-22

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is an accepted treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the behavioral and cognitive consequences following HTS administration have not thoroughly been examined. Recent preclinical evidence has suggested that nicotinamide (NAM) is beneficial for recovery of function following TBI. The current study compared the behavioral and cognitive consequences of HTS and NAM as competitive therapeutic agents for the treatment of TBI. Following controlled cortical impact (CCI), bolus administrations of NAM (500 mg/kg), 7.5% HTS, or 0.9% saline Vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) were given at 2, 24, and 48 h post-CCI. Behavioral results revealed that animals treated with NAM and HTS showed significant improvements in beam walk and locomotor placing compared to the Vehicle group. The Morris water maze (MWM) retrograde amnesia test was conducted on day 12 post-CCI and showed that all groups had significant retention of memory compared to injured, Vehicle-treated animals. Working memory was also assessed on days 8-20 using the MWM. The NAM and Vehicle groups quickly acquired the task; however, HTS animals showed no acquisition of this task. Histological examinations revealed that the HTS-treated animals lost significantly more cortical tissue than either the NAM or Vehicle-treated animals. HTS-treated animals showed a greater loss of hippocampal tissue compared to the other groups. In general, NAM showed a faster rate of recovery than HTS without this associated tissue loss. The results of this study reiterate the strengths of NAM following injury and show concerns with bolus administrations of HTS due to the differential effects on cognitive performance and apparent tissue loss. PMID:19781534

  2. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  3. Role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 in regulating hypertonic-mediated secretin receptor expression in kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Oscar W H; Wong, Kenneth K L; Ko, Ben C; Chung, Sookja K; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2016-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that secretin (SCT) is an important element in the osmoregulatory pathway. It is interesting to note that both SCT and its receptor (SCTR) gene are activated upon hyperosmolality in the kidney. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of the SCTR gene expression in response to changes in osmolality have yet to be clarified. Detailed DNA sequence analysis of the promoter regions of the SCTR gene reveals the presence of multiple osmotic response elements (ORE). The ORE is the binding site of a key osmosensitive transactivator, namely, the nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5). SCTR and NFAT5 are co-expressed in the kidney cortex and medulla collecting duct cells. We therefore hypothesize that NFAT5 is responsible for modulating SCTR expression in hypertonic environments. In this study, we found hypertonicity stimulates the promoter activities and endogenous gene expression of SCTR in mouse kidney cortex collecting duct cells (M1) and inner medulla collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The overexpression and silencing of NFAT5 further confirmed it to be responsible for the up-regulation of the SCTR gene under hypertonic conditions. A significant increase in the interaction between NFAT5 and the SCTR promoter was also observed following chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In vivo, osmotic stress up-regulates the SCTR gene in the kidney cortex and medulla of wild-type mice, but does not do so in NFAT5(+/-) animals. Hence, this study provides comprehensive information on how NFAT5 regulates SCTR expression in different osmotic environments.

  4. Early free access to hypertonic NaCl solution induces a long-term effect on drinking, brain cell activity and gene expression of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Macchione, A F; Beas, C; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E; Godino, A; Ponce, L F; Amigone, J L; Vivas, L

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to an altered osmotic environment during a pre/postnatal period can differentially program the fluid intake and excretion pattern profile in a way that persists until adulthood. However, knowledge about the programming effects on the underlying brain neurochemical circuits of thirst and hydroelectrolyte balance, and its relation with behavioral outputs, is limited. We evaluated whether early voluntary intake of hypertonic NaCl solution may program adult offspring fluid balance, plasma vasopressin, neural activity, and brain vasopressin and angiotensinergic receptor type 1a (AT1a)-receptor gene expression. The manipulation (M) period covered dams from 1 week before conception until offspring turned 1-month-old. The experimental groups were (i) Free access to hypertonic NaCl solution (0.45 M NaCl), food (0.18% NaCl) and water [M-Na]; and (ii) Free access to food and water only [M-Ctrol]. Male offspring (2-month-old) were subjected to iv infusion (0.15 ml/min) of hypertonic (1.5M NaCl), isotonic (0.15M NaCl) or sham infusion during 20 min. Cumulative water intake (140 min) and drinking latency to the first lick were recorded from the start of the infusion. Our results indicate that, after systemic sodium overload, the M-Na group had increased water intake, and diminished neuronal activity (Fos-immunoreactivity) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and nucleus of the solitary tract. They also showed reduced relative vasopressin (AVP)-mRNA and AT1a-mRNA expression at the supraoptic nucleus and SFO, respectively. The data indicate that the availability of a rich source of sodium during the pre/postnatal period induces a long-term effect on drinking, neural activity, and brain gene expression implicated in the control of hydroelectrolyte balance.

  5. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50–14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  6. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  7. Pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Ru, Xiaojuan; Sun, Haixin; Liu, Hongmei; Sun, Dongling; Liu, Yunhai; Huang, Jiuyi; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-hospital delay and its associated factors in first-ever stroke registered in communities from three cities in China. The rates of delay greater than or equal to 2 hours were calculated and factors associated with delays were determined by non-conditional binary logistic regression, after adjusting for different explanatory factors. Among the 403 cases of stroke with an accurate documented time of prehospital delay, the median time (interquartile range) was 4.00 (1.50-14.00) hours. Among the 544 cases of stroke with an estimated time range of prehospital delay, 24.8% of patients were transferred to the emergency department or hospital within 2 hours, only 16.9% of patients with stroke were aware that the initial symptom represented a stroke, only 18.8% used the emergency medical service and one-third of the stroke cases were not identified by ambulance doctors. In the multivariate analyses, 8 variables or sub-variables were identified. In conclusion, prehospital delay of stroke was common in communities. Thus, intervention measures in communities should focus on education about the early identification of stroke and appropriate emergency medical service (EMS) use, as well as the development of organized stroke care. PMID:27411494

  8. Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 1: Tourniquets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert; Payne, Ellen K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this column is to provide athletic training educators (ATE) with evidence regarding the use of tourniquets in the prehospital setting as well as to be a resource on how to teach the management of external hemorrhage using tourniquets.

  9. Recent advances in TeleStroke: a systematic review on applications in prehospital management and Stroke Unit treatment or TeleStroke networking in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Gordian J; Müller-Barna, Peter; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2014-12-01

    TeleStroke has become an increasing means to overcome shortage of stroke expertise in underserved areas. This rapidly growing field has triggered a large amount of publications in recent years. We aimed to analyze recent advances in the field of telemedicine for acute stroke, with main focus on prehospital management, Stroke Unit treatment and network implementations in developing countries. Out of 260 articles, 25 were selected for this systematic review: 9 regarding prehospital management, 14 regarding Stroke Unit treatment and 2 describing a network in developing countries. Prehospital management showed that stroke recognition can start at the dispatch emergency call, important clinical information can be electronically transmitted to hospitals before admission and even acute treatment such as thrombolysis can be initiated in the prehospital field if ambulances are equipped with CT scan and point-of-care laboratory. Articles on remote clinical examination, telemedical imaging interpretation, trial recruitment and cost-effectiveness described various aspects of Stroke Unit treatment within TeleStroke networks, underlining reliability, safety and cost savings of these systems of care. Only one network was described to have been implemented in a developing/emerging nation. TeleStroke is a growing field expanding its focus to a broader spectrum of stroke care. It still seems to be underused, particularly in developing countries.

  10. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients. OPALS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Nichol, G; O'Brien, B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Lyver, M B; Luinstra, L G; Dagnone, E; Campeau, T; Ward, R; Anderson, S

    1999-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period (1994-2002). The current article, Part II, describes in detail the rationale and methodology for major trauma and respiratory distress patients and for an economic evaluation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) programs in the OPALS Study. The OPALS Study, using a rigorous controlled methodology and a large sample size, should clearly indicate the benefit in trauma and respiratory distress patient survival and morbidity that results from the widespread introduction of prehospital ALS programs to communities of many different sizes. [Stiell IG, Wells GA, Spaite DW, Nichol G, O'Brien B, Munkley DP, Field BJ, Lyver MB, Luinstra LG, Dagnone E, Campeau T, Ward R, Anderson S, for the OPALS Study Group: The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients.

  11. Prehospital antiplatelet use and functional status on admission of patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease: a nationwide retrospective cohort study (J-ASPECT study)

    PubMed Central

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Kada, Akiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Toyoda, Kazunori; Matsuda, Shinya; Suzuki, Akifumi; Kataoka, Hiroharu; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Kamitani, Satoru; Nishimura, Ataru; Kurogi, Ryota; Sayama, Tetsuro; Iihara, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To elucidate the association between antiplatelet use in patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease before hospital admission and good functional status on admission in Japan. Design Retrospective, multicentre, non-randomised, observational study. Setting Nationwide registry data in Japan. Participants A total of 1925 patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease admitted between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2014 in Japan. Main outcome measure We performed propensity score-matched analysis to examine the association between prehospital antiplatelet use and no significant disability on hospital admission, as defined by a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1. Results Propensity-matched patients who received prehospital antiplatelet drugs were associated with a good outcome on hospital admission (OR adjusted for all covariates, 3.82; 95% CI 1.22 to 11.99) compared with those who did not receive antiplatelet drugs prior to hospital admission. Conclusions Prehospital antiplatelet use was significantly associated with good functional status on hospital admission among patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease in Japan. Our results suggest that prehospital antiplatelet use should be considered when evaluating outcomes of patients with non-haemorrhagic moyamoya disease. PMID:27008684

  12. Use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) as pre-hospital treatment in a swine model of fluid percussion traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bobby; Haque, Ashraful; Arnaud, Françoise G.; Teranishi, Kohsuke; Steinbach, Thomas; Auker, Charles R.; McCarron, Richard M.; Freilich, Daniel; Scultetus, Anke H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has been used as an adjunctive therapy for acute post-traumatic hemorrhage and reversal of iatrogenic coagulopathy in trauma patients in the hospital setting. However, investigations regarding its potential use in pre-hospital management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been conducted extensively. Aims: In the present study, we investigated the physiology, hematology and histology effects of a single pre-hospital bolus injection of rFVIIa compared to current clinical practice of no pre-hospital intervention in a swine model of moderate fluid percussion TBI. Materials and Methods: Animals were randomized to receive either a bolus of rFVIIa (90 μg/kg) or nothing 15 minutes (T15) post-injury. Hospital arrival was simulated at T60, and animals were euthanized at experimental endpoint (T360). Results: Survival was 100% in both groups; baseline physiology parameters were similar, vital signs were comparable. Animals that received rFVIIa demonstrated less hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (P = 0.0037) and less neuronal degeneration in left hippocampus, pons, and cerebellum (P = 0.00009, P = 0.00008, and P = 0.251, respectively). Immunohistochemical staining of brain sections showed less overall loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and less Flouro-Jade B positive cells in rFVIIa-treated animals. Conclusions: Early pre-hospital administration of rFVIIa in this swine TBI model reduced neuronal necrosis and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). These results merit further investigation of this approach in pre-hospital trauma care. PMID:24812455

  13. A prediction model for prehospital triage of patients with suspected cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, M; Zalenski, R J; Ross, M A; Bock, B

    2000-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology recommends that patients with high risk acute myocardial infarction (AMI) be triaged to hospitals with percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty capability. However, there are no prehospital triage criteria to select candidates for bypassing community hospitals and being taken directly to "cardiac centers." This article assesses which independent variables predict death within 7 days in patients with suspected AMI transported by EMS. This is a retrospective study of 291 AMI patients transported by ambulance to 3 hospitals during 1996-1997. Included were patients who were (n = 244) > or =18 years of age, had a ED chief complaint of chest pain or dyspnea for whom we had mortality data. Mortality at 7 days, our primary outcome measure, was obtained by using a metropolitan Detroit tricounty death index records. Differences between the survivors and nonsurvivors were assessed using the Student's t-test and chi-square tests. Multiple triage criteria were assessed for optimal identification of high risk patients by constructing a logistic multivariate model. Among the study population, 15% died within 7 days (95% confidence interval (CI) 10.3-19.2), and this group represented 63.2% of all deaths over a 2 year surveillance period. Survivors, compared to nonsurvivors, were 14.1 years younger (P < or = .001) and more often men (P < or = 0.001). The dispatch time to ED arrival was less among survivors than nonsurvivors (42.8 vs. 50.6 min, P < or = .01). EMS vital signs differed by survivor status. Among survivors, HR was lower (-11.9 bpm; P < or = 0.01), RR was lower (-6.7 rpm; P < or = .001), SBP was higher (+14.5 mmHg; P < or = 0.05) and DBP was higher (+13.2 mm Hg; P < or = .01). A multivariate model identified the following as independent predictors of early mortality: female gender (OR = 2.3; P < or = .05), age > or =65 (OR = 5.9; P < or = .01), RR > or = 20 (OR = 4.6; P < or = .001), SBP < 120 (OR = 2.4; P < or = .05). The overall

  14. Recognition and perception of elder abuse by prehospital and hospital-based care providers.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Austin G

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the extent of exposure, knowledge and attitudes of prehospital care providers (PCPs) and hospital care providers (HCPs) to elder abuse and neglect. A 20-question survey was designed to determine the providers' perception, knowledge and ability to identify patients that were potential victims of elder abuse and/or neglect. The surveys were distributed at four Maryland statewide conferences during 2006. A total of 645 surveys were distributed at the start of the individual conferences and 400 completed surveys were returned. Of the respondents, 272 (68.2%) were PCP (emergency medical services=EMSs) and 127 (31.8%) were HCP. During the past 12 months, 51.3% of those surveyed did not have reason to suspect any patients were exposed to abuse or neglect, although 60.5% admitted little or no contact with the elderly. In an attempt to determine respondent's ability to recognize potential abuse and neglect patients, scenario-type questions were used. Respondents believed a decubital ulcer (bedsore) was a positive indicator (83.5%) of abuse/neglect and 92.8% indicated that the elderly could suffer from injuries similar to "shaken-baby syndrome". When questioned about skin bruises as a possible indicator of abuse, only 69.3% of the respondents identified it as a possible sign of abuse. Seventy-one percent of respondents indicated that burns are not common in the elderly and could be another sign of elder abuse. One-in-three providers indicated they would suspect other reasons (dementia, depression, etc.) for the report of a sexual assault in an elderly patient. Eighty-nine percent of providers were aware that healthcare providers in the State of Maryland are required to report suspected elder and vulnerable patient abuse and/or neglect to law enforcement or social services' agencies. When asked to define elder abuse as a medical or social problem, 25.0% of providers stated that it was a social problem. Over 95% of the providers

  15. Continuous controlled-infusion of hypertonic saline solution in traumatic brain-injured patients: a 9-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Description of a continuous hypertonic saline solution (HSS) infusion using a dose-adaptation of natremia in traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients with refractory intracranial hypertension (ICH). Methods We performed a single-center retrospective study in a surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Fifty consecutive TBI patients with refractory ICH treated with continuous HSS infusion adapted to a target of natremia. In brief, a physician set a target of natremia adapted to the evolution of intracranial pressure (ICP). Flow of NaCl 20% was a priori calculated according to natriuresis, and the current and target natremia that were assessed every 4 hours. Results The HSS infusion was initiated for a duration of 7 (5 to 10) (8 ± 4) days. ICP decreased from 29 (26 to 34) (31 ± 9) mm Hg at H0 to 20 (15 to 26) (21 ± 8) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). Cerebral perfusion pressure increased from 61 (50 to 70) (61 ± 13) mm Hg at H0 up to 67 (60 to 79) (69 ± 12) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). No rebound of ICH was reported after stopping continuous HSS infusion. Natremia increased from 140 (138 to 143) (140 ± 4) at H0 up to 144 (141 to 148) (144 ± 4) mmol/L at H4 (P < 0.05). Plasma osmolarity increased from 275 (268 to 281) (279 ± 17) mmol/L at H0 up to 290 (284 to 307) (297 ± 17) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). The main side effect observed was an increase in chloremia from 111 (107 to 119) (113 ± 8) mmol/L at H0 up to 121 (117 to 124) (121 ± 6) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). Neither acute kidney injury nor pontine myelinolysis was recorded. Conclusions Continuous HSS infusion adapted to close biologic monitoring enables long-lasting control of natremia in TBI patients along with a decreased ICP without any rebound on infusion discontinuation. PMID:22035596

  16. Massive accumulation of 11C-Pittsburg compound B in the occipital lobes of a patient with early-onset dementia accompanied by muscle weakness and hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sano, Terunori; Kamiya, Kouhei; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Shigemoto, Yoko; Sato, Noriko; Oya, Yasushi; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent 11C-Pittsburg compound B (11C-PiB), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), 99mTc-ethyl-cysteinate-dimer single photon emission computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging after presenting with progressive dementia, muscle weakness, and hypertonicity. Some of her family members had died of muscle weakness with early-onset dementia of unknown etiology. Neurological and psychological examinations revealed moderate dementia in general fields and muscle weakness in her upper limbs. 11C-PiB PET/CT revealed abnormal accumulations of amyloid in the bilateral occipital lobes, while physiological uptakes of 11C-PiB in areas that normally show high uptake, such as white matter, appeared relatively decreased. Meanwhile, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β was decreased, and CSF total and phosphorylated tau proteins were increased. This case may be representative of a new category of amyloid deposition disease characterized by early-onset dementia, muscle weakness, and hypertonicity, or at least, a new uptake pattern of PiB in variant AD.

  17. A Physiologically-Motivated Compartment-Based Model of the Effect of Inhaled Hypertonic Saline on Mucociliary Clearance and Liquid Transport in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Markovetz, Matthew R.; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Locke, Landon W.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Parker, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by liquid hyperabsorption, airway surface dehydration, and impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC). Herein, we present a compartment-based mathematical model of the airway that extends the resolution of functional imaging data. Methods Using functional imaging data to inform our model, we developed a system of mechanism-motivated ordinary differential equations to describe the mucociliary clearance and absorption of aerosolized radiolabeled particle and small molecules probes from human subjects with and without CF. We also utilized a novel imaging metric in vitro to gauge the fraction of airway epithelial cells that have functional ciliary activity. Results This model, and its incorporated kinetic rate parameters, captures the MCC and liquid dynamics of the hyperabsorptive state in CF airways and the mitigation of that state by hypertonic saline treatment. Conclusions We postulate, based on the model structure and its ability to capture clinical patient data, that patients with CF have regions of airway with diminished MCC function that can be recruited with hypertonic saline treatment. In so doing, this model structure not only makes a case for durable osmotic agents used in lung-region specific treatments, but also may provide a possible clinical endpoint, the fraction of functional ciliated airway. PMID:25383714

  18. [Clinical pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a preservative-free hypertonic ophthalmic solution for patients with symptomatic corneal edema].

    PubMed

    Rouland, J-F

    2015-11-01

    This exploratory clinical trial aims to assess the effect on visual acuity and central corneal thickness of an unpreserved hypertonic ophthalmic solution containing sodium chloride (5%) and sodium hyaluronate, in patients with chronic corneal edema caused by endothelial disease reducing their visual acuity. Twenty patients were enrolled and treated with the hypertonic solution (1 to 2 drops per eye, 4 times a day over 28 days). Progression of visual acuity (ETDRS score) and corneal thickness (ultrasonic pachymetry) was measured from baseline (without treatment) through the treatment period (Day 7 and Day 28). The analyses were performed on 18 patients (Full Analysis Set [FAS] population). The causes of corneal edema were Fuchs endothelial dystrophy in 10 cases and post-cataract surgery endothelial decompensation in 8 patients. The mean visual acuity values for the FAS population compared between baseline (Day-7) and one week of treatment (Day+7) show a significant 5-point VA improvement (P<0.001 paired Wilcoxon test). For corneal thickness, there was also a significant decrease (P=0.033 paired Wilcoxon test). Functional improvement was observed at 28 days of instillation. No adverse events were recorded during the clinical study. In conclusion, the unpreserved hyperosmolar solution containing sodium chloride and sodium hyaluronate significantly improved ETDRS visual acuity after one week of use. In this clinical trial, the solution also showed excellent tolerability results.

  19. Prehospital Ketamine is a Safe and Effective Treatment for Excited Delirium in a Community Hospital Based EMS System.

    PubMed

    Scaggs, Thomas R; Glass, David M; Hutchcraft, Megan Gleason; Weir, William B

    2016-10-01

    Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is defined by marked agitation and confusion with sympathomimetic surge and incessant physical struggle, despite futility, which may lead to profound pathophysiologic changes and sudden death. Severe metabolic derangements, including lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and hyperthermia, occur. The pathophysiology of excited delirium is a subject of ongoing basic science and clinical research. Positive associations with ExDS include male gender, mental health disorders, and substance abuse (especially sympathomimetics). Excited delirium syndrome patients often exhibit violent, psychotic behavior and have "superhuman" strength which can result in the patient fighting with police and first responders. Continued struggle can cause a patient with ExDS to experience elevated temperature (T) and acidosis which causes enzymes to fail, leading to sudden death from cardiovascular collapse and multi-system organ failure. Therefore, effective early sedation is optimal to stop this fulminant process. Treatment of ExDS must be focused on rapidly, safely, and effectively sedating the patient and providing intensive, supportive care. Benzodiazepines, like midazolam, may not be ideal to sedate ExDS patients since their onset takes several minutes, and their side effects include loss of airway control and respiratory depression. Injectable antipsychotic medications have a relatively slow onset and may cause prolongation of the QTc interval. Ketamine is the ideal medication to sedate patients with ExDS. Ketamine has a rapid, predictable onset within three to four minutes when given by intramuscular (IM) injection. It does not adversely affect airway control, breathing, heart rate, or blood pressure (BP). In this retrospective case series, prehospital scenarios in which ExDS patients received ketamine by paramedics for sedation, and their subsequent treatment in the emergency department (ED) and hospital, are described. It is demonstrated that ketamine

  20. Prehospital Ketamine is a Safe and Effective Treatment for Excited Delirium in a Community Hospital Based EMS System.

    PubMed

    Scaggs, Thomas R; Glass, David M; Hutchcraft, Megan Gleason; Weir, William B

    2016-10-01

    Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is defined by marked agitation and confusion with sympathomimetic surge and incessant physical struggle, despite futility, which may lead to profound pathophysiologic changes and sudden death. Severe metabolic derangements, including lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and hyperthermia, occur. The pathophysiology of excited delirium is a subject of ongoing basic science and clinical research. Positive associations with ExDS include male gender, mental health disorders, and substance abuse (especially sympathomimetics). Excited delirium syndrome patients often exhibit violent, psychotic behavior and have "superhuman" strength which can result in the patient fighting with police and first responders. Continued struggle can cause a patient with ExDS to experience elevated temperature (T) and acidosis which causes enzymes to fail, leading to sudden death from cardiovascular collapse and multi-system organ failure. Therefore, effective early sedation is optimal to stop this fulminant process. Treatment of ExDS must be focused on rapidly, safely, and effectively sedating the patient and providing intensive, supportive care. Benzodiazepines, like midazolam, may not be ideal to sedate ExDS patients since their onset takes several minutes, and their side effects include loss of airway control and respiratory depression. Injectable antipsychotic medications have a relatively slow onset and may cause prolongation of the QTc interval. Ketamine is the ideal medication to sedate patients with ExDS. Ketamine has a rapid, predictable onset within three to four minutes when given by intramuscular (IM) injection. It does not adversely affect airway control, breathing, heart rate, or blood pressure (BP). In this retrospective case series, prehospital scenarios in which ExDS patients received ketamine by paramedics for sedation, and their subsequent treatment in the emergency department (ED) and hospital, are described. It is demonstrated that ketamine

  1. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid.

  2. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  3. A rapid infusion pump driven by micro electromagnetic linear actuation for pre-hospital intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chong, Yinbao; Zhao, An; Lang, Lang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jiuling

    2015-02-01

    A rapid infusion pump with a maximum flow rate of 6 L/h was designed experimentally using a micro electromagnetic linear actuator, and its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing with that of a commercial Power Infuser under preset flow rates of 0.2, 2, and 6 L/h. The flow rate, air detection sensitivity, occlusion response time, quantitative determination of hemolysis, and power consumption of the infusion devices were extensively investigated using statistical analysis methods (p < 0.05). The experimental results revealed that the flow rate of the designed infusion pump was more stable and accurate, and the hemolysis was significantly less than that of the Power Infuser. The air detection sensitivity and the power consumption could be comparable to that of the Power Infuser except the occlusion response time. The favorable performance made the designed infusion pump a potential candidate for applications in pre-hospital fluid administration.

  4. Survey of WBSNs for Pre-Hospital Assistance: Trends to Maximize the Network Lifetime and Video Transmission Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Enrique; Peña, Raul; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Avila, Alfonso; Perez-Diaz de Cerio, David

    2015-01-01

    This survey aims to encourage the multidisciplinary communities to join forces for innovation in the mobile health monitoring area. Specifically, multidisciplinary innovations in medical emergency scenarios can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and quality of the procedures and practices in the delivery of medical care. Wireless body sensor networks (WBSNs) are a promising technology capable of improving the existing practices in condition assessment and care delivery for a patient in a medical emergency. This technology can also facilitate the early interventions of a specialist physician during the pre-hospital period. WBSNs make possible these early interventions by establishing remote communication links with video/audio support and by providing medical information such as vital signs, electrocardiograms, etc. in real time. This survey focuses on relevant issues needed to understand how to setup a WBSN for medical emergencies. These issues are: monitoring vital signs and video transmission, energy efficient protocols, scheduling, optimization and energy consumption on a WBSN. PMID:26007741

  5. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion.

  6. RUC-4: A Novel αIIbβ3 Antagonist for Pre-hospital Therapy of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Vootukuri, Spandana; Shang, Yi; Negri, Ana; Jiang, Jian-kang; Nedelman, Mark; Diacovo, Thomas G.; Filizola, Marta; Thomas, Craig J.; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) within the first 1–2 hours with a thrombolytic agent, percutaneous coronary intervention, or an αIIbβ3 antagonist decreases mortality and the later development of heart failure. We previously reported on a novel small molecule αIIbβ3 antagonist, RUC-2, that has a unique mechanism of action. We have now developed a more potent and more soluble congener of RUC-2, RUC-4, designed to be easily administered intramuscularly (IM) by autoinjector to facilitate its use in the pre-hospital setting. Here we report the properties of RUC-4 and the antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of RUC-2 and RUC-4 in animal models. Approach and Results RUC-4 was ~20% more potent than RUC-2 in inhibiting human ADP-induced platelet aggregation and much more soluble in aqueous solutions (60–80 mg/ml). It shared RUC-2’s specificity for αIIbβ3 vs αVβ3, did not prime the receptor to bind fibrinogen, or induce changes in β3 identified by a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody. Both RUC-2 and RUC-4 prevented FeCl3-induced thrombotic occlusion of the carotid artery in mice and decreased microvascular thrombi in response to laser injury produced by human platelets infused into transgenic mice containing a mutated von Willebrand factor that reacts with human, but not mouse platelets. IM injection of RUC-4 in non-human primates at 1.9 and 3.85 mg/kg led to complete inhibition of platelet aggregation within 15 minutes, with dose-dependent return of platelet aggregation after 4.5–24 hours. Conclusions RUC-4 has favorable biochemical, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, antithrombotic, and solubility properties as a pre-hospital therapy of MI, but the possibility of increased bleeding with therapeutic doses remains to be evaluated. PMID:25147334

  7. The effect of active warming in prehospital trauma care during road and air ambulance transportation - a clinical randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prevention and treatment of hypothermia by active warming in prehospital trauma care is recommended but scientifical evidence of its effectiveness in a clinical setting is scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of additional active warming during road or air ambulance transportation of trauma patients. Methods Patients were assigned to either passive warming with blankets or passive warming with blankets with the addition of an active warming intervention using a large chemical heat pad applied to the upper torso. Ear canal temperature, subjective sensation of cold discomfort and vital signs were monitored. Results Mean core temperatures increased from 35.1°C (95% CI; 34.7-35.5°C) to 36.0°C (95% CI; 35.7-36.3°C) (p < 0.05) in patients assigned to passive warming only (n = 22) and from 35.6°C (95% CI; 35.2-36.0°C) to 36.4°C (95% CI; 36.1-36.7°C) (p < 0.05) in patients assigned to additional active warming (n = 26) with no significant differences between the groups. Cold discomfort decreased in 2/3 of patients assigned to passive warming only and in all patients assigned to additional active warming, the difference in cold discomfort change being statistically significant (p < 0.05). Patients assigned to additional active warming also presented a statistically significant decrease in heart rate and respiratory frequency (p < 0.05). Conclusions In mildly hypothermic trauma patients, with preserved shivering capacity, adequate passive warming is an effective treatment to establish a slow rewarming rate and to reduce cold discomfort during prehospital transportation. However, the addition of active warming using a chemical heat pad applied to the torso will significantly improve thermal comfort even further and might also reduce the cold induced stress response. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01400152 PMID:22017799

  8. Pre-hospital Utility of Rapid Stroke evaluation Using In-ambulance Telemedicine (PURSUIT): A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Nguyen, Claude; Ankrom, Christy; Yang, Julian; Persse, David; Vahidy, Farhaan; Grotta, James C.; Savitz, Sean I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose : Pre-hospital evaluation using telemedicine (TM) may accelerate acute stroke treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). We explored the feasibility and reliability of using TM in the field and ambulance to help evaluate acute stroke patients. Methods : Ten unique, scripted stroke scenarios, each conducted four times, were portrayed by trained actors retrieved and transported by Houston Fire Department emergency medical technicians (EMT) to our stroke center. The vascular neurologists (VN) performed remote assessments in real-time, obtaining clinical data points and NIH Stroke-Scale (NIHSS) using the In-Touch RP-Xpress TM device. Each scripted scenario was recorded for a subsequent evaluation by a second blinded VN. Study feasibility was defined by the ability to conduct 80% of the sessions without major technological limitations. Reliability of video interpretation was defined by a 90% concordance between the data derived during the real-time sessions and the scripted scenarios. Results In 34/40 (85%) scenarios, the teleconsultation was conducted without major technical complication. The absolute agreement for intra-class-correlation (ICC) was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.992-0.999) for the NIHSS obtained during the real-time sessions and 0.993 (95% CI: 0.975-0.999) for the recorded sessions. Inter-rater agreement using κ-statistics showed that for live-raters, 10/15 items on the NIHSS showed excellent agreement, and 5/15 showed moderate agreement. Matching of real-time assessments occurred for 88% (30/34) of NIHSS scores by ±2 points, and 96% of the clinical information. Conclusions Mobile TM is reliable and feasible in assessing actors simulating acute stroke in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:24938842

  9. The Influence of Prehospital Systemic Corticosteroid Use on Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Hospital Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Lee, Augustine S.; Gajic, Ognjen; Festic, Emir

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of systemic corticosteroids in pathophysiology and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is controversial. Use of prehospital systemic corticosteroid therapy may prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and improve hospital outcomes. Design This is a preplanned retrospective subgroup analysis of the prospectively identified cohort from a trial by the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group designed to validate the Lung Injury Prediction Score. Setting Twenty-two acute care hospitals. Patients Five thousand eighty-nine patients with at least one risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome at the time of hospitalization. Intervention Propensity-based analysis of previously recorded data. Measurements and Main Results Three hundred sixty-four patients were on systemic corticosteroids. Prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 7.7% and 6.9% (odds ratio, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.8–1.7]; p = 0.54) for patients on systemic corticosteroid and not on systemic corticosteroids, respectively. A propensity for being on systemic corticosteroids was derived through logistic regression by using all available covariates. Subsequently, 354 patients (97%) on systemic corticosteroids were matched to 1,093 not on systemic corticosteroids by their propensity score for a total of 1,447 patients in the matched set. Adjusted risk for acute respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.54–1.38]), invasive ventilation (odds ratio, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.62–1.12]), and inhospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.63–1.49]) was then calculated from the propensity-matched sample using conditional logistic regression model. No significant associations were present. Conclusions Prehospital use of systemic corticosteroids neither decreased the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome among patients hospitalized with at one least risk factor, nor affected the need for mechanical ventilation or hospital

  10. Cross-sectional study of the prehospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Louise H; Shewan, Jane; Baldwin, Trevor; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Suspected seizures are a common reason for emergency calls to ambulance services. Prehospital management of these patients is an important element of good quality care. The aim of this study, conducted in a regional ambulance service in the UK, was to quantify the number of emergency telephone calls for suspected seizures in adults, the associated costs, and to describe the patients’ characteristics, their prehospital management and their immediate outcomes. Design Quantitative cross-sectional study using routinely collected data and a detailed review of the clinical records of a consecutive series of adult patients (≥16 years). Setting A regional ambulance service within the National Health Service in England. Participants Cross-sectional data from all 605 481 adult emergency incidents managed by the ambulance service from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013. We selected a consecutive series of 178 individual incidents from May 2012 for more detailed analysis (132 after exclusions and removal of non-seizure cases). Results Suspected seizures made up 3.3% of all emergency incidents. True medical emergencies were uncommon but 3.3% had partially occluded airways, 6.8% had ongoing seizure activity and 59.1% had clinical problems in addition to the seizure (29.1% involving injury). Emergency vehicles were dispatched for 97.2% of suspected seizures, the seizure had terminated on arrival in 93.2% of incidents, 75% of these patients were transported to hospital. The estimated emergency management cost per annum of suspected seizures in the English ambulance services is £45.2 million (€64.0 million, $68.6 million). Conclusions Many patients with suspected seizures could potentially be treated more effectively and at lower cost by modifying ambulance call handling protocols. The development of innovative care pathways could give call handlers and paramedics alternatives to hospital transportation. Increased adoption of care plans could reduce 999 calls and

  11. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  12. Are three forms of potentially lethal damage expressed after X irradiation by treatment with hypertonic solutions in Chinese hamster V79 cells?

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebuchi, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Takashi; Hill, C.K.

    1995-01-01

    X rays have been shown to induce two forms of potentially lethal damage (PLD), {open_quotes}fast-repairing{close_quotes} PLD and {open_quotes}slowly repairing PLD, whose repair is completed in 1 h and 4-6 h, respectively. In this study three modes of treatment with hypertonic solutions containing different NaCl concentrations for different durations (0.5 M for 30 min, 0.225 M for 4 h, 0.16 M for 16 h) were examined to determine which form of PLD is expressed under each condition. These three modes of treatment enhanced the cell-killing action of X rays on actively growing V79 cells due to fixation of PLD. The kinetics of recovery from PLD was assessed by delayed treatments with hypertonic solutions. Cells exposed to one of the three treatments had completed recovery times of 1, 4 and 8 h, respectively, suggesting the possibility that these three modes of treatment cause the expression of different forms of PLD. As has been reported, treatment with 0.5 M NaCl for 30 min expressed fast-repairing PLD. The independence of the PLD expressed after 0.5 M NaCl for 30 min was shown by combined treatment with the two modes, which reduced survival to the level that would be reached if the two modes acted independently. The data on the recovery time and on the inhibition by 0.225 M NaCl of recovery from slowly repairing PLD in plateau-phase cells indicated that the PLD expressed after 0.225 M NaCl for 4 h may be related to slowly repairing PLD. The combined treatment of 0.16 M NaCl for 16 h with 0.225 M NaCl for 4 h indicated independent action, albeit incomplete, of the PLD expressed after 0.16 M NaCl for 16 h from slowly repairing PLD. We propose for the first time that {open_quotes}very slowly repairing{close_quotes} PLD is expressed after 0.16 M NaCl for 16 h in exponentially growing cells and that therefore three forms of PLD are expressed by hypertonic treatments after X irradiation. 31 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Protection of gastric mucosa against hypertonic sodium chloride by 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 or sodium thiosulfate in the rat: Evidence for decreased mucosal penetration of damaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Pihan, G.; Szabo, S. )

    1989-12-01

    Protection of the gastric mucosa may be the result of either increased cellular resistance to injury (cytoprotection) or, alternatively, decreased exposure of mucosal cells to the damaging agent. To determine whether decreased exposure of mucosal cells to damaging agents plays a role in mucosal protection by 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate, we estimated the intramucosal concentration of 22NaCl and measured its absorption from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after intragastric administration of hypertonic (25% w/v) 22NaCl. In an attempt to explain the differences observed, we also measured the net transmucosal water flux in control animals and rats pretreated with the protective agents. Administration of hypertonic NaCl rapidly (within 1 min) induced extensive hemorrhagic mucosal lesions that were significantly reduced by pretreatment with 16,16-dm PGE2 or sodium thiosulfate. Ultra-low temperature autoradiography indicated that luminal hypertonic 22NaCl penetrates the upper layers of the mucosa in relatively high concentrations (12.5% w/v) within 1 min but its concentration decreases rapidly and reached low levels (3.12% w/v) by 5 min. Absorption of NaCl from the gastric lumen into the systemic circulation 1 and 5 min after hypertonic NaCl was lower in both pretreatment groups than in the control. Net gastric transmucosal water flux (from serosa to mucosa) increased (P less than 0.05) from 100 +/- 2 in controls, to 1470 +/- 8 and 715 +/- 9 microliters in rats pretreated with 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate, respectively. We conclude that 16,16-dm PGE2 and sodium thiosulfate protect the gastric mucosa against hypertonic NaCl, diminish mucosal penetration of NaCl, decrease mucosal absorption of NaCl, and significantly increase serosal to mucosal transmucosal water flux.

  14. S.T.A.R.T.T. plus: addition of prehospital personnel to a national multidisciplinary crisis resource management trauma team training course

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Lawrence M.; Martin, Doug; Engels, Paul T.; Brindley, Peter; Widder, Sandy; French, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course is a unique multidisciplinary trauma team training course deliberately designed to address the common crisis resource management (CRM) skills of trauma team members. Moreover, the curriculum has been updated to also target the specific learning needs of individual participating professionals: physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists. This commentary outlines further modifications to the course curriculum in order to address the needs of a relatively undertargeted group: prehospital personnel (i.e., emergency medical services). Maintenance of high participant satisfaction, regardless of profession, suggests that the S.T.A.R.T.T. course can be readily modified to incorporate prehospital personnel without losing its utility or popularity. PMID:26574706

  15. Electron microscope studies of the structure of the microvilli on principal epithelial cells of rat jejunum after treatment in hypo- and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    MILLINGTON, P F; FINEAN, J B

    1962-07-01

    Immersion of the intestinal tissue, from rat jejunum, in hypertonic saline produced very rapid changes in all regions of the epithelial cells, but the apical region was apparently unaffected by hypotonic solutions for at least (1/2) hour. In both cases, blistering of the microvilli was taken as the first sign of degenerative changes which finally resulted in a breakdown to large vesicular particles. Consideration of both normal and modified tissue indicates that the core of the microvillus contains either paired strands or tubular structures. Lateral cross-fibres extended from the core to the microvillus membrane and may be an essential part of the supporting structure of the microvillus. Densitometer traces across the microvillus membrane at various stages of modification indicated that this membrane might include a 75 A unit membrane structure with additional components associated at either surface. Interruptions in the membrane were apparently expanded by the hypotonic solutions and these might possibly be distinguished from preparative artefacts.

  16. Impact of the prehospital activation strategy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous revascularization: a single center community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Sofia A; Xu, Ke; Nwanyanwu, Francis; Chan, Richard; Correa, Luis; Nass, Nouri; Jaraki, Abdul-Rahman; Jurkovich, David; Kennedy, Richard; Andrzejewski, Lee; Vignola, Paul A; Cubeddu, Roberto J

    2012-12-01

    The strategy of prehospital activation by the emergency medical system (EMS) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been poorly adopted among the US hospitals that currently offer 24/7 primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In this study, we report a single center experience after the implementation of this strategy. From 2008 to 2011, we identified a total 188 STEMI patients (age 65 ± 15 years) presenting via EMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Of these, 112 (59.6%) underwent prehospital activation (EMS group), whereas the remaining 76 (40.4%) underwent emergency department activation [emergency department (ED) group]. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar between both groups. The overall median door-to-balloon (DTB) time was 49 ± 14 minutes. Patients undergoing prehospital activation had on average significantly lower overall DTB times (EMS 44 ± 11 minutes vs. ED 57 ± 15 minutes; P < 0.001). Concordantly, DTB times <60 minutes were much more commonly achieved with this strategy (EMS 95.5% vs. ED 64.5%; P < 0.001). Fallouts beyond the recommended 90-minute DTB time were seen among ED patients only. No difference in in-hospital death (EMS 5.4% vs. ED 6.6%; P = 0.75) or cumulative 30-day mortality (EMS 6.3% vs. ED 7.9%; P = 0.68) was observed between both groups. However, on average, EMS patients had higher postinfarct left ventricular ejection fraction (EMS 48 ± 9.5% vs. ED 39 ± 14.6%; P = 0.004). Differences in DTB time and left ventricular ejection fraction remained significant after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics. In conclusion, the prehospital activation strategy is largely effective and should be systematically adopted in the treatment scheme of STEMI patients to lower mechanical reperfusion times and reduce the potential for untoward clinical outcomes. PMID:23149360

  17. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel: a 1-year follow-up from the European MULTIPRAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin; Danchin, Nicolas; Ramos, Yvonne; Goedicke, Jochen; Clemmensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim MULTIPRAC was designed to provide insights into the use and outcomes associated with prehospital initiation of antiplatelet therapy with either prasugrel or clopidogrel in the context of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After a previous report on efficacy and safety outcomes during hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. Methods and results MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel was associated with a significantly lower risk of CV death than treatment with clopidogrel (odds ratio 0.248; 95% confidence interval 0.06–0.89). Conclusion In STEMI patients from routine practice undergoing primary angioplasty, who were able to start oral antiplatelet therapy prehospital, treatment with prasugrel as compared to clopidogrel was associated with a lower risk of CV death at 1-year follow-up. PMID:27143908

  18. Fluid deprivation increases isotonic NaCl intake, but not hypertonic salt intake, under normal and heated conditions in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Omouessi, S T; Lemamy, G J; Kiki-Mvouaka, S; Fernette, B; Falconetti, C; Ndeboko, B; Mouecoucou, J; Thornton, S N

    2016-02-01

    In the course of exposure to fluid deprivation and heated environment, mammals regulate their hydromineral balance and body temperature by a number of mechanisms including sweating, water and salt intakes. Here we challenged obese Zucker rats, known to have a predisposition to hypertension, with 0.9%NaCl alone or with 2%NaCl solution + water to drink under fluid deprivation and heated conditions. Food and fluid intakes, body weight, diuresis and natriuresis were measured daily throughout. Serum aldosterone levels and Na(+) concentration were also analyzed. Data showed that obese and lean rats presented similar baseline measurements of food, 0.9%NaCl and fluid intakes, diuresis and fluid balance; whereas hypertonic 2%NaCl consumption was almost absent. Before and during fluid deprivation animals increased isotonic but not hypertonic NaCl intake; the obese showed significant increases in diuresis and Na(+) excretion, whereas, total fluid intake was similar between groups. Heat increased isotonic NaCl intake and doubled natriuresis in obese which were wet on their fur and displayed a paradoxical increase of fluid gain. Fluid deprivation plus heat produced similar negative fluid balance in all groups. Body weight losses, food intake and diuresis reductions were amplified under the combined conditions. Animals exposed to 2%NaCl showed higher circulating levels of aldosterone and obese were lower than leans. In animals which drank 0.9%NaCl, obese showed higher serum levels of Na(+) than leans. We conclude that in spite of their higher sensitivity to high salt and heat obese Zucker rats can control hydromineral balance in response to fluid deprivation and heat by adjusting isotonic NaCl preference with sodium balance and circulating levels of aldosterone. This suggests a key hormonal role in the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation, body fluid homeostasis and sodium intake. PMID:26621332

  19. Fluid deprivation increases isotonic NaCl intake, but not hypertonic salt intake, under normal and heated conditions in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Omouessi, S T; Lemamy, G J; Kiki-Mvouaka, S; Fernette, B; Falconetti, C; Ndeboko, B; Mouecoucou, J; Thornton, S N

    2016-02-01

    In the course of exposure to fluid deprivation and heated environment, mammals regulate their hydromineral balance and body temperature by a number of mechanisms including sweating, water and salt intakes. Here we challenged obese Zucker rats, known to have a predisposition to hypertension, with 0.9%NaCl alone or with 2%NaCl solution + water to drink under fluid deprivation and heated conditions. Food and fluid intakes, body weight, diuresis and natriuresis were measured daily throughout. Serum aldosterone levels and Na(+) concentration were also analyzed. Data showed that obese and lean rats presented similar baseline measurements of food, 0.9%NaCl and fluid intakes, diuresis and fluid balance; whereas hypertonic 2%NaCl consumption was almost absent. Before and during fluid deprivation animals increased isotonic but not hypertonic NaCl intake; the obese showed significant increases in diuresis and Na(+) excretion, whereas, total fluid intake was similar between groups. Heat increased isotonic NaCl intake and doubled natriuresis in obese which were wet on their fur and displayed a paradoxical increase of fluid gain. Fluid deprivation plus heat produced similar negative fluid balance in all groups. Body weight losses, food intake and diuresis reductions were amplified under the combined conditions. Animals exposed to 2%NaCl showed higher circulating levels of aldosterone and obese were lower than leans. In animals which drank 0.9%NaCl, obese showed higher serum levels of Na(+) than leans. We conclude that in spite of their higher sensitivity to high salt and heat obese Zucker rats can control hydromineral balance in response to fluid deprivation and heat by adjusting isotonic NaCl preference with sodium balance and circulating levels of aldosterone. This suggests a key hormonal role in the mechanisms underlying thermoregulation, body fluid homeostasis and sodium intake.

  20. Evaluation of the Impact of Implementing the Emergency Medical Services Traumatic Brain Injury Guidelines in Arizona: The Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) Study Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Spaite, Daniel W.; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Stolz, Uwe; Sherrill, Duane; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Sotelo, Michael; Gaither, Joshua B.; Viscusi, Chad; Adelson, P. David; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) exacts a great toll on society. Fortunately, there is growing evidence that the management of TBI in the early minutes after injury may significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. In response, evidence-based prehospital and in-hospital TBI treatment guidelines have been established by authoritative bodies. However, no large studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of implementing these guidelines in the prehospital setting. This article describes the background, design, implementation, emergency medical services (EMS) treatment protocols, and statistical analysis of a prospective, controlled (before/after), statewide study designed to evaluate the effect of implementing the EMS TBI guidelines—the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) study (NIH/NINDS R01NS071049, “EPIC”; and 3R01NS071049-S1, “EPIC4Kids”). The specific aim of the study is to test the hypothesis that statewide implementation of the international adult and pediatric EMS TBI guidelines will significantly reduce mortality and improve nonmortality outcomes in patients with moderate or severe TBI. Furthermore, it will specifically evaluate the effect of guideline implementation on outcomes in the subgroup of patients who are intubated in the field. Over the course of the entire study (~9 years), it is estimated that approximately 25,000 patients will be enrolled. PMID:25112451

  1. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-08-01

    Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was principally

  2. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  3. Does standardized mega-code training improve the quality of pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support (ACLS)?

    PubMed

    Schneider, T; Mauer, D; Diehl, P; Eberle, B; Dick, W

    1995-04-01

    The aim of our prospective study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized mega-code and arrhythmia training upon process elements of quality of pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support provided by a physician-staffed mobile intensive care unit. In 145 cases of adult cardiac arrest due to cardiac aetiology, time intervals from arrival of the mobile intensive care unit at the patient's side until first ECG diagnosis, first defibrillation, endotracheal intubation, and first epinephrine administration were measured with on-line tape recording, prior to, and following a standardized 8-h arrhythmia and mega-code training. Following the training, patients with asystole or pulseless electrical activity were intubated 1.1 min earlier (P = 0.03), and received epinephrine 1.3 min earlier (P = 0.01) than prior to the training. There were no significant differences in time intervals concerning management of ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. Neither admission nor discharge rates differed significantly before and after the training. Thus, practical training including rhythm analysis and mega-code session improved the performance of our mobile intensive care unit in cases of asystole and pulseless electrical activity, and, hence, process elements of quality.

  4. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  5. Prehospital blood product transfusion by U.S. army MEDEVAC during combat operations in Afghanistan: a process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Malsby, Robert F; Quesada, Jose; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Kinoshita, Ren; Kurtz, John; Gehlen, William; Adams, Colleen; Martin, Dustin; Shackelford, Stacy

    2013-07-01

    U.S. Army flight medics performed a process improvement initiative of 15 blood product transfusions on select Category A (Urgent) helicopter evacuation casualties meeting approved clinical indications for transfusion. These transfusions were initiated from point of injury locations aboard MEDEVAC aircraft originating from one of two locations in southern Afghanistan. All flight medics executing the transfusions were qualified through a standardized and approved program of instruction, which included day and night skills validation, and a 90% or higher written examination score. There was no adverse reaction or out-of-standard blood product temperature despite hazardous conditions and elevated cabin temperatures. All casualties within a 10-minute flight time who met clinical indications were transfused. Utilization of a standard operating procedure with strict handling and administration parameters, a rigorous training and qualification program, an elaborate cold chain system, and redundant documentation of blood product units ensured that flight medic initiated transfusions were safe and effective. Research study is needed to refine the indications for prehospital blood transfusion and to determine the effect on outcomes in severely injured trauma patients.

  6. Prehospital blood product transfusion by U.S. army MEDEVAC during combat operations in Afghanistan: a process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Malsby, Robert F; Quesada, Jose; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Kinoshita, Ren; Kurtz, John; Gehlen, William; Adams, Colleen; Martin, Dustin; Shackelford, Stacy

    2013-07-01

    U.S. Army flight medics performed a process improvement initiative of 15 blood product transfusions on select Category A (Urgent) helicopter evacuation casualties meeting approved clinical indications for transfusion. These transfusions were initiated from point of injury locations aboard MEDEVAC aircraft originating from one of two locations in southern Afghanistan. All flight medics executing the transfusions were qualified through a standardized and approved program of instruction, which included day and night skills validation, and a 90% or higher written examination score. There was no adverse reaction or out-of-standard blood product temperature despite hazardous conditions and elevated cabin temperatures. All casualties within a 10-minute flight time who met clinical indications were transfused. Utilization of a standard operating procedure with strict handling and administration parameters, a rigorous training and qualification program, an elaborate cold chain system, and redundant documentation of blood product units ensured that flight medic initiated transfusions were safe and effective. Research study is needed to refine the indications for prehospital blood transfusion and to determine the effect on outcomes in severely injured trauma patients. PMID:23820353

  7. Potentially lethal and DNA radiation damage: similarities in inhibition of repair by medium containing D/sub 2/O and by hypertonic buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hur, E.; Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    Killing of log-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation is enhanced when cells are treated immediately after irradiation with anisotonic phosphate-buffered saline or with medium containing 90% D/sub 2/O. These treatments are not toxic to unirradiated cells. In medium containing D/sub 2/O, cells are unable to repair sublethal damage; however, repair occurs after a shift to normal medium. Thus, as is observed with anisotonic buffer, enhanced killing by medium containing D/sub 2/O does not prevent cells from repairing sublethal damage. Further aspects of the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by medium containing D/sub 2/O and by anisotonic buffer are also similar. For example, both are largely ineffective after treatments involving nonionizing radiation, and both treatments retard the repair of DNA breaks. From the foregoing, and the partial overlapping of enhanced killing due to medium containing D/sub 2/O and due to hypertonic saline, we infer that the latter treatments affect the repair, or reparability, of the same sensitive targets.

  8. Novel hypertonic saline-sodium hydroxide (HS-SH) method for decontamination and concentration of sputum samples for Mycobacterium tuberculosis microscopy and culture.

    PubMed

    Ganoza, Christian A; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Chauca, José; Rojas, Gabriel; Munayco, César; Agapito, Juan; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Guerra, Humberto

    2008-09-01

    This study evaluated a new decontamination and concentration (DC) method for sputum microscopy and culture. Sputum samples from patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) (n=106) were tested using the proposed hypertonic saline-sodium hydroxide (HS-SH) DC method, the recommended N-acetyl-L-cysteine-sodium citrate-sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH) DC method and unconcentrated direct smear (Ziehl-Neelsen) techniques for the presence of mycobacteria using Löwenstein-Jensen culture and light microscopy. Of 94 valid specimens, 21 (22.3%) were positive in culture and were further characterized as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The sensitivity for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smears was increased from 28.6% using the direct method to 71.4% (HS-SH) and 66.7% (NALC-NaOH) using DC methods. Both concentration techniques were highly comparable for culture (kappa=0.794) and smear (kappa=0.631) for AFB. Thus the proposed HS-SH DC method improved the sensitivity of AFB microscopy compared with a routine unconcentrated direct smear; its performance was comparable to that of the NALC-NaOH DC method for AFB smears and culture, but it was methodologically simpler and less expensive, making it a promising candidate for evaluation by national TB control programmes in developing countries.

  9. SGEM Hot Off the Press: hypertonic saline in severe traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Eve; Thoma, Brent; Milne, Ken; Bond, Chris

    2016-09-01

    As part of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine's (CJEM) developing social media strategy, 1 we are collaborating with the Skeptics' Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) to summarize and critically appraise the current emergency medicine (EM) literature using evidence-based medicine principles. In the "Hot Off the Press" series, we select original research manuscripts published in CJEM to be featured on the SGEM website/podcast and discussed by the study authors and the online EM community. A similar collaboration is under way between the SGEM and Academic Emergency Medicine. What follows is a summary of the selected article, the immediate post-publication synthesis from the SGEM podcast, commentary by the first author, and the subsequent discussion from the SGEM blog and other social media. Through this series, we hope to enhance the value, accessibility, and application of important, clinically relevant EM research. In this, the second SGEM HOP hosted collaboratively with CJEM, we discuss a systematic review evaluating the use of hypertonic saline in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. 2. PMID:27618977

  10. Inhibition of natriuresis in median eminence polydipsia: effects after intake of diets with different osmolalities and after hypertonic NaCl administration.

    PubMed

    Mahía, Javier; Bernal, Antonio; Puerto, Amadeo

    2013-01-01

    Lesions in the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) induce polydipsia and polyuria in male rats. A first experiment was designed to examine the effect of salt consumption (standard 0.25 percent Na+ vs. low-salt 0.04 percent Na+ diet) on the fluid-electrolytic balance (plasma sodium, urinary sodium excretion, urine osmolality) and water intake of ME polydipsic animals. In the first 6 h post-surgery, the natriuretic response was higher in ME-lesioned animals than in control groups. At 24 h post-surgery, however, less sodium was excreted by ME rats fed with a standard salt diet (ME/SS), despite showing no decrease in salt intake, and they evidenced an increase in plasma sodium concentration and water intake. Urine osmolality was significantly higher in control animals than in either ME-lesioned group. In experiment 2, hypertonic NaCl administration (2 ml/2M) increased the polydipsic behavior of ME-lesioned but not control rats (day 2). Animals deprived of food/salt showed a significant reduction (on day 2) in the initial (day 1) polydipsia, which increased on day 3 when the animals had access to a standard-salt diet. These results suggest that the reduced natriuretic response and the consequent sodium retention observed in ME animals may exacerbate the hydromineral imbalance of this polydipsic syndrome. PMID:24129482

  11. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  12. Prehospital intubation of the moderately injured patient: a cause of morbidity? A matched-pairs analysis of 1,200 patients from the DGU Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia and hypoxemia can lead to an unfavorable outcome after severe trauma, by both direct and delayed mechanisms. Prehospital intubation is meant to ensure pulmonary gas exchange. Limited evidence exists regarding indications for intubation after trauma. The aim of this study was to analyze prehospital intubation as an independent risk factor for the posttraumatic course of moderately injured patients. Therefore, only patients who, in retrospect, would not have required intubation were included in the matched-pairs analysis to evaluate the risks related to intubation. Methods The data of 42,248 patients taken from the trauma registry of the German Association for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie (DGU)) were analyzed. Patients who met the following criteria were included: primary admission to a hospital; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15; age 16 years or older; maximum injury severity per body region (AIS) ≤ 3; no administration of packed red blood cell units in the emergency trauma room; admission between 2005 and 2008; and documented data regarding intubation. The intubated patients were then matched with not-intubated patients. Results The study population included 600 matched pairs that met the inclusion criteria. The results indicated that prehospital intubation was associated with a prolonged rescue time (not intubated, 64.8 minutes; intubated, 82.3 minutes; P ≤ 0.001) and a higher volume replacement (not intubated, 911.3 ml; intubated, 1,573.8 ml; P ≤ 0.001). In the intubated patients, coagulation parameters, such as the prothrombin time ratio (PT) and platelet count, declined, as did the hemoglobin value (PT not intubated: 92.3%; intubated, 85.7%; P ≤ 0.001; hemoglobin not intubated, 13.4 mg/dl; intubated, 12.2 mg/dl; P ≤ 0.001). Intubation at the scene resulted in an elevated sepsis rate (not intubated, 1.5%; intubated, 3.7%; P ≤ 0.02) and an elevated prevalence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and organ

  13. An evaluation of the professional, social and demographic profile and quality of life of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Tallo, Fernando Sabia; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Baitello, André Luciano; Lopes, Renato Delascio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile of physicians working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical System (SAMU) in Brazil and to evaluate their quality of life. METHODS: Both a semi-structured questionnaire with 57 questions and the SF-36 questionnaire were sent to research departments within SAMU in the Brazilian state capitals, the Federal District and inland towns in Brazil. RESULTS: Of a total of 902 physicians, including 644 (71.4%) males, 533 (59.1%) were between 30 and 45 years of age and 562 (62.4%) worked in a state capital. Regarding education level, 45.1% had graduated less than five years before and only 43% were specialists recognized by the Brazilian Medical Association. Regarding training, 95% did not report any specific training for their work at SAMU. The main weaknesses identified were psychiatric care and surgical emergencies in 57.2 and 42.9% of cases, respectively; traumatic pediatric emergencies, 48.9%; and medical emergencies, 42.9%. As for procedure-related skills, the physicians reported difficulties in pediatric advanced support (62.4%), airway surgical access (45.6%), pericardiocentesis (64.4%) and thoracentesis (29.9%). Difficulties in using an artificial ventilator (43.3%) and in transcutaneous pacing (42.2%) were also reported. Higher percentages of young physicians, aged 25-30 years (26.7 vs 19.0%; p<0.01), worked exclusively in prehospital care (18.0 vs 7.7%; p<0.001), with workloads >48 h per week (12.8 vs 8.6%; p<0.001), and were non-specialists with the shortest length of service (<1 year) at SAMU (30.1 vs 18.2%; p<0.001) who were hired without having to pass public service exams* (i.e., for a temporary job) (61.8 vs 46.2%; p<0.001). Regarding quality of life, the pain domain yielded the worst result among physicians at SAMU. CONCLUSIONS: The doctors in this sample were young and within a few years of graduation, and they had no specific training in prehospital emergencies. Deficiencies were mostly found in pediatrics and psychiatry

  14. Design of the PRINCESS trial: pre-hospital resuscitation intra-nasal cooling effectiveness survival study (PRINCESS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH, 32-34°C) has been shown to improve neurological outcome in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Earlier initiation of TH may increase the beneficial effects. Experimental studies have suggested that starting TH during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may further enhance its neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether intra-arrest TH (IATH), initiated in the field with trans nasal evaporative cooling (TNEC), would provide outcome benefits when compared to standard of care in patients being resuscitated from OHCA. Methods/design We describe the methodology of a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial comparing IATH delivered through TNEC device (Rhinochill, Benechill Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) during CPR to standard treatment, including TH initiated after hospital admission. The primary outcome is neurological intact survival defined as cerebral performance category 1–2 at 90 days among those patients who are admitted to the hospital. Secondary outcomes include survival at 90 days, proportion of patients achieving a return to spontaneous circulation (ROSC), the proportion of patients admitted alive to the hospital and the proportion of patients achieving target temperature (<34°C) within the first 4 hours since CA. Discussion This ongoing trial will assess the impact of IATH with TNEC, which may be able to rapidly induce brain cooling and have fewer side effects than other methods, such as cold fluid infusion. If this intervention is found to improve neurological outcome, its early use in the pre-hospital setting will be considered as an early neuro-protective strategy in OHCA. Trial registration NCT01400373. PMID:24274342

  15. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    PubMed

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. PMID:27091515

  16. Severe sepsis and septic shock in pre-hospital emergency medicine: survey results of medical directors of emergency medical services concerning antibiotics, blood cultures and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Casu, Sebastian; Häske, David

    2016-06-01

    Delayed antibiotic treatment for patients in severe sepsis and septic shock decreases the probability of survival. In this survey, medical directors of different emergency medical services (EMS) in Germany were asked if they are prepared for pre-hospital sepsis therapy with antibiotics or special algorithms to evaluate the individual preparations of the different rescue areas for the treatment of patients with this infectious disease. The objective of the survey was to obtain a general picture of the current status of the EMS with respect to rapid antibiotic treatment for sepsis. A total of 166 medical directors were invited to complete a short survey on behalf of the different rescue service districts in Germany via an electronic cover letter. Of the rescue districts, 25.6 % (n = 20) stated that they keep antibiotics on EMS vehicles. In addition, 2.6 % carry blood cultures on the vehicles. The most common antibiotic is ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin). In total, 8 (10.3 %) rescue districts use an algorithm for patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Although the German EMS is an emergency physician-based rescue system, special opportunities in the form of antibiotics on emergency physician vehicles are missing. Simultaneously, only 10.3 % of the rescue districts use a special algorithm for sepsis therapy. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock do not appear to be prioritized as highly as these deadly diseases should be in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:26719078

  17. Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Professionals Assaulted by Patients and/or Relatives: Importance of Severity and Experience of the Aggression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, M Mar; Bernaldo-de-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to violence from patients or relatives causes problems in emergency departments. To assess the development of posttraumatic symptoms in pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives, it may be crucial to establish preventive measures at different levels. This study examined 358 pre-hospital emergency care professionals assaulted by patients and/or relatives. The aims of the present study were (a) to assess the presence of posttraumatic symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and (b) identify compliance diagnoses for PTSD depending on the experience of aggression (presence of fear, helplessness, or horror during the aggression), the perceived severity of aggression, and socio-demographic variables (gender, age, profession, employment status, and work experience). The results show that the experience of aggression with fear, helplessness, or horror is associated with the presence of posttraumatic symptoms related to re-experiencing but is not related to avoidance and emotional numbing and arousal. Furthermore, the perception of aggression as severe was associated with the presence of symptoms related to re-experiencing. These results are presented and discussed. PMID:25381283

  18. Nebulized hypertonic saline treatment reduces both rate and duration of hospitalization for acute bronchiolitis in infants: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Lee, Wen-Li; Wang, Chuang-Ming; Chou, Hsin-Hsu

    2014-12-01

    Nebulized hypertonic saline (HS) treatment reduced the length of hospitalization in infants with acute bronchiolitis in a previous meta-analysis. However, there was no reduction in the admission rate. We hypothesized that nebulized HS treatment might significantly decrease both the duration and the rate of hospitalization if more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) without a language restriction. A meta-analysis was performed based on the efficacy of nebulized HS treatment in infants with acute bronchiolitis. We used weighted mean difference (WMD) and risk ratio as effect size metrics. Eleven studies were identified that enrolled 1070 infants. Nebulized HS treatment significantly decreased the duration and rate of hospitalization compared with nebulized normal saline (NS) [duration of hospitalization: WMD = -0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.38 to -0.54, p < 0.001; rate of hospitalization: risk ratio = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.93, p = 0.02]. Furthermore, nebulized HS treatment had a beneficial effect in reducing the clinical severity (CS) score of acute bronchiolitis infants post-treatment (Day 1: WMD = -0.77, 95% CI = -1.30 to -0.24, p = 0.005; Day 2: WMD = -0.85, 95% CI = -1.30 to -0.39, p < 0.001; Day 3: WMD = -1.14, 95% CI = -1.69 to -0.58, p < 0.001). There was no decrease in the rate of readmission (risk ratio = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.68-1.73, p = 0.74). Nebulized HS treatment significantly decreased both the rate and the duration of hospitalization. Due to the efficacy and cost-effectiveness, HS should be considered for the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in infants.

  19. Hypertonic saline is effective in the prevention and treatment of mucus obstruction, but not airway inflammation, in mice with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Simon Y; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Boucher, Richard C; Mall, Marcus A

    2013-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inadequate hydration of airway surfaces is a common mechanism in the pathogenesis of airway mucus obstruction. Inhaled hypertonic saline (HS) induces osmotic water flux, improving hydration of airway surfaces. However, trials in patients with obstructive lung diseases are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of HS on mucus obstruction and airway inflammation in the prevention and treatment of obstructive lung disease in vivo. We, therefore, used the β-epithelial Na(+) channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse as a model of chronic obstructive lung disease and determined effects of preventive and late therapy with 3% HS and 7% HS on pulmonary mortality, airway mucus obstruction, and inflammation. We found that preventive treatment with 3% HS and 7% HS improved growth, reduced mortality, and reduced mucus obstruction in neonatal βENaC-overexpressing mice. In adult βENaC-overexpressing mice with chronic lung disease, mucus obstruction was significantly reduced by 7% HS, but not by 3% HS. Treatment with HS triggered airway inflammation with elevated keratinocyte chemoattractant levels and neutrophils in airways from wild-type mice, but reduced keratinocyte chemoattractant in chronic neutrophilic inflammation in adult βENaC-overexpressing mice. Our data demonstrate that airway surface rehydration with HS provides an effective preventive and late therapy of mucus obstruction with no consistent effects on inflammation in chronic lung disease. These results suggest that, through mucokinetic effects, HS may be beneficial for patients with a spectrum of obstructive lung diseases, and that additional strategies are required for effective treatment of associated airway inflammation.

  20. Improvement of Neuroenergetics by Hypertonic Lactate Therapy in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury Is Dependent on Baseline Cerebral Lactate/Pyruvate Ratio.

    PubMed

    Quintard, Hervé; Patet, Camille; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Suys, Tamarah; Bouzat, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Energy dysfunction is associated with worse prognosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that hypertonic sodium lactate infusion (HL) improves energy metabolism after TBI. Here, we specifically examined whether the efficacy of HL (3h infusion, 30-40 μmol/kg/min) in improving brain energetics (using cerebral microdialysis [CMD] glucose as a main therapeutic end-point) was dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state (assessed by CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR]) and cerebral blood flow (CBF, measured with perfusion computed tomography [PCT]). Using a prospective cohort of 24 severe TBI patients, we found CMD glucose increase during HL was significant only in the subgroup of patients with elevated CMD LPR >25 (n = 13; +0.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.19] mmol/L, p < 0.001; vs. +0.04 [-0.05-0.13] in those with normal LPR, p = 0.33, mixed-effects model). In contrast, CMD glucose increase was independent from baseline CBF (coefficient +0.13 [0.04-0.21] mmol/L when global CBF was <32.5 mL/100 g/min vs. +0.09 [0.04-0.14] mmol/L at normal CBF, both p < 0.005) and systemic glucose. Our data suggest that improvement of brain energetics upon HL seems predominantly dependent on baseline cerebral metabolic state and support the concept that CMD LPR - rather than CBF - could be used as a diagnostic indication for systemic lactate supplementation following TBI.

  1. An equiosmolar study on early intracranial physiology and long term outcome in severe traumatic brain injury comparing mannitol and hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Jagannatha, Aniruddha Tekkatte; Sriganesh, Kamath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Rao, Ganne Sesha Umamaheswara

    2016-05-01

    The impact of hypertonic saline (HTS) on long term control of intracranial hypertension (ICH) is yet to be established. The current prospective randomized controlled study was carried out in 38 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over 450 episodes of refractory ICH were treated with equiosmolar boluses of 20% mannitol in 20 patients and 3.0% HTS in 18 subjects. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored for 6days. ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were comparable between the groups. The mannitol group had a progressive increase in the ICP over the study period (p=0.01). A similar increase was not seen in the HTS group (p=0.1). The percentage time for which the ICP remained below a threshold of 20 mmHg on day6 was higher in the HTS group (63% versus 49%; p=0.3). The duration of inotrope requirement in the HTS group was less compared to the mannitol group (p=0.06). The slope of fall in ICP in response to a bolus dose at a given baseline value of ICP was higher with HTS compared to mannitol (p=0.0001). In-hospital mortality tended to be lower in the HTS group (3 versus 10; p=0.07) while mortality at 6 months was not different between the groups (6 versus 10; p=0.41). Dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale scores at 6months were comparable between the groups (p=0.21). To conclude, immediate physiological advantages seen with HTS over mannitol did not translate into long term benefit on ICP/CPP control or mortality of patients with TBI.

  2. Pollen tube growth is coupled to the extracellular calcium ion flux and the intracellular calcium gradient: effect of BAPTA-type buffers and hypertonic media.

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, E S; Miller, D D; Callaham, D A; Shipley, A M; Rivers, B A; Cresti, M; Hepler, P K

    1994-01-01

    Lily pollen tubes possess a steep, tip-focused intracellular Ca2+ gradient and a tip-directed extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ratiometric ion imaging revealed that the gradient extends from above 3.0 microM at the apex to approximately 0.2 microM within 20 microns from the tip, while application of the Ca(2+)-specific vibrating electrode indicated that the extracellular influx measured between 1.4 and 14 pmol cm-2 sec-1. We examined the relationship between these phenomena and their role in tube growth by using different 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)-type buffers and hypertonic media. Injection of active BAPTA-type buffers or application of elevated levels of sucrose reversibly inhibited growth, destroyed tip zonation of organelles, and modified normal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming. Simultaneously, these treatments dissipated both the intracellular tip-focused gradient and the extracellular Ca2+ flux. Of the BAPTA-type buffers, 5,5'-dibromo-BAPTA (dissociation constant [Kd] is 1.5 microM) and 4,4'-difluoro-BAPTA (Kd of 1.7 microM) exhibited greater activity than those buffers with either a higher affinity (5,5'-dimethyl-BAPTA, Kd of 0.15 microM; BAPTA, Kd of 0.21 microM; 5,5'-difluoro-BAPTA, Kd of 0.25 microM) or lower affinity (5-methyl, 5'-nitro-BAPTA, Kd of 22 microM) for Ca2+. Our findings provide evidence that growing pollen tubes have open Ca2+ channels in their tip and that these channels become inactivated in nongrowing tubes. The studies with elevated sucrose support the view that stretching of the apical plasma membrane contributes to the maintenance of the Ca2+ signal. PMID:7866026

  3. Abdominal insufflation decreases blood loss without worsening the inflammatory response: implications for prehospital control of internal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Velmahos, George C; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Tabbara, Malek; Duggan, Michael; Li, Yongqing; De Moya, Marc; Alam, Hasan B

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal insufflation (AI) by carbon dioxide has been shown to decrease the rate of bleeding in different swine models of abdominal organ injuries. With development of appropriate tools, AI could be used to control bleeding temporarily in the prehospital setting. Concerns have been raised about the inflammatory response to AI, which could damage organs at a later stage despite initial hemostasis. We hypothesized that AI controls bleeding without inducing an unfavorable inflammatory response. An experimental splenic injury was caused in 28 Yorkshire pigs, which were randomized to: 1) standard resuscitation (n = 14) with crystalloids to a mean arterial pressure of 60 mm Hg, or 2) standard resuscitation and AI (n = 14) to an abdominal pressure of 20 cmH2O. The experiment lasted for 30 minutes, and intra-abdominal blood loss was measured. Blood serum interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), transforming growth factor beta1, and lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression were measured at 0, 15, and 30 minutes, as markers of the inflammatory response. All animals survived to the end of the experiment. Total blood loss was significantly less in the AI group compared with the other standard resuscitation animals (733 +/- 76 vs 1094 +/- 153 mL, P = 0.049). The pH at the end of the experiment was significantly lower in the AI group (7.28 +/- 0.02 vs 7.44 +/- 0.05, P < 0.01) but there was no difference in lactate levels (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 1.7 +/- 0.3, P = 0.7). Similarly, there was no difference in IL-1beta, transforming growth factor beta1, or lung tissue heat shock protein 70 gene expression between the two groups at any time point, although there was a trend towards lower IL-1beta levels in the AI group. Our conclusion is that AI reduces blood loss from splenic injury without a measurable effect on the early inflammatory response in a clinically relevant animal model.

  4. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Marcin; Timler, Dariusz; Sobczak, Renata; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Sekalski, Przemyslaw; Borkowska, Natalia; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Materials and methods This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolar-yngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH). The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software. Results In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency between using the guidewire and the occurrence of the hematomas and loss of mucosa was statistically significant (P<0.01). In nearly half (42%) of the patients the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was excessively inflated over 30 cm H2O, and in two cases, endotracheal tube displacement was observed on account of poor cuff inflation (<20 cm H2O). Conclusion The highest percentage of overfilled cuffs were observed in the

  5. Damage control immunoregulation: is there a role for low-volume hypertonic saline resuscitation in patients managed with damage control surgery?

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Simms, Eric; Guidry, Chrissy; Duke, Marquinn; Beeson, Esther; McSwain, Norman E; Cotton, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is beneficial in the treatment of head-injured patients as a result of its potent cytoprotective effects on various cell lines. We hypothesize that low-volume resuscitation with 3 per cent HTS, when used after damage control surgery (DCS), improves outcomes compared with standard resuscitation with isotonic crystalloid solution (ICS). This is a 4-year retrospective review from two Level I trauma centers. Patients included had 10 units or more of packed red blood cells during initial DCS. On arrival to the trauma intensive care unit (TICU), patients were resuscitated with low-volume 3 per cent HTS or with conventional ICS. A cohort analysis was performed comparing resuscitation strategies. Univariate analysis of continuous data was done with Student t test followed by multivariate analysis. Of 188 patients included, 76 were in the low-volume HTS group and 112 in the ICS group. Demographics were similar between the groups. Over the next 48 hours after DCS in HTS versus ISC groups, intravenous fluids were given: 1920 ± 455 mL versus 8400 ± 1200 mL (P < 0.0001); urine output was 4320 ± 480 mL versus 1940 ± 480 mL(P < 0.0001); mean TICU length of stay was 10 ± 8 versus 16 ± 15 days (P < 0.01); prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 4.0 versus 13.4 per cent (P = 0.02); sepsis was 6.6 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.06); multisystem organ failure was: 2.6 versus 16.1 per cent (P < 0.01); and 30-day mortality was 5.3 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.03). There was no difference for prevalence of renal failure at 5.3 versus 3.6 per cent (P = 0.58). Low-volume resuscitation with HTS administered after DCS on arrival to the TICU may have a protective effect on the polytrauma patient. We believe that this study demonstrates a role for low-volume resuscitation with HTS to improve outcomes in patients undergoing DCS.

  6. Stroke management in northern Lombardy: organization of an emergency-urgency network and development of a connection between prehospital and in-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Vidale, Simone; Verrengia, Elena; Gerardi, Francesca; Arnaboldi, Marco; Bezzi, Giacomo; Bono, Giorgio; Guidotti, Mario; Grampa, Giampiero; Perrone, Patrizia; Zarcone, Davide; Zoli, Alberto; Beghi, Ettore; Agostoni, Elio; Porazzi, Daniele; Landriscina, Mario

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in adulthood, and the principal aim of care in cerebrovascular disease is the reduction of this negative outcome and mortality. Several studies demonstrated the efficacy of thrombolytic therapy in ischemic stroke, but up to 80% of cases could not be treated because the diagnostic workup exceeds the time limit. In this article, we described the design of a study conducted in the northern Lombardy, within the district of Sondrio, Lecco, Como, and Varese. The awaited results of this study are reduction of avoidable delay, organization of an operative stroke emergency network, and identification of highly specialized structures. The study schedules education and data registration with implementation and training of acute stroke management algorithms. The use of standardized protocols during prehospital and in-hospital phase can optimize acute stroke pathways. The results of this study could contribute to the assessment of an effective and homogeneous health system to manage acute stroke.

  7. [Longer waiting time and higher mortality in older people with traumatic brain injuries. Mapping of emergency prehospital management and hospital management in Västerbotten].

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Martin; Bylund, Per O; Degerfält, Lisa; Carlsson, Axel C; Wändell, Per; Ruge, Toralph

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose was to study the prehospital and early intrahospital treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the county of Västerbotten 2011-2012. In total, 162 patients were included. The main finding was that a large proportion of TBI patients were older men who fell in the same or from a different level. Older patients had higher mortality and had to wait longer for diagnostic imaging compared to younger patients. Furthermore, most patients were initially relatively unaffected by the injury and around 1/5 of the patients were transported to hospital by private transport. Finally, we observed that most patients were admitted to hospital and computer tomography scan of the head was performed within 4 hours. PMID:26440946

  8. [Longer waiting time and higher mortality in older people with traumatic brain injuries. Mapping of emergency prehospital management and hospital management in Västerbotten].

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Martin; Bylund, Per O; Degerfält, Lisa; Carlsson, Axel C; Wändell, Per; Ruge, Toralph

    2015-10-06

    The main purpose was to study the prehospital and early intrahospital treatment of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the county of Västerbotten 2011-2012. In total, 162 patients were included. The main finding was that a large proportion of TBI patients were older men who fell in the same or from a different level. Older patients had higher mortality and had to wait longer for diagnostic imaging compared to younger patients. Furthermore, most patients were initially relatively unaffected by the injury and around 1/5 of the patients were transported to hospital by private transport. Finally, we observed that most patients were admitted to hospital and computer tomography scan of the head was performed within 4 hours.

  9. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use. PMID:22321943

  10. Color-coded prefilled medication syringes decrease time to delivery and dosing errors in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations: A randomized crossover trial☆, ☆

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Allen D.; Hernandez, Caleb; Jones, Seth; Moreira, Maria E.; Blumen, Jason R.; Hopkins, Emily; Sande, Margaret; Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication dosing errors remain commonplace and may result in potentially life-threatening outcomes, particularly for pediatric patients where dosing often requires weight-based calculations. Novel medication delivery systems that may reduce dosing errors resonate with national healthcare priorities. Our goal was to evaluate novel, prefilled medication syringes labeled with color-coded volumes corresponding to the weight-based dosing of the Broselow Tape, compared to conventional medication administration, in simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitation scenarios. Methods We performed a prospective, block-randomized, cross-over study, where 10 full-time paramedics each managed two simulated pediatric arrests in situ using either prefilled, color-coded-syringes (intervention) or their own medication kits stocked with conventional ampoules (control). Each paramedic was paired with two emergency medical technicians to provide ventilations and compressions as directed. The ambulance patient compartment and the intravenous medication port were video recorded. Data were extracted from video review by blinded, independent reviewers. Results Median time to delivery of all doses for the intervention and control groups was 34 (95% CI: 28–39) seconds and 42 (95% CI: 36–51) seconds, respectively (difference = 9 [95% CI: 4–14] seconds). Using the conventional method, 62 doses were administered with 24 (39%) critical dosing errors; using the prefilled, color-coded syringe method, 59 doses were administered with 0 (0%) critical dosing errors (difference = 39%, 95% CI: 13–61%). Conclusions A novel color-coded, prefilled syringe decreased time to medication administration and significantly reduced critical dosing errors by paramedics during simulated prehospital pediatric resuscitations. PMID:26247145

  11. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use.

  12. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  13. Chloride/bicarbonate exchanger SLC26A7 is localized in endosomes in medullary collecting duct cells and is targeted to the basolateral membrane in hypertonicity and potassium depletion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Worrell, Roger T; Li, Hong C; Barone, Sharon L; Petrovic, Snezana; Amlal, Hassane; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2006-04-01

    SLC26A7 is a Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger that is expressed on the basolateral membrane and in the cytoplasm of two distinct acid-secreting epithelial cells: The A-intercalated cells in the kidney outer medullary collecting duct and the gastric parietal cells. The intracellular localization of SLC26A7 suggests the possibility of trafficking between cell membrane and intracellular compartments. For testing this hypothesis, full-length human SLC26A7 cDNA was fused with green fluorescence protein and transiently expressed in MDCK epithelial cells. In monolayer cells in isotonic medium, SLC26A7 showed punctate distribution throughout the cytoplasm. However, in medium that was made hypertonic for 16 h, SLC26A7 was detected predominantly in the plasma membrane. The presence of mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors blocked the trafficking of SLC26A7 to the plasma membrane. Double-labeling studies demonstrated the localization of SLC26A7 to the transferrin receptor-positive endosomes. A chimera that was composed of the amino terminal fragment of SLC26A7 and the carboxyl terminal fragment of SLC26A1, and a C-terminal-truncated SLC26A7 were retained in the cytoplasm in hypertonicity. In separate studies, SLC26A7 showed predominant localization in plasma membrane in potassium-depleted isotonic medium (0.5 or 2 mEq/L KCl) versus cytoplasmic distribution in normal potassium isotonic medium (4 mEq/L). It is concluded that SLC26A7 is present in endosomes, and its targeting to the basolateral membrane is increased in hypertonicity and potassium depletion. The trafficking to the cell surface suggests novel functional upregulation of SLC26A7 in states that are associated with hypokalemia or increased medullary tonicity. Additional studies are needed to ascertain the role of SLC26A7 in enhanced bicarbonate absorption in outer medullary collecting duct in hypokalemia and in acid-base regulation in conditions that are associated with increased medullary tonicity. PMID:16524946

  14. Pre-hospital diagnosis and transfer of patients with acute myocardial infarction--a decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Peter; Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Lindholm, Matias Greve; Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Pedersen, Frants; Jørgensen, Erik; Holmvang, Lene; Sejersten, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Early reperfusion in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is essential. Although primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) is the preferred revascularization technique, it often involves longer primary transportation or secondary inter-hospital transfers and thus longer system related delays. The current ESC Guidelines state that PCI should be performed within 120 minutes from first medical contact, and door-to-balloon time should be <60 minutes in order to reduce long term mortality. STEMI networks should be established with regionalization of pPCI treatment to address the challenges regarding pre-hospital treatment, triage and transport of STEMI patients and collaborations between hospitals and Emergency Medical Services (EMS). We report on a regional decade long experience from one of Europe's largest STEMI networks located in Eastern Denmark, which serves a catchment area of 2.5 million inhabitants by processing ~4000 prehospital ECGs annually transmitted from 4 EMS systems to a single pPCI center treating 1100 patients per year. This organization has led to a significant improvement of the standard of therapy for acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients leading to historically low 30-day mortality for STEMI patients (<6%). About 70-80% of all STEMI patients are being triaged from the field and rerouted to the regional pPCI center. Significant delays are still found among patients who present to local hospitals and for those who are first admitted to a local emergency room and thus subject to inter-hospital transfer. In the directly transferred group, approximately 80% of patients can be treated within the current guideline time window of 120 minutes when triaged within a 185 km (~115 miles) radius. Since 2010, a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service has been implemented for air rescue. Air transfer was associated with a 20-30 minute decrease from first medical contact to pPCI, at distances down to 90 km from the pPCI center

  15. Blood oxygenation during hyperpressure intraperitoneal fluid administration in a rabbit model of severe liver injury: Evaluation of a novel concept for control of pre-hospital liver bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Noorbakhsh, Siavash; Azizi, Saeed; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Maham, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential part of the most important metabolic pathways in aerobic organisms. Oxygen delivery is merely dependent on blood, rendering blood loss a devastating event. Traumatic pre-hospital liver bleeding is a major cause of early trauma deaths in human and animals, with no established therapeutic method yet. Increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) has been shown to reduce liver bleeding by half. Although reduction of blood loss could be in favor of blood oxygen delivery, however, the complex interaction between increased IAP and respiratory mechanics during severe hemorrhagic shock remained unclear. We used a novel model of liver trauma in 16 rabbits and randomly assigned them to either normotensive abdomen group or increased IAP by fluid infusion (HA) groups (n=8 each). Liver size and the amount of liver injury were evaluated. Various blood oxygenation parameters were recorded. Both groups were identical in terms of the liver size and injury. The HA group had significantly lower shock index. Arterial oxygen capacity and oxygen content were higher in the HA group. No significant statistical difference was seen between groups in terms of abdominal perfusion pressure; alveolar pressure of oxygen; dissolved oxygen in blood plasma; alveolar to arterial oxygen tension gradient; arterial to alveolar oxygen pressure ratio; the ratio between partial pressure of arterial oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen; and respiratory index. In conclusion, the novel therapeutic method of increasing IAP by fluid infusion in a rabbit model of liver hemorrhage preserved blood oxygenation better than the classic therapeutic method. PMID:25653758

  16. Efficacy of pre-hospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction before mechanical reperfusion in a rapid-transfer network (from the Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry of Brittany).

    PubMed

    Auffret, Vincent; Oger, Emmanuel; Leurent, Guillaume; Filippi, Emmanuelle; Coudert, Isabelle; Hacot, Jean Philippe; Castellant, Philippe; Rialan, Antoine; Delaunay, Régis; Rouault, Gilles; Druelles, Philippe; Boulanger, Bertrand; Treuil, Josiane; Avez, Bertrand; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Le Guellec, Marielle; Le Breton, Hervé

    2014-07-15

    Previous studies investigating prehospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIs) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reached conflicting conclusions. The benefit of this strategy in addition to in-ambulance loading of dual-antiplatelet therapy remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze data from a prospective registry of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions admitted <24 hours after symptom onset (July 2006 to May 2012). A total of 2,052 patients managed in a physician-staffed mobile intensive care unit (MICU)<12 hours after symptom onset and scheduled for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) were retrospectively included. Patients who received GPIs in the MICU were compared with those who did not. The primary end point was infarct-related artery patency, defined as pre-PPCI Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade 3. GPIs were administered in the MICU to 737 patients (36%), including 430<2 hours after symptom onset, and 1,315 patients (64%) did not received prehospital GPIs. Pre-PPCI TIMI flow grade 3 rate was lower in patients treated in the MICU (17.2% vs 21.3%, p=0.03) because of patients treated >2 hours after symptom onset, of whom only 12.7% reached the primary end point. There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. In conclusion, prehospital GPI use in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions<12 hours after symptom onset scheduled for PPCI neither improved pre-PPCI infarct-related artery patency nor reduced in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. PMID:24878117

  17. Efficacy of pre-hospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction before mechanical reperfusion in a rapid-transfer network (from the Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry of Brittany).

    PubMed

    Auffret, Vincent; Oger, Emmanuel; Leurent, Guillaume; Filippi, Emmanuelle; Coudert, Isabelle; Hacot, Jean Philippe; Castellant, Philippe; Rialan, Antoine; Delaunay, Régis; Rouault, Gilles; Druelles, Philippe; Boulanger, Bertrand; Treuil, Josiane; Avez, Bertrand; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Le Guellec, Marielle; Le Breton, Hervé

    2014-07-15

    Previous studies investigating prehospital use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPIs) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reached conflicting conclusions. The benefit of this strategy in addition to in-ambulance loading of dual-antiplatelet therapy remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze data from a prospective registry of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions admitted <24 hours after symptom onset (July 2006 to May 2012). A total of 2,052 patients managed in a physician-staffed mobile intensive care unit (MICU)<12 hours after symptom onset and scheduled for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) were retrospectively included. Patients who received GPIs in the MICU were compared with those who did not. The primary end point was infarct-related artery patency, defined as pre-PPCI Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow grade 3. GPIs were administered in the MICU to 737 patients (36%), including 430<2 hours after symptom onset, and 1,315 patients (64%) did not received prehospital GPIs. Pre-PPCI TIMI flow grade 3 rate was lower in patients treated in the MICU (17.2% vs 21.3%, p=0.03) because of patients treated >2 hours after symptom onset, of whom only 12.7% reached the primary end point. There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events. In conclusion, prehospital GPI use in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions<12 hours after symptom onset scheduled for PPCI neither improved pre-PPCI infarct-related artery patency nor reduced in-hospital major adverse cardiac events.

  18. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria. PMID:26017368

  19. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in prehospital emergency care – an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Aléx, Jonas; Karlsson, Stig; Björnstig, Ulf; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients’ exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001). At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes. Conclusions The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients’ thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress. PMID:26374468

  20. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria.

  1. Prehospital digital photography and automated image transmission in an emergency medical service – an ancillary retrospective analysis of a prospective controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Still picture transmission was performed using a telemedicine system in an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) during a prospective, controlled trial. In this ancillary, retrospective study the quality and content of the transmitted pictures and the possible influences of this application on prehospital time requirements were investigated. Methods A digital camera was used with a telemedicine system enabling encrypted audio and data transmission between an ambulance and a remotely located physician. By default, images were compressed (jpeg, 640 x 480 pixels). On occasion, this compression was deactivated (3648 x 2736 pixels). Two independent investigators assessed all transmitted pictures according to predefined criteria. In cases of different ratings, a third investigator had final decision competence. Patient characteristics and time intervals were extracted from the EMS protocol sheets and dispatch centre reports. Results Overall 314 pictures (mean 2.77 ± 2.42 pictures/mission) were transmitted during 113 missions (group 1). Pictures were not taken for 151 missions (group 2). Regarding picture quality, the content of 240 (76.4%) pictures was clearly identifiable; 45 (14.3%) pictures were considered “limited quality” and 29 (9.2%) pictures were deemed “not useful” due to not/hardly identifiable content. For pictures with file compression (n = 84 missions) and without (n = 17 missions), the content was clearly identifiable in 74% and 97% of the pictures, respectively (p = 0.003). Medical reports (n = 98, 32.8%), medication lists (n = 49, 16.4%) and 12-lead ECGs (n = 28, 9.4%) were most frequently photographed. The patient characteristics of group 1 vs. 2 were as follows: median age – 72.5 vs. 56.5 years, p = 0.001; frequency of acute coronary syndrome – 24/113 vs. 15/151, p = 0.014. The NACA scores and gender distribution were comparable. Median on-scene times were longer with picture transmission (26 vs. 22

  2. Achieving a Safe Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure in the Prehospital Setting: Is It Time to Revise the Standard Cuff Inflation Practice?

    PubMed

    Carhart, Elliot; Stuck, Logan H; Salzman, Joshua G

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported unsafe endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressures (CP) in the prehospital environment. The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal cuff inflation volume (CIV) to achieve a safe CP (20-30 cmH2O). This observational study utilized 30 recently harvested ovine tracheae, which were warmed from refrigeration in a water bath at 85°F prior to testing. Each trachea was intubated with five different ETT sizes (6.0-8.0 mm), and each size tube was tested with six cuff inflation volumes (5-10 cc). The order of ETT size for each trachea and CIV for each size ETT was randomly pre-assigned. Data were descriptively summarized and categorized before mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine optimal CIV. Only 113 CP measurements (12.6%, N = 900) were within the optimal range (M = 54.75 cmH2O, SD = 38.52), all of which resulted from a CIV 6 or 7 cc (61% and 39%, respectively). CIVs of 5 cc (n = 150) resulted in underinflation (<20 cmH2O) in all instances, while CIVs of 8, 9, or 10 cc (n = 150 each) resulted in overinflation (>30 cmH2O) in all instances, regardless of ETT size. The odds of achieving a safe CP were greater with CIV of 6 cc for tube sizes 6.0 (OR = 15.9, 95% CI = 3.85-65.58, p < 0.01) and 6.5 mm (OR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.06-9.39, p = 0.039); however, there was no significant difference in the odds of achieving a safe CP between CIV of 6 and 7 cc for tube sizes 7.0, 7.5, or 8.0 mm. Neither trachea circumference (M = 7.11 cm, SD = 0.40), nor tissue temperature (M = 81.32°F, SD = 0.93) were found to be significant predictors of CP (p = 0.20 and 0.81, respectively). Our study showed a high frequency of CP measurements outside of the desired norms. The CIV range of 6-7 cc resulted in the highest likelihood of achieving the desired cuff pressure range, while cuffs inflated with 8-10 cc resulted in dangerously high CPs in all instances. In the absence of a more ideal solution, the results of this study suggest that narrowing the

  3. Have the implementation of a new specialised emergency medical service influenced the pattern of general practitioners involvement in pre-hospital medical emergencies? A study of geographic variations in alerting, dispatch, and response

    PubMed Central

    Vaardal, B; Lossius, H; Steen, P; Johnsen, R

    2005-01-01

    Methods: This was a prospective, observational cohort study of 385 000 inhabitants covered by the two EMDCs of Rogaland county, Norway, including 1035 on scene missions of the EP manned EMS during the period 1998–99. Results: The proportion of emergency calls routed through 113 was significantly lower, the proportion of alerts to GPs significantly higher, and the proportions of GPs on scene significantly higher in rural than urban areas. Conclusion: We found geographical differences in the involvement of GPs in pre-hospital emergency medical situations, probably caused by a specialised emergency medical service system including an EMDC and an air and ground EP manned EMS. There were geographical differences in public use of the toll free 113, and alerts to GPs by the EMDCs, which is likely to result from geographical conditions and proximity to medical resources. Future organisation of the EMS has to reflect this to prevent unplanned and unwanted autonomously emerging EMS systems. PMID:15735277

  4. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  5. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  6. PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) overseas.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, W

    2001-05-01

    There are many names and places that space will not allow here. In the future, I hope to write about these places one at a time and give more detailed reports on the people all over the world who are our brothers and sisters in EMS, covering the places they work and how they provide care. In any event, with each opportunity, we learn about people, ourselves and how small a place the world has become. We are reminded not to approach people and places with belligerence, implying that we have all the answers. By considering the culture and environment in which care is provided, we learn to bring the same open-mindedness back home to help when addressing the problems we face every day. What our neighbors have to teach us may be the next big step in our development.

  7. Management of eclampsia in the prehospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alonso A Mateos; Vellisca, Miguel Ángel Benito

    2007-01-01

    Eclampsia is an uncommon and serious condition, particularly in the pre‐hospital setting. Immediate treatment is required and should include airway control, administration of oxygen, anti‐epileptics and magnesium, hypertension control, and urgent delivery of the baby. PMID:17582050

  8. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy. PMID:24343140

  9. Hypertonic saline in the treatment of corneal jellyfish stings.

    PubMed

    Yu Yao, Hsin; Cho, Ta Hsiung; Lu, Ching Hsiang; Lin, Feng Chi; Horng, Chi Ting

    2016-02-01

    A 20-year-old male soldier was hit by the jellyfish. The ophthalmic examination revealed that epithelial keratitis and corneal oedema in the right eye. We prescribed 3% NaCl eyedrops and 0.3% Norfloxacin eyedrops in the treatment of the corneal jellyfish stings. Two weeks later, the cornea in the right eye healed. In this case report, 3% NaCl eyedrops was effective in the treatment of acute phase of jellyfish stings of the cornea. PMID:26883926

  10. [Hypertonic dehydration in "silent" malnutrition of breast-fed infants].

    PubMed

    van der Heide, P A; Toet, M C; van Diemen-Steenvoorde, J A; Renardel de Lavalette, P A; de Jonge, G A

    1998-05-01

    Two firstborn, breast-fed infants (delivery at home) were admitted to the hospital in a critical state of hypernatraemic dehydration. Case 1, a boy aged 13 days, had suffered 1220 g loss of weight since birth (31%), his serum sodium concentration was 180 mmol/l. Case 2, a girl aged 7 days, had lost 610 g since birth (18%); her serum sodium level was 159 mmol/l. In both cases poor professional support of lactation and lack of weight control had resulted in unnoticed severe malnutrition. After slow rehydration recovery was uneventful. Closer monitoring of babies' weight, e.g. twice a week, is advocated especially for breast-fed firstborns in the early weeks of life.

  11. Hyperinvasive approach to out-of hospital cardiac arrest using mechanical chest compression device, prehospital intraarrest cooling, extracorporeal life support and early invasive assessment compared to standard of care. A randomized parallel groups comparative study proposal. “Prague OHCA study”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has a poor outcome. Recent non-randomized studies of ECLS (extracorporeal life support) in OHCA suggested further prospective multicenter studies to define population that would benefit from ECLS. We aim to perform a prospective randomized study comparing prehospital intraarrest hypothermia combined with mechanical chest compression device, intrahospital ECLS and early invasive investigation and treatment in all patients with OHCA of presumed cardiac origin compared to a standard of care. Methods This paper describes methodology and design of the proposed trial. Patients with witnessed OHCA without ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation) after a minimum of 5 minutes of ACLS (advanced cardiac life support) by emergency medical service (EMS) team and after performance of all initial procedures (defibrillation, airway management, intravenous access establishment) will be randomized to standard vs. hyperinvasive arm. In hyperinvasive arm, mechanical compression device together with intranasal evaporative cooling will be instituted and patients will be transferred directly to cardiac center under ongoing CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After admission, ECLS inclusion/exclusion criteria will be evaluated and if achieved, veno-arterial ECLS will be started. Invasive investigation and standard post resuscitation care will follow. Patients in standard arm will be managed on scene. When ROSC achieved, they will be transferred to cardiac center and further treated as per recent guidelines. Primary outcome 6 months survival with good neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1–2). Secondary outcomes will include 30 day neurological and cardiac recovery. Discussion Authors introduce and offer a protocol of a proposed randomized study comparing a combined “hyperinvasive approach” to a standard of care in refractory OHCA. The protocol is opened for sharing by other cardiac centers with available ECLS and

  12. [Emergency nurse faced with death in pre-hospital situations].

    PubMed

    Hugenschmitt, Delphine; Souquet, Marie-Laure; Lefort, Hugues; Bagur, Jacques; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of a death in the out-of-hospital environment is often brutal and the reactions of the deceased's family and friends, unprepared for this event, can be unpredictable. After the technical procedures have been carried out and within a limited period of intervention, the caregivers, and in particular the nurse of the mobile emergency and intensive care service, must provide the family and friends with support enabling them to begin the grieving process. To help the caregivers in this mission, a pedagogical tool remains to be developed. PMID:26145698

  13. Exertional heat illness: emerging concepts and advances in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Riana R; Roth, Ronald N; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2015-06-01

    Exertional heat illness is a classification of disease with clinical presentations that are not always diagnosed easily. Exertional heat stroke is a significant cause of death in competitive sports, and the increasing popularity of marathons races and ultra-endurance competitions will make treating many heat illnesses more common for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Although evidence is available primarily from case series and healthy volunteer studies, the consensus for treating exertional heat illness, coupled with altered mental status, is whole body rapid cooling. Cold or ice water immersion remains the most effective treatment to achieve this goal. External thermometry is unreliable in the context of heat stress and direct internal temperature measurement by rectal or esophageal probes must be used when diagnosing heat illness and during cooling. With rapid recognition and implementation of effective cooling, most patients suffering from exertional heat stroke will recover quickly and can be discharged home with instructions to rest and to avoid heat stress and exercise for a minimum of 48 hours; although, further research pertaining to return to activity is warranted.

  14. Prehospital Identification of Underlying Coronary Artery Disease by Community Paramedics.

    PubMed

    Heinelt, Martina; Drennan, Ian R; Kim, Jinbaek; Lucas, Steven; Grant, Kyle; Spearen, Chris; Tavares, Walter; Al-Imari, Lina; Philpott, Jane; Hoogeveen, Paul; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of definitive evidence that preventative, in-home medical care provided by highly trained community paramedics reduces acute health care utilization and improves the overall well-being of patients suffering from chronic diseases. The Expanding Paramedicine in the Community (EPIC) trial is a randomized controlled trial designed to investigate the use of community paramedics in chronic disease management (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02034045). This case of a patient randomized to the intervention arm of the EPIC study demonstrates how the added layer of frequent patient contact by community paramedics and real-time electronic medical record (EMR) correspondence between the paramedics, physicians and other involved practitioners prevented possible life-threatening complications. The visiting community paramedic deduced the need for an electrocardiogram, which prompted the primary care physician to order a stress test revealing abnormalities and thus a coronary artery bypass graft was performed without emergency procedures, unnecessary financial expenditure or further health degradation such as a myocardial infarction. PMID:25909892

  15. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  16. Exertional heat illness: emerging concepts and advances in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Riana R; Roth, Ronald N; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2015-06-01

    Exertional heat illness is a classification of disease with clinical presentations that are not always diagnosed easily. Exertional heat stroke is a significant cause of death in competitive sports, and the increasing popularity of marathons races and ultra-endurance competitions will make treating many heat illnesses more common for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Although evidence is available primarily from case series and healthy volunteer studies, the consensus for treating exertional heat illness, coupled with altered mental status, is whole body rapid cooling. Cold or ice water immersion remains the most effective treatment to achieve this goal. External thermometry is unreliable in the context of heat stress and direct internal temperature measurement by rectal or esophageal probes must be used when diagnosing heat illness and during cooling. With rapid recognition and implementation of effective cooling, most patients suffering from exertional heat stroke will recover quickly and can be discharged home with instructions to rest and to avoid heat stress and exercise for a minimum of 48 hours; although, further research pertaining to return to activity is warranted. PMID:25860637

  17. Subcutaneous Fluid Administration: A Potentially Useful Tool in Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Annette O.; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Mass casualty incidents (MCIs) and disaster medical situations are ideal settings in which there is need for a novel approach to infusing fluids and medications into a patient's intravascular space. An attractive new approach would avoid the potentially time-consuming needlestick and venous cannulation requiring a trained practitioner. In multiple-patient situations, trained practitioners are not always available in sufficient numbers to enable timely placement of intravenous catheters. The novel approach for intravascular space infusion, described in this paper involves the preadministration of the enzyme, human recombinant hyaluronidase (HRH), into the subcutaneous (SC) space, via an indwelling catheter. The enzyme “loosens” the SC space effectively enhancing the absorption of fluids and medication. PMID:22649733

  18. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  19. Hypervolemia During Drinking of ISO and Hypertonic Fluids by Men at Rest and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Wisherd, J. L.; Fung, P. P.; Erti, A. C.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.; Wong, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that drink composition is more important than osmolality (osm) for maintaining and increasing plasma vol. (PV, hypervolemia) at rest and exercise (21.8C Tdb, 50% rh), 6 men (22-39 vr) underwent six treatments while sitting for 90 min (0.39 l/min) followed by 70 min of sitting ergometer exercise (2.08 l/min, 70%vO2 peak). Resting, intermittent drinking (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) beverages were: P1 (20 mEq Na+, 365 mosmol/kg), P2 (40 mEq Na+. 791 mosm), P2G (40 mEq Na+, 80 ml glycerol, 1.392 mosm). AA (157 mEq Na+, 253 mosm), and 01 and 02 (nothing). The exercise drink (10 ml/kg, 768 ml) was P1 for all experiments, except 02 (nothing). Resting % delta PV (Hb-Hct) increased (P<0.05) by 3-6% only with P2 and AA, respectively, Exercise % delta PV was + 1 to + 3% (NS) with AA, -6% to 0% (KS) with P1, P2. P2G, and 01,and 8% to -5% (P<0.05) with 02- Thus, AA with 157 mEq Na+ and the lowest osmolality maintained PV at rest and exercise, while the other beverages with low Na+ and higher osmolality (365 to 1.382 mosm) did not.

  20. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... burning and irritation on being instilled into the eye.” (3) “If solution changes color or becomes cloudy... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of...

  1. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  2. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  3. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “hypertonicity” (select one of the following: “eye” or “ophthalmic”) “(insert dosage form, e.g., drops).” (b... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the eye, or if the condition worsens or persists, consult a doctor.” (2) “This product may cause...

  4. Diphenhydramine Overdose with Intraventricular Conduction Delay Treated with Hypertonic Sodium Bicarbonate and IV Lipid Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Amin; Rose, Emily; Levine, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diphenhydramine toxicity commonly manifests with antimuscarinic features, including dry mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, mydriasis, tachycardia, and encephalopathy. Severe toxicity can include seizures and intraventricular conduction delay. We present here a case of a 23-year-old male presenting with recurrent seizures, hypotension and wide complex tachycardia who had worsening toxicity despite treatment with sodium bicarbonate. The patient was ultimately treated with intravenous lipid emulsion therapy that was temporally associated with improvement in the QRS duration. We also review the current literature that supports lipid use in refractory diphenhydramine toxicity. PMID:25493135

  5. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  6. External application of hypertonic salt solution for treatment of posttraumatic oedema.

    PubMed

    Atalar, Hakan; Yavuz, Osman Y; Uras, Ismail; Selek, Hakan; Erakar, Aziz; Sayli, Ugur

    2005-08-01

    In 20 New Zealand rabbits (two groups of 10 rabbits each), hind limb circumference and anterior compartment pressure were measured following ketamin anaesthesia (time zero). During the same anaesthesia, closed transverse proximal tibial shaft fractures were created in both groups. Twenty-four hours after the fractures, during a second anaesthesia, limb circumference and compartment pressure were measured as before, and fractured limbs were fixed to the rabbits' bodies. At the same time, treatment was started: one group received external application of saturated salt solution and the other group received intermittent ice application. During 48 hours of treatment (from 24 to 72 hours) in the saturated salt solution group, the mean limb circumference decreased from 125.70 +/- 9.93 mm to 115.70 +/- 8.78 mm (p = 0.005) and the mean compartment pressure decreased from 18.30 +/- 1.70 mmHg to 12.40 +/- 1.77 mmHg (p = 0.005). In the control group, the mean limb circumference decreased from 127.85 +/- 7.47 mm to 122.00 +/- 6.83 mm (not significant) and the mean compartment pressure decreased from 19.57 +/- 1.27 mmHg to 17.85 +/- 2.67 mmHg (not significant). In short, differences in compartment pressure and limb circumference before and after treatment were statistically significant in the saturated salt solution group (p = 0.005) but not in the control group.

  7. Metabolic cost of osmoregulation in a hypertonic environment in the invasive African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Villalobos, Isaac; Narváez, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of aquatic invertebrates reveal that salinity affects feeding and growth rates, reproduction, survival, and diversity. Little is known, however, about how salinity impacts the energy budget of vertebrates and amphibians in particular. The few studies focused on this topic in vertebrates suggest that the ingestion of salts and the resulting osmoregulatory activity is energetically expensive. We analyzed the effect of saline acclimation on standard metabolic rates (SMR) and the activities of metabolic enzymes of internal organs and osmoregulatory variables (plasma osmolality and urea plasma level) in females of Xenopus laevis by means of acclimating individuals to an isosmotic (235 mOsm NaCl; ISO group) and hyper-osmotic (340 mOsm NaCl; HYP group) environment for 40 days. After acclimation, we found that total and mass-specific SMR was approximately 80% higher in the HYP group than those found in the ISO group. These changes were accompanied by higher citrate synthase activities in liver and heart in the HYP group than in the ISO group. Furthermore, we found a significant and positive correlation between metabolic rates and plasma urea, and citrate synthase activity in liver and heart. These results support the notion that the cost of osmoregulation is probably common in most animal species and suggest the existence of a functional association between metabolic rates and the adjustments in osmoregulatory physiology, such as blood distribution and urea synthesis. PMID:27334694

  8. 21 CFR 349.70 - Labeling of ophthalmic hypertonicity drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... supervision of a doctor. If you experience eye pain, changes in vision, continued redness or irritation of the... burning and irritation on being instilled into the eye.” (3) “If solution changes color or becomes...

  9. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. Objectives: In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. Patients and Methods: In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. Results: In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA. PMID:26587401

  10. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and follow-up for paediatric upper limb hypertonicity: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Fehlings, D; Novak, I; Berweck, S; Hoare, B; Stott, N S; Russo, R N

    2010-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to evaluate the published evidence of efficacy and safety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections in paediatric upper limb hypertonia (PULH). Secondary objectives included the provision of clinical context, based on evidence and expert opinion, in the areas of assessment, child and muscle selection, dosing, and adjunctive treatment. A multidisciplinary panel of authors systematically reviewed, abstracted, and classified relevant literature. Recommendations were based on the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) evidence classification. Following a literature search, 186 potential articles were screened for inclusion, and 15 of these met the criteria and were reviewed. Grade A evidence was found to support the use of BoNT to reach individualized therapeutic goals for PULH. There is grade B evidence (probably effective) for tone reduction following BoNT injections and grade U evidence (inconclusive) for improvement in upper limb (UL) activity and function. BoNT injections were generally found to be safe and well tolerated with the most common side effect identified as a transient decrease in grip strength. PMID:20633178

  11. Hypertonic Dextrose and Morrhuate Sodium Injections (Prolotherapy) for Lateral Epicondylosis (Tennis Elbow)

    PubMed Central

    Rabago, David; Lee, Ken S.; Ryan, Michael; Chourasia, Amrish O.; Sesto, Mary E.; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Kijowski, Rick; Grettie, Jessica; Wilson, John; Miller, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chronic lateral epicondylosis (CLE) is common, debilitating and often refractory. Prolotherapy (PrT) is an injection therapy for tendinopathy. The efficacy of two PrT solutions for CLE was evaluated. Design 3-arm randomized controlled trial. 26 adults (32 elbows) with ≥3 months of CLE were randomized to ultrasound-guided PrT with dextrose (PrT-D), PrT with dextrose-morrhuate (PrT-DM) or watchful waiting (Wait-and-see). The primary outcome was the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE; 100-points) at 4, 8 and 16 weeks, (all groups) and 32 weeks (PrT groups). Secondary outcomes included pain-free grip strength and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) score. Results PrT-D and PrT-DM participants reported improved PRTEE composite and subscale scores at 4, 8 and/or 16 weeks compared to Wait-and-see (p<0.05). At 16 weeks, compared to baseline, PrT-D and PrT-DM groups improved composite PRTEE scores by 18.7±9.6 (41.1%) and 17.5±11.6 (53.5%) points, respectively. Grip strength of PrT-D participants exceeded that of PrT-DM and Wait-and-see at 8 and 16 weeks (p<0.05). There were no differences in MRI scores. Satisfaction was high; there were no adverse events. Conclusions Prolotherapy resulted in safe, significant improvement of elbow pain and function compared to baseline status and wait-and-see control. This pilot study suggests the need for a definitive trial. PMID:23291605

  12. [Pre-hospital treatment of an anterior shoulder dislocation: medico-legal concerns].

    PubMed

    Möhler, A; Arikan, H; Gris, M

    2015-01-01

    A man of 23 years, diabetic of type 1, shows a functional handicap of the right upper limb following a convulsion in the context of hypoglycemia. On arrival of the "S.A.M.U.", the physician diagnoses an anterior shoulder dislocation that he decides to reduce on the spot after analgesic treatment. The X-ray examination at the emergency shows a reduction of the dislocation as well as a fracture of the greater tuberosity. Has the fracture followed the convulsion or the reduction movement ? The absence of an X-ray examination before the reduction movement presents a forensic medical problem. Certain criteria mentioned in several studies would allow the reduction without X-ray before. However, these studies remain controversial. PMID:26749634

  13. EMS Provider Attitudes and Perceptions of Enrolling Patients without Consent in Prehospital Emergency Research.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Jamie; Fernandez, Antonio R; Schmidt, Terri A; Lerner, E Brooke

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes and opinions of a broad population of EMS providers on enrolling patients in research without consent. A survey was conducted in 2010 of all EMS providers who participated in the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) reregistration process, which included half of all registered providers. Each reregistration packet included our optional survey, which had nine 6-point Likert scale questions concerning their opinion of research studies without consent as well as 8 demographic questions. Responses were collapsed to agree and disagree and then analyzed using descriptive statistics with 99% confidence intervals. A total of 65,993 EMS providers received the survey and 23,832 (36%) participated. Most respondents agreed (98.4%, 99%CI: 98.2-98.6) that EMS research is important, but only 30.9% (99%CI: 30.1-31.6) agreed with enrolling patients without their consent when it is important to learn about a new treatment. Only 46.6% (99%Cl: 45.7-47.4) were personally willing to be enrolled in a study without their consent. A majority (68.5% [99%Cl: 67.7-69.3]) of respondents believed that EMS providers should have the individual right to refuse to enroll patients in EMS research. While the majority of respondents agreed that EMS research is important, considerably less agree with enrolling patients without consent and less than half would be willing to be enrolled in a study without their consent. Prior to starting an Exception from Informed Consent (EFIC) study, researchers should discuss with EMS providers their perceptions of enrolling patients without consent and address their concerns.

  14. Epidemiology of Pediatric Prehospital Basic Life Support Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diggs, Leigh Ann; Sheth-Chandra, Manasi; De Leo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Children have unique medical needs compared to adults. Emergency medical services personnel need proper equipment and training to care for children. The purpose of this study is to characterize emergency medical services pediatric basic life support to help better understand the needs of children transported by ambulance. Pediatric basic life support patients were identified in this retrospective descriptive study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine incident location, possible injury, cardiac arrest, resuscitation attempted, chief complaint, primary symptom, provider's primary impression, cause of injury, and procedures performed during pediatric basic life support calls using the largest aggregate of emergency medical services data available, the 2013 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public Release Research Data Set. Pediatric calls represented 7.4% of emergency medical services activations. Most pediatric patients were male (49.8%), White (40.0%), and of non-Hispanic origin (56.5%). Most incidents occurred in the home. Injury, cardiac arrest, and resuscitation attempts were highest in the 15 to 19 year old age group. Global complaints (37.1%) predominated by anatomic location and musculoskeletal complaints (26.9%) by organ system. The most common primary symptom was pain (30.3%) followed by mental/psychiatric (13.4%). Provider's top primary impression was traumatic injury (35.7%). The most common cause of injury was motor vehicle accident (32.3%). The most common procedure performed was patient assessment (27.4%). Median EMS system response time was 7 minutes (IQR: 5-12). Median EMS scene time was 12 minutes (IQR: 8-19). Median transport time was 14 minutes (IQR: 8-24). Median EMS total call time was 51 minutes (IQR: 33-77). The epidemiology of pediatric basic life support can help to guide efforts in both emergency medical services operations and training.

  15. [Lightning strikes and lightning injuries in prehospital emergency medicine. Relevance, results, and practical implications].

    PubMed

    Hinkelbein, J; Spelten, O; Wetsch, W A

    2013-01-01

    Up to 32.2% of patients in a burn center suffer from electrical injuries. Of these patients, 2-4% present with lightning injuries. In Germany, approximately 50 people per year are injured by a lightning strike and 3-7 fatally. Typically, people involved in outdoor activities are endangered and affected. A lightning strike usually produces significantly higher energy doses as compared to those in common electrical injuries. Therefore, injury patterns vary significantly. Especially in high voltage injuries and lightning injuries, internal injuries are of special importance. Mortality ranges between 10 and 30% after a lightning strike. Emergency medical treatment is similar to common electrical injuries. Patients with lightning injuries should be transported to a regional or supraregional trauma center. In 15% of all cases multiple people may be injured. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to create emergency plans and evacuation plans in good time for mass gatherings endangered by possible lightning. PMID:21909737

  16. Evolution of a new series of self-contained micromechanical ventilators for prehospital use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Smith, Dexter G.; Wenstrand, Douglas S.; Wiesmann, William P.

    2002-05-01

    Immediate medical care can dramatically reduce the number of fatalities sustained during military operations. However, the shift from large-scale regional conflicts to smaller peacekeeping and humanitarian missions has reduced the military medical support infrastructure. In the civilian emergency medical services arena, there has long been an emphasis on the golden hour during which a patient must receive definitive medical attention. Without on-scene medical support, injured soldiers must be transported significant distances before receiving definitive medical care, and rapid transport to a medical facility is not always a viable option. We reported here three years ago on the development of an early prototype portable ventilator with basic functionality. Since that time, four new prototypes with varying capabilities and sizes have been developed. Each of these fits a particular role in military or civilian use. The design goals and tradeoffs for each unit will be discussed, as well as the design implementation used to achieve those goals.

  17. Predictors of delayed pre-hospital presentation among patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Albrahim, Mohammed; Ahmed, Amjad M.; Alwakeel, Abdulrahman; Hijji, Faisal; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early treatment of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is essential to improve survival of these patients. However, not all patients present early enough to receive optimal treatment especially in third world countries. Social factors affecting early vs. late treatment have not been studied, particularly in the Middle East. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the social factors associated with delayed presentation of STEMI patients. Methods: All patients with STEMI presenting to King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center (KACC) between October 2013 and July 2014 were approached. After obtaining consent, patients were interviewed regarding their psychosocial circumstances using a standardized questionnaire. Their medical charts were also reviewed for further clinical data. Patients were divided according to their symptom-to-door time into early ( ≤ 6h) and late (>6h) presentation and group comparisons were conducted. Results: A total of 79 patients were enrolled, of which 24 patients (30%) presented late. Patients with increased symptom-to-door time had higher prevalence of diabetes (40% vs. 79.2%, p = 0.001), hypertension (43.6% vs. 70.8%, p = 0.023), and dyslipidemia (23.6% vs. 54.2%, p = 0.009). Most of the late presenters did not undergo primary coronary intervention (72.7% vs. 47.8%, P = 0.034) and had less prior information about myocardial infarction (43.6% vs. 25%, P = 0.023). Late presenters were more often illiterates and lived most often far away from the hospital. Using multivariate logistic regression; dyslipidemia was the only independent predictor for the late hospital presentation for STEMI patients. Conclusion: One third of patients with STEMI present more than six hours after symptom onset; these patients have a higher prevalence of coronary risk factors and less information about STEMI. Programs should be designed to educate patients and the general public about the symptoms of STEMI and the necessary action to be taken if a heart attack is suspected. PMID:27540516

  18. Dignitary medicine: adapting prehospital, preventive, tactical and travel medicine to new populations.

    PubMed

    Band, Roger A; Callaway, David W; Connor, Bradley A; Haughton, Brian P; Mechem, C Crawford

    2012-09-01

    Dignitary Protection Medicine (DPM) is a new area of medical expertise that incorporates elements of virtually all medical and surgical specialties, drawing heavily from travel, tactical and expedition medicine. The fundamentals of DPM stem from the experiences of White House, State Department and other physicians who have traveled extensively with dignitaries. Furthermore, increased international travel of business executives and political dignitaries has mandated a need for proficiency in this realm. We sought to define the requisite knowledge base and skill sets that form the foundation of this new area of specialization.

  19. [Modern methods of prehospital bleeding management based on the experience and standards of tactical medicine].

    PubMed

    Kluj, Przemysław; Aleksandrowicz, Dawid; Machała, Waldemar; Gaszyński, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Isolated limb hemorrhage represents 60% of avoidable deaths and remains the leading cause of death in combat zone. Ideal tourniquet must be light, durable and cheap. They should completely stop the flow of arterial blood in the limb, and their attachment should be quick and easy. Tourniquets applied in correct location save lives by stopping the bleeding. Their use in civil environment appear to be particularly relevant in the mass casualties events. Modern bandages used by the military, were designed mostly in the form of an elastic bandage, which attachment has to be easy and quick. Sequential wrapping of elastic dressing around the wound produces compressive force which aim is to stem the bleeding by pressing vessel from the outside. Dressings are made of materials which adhere well to the wound, causing the seal and leave no fragments in the injured tissue. The combination of all components enables fast and effective application of the dressing in the most demanding conditions.

  20. [From the hospital in white to the pre-hospital in red].

    PubMed

    Marchal, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Having started out in the hospital sector, Christian Marchal has had a rewarding and original career. His credo: emergency assistance and the interest of the victims. As part of the fire and rescue service nursing corps, he has acquired skills and trained as a supervisor. PMID:26743369

  1. Experiential Learning in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care: A Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Vidar

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of 141 nursing students' diaries and focus group interviews about their work with an ambulance service revealed the following: holistic nursing played a role; they developed appreciation for paramedics' skills; and experiential learning helped them understand the complete care process from the emergency call to patient discharge. (SK)

  2. Lung ultrasound associated to capnography to verify correct endotracheal tube positioning in prehospital.

    PubMed

    Brun, Pierre-Marie; Bessereau, Jacques; Cazes, Nicolas; Querellou, Emgan; Chenaitia, Hichem

    2012-11-01

    Endotracheal intubation is the “gold standard” of the control of airway patency but is associated with nonnegligible morbidity rates. A rapid detection of esophageal intubation is essential. Capnography is considered the reference technique for correct endotracheal tube (ETT) positioning confirmation. However, capnography can provide false-positive and false-negative results in some situations. Recently, the ultrasound assessment has been studied for confirming ETT placement. Despite of few trials, the ultrasound procedure may enhance physician confidence and decision making in airway management. We report the case of a 52-year-old female patient presenting cardiorespiratory failure. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there was a sudden absence of end-tidal CO2 capnographic detection. Correct tube positioning could not be ascertained by auscultation because the environment had become extremely noisy. However, TM-mode (Time Motion--mode) lung ultrasound revealed bilateral pleural sliding during insufflation with the self-filling balloon, thus confirming correct ETT positioning.

  3. Educational and training systems in Sweden for prehospital response to acts of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Kulling, Per E J; Holst, Jonas E A

    2003-01-01

    Sweden has a long tradition in planning for disaster situations in which the National Board of Health and Welfare has a key responsibilty within the health sector. One important part of this disaster preparedness is education and training. Since 11 September 2001, much focus has been placed on the acts of terrorism with special reference to the effects of the use of chemical, biological, or nuclear/radiological (CBNR) agents. In the health sector, the preparedness for such situations is much the same as for other castastrophic events. The National Board of Health and Welfare of Sweden is a national authority under the government, and one of its responsibilities is planning and the provision of supplies for health and medical services, environmental health, and social services in case of war or crises. "Joint Central Disaster Committees" in each County Council/Region in the country are responsible for overseeing major incident planning for their respective counties/regions. The "Disaster Committee" is responsible for ensuring that: (1) plans are established and revised; (2) all personnel involved in planning receive adequate information and training; (3) equipment and supplies are available; and (4) maintenance arrangements are in place. Sweden adopts a "Total Defense" strategy, which means that it places a high value in preparing for peacetime and wartime major incidents. The Swedish Emergency Management Agency coordinates the civilian Total Defense strategy, and provides funding to the relevant responsible authority to this end. The National Board of Health and Welfare takes responsibility in this process. In this area, the main activities of the National Board of Health and Welfare are: (1) the establishment of national guidelines and supervision of standards in emergency and disaster medicine, social welfare, public health, and prevention of infectious diseases; (2) the introduction of new principles, standards, and equipment; (3) the conducting education and training programmes; and (4) the provision of financial support. The budget for National Board of Health and Welfare in this area is approximately 160 million SEK (US dollar 18 million). The National Board of Health and Welfare also provides funding to the County Councils/Regions for the training of healthcare professionals in disaster medicine and crises management by arranging (and financing) courses primarily for teachers and by providing financial support to the County Councils/Regions for providing their own educational and training programmes. The National Board of Health and Welfare provides funding of approximately 20 million SEK (US dollar 2.4 million) to the County Councils/Regions for this training of healthcare professionals in disaster medicine and crises. PMID:15141856

  4. Educational and training systems in Sweden for prehospital response to acts of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Kulling, Per E J; Holst, Jonas E A

    2003-01-01

    Sweden has a long tradition in planning for disaster situations in which the National Board of Health and Welfare has a key responsibilty within the health sector. One important part of this disaster preparedness is education and training. Since 11 September 2001, much focus has been placed on the acts of terrorism with special reference to the effects of the use of chemical, biological, or nuclear/radiological (CBNR) agents. In the health sector, the preparedness for such situations is much the same as for other castastrophic events. The National Board of Health and Welfare of Sweden is a national authority under the government, and one of its responsibilities is planning and the provision of supplies for health and medical services, environmental health, and social services in case of war or crises. "Joint Central Disaster Committees" in each County Council/Region in the country are responsible for overseeing major incident planning for their respective counties/regions. The "Disaster Committee" is responsible for ensuring that: (1) plans are established and revised; (2) all personnel involved in planning receive adequate information and training; (3) equipment and supplies are available; and (4) maintenance arrangements are in place. Sweden adopts a "Total Defense" strategy, which means that it places a high value in preparing for peacetime and wartime major incidents. The Swedish Emergency Management Agency coordinates the civilian Total Defense strategy, and provides funding to the relevant responsible authority to this end. The National Board of Health and Welfare takes responsibility in this process. In this area, the main activities of the National Board of Health and Welfare are: (1) the establishment of national guidelines and supervision of standards in emergency and disaster medicine, social welfare, public health, and prevention of infectious diseases; (2) the introduction of new principles, standards, and equipment; (3) the conducting education and training programmes; and (4) the provision of financial support. The budget for National Board of Health and Welfare in this area is approximately 160 million SEK (US dollar 18 million). The National Board of Health and Welfare also provides funding to the County Councils/Regions for the training of healthcare professionals in disaster medicine and crises management by arranging (and financing) courses primarily for teachers and by providing financial support to the County Councils/Regions for providing their own educational and training programmes. The National Board of Health and Welfare provides funding of approximately 20 million SEK (US dollar 2.4 million) to the County Councils/Regions for this training of healthcare professionals in disaster medicine and crises.

  5. [Pre-hospital management of adults with life-threatening emergencies].

    PubMed

    Wattel, Francis; Dubois, François

    2012-01-01

    In France, acute life-threatening situations are handled by the French Secours a Personne (assistance to persons) and emergency medical facilities. An unequivocal success, this early management of life-threatening emergency situations relies upon centralized call reception, medical dispatching, and immediate on-site emergency medical care. We describe the different emergency care providers and steps involved in the response to emergency situations. Each call centre (Samu, phone number 15; Sapeurs-Pompiers, 18) provides a response tailored to the nature of incoming calls for assistance. A check-list of grounds for an "automatic response" by the SDIS (Service Départemental d'Incendie et de Secours--the French fire brigade) is in use, ensuring that firefighters are often the first on the spot, while the knowledge and skills of the dispatching physician are essential to ascertain the patient's needs, to preserve life and vital functions, and to ensure the patient is sent to the appropriate emergency healthcare facility. In life-threatening emergency situations, patients must be brought straight to the appropriate reference emergency healthcare facility, as quickly as possible, without prior admittance to an emergency department. This is the procedure for extremely acute emergency situations in the following areas: trauma (multiple trauma and/or uncontrolled bleeding, spinal cord trauma), delivery bleeding, other life-threatening situations such as ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrest (sudden death), cerebrovascular stroke and ensuing brain damage, some acute respiratory situations such as anaphylactic shock, foreign-body inhalation, electrocution, drowning, drug overdose, certain forms of poisoning, and conditions requiring initial hyperbaric oxygen (diving accidents, acute carbon monoxide and smoke poisoning). The reasons for suboptimal emergency care in life-threatening situations are currently a major issue, with medical facilities being reduced in some areas, fewer voluntary firemen, hospital reorganization, tight funding, difficulties of medical dispatching, and the varying skills of "first-on-the-scene "emergency workers. Grievances include late emergency responses, inappropriate medical care, and dispatching to the wrong facility. This raises the question of equal opportunity for all in a country with widely varying geographic features and population density. Improvement in the system's efficiency will require a series of objectives to be met in varied and complementary--Enhanced functional coordination, by speeding up the deployment of the ANTARES digital radio-frequency transmission network (Adaptation Nationale des Transmissions Aux Risques Et aux Secours).--Implementation of a network of emergency services with varying degrees of emergency healthcare management related to the technical nature of the facilities. Three levels of emergency healthcare must be made available: level 1 is provided by local hospitals, level 2 includes support facilities available in general hospitals (not necessarily the nearest hospital), and level 3 provides specialized healthcare in large and/or training hospitals with specialized departments. Life-threatening emergency situations are to be handled by level 2 or 3 facilities. Specific facilities must be selected as reference centers. In France, the ARS (Agences Régionales de Santé) is in charge of this procedure, as it provide funding for healthcare continuity--Reducing inequalities in access to emergency care. This will involve improving the network of SDIS brigades, making local medical facilities more responsive, delegating more medical procedures, on-site telemedicine, providing more helicopters equipped with healthcare facilities, more automated external defibrillators, and more dedicated neuro-vascular units.--First aid training must be made widely available. The French National Academy of Medicine has approved ten recommendations regarding organization and facilities.

  6. [Modern methods of prehospital bleeding management based on the experience and standards of tactical medicine].

    PubMed

    Kluj, Przemysław; Aleksandrowicz, Dawid; Machała, Waldemar; Gaszyński, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Isolated limb hemorrhage represents 60% of avoidable deaths and remains the leading cause of death in combat zone. Ideal tourniquet must be light, durable and cheap. They should completely stop the flow of arterial blood in the limb, and their attachment should be quick and easy. Tourniquets applied in correct location save lives by stopping the bleeding. Their use in civil environment appear to be particularly relevant in the mass casualties events. Modern bandages used by the military, were designed mostly in the form of an elastic bandage, which attachment has to be easy and quick. Sequential wrapping of elastic dressing around the wound produces compressive force which aim is to stem the bleeding by pressing vessel from the outside. Dressings are made of materials which adhere well to the wound, causing the seal and leave no fragments in the injured tissue. The combination of all components enables fast and effective application of the dressing in the most demanding conditions. PMID:25771513

  7. Implementation phase of a multicentre prehospital telemedicine system to support paramedics: feasibility and possible limitations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legal regulations often limit the medical care that paramedics can provide. Telemedical solutions could overcome these limitations by remotely providing expert support. Therefore, a mobile telemedicine system to support paramedics was developed. During the implementation phase of this system in four German emergency medical services (EMS), the feasibility and possible limitations of this system were evaluated. Methods After obtaining ethical approval and providing a structured training program for all medical professionals, the system was implemented on three paramedic-staffed ambulances on August 1st, 2012. Two more ambulances were included subsequently during this month. The paramedics could initiate a consultation with EMS physicians at a teleconsultation centre. Telemedical functionalities included audio communication, real-time vital data transmission, 12-lead electrocardiogram, picture transmission on demand, and video streaming from a camera embedded into the ceiling of each ambulance. After each consultation, telephone-based debriefings were conducted. Data were retrieved from the documentation protocols of the teleconsultation centre and the EMS. Results During a one month period, teleconsultations were conducted during 35 (11.8%) of 296 emergency missions with a mean duration of 24.9 min (SD 12.5). Trauma, acute coronary syndromes, and circulatory emergencies represented 20 (57%) of the consultation cases. Diagnostic support was provided in 34 (97%) cases, and the administration of 50 individual medications, including opioids, was delegated by the teleconsultation centre to the paramedics in 21 (60%) missions (range: 1–7 per mission). No medical complications or negative interpersonal effects were reported. All applications functioned as expected except in one case in which the connection failed due to the lack of a viable mobile network. Conclusion The feasibility of the telemedical approach was demonstrated. Teleconsultation enabled early initiation of treatments by paramedics operating under the real-time medical direction. Teleconsultation can be used to provide advanced care until the patient is under a physician’s care; moreover, it can be used to support the paramedics who work alone to provide treatment in non-life-threatening cases. Non-availability of mobile networks may be a relevant limitation. A larger prospective controlled trial is needed to evaluate the rate of complications and outcome effects. PMID:23844941

  8. A new model for providing prehospital medical care in large stadiums.

    PubMed

    Spaite, D W; Criss, E A; Valenzuela, T D; Meislin, H W; Smith, R; Nelson, A

    1988-08-01

    To determine proper priorities for the provision of health care in large stadiums, we studied the medical incident patterns occurring in a major college facility and combined this with previously reported information from four other large stadiums. Medical incidents were an uncommon occurrence (1.20 to 5.23 per 10,000 people) with true medical emergencies being even more unusual (0.09 to 0.31 per 10,000 people). Cardiac arrest was rare (0.01 to 0.04 events per 10,000 people). However, the rates of successful resuscitation in three studies were 85% or higher. The previous studies were descriptive in nature and failed to provide specific recommendations for medical aid system configuration or response times. A model is proposed to provide rapid response of advanced life support care to victims of cardiac arrest. We believe that the use of this model in large stadiums throughout the United States could save as many as 100 lives during each football season. PMID:3394987

  9. [Lightning strikes and lightning injuries in prehospital emergency medicine. Relevance, results, and practical implications].

    PubMed

    Hinkelbein, J; Spelten, O; Wetsch, W A

    2013-01-01

    Up to 32.2% of patients in a burn center suffer from electrical injuries. Of these patients, 2-4% present with lightning injuries. In Germany, approximately 50 people per year are injured by a lightning strike and 3-7 fatally. Typically, people involved in outdoor activities are endangered and affected. A lightning strike usually produces significantly higher energy doses as compared to those in common electrical injuries. Therefore, injury patterns vary significantly. Especially in high voltage injuries and lightning injuries, internal injuries are of special importance. Mortality ranges between 10 and 30% after a lightning strike. Emergency medical treatment is similar to common electrical injuries. Patients with lightning injuries should be transported to a regional or supraregional trauma center. In 15% of all cases multiple people may be injured. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to create emergency plans and evacuation plans in good time for mass gatherings endangered by possible lightning.

  10. Comparison of HTK and hypertonic citrate to intraarterial cooling in human non-heart-beating kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C H; Asher, J F; Gupta, A; Vijayanand, D; Wyrley-Birch, H; Stamp, S; Rix, D A; Soomro, N; Manas, D M; Jaques, B C; Peaston, R; Talbot, D

    2007-03-01

    Intraarterial cooling (IAC) of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD) for renal donation requires a cheap, low-viscosity solution. HTK contains a high hydrogen ion buffer level that theoretically should reduce the observable acidosis associated with ongoing anaerobic metabolism. A retrospective comparison of all retrieved NHBD kidneys as well as of viability on the Organ Recovery Systems Lifeporter machine perfusion circuit was performed with respect to the preservation solution HTK or Marshall's HOC. Forty-two NHBD kidneys (19 HTK and 23 HOC) were machine perfused between February 2004 and May 2005. Most of the HTK kidneys were obtained from uncontrolled donors (12 vs 5; Fisher exact test, P = .01). As a consequence, the glutathione-s-transferase viability assay (411 vs 292 IU/L, P = .12) and the lactate concentrations (2.33 vs 1.94 mmol/L, P = .13) were higher among the HTK cohort. There was evidence of greater buffering capacity in HTK, since the lactate:hydrogen ion ratios were consistently lower during the first 2 perfusion hours (1 hour P = .03, 2 hour P = .02). A linear regression analysis confirmed that this was related to the IAC solution (ANCOVA, P < .001). All controlled donor kidneys passed viability testing and were transplanted. In contrast, 83% (10/12) of the uncontrolled donor kidneys preserved with HTK passed the viability test and were transplanted, compared with only 20% (1/5) of the HOC-treated comparators (Fisher exact test, P = .03). It may be concluded that the postulated advantages of improved pH buffering with HTK appear to have clinical relevance. PMID:17362727

  11. Bumetanide-sensitive NaCl uptake in rabbit tracheal epithelial cells is stimulated by neurohormones and hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, C M

    1992-05-01

    Loop diuretic-sensitive NaCl(K) cotransport plays a fundamental role in absorption and secretion of electrolytes in epithelial tissues. Cotransport activity was measured as uptake of 22Na, 36Cl, or 86Rb at 27 degrees C in isolated rabbit tracheal epithelial cells. Uptake of radiotracer was linear from 1 to 2 min after initiation of radiotracer transport. Bumetanide at 10 microM final concentration did not affect tracer uptake. The endogenous catecholamine l-epinephrine and alpha 2-adrenergic agent clonidine increased sodium and chloride uptake at least 5.5-fold. Bumetanide blocked sodium uptake by 85% and chloride uptake by 72%. 86Rb uptake was not affected by l-epinephrine, clonidine, or bumetanide. The alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine blocked the effects of l-epinephrine and clonidine on 22Na and 36Cl uptake. In Ca(2+)-depleted transport medium, baseline levels of sodium and chloride uptake increased 3.8- and 2.4-fold, respectively, in a bumetanide-independent manner. Nevertheless, l-epinephrine and clonidine induced a net stimulation of sodium and chloride uptake similar to that found in Ca(2+)-replete medium. This response was reduced by bumetanide and yohimbine. The Ca(2+)-elevating agent ionomycin increased bumetanide-sensitive sodium and chloride uptake 7.2- and 6.2-fold, respectively. Replacement of chloride with gluconate or sodium with N-methyl-D-glucamine in the extracellular medium inhibited l-epinephrine and clonidine-stimulated bumetanide-sensitive sodium and chloride uptake, respectively. Osmotic shrinkage in hyperosmotic (500 mM NaCl with all other electrolytes at normal concentration) transport medium markedly increased bumetanide-inhibitable sodium and chloride uptake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1590411

  12. Add-on treatment with nebulized hypertonic saline in a child with plastic bronchitis after the Glenn procedure*, **

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Grzegorz; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Glowacka, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB), although a rare cause of airway obstruction, has mortality rates up to 50% in children after Fontan-type cardiac surgery. We present the case of an 18-month-old female patient with PB following pneumonia. At 6 months of age, the patient underwent the Glenn procedure due to functionally univentricular heart. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed complete blockage of the left bronchus by mucoid casts. Pharmacotherapy consisted of glucocorticosteroids, azithromycin, and enalapril maleate. The child also received nebulized 3% NaCl solution, which proved to be beneficial. In children submitted to Fontan-type procedures, physicians must be alert for PB, which can be triggered by respiratory tract infection. PMID:24626275

  13. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and after-care for upper limb hypertonicity in adults: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Sheean, G; Lannin, N A; Turner-Stokes, L; Rawicki, B; Snow, B J

    2010-08-01

    Upper limb spasticity affecting elbow, wrist, and finger flexors can be safely and effectively reduced with injections of botulinum toxin type-A (BoNT-A). It has been best studied in adults in the context of post-stroke spasticity. The clinical benefits include reduction in pain and deformity, improvement in washing and dressing the upper limb, and a reduction in caregiver burden (Class I evidence, recommendation level A). Some patients show improvement in function performed by active movement of the affected upper limb (Class III evidence, recommendation C), but predicting and measuring this is difficult, and further research is needed. An individually based approach to treatment and outcome measurement is preferred (Class IV, recommendation U). More research is needed to resolve many unknown issues of assessment and treatment, using research methods appropriate to the question. PMID:20633180

  14. [Prehospital cardiac resuscitation in Queretaro, Mexico. Report of 3 cases. Importance of an integral emergency medical care system].

    PubMed

    Fraga-Sastrías, Juan Manuel; Aguilera-Campos, Andrea; Barinagarrementería-Aldatz, Fernando; Ortíz-Mondragón, Claudio; Asensio-Lafuente, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a health problem that represents 33,000 to 150,000 or more deaths per year. The few existent reports show mortality as high as 100% in contrast to some international reports that show higher survival rates. In Queretaro, during the last 5 years there were no successful resuscitation cases. However, in 2012 some patients were reported to have return of spontaneous circulation. We report in this article 3 cases with return of spontaneous circulation and pulse at arrival to the hospital. Two of the patients were discharged alive, one of them with poor cerebral performance category. Community cardiopulmonary resuscitation, early defibrillation and better emergency medical system response times, are related with survival. This poorly explored health problem in Queretaro could be increased with quality and good public education, bystander assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, police involvement in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, public access defibrillation programs and measurement of indicators and feedback for better results.

  15. [Telemedicine: Improving the quality of care for critical patients from the pre-hospital phase to the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Murias, G; Sales, B; García-Esquirol, O; Blanch, L

    2010-01-01

    The Health System is in crisis and critical care (from transport systems to the ICU) cannot escape from that. Lack of integration between ambulances and reference Hospitals, a deep shortage of critical care specialists and assigned economical resources that increase less than critical care demand are the cornerstones of the problem. Moreover, the analysis of the situation anticipated that the problem will be worse in the future. "Closed" ICUs in which critical care specialists direct patient care outperform "open" ones in which primary admitting physicians direct patient care in consultation with critical care specialists. However, the current paradigm in which a critical care specialist is close to the patient is in the edge of the trouble so, only a new paradigm could help to increase the number of patients under intensivist care. Current information technology and networking capabilities should be fully exploited to improve both the extent and quality of intensivist coverage. Far to be a replacement of the existing model Telemedicine might be a complimentary tool. In fact, to centralize medical data into servers has many additional advantages that could even improve the way in which critical care physicians take care of their patients under the traditional system. PMID:19811855

  16. Prehospital management of sarin nerve gas terrorism in urban settings: 10 years of progress after the Tokyo subway sarin attack.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Kikuchi, Makiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Stein, Gerald H

    2006-02-01

    Chemical agents have been used previously in wartime on numerous occasions, from World War I to the Gulf War. In 1994 and 1995, sarin nerve gas was used first in peacetime as a weapon of terrorism in Japan. The Tokyo subway sarin attack was the first large-scale disaster caused by nerve gas. A religious cult released sarin gas into subway commuter trains during morning rush hour. Twelve passengers died and about 5500 people were harmed. Sarin is a highly toxic nerve agent that can be fatal within minutes to hours. It causes the clinical syndrome of cholinergic hyperstimulation by inhibition of the crucial enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Therapy of nerve agent toxicity is divided into three categories, decontamination, respiratory support, and antidotes. All of these therapies may be given simultaneously. This article reviews toxicology and management of this acute chemical emergency. To help minimize the possible catastrophic impact on the public, we make several recommendations based on analysis of the Tokyo subway sarin attack and systematically review the current scientific literature.

  17. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  18. Pre-hospital assessment by a single responder: The Swedish ambulance nurse in a new role: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Carl; Källenius, Christofer; Knutsson, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Axelsson, Christer

    2016-05-01

    When a person with vague symptoms calls 112, the dispatchers often have difficulty prioritising the severity of the call. Their only alternative has been to send an ambulance. In Gothenburg, Sweden, a nurse-manned single responder (SR) was initiated to assess this patient group. The study aims to describe patient characteristics and assessment level made by the SR nurse among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority and/or vague symptoms. A consecutive journal review was conducted. During six months, 529 patients were assessed; 329 (62%) attended the emergency department (ED) or inpatient care (IC). Of these, 85 patients (26%) were assessed as high priority. Only 108 were assessed as being in need of ambulance transport. ED/IC patients were significantly older. Two hundred (38%) stayed at the scene (SS) (n = 142) or were referred to primary care (PC) (n = 58). Of the 200 SS/PC patients, 38 (19%) attended the ED within 72 hrs with residual symptoms, 20 of whom were admitted to a ward. Nine patients (4% of 200 SS/PC patients) required inpatient treatment and 11 patients stayed overnight for observation. These results suggest a relatively high level of patient safety and the usefulness of an SR among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority. PMID:26472522

  19. Prehospital care of burns: an analysis of 3 years use of the emergency physician system (EPS) Cologne.

    PubMed

    Lechleuthner, A; Schmidt-Barbo, A; Bouillon, B; Perbix, W; Holzki, J; Spilker, G

    1993-04-01

    Little information is available about the vital parameters of burns victims shortly after the accident. Therefore cases of burns, electrical and caustic injuries presenting to the Cologne Emergency Physician System over 3 years (n = 262) were prospectively studied and analysed. The average incidence in Cologne, Germany (population 1 million), of burns victims attended by the Emergency Medical System and emergency physicians at the scene was 74 adults and 14 children per year. Children are mainly injured by scalds (41.4 per cent); adults by fire accidents (43 per cent). A classification of the victims at the site of the accident according to their vital signs (Trauma Score (TS) after Champion H. R., Sacco W. J. and Carnazzo A. J. et al. (1981) Trauma Score. Crit. Care Med. 9, 672) showed, that in spite of a major burn injury, the vital signs were usually not or only slightly impaired. Subsequent measurements instituted by the emergency physician at the scene increased with decreasing initial TS. With TS = 14, 50 per cent of the patients were intubated; below 14 points nearly 100 per cent. The fluid administered also increased with a decreasing TS.

  20. Diagnosis and mortality in prehospital emergency patients transported to hospital: a population-based and registry-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Larsen, Thomas Mulvad; Jensen, Flemming Bøgh; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Hansen, Poul Anders; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge about patients after calling for an ambulance is limited to subgroups, such as patients with cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, trauma and stroke, while population-based studies including all diagnoses are few. We examined the diagnostic pattern and mortality among all patients brought to hospital by ambulance after emergency calls. Design Registry-based cohort study. Setting and participants We included patients brought to hospital in an ambulance dispatched after emergency calls during 2007–2014 in the North Denmark Region (580 000 inhabitants). We reported hospital diagnosis according to the chapters of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10), and studied death on days 1 and 30 after the call. Cohort characteristics and diagnoses were described, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate mortality and 95% CIs. Results In total, 148 757 patients were included, mean age 52.9 (SD 24.3) years. The most frequent ICD-10 diagnosis chapters were: ‘injury and poisoning’ (30.0%), and the 2 non-specific diagnosis chapters: ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (17.5%) and ‘factors influencing health status and contact with health services’ (14.1%), followed by ‘diseases of the circulatory system’ (10.6%) and ‘diseases of the respiratory system’ (6.7%). The overall 1-day mortality was 1.8% (CI 1.7% to 1.8%) and 30-day mortality 4.7% (CI 4.6% to 4.8%). ‘Diseases of the circulatory system’ had the highest 1-day mortality of 7.7% (CI 7.3% to 8.1%) accounting for 1209 deaths. After 30 days, the highest number of deaths were among circulatory diseases (2313), respiratory diseases (1148), ‘symptoms and abnormal findings, not elsewhere classified’ (1119) and ‘injury and poisoning’ (741), and 30 days mortality in percentage was 14.7%, 11.6%, 4.3% and 1.7%, respectively. Conclusions Patients' diagnoses from hospital stay after calling 1-1-2 in this population-based study were distributed across all ICD-10 chapters. Mortality varied widely between diagnostic groups. Non-specific diagnoses accounted for one-third of the patients and contributed to mortality in terms of total number of deaths. PMID:27377636

  1. [The study of partial tension of blood oxygen and forced expiration in patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis receiving inhalation of hypertonic salt solution].

    PubMed

    Kobylianskiĭ, V I; Litvinenko, I G; Petrova, T A; Burmistrova, M V; Bushkovskaia, O V

    2002-01-01

    To ascertain side effects of aerosol therapy which implies use of concentrated hypertensive salt solution (HSS), patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis (COB) and marked obstructive ventilation disturbances on HSS inhalation treatment were examined for PaO2 and bronchial patency. It was established that HSS inhalations do not affect PaO2 in COB patients. This expands opportunities for design of aerosol technology and its practical applications.

  2. Evidence for the promoting role of the intra-uterine kinin release in the development of late hypertonic saline-induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Makevnina, L G; Nikonov, A P; Goncharova, V N; Morozova, M S; Paskhina, T S

    1996-06-01

    Blood plasma kininogen (K), kininases (KS), kallikrein (KK), prekallikrein (PKK), and PGF2a were estimated in the common circulation of pregnant women during late saline-induced abortion and also in retroplacental blood after foetus delivery. The results provide evidence for intra-uterine kinin release from circulating blood K by locally activated KK from the very beginning of abortion. The greatest kinin release coincided with the strongest KS activity decrease at the time of foetus delivery. The pre-abortive KS levels correlated directly with abortus duration. Uterine PG biosynthesis was activated, but appeared to be a secondary process.

  3. Jacques Forestier's vanished bowstring sign in ankylosing spondylitis: a call to test its validity and possible relation to spinal myofascial hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Sierakowski, S; Kim, J M

    2005-01-01

    Jacques Forestier's bowstring sign (signe de la "corde de l'arc") in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) was described by him in his 1951 book (French). In free lateral bending, the early AS patient has palpably firm, contracted dorsolumbar muscles on the concave side, opposite to the findings in normals. Forestier described this sign as a common and characteristic finding in AS. Perplexingly, the sign is essentially unknown in the rheumatologic field. A single report (Polish) on electromyographic (EMG) findings in AS and control subjects documented the electromotor component of the bowstring sign as well as its diagnostic utility in early AS patients. In this paper, the literature on EMG studies in series of AS patients is reviewed as well as kinesiologic EMG studies of normals in lateral bending. Paravertebral and other muscle pathology in AS was reviewed in relation to the EMG findings. Critical, controlled assessment of Forestier's bowstring sign and biomechanical investigations of the dorsolumbar muscles in AS promise to offer new insights into the early physiopathogenesis of this unique disease.

  4. [Surgical care for the wounded in an armed conflict: the organization and support of first aid, prehospital and initial medical care (1)].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Gumanenko, E K; Samokhvalov, I M; Trusov, A A

    1999-06-01

    The article is devoted to surgical care organization to the battle casualties in Northern Caucasus, analysis of size and structure of "sanitary losses" (wounded in actions), questions of rendering first aid, battalion medical specialist aid and initial physician care. Gunshot wounds prevailed (64.1%) in the structure of battle surgical casualties. The blunt traumas and non-gunshot injuries have made of 33.2%, burns--4.1%, frost-bites--1.3%. The efficiency of medical care in this armed conflict is investigated on the own experience and retrospective analysis of graduated care to the 1030 casualties. Significance of duly rendering of the first aid to battle casualties is shown: the morality in this group had made 1.3%. Among wounded, which the first aid did not appear, the morality was of 7.0%.

  5. Development and Evaluation of Educational Materials for Pre-Hospital and Emergency Department Personnel on the Care of Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle, John J.; Migyanka, Joann M.; Glor-Scheib, Susan J.; Cramer, Ryan; Fratangeli, Jeffrey J.; Hegde, Gajanan G.; Shang, Jennifer; Venkat, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    With the rising prevalence of patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there has been an increase in the acute presentation of these individuals to the general health care system. Emergency medical services and emergency department personnel commonly address the health care needs of patients with ASD at times of crisis. Unfortunately, there…

  6. [Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and haemorrhagic shock at the end of the holidays: pre-hospital and in-hospital management of a gastrointestinal emergency].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tat, M; Hoffman, A; Marquardt, J U; Buggenhagen, H; Münzel, T; Kneist, W; Galle, P R; Kiesslich, R; Rey, J W

    2014-05-01

    Upon returning from holidays, a 55-year-old patient presenting with melena and haemorrhagic shock was admitted to a University hospital after receiving first emergency medical care in a German InterCity train. In an interdisciplinary effort, haemodynamics were stabilised and the airway and respiratory function were secured. Under emergency care conditions the patient then underwent an emergency upper GI endoscopy where a spurting arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Forrest 1a) was found. While the bleeding could not be controlled with endoscopic techniques, definitive haemostasis was achieved with a surgical laparotomy. While not commonly established for patients with severe GI bleeding, by spontaneous implementation of an interdisciplinary trauma room approach following established trauma algorithms the team was able to achieve stabilisation of vital functions and final control of bleeding in this highly unstable patient. Although the majority of upper gastrointestinal bleedings spontaneously cease, emergency care algorithms should be developed and implemented for patients with severe gastrointestinal bleedings in shock. Following the case vignette, we discuss a potential approach and develop an exemplary protocol for shock room management in this patient subgroup.

  7. The Effect of Emergency Medical Service Use and Inter-hospital Transfer on Prehospital Delay among Ischemic Stroke Patients: A Multicenter Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The time between symptom onset and arrival at an emergency department (ED) (S2D) is a crucial time for optimal intravenous reperfusion care for ischemic stroke. We aimed to analyze the effect of emergency medical services (EMS) utilization and inter-hospital transfer on S2D in Korea. Ischemic stroke patients were prospectively enrolled from November 2007 to December 2012 in 23 tertiary and teaching hospital EDs in Korea. Of 31,443 adult ischemic stroke patients, 20,780 were categorized into 4 groups based on modes of EMS utilization and inter-hospital transfer: direct transport to destination ED by EMS (EMS direct; n=6,257, 30.1%), transfer after transport to another ED by EMS (EMS indirect; n=754, 3.6%), direct transport to the ED without using EMS (non-EMS direct; n=8,928, 43.0%), and transfer after visiting another hospital without using EMS (non-EMS indirect; n=4,841, 23.3%). Our primary outcome variable was of S2D within 2 hr (S2D ≤2 hr) and found that 30.8% of all patients and 52.3%, 16.4%, 25.9%, and 13.9% of EMS direct, EMS indirect, non-EMS direct, and non-EMS indirect, respectively, achieved S2D ≤2 hr. Adjusted odds ratio for S2D ≤2 hr were 6.56 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.94-7.24), 2.27 (95% CI, 2.06-2.50), and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.87-1.33) for EMS direct, non-EMS direct, and EMS indirect, respectively. Patients directly transported to destination hospitals by the EMS show the highest proportion of therapeutic time window for optimal care in ischemic stroke. PMID:26770050

  8. Hospital and prehospital resources for optimal care of patients with burn injury: guidelines for development and operation of burn centers. American Burn Association.

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    Each year in the United States burn injuries result in more than 500,000 hospital emergency department visits and approximately 70,000 acute inpatient admissions. Most burn injuries are relatively minor, and patients are discharged following outpatient treatment at the medical facility where they are first seen. Of those patients with injuries serious enough to require hospitalization, about 20,000 are admitted directly or by referral to hospitals with special capabilities in the treatment of burn injury. Hospitals with these service capabilities are normally termed "burn centers." This document defines the system, organizational structure, personnel, program, and physical facilities involved in establishing the eligibility of hospitals with the capability of being identified as burn centers.

  9. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  10. Oslo government district bombing and Utøya island shooting July 22, 2011: The immediate prehospital emergency medical service response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background On July 22, 2011, a single perpetrator killed 77 people in a car bomb attack and a shooting spree incident in Norway. This article describes the emergency medical service (EMS) response elicited by the two incidents. Methods A retrospective and observational study was conducted based on data from the EMS systems involved and the public domain. The study was approved by the Data Protection Official and was defined as a quality improvement project. Results We describe the timeline and logistics of the EMS response, focusing on alarm, dispatch, initial response, triage and evacuation. The scenes in the Oslo government district and at Utøya island are described separately. Conclusions Many EMS units were activated and effectively used despite the occurrence of two geographically separate incidents within a short time frame. Important lessons were learned regarding triage and evacuation, patient flow and communication, the use of and need for emergency equipment and the coordination of helicopter EMS. PMID:22280935

  11. Computer-Assisted Learning Design for Reflective Practice Supporting Multiple Learning Styles for Education and Training in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Indra; Cookson, John

    2001-01-01

    Students in paramedic education used a model combining computer-assisted instruction (CAI), reflective practice, and learning styles. Although reflective practice normally requires teacher-student interaction, CAI with reflective practice embedded enabled students to develop learning style competencies and achieve curricular outcomes. (SK)

  12. Prehospital and in-hospital use of healthcare resources in patients surviving acute coronary syndromes: an analysis of the EPICOR registry

    PubMed Central

    Annemans, Lieven; Danchin, Nicolas; Van de Werf, Frans; Pocock, Stuart; Licour, Muriel; Medina, Jesús; Bueno, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this report is to provide insight into real-world healthcare resource use (HCRU) during the critical management of patients surviving acute coronary syndromes (ACS), using data from EPICOR (long-tErm follow-up of antithrombotic management Patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) (NCT01171404). Methods EPICOR was a prospective, multinational, observational study that enrolled 10 568 ACS survivors from 555 hospitals in 20 countries in Europe and Latin America, between September 2010 and March 2011. HCRU was evaluated in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS), with or without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Multivariable analysis was performed to determine factors that affected resource use. Results Before hospitalisation, more patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had their first ECG (44.1% vs 36.4%, p<0.0001) and received antithrombotic medication (26.6% vs 15.2%, p<0.0001). Patients with NSTE-ACS with prior CVD were less likely than those without to be catheterised (73.1% vs 82.8%, p<0.0001). More patients with STEMI than with NSTE-ACS had percutaneous coronary intervention (77.1% vs 54.9%, p<0.0001), but fewer underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (1.2% vs 3.7%, p<0.0001). Multivariable analysis showed that resource use, including length of hospital stay and coronary revascularisation, was significantly influenced by multiple factors, including ACS type, site characteristics and region (all p≤0.05). Conclusions In this large-scale, real-life study, findings were generally in line with clinical logic, although site characteristics and region still significantly affected resource use. Moreover, and unexpectedly, resource use tended to be slightly higher in patients without a history of CVD. Trial registration number NCT01171404 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:27127635

  13. Early-Onset Pneumonia in Non-Traumatic Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients with Special Focus on Prehospital Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Martin; von Auenmueller, Katharina Isabel; Amirie, Scharbanu; Sasko, Benjamin Michel; Brand, Michael; Trappe, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background More than half of all non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients die in the hospital. Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) has been described as one of the most common complications after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, the expanded use of alternative airway devices (AAD) might influence the incidence of EOP following OHCA. Material/Methods We analyzed data from all OHCA patients admitted to our hospital between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2014. EOP was defined as proof of the presence of a pathogenic microorganism in samples of respiratory secretions within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Results There were 252 patients admitted: 155 men (61.5%) and 97 women (38.5%), with a mean age of 69.1±13.8 years. Of these, 164 patients (77.6%) were admitted with an endotracheal tube (ET) and 62 (27.4%) with an AAD. We found that 36 out of a total of 80 respiratory secretion samples (45.0%) contained pathogenic microorganisms, with Staphylococcus aureus as the most common bacteria. Neither bacterial detection (p=0.765) nor survival rates (p=0.538) differed between patients admitted with ET and those with AAD. Conclusions Irrespective of increasing use of AAD, the incidence of EOP remains high. PMID:27295123

  14. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Logistic constraints on combat casualty care preclude traditional resuscitation strategies which can require volumes and weights 3 fold or greater than hemorrhaged volume. We present a review of quantitative analyses of clinical and animal data on small volume strategies using 1) hypertonic-hyperosmotic solutions (HHS); 2) hemoglobin based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) and 3) closed-loop infusion regimens.Methods and Results: Literature searches and recent queries to industry and academic researchers have allowed us to evaluate the record of 81 human HHS studies (12 trauma trials), 19 human HBOCs studies (3trauma trials) and two clinical studies of closed-loop resuscitation.There are several hundreds animal studies and at least 82 clinical trials and reports evaluating small volume7.2%-7.5% hypertonic saline (HS) most often combined with colloids, e.g., dextran (HSD) or hetastarch(HSS). HSD and HSS data has been published for 1,108 and 392 patients, respectively. Human studies have documented volume sparing and hemodynamic improvements. Meta-analyses suggest improved survival for hypotensive trauma patients treated with HSD with significant reductions in mortality found for patients with blood pressure < 70 mmHg, head trauma, and penetrating injury requiring surgery. HSD and HSS have received regulatory approval in 14 and 3 countries, respectively, with 81,000+ units sold. The primary reported use was head injury and trauma resuscitation. Complications and reported adverse events are surprisingly rare and not significantly different from other solutions.HBOCs are potent volume expanders in addition to oxygen carriers with volume expansion greater than standard colloids. Several investigators have evaluated small volume hyperoncotic HBOCs or HS-HBOC formulations for hypotensive and normotensive resuscitation in animals. A consistent finding in resuscitation with HBOCs is depressed cardiac output. There is some evidence that HBOCs more efficiently unload

  15. Medicine in the heart of the Antarctic: 1908–2001

    PubMed Central

    Guly, H

    2002-01-01

    Prehospital care in the United Kingdom rarely lasts more than a few hours other than in exceptional circumstances (for example, mountain and cave rescue, oil rigs). In other parts of the world hospitals may be much more distant and in expeditions to remote areas, prehospital care may extend to days or even weeks. When this occurs, the boundaries between primary care and prehospital care blur. PMID:12101139

  16. 77 FR 43601 - Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solutions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... INFORMATION: HES solutions are synthetic colloids administered intravenously to patients to maintain or expand..., sepsis, burns, or anaphylaxis. These products are used in the prehospital and hospital environment...

  17. 21 CFR 349.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... semipermeable membranes. Applied topically to the eye, a hypertonicity agent creates an osmotic gradient which draws water out of the cornea. (h) Isotonicity. A state or quality in which the osmotic pressure in two... flushing the eye. (g) Hypertonicity agent. An agent which exerts an osmotic gradient greater than...

  18. Battlefield Documentation of Tactical Combat Casualty Care in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Sauer, Samual W; Geracci, James J; Day, Charlie D; Kotwal, Russ S

    2016-01-01

    Performance improvement is reliant on information and data, as you cannot improve what you do not measure. The US military went to war in 2001 without an integrated trauma care system to collect and analyze combat casualty care data. By 2006, the conflict in Afghanistan began appreciating the capture and consolidation of hospital care documentation into the Department of Defense Trauma Registry. In contrast, a paucity of documentation has existed for prehospital or tactical combat casualty care (TCCC). Using the 75th Ranger casualty documentation model established in 2005, the Joint Trauma System developed a casualty data collection system for prehospital care using the TCCC Card, the TCCC After Action Report (AAR), and the Prehospital Trauma Registry. In 2013, this system was mandated for use by US forces in Afghanistan. The Joint Trauma System also created and deployed a prehospital team to be an integral part of the Joint Theater Trauma System in Afghanistan. This prehospital team provided prehospital training and facilitated prehospital data capture. Described and analyzed in this report are prehospital data captured in Afghanistan from 2013 to 2014 using the TCCC Card and the TCCC AAR. PMID:27215873

  19. Parallel effects of freezing and osmotic stress on the ATPase activity and protein composition of the plasma membrane of winter rye seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Matsuo; Steponkus, P.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of freezing versus hypertonic stress on the ATPase activity and polypeptide profile of the plasma membrane of nonacclimated winter rye leaves (Secale cereale L. cv Puma). Exposure of leaves to hypertonic sorbitol solutions resulted in a similar extent of injury as did freezing to subzero temperatures that resulted in equivalent osmotic stresses. When isolated with a two-phase partition system of aqueous polymers, the plasma membrane fractions of control, frozen, or hypertonically stressed leaves were of similar purity as judged by the distribution of marker enzyme activities. When assayed in the presence of Triton X-100 (0.05% w/w), ATPase activity was decreased only slightly in plasma membrane fractions isolated from either frozen or hypertonically