Science.gov

Sample records for prehospital trauma care

  1. Advances in prehospital trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Kelvin; Ramesh, Ramaiah; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital trauma care developed over the last decades parallel in many countries. Most of the prehospital emergency medical systems relied on input or experiences from military medicine and were often modeled after the existing military procedures. Some systems were initially developed with the trauma patient in mind, while other systems were tailored for medical, especially cardiovascular, emergencies. The key components to successful prehospital trauma care are the well-known ABCs of trauma care: Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Establishing and securing the airway, ventilation, fluid resuscitation, and in addition, the quick transport to the best-suited trauma center represent the pillars of trauma care in the field. While ABC in trauma care has neither been challenged nor changed, new techniques, tools and procedures have been developed to make it easier for the prehospital provider to achieve these goals in the prehospital setting and thus improve the outcome of trauma patients. PMID:22096773

  2. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  3. International comparison of prehospital trauma care systems.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Bahman S; Nathens, Avery B; Cameron, Peter; Civil, Ian; Gruen, Russel L; Koepsell, Thomas D; Lecky, Fiona E; Lefering, Rolf L; Liberman, Moishe; Mock, Charles N; Oestern, Hans-Jörg; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Waydhas, Christian; Rivara, Frederick P

    2007-09-01

    Given the recent emphasis on developing prehospital trauma care globally, we embarked upon a multicentre study to compare trauma patients' outcome within and between countries with technician-operated advanced life support (ALS) and physician-operated (Doc-ALS) emergency medical service (EMS) systems. These environments represent the continuum of prehospital care in high income countries with more advanced prehospital trauma care systems. Five countries with ALS-EMS system and four countries with Doc-ALS EMS system provided us with de-identified patient-level data from their national or local trauma registries. Generalised linear latent and mixed models was used in order to compare emergency department (ED) shock rate (systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90mmHg) and early trauma fatality rate (i.e. death during the first 24h after hospital arrival) between ALS and Doc-ALS EMS systems. Logistic regression was used to compare outcomes of interest among different countries, accounting for within-system correlation in patient outcomes. After adjustment for patient age, sex, type and mechanism of injury, injury severity score and SBP at scene, the ED shock rate did not vary significantly between Doc-ALS and ALS systems (OR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.73-1.91). However, the early trauma fatality rate was significantly lower in Doc-ALS EMS systems compared with ALS EMS systems (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.54-0.91). Furthermore, we found a considerable heterogeneity in patient outcomes among countries even with similar type of EMS systems. These findings suggest that prehospital trauma care systems that dispatch a physician to the scene may be associated with lower early trauma fatality rates, but not necessarily with significantly better outcomes on other clinical measures. The reasons for these findings deserve further studies.

  4. Effect of the prehospital trauma life support program (PHTLS) on prehospital trauma care.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Bedaysie, H; Williams, J I

    1997-05-01

    Improvement in trauma patient outcome has been demonstrated after the implementation of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. This study was aimed at identifying prehospital care factors that may explain this improvement. All patients transferred by ambulance to the major trauma referral hospital had assessment of airway control, oxygen use, cervical (C)-spine control, and hemorrhage control, as well as splinting of extremities during pre-PHTLS (July of 1990 to December of 1991; n = 332) and post-PHTLS periods (January of 1994 to June of 1995; n = 350). Pre-PHTLS data were compared with post-PHTLS data by chi 2 analysis with a p value < or = 0.05 being considered statistically significant. The frequency (%) increased in the post-PHTLS period for airway control (10 vs. 99.7%), C-spine control (2.1 vs. 89.4%), splinting of extremities (22 vs. 60.6%), hemorrhage control (16 vs. 96.9%), and oxygen use (6.6 vs. 89.5%) when no specific problem was identified. When a specific problem was identified in these areas, the post-PHTLS percentage also increased for airway control (16.2 vs. 100%), C-spine control (25 vs. 100%), splinting of extremities (33.9 vs. 100%), hemorrhage control (18 vs. 100%), and oxygen use (43.2 vs. 98.9%). Prehospital trauma care has changed after the introduction of the PHTLS program as indicated by more frequent airway control, use of oxygen, control of cervical (C)-spine and hemorrhage, as well as splinting of fractures. This finding was evident not only as a routine but particularly when a specific related problem was identified. This change in prehospital care could be responsible for the improved trauma patient outcome after PHTLS.

  5. Prehospital care for multiple trauma patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maegele, Marc

    2015-01-01

    For the German speaking countries, Tscherne's definition of "polytrauma" which represents an injury of at least two body regions with one or a combination being life-threatening is still valid. The timely and adequate management including quick referral of the trauma patient into a designated trauma center may limit secondary injury and may thus improve outcomes already during the prehospital phase of care. The professional treatment of multiple injured trauma patients begins at the scene in the context of a well structured prehospital emergency medical system. The "Primary Survey" is performed by the emergency physician at the scene according to the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS)-concept. The overall aim is to rapidly assess and treat life-threatening conditions even in the absence of patient history and diagnosis ("treat-first-what-kills-first"). If no immediate treatment is necessary, a "Secondary Sur- vey" follows with careful and structured body examination and detailed assessment of the trauma mechanism. Massive and life-threatening states of hemorrhage should be addressed immediately even disregarding the ABCDE-scheme. Critical trauma patients should be referred without any delay ("work and go")toTR-DGU® certified trauma centers of the local trauma networks. Due to the difficult pre- hospital environment the number of quality studies in the field is low and, as consequence, the level of evidence for most recommendations is also low. Much information has been obtained from different care systems and the interchangeability of results is limited. The present article provides a synopsis of rec- ommendations for early prehospital care for the severely injured based upon the 2011 updated multi- disciplinary S3-Guideline "Polytrauma/Schwerstverletzten Behandlung", the most recently updated European Trauma guideline and the current PHTLS-algorithms including grades of recommendation whenever possible.

  6. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  7. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Calderon-Miranda, Willem; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Blancas Rivera, Marco Antonio; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.  PMID:27162922

  8. National consensus on communication in prehospital trauma care, the DENIM study.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke Maria Karien; Geeraedts, Leo Maria George; Giannakopoulos, Georgios Fredericus; Terra, Maartje; Christiaans, Herman M T; Mokkink, Lidwine Brigitta; Bloemers, Frank Willem

    2017-07-11

    In the Netherlands prehospital trauma care is provided by emergency medical services (EMS) nurses. This care is extended by Physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (P-HEMS) for the more severely injured patient. Prehospital communication is a factor of influence on the identification of these patients and the dispatch of P-HEMS. Though prehospital communication it is often perceived to be incomplete and unstructured. To elucidated factors of influence on prehospital triage and the identification of the severely injured patient a Delphi study was performed. A three round modified Delphi study was designed to explore concepts amongst experts in prehospital trauma care. P-HEMS physicians/nurses, trauma surgeons, EMS nurses and dispatch center operators where asked to state their opinion regarding identification of the poly trauma patient, trauma patient characteristics, prehospital communication and prehospital handover. Seventy-one panellist completed all three rounds. For the first round seven cases and 13 theses were presented. From the answers/argumentation the second round was build, in which 68 theses had to be ranked within four principle themes: factors that influence prehospital communication, critical information for proper handover, factors influencing collaboration and how training/education can influence this. Out of these answers the third survey was build, focussing on determining the exact content of a prehospital trauma handover. The majority of the panellists agreed to a set of parameters resulting in a new model of inter-professional hand over regarding prehospital trauma patients. Exact identification of the poly trauma patient in need of care by P-HEMS is difficult though prehospital communication and the prehospital handover may be improved. The respondents report that prehospital communication needs to be unambiguous to improve trauma care. Consensus was reached on a set of ten parameters that should minimally be handed over with

  9. [Standardised primary care of multiple trauma patients. Prehospital Trauma Life Support und Advanced Trauma Life Support].

    PubMed

    Wölfl, C G; Gliwitzky, B; Wentzensen, A

    2009-10-01

    Standardised management improves treatment results in seriously injured patients. For conditions like stroke or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) there are set treatment pathways which have been established for prehospital and primary hospital care. The treatment of critical trauma patients, however, follows varying procedures in both the prehospital and primary hospital phases. From an analysis of the trauma register of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU), we know that a seriously injured patient remains on the road for 70 min on average before transferral to hospital. This requires improvement. With the 2003 introduction of the ATLS programme in Germany, the initial clinical phase could be improved upon simply by means of standardised training. PHTLS und ATLS complement one another. PHTLS und ATLS represent training concepts which teach standardised, priority-based prehospital and hospital trauma management. The aim is to make an initial rapid and accurate assessment of the patient's condition, thereby identifying the"critical" patient. The concepts also make priority-based treatment possible and facilitate decision-making as to whether patients can receive further on-the-spot treatment or whether immediate transport is necessary. The procedure is identical in the shock room. The primary consideration is to prevent secondary damage, not to lose track of time and to ensure consistent quality of care. The courses teach systematic knowledge, techniques, skills and conduct in diagnosis and therapy. The courses are oriented to all medical specialities associated with trauma care. With the support of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) and the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Medicine (DGAI), the German Professional Organisation of Rescue Services (DBRD) has adopted the PHTLS course system on licence from the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and has been offering it in

  10. The identification of criteria to evaluate prehospital trauma care using the Delphi technique.

    PubMed

    Rosengart, Matthew R; Nathens, Avery B; Schiff, Melissa A

    2007-03-01

    Current trauma system performance improvement emphasizes hospital- and patient-based outcome measures such as mortality and morbidity, with little focus upon the processes of prehospital trauma care. Little data exist to suggest which prehospital criteria should serve as potential filters. This study identifies the most important filters for auditing prehospital trauma care using a Delphi technique to achieve consensus of expert opinion. Experts in trauma care from the United States (n = 81) were asked to generate filters of potential utility in monitoring the prehospital aspect of the trauma system, and were then required to rank these questions in order of importance to identify those of greatest importance. Twenty-eight filters ranking in the highest tertile are proposed. The majority (54%) pertains to aspects of emergency medical services, which comprise 7 of the top 10 (70%) filters. Triage filters follow in priority ranking, comprising 29% of the final list. Filters concerning interfacility transfers and transportation ranked lowest. This study identifies audit filters representing the most important aspects of prehospital trauma care that merit continued evaluation and monitoring. A subsequent trial addressing the utility of these filters could potentially enhance the sensitivity of identifying deviations in prehospital care, standardize the performance improvement process, and translate into an improvement in patient care and outcome.

  11. Prehospital trauma care reduces mortality. Ten-year results from a time-cohort and trauma audit study in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Blunt implementation of Western trauma system models is not feasible in low-resource communities with long prehospital transit times. The aims of the study were to evaluate to which extent a low-cost prehospital trauma system reduces trauma deaths where prehospital transit times are long, and to identify specific life support interventions that contributed to survival. Methods In the study period from 1997 to 2006, 2,788 patients injured by land mines, war, and traffic accidents were managed by a chain-of-survival trauma system where non-graduate paramedics were the key care providers. The study was conducted with a time-period cohort design. Results 37% of the study patients had serious injuries with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9. The mean prehospital transport time was 2.5 hours (95% CI 1.9 - 3.2). During the ten-year study period trauma mortality was reduced from 17% (95% CI 15 -19) to 4% (95% CI 3.5 - 5), survival especially improving in major trauma victims. In most patients with airway problems, in chest injured, and in patients with external hemorrhage, simple life support measures were sufficient to improve physiological severity indicators. Conclusion In case of long prehospital transit times simple life support measures by paramedics and lay first responders reduce trauma mortality in major injuries. Delegating life-saving skills to paramedics and lay people is a key factor for efficient prehospital trauma systems in low-resource communities. PMID:22304808

  12. [Prehospital trauma care training course. Integration of emergency physician and rescue services].

    PubMed

    Kopschina, C; Stangl, R

    2008-08-01

    With the emergence of a trauma network in the metropolitan area of Nuremberg, Germany, the question arose whether prehospital trauma management and emergency department management could be better integrated. A training scheme was designed for prehospital trauma care by the rescue services of the Workers' Samaritan Federation Germany (ASB), the Bavarian Red Cross, Maltese Ambulance, St. Johns Ambulance, representatives of the emergency physicians, and physicians of Rummelsberg Hospital. A detailed search of the international literature was done for all subjects regarding prehospital trauma management, and the American training systems (ITLS, PHTLS) were studied. The review was followed by a critical evaluation of the reality of on site-care, and the German and American systems were compared. A 2-day course with 6 sessions (accident place and kinetics, trauma investigation, pathologies, resuscitation, practical training, and evaluation) was developed, adapted from the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) algorithm. Special attention was given to the integration and position of the emergency physician in Germany, as well as to the defined authority of the rescue services. Conversion into practice was facilitated by teamwork. The course is free of charge to all rescue services and members of the concept group. With a qualified prehospital system that works smoothly with the ATLS concepts, improved prehospital care for trauma patients seems possible.

  13. [Prehospital care to multiple victims with simulated trauma].

    PubMed

    Simões, Romeo Lages; Duarte Neto, Caio; Maciel, Gustavo Sasso Benso; Furtado, Tatiana Piotz; Paulo, Danilo Nagib Salomão

    2012-01-01

    To assess the quality of prehospital care agencies conducted in Vitória, capital of Espírito Santo State, Brazil. We conducted a retrospective study in the archives of the League of Academic Surgery and Trauma Care of Espírito Santo (Lacates) regarding 40 victims of a simulated crash between a bus and two cars. The patients were treated by four teams: Military Fire Department of Espírito Santo, Samu 192, County Guard and Civil Defense. The performance of these teams was evaluated by Lacates, through analysis of a check-list with pre-established guidelines for each victim. The Fire Department of Espírito Santo (CBMES), which extricated victims, outlined the danger zones and carried out the screening by the method START, acted correctly in 92.5% of cases. The Samu 192 victims, which attended victims by the mnemonic method (ABCDE) in medical outposts, acted correctly in 92.5% of cases in the category Airway; 97.5% in breathing, 92.5% in circulation, 90% in Neurological Assessment, and 50% in the Exhibition and Environmental Control. The analysis showed that the ABCDE care was correct in 42.5% of cases. The transport of patients was performed correctly in 95% of cases. The County Guard secured the patency of the avenues for transportation of patients and Civil Defense successfully coordinated the work of teams involved in the command post. The triage and transport of victims have been performed satisfactorily. However, more attention should be given to exposure and hypothermia protection of victims, since this item compromised treatment.

  14. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  15. Prehospital trauma care education for first responders in India.

    PubMed

    Aekka, Apoorva; Abraham, Rohit; Hollis, Michael; Boudiab, Elizabeth; Laput, Gieric; Purohit, Harshadha; Kumar, Richa; Vyas, Arpita; Basson, Marc; Vyas, Dinesh

    2015-08-01

    A major factor contributing to global trauma mortality and morbidity is the lack of effective prehospital trauma services in developing settings. We developed a 2-d training course for nondoctor first responders featuring high-fidelity simulation and video-assisted debriefing, self-directed learning videos, and native language instruction. A pilot session was conducted in Jodhpur, Rajasthan. Eighteen local instructors were recruited to train 48 layperson first responders in 10 essential subjects. Didactic sessions of 15-20 min consisting of self-directed learning videos were followed by 30-40 min skill sessions featuring high-fidelity simulation, and concluded with 15-20 min video-debriefing periods. Changes in competence were evaluated using pretraining and posttraining surveys. Results demonstrated that statistically significant competence increases in all areas of trauma management assessed: airway (t[46] = 7.30, P < 0.000), hemorrhage (t[46] = 9.96, P < 0.000), fractures (t[46] = 9.22, P < 0.000), cervical spine injury (t[46] = 12.12, P = 0.000), chest injury (t[46] = 7.84, P < 0.000), IV line placement (t[46] = 4.36, P < 0.000), extrication (t[46] = 2.81, P < 0.005), scene assessment (t[46] = 7.06, P < 0.000), triage (t[46] = 5.92, P < 0.000), and communication (t[46] = 5.56, P < 0.000). Highest increases in competence were observed in cervical spine injury and hemorrhage management, with lowest increases in IV line placement and extrication. Results suggest this approach may be effective in imparting prehospital trauma management concepts to layperson first responders. This study highlights an innovative educational avenue through which trauma management capacity can be enhanced in developing settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS): An interdisciplinary training in preclinical trauma care].

    PubMed

    Wölfl, C G; Bouillon, B; Lackner, C K; Wentzensen, A; Gliwitzky, B; Gross, B; Brokmann, J; Hauer, T

    2008-09-01

    There is clinical evidence that standardized management of trauma patients in the emergency department improves outcome. Standardized prehospital management has been established for stroke patients and those suffering acute coronary syndrome. Prehospital treatment of trauma patients differs quite significantly from one system to another. The data from the German Trauma Registry show that the average time from accident until arrival in the emergency department is 72 min. This needs improvement. PHTLS is a training course that teaches a systematic approach to the trauma patient in the preclinical setting. The aim is to rapidly and accurately assess the patient's physiologic status, treat according to priorities, and decide whether the patient is critical and needs rapid rescue and transport. Above all, it is important for caregivers to prevent secondary injury, to realize the relevance of timing in the initial treatment, and to assure a high standard of care. PHTLS provides the participant with knowledge, skills, and necessary behaviors. The course is open to persons in all specialties involved in the initial management of severely injured patients. The German Board of Emergency Technicians e.V. inaugurated the course concept in cooperation with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and is authorized to organize PHTLS courses in Germany. PHTLS teaches a standardized and established approach to the trauma patient in the emergency department. It has been established in 36 countries and the content is reviewed regularly to consider new scientific evidence. Healthcare personnel in Germany have the chance to participate in this international standard of care and to introduce their own experiences into the review process.

  17. Low-cost improvements in prehospital trauma care in a Latin American city.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Risa, C; Mock, C N; Lojero-Wheatly, L; de la Cruz, O; Garcia, C; Canavati-Ayub, F; Jurkovich, G J

    2000-01-01

    Prehospital care is a critical component of efforts to lower trauma mortality. In less-developed countries, scarce resources dictate that any improvements in prehospital care must be low in cost. In one Latin American city, recent efforts to improve prehospital care have included an increase in the number of sites of ambulance dispatch from two to four and introduction of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course. The effect of increased dispatch sites was evaluated by comparing response times before and after completion of the change. The effect of PHTLS was evaluated by comparing prehospital treatment for the 3 months before initiation of the course (n = 361 trauma patients) and the 6 months after (n = 505). Response time decreased from a mean of 15.5 +/- 5.1 minutes, when there were two sites of dispatch, to 9.5 +/- 2.7 minutes, when there were four sites. Prehospital trauma care improved after initiation of the PHTLS course. For all trauma patients, use of cervical immobilization increased from 39 to 67%. For patients in respiratory distress, there were increases in the use of oropharyngeal airways (16-39%), in the use of suction (10-38%), and in the administration of oxygen (64-87%). For hypotensive patients, there was an increase in use of large-bore intravenous lines from 26 to 58%. The improved prehospital treatment did not increase the mean scene time (5.7 +/- 4.4 minutes before vs. 5.9 +/- 6.8 minutes after). The percent of patients transported who died in route decreased from 8.2% before the course to 4.7% after. These improvements required a minimal increase (16%) in the ambulance service budget. Increase in sites of dispatch and increased training in the form of the PHTLS course improved the process of pre-hospital care in this Latin American city and resulted in a decrease in prehospital deaths. These improvements were low cost and should be considered for use in other less developed countries.

  18. Pre-hospital trauma care in road traffic accidents in kashan, iran.

    PubMed

    Paravar, Mohammad; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Salehi, Shayesteh; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Shojaee, Abolfazl; Akbari, Hossein; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat

    2013-01-01

    Iran has one of the highest rates of road traffic accidents (RTAs) worldwide. Pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize many instances of traffic-related mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of pre-hospital care in patients who were injured in RTAs, admitted to hospital. The focus was mainly directed at evaluating pre-hospital trauma care provided in city streets and roads out of the city. This retrospective study was carried out on all trauma patients, transported by the emergency medical service (EMS) system, who were admitted to Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital during the period from March 2011 to March 2012. The patients' demographic data, location of accident, damaged organs, mechanism of injury, injury severity, pre-hospital times (response, scene, transport), pre-hospital interventions and outcomes, were extracted from the data registry and analyzed through descriptive statistics using SPSS 18 software. Findings of this study showed that, 75% of RTAs occurred on city streets (n = 1 251). Motor-car accidents were the most frequent mechanism of RTA on city streets (n = 525) (42%), while car rollover was the most frequent mechanism of RTA on roads out of the city (n = 155) (44.4%). The mean pre-hospital time intervals (min); response, scene, and transport for all patients were 6.6 ± 3.1, 10.7 ± 5 and 13 ± 9.8, respectively. The mean pre-hospital time intervals (response, scene, transport) in roads out of the city were higher than those in city streets. There was a significant difference (P = 0.04) in the mortality rates due to RTAs between city streets (n = 46) and roads out of the city (n = 32). In comparison with road traffic accidents on city streets, trauma patients in RTAs on roads out of the city have longer pre-hospital time intervals and more severe injuries; therefore, this group needs more pre-hospital resuscitation interventions.

  19. Cost-effectiveness and benefit of alternatives to improve training for prehospital trauma care in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Herrera-Escamilla, Alejandro J; Contreras, Ismael; Vargas, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    In Latin America, there is a preponderance of prehospital trauma deaths. However, scarce resources mandate that any improvements in prehospital medical care must be cost-effective. This study sought to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of several approaches to improving training for personnel in three ambulance services in Mexico. In Monterrey, training was augmented with PreHospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) at a cost of [US] dollar 150 per medic trained. In San Pedro, training was augmented with Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), and a locally designed airway management course, at a cost of dollar 400 per medic. Process and outcome of trauma care were assessed before and after the training of these medics and at a control site. The training was effective for both intervention services, with increases in basic airway maneuvers for patients in respiratory distress in Monterrey (16% before versus 39% after) and San Pedro (14% versus 64%). The role of endotrachal intubation for patients with respiratory distress increased only in San Pedro (5% versus 46%), in which the most intensive Advanced Life Support (ALS) training had been provided. However, mortality decreased only in Monterrey, where it had been the highest (8.2% before versus 4.7% after) and where the simplest and lowest cost interventions were implemented. There was no change in process or outcome in the control site. This study highlights the importance of assuring uniform, basic training for all prehospital providers. This is a more cost-effective approach than is higher-cost ALS training for improving prehospital trauma care in environments such as Latin America.

  20. [Essential measures for prehospital treatment of severely injured patients: The trauma care bundle].

    PubMed

    Matthes, G; Trentzsch, H; Wölfl, C G; Paffrath, T; Flohe, S; Schweigkofler, U; Ekkernkamp, A; Schulz-Drost, S

    2015-08-01

    In order to ensure adequate treatment and to avoid complications, care bundles are increasingly being implemented. These are comprehensive and evidence-based procedures for the treatment of individual diseases or injuries which should be carried out for every patient. The aim of this study was to define a care bundle for the prehospital treatment of severely injured patients. The scientific contents of the bundle were gathered from the interdisciplinary evidence-based S3 guidelines for the treatment of severely injured patients by the German Trauma Society. The ABCDE scheme suggested by the prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS®) and the advanced trauma life support (ATLS®) functioned as a matrix for the individual elements in the bundles. The identified elements were finalized by a consensus process. A bundle of six elements was suggested and a comprehensive summary of key items during prehospital management of severely injured patients was identified. In a next step the effectiveness of the care bundle should be evaluated in a clinical trial.

  1. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany – who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. Methods PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. Results 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p < 0.001) more deficits in their professional training than paramedics. 80% of the paramedics affirmed to have had adequate training with respect to prehospital trauma care, all physicians claimed not to have had sufficient training for prehospital trauma care situations at Medical School. Physicians were statistically most significant dissatisfied then paramedics (p < 0.001). While most participants gave positive feedback, anesthetists were less convinced of PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn’t benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p < 0.001). After PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. Conclusion The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital

  2. PHTLS ® (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) provider courses in Germany - who takes part and what do participants think about prehospital trauma care training?

    PubMed

    Frank, Christian B; Wölfl, Christoph G; Hogan, Aidan; Suda, Arnold J; Gühring, Thorsten; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Münzberg, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine PHTLS Provider courses in Germany and to proof the assumption that formation of physicians and paramedics in prehospital trauma care can be optimized. PHTLS participants were asked to fill out standardized questionnaires during their course preparation and directly after the course. There were some open questions regarding their professional background and closed questions concerning PHTLS itself. Further questions were to be answered on an analog scale in order to quantify subjective impressions of confidence, knowledge and also to describe individual levels of education and training. 247 questionnaires could be analyzed. Physicians noted significant (p < 0.001) more deficits in their professional training than paramedics. 80% of the paramedics affirmed to have had adequate training with respect to prehospital trauma care, all physicians claimed not to have had sufficient training for prehospital trauma care situations at Medical School. Physicians were statistically most significant dissatisfied then paramedics (p < 0.001). While most participants gave positive feedback, anesthetists were less convinced of PHTLS (p = 0.005), didn't benefit as much as the rest (p = 0.004) and stated more often, that the course was of less value for their daily work (p = 0.03). After the course confidence increased remarkably and reached higher rates than before the course (p < 0.001). After PHTLS both groups showed similar ratings concerning the course concept indicating that PHTLS could equalize some training deficits and help to gain confidence and assurance in prehospital trauma situations. 90% of the paramedics and 100% of the physicians would recommend PHTLS. Physicians and especially anesthetists revised their opinions with regard to providing PHTLS at Medical School after having taken part in a PHTLS course. The evaluation of PHTLS courses in Germany indicates the necessity for special prehospital trauma care training. Paramedics and

  3. Improving prehospital trauma care in Rwanda through continuous quality improvement: an interrupted time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Nyinawankusi, Jeanne D'Arc; Enumah, Samuel; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; Hu, Yihan; Kabagema, Ignace; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Riviello, Robert; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Injury is a major cause of premature death and disability in East Africa, and high-quality pre-hospital care is essential for optimal trauma outcomes. The Rwandan pre-hospital emergency care service (SAMU) uses an electronic database to evaluate and optimize pre-hospital care through a continuous quality improvement programme (CQIP), beginning March 2014. The SAMU database was used to assess pre-hospital quality metrics including supplementary oxygen for hypoxia (O2), intravenous fluids for hypotension (IVF), cervical collar placement for head injuries (c-collar), and either splinting (splint) or administration of pain medications (pain) for long bone fractures. Targets of >90% were set for each metric and daily team meetings and monthly feedback sessions were implemented to address opportunities for improvement. These five pre-hospital quality metrics were assessed monthly before and after implementation of the CQIP. Met and unmet needs for O2, IVF, and c-collar were combined into a summative monthly SAMU Trauma Quality Scores (STQ score). An interrupted time series linear regression model compared the STQ score during 14 months before the CQIP implementation to the first 14 months after. During the 29-month study period 3,822 patients met study criteria. 1,028 patients needed one or more of the five studied interventions during the study period. All five endpoints had a significant increase between the pre-CQI and post-CQI periods (p<0.05 for all), and all five achieved a post-CQI average of at least 90% completion. The monthly composite STQ scores ranged from 76.5 to 97.9 pre-CQI, but tightened to 86.1-98.7 during the post-CQI period. Interrupted time series analysis of the STQ score showed that CQI programme led to both an immediate improvement of +6.1% (p=0.017) and sustained monthly improvements in care delivery-improving at a rate of 0.7% per month (p=0.028). The SAMU experience demonstrates the utility of a responsive, data-driven quality improvement

  4. Pre-hospital trauma care resources for road traffic injuries in a middle-income country--a province based study on need and access in Iran.

    PubMed

    Haghparast Bidgoli, Hassan; Bogg, Lennart; Hasselberg, Marie

    2011-09-01

    Access to pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize many of traffic related mortality and morbidity in low- and middle-income countries with high rate of traffic deaths such as Iran. The aim of this study was to assess if the distribution of pre-hospital trauma care facilities reflect the burden of road traffic injury and mortality in different provinces in Iran. This national cross-sectional study is based on ecological data on road traffic mortality (RTM), road traffic injuries (RTIs) and pre-hospital trauma facilities for all 30 provinces in Iran in 2006. Lorenz curves and Gini coefficients were used to describe the distributions of RTM/RTIs and pre-hospital trauma care facilities across provinces. Spearman rank-order correlation was performed to assess the relationship between RTM/RTI and pre-hospital trauma care facilities. RTM and RTIs as well as pre-hospital trauma care facilities were distributed unequally between different provinces. There was no significant association between the rate of RTM and RTIs and the number of pre-hospital trauma care facilities across the country. The distribution of pre-hospital trauma care facilities does not reflect the needs in terms of RTM and RTIs for different provinces. These results suggest that traffic related mortality and morbidity could be reduced if the needs in terms of RTM and RTIs were taken into consideration when distributing pre-hospital trauma care facilities between the provinces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prehospital trauma care systems: potential role toward reducing morbidities and mortalities from road traffic injuries in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeloye, Davies

    2012-12-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) and attendant fatalities on Nigerian roads have been on an increasing trend over the past three decades. Mortality from RTIs in Nigeria is estimated to be 162 deaths/100,000 population. This study aims to compare and identify best prehospital trauma care practices in Nigeria and some other African countries where prehospital services operate. A review of secondary data, grey literature, and pertinent published articles using a conceptual framework to assess: (1) policies; (2) structures; (3) first responders; (4) communication facilities; (5) transport and ambulance facilities, and (6) roadside emergency trauma units. There is no national prehospital trauma care system (PTCS) in Nigeria. The lack of a national emergency health policy is a factor in this absence. The Nigerian Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) mainly has been responsible for prehospital services. South Africa, Zambia, Kenya, and Ghana have improved prehospital services in Africa. Commercial drivers, laypersons, military, police, a centrally controlled communication network, and government ambulance services are feasible delivery models that can be incorporated into the Nigerian prehospital system. Prehospital trauma services have been useful in reducing morbidities and mortalities from traffic injuries, and appropriate implementation of this study's recommendations may reduce this burden in Nigeria.

  6. Comparison between two mobile pre-hospital care services for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Pre-hospital care (PH) in Brazil is currently in the phase of implementation and expansion, and there are few studies on the impacts of this public health service. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of care and severity of trauma among the population served, using trauma scores, attendance response times, and mortality rates. This work compares two pre-hospital systems: the Mobile Emergency Care Service, or SAMU 192, and the Fire Brigade Group, or CB. Method Descriptive study evaluating all patients transported by both systems in Catanduva, SP, admitted to a single hospital. Results 850 patients were included, most of whom were men (67.5%); the mean age was 38.5 ± 18.5 years. Regarding the use of PH systems, most patients were transported by SAMU (62.1%). The trauma mechanisms involved motorcycle accidents in 32.7% of cases, transferred predominantly by SAMU, followed by falls (25.8%). Regarding the response time, CB showed the lowest rates. In relation to patient outcome, only 15.5% required hospitalization. The average score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 14.7 ± 1.3; average RTS was 7.7 ± 0.7; ISS 3.8 ± 5.9; and average TRISS 97.6 ± 9.3. The data analysis showed no statistical differences in mortality between the groups studied (SAMU - 1.5%; CB - 2.5%). The trauma scores showed a higher severity of trauma among the fatal victims. Conclusion Trauma victims are predominantly young and male; the trauma mechanism that accounted for the majority of PH cases was motorcycle accidents; CB responded more quickly than SAMU; and there was no statistical difference between the services of SAMU and CB in terms of severity of the trauma and mortality rates. PMID:23531089

  7. An Intelligent Ecosystem for Providing Support in Prehospital Trauma Care in Cuenca, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Timbi-Sisalima, Cristian; Rodas, Edgar B; Salamea, Juan C; Sacoto, Hernán; Monje-Ortega, Diana; Robles-Bykbaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    According to facts given by the World Health Organization, one in ten deaths worldwide is due to an external cause of injury. In the field of pre-hospital trauma care, adequate and timely treatment in the golden period can impact the survival of a patient. The aim of this paper is to show the design of a complete ecosystem proposed to support the evaluation and treatment of trauma victims, using standard tools and vocabulary such as OpenEHR, as well as mobile systems and expert systems to support decision-making. Preliminary results of the developed applications are presented, as well as trauma-related data from the city of Cuenca, Ecuador.

  8. Prevalence of Prehospital Hypoxemia and Oxygen Use in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    2008; 12(Suppll): Sl-52. 10. Care CoTCC: Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guidelines. November I, 2010. Available at http://www.naemt.org/Libraries/ PHTLS ...Prehospital Trauma Life Support Committee, Arilerican College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. PHTLS : Prehospital Trauma Life Support. Ed 6. St

  9. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. Methods A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Conclusions Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process. PMID:21059243

  10. Barriers and facilitators to provide effective pre-hospital trauma care for road traffic injury victims in Iran: a grounded theory approach.

    PubMed

    Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Hasselberg, Marie; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Johansson, Eva

    2010-11-08

    Road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem. Improvements in pre-hospital trauma care can help minimize mortality and morbidity from road traffic injuries (RTIs) worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with a high rate of RTIs such as Iran. The current study aimed to explore pre-hospital trauma care process for RTI victims in Iran and to identify potential areas for improvements based on the experience and perception of pre-hospital trauma care professionals. A qualitative study design using a grounded theory approach was selected. The data, collected via in-depth interviews with 15 pre-hospital trauma care professionals, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Seven categories emerged to describe the factors that hinder or facilitate an effective pre-hospital trauma care process: (1) administration and organization, (2) staff qualifications and competences, (3) availability and distribution of resources, (4) communication and transportation, (5) involved organizations, (6) laypeople and (7) infrastructure. The core category that emerged from the other categories was defined as "interaction and common understanding". Moreover, a conceptual model was developed based on the categories. Improving the interaction within the current pre-hospital trauma care system and building a common understanding of the role of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) emerged as key issues in the development of an effective pre-hospital trauma care process.

  11. Effect of an organizational change in a prehospital trauma care protocol and trauma transport directive in a large urban city: a before and after study.

    PubMed

    Rubenson Wahlin, Rebecka; Ponzer, Sari; Skrifvars, Markus B; Lossius, Hans Morten; Castrén, Maaret

    2016-03-09

    Trauma systems and regionalized trauma care have been shown to improve outcome in severely injured trauma patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a prehospital trauma care protocol and transport directive, and to determine its effects on the number of primary admissions and secondary trauma transfers in a large Scandinavian city. We performed a retrospective observational study based on local trauma registries and hospital and ambulance records in Stockholm County; patients > 15 years of age with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 transported to any emergency care hospitals in the Stockholm area were included for the years 2006 and 2008. We also included secondary transferred patients to the regional trauma center during 2006, 2008, and 2013. A total of 693 primarily admitted trauma patients were included for the years 2006 and 2008. For the years 2006, 2008 and 2013, we included 114 secondarily transported trauma patients. The number of primary patient transports to the trauma center increased during the years by 20.2%, (p < 0.001); patients primarily transported to the trauma center had a significantly higher Injury Severity Score in 2008 than in 2006, and the number of patients transported secondarily to the trauma center in 2006 was higher compared to 2008 and to 2013 (p < 0.001, all 3 years). Our data indicate that implementation of a prehospital trauma care protocol may have an effect on transportation of severely injured trauma patients. A decrease in secondarily transported trauma patients to the regional trauma center was noted after 1 year and persisted at 7 years after the organizational change. Patients primarily admitted to the trauma center after the change had more severe injuries than patients transported to other emergency hospitals in the area even if 20 % of patients were not admitted primarily to a trauma center. This does not imply that the transport directives or the criteria were not followed but

  12. Use of Respiratory Impedance in Prehospital Care of Hypotensive Patients Associated with Hemorrhage and Trauma: A Case Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Use of respiratory impedance in prehospital care of hypotensive patients associated with hemorrhage and trauma: A case series Victor A. Convertino...J.Z., D.L.), Toledo , Ohio; Cypress Creek Emergency Medical Services (K.T., L.V.), Spring, Texas; Em- press EmergencyMedical Services (D.B.), Yonkers...Minneapolis, Minnesota. Address for reprints: Victor A. Convertino, PhD, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Fort Sam

  13. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  14. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    PubMed

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  15. Subjective safety and self-confidence in prehospital trauma care and learning progress after trauma-courses: part of the prospective longitudinal mixed-methods EPPTC-trial.

    PubMed

    Häske, David; Beckers, Stefan K; Hofmann, Marzellus; Lefering, Rolf; Grützner, Paul A; Stöckle, Ulrich; Papathanassiou, Vassilios; Münzberg, Matthias

    2017-08-14

    Prehospital trauma care is stressful and requires multi-professional teamwork. A decrease in the number of accident victims ultimately affects the routine and skills and underlines the importance of effective training. Standardized courses, like PHTLS, are established for health care professionals to improve the prehospital care of trauma patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the subjective safety in prehospital trauma care and learning progress by paramedics in a longitudinal analysis. This was a prospective intervention trial and part of the mixed-method longitudinal EPPTC-trial, evaluating subjective and objective changes among participants and real patient care as a result of PHTLS courses. Participants were evaluated with pre/post questionnaires as well as one year after the course. We included 236 datasets. In the pre/post comparison, an increased performance could be observed in nearly all cases. The result shows that the expectations of the participants of the course were fully met even after one year (p = 0.002). The subjective safety in trauma care is significantly better even one year after the course (p < 0.001). Regression analysis showed that (ABCDE)-structure is decisive (p = 0.036) as well as safety in rare and common skills (both p < 0.001). Most skills are also rated better after one year. Knowledge and specific safety are assessed as worse after one year. The courses meet the expectations of the participants and increase the subjective safety in the prehospital care of trauma patients. ABCDE-structure and safety in skills are crucial. In the short term, both safety in skills and knowledge can be increased, but the courses do not have the power to maintain knowledge and specific subjective safety issues over a year. German Clinical Trials Register, ID DRKS00004713 , registered 14. February 2014.

  16. Saving Lives on the Battlefield: A Joint Trauma System Review of Pre-Hospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operating Area - Afghanistan (CJOA-A)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-30

    What makes military medicine unique? 2. Why do military medical providers exist? 3. What is the leading cause of death on the battlefield? 4. Where do...the advocate for medics and pre-hospital battlefield trauma care? 13. Who owns battlefield medicine ? Unclassified 3 Unclassified SECTION II. EXECUTIVE...customized for use on the battlefield. [Maughon JS. An inquiry into the nature of wounds resulting in killed in action in Vietnam. Military Medicine 1970; 135

  17. Inadequate ventilation of patients with severe brain injury: a possible drawback to prehospital advanced trauma care?

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Stefano; Sanson, Gianfranco; Nardi, Giuseppe; Michelutto, Vanni; Scian, Franca

    2003-12-01

    To assess the appropriateness of arterial carbon dioxide tension control in a group of 92 patients with traumatic brain injury who, despite receiving advanced prehospital care, showed no improved outcome in comparison with a group homogeneous but for a lower level of prehospital care. A retrospective registration of the early in-hospital arterial carbon dioxide tension of the patients intubated and ventilated on scene. Patients were excluded if the arterial carbon dioxide tension did not reflect prehospital ventilation or its alteration might have been intentional or unavoidable. Arterial carbon dioxide tension was normal (35-45 mmHg) in only six of the 16 suitable cases (37.5%), was elevated (>45 mmHg) in three cases (18.75%), low (25-35 mmHg) in five cases (31.25%), and extremely low (<25 mmHg) in two cases (12.5%). Potentially dangerous alterations in capnia occurred in the majority of patients analysed. The possible consequences and causes are discussed. Further studies are needed to assess the consequences of any deviation from ideal standards, and to set realistic standards of arterial carbon dioxide tension control during prehospital ventilation.

  18. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers

    PubMed Central

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P.; Giummarra, Melita J.; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers’ knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one

  19. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance: international survey among pre-hospital providers.

    PubMed

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P; Giummarra, Melita J; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers' knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes towards psychosocial aspects of care, and confidence in providing psychosocial care, (b) variations in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence according to demographic and professional characteristics, and (c) training preferences of pre-hospital providers regarding psychosocial care to support paediatric patients and their families. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional, online survey among an international sample of 812 pre-hospital providers from high-income countries. The questionnaire was adapted from a measure for a similar study among Emergency Department staff, and involved 62 items in 7 main categories (e.g. personal and work characteristics, knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress, and confidence regarding 18 elements of psychosocial care). The main analyses comprised descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses. Results: On average, respondents answered 2.7 (SD = 1.59) out of seven knowledge questions correctly. Respondents with higher knowledge scores were more often female, parent of a child under 17, and reported that at least 10% of their patients were children. A majority of participants (83.5%) saw all 18 aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Providers felt moderately confident (M = 3.2, SD = 0.45) regarding their skills in psychosocial care, which was predicted by gender (female), having more experience, having a larger proportion of child patients, and having received training in psychosocial care in the past five years. Most respondents (89.7%) wanted to gain more knowledge and skills regarding psychosocial care for injured children. In terms of training format, they preferred an interactive website or a one-off group

  20. Prognostic factors associated with mortality in patients with severe trauma: from prehospital care to the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    González-Robledo, J; Martín-González, F; Moreno-García, M; Sánchez-Barba, M; Sánchez-Hernández, F

    2015-10-01

    To identify factors related to mortality in adult trauma patients, analyzing the clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic characteristics at the pre-hospital levels, in the Emergency Care Department and in Intensive Care. A retrospective, longitudinal descriptive study was carried out. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, MultBiplot and data mining methodology. Adult multiple trauma patients admitted to the Salamanca Hospital Complex (Spain) from 2006 to 2011. Demographic variables, clinical, therapeutic and analytical data from the injury site to ICU admission. Evolution from ICU admission to hospital discharge. A total of 497 patients with a median age of 45.5 years were included. Males predominated (76.7%). The main causes of injury were traffic accidents (56.1%), precipitation (18.4%) and falls (11%). The factors with the strongest association to increased mortality risk (P<.05) were age > 65 years (OR 3.15), head injuries (OR 3.1), pupillary abnormalities (OR 113.88), level of consciousness according to the Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 8 (OR 12.97), and serum lactate levels > 4 mmol/L (OR 9.7). The main risk factors identified in relation to the prognosis of trauma patients are referred to the presence of head injuries. Less widely known statistical techniques such as data mining or MultBiplot also underscore the importance of other factors such as lactate concentration. Trauma registries help assess the healthcare provided, with a view to adopting measures for improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Standard Versus Nonstandard Vital Signs Monitors in the Prehospital and Emergency Departments: Results and Lessons Learned from a Trauma Patient Care Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-24

    McManus JM, Miller CC, Cooke WH, Convertino VA.Manual vital signs reliably predict need for life -saving interventions in trauma patients. J Trauma...Evaluation of standard versus nonstandard vital signs monitors in the prehospital and emergency departments: Results and lessons learned from a...lessons have been learned in preparation for this study. Adoption of nonstandard vital signs monitors into critical care/trauma medicine may require a new

  2. Police transport versus ground EMS: A trauma system-level evaluation of prehospital care policies and their effect on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wandling, Michael W; Nathens, Avery B; Shapiro, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2016-11-01

    Rapid transport to definitive care ("scoop and run") versus field stabilization in trauma remains a topic of debate and has resulted in variability in prehospital policy. We aimed to identify trauma systems frequently using a true "scoop and run" police transport approach and to compare mortality rates between police and ground emergency medical services (EMS) transport. Using the National Trauma Databank (NTDB), we identified adult gunshot and stab wound patients presenting to Level 1 or 2 trauma centers from 2010 to 2012. Hospitals were grouped into their respective cities and regional trauma systems. Patients directly transported by police or ground EMS to trauma centers in the 100 most populous US trauma systems were included. Frequency of police transport was evaluated, identifying trauma systems with high utilization. Mortality rates and risk-adjusted odds ratio for mortality for police versus EMS transport were derived. Of 88,564 total patients, 86,097 (97.2%) were transported by EMS and 2,467 (2.8%) by police. Unadjusted mortality was 17.7% for police transport and 11.6% for ground EMS. After risk adjustment, patients transported by police were no more likely to die than those transported by EMS (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.69-1.45). Among all police transports, 87.8% occurred in three locations (Philadelphia, Sacramento, and Detroit). Within these trauma systems, unadjusted mortality was 19.9% for police transport and 13.5% for ground EMS. Risk-adjusted mortality was no different (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.68-1.50). Using trauma system-level analyses, patients with penetrating injuries in urban trauma systems were found to have similar mortality for police and EMS transport. The majority of prehospital police transport in penetrating trauma occurs in three trauma systems. These cities represent ideal sites for additional system-level evaluation of prehospital transport policies. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level III.

  3. Prehospital stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Lees, Kennedy R.; Endres, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Brain cells die rapidly after stroke and any effective treatment must start as early as possible. In clinical routine, the tight time–outcome relationship continues to be the major limitation of therapeutic approaches: thrombolysis rates remain low across many countries, with most patients being treated at the late end of the therapeutic window. In addition, there is no neuroprotective therapy available, but some maintain that this concept may be valid if administered very early after stroke. Recent innovations have opened new perspectives for stroke diagnosis and treatment before the patient arrives at the hospital. These include stroke recognition by dispatchers and paramedics, mobile telemedicine for remote clinical examination and imaging, and integration of CT scanners and point-of-care laboratories in ambulances. Several clinical trials are now being performed in the prehospital setting testing prehospital delivery of neuroprotective, antihypertensive, and thrombolytic therapy. We hypothesize that these new approaches in prehospital stroke care will not only shorten time to treatment and improve outcome but will also facilitate hyperacute stroke research by increasing the number of study participants within an ultra-early time window. The potentials, pitfalls, and promises of advanced prehospital stroke care and research are discussed in this review. PMID:23897876

  4. Point-of-injury Use of Reconstituted Freeze Dried Plasma as a Resuscitative Fluid: A Special Report for Prehospital Trauma Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-injury use of reconstituted freeze dried plasma as a resuscitative fluid : A special report for prehospital trauma care Elon Glassberg, MD...Ramat Gan, Israel This special report describes the broader implications ofprehospital fluid resuscitation in the context of what is the first reported...case of point-of-injury use of reconstituted, lyophilized single-donor freeze dried plasma (FDP) as a re- suscitative fluid . The Israeli Defense Force

  5. Prehospital Sepsis Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jerrilyn; Lawner, Benjamin J

    2017-02-01

    Prehospital care providers are tasked with the delivery of time-sensitive care, and emergency medical services (EMS) systems must match patients to appropriate clinical resources. Modern systems are uniquely positioned to recognize and treat patients with sepsis. Interventions such as administration of intravenous fluid and transporting patients to the appropriate level of definitive care are linked to improved patient outcomes. As EMS systems refine their protocols for the recognition and stabilization of patients with suspected or presumed sepsis, EMS providers need to be educated about the spectrum of sepsis-related presentations and treatment strategies need to be standardized.

  6. Prehospital care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, E; Pusponegoro, A

    2005-01-01

    Current system: Hospitals of varying standards are widespread but have no system of emergency ambulance or patient retrieval. Indonesia's only public emergency ambulance service, 118, is based in five of the biggest cities and is leading the way in paramedic training and prehospital care. Challenges and developments: There are many challenges faced including the culture of acceptance, vast geographical areas, traffic, inadequate numbers of ambulances, and access to quality training resources. Recently there have been a number of encouraging developments including setting up of a disaster response brigade, better provision of ambulances, and development of paramedic training. Conclusions: An integrated national regionalised hospital and prehospital system may seem fantastic but with the enthusiasm of those involved and perhaps some help from countries with access to training resources it may not be an unrealistic goal. PMID:15662073

  7. The effect of paramedic training on pre-hospital trauma care (EPPTC-study): a study protocol for a prospective semi-qualitative observational trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are the leading cause of death in adults prior to middle age. The care of severely injured patients is an interdisciplinary challenge. Limited evidence is available concerning pre-hospital trauma care training programs and the advantage of such programs for trauma patients. The effect on trauma care procedures or on the safety of emergency crews on the scene is limited; however, there is a high level of experience and expert opinion. Methods I – Video-recorded case studies are the basis of an assessment tool and checklist being developed to verify the results of programs to train participants in the care of seriously injured patients, also known as “objective structured clinical examination” (OSCE). The timing, completeness and quality of the individual measures are assessed using appropriate scales. The evaluation of team communication and interaction will be analyzed with qualitative methods and quantified and verified by existing instruments (e.g. the Clinical Team Scale). The developed assessment tool is validated by several experts in the fields of trauma care, trauma research and medical education. II a) In a German emergency medical service, the subjective assessment of paramedics of their pre-hospital care of trauma patients is evaluated at three time points, namely before, immediately after and one year after training. b) The effect of a standardized course concept on the quality of documentation in actual field operations is determined based on three items relevant to patient safety before and after the course. c) The assessment tool will be used to assess the effect of a standardized course concept on procedures and team communication in pre-hospital trauma care using scenario-based case studies. Discussion This study explores the effect of training on paramedics. After successful study completion, further multicenter studies are conceivable, which would evaluate emergency-physician staffed teams. The influence on the patients

  8. Military Medical Revolution: Prehospital Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Military medical revolution: Prehospital combat casualty care Lorne H. Blackbourne, MD, David G. Baer, PhD, Brian J. Eastridge, MD, Bijan Kheirabadi...sur- vival for patients with combat-related traumatic injuries. J Trauma. 2009;66(suppl 4):S69 S76. 33. Eastridge BJ, Hardin M, Cantrell J, Oetjen

  9. A comparison of ketamine and morphine analgesia in prehospital trauma care: a cluster randomized clinical trial in rural Quang Tri province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim Phung; Nguyen, Quynh; Truong, Xuan Nhuan; Le, Viet; Le, Van Phu; Mai, Nam; Husum, Hans; Losvik, Ole Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics in prehospital trauma care has been reported to have negative side effects on the airway and circulation. Several studies of urban trauma management have recommend ketamine as a safe and efficient analgesic. To date, however, no controlled trials of prehospital opioid analgesics versus ketamine in rural trauma management have been published. This study aimed to compare the analgesic effects and side effects of ketamine and morphine in a prehospital, low-resource setting. The study was conducted with a prospective, cluster-randomized design. The Quang Tri province of Vietnam was divided into two sectors that alternated monthly between ketamine and morphine treatments. A total of 169 trauma patients were treated outside hospital settings with ketamine, while 139 patients were treated with morphine. The treatment effects were measured by comparing the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) ratings in the field to those upon on admission. The analgesic effects were positive and similar for the two drugs. The rate of vomiting was significantly lower in the ketamine group (5%) than in the morphine group (19%, 95% CI for difference 8-22%). The rate of hallucinations and agitation was higher in ketamine-treated patients (11%) than in the morphine-treated patients (1.5%, 95% CI for difference 4-16%). In this study, patients with head trauma (n = 57) showed no adverse effects on consciousness level after being treated with ketamine. Ketamine had an analgesic effect similar to morphine and carried a lower risk of airway problems. The risk of hallucinations and agitation was increased in the ketamine group. These findings are of medical significance, particularly in rough and low-resource scenarios.

  10. Effect of physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service on blunt trauma patient survival and prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Iirola, Timo T; Laaksonen, Mikko I; Vahlberg, Tero J; Pälve, Heikki K

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the immediate and long-term effect of a helicopter emergency physician giving advanced life support on-scene compared with conventional load and go principle in urban and rural settings in treating blunt trauma patients. In a retrospective study, 81 blunt trauma patients treated prehospitally by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service were compared with 77 patients treated before the era of the helicopter emergency medical service. The data were collected in the prehospital and hospital files and a questionnaire was sent to the survivors 3 years after the trauma. The physicians treated the patients more aggressively (gave drugs, intubated and cannulated) and had the patients transported directly to a university hospital. The given treatment did not delay arrival at the hospital. No statistically significant difference was found, but a trend (P = 0.065) to lower survival in the helicopter emergency medical service group. Almost half of the deaths in the helicopter emergency medical service group and none in the control group, however, occurred in the emergency department. No difference was found 3 years later between the groups in the health-related quality of life or decrease in the income owing to the accident. The physicians treated the patients more aggressively, but it did not delay the arrival at the hospital. A beneficial effect of this aggressive treatment or direct transport to a university hospital could not be seen in the immediate physiological parameters or later health-related quality of life. The physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service was not beneficial to blunt trauma patients in this setting.

  11. Neural Network Medical Decision Algorithms for Pre-Hospital Trauma Care. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    Associates, Inc. Abbreviations and Acronyms AGE Patient’s age AI Artificial Intelligence AIS Abbreviated Injury Scale APACHE Acute Physiology and...Statistics, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1991, pp. 1-66. [30] Fries, G.R., G. McCalla, M.A. Levitt, and R. Cordova , "A prospective comparison of paramedic judgment and...judgment and APACHE II score predicting the outcome in critically ill surgical patients," J. Trauma, Vol. 32, No. 6, Jun. 1992, p. 747. [60] Morris, J.A

  12. [Prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries].

    PubMed

    Samokhvallov, I M; Reva, V A; Pronchenko, A A; Seleznev, A B

    2011-09-01

    The problem of temporary hemorrhage control is one of the most important issues of modern war surgery and surgery of trauma. It is a review of literature devoted to prehospital care in extremity major vascular injuries, embraced up-to-date domestic materials as well as the modern foreign papers in this area. The most important historical landmarks of temporary hemorrhage control system are considered. We paid special attention to the most usable methods and means of hemorrhage control which are utilized at the modern time: pressure bandages, tourniquets, local haemostatic agents. The comprehensive analysis of the contamporary haemostatic means concerning U.S. Army has done. The experience of foreign colleagues in development of prehospital care for the injured, creation and progress of new haemostatic methods, application of temporary hemorrhage control system is analyzed.

  13. Pre-hospital care--current concepts.

    PubMed

    Boyington, T; Williams, D

    1995-01-01

    After a brief outline of past developments in the training of ambulance personnel, this paper traces the adoption in the UK of Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) courses from the US. The 1991 World Student Games in Sheffield, UK led to liaison between training staff from South Yorkshire Metropolitan Ambulance and Paramedic Service (SYMAPS) and from Western New York Medical Training Institute. As a result, the trauma care policy of SYMAPS was altered from aiming to stabilise the patient at the scene of the accident to emphasising rapid and thorough assessment, packaging and transport. This is a resume of the scope of the PHTLS provider course. The course concentrates on the principles of PHTLS for the multisystems trauma victim.

  14. Trauma patient outcome after the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; Williams, J I

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in trauma patient outcome after the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program in Trinidad and Tobago. In January of 1992, a Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program was also instituted. This study assessed trauma patient outcome after the PHTLS program. Morbidity (length of stay and degree of disability), mortality, injury severity score, mechanism of injury, age, and sex among all adult trauma patients transported by ambulance to the major trauma hospital were assessed between July of 1990 to December of 1991 (pre-PHTLS, n = 332) and January of 1994 to June of 1995 (post-PHTLS, n = 350). Age, sex distribution, percentage blunt injury, and injury severity score were similar for both groups. Mortality pre-PHTLS (15.7%) was greater than post-PHTLS (10.6%). Length of stay and disability were statistically significantly decreased post-PHTLS. Age, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury were positively correlated with mortality in both periods. The previously reported post-ATLS mortality was similar to the pre-PHTLS mortality. Post-PHTLS mortality and morbidity were significantly decreased, suggesting a positive impact of the PHTLS program on trauma patient outcome.

  15. Pain management in trauma patients in (pre)hospital based emergency care: current practice versus new guideline.

    PubMed

    Scholten, A C; Berben, S A A; Westmaas, A H; van Grunsven, P M; de Vaal, E T; Rood, P P M; Hoogerwerf, N; Doggen, C J M; Schoonhoven, L

    2015-05-01

    Acute pain in trauma patients in emergency care is still undertreated. Early pain treatment is assumed to effectively reduce pain in patients and improve long-term outcomes. In order to improve pain management in the chain of emergency care, a national evidence-based guideline was developed. The aim of this study was to assess whether current practice is in compliance with the guideline 'Pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care' from the Netherlands Association for Emergency Nurses (in Dutch NVSHV), and to evaluate early and initial pain management for adult trauma patients in emergency care. Chart reviews were conducted in three regions of the Netherlands using electronic patient files of trauma patients from the chain of emergency care. We included one after-hours General Practitioner Co-operation (GPC), one ambulance Emergency Medical Services (EMS), two Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS), and three Emergency Departments (EDs). Organisation of pain management, pain assessment, and pain treatment was examined and compared with national guideline recommendations, including quality indicators. We assessed a random sample of 1066 electronic patient files. The use of standardised tools to assess pain was registered in zero to 52% of the electronic patient files per organisation. Registration of (non-)pharmacological pain treatment was found in less than half of the files. According to the files, pharmacological pain treatment deviated from the guideline in 73-99% of the files. Time of administration of medication was missing in 73-100%. Reassessment of pain following pain medication was recorded in half of the files by the HEMS, but not in files of the other organisations. The (registration of) current pain management in trauma patients in the chain of emergency care varies widely between healthcare organisation, and deviates from national guideline recommendations. Although guideline compliance differs across groups of healthcare

  16. Is the prevalence of deliberate penetrating trauma increasing in London? Experiences of an urban pre-hospital trauma service.

    PubMed

    Crewdson, K; Lockey, D; Weaver, A; Davies, G E

    2009-05-01

    Recent media interest in stabbings and shootings has lead to the general assumption that injury and death secondary to deliberate penetrating trauma are rising. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of deliberate penetrating trauma within a London-based physician-led pre-hospital trauma service, and evaluate whether the perceived increase reported by the media translates into a real increase in penetrating trauma caseload. A retrospective review of a physician-led pre-hospital care trauma database was conducted to identify all patients who sustained stabbing or shooting injuries over a 16-year period. Patients who died in the pre-hospital phase and paediatric patients were included. Other local and national datasets were examined to determine whether similar trends were observed. 1564 penetrating trauma victims were identified, including 92 children. 1358 patients (86.8%) sustained stab wounds; 206 patients were shot (13.2%). Penetrating injury accounted for 9.9% of the overall trauma caseload during the study period. The annual increase in patients sustaining stabbing injuries was 23.2%. Gun shot wounds increased by 11.0% per year. The study demonstrates a significant annual rise in the number of cases of deliberate penetrating trauma managed by a UK physician-led pre-hospital trauma service.

  17. Supporting Information Use and Retention of Pre-Hospital Information during Trauma Resuscitation: A Qualitative Study of Pre-Hospital Communications and Information Needs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Burd, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-hospital communication is a critical first step towards ensuring efficient management of critically injured patients during trauma resuscitation. Information about incoming patients received from the field and en route serves a critical role in helping emergency medical teams prepare for patient care. Despite many efforts, inefficiencies persist. In this paper, we examine the pre-hospital communications between pre-hospital and hospital providers, including the types of information transferred during en-route calls, as well as the information needs of trauma teams. Our findings show that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) teams report a great deal of information from the field, most of which match the needs of trauma teams. We discuss design implications for a computerized system to support the use and retention of pre-hospital information during trauma resuscitation. PMID:24551428

  18. Advanced airway management is necessary in prehospital trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Lockey, D J; Healey, B; Crewdson, K; Chalk, G; Weaver, A E; Davies, G E

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of airway compromise in trauma patients is a priority. Basic airway management is provided by all emergency personnel, but the requirement for on-scene advanced airway management is controversial. We attempted to establish the demand for on-scene advanced airway interventions. Trauma patients managed with standard UK paramedic airway interventions were assessed to determine whether airway compromise had been effectively treated or whether more advanced airway management was required. A prospective observational study was conducted to identify trauma patients requiring prehospital advanced airway management attended by a doctor-paramedic team. The team assessed and documented airway compromise on arrival, interventions performed before and after their arrival, and their impact on airway compromise. Four hundred and seventy-two patients required advanced airway intervention and received 925 airway interventions by ground-based paramedics. Two hundred and sixty-nine patients (57%) still had airway compromise on arrival of the enhanced care team; no oxygen had been administered to 52 patients (11%). There were 45 attempted intubations by ground paramedics with a 64% success rate and 11% unrecognized oesophageal intubation rate. Doctor-paramedic teams delivering prehospital anaesthesia achieved definitive airway management for all patients. A significant proportion of severely injured trauma patients required advanced airway interventions to effectively treat airway compromise. Standard ambulance service interventions were only effective for a proportion of patients, but might not have always been applied appropriately. Complications of advanced airway management occurred in both provider groups, but failed intubation and unrecognized oesophageal intubation were a particular problem in the paramedic intubation group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  19. A model of prehospital trauma training for lay persons devised in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tiska, M; Adu-Ampofo, M; Boakye, G; Tuuli, L; Mock, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Over 300 commercial drivers attended a first aid and rescue course designed specifically for roadway trauma and geared to a low education level. The training programme has been evaluated twice at one and two year intervals by interviewing both trained and untrained drivers with regard to their experiences with injured persons. In conjunction with a review of prehospital care literature, lessons learnt from the evaluations were used in the revision of the training model. Results: Control of external haemorrhage was quickly learnt and used appropriately by the drivers. Areas identified needing emphasis in future trainings included consistent use of universal precautions and protection of airways in unconscious persons using the recovery position. Conclusion: In low income countries, prehospital trauma care for roadway casualties can be improved by training laypersons already involved in prehospital transport and care. Training should be locally devised, evidence based, educationally appropriate, and focus on practical demonstrations. PMID:14988361

  20. Medical pre-hospital management reduces mortality in severe blunt trauma: a prospective epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Severe blunt trauma is a leading cause of premature death and handicap. However, the benefit for the patient of pre-hospital management by emergency physicians remains controversial because it may delay admission to hospital. This study aimed to compare the impact of medical pre-hospital management performed by SMUR (Service Mobile d'Urgences et de Réanimation) with non-medical pre-hospital management provided by fire brigades (non-SMUR) on 30-day mortality. Methods The FIRST (French Intensive care Recorded in Severe Trauma) study is a multicenter cohort study on consecutive patients with severe blunt trauma requiring admission to university hospital intensive care units within the first 72 hours. Initial clinical status, pre-hospital life-sustaining treatments and Injury Severity Scores (ISS) were recorded. The main endpoint was 30-day mortality. Results Among 2,703 patients, 2,513 received medical pre-hospital management from SMUR, and 190 received basic pre-hospital management provided by fire brigades. SMUR patients presented a poorer initial clinical status and higher ISS and were admitted to hospital after a longer delay than non-SMUR patients. The crude 30-day mortality rate was comparable for SMUR and non-SMUR patients (17% and 15% respectively; P = 0.61). After adjustment for initial clinical status and ISS, SMUR care significantly reduced the risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio (OR): 0.55, 95% CI: 0.32 to 0.94, P = 0.03). Further adjustments for the delay to hospital admission only marginally affected these results. Conclusions This study suggests that SMUR management is associated with a significant reduction in 30-day mortality. The role of careful medical assessment and intensive pre-hospital life-sustaining treatments needs to be assessed in further studies. PMID:21251331

  1. Pre-hospital triage performance after standardized trauma courses.

    PubMed

    Lampi, Maria; Junker, Johan; Berggren, Peter; Jonson, Carl-Oscar; Vikström, Tore

    2017-05-19

    The pre-hospital triage process aims at identifying and prioritizing patients in the need of prompt intervention and/or evacuation. The objective of the present study was to evaluate triage decision skills in a Mass Casualty Incident drill. The study compares two groups of participants in Advanced Trauma Life Support and Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support courses. A questionnaire was used to deal with three components of triage of victims in a Mass Casualty Incident: decision-making; prioritization of 15 hypothetical casualties involved in a bus crash; and prioritization for evacuation. Swedish Advanced Trauma Life Support and Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support course participants filled in the same triage skills questionnaire just before and after their respective course. One hundred fifty-three advanced Trauma Life Support course participants were compared to 175 Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support course participants. The response rates were 90% and 95%, respectively. A significant improvement was found between pre-test and post-test for the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support group in regards to decision-making. This difference was only noticeable among the participants who had previously participated in Mass Casualty Incident drills or had experience of a real event (pre-test mean ± standard deviation 2.4 ± 0.68, post-test mean ± standard deviation 2.60 ± 0.59, P = 0.04). No improvement was found between pre-test and post-test for either group regarding prioritization of the bus crash casualties or the correct identification of the most injured patients for immediate evacuation. Neither Advanced Trauma Life Support nor Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support participants showed general improvement in their tested triage skills. However, participation in Mass Casualty Incident drills or experience of real events prior to the test performed here, were shown to be advantageous for Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support participants. These courses should be

  2. The prehospital burden of disease due to trauma in KwaZulu-Natal: the need for Afrocentric trauma systems.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Timothy Craig; Finlayson, Melissa; van Heerden, Marc; Johnson, Ben; Samuel, Candice; Muckart, David J J

    2013-07-01

    Trauma is one of the leading prehospital disease profiles in South Africa in general and in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) in particular. The present study was designed to review the prehospital burden of injury in KZN, identify trauma burden to ambulance ratios, analyze system deficiencies, and propose a prehospital trauma system that is Afrocentric in nature. Approval from the relevant ethics authorities was obtained. Using a convenience data set all Emergency Medical Service (EMS) call data for the months of March and September 2010 were reviewed for the three main EMS providers in KZN. Data were extrapolated to annual data and placed in the context of population, ambulance service, and facility. The data were then mapped for area distribution and prehospital workload relative to the entire province. Questionnaire-based assessments of knowledge and deficiencies of the current system were completed by senior officers of the provincial system as part of the analysis of the current system. The total annual call burden for trauma ranges between 94,840 and 101,420, or around 11.6 trauma calls per thousand of the population per year. Almost 70 % of calls were either for interpersonal intentional violence or vehicular collisions. Only 0.25 % of calls involved aeromedical resources. Some 80 % of patients were considered to be moderately to seriously injured, yet only 41 % of the patients were transported to a suitable level of care immediately, with many going to inappropriate lower level care facilities. Many rural calls are not attended within the time norms accepted nationally. Deficiencies noted by the questionnaire survey are the general lack of a bypass mechanism and the feeling among staff that most EMS bases do not have a bypass option or feel part of a system of care, despite large numbers of staff having been recently trained in triage and major trauma care. The prehospital trauma burden in KZN is significant and consumes vital resources and gridlocks facilities. A

  3. Prehospital trauma system reduces mortality in severe trauma: a controlled study of road traffic casualties in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Murad, Mudhafar Karim; Issa, Dara B; Mustafa, Farhad M; Hassan, Hlwa O; Husum, Hans

    2012-02-01

    In low-resource communities with long prehospital transport times, most trauma deaths occur outside the hospital. Previous studies from Iraq demonstrate that a two-tier network of rural paramedics with village-based first helpers reduces mortality in land mine and war-injured from 40% to 10%. However, these studies of prehospital trauma care in low-income countries have been conducted with historical controls, thus the results may be unreliable due to differences in study contexts. The aim of this study was to use a controlled study design to examine the effect of a two-tier prehospital rural trauma system on road traffic accident trauma mortality. A single referral surgical hospital was the endpoint in a single-blinded, non-randomized cohort study. The catchment areas consisted of some districts with no formal Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system, and other districts where 95 health center paramedics had been trained and equipped to provide advanced life support, and 5,000 laypersons had been trained to give on-site first aid. The hospital staff registered trauma mortality and on-admission physiological severity blindly. Assuming that prehospital care would have no significant impact on mortality in moderate injuries, only road traffic accident (RTA) casualties with an Injury Severity Score (ISS)≥9 were selected for study. During a three-month study period, 205 patients were selected for study (128 in the treatment group and 77 in the control group). The mean prehospital transit time was approximately two hours. The two groups were comparable with regards to demographic characteristics, distribution of wounds and injuries, and mean anatomical severity. The mortality rate was eight percent in the treatment group, compared to 44% in the control group (95% CI, 25%-48%). Adjusted for severity differences between the treatment and control groups, prehospital care was a significant contributor to survival. Where prehospital transport time is long, a two

  4. Analysis of Prehospital Transport Use for Trauma Patients in Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mowafi, Hani; Oranmore-Brown, Rae; Hopkins, Kathryn L; White, Emily E; Mulla, Yacob F; Seidenberg, Phil

    2016-12-01

    Despite an increasing burden of injuries, prehospital transport systems remain underdeveloped in many low- and middle-income countries. Little information exists on the use of prehospital services for trauma patients in Zambia. A prospective, observational study of trauma presentations was undertaken for 6 months in Lusaka, Zambia, to establish the epidemiology and outcomes of injury in the region. In addition to demographics and mechanism of injury, data were collected on prehospital transport as well as inpatient resources utilization. Trained study personnel gathered data on trauma presentations 24 h a day. Statistical analysis was conducted using SAS 9.3 from a Microsoft(®) Access database. 3498 trauma patients were enrolled in the study on arrival to University Teaching Hospital (UTH). 3264 patients had a transport means recorded (95.3 %). Two-thirds (66 %) arrived within 6 h of injury, and 23 % arrived within the first hour after injury. A majority arrived by private vehicle (53.4 %) or public transport (37.7 %); only 5.9 % were transported by public or private ambulance. Of those arriving within the first hour after injury, 69.1 % came by private car, 24.6 % by public transport and 3.1 % by ambulance. There was a small statistical increase in Kampala Trauma Score II among ambulance arrivals. Trauma patient use a variety of transport methods to get to UTH. A majority of patients use no formal ambulance transport. Despite this fact, a majority arrives within 6 h of injury but receive no formal prehospital care. An integrated, multilayered prehospital care and transport system may be the most effective approach for Zambia.

  5. Road Traffic Injury in Lagos, Nigeria: Assessing Prehospital Care.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nasiru A; Ajani, Abdul Wahab O; Mustafa, Ibrahim A; Balogun, Rufai A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Idowu, Olufemi E; Solagberu, Babatunde A

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Injuries are the third most important cause of overall deaths globally with one-quarter resulting from road traffic crashes. Majority of these deaths occur before arrival in the hospital and can be reduced with prompt and efficient prehospital care. The aim of this study was to highlight the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in Lagos, Nigeria and assess the effectiveness of prehospital care, especially the role of Lagos State Ambulance Service (LASAMBUS) in providing initial care and transportation of the injured to the hospital. A three-year, retrospective review of road traffic injured patients seen at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Nigeria, from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 was conducted. Parameters extracted from the Institution Trauma Registry included bio-data, date and time of injury, date and time of arrival in SER, host status, type of vehicle involved, and region(s) injured. Information on how patients came to the hospital and outcome in SER also were recorded. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS; IBM Corporation; Armonk, New York USA) version 16. A total of 23,537 patients were seen during the study period. Among them, 16,024 (68.1%) had trauma. Road traffic crashes were responsible in 5,629 (35.0%) of trauma cases. Passengers constituted 42.0% of the injured, followed by pedestrians (34.0%). Four wheelers were the most frequent vehicle type involved (54.0%), followed by motor cycles (30.0%). Regions mainly affected were head and neck (40.0%) and lower limb (29.0%). Less than one-quarter (24.0%) presented to the emergency room within an hour, while one-third arrived between one and six hours following injury. Relatives brought 55.4%, followed by bystanders (21.4%). Only 2.3% had formal prehospital care and were brought to the hospital by LASAMBUS. They also had significantly shorter arrival time. One hundred and nine patients

  6. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)—particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols—such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)—have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a “train-the-trainer” approach for exponential growth—both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS. PMID:27419222

  7. Strategically Leapfrogging Education in Prehospital Trauma Management: Four-Tiered Training Protocols.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Rohit; Vyas, Dinesh; Narayan, Mayur; Vyas, Arpita

    2015-12-01

    Trauma-related injury in fast developing countries are linked to 90% of international mortality rates, which can be greatly reduced by improvements in often non-existent or non-centralized emergency medical systems (EMS)-particularly in the pre-hospital care phase. Traditional trauma training protocols-such as Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS), International Trauma Life Support (ITLS), and Basic Life Support (BLS)-have failed to produce an effective pre-hospital ground force of medical first responders. To overcome these barriers, we propose a new four-tiered set of trauma training protocols: Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Trauma Training, Acute Trauma Training (ATT), Broad Trauma Training (BTT), and Cardiac and Trauma Training (CTT). These standards are specifically differentiated to accommodate the educational and socioeconomic diversity found in fast developing settings, where each free course is taught in native, lay language while ensuring the education standards are maintained by fully incorporating high-fidelity simulation, video-recorded debriefing, and retraining. The innovative pedagogy of this trauma education program utilizes MOOC for global scalability and a "train-the-trainer" approach for exponential growth-both components help fast developing countries reach a critical mass of first responders needed for the base of an evolving EMS.

  8. Prehospital Lactate Improves Accuracy of Prehospital Criteria for Designating Trauma Activation Level

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Lerner, E. Brooke; Sperry, Jason L.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Guyette, Francis X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trauma activation level is determined by prehospital criteria. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) recommends trauma activation criteria; however, their accuracy may be limited. Prehospital lactate has shown promise in predicting trauma center resource requirements. Our objective was to investigate the added value of incorporating prehospital lactate in an algorithm to designate trauma activation level. Methods Air medical trauma patients undergoing prehospital lactate measurement were included. Algorithms using ACS activation criteria (ACS) and ACS activation criteria plus prehospital lactate (ACS+LAC) to designate trauma activation level were compared. Test characteristics and net reclassification improvement (NRI), which evaluates reclassification of patients among risk categories with additional predictive variables, were calculated. Algorithms were compared to predict trauma center need (TCN) defined as >1unit of blood in the ED; spinal cord injury; advanced airway; thoracotomy or pericardiocentesis; ICP monitoring; emergent operative or interventional radiology procedure; or death. Results There were 6,347 patients included. Twenty-eight percent had TCN. The ACS+LAC algorithm upgraded 256 patients and downgraded 548 patients compared to the ACS algorithm. The ACS+LAC algorithm versus ACS algorithm had a NRI of 0.058 (95%CI 0.044, 0.071; p<0.01), with an event NRI of −0.5% and non-event NRI of 6.2%. When weighted to favor changes in under-triage, the ACS+LAC still had a favorable overall reclassification (wNRI 0.041; 95%CI 0.028, 0.054; p=0.01). The ACS+LAC algorithm increased PPV, NPV, and accuracy. Over-triage was reduced 7.2%, while under-triage only increased 0.7%. The area under the curve (AUC) was significantly higher for the ACS+LAC algorithm (0.79 vs. 0.76, p<0.01). Conclusions The ACS+LAC algorithm reclassified patients to more appropriate levels of trauma activation when compared to the ACS algorithm. This overall benefit is achieved

  9. Expertise of German paramedics concerning the prehospital treatment of patients with spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Kreinest, M; Goller, S; Gliwitzky, B; Grützner, P A; Küffer, M; Häske, D; Papathanassiou, V; Münzberg, M

    2017-06-01

    Spinal immobilization is a standard procedure in emergency medicine. Increasing awareness of complications associated with immobilization of trauma patients leads to controversial discussions in the literature. Current guidelines require to include considerations of accident mechanism, an assessment of the patient's condition and an examination of the spine in the decision-making process if immobilization of the spine should be performed. This requires sound knowledge of assessing these parameters. The aim of the current study is to analyze German paramedics' subjective uncertainty in terms of their prehospital assessment and treatment of patients suffering from spine injuries. Over a period of 17 months participants in a trauma course were asked to complete a standardized anonymous questionnaire about subjective uncertainty of prehospital assessment and management of spinal trauma before participation in that course. Questions about the frequency of application of different immobilization tools and skills training on spinal immobilization were also asked. A total of 465 paramedics were surveyed. The participants did not indicate any uncertainty about the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of spinal injuries. The feeling of confidence was significantly greater in participants who had already attended another course on structured trauma care before. The participants agreed with the statements that standardized algorithms facilitate teamwork and that there is a need for a protocol for the prehospital treatment of spinal injuries. Paramedics do not feel uncertain about the prehospital assessment and treatment of spinal injuries. The feeling of confidence in participants who had already attended a course on the treatment of trauma patients before was significantly higher.

  10. Prehospital Use of Cervical Collars in Trauma Patients: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Asbjørnsen, Helge; Habiba, Samer; Sunde, Geir Arne; Wester, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cervical collar has been routinely used for trauma patients for more than 30 years and is a hallmark of state-of-the-art prehospital trauma care. However, the existing evidence for this practice is limited: Randomized, controlled trials are largely missing, and there are uncertain effects on mortality, neurological injury, and spinal stability. Even more concerning, there is a growing body of evidence and opinion against the use of collars. It has been argued that collars cause more harm than good, and that we should simply stop using them. In this critical review, we discuss the pros and cons of collar use in trauma patients and reflect on how we can move our clinical practice forward. Conclusively, we propose a safe, effective strategy for prehospital spinal immobilization that does not include routine use of collars. PMID:23962031

  11. Prehospital Volume Therapy as an Independent Risk Factor after Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Touma, Alexander; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Keitel, Judith; Lendemans, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prehospital volume therapy remains widely used after trauma, while evidence regarding its disadvantages is growing. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the volume administered in a prehospital setting as an independent risk factor for mortality. Material and Methods. Patients who met the following criteria were analyzed retrospectively: Injury Severity Score = 16, primary admission (between 2002 and 2010), and age = 16 years. The following data had to be available: volume administered (including packed red cells), blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, therapeutic measures, and laboratory results. Following a univariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality after trauma were investigated using a multivariate regression analysis. Results. A collective of 7,641 patients met the inclusion criteria, showing that increasing volumes administered in a prehospital setting were an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio: 1.34). This tendency was even more pronounced in patients without severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) (odds ratio: 2.71), while the opposite tendency was observed in patients with TBI. Conclusions. Prehospital volume therapy in patients without severe TBI represents an independent risk factor for mortality. In such cases, respiratory and circulatory conditions should be stabilized during permissive hypotension, and patient transfer should not be delayed. PMID:25949995

  12. Heart rate variability as a triage tool in patients with trauma during prehospital helicopter transport.

    PubMed

    King, David R; Ogilvie, Michael P; Pereira, Bruno M T; Chang, Yuchiao; Manning, Ronald J; Conner, Jeffrey A; Schulman, Carl I; McKenney, Mark G; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2009-09-01

    Prehospital triage of patients with trauma is routinely challenging, but more so in mass casualty situations and military operations. The purpose of this study was to prospectively test whether heart rate variability (HRV) could be used as a triage tool during helicopter transport of civilian patients with trauma. After institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent, 75 patients with trauma requiring prehospital helicopter transport to our level I center (from December 2007 to November 2008) were prospectively instrumented with a 2-Channel SEER Light recorder (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). HRV was analyzed with a Mars Holter monitor system and proprietary software. SDNN (standard deviation [SD] of the normal-to-normal R-R interval), as an index of HRV, was correlated with prehospital trauma triage criteria, base deficit, seriousness of injury, operative interventions, outcome, and other data extracted from the patients' medical records. There were no interventions or medical decisions based on HRV. Data were excluded only if there was measurement artifact or technical problems with the recordings. The demographics were mean age 47 years, 63% men, 88% blunt, 25% traumatic brain injury, 9% mortality. Prehospital SDNN predicted patients with base excess < or = -6, those defined as seriously injured and benefiting from trauma center care, as well as patients requiring a life-saving procedure in the operating room. No other available data, including prehospital en-route vital signs, predicted any of these. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 80%, 75%, 33%, 96%, respectively, with and an overall accuracy of 76% for predicting a life-saving intervention in the operating room. This is the first demonstration that prehospital HRV (specifically SDNN) predicts base excess and operating room life-saving opportunities. HRV triages and discriminates severely injured patients better than routine trauma

  13. Limitations in Prehospital Communication Between Trauma Helicopter, Ambulance Services, and Dispatch Centers.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke Maria Karien; Giannakopoulos, Georgios; Franschman, Gaby; Christiaans, Herman; Bloemers, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Prehospital communication with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is carried out in hectic situations. Proper communication among all medical personal is required to enhance collaboration, to provide the best care and enable shared situational awareness. The objective of this article was to give insight into current Dutch prehospital emergency care communication among all EMS and evaluate the usage of a new physician staffed helicopter EMS (P-HEMS) cancellation model. Trauma-related P-HEMS dispatches between November 1, 2014 and May 31, 2015 for the Lifeliner 1 were included; a random sample of 100 dispatches was generated. Tape recordings on all verbal prehospital communication between the dispatch center, EMS, and P-HEMS were transcribed and analyzed. Qualitative content analysis was performed, using open coding to code key messages. Ninety-two tape recordings were analyzed. The most frequent reason for P-HEMS dispatch was suspicion of brain injury (24%). The cancellation model was followed in 66%, overruled in 9%, and not applicable in 25%. The main reason for not adhering to the model was hemodynamic stability. In 5% of P-HEMS dispatches, a complete ABCD (airway, breathing, circulation, disability) methodology was used for handover, in 9% a complete Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation technique, in 2% a complete Mechanism-Injuries-Signs-Treatment method was used. The other handovers were incomplete. Prehospital handover between EMS on-scene and P-HEMS often entails insufficient information. The cancellation model for P-HEMS is frequently used and promotes adequate information transfer. To increase joined decision-making, more patient and situational information needs to be handed over. Standardization of prehospital trauma handovers will facilitate this and improve trauma patient's outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prehospital anaesthesia performed by physician/critical care paramedic teams in a major trauma network in the UK: a 12 month review of practice.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nicholas; Hulme, Jonathan; Cormack, Stef; Hussain, Nageena; Ludwig, Frank; Wheaton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In the West Midlands region of the UK, delivery of pre-hospital care has been remodelled through introduction of a 24 h Medical Emergency Response Incident Team (MERIT). Teams including physicians and critical care paramedics (CCP) are deployed to incidents on land-based and helicopter-based platforms. Clinical practice, including delivery of rapid sequence induction of anaesthesia (RSI), is underpinned by standard operating procedures (SOP). This study describes the first 12 months experience of prehospital RSI in the MERIT scheme in the West Midlands. Retrospective review of the MERIT clinical database for the 12 months following the launch of the scheme. Data was collected relating to the number of RSIs performed; indication for RSI; number of intubation attempts; grade of view on laryngoscopy and the base speciality/grade of the operator performing intubation. MERIT teams were activated 1619 times, attending scene in 1029 cases. RSI was performed 142 times (13.80% of scene attendances). There was one recorded case of failure to intubate requiring insertion of a supraglottic airway device (0.70%). In over a third of RSI cases, CCPs performed laryngoscopy and intubation (n=53, 37.32%). Proficiency of obtaining Grade I view at laryngoscopy was similar for physicians (74.70%) and CCPs (77.36%). Intubation was successful at the first attempt in over 90% of cases. This study demonstrates that operation within a system that provides high levels of exposure, underpinned by comprehensive and robust training and governance frameworks, promotes levels of performance in successful prehospital RSI regardless of base speciality or profession. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Improving trauma care in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Adam, R; Stedman, M; Winn, J; Howard, M; Williams, J I; Ali, J

    1994-06-01

    Identification of trauma as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Trinidad and Tobago prompted the establishment of a training programme aimed at improving trauma care in this developing country. An Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) programme for physicians, funded through the Canadian International Development Agency resulted in a statistically significant improvement of in-hospital trauma patient outcome at the Port-of-Spain General Hospital (observed to expected mortality ratio of 3.16 pre-ATLS compared to 1.94 post-ATLS). A recent analysis of all motor vehicle injuries for a shorter period did not confirm this positive impact of the ATLS programme, primarily because a large number of these patients died in the pre-hospital period. Pre-hospital trauma care therefore required urgent attention to complement the positive in-hospital impact of the ATLS programme. A second training programme (the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support or PHTLS) for paramedical personnel was thus instituted in 1990. Over 250 physicians have been trained in the ATLS programme and to date over 100 paramedical personnel have been trained in the PHTLS programme. Attempts have also been made to equip the ambulances with more appropriate resuscitative devices in order to improve pre-hospital care. The combination of the PHTLS and the ATLS programme should result in further improvement in the care of patients sustaining major injuries in Trinidad and Tobago.

  16. The effects of standardized trauma training on prehospital pain control: have pain medication administration rates increased on the battlefield?

    PubMed

    Bowman, W Joseph; Nesbitt, Michael E; Therien, Sean P

    2012-08-01

    The US Military has served in some of the most austere locations in the world. In this ever-changing environment, units are organized into smaller elements operating in very remote areas. This often results in longer evacuation times, which can lead to a delay in pain management if treatment is not initiated in the prehospital setting. Early pain control has become an increasingly crucial military prehospital task and must be controlled from the pain-initiating event. The individual services developed their standardized trauma training based on the recommendations by Frank Butler and the Defense Health Board Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. This training stresses evidence-based treatment modalities, including pain control, derived from casualty injury analysis. Inadequate early pain control may lead to multiple acute and potentially chronic effects. These effects encompass a wide range from changes in blood pressure to delayed wound healing and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, it is essential that pain be addressed in the prehospital environment. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective Joint Theater Trauma Registry comparative study evaluating whether standardized trauma training increased prehospital pain medication administration between 2007 and 2009. These years were selected on the basis of mandatory training initiation dates and available Joint Theater Trauma Registry records. Records were analyzed for all US prehospital trauma cases with documented pain medication administration from Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom for the specified years. Data analysis revealed 232 patients available for review (102 for 2007 and 130 for 2009). A statistically significant prehospital pain treatment increase was noted, from 3.1% in 2007 to 6.7% in 2009 (p < 0.0005; 95% confidence interval, 2.39-4.93). Standardized trauma training has increased the administration of prehospital pain medication and the

  17. Prehospital airway management: high tech meets trauma: an air medical perspective.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Kris

    2012-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in the United States for those younger than 35 years and injuries sustained from trauma are a significant source of moderate to severe disability. The inability to establish, secure, or maintain a definitive airway is a major cause of preventable death and secondary injury due to inadequate oxygenation and ventilation. Prehospital airway management is an essential skill of any prehospital care provider. A critical component to providing excellent airway management is the ability of the provider to quickly establish endotracheal intubation without complications such as hypoxia, hyper/hypocapnea, or hypotension. These complications have been shown to cause increased morbidity and mortality, especially in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury. This article presents some of the challenges faced by flight nurses in the air medical environment and how Airlift Northwest has developed a structured, standardized approach to airway management both in training and it the prehospital setting. We will discuss the process improvements that lead to the implementation of video laryngoscopy as our first-line intubation tool. The ultimate goal of any air medical or prehospital emergency medical services program is to manage 100% of airways without complications, which will decrease morbidity and mortality, ultimately improving patient outcomes.

  18. Clinical governance in pre-hospital care.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Steel, I; Edwards, S; Gough, M

    2001-01-01

    This article seeks to discover and recognize the importance of clinical governance within a new and emerging quality National Health Service (NHS) system. It evaluates the present state of prehospital care and recommends how change, via clinical governance, can ensure a paradigm shift from its currently fragmented state to a seamless ongoing patient care episode. Furthermore, it identifies the drivers of a quality revolution, examines the monitoring and supervision of quality care, and evaluates the role of evidence-based practice. A frank and open view of immediate care doctors is presented, with recommendations to improve the quality of skill delivery and reduce the disparity that exists. Finally, it reviews the current problems with pre-hospital care and projects a future course for quality and patient care excellence. PMID:11383428

  19. Availability and Quality of Prehospital Care on Pakistani Interurban Roads

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Junaid A.; Waseem, Hunniya; Razzak, Junaid A.; Shiekh, Naeem-ul-lah; Khoso, Ajmal Khan; Salmi, L.-Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Interurban road crashes often result in severe Road Traffic Injuries (RTIs). Prehospital emergency care on interurban roads was rarely evaluated in the low- and middle-income countries. The study highlighted the availability and quality of prehospital care facilities on interurban roads in Pakistan, a low-income country. The study setting was a 592-km-long National highway in the province of Sindh, Pakistan. Using the questionnaires adapted from the World Health Organization prehospital care guidelines [Sasser et al., 2005], managers and ambulance staff at the stations along highways were interviewed regarding the process of care, supplies in ambulances, and their experience of trauma care. Ambulance stations were either managed by the police or the Edhi Foundation (EF), a philanthropic organization. All highway stations were managed by the EF; the median distance between highway stations was 38 km (Interquartile Range [IQR]=27–46). We visited 14 stations, ten on the highway section, and four in cities, including two managed by the police. Most highway stations (n=13) received one RTI call per day. Half of stations (n=5) were inside highway towns, usually near primary or secondary-level healthcare facilities. Travel time to the nearest tertiary healthcare facility ranged from 31 to 70 minutes (median=48 minutes; IQR=30–60). Other shortcomings noted for stations were not triaging RTI cases (86%), informing hospitals (64%), or recording response times (57%). All ambulances (n=12) had stretchers, but only 58% had oxygen cylinders. The median schooling of ambulance staff (n=13) was 8 years (IQR=3–10), and the median paramedic training was 3 days (IQR=2–3). Observed shortcomings in prehospital care could be improved by public-private partnerships focusing on paramedic training, making available essential medical supplies, and linking ambulance stations with designated healthcare facilities for appropriate RTI triage. PMID:24406963

  20. What is dignity in prehospital emergency care?

    PubMed

    Abelsson, Anna; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2017-05-01

    Ethics and dignity in prehospital emergency care are important due to vulnerability and suffering. Patients can lose control of their body and encounter unfamiliar faces in an emergency situation. To describe what specialist ambulance nurse students experienced as preserved and humiliated dignity in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative approach. Data were collected by Flanagan's critical incident technique. The participants were 26 specialist ambulance nurse students who described two critical incidents of preserved and humiliated dignity, from prehospital emergency care. Data consist of 52 critical incidents and were analyzed with interpretive content analysis. Ethical considerations: The study followed the ethical principles in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. The result showed how human dignity in prehospital emergency care can be preserved by the ambulance nurse being there for the patient. The ambulance nurses meet the patient in the patient's world and make professional decisions. The ambulance nurse respects the patient's will and protects the patient's body from the gaze of others. Humiliated dignity was described through the ambulance nurse abandoning the patient and by healthcare professionals failing, disrespecting, and ignoring the patient. It is a unique situation when a nurse meets a patient face to face in a critical life or death moment. The discussion describes courage and the ethical vision to see another human. Dignity was preserved when the ambulance nurse showed respect and protected the patient in prehospital emergency care. The ambulance nurse students' ethical obligation results in the courage to see when a patient's dignity is in jeopardy of being humiliated. Humiliated dignity occurs when patients are ignored and left unprotected. This ethical dilemma affects the ambulance nurse students badly due to the fact that the morals and attitudes of ambulance nurses are reflected in their actions toward the patient.

  1. Best practice recommendations for prehospital veterinary care of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Hanel, Rita M; Palmer, Lee; Baker, Janice; Brenner, Jo-Anne; Crowe, Dennis T Tim; Dorman, David; Gicking, John C; Gilger, Brian; Otto, Cynthia M; Robertson, Sheilah A; Rozanski, Elizabeth; Trumpatori, Brian

    2016-01-01

    To examine available evidence on prehospital care in human and veterinary trauma and emergency medicine and develop best practice guidelines for use by both paramedical and nonparamedical personnel in the approach to the prehospital care of dogs and cats. Systematic evaluation of the literature gathered via medical databases searches of Medline, CAB abstracts, and Google Scholar. From a review and systematic evaluation of the available evidence, consensus guidelines on the approach to prehospital care of dogs and cats in 18 scenarios were developed. Due to the lack of current evidence in the veterinary prehospital arena, best practice guidelines were developed as an initial platform. Recommendations were based on a review of pertinent human and available veterinary literature as well as a consensus of the authors' professional opinions. It is anticipated that evidence-based additions will be made in the future. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  2. Trauma care in India and Germany.

    PubMed

    Oestern, Hans-Joerg; Garg, Bhavuk; Kotwal, Prakash

    2013-09-01

    Road traffic accidents are among the leading causes of death worldwide in individuals younger than 45 years. In both India and Germany, there has been an increase in registered motor vehicles over the last decades. However, while the number of traffic accident victims steadily dropped in Germany, there has been a sustained increase in India. We analyze this considering the sustained differences in rescue and trauma system status. We compared India and Germany in terms of (1) vehicular infrastructure and causes of road traffic accident-related trauma, (2) burden of trauma, and (3) current trauma care and prevention, and (4) based on these observations, we suggested how India and other countries can enhance trauma care and prevention. Data for Germany were obtained from federal statistical databases, German Automobile Club, and German Trauma Registry. Data from India were available from the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways. We also performed a standardized literature search of PubMed for India and Germany using the following key words: "road traffic accidents", "prevention", "prehospital trauma care", "trauma system", "trauma registry", "trauma centers", and "development of vehicles." The total number of registered motor vehicles increased 473-fold in India and 100-fold in Germany from 1951 to 2011. The number of road traffic deaths increased in both countries until 1970, but thereafter decreased in Germany (3606 in 2012) while continuing to increase in India (142,485 in 2011). The differences between Germany and India relate to the relative sizes and populations of the countries (1:9 and 1:15, respectively), and differences in prevention and prehospital care (nationwide versus big cities) and hospital trauma systems (nationwide versus exceptional). Improvement requires attention to three major issues: (1) prevention through infrastructure, traffic laws, mandatory licensing; (2) establishment of a prehospital care system; and (3) establishment of regional

  3. Impact of the prehospital trauma life support programme in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R U; Gana, T J; George, B; Taylor, A; Patino, T; West, U; Ali, E; Bedaysie, H

    1998-09-01

    The impact of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) programme, introduced in Trinidad and Tobago in 1992, was assessed by questionnaires completed by 26 medical personnel (MP); 71 ambulance personnel (AP); and 50 non ambulance paramedical personnel (NAP). Of the 23 MP, 45 AP and 38 NAP who were aware of the programme, 19 (82.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 25 (65.8%) NAP were able to differentiate personnel that had taken the PHTLS programme based on their performance. 32 (71.1%) of the AP were PHTLS trained. 24 (53.3%) and 4 (9%) of the AP identified poor equipment and poor supervision, respectively, as reasons for difficulty in applying PHTLS principles. Improvements observed among those completing the PHTLS programme were: improved resuscitation techniques by 20 (86.9%) MP, 38 (84.4%) AP and 27 (71.1%) NAP; better vital signs recording by 8 (34.8%) MP, 27 (60%) AP and 8 (21.1%) NAP; improved immobilization by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 33 (86.8%) NAP; better haemorrhage control by 22 (95.6%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 24 (63.2%) NAP; appropriate splinting of fractures by 23 (100%) MP, 40 (88.9%) AP and 32 (84.2%) NAP; and increased utilization of oxygen by 15 (65.2%) MP, 31 (68.9%) AP and 21 (55.3%) NAP. 32 (71.1%) AP with PHTLS training indicated improvement in their ability to resuscitate and transport trauma victims, with 42 (93.3%) reporting improvement in overall prehospital care. Medical, paramedical and ambulance personnel all perceive a significant positive impact of PHTLS training on prehospital trauma care. Although improvements in supervision, documentation and equipment are still required, improved trauma resuscitative techniques after PHTLS training should improve trauma patient outcome in Trinidad and Tobago.

  4. Prehospital care and new models of regionalization.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C; Brooke Lerner, E; Band, Roger A; Renjilian, Chris; Bobrow, Bentley J; Crawford Mechem, C; Carter, Alix J E; Kupas, Douglas F; Spaite, Daniel W

    2010-12-01

    This article summarizes the discussions of the emergency medical services (EMS) breakout session at the June 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." The group focused on prehospital issues such as the identification of patients by EMS personnel, protocol-driven destination selection, bypassing closer nondesignated centers to transport patients directly to more distant designated specialty centers, and the modes of transport to be used as they relate to the regionalization of emergency care. It is our hope that the proposed research agenda will be advanced in a way that begins to rigorously approach the unanswered research questions and that these answers, in turn, will lead to an evidence-based, cohesive, comprehensive, and more uniform set of guidelines that govern the delivery and practice of prehospital emergency care.

  5. PHTLS (Prehospital Trauma Life Support) overseas.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, W

    2001-05-01

    There are many names and places that space will not allow here. In the future, I hope to write about these places one at a time and give more detailed reports on the people all over the world who are our brothers and sisters in EMS, covering the places they work and how they provide care. In any event, with each opportunity, we learn about people, ourselves and how small a place the world has become. We are reminded not to approach people and places with belligerence, implying that we have all the answers. By considering the culture and environment in which care is provided, we learn to bring the same open-mindedness back home to help when addressing the problems we face every day. What our neighbors have to teach us may be the next big step in our development.

  6. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance.

  7. Prehospital care - scoop and run or stay and play?

    PubMed

    Smith, R Malcolm; Conn, Alasdair K T

    2009-11-01

    Improved training and expertise has enabled emergency medical personnel to provide advanced levels of care at the scene of trauma. While this could be expected to improve the outcome from major injury, current data does not support this. Indeed, prehospital interventions beyond the BLS level have not been shown to be effective and in many cases have proven to be detrimental to patient outcome. It is better to "scoop and run" than "stay and play". Current data relates to the urban environment where transport times to trauma centres are short and where it appears better to simply rapidly transport the patient to hospital than attempt major interventions at the scene. There may be more need for advanced techniques in the rural environment or where transport times are prolonged and certainly a need for more studies into subsets of patients who may benefit from interventions in the field.

  8. Prehospital intravenous fluid administration is associated with higher mortality in trauma patients: a National Trauma Data Bank analysis.

    PubMed

    Haut, Elliott R; Kalish, Brian T; Cotton, Bryan A; Efron, David T; Haider, Adil H; Stevens, Kent A; Kieninger, Alicia N; Cornwell, Edward E; Chang, David C

    2011-02-01

    Prehospital intravenous (IV) fluid administration is common in trauma patients, although little evidence supports this practice. We hypothesized that trauma patients who received prehospital IV fluids have higher mortality than trauma patients who did not receive IV fluids in the prehospital setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients from the National Trauma Data Bank. Multiple logistic regression was used with mortality as the primary outcome measure. We compared patients with versus without prehospital IV fluid administration, using patient demographics, mechanism, physiologic and anatomic injury severity, and other prehospital procedures as covariates. Subset analysis was performed based on mechanism (blunt/penetrating), hypotension, immediate surgery, severe head injury, and injury severity score. A total of 776,734 patients were studied. Approximately half (49.3%) received prehospital IV. Overall mortality was 4.6%. Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in patients receiving prehospital IV fluids (4.8% vs. 4.5%, P < 0.001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that patients receiving IV fluids were significantly more likely to die (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.17). The association was identified in nearly all subsets of trauma patients. It is especially marked in patients with penetrating mechanism (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08–1.45), hypotension (OR 1.44, 95% CI1.29–1.59), severe head injury (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.17–1.54), and patients undergoing immediate surgery (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.22–1.50). The harm associated with prehospital IV fluid administration is significant for victims of trauma. The routine use of prehospital IV fluid administration for all trauma patients should be discouraged.

  9. Prehospital coagulation monitoring of resuscitation with point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    A variety of point-of-care monitors for the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood gas with electrolytes, and lactate can be used also in the prehospital setting for optimizing and individualizing trauma resuscitation. Point-of-care coagulation testing with activated prothrombin test, prothrombin test, and activated coagulation/clotting time tests is available for prehospital use. Although robust, battery driven, and easy to handle, many devices lack documentation for use in prehospital care. Some of the devices correspond poorly to corresponding laboratory analyses in acute trauma coagulopathy and at lower hematocrits. In trauma, viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography can rapidly detect acute trauma coagulopathy and give an overall dynamic picture of the hemostatic system and the interaction between its different components: coagulation activation, fibrin polymerization, fibrin platelet interactions within the clot, and fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry is shock resistant and has the potential to be used outside the hospital setting to guide individualized coagulation factor and blood component therapies. Sonoclot and Rheorox are two small viscoelastic instruments with one-channel options, but with less documentation. The point-of-care market for coagulation tests is quickly expanding, and new devices are introduced all the time. Still they should be better adopted to prehospital conditions, small, robust, battery charged, and rapid and use small sample volumes and whole blood.

  10. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) - One Year Later: A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area-Afghanistan (CJOA-A)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    control noncompressible hemorrhage in the prehos- pital environment. 10. The authorization of ketamine as a prehospi- tal pain management therapy in...severe pain /shock/ respiratory distress, or at significant risk of these conditions. 11. Creation and manning of the deployed JTTS Pre- hospital...by data analysis from the JTS, the most common and prevailing prehospital method for treating pain in CJOA-A is the absence of treatment with a pain

  11. Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice. Methods An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context. Results The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage. Conclusion Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of

  12. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  13. Protocol for a prospective observational study to improve prehospital notification of injured patients presenting to trauma centres in India

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Biswadev; Mathew, Joseph; Gupta, Amit; Cameron, Peter; O'Reilly, Gerard; Soni, Kapil Dev; Kaushik, Gaurav; Howard, Teresa; Fahey, Madonna; Stephenson, Michael; Kumar, Vineet; Vyas, Sharad; Dharap, Satish; Patel, Pankaj; Thakor, Advait; Sharma, Naveen; Walker, Tony; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Gruen, Russell; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prehospital notification of injured patients enables prompt and timely care in hospital through adequate preparation of trauma teams, space, equipment and consumables necessary for resuscitation, and may improve outcomes. In India, anecdotal reports suggest that prehospital notification, in those few places where it occurs, is unstructured and not linked to a well-defined hospital response. The aim of this manuscript is to describe, in detail, a study protocol for the evaluation of a formalised approach to prehospital notification. Methods and analysis This is a longitudinal prospective cohort study of injured patients being transported by ambulance to major trauma centres in India. In the preintervention phase, prospective data on patients will be collected on prehospital assessment, notification, inhospital assessment, management and outcomes and recorded in a new tailored multihospital trauma registry. All injured patients arriving by ambulance and allocated to a red or yellow priority category will be eligible for inclusion. The intervention will be a prehospital notification application to be used by ambulance clinicians to notify emergency departments of the impending arrival of a patient. The proportion of eligible patients arriving to hospital after notification will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes evaluated will be availability of a trauma cubicle, presence of a trauma team on patient arrival, time to first chest X-ray and inhospital mortality. Progress Ethical approval has been obtained from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and site-specific approval granted by relevant trauma services. The trial has also been registered with the Monash University Human Research and Ethics Committee; Project number: CF16/1814 – 2016000929. Results will be fed back to prehospital and hospital clinicians via a series of reports and presentations. These will be used to facilitate discussions about service redesign and

  14. Protocol for a prospective observational study to improve prehospital notification of injured patients presenting to trauma centres in India.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Biswadev; Mathew, Joseph; Gupta, Amit; Cameron, Peter; O'Reilly, Gerard; Soni, Kapil Dev; Kaushik, Gaurav; Howard, Teresa; Fahey, Madonna; Stephenson, Michael; Kumar, Vineet; Vyas, Sharad; Dharap, Satish; Patel, Pankaj; Thakor, Advait; Sharma, Naveen; Walker, Tony; Misra, Mahesh Chandra; Gruen, Russell; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2017-07-17

    Prehospital notification of injured patients enables prompt and timely care in hospital through adequate preparation of trauma teams, space, equipment and consumables necessary for resuscitation, and may improve outcomes. In India, anecdotal reports suggest that prehospital notification, in those few places where it occurs, is unstructured and not linked to a well-defined hospital response. The aim of this manuscript is to describe, in detail, a study protocol for the evaluation of a formalised approach to prehospital notification. This is a longitudinal prospective cohort study of injured patients being transported by ambulance to major trauma centres in India. In the preintervention phase, prospective data on patients will be collected on prehospital assessment, notification, inhospital assessment, management and outcomes and recorded in a new tailored multihospital trauma registry. All injured patients arriving by ambulance and allocated to a red or yellow priority category will be eligible for inclusion. The intervention will be a prehospital notification application to be used by ambulance clinicians to notify emergency departments of the impending arrival of a patient. The proportion of eligible patients arriving to hospital after notification will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes evaluated will be availability of a trauma cubicle, presence of a trauma team on patient arrival, time to first chest X-ray and inhospital mortality. Ethical approval has been obtained from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi and site-specific approval granted by relevant trauma services. The trial has also been registered with the Monash University Human Research and Ethics Committee; Project number: CF16/1814 - 2016000929. Results will be fed back to prehospital and hospital clinicians via a series of reports and presentations. These will be used to facilitate discussions about service redesign and implementation. It is expected that evidence

  15. Korean hand acupressure for motion sickness in prehospital trauma care: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded trial in a geriatric population.

    PubMed

    Bertalanffy, Petra; Hoerauf, Klaus; Fleischhackl, Roman; Strasser, Helmut; Wicke, Franziska; Greher, Manfred; Gustorff, Burkhard; Kober, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Patients with trauma or medical illnesses transported to the hospital by ambulance have a frequent incidence of motion sickness. Because the administration of drugs in the ambulance is prohibited by law in Austria, the noninvasive Korean hand acupressure point at K-K9 may be an alternative against nausea and vomiting. We enrolled 100 geriatric patients with minor trauma, randomizing them into a K-K9 group and a sham acupressure group. We recorded visual analog scores (VAS) for nausea and for the patient's overall satisfaction with the treatment, hemodynamic variables, and peripheral vasoconstriction. In the K-K9 group, a significant (P < 0.01) increase in nausea was recorded in all cases: from VAS of 0 mm to 25 +/- 6 mm. A similarly significant (P < 0.01) increase was registered in the sham group: from VAS of 0 mm to 83 +/- 8 mm. However, at the time of arrival in the hospital, nausea scores were significantly different between the K-K9 group and the sham group (P < 0.01). Although all patients had been vasoconstricted at the emergency site before treatment, there was a significant difference (P < 0.01) between groups with regard to the number of vasoconstricted patients at the hospital (4 and 46 constricted and dilated, respectively, in the K-K9 group versus 48 and 2 constricted and dilated, respectively, in the sham group). On arrival in the hospital, a significant difference (P < 0.01) in heart rate was noted between the K-K9 group and the sham group (65 +/- 6 bpm versus 98 +/- 8 bpm). The patients' overall satisfaction with the provided care was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the K-K9 group (19 +/- 9 mm VAS) than in the sham group (48 +/- 12 mm VAS). Neither group experienced a significant change in blood pressure. K-K9 stimulation was an effective and simple treatment for nausea during emergency care and significantly improved patient satisfaction. Korean hand acupressure at the K-K9 point was effective in reducing nausea and subjective symptoms of motion

  16. Effect of basic prehospital trauma life support program on cognitive and trauma management skills.

    PubMed

    Ali, J; Adam, R; Josa, D; Pierre, I; Bedsaysie, H; West, U; Winn, J; Ali, E; Haynes, B

    1998-12-01

    We tested the effectiveness of a basic prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) program by assessing cognitive performance and trauma management skills among prehospital trauma personnel. Fourteen subjects who completed a standard PHTLS course (group I) were compared to a matched group not completing a PHTLS program (group II). Cognitive performance was assessed on 50-item multiple choice examinations, and trauma skills management was assessed with four simulated trauma patients. Pre-PHTLS multiple choice questionnaire scores were similar (45.8 +/- 9.4% vs. 48.8 +/- 8.9% for groups I and II, respectively), but the post-PHTLS scores were higher in group I (80.4 +/- 5.9%) than in group II (52.6 +/- 4.9%). Pre-PHTLS simulated trauma patient performance scores (standardized to a maximum total of 20 for each station) were similar at all four stations for both groups, ranging from 7.9 to 10.4. The post-PHTLS scores were statistically significantly higher at all four stations for group I (range 16.0-19.0) compared to those for group II (range 8.0-11.1). The overall mean pre-PHTLS score for all four stations was 8.3 +/- 2.1 for group I and 8.8 +/- 2.0 (NS) for group II; the group I post-PHTLS mean score for the four stations was 17.1 +/- 2.7 (p < 0.05) compared to 9.1 +/- 2.3 for group II. Pre-PHTLS Adherence to Priority scores on a scale of 1 to 7 were similar (1.1 +/- 0.9 for group I and 1.2 +/- 1.0 for group II). Post-PHTLS group I Priority scores increased to 5.9 +/- 1.1. Group II (1.1 +/- 1.0) did not improve their post-PHTLS scores. The pre-PHTLS Organized Approach scores in the simulated trauma patients on a scale of 1 to 5 were 2.1 +/- 1.0 for group I and 1.9 +/- 1.2 for group II (NS) compared to 4.2 +/- 0.9 (p < 0.05) in group I and 2.0 +/- 0.8 in group II after PHTLS. This study demonstrates improved cognitive and trauma management skills performance among prehospital paramedical personnel who complete the basic PHTLS program.

  17. Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training of ambulance caregivers and impact on survival of trauma victims.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jakob; Blomberg, Hans; Svennblad, Bodil; Wernroth, Lisa; Melhus, Håkan; Byberg, Liisa; Michaëlsson, Karl; Karlsten, Rolf; Gedeborg, Rolf

    2012-10-01

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course has been widely implemented and approximately half a million prehospital caregivers in over 50 countries have taken this course. Still, the effect on injury outcome remains to be established. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between PHTLS training of ambulance crew members and the mortality in trauma patients. A population-based observational study of 2830 injured patients, who either died or were hospitalized for more than 24 h, was performed during gradual implementation of PHTLS in Uppsala County in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. Prehospital patient records were linked to hospital-discharge records, cause-of-death records, and information on PHTLS training and the educational level of ambulance crews. The main outcome measure was death, on scene or in hospital. Adjusting for multiple potential confounders, PHTLS training appeared to be associated with a reduction in mortality, but the precision of this estimate was poor (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-1.19). The mortality risk was 4.7% (36/763) without PHTLS training and 4.5% (94/2067) with PHTLS training. The predicted absolute risk reduction is estimated to correspond to 0.5 lives saved annually per 100,000 population with PHTLS fully implemented. PHTLS training of ambulance crew members may be associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients, but the precision in this estimate was low due to the overall low mortality. While there may be a relative risk reduction, the predicted absolute risk reduction in this population was low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prehospital emergency care in Shanghai: present and future.

    PubMed

    Gui, Li; Gu, Shen; Lu, Feng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Ling

    2012-12-01

    In Shanghai, prehospital emergency medical services are provided by the public Ambulance Services. The 60th anniversary of the local Ambulance Services is a good opportunity to provide an overview of the current trends in prehospital emergency medical care in Shanghai. In this report, the features of Shanghai prehospital emergency medical care are described, as well as the Shanghai model of purely prehospital emergency medical care, including the communications and dispatch system, ambulance depots and ambulances, and prehospital rescue teams. Responses to major incidents including public health emergencies and natural disasters are also discussed, with the intention of highlighting future directions in emergency medical services, as well as the influence of international trends in emergency patient care. Although Shanghai has the most advanced dispatch system in China (equipped with a Global Positioning System, Global Information System, and more) and can be expanded quickly in case of mass casualty incidents, there is, as yet, no uniform Emergency Medical Service (EMS) dispatching for the entire city. Nor are there certifications, degrees, or special continuing education programs available for EMS dispatchers. Although there are more and more ambulance depots spread all over Shanghai, the city struggles with inadequate prehospital emergency caregivers, because every ambulance has to be staffed with a qualified Emergency Physician, and there are also recruitment problems for ambulance physicians. Although faced with many challenges, substantial progress is expected in Shanghai prehospital emergency care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. International trauma teleconference: evaluating trauma care and facilitating quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Castillo, Roberto C; Rodas, Edgar B; Suarez-Becerra, Jose M; Puentes-Manosalva, Fabian E; Wendt, Luke M

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation, development, and implementation of trauma systems in Latin America are challenging undertakings as no model is currently in place that can be easily replicated throughout the region. The use of teleconferencing has been essential in overcoming other challenges in the medical field and improving medical care. This article describes the use of international videoconferencing in the field of trauma and critical care as a tool to evaluate differences in care based on local resources, as well as facilitating quality improvement and system development in Latin America. In February 2009, the International Trauma and Critical Care Improvement Project was created and held monthly teleconferences between U.S. trauma surgeons and Latin American general surgeons, emergency physicians, and intensivists. In-depth discussions and prospective evaluations of each case presented were conducted by all participants based on resources available. Care rendered was divided in four stages: (1) pre-hospital setting, (2) emergency room or trauma room, (3) operating room, and (4) subsequent postoperative care. Furthermore, the participating institutions completed an electronic survey of trauma resources based on World Health Organization/International Association for Trauma and Surgical Intensive Care guidelines. During a 17-month period, 15 cases in total were presented from a Level I and a Level II U.S. hospital (n=3) and five Latin American hospitals (n=12). Presentations followed the Advanced Trauma Life Support sequence in all U.S. cases but in only 3 of the 12 Latin American cases. The following deficiencies were observed in cases presented from Latin America: pre-hospital communication was nonexistent in all cases; pre-hospital services were absent in 60% of cases presented; lack of trauma team structure was evident in the emergency departments; during the initial evaluation and resuscitation, the Advanced Trauma Life Support protocol was followed one time and the Clinical

  20. Association of Prehospital Mode of Transport With Mortality in Penetrating Trauma: A Trauma System-Level Assessment of Private Vehicle Transportation vs Ground Emergency Medical Services.

    PubMed

    Wandling, Michael W; Nathens, Avery B; Shapiro, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2017-09-20

    Time to definitive care following injury is important to the outcomes of trauma patients. Prehospital trauma care is provided based on policies developed by individual trauma systems and is an important component of the care of injured patients. Given a paucity of systems-level trauma research, considerable variability exists in prehospital care policies across trauma systems, potentially affecting patient outcomes. To evaluate whether private vehicle prehospital transport confers a survival advantage vs ground emergency medical services (EMS) transport following penetrating injuries in urban trauma systems. Retrospective cohort study of data included in the National Trauma Data Bank from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2012, comprising 298 level 1 and level 2 trauma centers that contribute data to the National Trauma Data Bank that are located within the 100 most populous metropolitan areas in the United States. Of 2 329 446 patients assessed for eligibility, 103 029 were included in this study. All patients were 16 years or older, had a gunshot wound or stab wound, and were transported by ground EMS or private vehicle. In-hospital mortality. Of the 2 329 446 records assessed for eligibility, 103 029 individuals at 298 urban level 1 and level 2 trauma centers were included in the analysis. The study population was predominantly male (87.6%), with a mean age of 32.3 years. Among those included, 47.9% were black, 26.3% were white, and 18.4% were Hispanic. Following risk adjustment, individuals with penetrating injuries transported by private vehicle were less likely to die than patients transported by ground EMS (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.31-0.47). This association remained statistically significant on stratified analysis of the gunshot wound (OR,  0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.56) and stab wound (OR,  0.32; 95% CI, 0.20-0.52) subgroups. Private vehicle transport is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of death when compared with

  1. Education, exposure and experience of prehospital teams as quality indicators in regional trauma systems.

    PubMed

    Van Der Eng, Dorien M; van Beeck, Eduard F; Hoogervorst, Elizabeth M; Bierens, Joost J L M

    2016-08-01

    Indicators to measure the quality of trauma care may be instrumental in benchmarking and improving trauma systems. This retrospective, observational study investigated whether data on three indicators for competencies of Dutch trauma teams (i.e. education, exposure, experience; agreed upon during a prior Delphi procedure) can be retrieved from existing registrations. The validity and distinctive power of these indicators were explored by analysing available data in four regions. Data of all polytrauma patients treated by the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services were collected retrospectively over a 1-year period. During the Delphi procedure, a polytrauma patient was defined as one with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 9 or less or a Paediatric Coma Scale of 9 or less, together with a Revised Trauma Score of 10 or less. Information on education, exposure and experience of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services physician and nurse were registered for each patient contact. Data on 442 polytrauma patients could be retrieved. Of these, according to the Delphi consensus, 220 were treated by a fully competent team (i.e. both the physician and the nurse fulfilled the three indicators for competency) and 22 patients were treated by a team not fulfilling all three indicators for competency. Across the four regions, patients were treated by teams with significant differences in competencies (P=0.002). The quality indicators of education, exposure and experience of prehospital physicians and nurses can be measured reliably, have a high level of usability and have distinctive power.

  2. High-velocity facial gunshot wounds: multidisciplinary care from prehospital to discharge.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, J D; Morris, G; Medland, P J; Porter, K

    2016-01-28

    A case is presented in which a high velocity rifle (shotgun) was fired into the inferior part of a patient's face in an attempted suicide causing widespread trauma to the inferior and left side of the patient's face. He presented to his general practitioner where an ambulance was called. The patient is followed from prehospital care (air ambulance) to resuscitation in accident and emergency and through the first stages of reconstructive surgery. The article focuses on the multidisciplinary approach to the patient's prehospital care and initial resuscitation at a major trauma centre. CT reconstruction images of the patient's skull allow visualisation of the extent of bone damage at presentation. Medical photography allows visualisation of the extent of the initial damage and shows how reconstructive surgery was undertaken early and in progressive stages. A literature review was performed allowing discussion of the current evidence and best practice in the management of facial gunshot wounds. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Pre-Hospital Intravenous Fluid is Associated with Increased Survival in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, David A.; Fabricant, Löic J.; Differding, Jerry; Diggs, Brian; Underwood, Samantha; De La Cruz, Dodie; Holcomb, John B.; Brasel, Karen J.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Fox, Erin E.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Phelan, Herb A.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Wade, Charles E.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of intravenous crystalloid fluids (IVF) remains a tradition-based priority during pre-hospital resuscitation of trauma patients. Hypotensive and targeted resuscitation algorithms have been shown to improve patient outcomes. We hypothesized that receiving any pre-hospital IVF is associated with increased survival in trauma patients compared to receiving no pre-hospital IVF. Methods Prospective data from ten Level 1 trauma centers were collected. Patient demographics, pre-hospital IVF volume, pre-hospital and Emergency Department vital signs, life-saving interventions, laboratory values, outcomes and complications were collected and analyzed. Patients who did or did not receive pre-hospital IVF were compared. Tests for non-parametric data were utilized to assess significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent influence of IVF on outcome and complications. Results The study population consisted of 1245 trauma patients; 45 were removed due to incomplete data; 84% (n=1009) received pre-hospital IVF, and 16% (n=191) did not. There was no difference between the groups with respect to gender, age, and Injury Severity Score. The on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP) was lower in the IVF group (110 vs. 100 mmHg, p<0.04) and did not change significantly after IVF, measured at ED admission (110 vs. 105 mmHg, p=0.05). Hematocrit/hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and platelets were lower (p<0.05), and Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio and Partial Thromboplastin Time were higher (p<0.001) in the IVF group. The IVF group received a median fluid volume of 700ml (IQR: 300-1300). The Cox regression revealed that pre-hospital fluid administration was associated with increased survival, Hazard Ratio: 0.84 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.72, 0.98; p=0.03). Site differences in ISS and fluid volumes were demonstrated (p<0.001). Conclusions Pre-hospital IVF volumes commonly used by PROMMTT

  4. Prehospital management and fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Talving, Peep; Pålstedt, Joakim; Riddez, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Few previous studies have been conducted on the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to describe the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients admitted to the largest trauma center in Sweden, and to assess whether prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) guidelines have been implemented regarding prehospital time intervals and fluid therapy. In addition, the effects of the age, type of injury, injury severity, prehospital time interval, blood pressure, and fluid therapy on outcome were investigated. This is a retrospective, descriptive study on consecutive, hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure < or = 90 mmHg on the scene of injury) admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, during 2001-2003. The reported values are medians with interquartile ranges. Basic demographics, prehospital time intervals and interventions, injury severity scores (ISS), type and volumes of prehospital fluid resuscitation, and 30-day mortality were abstracted. The effects of the patient's age, gender, prehospital time interval, type of injury, injury severity, on-scene and emergency department blood pressure, and resuscitation fluid volumes on mortality were analyzed using the exact logistic regression model. In 102 (71 male) adult patients (age > or = 15 years) recruited, the median age was 35.5 years (range: 27-55 years) and 77 patients (75%) had suffered blunt injury. The predominant trauma mechanisms were falls between levels (24%) and motor vehicle crashes (22%) with an ISS of 28.5 (range: 16-50). The on-scene time interval was 19 minutes (range: 12-24 minutes). Fluid therapy was initiated at the scene of injury in the majority of patients (73%) regardless of the type of injury (77 blunt [75%] / 25 penetrating [25%]) or injury severity (ISS: 0-20; 21-40; 41-75). Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), male gender (OR = 3.2), ISS 21-40 (OR = 13.6), and ISS >40 (OR = 43.6) were the

  5. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Hanne H; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Steinmetz, Jacob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Wade, Charles E

    2016-12-09

    The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group; nearly half received both RBCs and plasma) whereas 182 patients only received in-hospital blood products (RBCs, Plasma and Platelets) within 6 hours of admission (IH group). PH patients had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, more penetrating injuries, lower systolic blood pressures, lower hemoglobin levels, lower platelet counts and greater acidosis upon ED admission than the IH group (all p < 0.05). Despite differences in type of injury and admission vitals indicating that the PH group had more signs of bleeding than the IH group, there were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality (PH 26.7% vs. IH 20.9% p = 0.31). When comparing rTEG variables between PH patients transfused with 0, 1 or 2 units of plasma, more pre-hospital plasma transfusion was tendency towards improved rTEG variables. When adjusting for pre-hospital RBC, pre-hospital plasma was associated with significantly higher rTEG MA (p = 0.012) at hospital admission. After adjusting for pre-hospital RBCs, pre-hospital plasma transfusion was independently associated with increased rTEG MA, as well as arrival indices of

  6. The characteristics and pre-hospital management of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Oosterwold, J T; Sagel, D C; van Grunsven, P M; Holla, M; de Man-van Ginkel, J; Berben, S

    2017-08-01

    Pre-hospital spinal immobilisation by emergency medical services (EMS) staff is currently the standard of care in cases of suspected spinal column injuries. There is, however, a lack of data on the characteristics of patients who received spinal immobilisation during the pre-hospital phase and on the adverse effects of immobilisation. The objectives of this study were threefold. First, we determined the pre-hospital characteristics of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries who were immobilised by EMS staff. Second, we assessed the choices made by EMS staff regarding spinal immobilisation techniques and reasons for immobilisation. Third, we researched the possible adverse effects of immobilisation. A retrospective observational study in a cohort of blunt trauma patients. Data of blunt trauma patients with suspected spinal column injuries were collected from one EMS organisation between January 2008 and January 2013. Coded data and free text notes were analysed. A total of 1082 patients were included in this study. Spinal immobilisation was applied in 96.3 % of the patients based on valid pre-hospital criteria. In 2.1 % of the patients immobilisation was not based on valid criteria. Data of 1.6 % patients were missing. Main reasons for spinal immobilisation were posterior midline spinal tenderness (37.2 % of patients) and painful distracting injuries (13.5 % of patients). Spinal cord injury (SCI) was suspected in 5.7 % of the patients with posterior midline spinal tenderness. A total of 15.8 % patients were immobilised using non-standard methods. The reason for departure from the standard method was explained for 3 % of these patients. Reported adverse effects included pain (n = 10, 0.9 %,); shortness of breath (n = 3, 0.3 %); combativeness or anxiety (n = 6, 0.6 %); and worsening of pain when supine (n = 1, 0.1 %). Spinal immobilisation was applied in 96.3 % of all included patients based on pre-hospital criteria. We found

  7. Prehospital fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients: do we need a tailored approach?

    PubMed

    Geeraedts, Leo M G; Pothof, Leonie A H; Caldwell, Erica; de Lange-de Klerk, Elly S M; D'Amours, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    The ideal strategy for prehospital intravenous fluid resuscitation in trauma remains unclear. Fluid resuscitation may reverse shock but aggravate bleeding by raising blood pressure and haemodilution. We examined the effect of prehospital i.v. fluid on the physiologic status and need for blood transfusion in hypotensive trauma patients after their arrival in the emergency department (ED). Retrospective analysis of trauma patients (n=941) with field hypotension presenting to a level 1 trauma centre. Regression models were used to investigate associations between prehospital fluid volumes and shock index and blood transfusion respectively in the emergency department and mortality at 24h. A 1L increase of prehospital i.v. fluid was associated with a 7% decrease of shock index in the emergency department (p<0.001). Volumes of 0.5-1L and 1-2L were associated with reduced likelihood of shock as compared to volumes of 0-0.5L: OR 0.61 (p=0.03) and OR 0.54 (p=0.02), respectively. Volumes of 1-2L were also associated with an increased likelihood of receiving blood transfusion in ED: OR 3.27 (p<0.001). Patients who had received volumes of >2L have a much greater likelihood of receiving blood transfusion in ED: OR 9.92 (p<0.001). Mortality at 24h was not associated with prehospital i.v. fluids. In hypotensive trauma patients, prehospital i.v. fluids were associated with a reduction of likelihood of shock upon arrival in ED. However, volumes of >1L were associated with a markedly increased likelihood of receiving blood transfusion in ED. Therefore, decision making regarding prehospital i.v. fluid resuscitation is critical and may need to be tailored to the individual situation. Further research is needed to clarify whether a causal relationship exists between prehospital i.v. fluid volume and blood transfusion. Also, prospective trials on prehospital i.v. fluid resuscitation strategies in specific patient subgroups (e.g. traumatic brain injury and concomitant haemorrhage) are

  8. The impact of short prehospital times on trauma center performance benchmarking: An ecologic study.

    PubMed

    Byrne, James P; Mann, N Clay; Hoeft, Christopher J; Buick, Jason; Karanicolas, Paul; Rizoli, Sandro; Hunt, John P; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-04-01

    Emergency medical service (EMS) prehospital times vary between regions, yet the impact of local prehospital times on trauma center (TC) performance is unknown. To inform external benchmarking efforts, we explored the impact of EMS prehospital times on the risk-adjusted rate of emergency department (ED) death and overall hospital mortality at urban TCs across the United States. We used a novel ecologic study design, linking EMS data from the National EMS Information System to TCs participating in the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) by destination zip code. This approach provided EMS times for populations of injured patients transported to TQIP centers. We defined the exposure of interest as the 90th percentile total prehospital time (PHT) for each TC. TCs were then stratified by PHT quartile. Analyses were limited to adult patients with severe blunt or penetrating trauma, transported directly by land to urban TQIP centers. Random-intercept multilevel modeling was used to evaluate the risk-adjusted relationship between PHT quartile and the outcomes of ED death and overall hospital mortality. During the study period, 119,740 patients met inclusion criteria at 113 TCs. ED death occurred in 1% of patients, and overall mortality was 7.2%. Across all centers, the median PHT was 61 minutes (interquartile range, 53-71 minutes). After risk adjustment, TCs in regions with the shortest quartile of PHTs (<53 minutes) had significantly greater odds of ED death compared with those with the longest PHTs (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.78). However, there was no association between PHT and overall TC mortality. At urban TCs, local EMS prehospital times are a significant predictor of ED death. However, no relationship exists between prehospital time and overall TC risk-adjusted mortality. Therefore, there is no evidence for the inclusion of EMS prehospital time in external benchmarking analyses.

  9. The Tanzanian trauma patients' prehospital experience: a qualitative interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Kristin; Lim, Andrew George; Kepha, Bernard; Nalitolela, Neema Evelyne; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterise the prehospital experience of Tanzanian trauma patients, and identify barriers and facilitators to implement community-based emergency medical systems (EMS). Settings Our study was conducted in the emergency department of an urban national referral hospital in Tanzania. Participants A convenience sample of 34 adult trauma patients, or surrogate family members, presenting or referred to an urban referral emergency department in Tanzania for treatment of injury, participated in the study. Interventions Participation in semistructured, iteratively developed interviews until saturation of responses was reached. Outcomes A grounded theory-based approach to qualitative analysis was used to identify recurrent themes. Results We characterised numerous deficiencies within the existing clinic-to-hospital referral network, including missed/delayed diagnoses, limited management capabilities at pre-referral facilities and interfacility transfer delays. Potential barriers to EMS implementation include patient financial limitations and lack of insurance, limited public infrastructure and resources, and the credibility of potential first aid responders. Potential facilitators of EMS include communities’ tendency to pool resources, individuals’ trust of other community members to be first aid responders, and faith in community leaders to organise EMS response. Participants expressed a strong desire to learn first aid. Conclusions The composite themes generated by the data suggest that there are myriad structural, financial, institutional and cultural barriers to the implementation of a formal prehospital system. However, our analysis also revealed potential facilitators to a first-responder system that takes advantage of close-knit local communities and the trust of recognised leaders in society. The results suggest favourable acceptability for community-based response by trained lay people. There is significant opportunity for care

  10. A National Coordinating Center for Prehospital Trauma Research Funding Transfusion Using Stored Fresh Whole Blood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Using Stored Fresh Whole Blood PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donald Jenkins, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: NATIONAL TRAUMA INSTITUTE San Antonio...Std. Z39.18 A National Coordinating Center for Prehospital Trauma Research Funding Transfusion Using Stored Fresh Whole Blood Table of Contents...Warfighter Medical Research Program Funding to extend the work previously completed looking at the use of fresh whole blood FWB) and its ability to

  11. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1.

  12. Commercial filming of prehospital patient care

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, P D; Henning, J D

    2007-01-01

    Commercial filming of patients in the hospital and now the prehospital environment is becoming increasingly common. Television programmes that focus on medical emergencies with real footage of events remain highly successful and can make compelling viewing for both medical professionals and the general public alike. Recently several commentators have questioned the ethical aspects of filming in hospital emergency departments, and noted the lack of available evidence. This article reviews commercial filming and its impact in the prehospital environment and examines the ethical implications and current guidance in this unique setting. PMID:18029523

  13. The Quality of Pre-hospital Circulatory Management in Patients With Multiple Trauma Referred to the Trauma Center of Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, in the First Six Months of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulatory management is a critical issue in pre-hospital transportation phase of multiple trauma patients. However, the quality of this important care did not receive enough attention. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the quality of pre-hospital circulatory management in patients with multiple trauma. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. The study population consisted of all patients with multiple trauma who had been transferred by emergency medical services (EMS) to the central trauma department in Kashan Shahid Beheshti medical center, Kashan, Iran. We recruited a convenience sample of 400 patients with multiple trauma. Data were collected using the circulatory assessment questionnaire and controlling hemorrhage (CAQCH) that were designed by the researchers and were described by using frequency tabulations, central tendency measures, and variability indices. The chi-square test was used to analyze the data. Results The study sample consisted of 263 males (75.2%); 57.75% had lower levels of education and 28.75% were workers. The most common mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (85.4%). We found that the quality of circulatory management was unfavorable in 61% of the cases. A significant relationship was observed between the quality of circulatory management and type of trauma and staff’s employment status. Conclusions The quality of pre-hospital circulatory management provided to patients with multiple trauma was unfavorable. Therefore, establishment of in-service training programs on circulatory management is recommended. PMID:27556056

  14. Overview of the Essential Trauma Care Project.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul; Goosen, Jacques; Maier, Ronald

    2006-06-01

    The Essential Trauma Care (EsTC) Project represents an effort to set reasonable, affordable, minimum standards for trauma services worldwide and to define the resources necessary to actually provide these services to every injured person, even in the lowest-income countries. An emphasis is improved organization and planning, at minimal cost. The EsTC Project is a collaborative effort of the World Health Organization and the International Association for Trauma Surgery and Intensive Care, an integrated society within the International Society of Surgery-Société Internationale de Chirurgie. A milestone of the project has been the release of Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. This establishes 11 core Essential Trauma Care services that can be considered "The Rights of the Injured." To assure these services, Guidelines delineates 260 items of human and physical resources that should be in place at the spectrum of health facilities globally. These are delineated in a series of flexible resource tables, to be adjusted based on an individual country's circumstances. Guidelines is intended to serve as both a planning guide and an advocacy statement. It has been used to catalyze improvements in trauma care in several countries. It has stimulated five national-level consultation meetings on trauma care, which constituted the highest governmental attention yet devoted to trauma care in those countries. At these meetings, the EsTC resource templates were adjusted to local circumstances and implementation strategies developed. Future efforts need to emphasize more on-the-ground implementation in individual countries, greater linkages with prehospital care, and wider political endorsement, such as by passage of a World Health Assembly resolution.

  15. Prehospital trauma life support training of ambulance caregivers and the outcomes of traffic-injury victims in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Hans; Svennblad, Bodil; Michaelsson, Karl; Byberg, Liisa; Johansson, Jakob; Gedeborg, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    There is limited evidence that the widely implemented Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) educational program improves patient outcomes. The primary aim of this national study in Sweden was to investigate the association between regional implementation of PHTLS training and mortality after traffic injuries. We extracted information from the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry on victims of motor-vehicle traffic injuries in Sweden from 2001 to 2004 (N = 28,041). During this time period, PHTLS training was implemented at a varying pace in different regions. To control for other influences on patient outcomes related to regional and hospital-level effects, such as variations in performance of trauma care systems, we used Bayesian hierarchical regression models to estimate odds ratios for prehospital mortality and 30-day mortality after hospital admission. We also controlled for the calendar year for each injury to account for period effects. We analyzed the time to death after hospital admission and time to return to work using Cox's proportional hazards frailty models. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratio for prehospital mortality with PHTLS-trained prehospital staff was 1.54 (95% credibility interval, 1.07-2.13). For 30-day mortality among those surviving to hospital admission, the odds ratio was 0.85 (95% credibility interval, 0.45-1.48). There was no association between PHTLS training and time to death (hazard ratio = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.85-1.14) or time to return to work (hazard ratio = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.92-1.05). In this observational study, the implementation of PHTLS training did not appear to be associated with reduced mortality or ability to return to work after motor-vehicle traffic injuries. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improve performance in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Spath, P

    2001-05-01

    Many states have adopted trauma program legislation that includes a statewide trauma registry and performance evaluation activities. Hospitals participating in the trauma network are required to support the statewide activities through submission of data about the trauma patients they treat. By analyzing the quality of care provided to trauma patients, the trauma team members work to improve their services. Consulting editor Patrice Spath, RHIT, provides in-depth advice on how to measure and improve performance in trauma care.

  17. First Responders and Prehospital Care for Road Traffic Injuries in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Chokotho, Linda; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Singini, Isaac; Njalale, Yasin; Maliwichi-Senganimalunje, Limbika; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Road traffic collisions are a common cause of injuries and injury-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Basic prehospital care can be the difference between life and death for injured drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Problem This study examined the challenges associated with current first response practices in Malawi. In April 2014, focus groups were conducted in two areas of Malawi: Karonga (in the Northern Region) and Blantyre (in the Southern Region; both are along the M1 highway), and a qualitative synthesis approach was used to identify themes. All governmental and nongovernmental first response organizations identified by key informants were contacted, and a checklist was used to identify the services they offer. Access to professional prehospital care in Malawi is almost nonexistent, aside from a few city fire departments and private ambulance services. Rapid transportation to a hospital is usually the primary goal of roadside care because of limited first aid knowledge and a lack of access to basic safety equipment. The key informants recommended: expanding community-based first aid training; emphasizing umunthu (shared humanity) to inspire bystander involvement in roadside care; empowering local leaders to coordinate on-site responses; improving emergency communication systems; equipping traffic police with road safety gear; and expanding access to ambulance services. Prehospital care in Malawi would be improved by the creation of a formal network of community leaders, police, commercial drivers, and other lay volunteers who are trained in basic first aid and are equipped to respond to crash sites to provide roadside care to trauma patients and prepare them for safe transport to hospitals. Chokotho L , Mulwafu W , Singini I , Njalale Y , Maliwichi-Senganimalunje L , Jacobsen KH . First responders and prehospital care for road traffic injuries in Malawi. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):14-19.

  18. Development of key performance indicators for prehospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian; Wakai, Abel; Walsh, Cathal; Cummins, Fergal; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2016-04-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are used to monitor and evaluate critical areas of clinical and support functions that influence patient outcome. Traditional prehospital emergency care performance monitoring has focused solely on response time metrics. The landscape of emergency care delivery in Ireland is in the process of significant national reconfiguration. The development of KPIs is therefore considered one of the key priorities in prehospital research. The aim of this study was to develop a suite of KPIs for prehospital emergency care in Ireland. A systematic literature review of prehospital care performance measurement was undertaken followed by a three-round Delphi consensus process facilitated by a broad-based multidisciplinary group of panellists. The consensus process was conducted between June 2012 and October 2013. Each candidate indicator on the Delphi survey questionnaire was rated using a 5-point Likert-type rating scale. Agreement was defined as at least 70% of responders rating an indicator as 'agree' or 'strongly agree' on the rating scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Sensitivity of the ratings was examined for robustness by bootstrapping the original sample. Of the 78 citations identified by the systematic review, 5 relevant publications were used to select candidate indicators for the Delphi round 1 questionnaire. Response rates in Delphi rounds 1 and 2 were 89% and 83%, respectively. Following the consensus development conference, 101 KPIs reached consensus. Based on the Donabedian framework for quality-of-care indicators, 7 of the KPIs which reached agreement were structure KPIs, 74 were process KPIs and 20 were outcome KPIs. The highest ranked indicator was a process KPI ('Direct transport of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients to a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI)-capable facility for ECG to PCI time <90 min'). Improving the quality of prehospital care requires the development and implementation of

  19. Predicting prehospital care students' first-year academic performance.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    To answer two research questions: First, can previously identified factors relating to academic performance be used to predict first-year academic success for students undertaking a newly developed and vocationally oriented prehospital care course delivered in a rural setting? Second, can the study's findings be used to develop appropriate student selection criteria to assist in the admission of students into relevant tertiary studies or the prehospital care industry? A retrospective review of all first-year, on-campus prehospital care students enrolled in a vocational course at a rural Australian university from 1998 to 2001 was conducted. Six predictors of academic performance were examined, namely: University Admission Index (UAI), postsecondary educational qualifications, student entry type (traditional or mature-aged), previous health-related experience, gender, and background (rural or urban). Three dependent variables assessed academic performance: grade point average (GPA) of students who completed all required first-year subjects, GPA of students who completed at least one subject in the first year, and the student's ability to successfully complete the first year. UAI > 50, previous health-related experience, postsecondary educational qualifications, background, student entry type, and gender were all found to be significant predictors of first-year academic performance in selective cohorts. In addition, a combination of predictors produced higher GPAs than did any single predictor. Academic performance of first-year students in the prehospital care discipline can be predicted given the appropriate selection variables. Admission selection can be assisted with the generated Student Selection 001.

  20. An intelligent pre-hospital patient care system.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Mark; Myung, Dan; Hashmi, Nada; Shankaranarayanan, G

    2007-01-01

    iRevive is a sensor-supported, pre-hospital patient care system for the capture and transmittal of electronic patient data from the field to hospitals. It is being developed by 10Blade and Boston MedFlight. iRevive takes advantage of emerging technologies to offer a robust, flexible, and extensible IT infrastructure for patient data collection.

  1. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Van Dillen, Christine M; Tice, Matthew R; Patel, Archita D; Meurer, David A; Tyndall, Joseph A; Elie, Marie Carmelle; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88-1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25-1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43-1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures.

  2. Trauma Simulation Training Increases Confidence Levels in Prehospital Personnel Performing Life-Saving Interventions in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Archita D.; Meurer, David A.; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Limited evidence is available on simulation training of prehospital care providers, specifically the use of tourniquets and needle decompression. This study focused on whether the confidence level of prehospital personnel performing these skills improved through simulation training. Methods. Prehospital personnel from Alachua County Fire Rescue were enrolled in the study over a 2- to 3-week period based on their availability. Two scenarios were presented to them: a motorcycle crash resulting in a leg amputation requiring a tourniquet and an intoxicated patient with a stab wound, who experienced tension pneumothorax requiring needle decompression. Crews were asked to rate their confidence levels before and after exposure to the scenarios. Timing of the simulation interventions was compared with actual scene times to determine applicability of simulation in measuring the efficiency of prehospital personnel. Results. Results were collected from 129 participants. Pre- and postexposure scores increased by a mean of 1.15 (SD 1.32; 95% CI, 0.88–1.42; P < 0.001). Comparison of actual scene times with simulated scene times yielded a 1.39-fold difference (95% CI, 1.25–1.55) for Scenario 1 and 1.59 times longer for Scenario 2 (95% CI, 1.43–1.77). Conclusion. Simulation training improved prehospital care providers' confidence level in performing two life-saving procedures. PMID:27563467

  3. Pre-hospital care of the injured in South Western Nigeria: a hospital based study of four tertiary level hospitals in three states.

    PubMed

    Oluwadiya, K S; Olakulehin, A O; Olatoke, S A; Kolawole, I K; Solagberu, B A; Olasinde, A A; Komolafe, E O K

    2005-01-01

    Pre-hospital care in developing worlds has been found to be grossly deficient compared to high income countries. The pre-hospital care given to road accident victims attending the casualty departments of four tertiary level hospitals in South Western Nigeria was assessed using a one-page pro-forma. 1996 patients with injuries from road crashes were seen in the hospitals, only 172 had any form of pre-hospital care, just 160 were transported in ambulances and none had any form of organized pre-hospital care. The mean arrival time in the hospital after crashes was 93.6 minutes and there was a high rate (29.5%) of inter-hospital referral. For every Revised Trauma Score (RTS), the Probability of survival (Ps) of the patients was higher than the Ps of patients from high income countries.

  4. Usage of documented pre-hospital observations in secondary care: a questionnaire study and retrospective comparison of records.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Geir O; Fredriksen, Knut

    2013-03-01

    The patient handover is important for the safe transition from the pre-hospital setting to secondary care. The loss of critical information about the pre-hospital phase may impact upon the clinical course of the patient. University Hospital Emergency Care registrars answered a questionnaire about how they perceive clinical documentation from the ambulance services. We also reviewed patient records retrospectively, to investigate to what extent eight selected parameters were transferred correctly to hospital records by clinicians. Only parameters outside the normal range were selected. The registrars preferred a verbal handover with hand-written pre-hospital reports as the combined source of clinical information. Scanned report forms were infrequently used. Information from other doctors was perceived as more important than the information from ambulance crews. Less than half of the selected parameters in pre-hospital notes were transferred to hospital records, even for parameters regarded as important by the registrars. Abnormal vital signs were not transferred as often as mechanism of injury, medication administered and immobilisation of trauma patients. Data on pre-hospital abnormal vital signs are frequently not transferred to the hospital admission notes. This information loss may lead to suboptimal care.

  5. [Recruitment and training of prehospital emergency care nurses in Paris].

    PubMed

    Pladec, Boris Martin le; Menoret, Romuald; Rodes, Raphaël

    2016-11-01

    In collaboration with the ambulance driver and the emergency doctor, the prehospital nurse provides care in a universe which is often difficult and sometimes hostile. Whether they are a nurse from the Samu (urgent medical aid service) or from the Paris fire service, how are they recruited and what training do these emergency care professionals receive? Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prehospital care pathway delays: gender and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sharon; Condell, Sarah; Begley, Cecily; Fitzgerald, Tony

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study that identified gender specific prehospital care pathway delays amongst Irish women and men with myocardial infarction. Women are more likely to experience a poorer prognosis than their male counterparts following hospitalization for myocardial infarction, yet research shows that women continue to experience prehospital care pathway delays. A 1-year prospective census was carried in six major academic teaching hospitals in Dublin, Ireland in 2001-2002. A total of 277 (31%) female and 613 (69%) male patients with confirmed myocardial infarction were included in the study. Women were more likely to experience prolonged 'initial symptom-onset to A&E delays' (14 hours vs. 2.8 hours P < 0.0001), and 'intense symptom-onset to A&E delays' (3.1 hours vs. 1.8 hours , P < 0.0001), i.e. arrival at a hospital accident and emergency department. Advancing age was associated with greater prehospital delays (P < 0.0001), whilst patients with private health insurance had shorter delays than public patients (without private health insurance) or those with medical cards (entitling them to means-tested medical benefits) (P = 0.001). Patients who drove themselves by car to hospital had shorter median prehospital times than those arriving by any other admission mode (P < 0.0001), whilst those referred by their general practitioner had longer delays than those who were self-referred (5 hours vs. 1.7 hours, P < 0.0001). Female gender, advancing age, referral source, insurance status and mode of transport to hospital are independent factors contributing to prehospital patient delays. Nurses who care for patients with coronary artery disease have a unique opportunity to educate people about the most appropriate action to be taken in the event of experiencing symptoms.

  7. The Prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients` performed by the specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden – a phenomenographic study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse’s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses’ perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma. Methods This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton. Results The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one’s own leadership and Developing professional knowledge. Conclusions This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed. PMID:22985478

  8. Prehospital and Early Clinical Care of Infants, Children, and Teenagers Compared to an Adult Cohort : Analysis of 2,961 Children in Comparison to 21,435 Adult Patients from the Trauma Registry of DGU in a 15-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Wyen, Hendrik; Jakob, Heike; Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Laurer, Helmut L; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Although the incidence of pediatric patients in emergency services is as low as 5-10%, trauma remains one of the leading causes of death during childhood. Only a few reports exist about the quality of the initial treatment of pediatric trauma patients. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of whether prehospital treatment and emergency management in pediatric trauma patients is similar to the treatment that is provided for adult patients. We performed a retrospective data analysis of the German Trauma Registry of the DGU from January 1993 to December 2007. Exclusion criteria were missing information about injury severity and/or age and patients older than 50 years. All pediatric patients were subdivided into five groups (infants 0-1 year, toddlers 2-5 years, children 6-9 years, pupils 10-13 years, teenagers 14-17 years) with regard to their age and were compared with the adult cohort (18-50 years). From 24,396 patients, 2,961 were below 18 years of age, thus, about 12% of the whole population of injured patients below the age of 50 years. 66.4% of infants sustained relevant head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] ≥3), and this rate declined with increasing age. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) increased from 21.0 (±11.6) in the group of infants to 26.7 (±13.9) in the adult cohort. In all groups, the majority of patients were male. The injury pattern differed according to age, with predominant traumatic brain injury (TBI) in infants. During the preclinical treatment, infants were less often intubated and this was contrasted by a higher rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in this group (infants 16.2%, toddlers 6.8%, adults 3.1%). Diagnostic multislice computed tomography (CT) examination was less often performed in infants as compared to the other groups (infants 57.1%, toddlers 77.2%, adults 77.8%). Mortality and quality indicators such as timelines show no significant differences between children and adults. We observed typical age

  9. Prehospital Medical Documentation in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry: A Retrospective Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Nesbitt , DSc, PA-C, Amelia M. Duran-Stanton, PhD, PA-C, and Robert T. Gerhardt, MD, MPH, FACEP Background: Prehospital care of combat casualties is a...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Therien S. P., Nesbitt M. E., Duran-Stanton A. M., Gerhardt R. T., 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  10. Spinal motion restriction: an educational and implementation program to redefine prehospital spinal assessment and care.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James F; Kusel, Elsie R; Sporer, Karl A

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital spine immobilization has long been applied to victims of trauma in the United States and up to 5 million patients per year are immobilized mostly with a cervical collar and a backboard. The training of paramedics and emergency medical technicians on the principals of spine motion restriction (SMR) will decrease the use of backboards. The training for SMR emphasized the need to immobilize those patients with a significant potential for an unstable cervical spine fracture and to use alternative methods of maintaining spine precautions for those with lower risk. The training addressed the potential complications of the use of the unpadded backboard and education was provided about the mechanics of spine injuries. Emergency medical services (EMS} personnel were taught to differentiate between the critical multisystem trauma patients from the more common moderate, low kinetic energy trauma patients. A comprehensive education and outreach program that included all of the EMS providers (fire and private), hospitals, and EMS educational institutions was developed. Within 4 months of the policy implementation, prehospital care practitioners reduced the use of the backboard by 58%. This was accomplished by a decrease in the number of patients considered for SMR with low kinetic energy and the use of other methods, such as the cervical collar only. The implementation of a SMR training program significantly decreases the use of backboards and allows alternative methods of maintaining spine precautions.

  11. Cost-utility analysis of prehospital spine immobilization recommendations for penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Arturo; Liu, Terrence H; Victorino, Gregory P

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma's recent prehospital trauma life support recommendations against prehospital spine immobilization (PHSI) after penetrating trauma are based on a low incidence of unstable spine injuries after penetrating injuries. However, given the chronic and costly nature of devastating spine injuries, the cost-utility of PHSI is unclear. Our hypothesis was that the cost-utility of PHSI in penetrating trauma precludes routine use of this prevention strategy. A Markov model based cost-utility analysis was performed from a society perspective of a hypothetical cohort of 20-year-old males presenting with penetrating trauma and transported to a US hospital. The analysis compared PHSI with observation alone. The probabilities of spine injuries, costs (US 2010 dollars), and utility of the two groups were derived from published studies and public data. Incremental effectiveness was measured in quality-adjusted life-years. Subset analyses of isolated head and neck injuries as well as sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the strength of the recommendations. Only 0.2% of penetrating trauma produced unstable spine injury, and only 7.4% of the patients with unstable spine injury who underwent spine stabilization had neurologic improvement. The total lifetime per-patient cost was $930,446 for the PHSI group versus $929,883 for the nonimmobilization group, with no difference in overall quality-adjusted life-years. Subset analysis demonstrated that PHSI for patients with isolated head or neck injuries provided equivocal benefit over nonimmobilization. PHSI was not cost-effective for patients with torso or extremity penetrating trauma. Despite increased incidence of unstable spine injures produced by penetrating head or neck injuries, the cost-benefit of PHSI in these patients is equivocal, and further studies may be needed before omitting PHSI in patients with penetrating head and neck injuries. Economic and value-based evaluation

  12. Prehospital Pediatric Care: Opportunities for Training, Treatment, and Research.

    PubMed

    Drayna, Patrick C; Browne, Lorin R; Guse, Clare E; Brousseau, David C; Lerner, E Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric transports comprise approximately 10% of emergency medical services (EMS) requests for aid, but little is known about the clinical characteristics of pediatric EMS patients and the interventions they receive. Our objective was to describe the pediatric prehospital patient cohort in a large metropolitan EMS system. This retrospective analysis of all pediatric (age <19 years) EMS patients transported from October 2011 to September 2013 was conducted by reviewing a system-wide National EMS Information System (NEMSIS)-compliant database of all EMS patient encounters. We identified the most common primary working assessments, the frequency of abnormal initial vital signs, and the interventions provided. Vital signs included systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory (RR) and pulse rate, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), pulse oximetry (Pox), and respiratory effort. We defined abnormal vital signs using previously reported age-specific standards. We identified the working assessments most frequently associated with abnormal vital signs and the working assessments associated with the most commonly performed interventions. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. There were 9,956 pediatric transports, 8.7% of the total call volume. The most common working assessments were "other" (16.1%), respiratory distress (13.7%), seizure (12.4%), and blunt trauma (12.0%). Vital signs were documented at variable rates: RR (91.1%), GCS (82.9%), SBP (71.3%), pulse (69.4%), respiratory effort (49.7%), and Pox (33.5%). Of all transported patients, 61.5% had a documented abnormal initial vital sign. Patients with an abnormal vital sign had the same most common working assessments as those with normal vital signs. Glucometry (16.9%), medication delivery (13.6%), and IV placement (11.5%) were the most common interventions and were most often provided to patients with working assessments of seizure, asthma, trauma, altered consciousness, or "other." Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (0

  13. Prehospital transportation decisions for patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Candefjord, Stefan; Buendia, Ruben; Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne; Fagerlind, Helen

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion and characteristics of patients sustaining major trauma in road traffic crashes (RTCs) who could benefit from direct transportation to a trauma center (TC). Currently, there is no national classification of TC in Sweden. In this study, 7 university hospitals (UHs) in Sweden were selected to represent a TC level I or level II. These UHs have similar capabilities as the definition for level I and level II TC in the United States. Major trauma was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. A total of 117,730 patients who were transported by road or air ambulance were selected from the Swedish TRaffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA) database between 2007 to 2014. An analysis of the patient characteristics sustaining major trauma in comparison with patients sustaining minor trauma (ISS < 15) was conducted. Major trauma patients transported to a TC versus non-TC were further analysed with respect to injured body region and road user type. Approximately 3% (n = 3, 411) of patients sustained major trauma. Thirty-eight percent of major trauma patients were transported to a TC, and 62% were transported to a non-TC. This results in large proportions of patients with Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 3+ injuries being transported to a non-TC.  The number of AIS 3+ head injuries for major trauma patients transported to a TC versus non-TC were similar, whereas a larger number of AIS 3+ thorax injuries were present in the non-TC group. The non-TC major trauma patients had a higher probability of traveling in a car, truck, or bus and to be involved in a crash in a rural location. Our results show that the majority of RTC major trauma patients are transported to a non-TC. This may cause unnecessary morbidity and mortality. These findings can guide the development of improved prehospital treatment guidelines, protocols and decision support systems.

  14. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    PubMed

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy.

  15. Impact of on-site care, prehospital time, and level of in-hospital care on survival in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Sampalis, J S; Lavoie, A; Williams, J I; Mulder, D S; Kalina, M

    1993-02-01

    A sample of 360 severely injured patients was selected from a cohort of 8007 trauma victims followed prospectively from the time of injury to death or discharge. A case referent study was used to test the association between on-site care, total prehospital time, and level of care at the receiving hospital with short-term survival. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that use of Advanced Life Support (ALS) at the scene was not associated with survival, whereas treatment at a level I compatible hospital was associated with a 38% reduction in the odds of dying, which approached statistical significance. Total prehospital time over 60 minutes was associated with a statistically significant adjusted relative odds of dying (OR = 3.0). The results of this study support the need for regionalization of trauma care and fail to show a benefit associated with ALS.

  16. Identifying pre-hospital factors associated with outcome for major trauma patients in a regional trauma network: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lee; Hill, Michael; Davies, Caroline; Shaw, Gary; Kiernan, Matthew D

    2017-08-23

    Major trauma is often life threatening and the leading cause of death in the United Kingdom (UK) for adults aged less than 45 years old. This study aimed to identify pre-hospital factors associated with patient outcomes for major trauma within one Regional Trauma Network. Secondary analysis of pre-hospital audit data and patient outcome data from the Trauma Audit Research Network (TARN) was undertaken. The primary outcome used in analysis was 'Status at Discharge' (alive/deceased). Independent variables considered included 'Casualty Characteristics' such as mechanism of injury (MOI), age, and physiological measurements, as well as 'Response Characteristics' such as response timings and skill mix. Binary Logistic Regression analysis using the 'forward stepwise' method was undertaken for physiological measures taken at the scene. The study analysed 1033 major trauma records (mean age of 38.5 years, SD 21.5, 95% CI 37-40). Adults comprised 82.6% of the sample (n = 853), whilst 12.9% of the sample were children (n = 133). Men comprised 68.5% of the sample (n = 708) in comparison to 28.8% women (n = 298). Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) (p < 0.000), Respiration Rate (p < 0.001) and Age (p < 0.000), were all significant when associated with the outcome 'Status at Discharge' (alive/deceased). Isolated bivariate associations provided tentative support for response characteristics such as existing dispatching practices and the value of rapid crew arrival. However, these measurements appear to be of limited utility in predictive modelling of outcomes. The complexity of physiological indices potentially complicate their predictive utility e.g. whilst a Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) of < 90 mmHg serves as a trigger for bypass to a Major Trauma Centre, the utility of this observation is nullified in cases of Traumatic Brain Injury. Analysis suggested that as people age, outcomes from major trauma significantly worsened. This finding is consistent with existing research

  17. Is heart period variability associated with the administration of lifesaving interventions in individual prehospital trauma patients with normal standard vital signs?

    PubMed

    Rickards, Caroline A; Ryan, Kathy L; Ludwig, David A; Convertino, Victor A

    2010-08-01

    To determine whether heart period variability provides added value in identifying the need for lifesaving interventions (LSI) in individual trauma patients with normal standard vital signs upon early medical assessment. Retrospective database review. Helicopter transport to Level 1 trauma center and first 24 hrs of in-hospital care. Prehospital trauma patients requiring helicopter transport to Level 1 trauma center. Heart period variability was analyzed from electrocardiographic recordings collected from 159 prehospital trauma patients with normal standard vital signs (32 LSI patients, 127 No-LSI patients). Although 13 of the electrocardiogram derived metrics demonstrated simple (i.e., univariate) discrimination between groups, at the multivariate level, only fractal dimension by curve length (FD-L) was uniquely associated with group membership (LSI vs. No-LSI, p = .0004). Whereas the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for FD-L was 0.70, the overall correct classification rate (true positives and true negatives) of 82% was only 2% higher than the baseline prediction rate of 80% (i.e., no information except for the known proportion of overall No-LSI cases, 127 of 159 patients). Furthermore, 84% of the individual FD-L values for the LSI group were within the range of the No-LSI group. Only FD-L was uniquely able to distinguish patient groups based on mean values when standard vital signs were normal. However, the accuracy of FD-L in distinguishing between patients was only slightly better than the baseline prediction rate. There was also very high overlap of individual heart period variability values between groups, so many LSI patients could be incorrectly classified as not requiring an LSI if a single heart period variability value was used as a triage tool. Based on this analysis, heart period variability seems to have limited value for prediction of LSIs in prehospital trauma patients with normal standard vital signs.

  18. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical penetrating wounds to the thorax and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pons, P T; Honigman, B; Moore, E E; Rosen, P; Antuna, B; Dernocoeur, J

    1985-09-01

    The role of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in the prehospital care of the critically injured is highly controversial. This study analyzes the efficacy of ATLS in the management of critical penetrating wounds of the thorax and abdomen. In the 2 1/2-year period ending July 1984, 203 consecutive patients underwent emergency laparotomy or thoracotomy for gunshot and stab wounds. All patients were treated in the field by advanced paramedics (EMT-P). For gunshot wounds the mean time (+/- S.E.M.) responding to the scene was 4.5 (+/- 0.29) minutes, on the scene 10.1 (+/- 0.41) minutes, and returning to the hospital 6.4 (+/- 0.32) minutes. For stab wounds the mean time responding to the scene was 4.8 (+/- 0.21) minutes, on the scene 9.5 (+/- 0.37) minutes, and returning to the hospital 5.7 (+ 0.30) minutes. The number of intravenous lines started averaged 1.8 per patient. Eighty-one patients had PASG applied and 28 patients underwent endotracheal intubation (21 orally, seven nasally). Thirty-three patients had no obtainable blood pressure, of whom six survived (18%). One hundred sixty (94%) of the remaining 170 patients who had any initial blood pressure survived. One hundred nine (55%) patients had an increase in BP greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 35.6 mm Hg), 64 (32%) had no significant change, and 25 (13%) had a fall greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 24.2 mm Hg) from the field to the emergency department. Twenty (80%) of the 25 patients with a fall in blood pressure survived.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Pre-Hospital Triage of Trauma Patients Using the Random Forest Computer Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Scerbo, Michelle; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Cotton, Bryan; Dua, Anahita; Del Junco, Deborah; Wade, Charles; Holcomb, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over-triage not only wastes resources but displaces the patient from their community and causes delay of treatment for the more seriously injured. This study aimed to validate the Random Forest computer model (RFM) as means of better triaging trauma patients to Level I trauma centers. Methods Adult trauma patients with “medium activation” presenting via helicopter to a Level I Trauma Center from May 2007 to May 2009 were included. The “medium activation” trauma patient is alert and hemodynamically stable on scene but has either subnormal vital signs or an accumulation of risk factors that may indicate a potentially serious injury. Variables included in the RFM computer analysis including demographics, mechanism of injury, pre-hospital fluid, medications, vitals, and disposition. Statistical analysis was performed via the Random Forest Algorithm to compare our institutional triage rate to rates determined by the RFM. Results A total of 1,653 patients were included in this study of which 496 were used in the testing set of the RFM. In our testing set, 33.8% of patients brought to our Level I trauma center could have been managed at a Level III trauma center and 88% of patients that required a Level I trauma center were identified correctly. In the testing set, there was an over-triage rate of 66% while utilizing the RFM we decreased the over-triage rate to 42% (p<0.001). There was an under-triage rate of 8.3%. The RFM predicted patient disposition with a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 42%, negative predictive value of 92% and positive predictive value of 34%. Conclusion While prospective validation is required, it appears that computer modeling potentially could be used to guide triage decisions, allowing both more accurate triage and more efficient use of the trauma system. PMID:24484906

  20. Prehospital triage of trauma patients using the Random Forest computer algorithm.

    PubMed

    Scerbo, Michelle; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Cotton, Bryan; Dua, Anahita; Del Junco, Deborah; Wade, Charles; Holcomb, John B

    2014-04-01

    Overtriage not only wastes resources but also displaces the patient from their community and causes delay of treatment for the more seriously injured. This study aimed to validate the Random Forest computer model (RFM) as means of better triaging trauma patients to level 1 trauma centers. Adult trauma patients with "medium activation" presenting via helicopter to a level 1 trauma center from May 2007 to May 2009 were included. The "medium activation" trauma patient is alert and hemodynamically stable on scene but has either subnormal vital signs or accumulation of risk factors that may indicate a potentially serious injury. Variables included in the RFM analysis were demographics, mechanism of injury, prehospital fluid, medications, vitals, and disposition. Statistical analysis was performed via the Random Forest algorithm to compare our institutional triage rate to rates determined by the RFM. A total of 1653 patients were included in this study, of which 496 were used in the testing set of the RFM. In our testing set, 33.8% of patients brought to our level 1 trauma center could have been managed at a level 3 trauma center, and 88% of patients who required a level 1 trauma center were identified correctly. In the testing set, there was an overtriage rate of 66%, whereas using the RFM, we decreased the overtriage rate to 42% (P < 0.001). There was an undertriage rate of 8.3%. The RFM predicted patient disposition with a sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 42%, negative predictive value of 92%, and positive predictive value of 34%. Although prospective validation is required, it appears that computer modeling potentially could be used to guide triage decisions, allowing both more accurate triage and more efficient use of the trauma system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploration of prehospital vital sign trends for the prediction of trauma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    We explored whether there are diagnostically useful temporal trends in prehospital vital signs of trauma patients. Vital signs were monitored during transport to a level I trauma center and electronically archived. Retrospectively, we identified reliable vital signs recorded from the 0- to 7-minute interval and from the 14- to 21-minute interval during transport, and, for each subject, we computed the temporal differences between the two intervals' vital signs, the intrasubject 95% data ranges, the values during the initial 2 minutes, and the 21-minute overall means. We tested for differences between subjects with major hemorrhage versus control subjects, and computed receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. We conducted sensitivity analyses, exploring alternative clinical outcomes, temporal windows, and methods of identifying reliable data. Comparing major hemorrhage cases versus controls, there were no discriminatory differences in temporal vital sign trends. Hemorrhage cases had significantly wider intrasubject data ranges for systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate (RR), and shock index (SI) versus controls. All results were consistent in several sensitivity analyses. Our findings add to a growing body of evidence that prehospital vital sign trends over 21 minutes or less are unlikely to be diagnostically useful because of substantial nondirectional fluctuations in vital signs that would obscure any subtle, progressive temporal trends. SBP, RR, and SI values were significantly different for high-acuity patients, and had more variability. Taken together, these findings suggest that higher-acuity patients experience episodes of instability rather than gradual, steady decline. Measures that account for data variability, such as taking the average of multiple measurements, may improve the diagnostic utility of prehospital vital signs.

  2. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  3. Development and Implementation of a Novel Prehospital Care System in the State of Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heather A; Douglass, Katherine A; Ejas, Shafi; Poovathumparambil, Venugopalan

    2016-12-01

    Most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have struggled to find a system for prehospital care that can provide adequate patient care and geographical coverage while maintaining a feasible price tag. The emergency medical systems of the Western world are not necessarily relevant in developing economic systems, given the lack of strict legislation, the scarcity of resources, and the limited number of trained personnel. Meanwhile, most efforts to provide prehospital care in India have taken the form of adapting Western models to the Indian context with limited success. Described here is a novel approach to prehospital care designed for and implemented in the State of Kerala, India. The Active Network Group of Emergency Life Savers (ANGELS) was launched in 2011 in Calicut City, the third largest city in the Indian State of Kerala. The ANGELS integrated an existing fleet of private and state-owned ambulances into a single network utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and a single statewide call number. A total of 85 volunteer emergency medical certified technicians (EMCTs) were trained in basic first aid and trauma care principles. Public awareness campaigns accompanied all activities to raise awareness amongst community members. Funding was provided via public-private partnership, aimed to minimize costs to patients for service utilization. Over a two-year period from March 2011 to April 2013, 8,336 calls were recorded, of which 54.8% (4,569) were converted into actual ambulance run sheets. The majority of calls were for medical emergencies and most patients were transported to Medical College Hospital in Calicut. This unique public-private partnership has been responsive to the needs of the population while sustaining low operational costs. This system may provide a relevant template for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) development in other resource-limited settings. Brown HA , Douglass KA , Ejas S , Poovathumparambil V . Development and

  4. Technology for trauma: testing the validity of a smartphone app for pre-hospital clinicians.

    PubMed

    Freshwater, Eleanor S; Crouch, Robert

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of regional trauma networks in England, ambulance clinicians have been required to make triage decisions relating to severity of injury, and appropriate destination for the patient, which may require 'bypassing' the nearest Emergency Department. A 'Trauma Unit Bypass Tool' is utilised in this process. The Major Trauma Triage tool smartphone application (App) is a digital representation of a tool, available for clinicians to use on their smartphone. Prior to disseminating the application, validity and performance against the existing paper-based tool was explored. A case-based study using clinical scenarios was conducted. Scenarios, with appropriate triage decisions, were agreed by an expert panel. Ambulance clinicians were assigned to either the paper-based tool or smartphone app group and asked to make a triage decision using the available information. The positive predictive value (PPV) of each tool was calculated. The PPV of the paper tool was 0.76 and 0.86 for the smartphone app. User comments were mainly positive for both tools with no negative comments relating to the smartphone app. The smartphone app version of the Trauma Unit Bypass Tool performs at least as well as the paper version and can be utilised safely by pre-hospital clinicians in supporting triage decisions relating to potential major trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Refraining from pre-hospital advanced airway management: a prospective observational study of critical decision making in an anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital critical care service.

    PubMed

    Rognås, Leif; Hansen, Troels Martin; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2013-10-25

    We report prospectively recorded observational data from consecutive cases in which the attending pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologist considered performing pre-hospital advanced airway management but decided to withhold such interventions. Anaesthesiologists from eight pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (a mixed rural and urban region with 1.27 million inhabitants) registered data from February 1st 2011 to October 31st 2012. Included were patients of all ages for whom pre-hospital advanced airway management were considered but not performed. The main objectives were to investigate (1) the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' reasons for considering performing pre-hospital advanced airway management in this group of patients (2) the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' reasons for not performing pre-hospital advanced airway management (3) the methods used to treat these patients (4) the incidence of complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management not being performed. We registered data from 1081 cases in which the pre-hospital critical care anaesthesiologists' considered performing pre-hospital advanced airway management. The anaesthesiologists decided to withhold pre-hospital advanced airway management in 32.1% of these cases (n = 347). In 75.1% of these cases (n = 257) pre-hospital advanced airway management were withheld because of the patient's condition and in 30.8% (n = 107) because of patient co-morbidity. The most frequently used alternative treatment was bag-mask ventilation, used in 82.7% of the cases (n = 287). Immediate complications related to the decision of not performing pre-hospital advanced airway management occurred in 0.6% of the cases (n = 2). We have illustrated the complexity of the critical decision-making associated with pre-hospital advanced airway management. This study is the first to identify the most common reasons why pre-hospital critical care

  6. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care.

  7. Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation and positive pressure ventilation is associated with hypotension and decreased survival in hypovolemic trauma patients: an analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Shahid; Gentilello, Larry

    2005-11-01

    Studies of pre-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) from single EMS systems have shown contradictory results, which may represent local differences in paramedic training and experience. An alternative hypothesis is that positive pressure ventilation increases mortality because positive pressure ventilation causes hypotension in severely injured hypovolemic patients. A national sample (National Trauma Data Bank, 1994-2002) was used to minimize effects of local paramedic training and experience. All patients with pre-hospital GCS < 8 (most likely to warrant early ETI) and ISS > 16 (most likely to be hypovolemic) were included. Patients intubated in the field (pre-hospital group, n = 871) and in the emergency department (ED group, n = 6581) were compared. To determine whether pre-hospital ETI was an independent predictor of hypotension and mortality, logistic regression was used to control for potential confounders, including age, ISS, body region injured, AIS scores, pre-hospital IV fluids, and other variables. Physiologic variables were not used, as they may be influenced by ETI and positive pressure ventilation, and were therefore considered outcomes, rather than predictors. Groups were comparable in age, gender, anatomic distribution of injuries, likelihood of at least one severe injury (AIS >3) and other variables, except for head injury (ED 83%, pre-hospital 71%, p < 0.001) and ISS (ED 33 +/- 0.2, pre-hospital 36 +/- 0.6, p < 0.001). Patients intubated in the field were more likely to be hypotensive upon arrival in the ED (SBP < or = 90 mm Hg; ED 33%, pre-hospital 54%, p < 0.001), and had worse survival (ED 45% versus pre-hospital 24%, p < 0.001). Even after controlling for potential confounders, pre-hospital ETI was still an independent predictor of hypotension upon arrival in ED (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.46 -2.09, p < 0.001) and decreased survival (OR 0.51, 95% C.I. 0.43-0.62, p < 0.001). Pre-hospital endotracheal intubation in trauma patients is associated with

  8. Comparison of the Prehospital Trauma Life Support recommendations and the German national guideline on treatment of patients with severe and multiple injuries.

    PubMed

    Häske, David; Stuke, Lance; Bernhard, Michael; Heller, Axel R; Schweigkofler, Uwe; Gliwitzky, Bernhard; Münzberg, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) concept is well established throughout the world. The aim is to improve prehospital care for patients with major trauma. In 2011, a German Level 3 (S3) evidence- and consensus-based guideline on the treatment of patients with severe and multiple injuries was published. The scope of this study was the systematic comparison between the educational content of the worldwide PHTLS concept and the German S3 Guideline. A total of 62 key recommendations of the German S3 Guideline were compared with the content of the English PHTLS manual (eighth edition). Depending on the level of agreement, the recommendations were categorized as (1) agreement, (2) minor variation, or (3) major variation. Comparison was done via a rating system by a number of international experts in the field of out-of-hospital trauma care. The Delphi method was used to get the final statements by indistinct or board-ranged ratings. Overall, there was no conformity in 12%. In 68% a total agreement and in 88% conformity with slight differences of minor variations were found between the key recommendations of the guideline and the PHTLS manual. The PHTLS primary assessment has a large conformity for the following individual priorities: airway, 92%; breathing, 92%; circulation, 63%; disability, 100%; exposure, 89%. According to our comparison, the PHTLS manual is largely compatible with the German S3 Guideline from 2011. The 12% divergent statements concern mainly fluid resuscitation. Minor deviations in the prehospital care are due to a national guideline with an emergency medical service with emergency physicians (S3 Guideline) and a global PHTLS concept.

  9. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-Making: A Model of What Happens Between the 911 Call and the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how: 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. Methods We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. Results We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Conclusions Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria. PMID

  11. Systematic review of the effectiveness of prehospital critical care following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    von Vopelius-Feldt, Johannes; Brandling, Janet; Benger, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Improving survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a priority for modern emergency medical services (EMS) and prehospital research. Advanced life support (ALS) is now the standard of care in most EMS. In some EMS, prehospital critical care providers are also dispatched to attend OHCA. This systematic review presents the evidence for prehospital critical care for OHCA, when compared to standard ALS care. We searched the following electronic databases: PubMed, EmBASE, CINAHL Plus and AMED (via EBSCO), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, NIHR Health Technology Assessment Database, Google Scholar and ClinicalTrials.gov. Search terms related to cardiac arrest and prehospital critical care. All studies that compared patient-centred outcomes between prehospital critical care and ALS for OHCA were included. The review identified six full text publications that matched the inclusion criteria, all of which are observational studies. Three studies showed no benefit from prehospital critical care but were underpowered with sample sizes of 1028-1851. The other three publications showed benefit from prehospital critical care delivered by physicians. However, an imbalance of prognostic factors and hospital treatment in these studies systematically favoured the prehospital critical care group. Current evidence to support prehospital critical care for OHCA is limited by the logistic difficulties of undertaking high quality research in this area. Further research needs an appropriate sample size with adjustments for confounding factors in observational research design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Is high-quality trauma care "business as usual" in New Zealand?

    PubMed

    Civil, Ian; Isles, Siobhan

    2017-05-12

    New Zealand is on the cusp of establishing a world-class trauma system. Many of the building blocks are in place with national and regional guidelines in both the pre-hospital and hospital phases of care established. A dedicated clinical workforce is available in all DHBs and national data available through the Major Trauma Registry. The greatest threat to achieving high-quality trauma care in New Zealand at this point is governance stability rather than clinical variability. Now is the time to lock the trauma system into a framework not subject to political or bureaucratic whims.

  13. Pre-hospital airway management: guidelines from a task force from the Scandinavian Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Berlac, P; Hyldmo, P K; Kongstad, P; Kurola, J; Nakstad, A R; Sandberg, M

    2008-08-01

    This article is intended as a generic guide to evidence-based airway management for all categories of pre-hospital personnel. It is based on a review of relevant literature but the majority of the studies have not been performed under realistic, pre-hospital conditions and the recommendations are therefore based on a low level of evidence (D). The advice given depends on the qualifications of the personnel available in a given emergency medical service (EMS). Anaesthetic training and routine in anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade is necessary for the use of most techniques in the treatment of patients with airway reflexes. For anaesthesiologists, the Task Force commissioned by the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine recommends endotracheal intubation (ETI) following rapid sequence induction when securing the pre-hospital airway, although repeated unsuccessful intubation attempts should be avoided independent of formal qualifications. Other physicians, as well as paramedics and other EMS personnel, are recommended the lateral trauma recovery position as a basic intervention combined with assisted mask-ventilation in trauma patients. When performing advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation, we recommend that non-anaesthesiologists primarily use a supraglottic airway device. A supraglottic device such as the laryngeal tube or the intubation laryngeal mask should also be available as a backup device for anaesthesiologists in failed ETI.

  14. Experience of pre-hospital treatment of survivors of falls-related trauma by an Australian helicopter emergency medical service.

    PubMed

    Janssen, D J; Burns, B J

    2013-05-01

    Greater Sydney Area Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (GSA-HEMS) operates a doctor and paramedic team providing pre-hospital and inter-hospital retrieval. Falls are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. In NSW, patients injured by falling comprise 38% of those with serious to critical injuries (ISS>15). The mortality of falls in this group is 15.2%, higher than the mortality rate for other common injury mechanisms. Mortality rate for high falls (>5m) is similar to that of low/medium falls. The primary aim was describe the basic demographics, transportation, injured areas, treatment and mortality of falls survivors attended to by GSA-HEMS. The secondary aim was to determine if there was any association between height of fall, revised trauma score (RTSc) and need for advanced pre-hospital interventions. Cases of trauma due to falling were identified by searching an electronic database covering the period June 2007 to March 2010. Hardcopy casesheets were abstracted using a proforma. Data was collected on demographics, timings, winch use, height of fall, physiologic variables, injured areas, advanced pre-hospital interventions and mortality at 24h. Associations between height of fall and RTSc, and height of fall and pre-hospital interventions were compared using Fischer's exact test. One hundred and fifty-four of 208 potential cases identified were cases of trauma due to falls, representing 13% of all pre-hospital trauma cases retrieved by the service. Median age of patients was 37, 67% of patients were male. Helicopter transport was use for 97% of cases, with 47% requiring winch extraction. High falls (>5m), which accounted for 25% of cases, were more likely to show non-normal RTSc. A greater proportion of high falls required advanced pre-hospital interventions. Our experience describes a HEMS system that is often called to falls not just based on injury severity or requirement for advanced pre-hospital intervention, but also due to

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as an Adjunct to Pre-hospital Advanced Trauma Life Support.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Most commercial diving operations and naval operations have 24/7, on-site availability of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to perform routine surface decompression or immediate treatment of arterial gas embolism or decompression sickness. Availability and prompt use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the field for treatment of divers with dysbaric conditions has demonstrated its efficacy in acute, co-morbid conditions such as acute exsanguination, blast injury, crush injury, and cardiopulmonary arrest affecting those same divers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy applied in these cases has demonstrated its utility to augment the efficacy of conventional, pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support. Case studies gleaned from actual experience with the diving industry illustrate the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in these conditions. The unexpectedly favorable results have been replicated by controlled laboratory animal studies. The deck decompression or saturation multiplace chambers used by offshore diving operations can easily and quickly be converted for use as medical field resuscitative units. Lightweight and mobile hyperbaric chambers can be outfitted for use in ambulances or helicopters to address civilian street injury or military "far-forward" injury. These transport chambers are compact in design to be efficient transport stretchers designed to hold both the patient and the medical support clinician. It is hoped that hyperbaric oxygen therapy will gain an increasing role as an adjunct to pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support resuscitative efforts as a low-cost, high-yield intervention. In this regard HBO as applied to ATLS/ACLS in civilian and military medical systems may be a productive, disruptive new application of technology.

  16. Emerging technologies for pediatric and adult trauma care.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Steven L; Haley-Andrews, Stephanie; Mulligan, Jane

    2010-06-01

    Current Emergency Medical Service protocols rely on provider-directed care for evaluation, management and triage of injured patients from the field to a trauma center. New methods to quickly diagnose, support and coordinate the movement of trauma patients from the field to the most appropriate trauma center are in development. These methods will enhance trauma care and promote trauma system development. Recent advances in machine learning, statistical methods, device integration and wireless communication are giving rise to new methods for vital sign data analysis and a new generation of transport monitors. These monitors will collect and synchronize exponentially growing amounts of vital sign data with electronic patient care information. The application of advanced statistical methods to these complex clinical data sets has the potential to reveal many important physiological relationships and treatment effects. Several emerging technologies are converging to yield a new generation of smart sensors and tightly integrated transport monitors. These technologies will assist prehospital providers in quickly identifying and triaging the most severely injured children and adults to the most appropriate trauma centers. They will enable the development of real-time clinical support systems of increasing complexity, able to provide timelier, more cost-effective, autonomous care.

  17. Telemedicine and telepresence for trauma and emergency care management.

    PubMed

    Latifi, R; Weinstein, R S; Porter, J M; Ziemba, M; Judkins, D; Ridings, D; Nassi, R; Valenzuela, T; Holcomb, M; Leyva, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only in recent years has it been applied to the specialities of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Despite being relatively new, the concept of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery is evolving and is being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This paper will address the current applications of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application. The University Medical Center and the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) in Tucson, Arizona have two functional teletrauma and emergency telemedicine programs and one ad-hoc program, the mobile telemedicine program. The Southern Arizona Telemedicine and Telepresence (SATT) program is an inter-hospital telemedicine program, while the Tucson ER-link is a link between prehospital and emergency room system, and both are built upon a successful existing award winning ATP and the technical infrastructure of the city of Tucson. These two programs represent examples of integrated and collaborative community approaches to solving the lack of trauma and emergency care issue in the region. These networks will not only be used by trauma, but also by all other medical disciplines, and as such have become an example of innovation and dedication to trauma care. The first case of trauma managed over the telemedicine trauma program or "teletrauma" was that of an 18-month-old girl who was the only survival of a car crash with three fatalities. The success of this case and the pilot project of SATT that ensued led to the development of a regional teletrauma program serving close to 1.5 million people. The telepresence of the trauma surgeon, through teletrauma, has infused confidence among local doctors and communities and is being used to identify knowledge gaps of rural health care providers and the needs for instituting new outreach educational programs.

  18. Learning the lessons from conflict: pre-hospital cervical spine stabilisation following ballistic neck trauma.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Arul; Midwinter, Mark; Mahoney, Peter; Clasper, Jon

    2009-12-01

    Current ATLS protocols dictate that spinal precautions should be in place when a casualty has sustained trauma from a significant mechanism of injury likely to damage the cervical spine. In hostile environments, the application of these precautions can place pre-hospital medical teams at considerable personal risk. It may also prevent or delay the identification of airway problems. In today's global threat from terrorism, this hostile environment is no longer restricted to conflict zones. The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence of cervical spine injury following penetrating ballistic neck trauma in order to evaluate the need for pre-hospital cervical immobilisation in these casualties. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of British military casualties of combat, from Iraq and Afghanistan presenting with a penetrating neck injury during the last 5.5 years. For each patient, the mechanism of injury, neurological state on admission, medical and surgical intervention was recorded. During the study period, 90 casualties sustained a penetrating neck injury. The mechanism of injury was by explosion in 66 (73%) and from gunshot wounds in 24 (27%). Cervical spine injuries (either cervical spine fracture or cervical spinal cord injury) were present in 20 of the 90 (22%) casualties, but only 6 of these (7%) actually survived to reach hospital. Four of this six subsequently died from injuries within 72 h. Only 1 (1.8%) of the 56 survivors to reach a surgical facility sustained an unstable cervical spine injury that required surgical stabilisation. This patient later died as result of a co-existing head injury. Penetrating ballistic trauma to the neck is associated with a high mortality rate. Our data suggests that it is very unlikely that penetrating ballistic trauma to the neck will result in an unstable cervical spine in survivors. In a hazardous environment (e.g. shooting incidents or terrorist bombings), the risk/benefit ratio of mandatory spinal

  19. Personal protective equipment provision in prehospital care: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Krzanicki, D A; Porter, K M

    2009-12-01

    Safety in prehospital practice is a paramount principle. Personal protective equipment (PPE) use is intrinsic to safe practice. There is varied guidance as to what constitutes effective PPE. No evidence is available of what current provision encompasses. A questionnaire-based study directed to all ambulance trusts, British Association for Immediate Care (BASICS) schemes and air ambulance operations in England, Scotland and Wales. Total response rate was in excess of 66%. A specific protocol for PPE use was issued by 81%, 89% and 38% of ambulance trusts, air ambulance and BASICS schemes, respectively. There was a wide variation in provision of PPE both within and between different groups of providers. Fewer than 55% of providers had an evaluation system in place for reviewing PPE use. Many reasons account for the differences in provision. There is a clear need for a standard to be set nationally in conjunction with locally implemented evaluation and re-accreditation processes.

  20. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Amadi-Obi, Ahjoku; Gilligan, Peadar; Owens, Niall; O'Donnell, Cathal

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome.

  1. Telemedicine in pre-hospital care: a review of telemedicine applications in the pre-hospital environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The right person in the right place and at the right time is not always possible; telemedicine offers the potential to give audio and visual access to the appropriate clinician for patients. Advances in information and communication technology (ICT) in the area of video-to-video communication have led to growth in telemedicine applications in recent years. For these advances to be properly integrated into healthcare delivery, a regulatory framework, supported by definitive high-quality research, should be developed. Telemedicine is well suited to extending the reach of specialist services particularly in the pre-hospital care of acute emergencies where treatment delays may affect clinical outcome. The exponential growth in research and development in telemedicine has led to improvements in clinical outcomes in emergency medical care. This review is part of the LiveCity project to examine the history and existing applications of telemedicine in the pre-hospital environment. A search of electronic databases including Medline, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) for relevant papers was performed. All studies addressing the use of telemedicine in emergency medical or pre-hospital care setting were included. Out of a total of 1,279 articles reviewed, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were critically analysed. A majority of the studies were on stroke management. The studies suggested that overall, telemedicine had a positive impact on emergency medical care. It improved the pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke and myocardial infarction and enhanced the supervision of delivery of tissue thromboplasminogen activator in acute ischaemic stroke. Telemedicine presents an opportunity to enhance patient management. There are as yet few definitive studies that have demonstrated whether it had an effect on clinical outcome. PMID:25635190

  2. Tennessee trauma care system plan, Part II.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-04-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  3. Tennessee trauma care system plan, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Dunn, Julie; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-03-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  4. Tennessee Trauma Care System Plan, part III.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joseph B; Barker, Donald; Enderson, Blaine

    2005-05-01

    Tennessee implemented a statewide trauma care system in 1988. This system serves the state of Tennessee and supports eight neighboring states. The demographics and geography of Tennessee have ensured that nearly all residents have rapid access to the trauma care system. However, since 1988, many changes have occurred in healthcare in general, and trauma care in particular, that point out problems and issues with the Tennessee trauma care system. Therefore, the Tennessee Trauma Care Advisory Council has developed this Trauma Care System Plan to look at needs and opportunities for the future of trauma care in Tennessee. This plan will be presented in four segments: History, Administrative Components, Operational Components, and Clinical Components.

  5. Migrants' and professionals' views on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Hannig, Christian; Schmidt, Silke

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to explore the views of migrants and professionals on culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care in order to adapt such care to migrants' needs. Interviews were conducted with 41 migrants who had received direct (as a patient) or indirect (as a significant other) pre-hospital emergency care. Furthermore, 20 professionals in the field of pre-hospital emergency care were interviewed. The content analysis showed five distinguishable categories based on the statements by the migrants and six categories based on the statements by the professionals. While migrants gave priority to basic proficiencies of first responders such as 'social/emotional competencies' and 'communication skills', the professionals considered '(basic) cultural knowledge', 'awareness' and 'attitude' the most important. Furthermore, migrants provided practical indications, e.g. regarding areas of cultural knowledge, whereas professionals seemed to view the issue of culturally pre-hospital emergency care from a more theoretical perspective. The issues of the culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care itself, as well as the varying points of view of the two groups interviewed, resulted in eight recommendations for culturally sensitive pre-hospital emergency care.

  6. Would a prehospital practitioner model improve patient care in rural Australia?

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, P

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Soft systems methodology was used to develop and critically appraise the prehospital practitioner model as an alternative to existing models. This approach started from the philosophical viewpoint that prehospital services should be patient centred. Soft systems methodology was used to structure the elements of prehospital systems and the relations between them into metaphors and pictures that could be analysed. Results: This analysis showed that the most powerful reason for advocating the prehospital practitioner model is that it places prehospital systems within a symbiotic relationship with the healthcare system. Unlike the existing emergency service models or the "chain of survival" model, it is an integrated system that provides a range of services at multiple points during the patient care cycle. Thus, the prehospital practitioner would have roles in the prevention of injury and illness, responding to emergencies, facilitating recovery, and planning future strategies for a healthy community. Conclusions: Implementing this new model would see the prehospital system using its available capacity more effectively to fulfill broader public health and primary care outreach roles than is currently the case. Patients would be referred or transported to the most appropriate and cost effective facility as part of a seamless system that provides patients with well organised and high quality care. PMID:12642545

  7. Trauma care and referral patterns in Rwanda: implications for trauma system development

    PubMed Central

    Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Wong, Evan G.; Rousseau, Mathieu C.; Ruhungande, Landouald; Kushner, Adam L.; Liberman, Alexander S.; Khwaja, Kosar; Dakermandji, Marc; Wilson, Marnie; Razek, Tarek; Kyamanywa, Patrick; Deckelbaum, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trauma remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The development of trauma systems in low-resource settings may be of benefit. The objective of this study was to describe operative procedures performed for trauma at a tertiary care facility in Kigali, Rwanda, and to evaluate geographical variations and referral patterns of trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all prospectively collected operative cases performed at the largest referral hospital in Rwanda, the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali (CHUK), between June 1 and Dec. 1, 2011, for injury-related diagnoses. We used the Pearson χ2 and Fisher exact tests to compare cases arising from within Kigali to those transferred from other provinces. Geospatial analyses were also performed to further elucidate transfer patterns. Results Over the 6-month study period, 2758 surgical interventions were performed at the CHUK. Of these, 653 (23.7%) were for trauma. Most patients resided outside of Kigali city, with 337 (58.0%) patients transferred from other provinces and 244 (42.0%) from within Kigali. Most trauma procedures were orthopedic (489 [84.2%]), although general surgery procedures represented a higher proportion of trauma surgeries in patients from other provinces than in patients from within Kigali (28 of 337 [8.3%] v. 10 of 244 [4.1%]). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight geographical variations in access to trauma care in a low-income country and the first description of trauma procedures at a referral centre in Rwanda. Future efforts should focus on maturing prehospital and interfacility transport systems, strengthening district hospitals and further supporting referral institutions. PMID:26812407

  8. Changes in rural trauma prehospital times following the Rural Trauma Team Development Course training.

    PubMed

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Neuhaus, Nina; Martin, David; Widom, Kenneth; Rapp, Megan; Leonard, Diane; Baro, Susan; Dove, James; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    The majority of the US population live in urban areas, yet more than half of all trauma deaths occur in rural areas. The Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC) is developed to improve the outcomes of rural trauma and we aimed to study its effect on patient transfer. Trauma referrals 2 years before the RTTDC training were compared with referrals 2 years after the course. Of the 276 studied patients, 97 were referred before the RTTDC training and 179 patients were referred after the course. Transfer acceptance time was significantly shorter after the RTTDC training (139.2 ± 87.1 vs 110 ± 66.3 min, P = .003). The overall transfer time was also significantly reduced following the RTTDC training (257.4 ± 110.8 vs 219.2 ± 86.5 min, P = .002). Patients receiving pretransfer imaging had a significantly higher transfer time both before and after RTTDC training (all Ps < .01). Mortality was nearly halved (6.2% vs 3.4%) after the RTTDC training. The RTTDC training was associated with reduced transfer acceptance time and reduced transfer time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality indicators for evaluating trauma care: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Stelfox, Henry Thomas; Bobranska-Artiuch, Barbara; Nathens, Avery; Straus, Sharon E

    2010-03-01

    To systematically review the literature on quality indicators (QIs) for evaluating trauma care, identify QIs, map their definitions, and examine the evidence base in support of the QIs. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the earliest available date through January 14, 2009. To increase the sensitivity of the search, we also searched the grey literature and select journals by hand, reviewed reference lists to identify additional studies, and contacted experts in the field. We selected all articles that identified or proposed 1 or more QIs to evaluate the quality of care delivered to patients with major traumatic injuries. Minimum inclusion criteria were a description of 1 or more QIs designed to evaluate patients with major traumatic injuries (defined as multisystem injuries resulting in hospitalization or death) and focused on prehospital care, hospital care, posthospital care, or secondary injury prevention. The literature search identified 6869 citations. Review of abstracts led to the retrieval of 538 full-text articles for assessment, of which 192 articles were selected for review. Of these, 128 (66.7%) articles were original research, predominantly trauma database case series (57 [29.7%]) and cohort studies (55 [28.6%]), whereas 37 (19.3%) were narrative reviews and 8 (4.2%) were guidelines. A total of 1572 QIs in trauma care were identified and classified into 8 categories: non-American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) audit filters (42.0%), ACS-COT audit filters (19.1%), patient safety indicators (13.2%), trauma center/system criteria (10.2%), indicators measuring or benchmarking outcomes of care (7.4%), peer review (5.5%), general audit measures (1.8%), and guideline availability or adherence (0.8%). Measures of prehospital and hospital processes (60.4%) and outcomes (22.8%) were the most

  10. French pre-hospital trauma triage criteria: Does the “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion provide additional benefit in triage?

    PubMed Central

    Hornez, Emmanuel; Maurin, Olga; Mayet, Aurélie; Monchal, Tristan; Gonzalez, Federico; Kerebel, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance of the specific French Vittel “Pre-Hospital (PH) resuscitation” criteria in selecting polytrauma patients during the pre-hospital stage and its potential to increase the positive predictive value (PPV) of pre-hospital trauma triage. METHODS: This was a monocentric prospective cohort study of injured adults transported by emergency medical service to a trauma center. Patients who met any of the field trauma triage criteria were considered “triage positive”. Hospital data was statistically linked to pre-hospital records. The primary outcome of defining a “major trauma patient” was Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 16. RESULTS: There were a total of 200 injured patients evaluated over a 2 years period who met at least 1 triage criterion. The number of false positives was 64 patients (ISS < 16). The PPV was 68%. The sensitivity and the negative predictive value could not be evaluated in this study since it only included patients with positive Vittel criteria. The criterion of “PH resuscitation” was present for 64 patients (32%), but 10 of them had an ISS < 16. This was statistically significant in correlation with the severity of the trauma in univariate analysis (OR = 7.2; P = 0.005; 95%CI: 1.6-31.6). However, despite this correlation the overall PPV was not significantly increased by the use of the criterion “PH resuscitation” (68% vs 67.8%). CONCLUSION: The criterion of “pre-hospital resuscitation” was statistically significant with the severity of the trauma, but did not increase the PPV. The use of “pre-hospital resuscitation” criterion could be re-considered if these results are confirmed by larger studies. PMID:25379459

  11. Success Rate of Pre-hospital Emergency Medical Service Personnel in Implementing Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support Guidelines on Traffic Accident Victims.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Changiz; Vahdati, Samad Shams; Notash, Mehdi; Miri, Seyed Hassan; Ghafouri, Rouzbeh Rajaei

    2014-06-01

    Road traffic injuries are responsible for a vast number of trauma-related deaths in middle- and low-income countries. Pre-hospital emergency medical service (PHEMS) provides care and transports the injured patients from the scene of accident to the destined hospital. The PHEMS providers and paramedics were recently trained in the Pre Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) guidelines to improve the outcome of trauma patients in developing countries. We decided to carry out a study on the success rate of PHEMS personnel in implementing PHTLS guidelines at the scene of trauma. Severe trauma patients who had been transferred to the emergency department were included in the study. Evaluations included transfer time, airway management, spinal immobilization, external bleeding management, intravenous (IV) line access, and fluid therapy. All evaluations were performed by an expert emergency physician in the emergency department. The mean response time was 17.87±9.1 minutes. The PHEMS personnel immobilized cervical spine in 60.4% of patients, out of whom 16.7% were not properly immobilized. Out of 99 (98%) cases of established IV line access by the PHEMS providers, 57% were satisfactory. Fluid therapy, which was carried out in 99 (98%) patients by the PHEMS personnel, was appropriate in 92% of the cases. PHEMS personnel need more education and supervising to provide services according to PHTLS guidelines.

  12. Trauma care systems in Saudi Arabia: an agenda for action

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naami, Mohammed Y.; Arafah, Maria A.; Al-Ibrahim, Fatimah S.

    2010-01-01

    Saudi Arabia is undergoing a rapid population growth that along with improved socioeconomics has led many individuals to own a car or even a number of cars per family, resulting in a greater number of vehicles on the roads. The reduced focus on good public transportation systems and the dependence on cars for transportation have created a diversity of drivers who are unfamiliar with the local driving rules and lack the basic skills for safe driving. This is in addition to some young drivers who frequently violate traffic laws and tend to speed most of the time. This unplanned expansion in road traffic has resulted in more car accidents, injuries, disabilities, and deaths. Accompanying that is an increased socioeconomic burden, depletion of human resources, emotional and psychological stress on families, and a strain on healthcare facilities. If this continues without prompt intervention, it will lead to increased insurance premiums and may become unmanageable. To minimize this impact, a national or regional multidisciplinary trauma system has to be developed and implemented. A trauma system is a preplanned, comprehensive, and coordinated regional injury response network that includes all facilities with the capability to care for the injured. Essential components of the system include trauma prevention, prehospital care, hospital care, rehabilitation, system administration, trauma care education and training, trauma care evaluation and quality improvement, along with the participation of society. Research has documented a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality from trauma after the implementation of such systems, depending on their efficiency. The purpose of this review is to discuss the problem of road traffic accidents in this country and address the trauma care system as an effective solution. PMID:20103958

  13. The Swiss bus accident on 13 March 2012: lessons for pre-hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The recent bus crash in Switzerland involving many children provides several lessons for the pre-hospital care community. The use of multiple helicopters that are capable of flying at night and that carry advanced medical pre-hospital teams undoubtedly saved lives following the tragedy. We describe the medical response to the incident and the lessons that can be learned for emergency medical services. PMID:22784360

  14. Telematics in acute trauma care.

    PubMed

    Juhra, C; Vordemvenne, T; Hartensuer, R; Uckert, F; Raschke, M J

    2009-01-01

    Each year, 20,000 people in Germany die because of a traffic accident. Altogether, yearly productivity loss caused by these injuries is estimated to be around 5 billion Euros. International and national studies revealed the trauma center level of the primary hospital as the major predictor for trauma related mortality. In 2006 the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU) called its members to form regionally based networks for the exchange of data among hospitals engaged in trauma care. In April 2008 the north-west region of Germany with 49 hospitals, three hospitals in the Netherlands, and local emergency services founded the "TraumaNetwork NorthWest (TNNW). The major goals of the TNNW are: 1) to shorten the time between accident and admission to the appropriate hospital, 2) to create effective means of communication, and 3) to implement common pre- and in-hospital standards for trauma care. Since the needed application software is not commercially available, a team of computer and medical specialists has been formed for its development. Once the software is in place, a pre- and post-analysis will be performed to study the consequences of the application on transportation time and injury-related mortality within the region. The project is recognized as a pilot project by the DGU and if it is successful is meant to be adapted across Germany.

  15. [PHTLS team course: a pilot project. Structured student education in prehospital care of severely injured patients].

    PubMed

    Woelfl, C G; Guehring, T; Moghaddam, A; Gliwitzky, B; Schaedler, T; Gruetzner, P A; Riess, M; Frank, C B

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical school students at the University of Heidelberg seems to be improvable regarding prehospital trauma treatment compared to an established anaesthesiology-based training for medical emergencies. This study addresses the current situation and possibilities for advancing this training. A baseline was set by interviews of the medical school students. Based on this the hypothesis was postulated that there is a deficit in the education of the medical school students concerning the training in prehospital trauma treatment. This was proved by questionnaires given to the students in the 7th and 8th semesters at the University of Heidelberg Medical School. The results were evaluated and a possible approach for improvement was developed. A total of 111 questionnaires could be evaluated. It could be shown that the existing education was not effectual and that there is a need for a praxis-orientated 1-day course in prehospital trauma treatment. Especially the treatment of multiply injured patients is a challenge for young medical professionals. However, there is a high motivation to learn and train in emergency medicine. The students long for a practical trauma course compared to the advanced medical CPR course provided by the Department of Anaesthesiology of the University of Heidelberg. Those algorithm-based trauma courses do exist with PHTLS® and ATLS®. Based on these courses we developed the PHTLS® TEAM course.

  16. Age, physical trauma and care.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A

    1995-01-01

    To cast light on the effects of aging on the metabolic responses to physical trauma an Ottawa researcher has studied strength and blood glucose metabolism in elderly people. He finds that because older people have less lean body mass, particularly muscle mass, than younger people, they are less able to tolerate trauma. They weaken faster and to a greater extent than younger patients who have experienced similar trauma, and they recover more slowly. At the same time, elderly people are less able to tolerate glucose, which is often given as part of their nutritional support. These findings have implications for care: the elderly trauma patient will be weaker than a younger counterpart, and nutrition will need to be provided early, with the glucose intolerance of elderly people borne in mind. Images p1454-a PMID:7728694

  17. Prehospital management of evolving critical illness by the primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Kerri A; Hosseinnezhad, Alireza; Ullah, Ashfaq; Vinagre, Yuka-Marie; Baker, Stephen P; Lilly, Craig M

    2013-10-01

    The factors that limit primary care providers (PCPs) from intervening for adults with evolving, acute, severe illness are less understood than the increasing frequency of management by acute care providers. Rates of prehospital patient management by a PCP and of communication with acute care teams were measured in a multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted in all four of the adult medical ICUs of the three hospitals in central Massachusetts that provide tertiary care. Rates were measured for 390 critical care encounters, using a validated instrument to abstract the medical record and conduct telephone interviews. PCPs implemented prehospital management for eight episodes of acute illness among 300 encounters. Infrequent prehospital management by PCPs was attributed to their lack of awareness of the patient's evolving acute illness. Only 21% of PCPs were aware of the acute illness before their patient was admitted to an ICU, and 33% were not aware that their patient was in an ICU. Rates of PCP involvement were not appreciably different among provider groups or by patient age, sex, insurance status, hospital, ICU, or ICU staffing model. We identified lack of PCP awareness of patients' acute illness and high rates of PCP referral to acute care providers as the most frequent barriers to prehospital management of evolving acute illness. These findings suggest that implementing processes that encourage early patient-PCP communication and increase rates of prehospital management of infections and acute exacerbations of chronic diseases could reduce use of acute care services.

  18. A propensity score analysis of prehospital factors and directness of transport of major trauma patients to a level I trauma center.

    PubMed

    Garwe, Tabitha; Cowan, Linda D; Neas, Barbara R; Sacra, John C; Albrecht, Roxie M; Rich, Katy M

    2011-01-01

    Indications for direct transport may be strongly related to risk of future health outcomes, and these indications may not be adequately controlled by considering only in-hospital variables. This study was designed to identify prehospital factors associated with directness of transport. The study included 2,062 patients treated at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2007. The outcome of interest was directness of transport to a Level I trauma center. A propensity score analysis was used to identify demographic, clinical, distance, and other injury scene-related variables associated with the probability of direct transport. A total of 1,459 patients were directly transported to the Level I trauma center and 603 were transferred from lower level facilities. Patients were more likely to be transported directly if they had lower Glasgow Comma Scale scores, had penetrating injuries, were involved in traffic-related injuries, were closer to a Level IV or I trauma center, and if an advanced life support emergency medical service agency transported them from the scene. Patients were more likely to initially stop if they required advanced airway management, met at least one anatomic criterion, were further away from a Level I trauma center, or closer to an intermediate facility. Confounding due to unadjusted prehospital factors may be present in studies evaluating the impact of directness of transport on short-term mortality outcomes. Propensity score analysis of treatment indications provides an additional and efficient method to reduce this bias.

  19. Psychological care in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mohta, Medha; Sethi, A K; Tyagi, Asha; Mohta, Anup

    2003-01-01

    The clinician manages trauma patients in the emergency room, operation theatre, intensive care unit and trauma ward with an endeavour to provide best possible treatment for physical injuries. At the same time, it is equally important to give adequate attention to behavioural and psychological aspects associated with the event. Knowledge of the predisposing factors and their management helps the clinician to prevent or manage these psychological problems. Various causes of psychological disturbances in trauma patients have been highlighted. These include pain, the sudden and unexpected nature of events and the procedures and interventions necessary to resuscitate and stabilise the patient. The ICU and trauma ward environment, sleep and sensory deprivation, impact of injury on CNS, medications and associated pre-morbid conditions are also significant factors. Specific problems that concern the traumatised patients are helplessness, humiliation, threat to body image and mental symptoms. The patients react to these stressors by various defence mechanisms like conservation withdrawal, denial, regression, anger, anxiety and depression. Some of them develop delirium or even more severe problems like acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Physical, pharmacological or psychological interventions can be performed to prevent or minimise these problems in trauma patients. These include adequate pain relief, prevention of sensory and sleep deprivation, providing familiar surroundings, careful explanations and reassurance to the patient, psychotherapy and pharmacological treatment whenever required.

  20. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-08-01

    Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was principally

  1. Evaluation of Prehospital Blood Products to Attenuate Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma in a Model of Severe Injury and Shock in Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sarah; Nordmann, Giles; Brohi, Karim; Midwinter, Mark; Woolley, Tom; Gwyther, Robert; Wilson, Callie; Poon, Henrietta; Kirkman, Emrys

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute trauma coagulopathy (ATC) is seen in 30% to 40% of severely injured casualties. Early use of blood products attenuates ATC, but the timing for optimal effect is unknown. Emergent clinical practice has started prehospital deployment of blood products (combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma [PRBCs:FFP], and alternatively PRBCs alone), but this is associated with significant logistical burden and some clinical risk. It is therefore imperative to establish whether prehospital use of blood products is likely to confer benefit. This study compared the potential impact of prehospital resuscitation with (PRBCs:FFP 1:1 ratio) versus PRBCs alone versus 0.9% saline (standard of care) in a model of severe injury. Twenty-four terminally anesthetised Large White pigs received controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage (35% blood volume) followed by a 30-min shock phase. The animals were allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups during a 60-min prehospital evacuation phase: hypotensive resuscitation (target systolic arterial pressure 80 mmHg) using either 0.9% saline (group 1, n = 9), PRBCs:FFP (group 2, n = 9), or PRBCs alone (group 3, n = 6). Following this phase, an in-hospital phase involving resuscitation to a normotensive target (110 mmHg systolic arterial blood pressure) using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all groups. There was no mortality in any group. A coagulopathy developed in group 1 (significant increase in clot initiation and dynamics shown by TEG [thromboelastography] R and K times) that persisted for 60 to 90 min into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly attenuated in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.025 R time and P = 0.035 K time), which were not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.0067) (2.8 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.2 and 1.8 ± 0.3 L, respectively). This difference was

  2. Assessment of the Status of Prehospital Care in 13 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Katie; Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul; Rubiano, Andres M.; Zakariah, Ahmed; Rivara, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Injury and other medical emergencies are becoming increasingly common in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Many to most of the deaths from these conditions occur outside of hospitals, necessitating the development of prehospital care. Prehospital capabilities are inadequately developed to meet the growing needs for emergency care in most LMICs. In order to better plan for development of prehospital care globally, this study sought to better understand the current status of prehospital care in a wide range of LMICs. Methods A survey was conducted of emergency medical services (EMS) leaders and other key informants in 13 LMICs in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Questions addressed methods of transport to hospital, training and certification of EMS providers, organization and funding of EMS systems, public access to prehospital care, and barriers to EMS development. Results Prehospital care capabilities varied significantly, but in general, were less developed in low-income countries and in rural areas, where utilization of formal emergency medical services was often very low. Commercial drivers, volunteers, and other bystanders provided a large proportion of prehospital transport and occasionally also provide first aid in many locations. Although taxes and mandatory motor vehicle insurance provided supplemental funds to EMS in 85% of the countries, the most frequently cited barriers to further development of prehospital care was inadequate funding (36% of barriers cited). The next most commonly sited barriers were lack of leadership within the system (18%) and lack of legislation setting standards (18%). Conclusions Expansion of prehospital care to currently under- or un-served areas, especially in low-income countries and in rural areas, could make use of the already existing networks of first responders, such as commercial drivers and lay persons. Efforts to increase their effectiveness, such as more widespread first aid training, and better

  3. Trauma care - a participant observer study of trauma centers at Delhi, Lucknow and Mumbai.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Sushant; Kumar, Akshay; Agarwal, Arpit Kumar; Misra, M C

    2009-06-01

    Trained doctors and para-medical personnel in accident and emergency services are scant in India. Teaching and training in trauma and emergency medical system (EMS) as a specialty accredited by the Medical Council of India is yet to be started as a postgraduate medical education program. The MI and CMO (casualty medical officer) rooms at military and civilian hospitals in India that practice triage, first-aid, medico-legal formalities, reference and organize transport to respective departments leads to undue delays and lack multidisciplinary approach. Comprehensive trauma and emergency infrastructure were created only at a few cities and none in the rural areas of India in last few years. To study the infrastructure, human resource allocation, working, future plans and vision of the established trauma centers at the 3 capital cities of India - Delhi (2 centres), Lucknow and Mumbai. Participant observer structured open ended qualitative research by 7 days direct observation of the facilities and working of above trauma centers. Information on, 1. Infrastructure; space and building, operating, ventilator, and diagnostic and blood bank facilities, finance and costs and pre-hospital care infrastructure, 2. Human resource; consultant and resident doctors, para-medical staff and specialists and 3. Work style; first responder, type of patients undertaken, burn management, surgical management and referral system, follow up patient management, social support, bereavement and postmortem services were recorded on a pre-structured open ended instrument interviewing the officials, staff and by direct observation. Data were compressed, peer-analyzed as for qualitative research and presented in explicit tables. Union and state governments of Delhi, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh have spent heavily to create trauma and emergency infrastructure in their capital cities. Mostly general and orthopedics surgeons with their resident staff were managing the facilities. Comprehensively

  4. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital resuscitation of cardiac arrest in trauma patients: prehospital trauma-associated cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, François-Xavier; Hamada, Sophie; Raux, Mathieu; Gay, Matthieu; Mantz, Jean; Paugam Burtz, Catherine; Gauss, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest (CA) remains associated with poor long-term outcome, recent studies show an improvement in the survival rate after prehospital trauma associated CA (TCA). However, data on the long-term neurological outcome of TCA, particularly from physician-staffed Emergency Medical Service (EMS), are scarce, and results reported have been inconsistent. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients admitted to several trauma centres after a TCA. This study is a retrospective database review of all patients from a multicentre prospective registry that experienced a TCA and had undergone successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) prior their admission at the trauma centre. The primary end point was neurological outcome at 6 months among patients who survived to hospital discharge. 88 victims of TCA underwent successful CPR and were admitted to the hospital, 90% of whom were victims of blunt trauma. Of these 88 patients, 10 patients (11%; CI 95% 6% to 19%) survived to discharge: on discharge, 9 patients displayed a GCS of 15 and Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) 1-2 and one patient had a GCS 7 and CPC of 3. Hypoxia was the most frequent cause of CA among survivors. 6-month follow-up was achieved for 9 patients of the 10 surviving patients. The 9 patients with a good outcome on hospital discharge had a CPC of 1 or 2 6 months post discharge. All returned to their premorbid family and social settings. Among patients admitted to hospital after successful CPR from TCA, hypoxia as the likely aetiology of arrest carried a more favourable prognosis. Most of the patients successfully resuscitated from TCA and surviving to hospital discharge had a good neurological outcome, suggesting that prehospital resuscitation may not be futile. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. [The NACA scale. Construct and predictive validity of the NACA scale for prehospital severity rating in trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Weiss, M; Bernoulli, L; Zollinger, A

    2001-03-01

    The NACA-scale is used in many Austrian, German and Swiss emergency medical systems for demographic description of emergency patients. Little attention has been payed to the evaluation of its construct and predictive validity. In 427 consecutive trauma patients rescued in primary mission the NACA-Scale and the Injury Severity Score (ISS) were determined. Outcome data were obtained from medical charts and by written or telephone requests. Data were analysed with Spearman-Rank-Correlation. NACA-Grade and ISS-values showed only a moderate correlation with a considerably large spread (Rho = 0.721). Both severity scores demonstrated a good correlation to mortality (Rho = 0.976/0.994) and to transfer to an ICU (Rho = 0.964/0.943), as well a moderate correlation to the duration of ICU-stay (Rho = 0.722/0.756) and of hospital stay (Rho = 0.558/0.694). The NACA-scale adequately describes life threat in trauma victims and correlates well with morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is a valuable tool for demographic purposes in emergency medical systems. For more precise prehospital severity rating in trauma patients, the NACA-scale should be supplemented or replaced by a physiologically based prehospital severity score.

  6. Prehospital anaesthesia by a physician and paramedic critical care team in Southwest England.

    PubMed

    von Vopelius-Feldt, Johannes; Benger, Jonathan R

    2013-12-01

    Prehospital anaesthesia using rapid sequence induction (RSI) is carried out internationally and in the UK despite equivocal evidence of clinical benefit. It is a core skill of the prehospital critical care service established by the Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust (GWAS) in 2008. This retrospective analysis of the service's first 150 prehospital RSIs describes intubation success rates and complications, thereby contributing towards the ongoing debate on its role and safety. Within the GWAS critical care team, RSI is only carried out in the presence of a qualified physician and critical care paramedic (CCP). The role of the intubating practitioner is interchangeable between physician and CCP. Data were collected retrospectively from RSI audit forms and electronic patient monitor printouts. GWAS physician and CCP teams undertook 150 prehospital RSIs between June 2008 and August 2011. The intubation success rate was 82, 91 and 97% for the first, second and third attempts, respectively. Successful intubation on the first attempt was achieved in 58 (85%) and 64 (78%) patients for physicians and CCPs, respectively. RSI complications included hypoxaemia (10.2%), hypotension (9.7%) and bradycardia (1.3%). Prehospital RSI can be carried out safely, with intubation success rates and complications comparable with RSI in the emergency department. The variation in the intubation success rates between individual practitioners highlights the importance of ongoing performance monitoring, coupled with high standards of clinical governance and training.

  7. The epidemiology of Scottish trauma: A comparison of pre-hospital and in-hospital deaths, 2000 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jonathan J; Yapp, Liam Z; Beattie, Anne; Devlin, Eimar; Samarage, Milan; McCaffer, Craig; Jansen, Jan O

    2016-02-01

    To characterise the temporal trends and urban-rural distribution of fatal injuries in Scotland through the analysis of mortality data collected by the National Records of Scotland. The prospectively collected NRS database was queried using ICD-10 codes for all Scottish trauma deaths during the period 2000 to 2011. Patients were divided into pre-hospital and in-hospital groups depending on the location of death. Incidence was plotted against time and linear regression was used to identify temporal trends. A total of 13,100 deaths were analysed. There were 4755 (36.3%) patients in the pre-hospital group with a median age (IQR) of 42 (28-58) years. The predominant cause of pre-hospital death related to vehicular injury (27.8%), which had a decreasing trend over the study period (p = 0.004). In-hospital, patients had a median age of 80 (58-88) years and the majority (67.0%) of deaths occurred following a fall on the level. This trend was shown to increase over the decade of study (p = 0.020). In addition, the incidence of urban incidents remained static, but the rate of rural fatal trauma decreased (p < 0.001). Around a third of Scottish trauma patients die prior to hospital admission and the predominant mechanism of injury is due to road traffic accidents. This contrasts with in-hospital deaths, which are mainly observed in elderly patients following a fall from standing height. Further research is required to determine the preventability of fatal traumatic injury in Scotland. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  9. The prehospital and hospital costs of emergency care for frequent ED patients.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Robert G; Edwards, Brandy L; Chidester, Jeffrey P; Perina, Debra G; Brady, William J; Williams, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Frequent emergency department (ED) use has been identified as a cause of ED overcrowding and increasing health care costs. Studies have examined the expense of frequent patients (FPs) to hospitals but have not added the cost Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to estimate the total cost of this pattern of care. Data on 2012 ED visits to a rural Level I Trauma Center and public safety net hospital were collected through a deidentified patient database. Transport data and 2012 Medicare Reimbursement Schedules were used to estimate the cost of EMS transport. Health information, outcomes, and costs were compared to find differences between the FP and non-FP group. This study identified 1242 FPs who visited the ED 5 or more times in 2012. Frequent patients comprised 3.25% of ED patients but accounted for 17% of ED visits and 13.7% of hospital costs. Frequent patients had higher rates of chronic disease, severity scores, and mortality. Frequent patients arrived more often via ambulance and accounted for 32% of total transports at an estimated cost of $2.5-$3.2 million. Hospital costs attributable to FPs were $29.1 million, bringing the total cost of emergency care to $31.6-$32.3 million, approximately $25,000 per patient. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of a prehospital cost estimate adds approximately 10% to the cost of care for the FP population. In addition to improving care for a sick population of patients, programs that reduce frequent EMS and ED use have the potential to produce a favorable cost benefit to communities and health systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical and logistical challenges of trauma care in a 12-day cave rescue: A case report.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas-Michael; Bregani, Rino; Stopar, Rok; Krammer, Jacob; Göksu, Martin; Müller, Natalie; Petermeyer, Michael; Schiffer, Johannes; Strapazzon, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    To describe the case of a patient with a severe head injury at a depth of about 1000 m from the cave entrance in Bavaria, Germany, who received pre-hospital trauma care for 12 days until evacuation. Search and rescue (SAR) operation involved 728 rescuers, 202 working directly in the cave (for a total of 9239 h) and 7 physicians from five countries. At 6-month follow-up, the patient had recovered completely and resumed his job. This case highlights several pitfalls of trauma care in complex SAR operations, which often rely on expert knowledge and are not yet evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prehospital Blood Transfusion in the En Route Management of Severe Combat Trauma: A Matched Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    definitve surgery delayed until physiology has been restored;7 limited use of synthetic intravenous fluids, which may worsen coagulopathy through... coagulopathy of trauma.4,11 Taken together, these are known as damage control resuscitation (DCR).12Y14 As DCR developed, it became clear that early, aggressive...resusci- tation could lead to early correction of acidosis, coagulopathy , and hypothermia.15,16 En route care, that is, during transport from point

  12. Damage control and point of injury care: extending the care continuum to military prehospital providers.

    PubMed

    Hetzler, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Damage control principles are well founded, well proven, and have been incorporated into many specialties of clinical care in both military and civilian practice. Theories regarding hemostatic and hypovolemic resuscitation and preventing the Lethal Triad have had profound effects on the survival of wounded during the present conflicts. As we continue to refine these practices, implementation of this theory should be extended to military prehospital providers. The impacts of damage control practices from those providing initial treatment could complete the continuity of care, prime patients for additional success, and affect overall morbidity and mortality. The basic tenets of damage control theory are easily transferred to the Role I provider in the field and may even address their unique requirements more appropriately. Understanding the working concept of damage control would improve decision-making skills in both therapeutics and evacuation while managing casualties in the uncontrolled environment of combat. Military prehospital damage control differs greatly from in-hospital use, in that the principles must incorporate both medical and tactical considerations for care of the wounded. Introducing damage control principles to established casualty care guidelines will recognize and unite an often underappreciated level of care into a successful practice.

  13. The trauma team--a system of initial trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, O. A.; Driscoll, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Trauma remains the leading cause of death under the age of 35 years. England and Wales lost 252,000 working years from accidental deaths, including poison, in 1992. In this country, preventable deaths from trauma are inappropriately high. In many hospitals there are not enough personnel; in the majority, there are no recognisable trauma care systems, which can reduce preventable deaths to a minimum. The appropriateness of trauma centres for this country is being assessed in Stoke-on-Trent, and a report is due out later this year. Even if the recommendation is made to establish such centres, it is unlikely that many will be set up. Consequently most hospitals will have to rely on their own resources to set up and run a trauma team. This type of trauma care system is the subject of this article. PMID:8977939

  14. ACCESS TO TERTIARY TRAUMA CARE: CHALLENGES WITHIN A DEVELOPING HEALTH CARE SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Mbanje, C; Muguti, G

    2017-06-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of mortality the world over, with an increasing impact in low and middle income countries. Oneof the key challenges in tackling the morbidity and mortality associated with the growing trauma epidemic includes the ability to provide timely access to appropriate trauma care. A prospective cross-sectional study of 385 consecutive trauma patients admitted at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals (PGH) following injury. Data inclusive of demographics, Methods of transfer, time to care and referral patterns was analysed. Over half of all casualties, (54%) were referrals from satellite hospitals. One hundred and twenty-one casualties (31.68%) received pre-hospital care by medical personnel. The most common means of transfer of casualties from injury scene was by private vehicle (53%), followed by ambulance (32%) and public transport (8%), but geographical variances were observed. The average transit time from injury was 10.64 hours (SD 23.61) for those injured within Harare. For direct transfers to PGH from within Harare, mean transit times were comparable between use of private vehicles (3.34 hours) and ambulances (3.31 hours). There was correlation between time of injury and method of transfer. There was no correlation between degree of injury according to ISS and transit time (p = 0.24). Significant challenges remain in ensuring timely and appropriate transfer of trauma casualties to tertiary care facilities.

  15. The development of sustainable emergency care in ghana: physician, nursing and prehospital care training initiatives.

    PubMed

    Martel, John; Oteng, Rockefeller; Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Bell, Sue Anne; Zakariah, Ahmed; Oduro, George; Kowalenko, Terry; Donkor, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ghana's first Emergency Medicine residency and nursing training programs were initiated in 2009 and 2010, respectively, at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in the city of Kumasi in association with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and the Universities of Michigan and Utah. In addition, the National Ambulance Service was commissioned initially in 2004 and has developed to include both prehospital transport services in all regions of the country and Emergency Medical Technician training. Over a decade of domestic and international partnership has focused on making improvements in emergency care at a variety of institutional levels, culminating in the establishment of comprehensive emergency care training programs. We describe the history and status of novel postgraduate emergency physician, nurse, and prehospital provider training programs as well as the prospect of creating a board certification process and formal continuing education program for practicing emergency physicians. Significant strides have been made in the development of emergency care and training in Ghana over the last decade, resulting in the first group of Specialist-level emergency physicians as of late 2012, as well as development of accredited emergency nursing curricula and continued expansion of a national Emergency Medical Service. This work represents a significant move toward in-country development of sustainable, interdisciplinary, team-based emergency provider training programs designed to retain skilled health care workers in Ghana and may serve as a model for similar developing nations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Canadian Forces trauma care system

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Homer

    2011-01-01

    According to the Trauma Association of Canada, a trauma system is a preplanned, organized and coordinated injury-control effort in a defined geographic area. An effective trauma system engages in comprehensive injury surveillance and prevention programs; delivers trauma care from the time of injury to recovery; engages in research, training and performance improvement; and establishes linkages with an all-hazards emergency preparedness program. To support Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan, the Canadian Forces (CF) developed a comprehensive trauma system based around its trauma hospital — the Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit (R3MMU) at Kandahar Airfield. This article reviews the essential components of a modern trauma system, outlines the evidence that trauma systems improve care to injury victims and describes how the current CF trauma system was developed. PMID:22099323

  17. The role of palliative care in trauma.

    PubMed

    Owens, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Trauma remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Despite the aggressive and heroic nature of trauma care, including trauma surgery, 10% to 20% of patients admitted to trauma intensive care units die. As the population continues to age, it is predicted that by 2050, approximately 40% of those experiencing traumatic injury will be older than 65 years. For multiple reasons, people in this age group who experience trauma are at greater risk for death. Palliative care is the specialty of health care that provides care for patients with serious, life-threatening, or life-limiting illness or injury, regardless of the stage of disease or treatment. The goal of palliative care is to reduce or alleviate suffering through expert pain and symptom management, as well as assistance with decision making. The integration of palliative and trauma care can assist and support patients and families through stressful, often life-changing times, regardless of the final outcome.

  18. [Nursing care in pre-hospital services and airmedical removal].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Radünz, Vera; Wosny, Antônio de Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The present article is a description of an experience developed during the Conclusive Monography of the Nursing Course from Santa Catarina's Federal University, in the second semester year 2000. It discusses the importance of the Pre-hospital Attendiment Service and Airmedical Removal, and the need of nurses preparation to attend the increasing requests of those services. It presents a historical review on these kind of attention method in health, in Brazil and in the world. It discusses some aspects related to management of human and material resources, concerning its specificity in those kind of services. It also points out the importance of the Nurse roll, and the necessity of widening their skills to act in the field of pre-hospital attendiment and airmedical removal.

  19. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  20. Evaluation of battery-operated monitor/defibrillators used in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Magliocchetti, T; Bennett, B; Jacobs, L M; Madigan, C

    1982-01-01

    During the past two decades, prehospital medical care has become more sophisticated, resulting in devices that are routinely used in the hospital being adapted for use in the field. One such device is the ECG machine, which has undergone extensive technological and performance modifications so it may better serve the large number of patients requiring electrocardiographic monitoring and cardioversion in stressed environments.

  1. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard (Bud) F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia’s most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.  PMID:27489749

  2. Implementing an Innovative Prehospital Care Provider Training Course in Nine Cambodian Provinces.

    PubMed

    Acker, Peter; Newberry, Jennifer A; Hattaway, Leonard Bud F; Socheat, Phan; Raingsey, Prak P; Strehlow, Matthew C

    2016-06-27

    Despite significant improvements in health outcomes nationally, many Cambodians continue to experience morbidity and mortality due to inadequate access to quality emergency medical services. Over recent decades, the Cambodian healthcare system and civil infrastructure have advanced markedly and now possess many of the components required to establish a well functioning emergency medical system. These components include enhanced access to emergency transportation through large scale road development efforts, widspread availability of emergency communication channels via the spread of cellphone and internet technology, and increased access to health services for poor patients through the implementation of health financing schemes. However, the system still lacks a number of key elements, one of which is trained prehospital care providers. Working in partnership with local providers, our team created an innovative, Cambodia-specific prehospital care provider training course to help fill this gap. Participants received training on prehospital care skills and knowledge most applicable to the Cambodian healthcare system, which was divided into four modules: Basic Prehospital Care Skills and Adult Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Emergencies, Obstetric Emergencies, and Neonatal/Pediatric Emergencies. The course was implemented in nine of Cambodia's most populous provinces, concurrent with a number of overarching emergency medical service system improvement efforts. Overall, the course was administered to 1,083 Cambodian providers during a 27-month period, with 947 attending the entire course and passing the course completion exam.

  3. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients. OPALS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Nichol, G; O'Brien, B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Lyver, M B; Luinstra, L G; Dagnone, E; Campeau, T; Ward, R; Anderson, S

    1999-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period (1994-2002). The current article, Part II, describes in detail the rationale and methodology for major trauma and respiratory distress patients and for an economic evaluation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) programs in the OPALS Study. The OPALS Study, using a rigorous controlled methodology and a large sample size, should clearly indicate the benefit in trauma and respiratory distress patient survival and morbidity that results from the widespread introduction of prehospital ALS programs to communities of many different sizes. [Stiell IG, Wells GA, Spaite DW, Nichol G, O'Brien B, Munkley DP, Field BJ, Lyver MB, Luinstra LG, Dagnone E, Campeau T, Ward R, Anderson S, for the OPALS Study Group: The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study Part II: Rationale and methodology for trauma and respiratory distress patients.

  4. [Survey on the use of mannitol in prehospital care in Paris area].

    PubMed

    Duchateau, F X; Burnod, A; Chollet, C; Ricard-Hibon, A; Samain, E; Marty, J

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the use of mannitol in prehospital care in Paris area. Survey using telephone interviews. Emergency physicians on duty in the 37 emergency departments in charge of prehospital care in Paris area were called by one investigator. They were asked to answer a questionnaire about their own use of mannitol in the prehospital setting. Ninety-six questionnaires were recorded. Physicians were anaesthesiologists (9%) or emergency physicians (87%). In three departments, mannitol was not available in the ambulances. Thirty-five per cent (n = 34) reported no use of mannitol and 17% (n = 16) just once. Fourteen physicians (15%) did not want to use it. The reasons for not using mannitol were lack of knowledge about efficacy for five, need for previous brain imaging for seven or neurosurgeon's agreement before using mannitol for three. For those who had already used mannitol or were ready to use it, the main indication was increased intracranial pressure with clinical signs of brain herniation after severe brain injury for 92% of physicians. Thirty-one % reported not knowing the dose of mannitol, 33% having a memorandum immediately available and among those who answered the question, 63% gave a value compatible with guidelines. A significant percentage of physicians tacking part in the French prehospital care system, do not follow published guidelines on the use of mannitol. Actions improving implementation of those guidelines should be supported.

  5. The Trauma Collaborative Care Study (TCCS).

    PubMed

    Wegener, Stephen T; Pollak, Andrew N; Frey, Katherine P; Hymes, Robert A; Archer, Kristin R; Jones, Clifford B; Seymour, Rachel B; OʼToole, Robert V; Castillo, Renan C; Huang, Yanjie; Scharfstein, Daniel O; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-04-01

    Previous research suggests that the care provided to trauma patients could be improved by including early screening and management of emotional distress and psychological comorbidity. The Trauma Collaborative Care (TCC) program, which is based on the principles of well-established models of collaborative care, was designed to address this gap in trauma center care. This article describes the TCC program and the design of a multicenter study to evaluate its effectiveness for improving patient outcomes after major, high-energy orthopaedic trauma at level 1 trauma centers. The TCC program was evaluated by comparing outcomes of patients treated at 6 intervention sites (n = 481) with 6 trauma centers where care was delivered as usual (control sites, n = 419). Compared with standard treatment alone, it is hypothesized that access to the TCC program plus standard treatment will result in lower rates of poor patient-reported function, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

  6. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  7. Prehospital identification of trauma patients with early acute coagulopathy and massive bleeding: results of a prospective non-interventional clinical trial evaluating the Trauma Induced Coagulopathy Clinical Score (TICCS).

    PubMed

    Tonglet, Martin L; Minon, Jean Marc; Seidel, Laurence; Poplavsky, Jean Louis; Vergnion, Michel

    2014-11-26

    Identifying patients who need damage control resuscitation (DCR) early after trauma is pivotal for adequate management of their critical condition. Several trauma-scoring systems have been developed to identify such patients, but most of them are not simple enough to be used in prehospital settings in the early post-traumatic phase. The Trauma Induced Coagulopathy Clinical Score (TICCS) is an easy-to-measure and strictly clinical trauma score developed to meet this medical need. TICCS is a 3-item clinical score (range: 0 to 18) based on the assessment of general severity, blood pressure and extent of body injury and calculated by paramedics on-site for patients with severe trauma. This non-interventional prospective study was designed to assess the ability of TICCS to discern patients who need DCR. These patients were patients with early acute coagulopathy of trauma (EACT), haemorrhagic shock, massive transfusion and surgical or endovascular haemostasis during hospitalization. Diagnosis of EACT was assessed by both thromboelastometry and conventional coagulation tests. During an 18-month period, 89 severe trauma patients admitted to the general emergency unit at our hospital were enrolled in the study, but 7 were excluded for protocol violations. Of the 82 remaining patients, 8 needed DCR and 74 did not. With receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, TICCS proved to be a powerful discriminant test (area under the curve = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.92 to 1.0). A cutoff of 10 on the TICCS scale provided the best balance between sensitivity (100%; 95% CI: 53.9 to 100) and specificity (95.9%; 95% CI: 88.2 to 99.2). The positive predictive value was 72.7%, and the negative predictive value was 100.0%. TICCS can be easily and rapidly measured by paramedics at the trauma site. In this study of blunt trauma patients, TICCS was able to discriminate between patients with and without need for DCR. TICCS on-site evaluation should allow initiation of optimal care immediately upon

  8. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria.

  9. Trauma Care Training for National Police Nurses in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Rubiano, Andrés M.; Sánchez, Álvaro I.; Guyette, Francis; Puyana, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In response to a requirement for advanced trauma care nurses to provide combat tactical medical support, the antinarcotics arm of the Colombian National Police (CNP) requested the Colombian National Prehospital Care Association to develop a Combat Tactical Medicine Course (MEDTAC course). Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of this course in imparting knowledge and skills to the students. Methods We trained 374 combat nurses using the novel MEDTAC course. We evaluated students using pre-and postcourse performance with a 45-question examination. Field simulations and live tissue exercises were evaluated by instructors using a Likert scale with possible choices of 1 to 4. Interval estimation of proportions was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Differences in didactic test scores were assessed using a t-test at 0.05 level of statistical significance. Results Between March 2006 and July 2007, 374 combat nursing students of the CNP were trained. The difference between examination scores before and after the didactic part of the course was statistically significant (p < 0.01). After the practical session of the course, all participants (100%) demonstrated competency on final evaluation. Conclusions The MEDTAC course is an effective option improving the knowledge and skills of combat nurses serving in the CNP. MEDTAC represents a customized approach for military trauma care training in Colombia. This course is an example of specialized training available for groups that operate in austere environments with limited resources. PMID:19947877

  10. Effective pre-hospital care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Fukuda-Ohashi, Naoko; Doi, Kent; Matsubara, Takehiro; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between pre-hospital care and the prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by respiratory disease is unclear. This study aimed to assess the impact of pre-hospital care on the prognosis of OHCA caused by respiratory disease. In a nationwide, population-based, observational study, we enrolled 121,081 adults aged ≥18 years who experienced OHCA from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010. The primary endpoint was favourable neurological outcomes. Of the 120,256 eligible adult OHCA patients, 7,071 (5.9%) experienced OHCA caused by respiratory disease. Of these 7,071 patients, 3,911 (55.3%) received no cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 2,403 (34.0%) received chest-compression-only CPR, and 757 (10.7%) received conventional CPR by a bystander. There was no significant difference between the three types of bystander CPR with regard to the neurological outcome (no CPR: OR 0.68, 95%CI 0.39-1.24, p=0.1951; chest-compression-only CPR: OR 0.68, 95%CI 0.37-1.29, p=0.2295; and conventional CPR: as a reference). Pre-hospital administration of epinephrine (OR 0.37, 95%CI 0.13-0.85, p=0.0170) and the implementation of advanced airway management (OR 0.32, 95%CI 0.19-0.52, p<0.0001) were associated with poor neurological outcomes. Even in OHCA caused by respiratory disease, not only pre-hospital epinephrine administration but also pre-hospital advanced airway management and rescue breathing in bystander CPR may not be critical. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The dynamics of prehospital/hospital care and modes of transport during civil conflict and terrorist incidents.

    PubMed

    Celik, S; Dursun, R; Aycan, A; Gönüllü, H; Adanaş, C; Eryılmaz, M; Gönüllü, E; Akyol, M E; Keskin, S; Güloğlu, C

    2017-09-05

    Prehospital and hospital care during incidents of mass violence and civil conflict involve a number of aspects that distinguish it from care during times of peace. We aimed to analyze the dynamics and outcomes of prehospital and hospital care during ongoing conflicts. Multicentric prospective observational study. Patients enrolled in the study, which was conducted in Turkey, were all injured in armed conflict and taken to level 1 trauma centers. On admittance, patients were requested to complete a semistructured questionnaire containing questions on patient demographics, transport type, weapons used, injury severity score (ISS), and other incident-related factors. We analyzed patient outcomes (mortality, morbidity, complications, and length of hospital stay) and transfers of patients between hospitals. The present study evaluated the cases of 390 victims enrolled over a 9-month period and followed up for 6 months. The majority of patients were transported by ambulances (n = 334, 85.6%); other transport modes were helicopters (n = 32, 8.2%) and private vehicles (n = 24, 6.2%). Nearly half of patients (48.7%) did not benefit by changing hospitals. During transport to hospitals, 4.1% of the vehicles in the study were involved in accidents. Using multiple regression analysis, only ISS (odds ratio [OR]: 1.098, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.044-1.156) and the Glasgow Coma Scale (OR: 0.744, 95% CI: 0.639-0.866) were found to affect mortality. In Receiver-operator characteristic analysis, a cutoff value of 22.5 for ISS had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 89.6% for mortality. Despite lower ISS values, patient outcomes were worse in terror incidents/civil conflicts. Transport modes did not significantly affect outcomes, whereas hospital transport was found to be inefficiently used. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiological evaluation of tube depth and complications of prehospital endotracheal intubation in pediatric trauma: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Simons, T; Söderlund, T; Handolin, L

    2017-01-27

    Pediatric prehospital endotracheal intubation (PHETI) is a difficult and rarely performed procedure that remains the gold standard for prehospital airway management when ventilation and/or anesthesia is required, but high complications rates, including malposition continue to concern. We reviewed the experience in our institution of pediatric intubations with particular emphasis on the position of the endotracheal tube (ETT) tip within the trachea and related complications. Intubated pediatric patients presenting directly from the scene to our level 1 trauma center, between 2006 and 2014, were included in our study. Patient records and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed to identify the ETT tip-to-carina distance and possible intubation-related complications. ETT tips identified beyond the carina on radiographs or by clinical diagnosis were defined as misplaced. Because head movement causes a significant ETT movement within the trachea, which is age related, we also defined ETT tip placement (1) less than 2 cm above the carina in children younger than 8 and (2) less than 3 cm above the carina in children 8 years or older as "near miss" intubations. From a total of 34 cases, ETT misplacement was identified in seven cases. Diagnosis was made radiologically in five cases and clinically in two cases. Four of these patients had left lung atelectasis due to tube misplacement. Tube thoracotomy was performed in two of these patients without concurrent evidence of chest injury. "Near miss" intubations accounted for 7/9 and 9/25 in children <8 years and ≥8 years old, respectively, totaling 16/34, with two of these leading to late displacements. Pediatric endotracheal tube intubation carries a high rate of tube malposition and left lung atelectasis in our experience of pediatric trauma patients, with less than a third of ETTs placed in a safe position.

  13. Pre-hospital care among victims of road traffic accident in a rural area of Tamil Nadu: A cross-sectional descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Saurabh R; Pandian, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Prateek S

    2014-11-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that globally almost 1.24 million people die annually on the world's roads. The aim of the study was to assess the attributes of pre-hospital care in road traffic accidents (RTAs) victim brought to the health care establishment and to evaluate the pre-hospital trauma care provided in the rural areas of Kancheepuram district of Tamil Nadu. A cross-sectional descriptive study of 3 months duration (June 2014 to August 2014) was conducted in the Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram. The method of sampling was universal sampling and all RTA victims satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in the study. During the entire study duration, total 200 RTA victims were included. A pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit the desired information after the victims of RTAs are stabilized. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee prior to the start of the study. Written informed consent was obtained from the study participants (patient/guardian of children) before obtaining any information from them. Data entry and statistical analysis were done using SPSS version 18. Frequency distributions and percentages were computed for all the variables. Majority of the RTA victims 158 (79%) were from the age-group of 15-45 years. Most of the accidents were reported in night time [77 (38.5%)], on week-ends [113 (56.5%)], and involved two-wheelers [153 (76.5%)]. Almost 66 (33%) of the victims were not aware of the existence of emergency ambulance services. Also, only 15 (7.5%) victims were brought to the hospital in the emergency ambulance, of which only 3 victims were accompanied by a doctor. To conclude, the study indicates that a significant proportion of people were unaware about the emergency trauma ambulance services and the existing pre-hospital care services lack in multiple dimensions in a rural area of South India.

  14. Improving prehospital trauma management for skiers and snowboarders - need for on-slope triage?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Injuries from skiing and snowboarding became a major challenge for emergency care providers in Switzerland. In the alpine setting, early assessment of injury and health status is essential for the initiation of adequate means of care and transport. Nevertheless, validated standardized protocols for on-slope triage are missing. This article can assist in understanding the characteristics of injured winter sportsmen and exigencies for future on-slope triage protocols. Methods Six-year review of trauma cases in a tertiary trauma centre. Consecutive inclusion of all injured skiers and snowboarders aged >15 (total sample) years with predefined, severe injury to the head, spine, chest, pelvis or abdomen (study sample) presenting at or being transferred to the study hospital. Descriptive analysis of age, gender and injury pattern. Results Amongst 729 subjects (total sample) injured from skiing or snowboarding, 401 (55%, 54% of skiers and 58% of snowboarders) suffered from isolated limb injury. Amongst the remaining 328 subjects (study sample), the majority (78%) presented with monotrauma. In the study sample, injury to the head (52%) and spine (43%) was more frequent than injury to the chest (21%), pelvis (8%), and abdomen (5%). The three most frequent injury combinations were head/spine (10% of study sample), head/thorax (9%), and spine/thorax (6%). Fisher's exact test demonstrated an association for injury combinations of head/thorax (p < 0.001), head/abdomen (p = 0.019), and thorax/abdomen (p < 0.001). Conclusion The data presented and the findings from previous investigations indicate the need for development of dedicated on-slope triage protocols. Future research must address the validity and practicality of diagnostic on-slope tests for rapid decision making by both professional and lay first responders. Thus, large-scale and detailed injury surveillance is the future research priority. PMID:21521524

  15. Prehospital administration of freeze-dried plasma, is it the solution for trauma casualties?

    PubMed

    Shlaifer, Amir; Siman-Tov, Maya; Radomislensky, Irina; Peleg, Kobi; Shina, Avi; Baruch, Erez Nachum; Glassberg, Elon; Yitzhak, Avraham

    2017-10-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of possible preventable death in the battlefield. There is an increasing evidence for the effectiveness of blood component therapy in general, and plasma infusion in particular but their use is less applicable in the prehospital setting due to logistic difficulties. Israeli Defense Force has implemented the use of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) at the point of injury (POI), this adoption of FDP use entailed doubts regarding the feasibility and effectiveness of this practice. In this article, we present our experience with the use of FDP at the POI and prehospital setting regarding the feasibility, safety, adverse reactions, and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. This is a descriptive retrospective cohort study based on all casualties receiving FDP during January 2013 to June 2016. The study describes the injury, treatment, and outcome characteristics from POI until hospital discharge. During the study period, 109 casualties received FDP. The majority were men, aged 18 years to 35 years. Multiple severe injuries were found in almost half of the casualties, 78% had penetrating injury, and more than half were involved in a multicasualty event. Eighty-three percent were treated with one unit of FDP, 13% with two units, and 4% casualties with three units, nine patients (8.2%) were also treated in the prehospital setting with packed red blood cells. Fifty-seven percent fulfilled at least one criterion for the administration of FDP. Lifesaving interventions were required in 64%. In five (4.6%) cases, there were difficulties with FDP administration. Side effects were reported in one female patient. This study supports the usage feasibility of FDP at the POI and in the prehospital setting. Further adjustment of the clinical practice guidelines is required basing it not only on pathophysiologic parameters but also on clinical judgment. Further investigation of the available data is required to learn about the effectiveness of FDP at POI

  16. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  17. Comparison of trauma care systems in Asian countries: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Jin; Oh, Moon Young; Kim, Na Rae; Jung, Yoo Joong; Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do

    2017-08-07

    The study aims to compare the trauma care systems in Asian countries. Asian countries were categorised into three groups; 'lower middle-income country', 'upper middle-income country' and 'high-income country'. The Medline/PubMed database was searched for articles published from January 2005 to December 2014 using relevant key words. Articles were excluded if they examined a specific injury mechanism, referred to a specific age group, and/or did not have full text available. We extracted information and variables on pre-hospital and hospital care factors, and regionalised system factors and compared them across countries. A total of 46 articles were identified from 13 countries, including Pakistan, India, Vietnam and Indonesia from lower middle-income countries; the Islamic Republic of Iran, Thailand, China, Malaysia from upper middle-income countries; and Saudi Arabia, the Republic of Korea, Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore from high-income countries. Trauma patients were transported via various methods. In six of the 13 countries, less than 20% of trauma patients were transported by ambulance. Pre-hospital trauma teams primarily comprised emergency medical technicians and paramedics, except in Thailand and China, where they included mainly physicians. In Iran, Pakistan and Vietnam, the proportion of patients who died before reaching hospital exceeded 50%. In only three of the 13 countries was it reported that trauma surgeons were available. In only five of the 13 countries was there a nationwide trauma registry. Trauma care systems were poorly developed and unorganised in most of the selected 13 Asian countries, with the exception of a few highly developed countries. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Prehospital oral chlorhexidine does not reduce the rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia among critically ill trauma patients: A prospective concurrent-control study.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Pelaez Gil, Carlos A; Harland, Karisa K; Faine, Brett; Stoltze, Andrew; Pearson, Kent; Ahmed, Azeemuddin

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that prehospital oral chlorhexidine administered to intubated trauma patients will decrease the Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS) during the first 2 days of hospitalization. Prospective interventional concurrent-control study of all intubated adult trauma patients transported by air ambulance to a 711-bed Midwestern academic trauma center over a 1-year period. Patients transported by 2 university-based helicopters were treated with oral chlorhexidine after intubation, and the control group was patients transported by other air transport services. Sixty-seven patients were enrolled, of which 23 received chlorhexidine (9 patients allocated to the intervention were not treated). The change in CPIS score was no different between the intervention and control groups by intention to treat (1.06- vs 1.40-point reduction, P = .520), and no difference was observed in tracheal colonization (29.0% vs 36.7%, P = .586). No differences were observed in the rate of clinical pneumonia (8.7% vs 8.6%, P = .987) or mortality (P = .196) in the per-protocol chlorhexidine group. The prehospital administration of oral chlorhexidine does not reduce the CPIS score over the first 48 hours of admission for intubated trauma patients. Further study should explore other prehospital strategies of reducing complications of critical illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 911 (nueve once): Spanish-speaking parents' perspectives on prehospital emergency care for children.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer; Cowden, John D; Cupertino, A Paula; Dowd, M Denise; Kennedy, Chris

    2011-06-01

    Racial, ethnic and language-based disparities occur throughout the US health system. Pediatric prehospital emergency medical services are less likely to be used by Latinos. We identified perceptions of and barriers to prehospital pediatric emergency care (911) access among Spanish-speaking parents. A qualitative study involving six focus groups was conducted. Spanish-speaking parents participated with a bilingual moderator. Topics discussed included experiences, knowledge, beliefs, fears, barriers, and improvement strategies. All groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and reviewed for recurring themes. Forty-nine parents participated. Though parents believed 911 was available to all, many were uncertain how to use it, and what qualified as an emergency. Barriers included language discordance, fear of exposing immigration status, and fear of financial consequences. Parents strongly desired to learn more about 911 through classes, brochures, and media campaigns. Prehospital emergency care should be available to all children. Further quantitative studies may help solidify the identified barriers and uncover areas needing improvement within Emergency Medical Systems. Addressing barriers to 911 use in Spanish-speaking communities could improve the equity of health care delivery, while also decreasing the amount of non-emergency 911 use.

  20. Anaesthesia and pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Booth, A; Steel, A; Klein, J

    2013-01-01

    Major trauma is a leading cause of death and disability in the UK, particularly in the young. Pre-hospital emergency medicine (PHEM) involves provision of immediate medical care to critically ill and injured patients, across all age ranges, often in environments that may be remote and are not only physically challenging but also limited in terms of time and resources. PHEM is now a GMC-recognised subspecialty of anaesthesia or emergency medicine and the first recognised training program in the UK commenced in August 2012. This article discusses subspeciality development in PHEM, the competency based framework for training in PHEM, and the provision of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia.

  1. A study of prehospital medical documentation by military medical providers during precombat training.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Adam B; Mott, Jeffrey C; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Documentation of medical care provided is paramount for improving performance and ultimately reducing morbidity and mortality. However, documentation of prehospital trauma care on the battlefield has historically been suboptimal. Modernization of prehospital documentation tools have aligned data and information to be gathered with up-to-date treatment being rendered through Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) protocols and practices. Our study was conducted to evaluate TCCC Card completion, and accuracy of card completion, by military medical providers conducting precombat training through the Tactical Combat Medical Care Course. Study results do not show a deficiency in TCCC documentation training as provided by this course which should translate to adequate ability to accurately document prehospital trauma care on the battlefield. Leadership emphasis and community acceptance is required to increase compliance with prehospital documentation.

  2. Clinical applicability of real-time, prehospital image transmission for FAST (Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma).

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Hong, Ki Jeong; Cheon, Kyoung Woo; Shin, Ilhyoung; Song, Sung-Wook; Kim, Hee Chan

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated a real-time, prehospital ultrasound image transmission system for use in focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST). The wireless, real-time ultrasound image transmission system comprised an ultrasound scanner with a convex abdominal transducer and a notebook computer connected to a 3 G wireless network for video data transmission. In our simulation experiment, ultrasonography was performed by emergency medical technicians (EMTs) on a human body phantom with simulated haemoperitoneum. Transmitted ultrasound video clips were randomly rearranged and presented to emergency physicians to make a diagnosis of haemoperitoneum. A total of 21 ultrasound video clips was used and 13 emergency physicians participated in the study. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 83.5-94.6) and 85.3% (95% CI 78.4-90.7) respectively, and the accuracy of detecting abnormal ultrasound results was 87.7% (95% CI 83.8-91.6). Diagnosis of hemoperitonuem in trauma patients by an emergency physician based on the transmitted video images of FAST performed by an EMT is feasible, and has an accuracy of about 88%.

  3. Patients with acute chest pain - experiences of emergency calls and pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kerstin; Kihlgren, Mona; Ostman, Ingela; Sørlie, Venke

    2005-01-01

    Acute chest pain is a common reason why people call an emergency medical dispatch (EMD) centre. We examined how patients with acute chest pain experience the emergency call and their pre-hospital care. A qualitative design was used with a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Thirteen patients were interviewed, three women and 10 men. The patients were grateful that their lives had been saved and in general were satisfied with their pre-hospital contact. Sometimes they felt that it took too long for the emergency operators to answer and to understand the urgency. They were in a life-threatening situation and their feeling of vulnerability and dependency was great. Time seemed to stand still while they were waiting for help during their traumatic experience. The situation was fraught with pain, fear and an experience of loneliness. A sense of individualized care is important to strengthen trust and confidence between the patient and the pre-hospital personnel. Patients were aware of what number to call to reach the EMD centre, but were uncertain about when to call. More lives can be saved if people do not hesitate to call for help.

  4. Prehospital Cricothyrotomy Kits Used in Combat.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Cunningham, Cord W; Long, Adrianna N; Carter, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Surgical cricothyrotomy remains the only definitive airway management modality for the tactical setting recommended by Tactical Combat Casualty Care guidelines. Some units have fielded commercial cricothyrotomy kits to assist Combat Medics with surgical cricothyrotomy. To our knowledge, no previous publications report data on the use of these kits in combat settings. This series reports the the use of two kits in four patients in the prehospital combat setting. Using the Department of Defense Trauma Registry and the Prehospital Trauma Registry, we identified four cases of patients who underwent prehospital cricothyrotomy with the use of commercial kits. In the first two cases, a Medic successfully used a North American Rescue CricKit (NARCK) to obtain a surgical airway in a Servicemember with multiple amputations from an improvised explosive device explosion. In case 3, the Medic unsuccessfully used an H&H Medical kit to attempt placement of a surgical airway in a Servicemember shot in the head by small arms fire. A second attempt to place a surgical airway using a NARCK was successful. In case 4, a Soldier sustained a gunshot wound to the chest. A Medic described fluid in the airway precluding bag-valve-mask ventilation; the Medic attempted to place a surgical airway with the H&H kit without success. Four cases of prehospital surgical airway cannulation on the battlefield demonstrated three successful uses of prehospital cricothyrotomy kits. Further research should focus on determining which kits may be most useful in the combat setting. 2017.

  5. Protocol of the DENIM study: a Delphi-procedure on the identification of trauma patients in need of care by physician-staffed Mobile Medical Teams in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Annelieke Maria Karien; Geeraedts, Leo Maria George; Giannakopoulos, Georgios Fredericus; Terra, Maartje; Christiaans, Herman Martinus Timotheus; Mokkink, Lidwine Brigitta; Bloemers, Frank Willem

    2015-02-08

    In The Netherlands, standard prehospital trauma care is provided by emergency medical services and can be supplemented with advanced trauma care by Mobile Medical Teams. Due to observed over and undertriage in the dispatch of the Mobile Medical Team for major trauma patients, the accuracy of the dispatch criteria has been disputed. In order to obtain recommendations to invigorate the dispatch criteria, this study aimed at reaching consensus in expert opinion on the question; which acute trauma patient is in need of care by a Mobile Medical Team? In this paper we describe the protocol of the DENIM study (a Delphi-procedure on the identification of prehospital trauma patients in need of care by Mobile Medical Teams). A national three round digital Delphi study will be conducted to reach consensus. Literature was explored for relevant topics. After agreement on the themes of interest, the steering committee will construct questions for the first round. In total, 120 panellists with the following backgrounds; Mobile Medical Team physicians and nurses, trauma surgeons, ambulance nurses, emergency medical operators will be invited to participate. Group opinion will be fed back between each round that follows, allowing the panellists to revise their previous opinions and so, converge towards group consensus. Successful prehospital treatment of trauma patients greatly depends on the autonomous decisions made by the different professionals along the chain of prehospital trauma care. Trauma patients in need of care by the Mobile Medical Team need to be identified by those professionals in order to invigorate deployment criteria and improve trauma care. The Delphi technique is used because it allows for group consensus to be reached in a systematic and anonymous fashion amongst experts in the field of trauma care. The anonymous nature of the Delphi allows all experts to state their opinion whilst eliminating the bias of dominant and/or hierarchical individuals on group

  6. High Yield Research Opportunities in Geriatric Emergency Medicine: Prehospital Care, Delirium, Adverse Drug Events, and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Shah, Manish N.; Hustey, Fredric M.; Heard, Kennon; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services constitute crucial and frequently used safety nets for older persons, an emergency visit by a senior very often indicates high vulnerability for functional decline and death, and interventions via the emergency system have significant opportunities to change the clinical course of older patients who require its services. However, the evidence base for widespread employment of emergency system-based interventions is lacking. In this article, we review the evidence and offer crucial research questions to capitalize on the opportunity to optimize health trajectories of older persons seeking emergency care in four areas: prehospital care, delirium, adverse drug events, and falls. PMID:21498881

  7. Pre-hospital, Maritime In-Transit care from a Role 2 Afloat platform.

    PubMed

    Whalley, L; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    Maritime In-Transit Care (MITC) is a new concept to allow the provision of pre-hospital care in the maritime environment within Role 2 Afloat (R2A) teams. This article describes the experiences of an Emergency Medicine nurse and a Medical Assistant who made up the MITC team on the recent R2A exercise on RFA CARDIGAN BAY. As well as describing their personal experiences, the concept of the MITC team is introduced and their role within R2A outlined.

  8. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia: a prospective population-based study.

    PubMed

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S; Kurola, J; Castrén, M; Skogvoll, E

    2013-10-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence and severity. This population-based, prospective study recorded activity in 16 anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden serving half of the Scandinavian population. We calculated population incidence of medical conditions, and the proportion of patients with severely deranged vital signs and/or receiving advanced therapy. Four thousand two hundred thirty-six alarm calls were recorded during 4 weeks. Two thousand two hundred fity-six alarms resulted in a patient encounter. The population incidence varied from 74.9 missions per 10,000 person-years (Denmark), followed by Finland with 14.6, Norway with 11, and Sweden with 5. Medical aetiology was most frequent (14.9 missions per 10,000 person-years, 95% CI: 14.2-15.8). Trauma was second (5.6 missions per 10,000 person-years, 95%CI: 5.12-6.09). Twenty-three per cent of patients had severely deranged vital functions, and advanced emergency medical procedures were performed in every four to twelve encounters (Denmark 8%, Sweden 15%, Norway 23%, and Finland 25%). The probability that the patient was physiologically deranged, received advanced medication, or procedure was 35%. Critical illness or injury occured at a rate of 25-30 per 10,000 person-years. The incidence of pre-hospital anaesthesiologist patient encounters in Scandinavia varies. Medical aetiology is most frequent. Almost one-quarter of patients presents with deranged vital functions requiring emergency measures. The Scandinavian pre-hospital population incidence of critical illness and injury is 25-30 per 10,000 person-years. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Michael A; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J; Perkins, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation) methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations to report findings. Results Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. PMID:27429693

  10. Pre-hospital care in Nigeria: a country without emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Solagberu, B A; Ofoegbu, C K P; Abdur-Rahman, L O; Adekanye, A O; Udoffa, U S; Taiwo, J

    2009-03-01

    Efficient pre-hospital transport (emergency medical services, EMS) is associated with improved outcomes in road traffic injuries (RTI). This study aims to discover possible interventions in the existing mode of transport. Persons bringing all RTI victims to the Emergency room (ER) over a 4-year period and the injury arrival intervals were noted prospectively. There were 2,624 patients (1,886 males and 738 females); only 2,046 (78%) had clear documentations of three categories of persons bringing victims to ER: Relatives (REL, 1,081, 52.83%); Police/Federal Road Safety Corps (P/F, 827, 40.42%) and Bystanders (BS, 138, 6.74%). No intervention was provided during transport: Within 1 hour, 986 victims (48.2% of 2,046) arrived ERbrought by P/F (448, 21.9%), REL (439, 21.5% of 2,046), and BS (99, 4.8%). These figures, in each instance, represent 40.6 % of total victims brought by REL; 54.2% by P/F and 71.7% by BS. However, after 6 hours, REL were the main active group as they brought 94.5% (359 of 380) patients of this period. In 91 victims (4.4%) the injury arrival time was not captured. This study has identified three groups of persons involved in pre-hospital transport with nearly 50% getting to ER within 1 hour without any intervention or prior notification of ER. Absence of EMS obscures pre-hospital death records. The P/F responsible for only 40% of transport should be trained and equipped to offer basic trauma life support (BTLS). The REL and BS (both responsible for 60% of transport) represent a pool of volunteers for BTLS to be trained.

  11. Trauma-Informed Care in the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jessica Dym; Barto, Beth; Griffin, Jessica L; Fraser, Jenifer Goldman; Hodgdon, Hilary; Bodian, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    Child maltreatment is a serious public health concern, and its detrimental effects can be compounded by traumatic experiences associated with the child welfare (CW) system. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a promising strategy for addressing traumatized children's needs, but research on the impact of TIC in CW is limited. This study examines initial findings of the Massachusetts Child Trauma Project, a statewide TIC initiative in the CW system and mental health network. After 1 year of implementation, Trauma-Informed Leadership Teams in CW offices emerged as key structures for TIC systems integration, and mental health providers' participation in evidence-based treatment (EBT) learning collaboratives was linked to improvements in trauma-informed individual and agency practices. After approximately 6 months of EBT treatment, children had fewer posttraumatic symptoms and behavior problems compared to baseline. Barriers to TIC that emerged included scarce resources for trauma-related work in the CW agency and few mental providers providing EBTs to young children. Future research might explore variations in TIC across service system components as well as the potential for differential effects across EBT models disseminated through TIC. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Difficult decisions in the surgical care of military casualties with major torso trauma.

    PubMed

    Bowley, D M; Jansen, J O; Nott, D; Sapsford, W; Streets, C G; Tai, N R M

    2011-09-01

    Testing and difficult decision-making is a sine qua non of surgical practice on military operations. Better pre-hospital care protocols, reduced evacuation timelines and increased scrutiny of outcome have rightfully emphasised the requirement of surgeons to "get it right, first time and every time" when treating patients. This article addresses five contentious areas concerning severe torso trauma, with relevant literature summarised by a subject matter expert, in order to produce practical guidance that will assist the newly deployed surgeon in delivering optimal clinical outcomes.

  13. Patient-centered care in adult trauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Gwendolyn L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover unique aspects of caring for adult trauma intensive care unit patients with respect to implementing patient-centered care. The concept of patient-centered care has been discussed since 2000, but the actual implementation is currently becoming the focus of health care. The Institute of Medicine defined patient-centered care as "providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions" in the 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm report. Discussion and documentation of patient centered-care of the intensive care trauma patient population are limited and yield no results for publication search. This article explores the concept of delivering patient-centered care specifically in a trauma adult intensive care unit.

  14. Extremity injuries as predictors of emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Shinji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya; Ueno, Masato; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Ichikawa, Masao; Yokota, Junichiro

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to exhaustively examine associations between prehospital variables and emergency care resource needs among blunt trauma patients. The study included blunt trauma patients aged 15 years or older who were admitted to a tertiary care medical center in Osaka, Japan, from January 2005 to December 2009. The primary end point was a composite measure of overall emergency care resource needs. Predictive variables were easily detectable upper and lower extremity injuries. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify associations between the predictive variables and the end point; this model included other covariates known to be associated with emergency care resource needs (demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, and physiological parameters). Of 982 blunt trauma patients, 81 died, and 573 required overall emergency care resources. Upper extremity injury (odds ratio [OR], 2.60) and lower extremity injury (OR, 4.50) were significantly associated with overall emergency care resource needs after controlling for other covariates. The results of this study suggest that easily detectable extremity injuries may be useful predictors of the emergency care resource needs of trauma patients. Further studies are needed to validate the predictive values of these injuries and to determine ways to use information about extremity injuries to improve triage decisions.

  15. Impact of a predefined hospital mass casualty response plan in a limited resource setting with no pre-hospital care system.

    PubMed

    Shah, Adil Aijaz; Rehman, Abdul; Sayyed, Raza Hasnain; Haider, Adil Hussain; Bawa, Amber; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Zia-Ur-Rehman; Ali, Kamran; Zafar, Hasnain

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital triage is an intricate part of any mass casualty response system. However, in settings where no such system exists, it is not known if hospital-based disaster response efforts are beneficial. This study describes in-hospital disaster response management and patient outcomes following a mass casualty event (MCE) involving 200 victims in a lower-middle income country in South Asia. We performed a single-center, retrospective review of bombing victims presenting to a trauma center in the spring of 2013, after a high energy car bomb leveled a residential building. Descriptive analysis was utilized to present demographic variables and physical injuries. A disaster plan was devised based on the canons of North-American trauma care; some adaptations to the local environment were incorporated. Relevant medical and surgical specialties were mobilized to the ED awaiting a massive influx of patients. ED waiting room served as the triage area. Operating rooms, ICU and blood bank were alerted. Seventy patients presented to the ED. Most victims (88%) were brought directly without prehospital triage or resuscitation. Four were pronounced dead on arrival. The mean age of victims was 27 (±14) years with a male preponderance (78%). Penetrating shrapnel injury was the most common mechanism of injury (71%). Most had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) >90 with a mean of 120.3 (±14.8). Mean pulse was 90.2 (±21.6) and most patients had full GCS. Extremities were the most common body region involved (64%) with orthopedics service being consulted most frequently. Surgery was performed on 36 patients, including 4 damage control surgeries. All patients survived. This overwhelming single mass-casualty incident was met with a swift multidisciplinary response. In countries with no prehospital triage system, implementing a pre-existing disaster plan with pre-defined interdisciplinary responsibilities can streamline in-hospital management of casualties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  16. Outcome of traumatic brain injuries in 1,508 patients: impact of prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Rudehill, Anders; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Weitzberg, Eddie; Bredbacka, Sixten; Backheden, Magnus; Gordon, Emeric

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the outcome of 1,508 patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) treated in a single neurosurgical unit over an 8-year period. Our aim has been to compare those outcomes with our previous results and with other large patient series. Another important goal was to evaluate the effect of the introduction of a 4-year ongoing study initiated in January 1993 using a new strategy of prehospital care on postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Results from the 1,508 patients showed good recovery or moderate disability in 69%, severe disability or vegetative state in 11%, and a mortality rate of 20%. When outcome of the most severely injured patients (GCS < or = 8) was compared with those of our previous and other large international patient series, more favorable outcome figures were shown in the present study. To evaluate the impact of the improved prehospital care after half of the study period, a logistic regression analysis showed after January 1993 a significantly increased expected odds/ratio for a postresuscitation GCS 8-15 rather than a GCS 3-4 (odds/ratio: 2.2; p < 0.001). For patients with postresuscitation GCS 5-7 and 8-15, the expected odds/ratio for a GOS 4-5 instead of GOS 1 increased significantly (odds/ratio: 2.2 and 1.7, respectively; p < 0.05-0.01). For patients with GCS 3-4, an increased expected odds/ratio (2.0; p < 0.05) for a GOS 2-3 rather than a GOS 1 was seen. The principal conclusion is that outcome for the severely injured patients in the present study is more favorable than in other large series of TBI. We posit that the introduction of effective prehospital care most likely contributed to the improved postresuscitation neurological status and consequently to the better outcome observed after January 1993.

  17. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services.

  18. Uptake of the World Health Organization’s trauma care guidelines: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Riggle, Kevin; Joshipura, Manjul; Quansah, Robert; Reynolds, Teri; Sherr, Kenneth; Mock, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand the degree to which the trauma care guidelines released by the World Health Organization (WHO) between 2004 and 2009 have been used, and to identify priorities for the future implementation and dissemination of such guidelines. Methods We conducted a systematic review, across 19 databases, in which the titles of the three sets of guidelines – Guidelines for essential trauma care, Prehospital trauma care systems and Guidelines for trauma quality improvement programmes – were used as the search terms. Results were validated via citation analysis and expert consultation. Two authors independently reviewed each record of the guidelines’ implementation. Findings We identified 578 records that provided evidence of dissemination of WHO trauma care guidelines and 101 information sources that together described 140 implementation events. Implementation evidence could be found for 51 countries – 14 (40%) of the 35 low-income countries, 15 (32%) of the 47 lower-middle income, 15 (28%) of the 53 upper-middle-income and 7 (12%) of the 59 high-income. Of the 140 implementations, 63 (45%) could be categorized as needs assessments, 38 (27%) as endorsements by stakeholders, 20 (14%) as incorporations into policy and 19 (14%) as educational interventions. Conclusion Although WHO’s trauma care guidelines have been widely implemented, no evidence was identified of their implementation in 143 countries. More serial needs assessments for the ongoing monitoring of capacity for trauma care in health systems and more incorporation of the guidelines into both the formal education of health-care providers and health policy are needed. PMID:27516636

  19. [Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB) managed by Japan Trauma Care and Research (JTCR)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Junichiro

    2016-02-01

    Japan Trauma Care and Research (JTCR) was founded for operating the trauma care education and research in 2005. Japan Advanced Trauma Evaluation and Care (JATEC) is an educational program of trauma care established by The Japanese Association for The Surgery of Trauma (JAST) and the Japanese Association of Acute Medicine (JAAM), managed by JTCR. The Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB) is the only database organization of Japan trauma registry that was also established by JAST and JAAM, and managed by JTCR. Registry data that is collected from the JTDB is compiled annually and disseminated in the forms of hospital benchmark reports, data quality reports, and research data sets.

  20. Trauma-Informed Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ganzel, Barbara L

    2016-12-07

    This review highlights the need to integrate trauma-informed practices into hospice and palliative care. The pervasiveness of psychological trauma exposure has been established in the general population and among the elderly adults. Moreover, there is emerging evidence for multiple additional opportunities for exposure to psychological trauma at or near the end of life. For example, many people experience intensive medical interventions prior to their admission to hospice and/or palliative care, and there is increasing recognition that these interventions may be traumatic. These and related opportunities for trauma exposure may combine synergistically at the end of life, particularly in the presence of pain, anxiety, delirium, dementia, or ordinary old age. This, in turn, can negatively affect patient mental health, well-being, behavior, and reported experience of pain. This review closes with suggestions for future research and a call for universal assessment of psychological trauma history and symptoms in hospice and palliative care patients, along with the development of palliative trauma intervention strategies appropriate to these populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Quality of initial trauma care in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Ibáñez Pradas, Vicente; Pérez Montejano, Rut

    2017-04-18

    Trauma care in Spain is not provided in specific centres, which means that health professionals have limited contact to trauma patients. After the setting up of a training program in paediatric trauma, the aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the initial care provided to these patients before they were admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a third level hospital (trauma centre), as an indirect measurement of the increase in the number of health professionals trained in trauma. Two cohorts of PICU admissions were reviewed, the first one during the four years immediately before the training courses started (Group 1, period 2001-2004), and the second one during the 4 years (Group 2, period 2012-2015) after nearly 500 professionals were trained. A record was made of the injury mechanism, attending professional, Glasgow coma score (GCS), and paediatric trauma score (PTS). Initial care quality was assessed using five indicators: use of cervical collar, vascular access, orotracheal intubation if GCS ≤ 8, gastric decompression if PTS≤8, and number of actions carried out from the initial four recommended (neck control, provide oxygen, get vascular access, provide IV fluids). Compliance was compared between the 2 periods. A P<.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 218 patient records were analysed, 105 in Group 1, and 113 in Group 2. The groups showed differences both in injury mechanism and in initial care team. A shift in injury mechanism pattern was observed, with a decrease in car accidents (28% vs 6%; P<.0001). Patients attended to in low complexity hospitals increased from 29.4% to 51.9% (P=.008), and their severity decreased when assessed using the GCS ≤ 8 (29.8% vs 13.5%; P=.004), or PTS≤8 (48.5% vs 29.7%; P=.005). As regards quality indicators, only the use of neck collar improved its compliance (17.3% to 32.7%; P=.01). Patients who received no action in the initial care remained unchanged (19% vs 11%%; P=.15

  2. Epidemiology of workplace-related fall from height and cost of trauma care in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Mazin A; Acerra, John R; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Recicar, John F; Al Yazeedi, Wafaa; Maull, Kimball I

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the incidence, injury patterns, and actual medical costs of occupational-related falls in Qatar, in order to provide a reference for establishing fall prevention guidelines and recommendations. Retrospective database registry review in Level 1 Trauma Center at Tertiary Hospital in Qatar. During a 12-month period between November 1(st) 2007 and October 31(st) 2008, construction workers who fell from height were enrolled. A database was designed to characterize demographics, injury severity score (ISS), total hospital length of stay, resource utilization, and cost of care. Data were presented as proportions, mean ± standard deviation or median and range as appropriate. In addition, case fatality rate and cost analysis were obtained from the Biostatistics and finance departments of the same hospital. There were 315 fall-related injuries, of which 298 were workplace related. The majority (97%) were male immigrants with mean age of 33 ± 11 years. The most common injuries were to the spine, head, and chest. Mean ISS was 16.4 ± 10. There was total of 29 deaths (17 pre-hospital and 12 in-hospital deaths) for a case fatality rate of 8.6%. Mean cost of care (rounded figures) included pre-hospital services Emergency Medical Services (EMS), trauma resuscitation room, radiology and imaging, operating room, intensive care unit care, hospital ward care, rehabilitation services, and total cost (123, 82, 105, 130, 496, 3048,434, and 4418 thousand United States Dollars (USD), respectively). Mean cost of care per admitted patient was approximately 16,000 USD. Falling from height at a construction site is a common cause of trauma that poses a significant financial burden on the health care system. Injury prevention efforts are warranted along with strict regulation and enforcement of occupational laws.

  3. Epidemiology of workplace-related fall from height and cost of trauma care in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Tuma, Mazin A.; Acerra, John R.; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Recicar, John F.; Al Yazeedi, Wafaa; Maull, Kimball I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to identify the incidence, injury patterns, and actual medical costs of occupational-related falls in Qatar, in order to provide a reference for establishing fall prevention guidelines and recommendations. Settings and Design: Retrospective database registry review in Level 1 Trauma Center at Tertiary Hospital in Qatar. Materials and Methods: During a 12-month period between November 1st 2007 and October 31st 2008, construction workers who fell from height were enrolled. A database was designed to characterize demographics, injury severity score (ISS), total hospital length of stay, resource utilization, and cost of care. Statistical Analysis: Data were presented as proportions, mean ± standard deviation or median and range as appropriate. In addition, case fatality rate and cost analysis were obtained from the Biostatistics and finance departments of the same hospital. Results: There were 315 fall-related injuries, of which 298 were workplace related. The majority (97%) were male immigrants with mean age of 33 ± 11 years. The most common injuries were to the spine, head, and chest. Mean ISS was 16.4 ± 10. There was total of 29 deaths (17 pre-hospital and 12 in-hospital deaths) for a case fatality rate of 8.6%. Mean cost of care (rounded figures) included pre-hospital services Emergency Medical Services (EMS), trauma resuscitation room, radiology and imaging, operating room, intensive care unit care, hospital ward care, rehabilitation services, and total cost (123, 82, 105, 130, 496, 3048,434, and 4418 thousand United States Dollars (USD), respectively). Mean cost of care per admitted patient was approximately 16,000 USD. Conclusions: Falling from height at a construction site is a common cause of trauma that poses a significant financial burden on the health care system. Injury prevention efforts are warranted along with strict regulation and enforcement of occupational laws. PMID:23724377

  4. Clinical decision-making described by Swedish prehospital emergency care nurse students - An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Tomas; Lindström, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the PECN students' clinical decision-making during a seven-week clinical rotation in the ambulance services. Developing expertise in prehospital emergency care practices requires both theoretical and empirical learning. A prehospital emergency care nurse (PECN) is a Registered Nurse (RN) with one year of additional training in emergency care. There has been little investigation of how PECN students describe their decision-making during a clinical rotation. A qualitative study design was used, and 12 logbooks written by the Swedish PECN students were analysed using content analysis. The students wrote about 997 patient encounters - ambulance assignments during their clinical rotation. Four themes emerged as crucial for the students' decision-making: knowing the patient, the context-situation awareness in the ambulance service, collaboration, and evaluation. Based on the themes, students made decisions on how to respond to patients' illnesses. The PECN students used several variables in their decision-making. The decision- making was an on-going process during the whole ambulance assignment. The university has the responsibility to guide the students during their transition from an RN to a PECN. The findings of the study can support the educators and clinical supervisors in developing the programme of study for becoming a PECN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Berlin prehospital or usual delivery of acute stroke care - Study protocol.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, Martin; Harmel, Peter; Nolte, Christian H; Grittner, Ulrike; Siegerink, Bob; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2017-08-01

    Rationale Prehospital stroke care in specialized ambulances increases thrombolysis rates, reduces alarm-to-treatment times, and improves the prehospital triage. Preliminary analyses suggest cost-effectiveness. However, scientific proof of better functional outcome compared to usual care is still lacking. Aim To prove better functional outcomes after deployment of the Stroke Emergency Mobile compared to regular ambulances. Sample size estimates A sample size of 686 patients will be required in each arm (Stroke Emergency Mobile group vs. regular care) to detect a difference regarding the primary outcome with 80% power at a two-sided significance level of 0.05. Methods and design This is a pragmatic, prospective study with blinded outcome assessment. Primary outcome will be functional status as defined by modified Rankin Scale score three months after the incident event. We will include cerebral ischemia patients within a predefined catchment area in Berlin, Germany. The study population consists of patients who might be candidates for acute recanalizing treatments, with onset-to-alarm time ≤4 h, symptoms not resolved at time of ambulance arrival, and able to walk without assistance prior to the qualifying incident. About 45% of Stroke Emergency Mobile dispatches are expected to be handled by regular ambulances, since Stroke Emergency Mobile will be already in operation creating the control group. Primary outcome Functional outcome after three months measured by the modified Rankin Scale over the entire range. Discussion The results will inform decision makers on the effectiveness of Stroke Emergency Mobile.

  6. Heart Rate Variability and Its Association with Mortality in Prehospital Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    variability and spontaneous baroreflex sequences: implications for autonomic monitoring during hemorrhage. J Trauma. 2005;58:798–805. 4. Cooke WH, Ryan KL...routine would have to overcome signif- icant technical hurdles (the power spectral analysis that is used to generate the HF/LF measure is sensitive to

  7. Pre-hospital care after a seizure: Evidence base and United Kingdom management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Taylor, Louise; Reuber, Markus; Grünewald, Richard A; Parkinson, Martin; Dickson, Jon M

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation to pre-hospital emergency services and they generate significant healthcare costs. This article summarises the United Kingdom (UK) Ambulance Service guidelines for the management of seizures and explores the extent to which these guidelines are evidence-based. Summary of the Clinical Practice Guidelines of the UK Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee relating to the management of seizures. Review of the literature relating to pre-hospital management of seizure emergencies. Much standard practice relating to the emergency out of hospital management of patients with seizures is drawn from generic Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines although many patients do not need ALS during or after a seizure and the benefit of many ALS interventions in seizure patients remains to be established. The majority of studies identified pertain to medical treatment of status epilepticus. These papers show that benzodiazepines are safe and effective but it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions about the best medication or the optimal route of administration. The evidence base for current pre-hospital guidelines for seizure emergencies is incomplete. A large proportion of patients are transported to hospital after a seizure but many of these may be suitable for home management. However, there is very little research into alternative care pathways or criteria that could be used to help paramedics avoid transport to hospital. More research is needed to improve care for people after a seizure and to improve the cost-effectiveness of the healthcare systems within which they are treated. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accuracy of prehospital triage protocols in selecting severely injured patients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Rein, Eveline A J; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Prehospital trauma triage ensures proper transport of patients at risk of severe injury to hospitals with an appropriate corresponding level of trauma care. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma recommends an undertriage rate below 5% and an overtriage rate below 50% for prehospital trauma triage protocols. To find the most accurate prehospital trauma triage protocol, a clear overview of all currently available protocols and corresponding outcomes is necessary. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature on all available prehospital trauma triage protocols and determine accuracy of protocol-based triage quality in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed to identify all studies describing prehospital trauma triage protocols before November 2016. The search terms included "trauma," "trauma center," or "trauma system" combined with "triage," "undertriage," or "overtriage." All studies describing protocol-based triage quality were reviewed. To assess the quality of these type of studies, a new critical appraisal tool was developed. In this review, 21 articles were included with numbers of patients ranging from 130 to over 1 million. Significant predictors for severe injury were: vital signs, suspicion of certain anatomic injuries, mechanism of injury, and age. Sensitivity ranged from 10% to 100%; specificity from 9% to 100%. Nearly all protocols had a low sensitivity, thereby failing to identify severely injured patients. Additionally, the critical appraisal showed poor quality of the majority of included studies. This systematic review shows that nearly all protocols are incapable of identifying severely injured patients. Future studies of high methodological quality should be performed to improve prehospital trauma triage protocols. Systematic review, level III.

  9. Threats and violence in the Swedish pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Petzäll, K; Tällberg, J; Lundin, T; Suserud, Björn-Ove

    2011-01-01

    Although acts of threats and violence are problems that have received increased attention in recent years within Swedish pre-hospital care, only a handful of scientific studies have been carried out in this field. Threats and violence have a negative influence on the well-being of ambulance personnel. The aim in this study was both to investigate the incidents of threats and violence within the Swedish ambulance service and to describe these situations. Data was collected with questionnaires answered by 134 registered nurses and paramedics from 11 ambulance stations located in four counties. The respondents' experiences of pre-hospital care varied from 3 months to 41 years (mean=12 years, median=8 years). The results showed that 66% of the ambulance personnel experienced threats and/or violence during their work while 26% experienced threats and 16% faced physical violence during the last year. The most common kind of threat was threats of physical violence with 27% of the respondents experiencing threats involving weapons. Commonly occurring physical violence was in the form of pushes, punches, kicks and bites. In most cases, the perpetrator was the patient himself often under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The most serious situations occurred when the reason for raising the ambulance alarm was intoxication or a decreased level of consciousness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Operation Canine Lifeline: Recommendations for Enhancing Prehospital Care for Government Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Corse, Teija; Firth, Chelsea; Burke, John; Schor, Kenneth; Koterski, James F; McGraw, Sabrina; Vincent-Johnson, Nancy; Gordon, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Operation Canine Lifeline was a tabletop exercise developed by students and faculty of Boston University School of Medicine's Healthcare Emergency Management master's program. The tabletop exercise led to discussion on current protocols for canines working in the field, what occurs if a canine encounters a toxin in the field, and what to do in situations of national security that require working with civilian agencies. This discussion led to the creation of a set of recommendations around providing prehospital veterinary care to government working dogs. The recommendations include a government-run veterinary toxicology hotline for the sole use of the government, issuing handlers deployment kits and preprogrammed smartphones that contain information on the care practices for dogs, and an increased effort for civilian integration, through local emergency medical services, in the emergency care of government canines. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:15-20).

  11. The prehospital management of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Scott A; Rojanasarntikul, Dhanadol; Jagoda, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of death and disability, particularly in younger populations. The prehospital evaluation and management of TBI is a vital link between insult and definitive care and can have dramatic implications for subsequent morbidity. Following a TBI the brain is at high risk for further ischemic injury, with prehospital interventions targeted at reducing this secondary injury while optimizing cerebral physiology. In the following chapter we discuss the prehospital assessment and management of the brain-injured patient. The initial evaluation and physical examination are discussed with a focus on interpretation of specific physical examination findings and interpretation of vital signs. We evaluate patient management strategies including indications for advanced airway management, oxygenation, ventilation, and fluid resuscitation, as well as prehospital strategies for the management of suspected or impending cerebral herniation including hyperventilation and brain-directed hyperosmolar therapy. Transport decisions including the role of triage models and trauma centers are discussed. Finally, future directions in the prehospital management of traumatic brain injury are explored. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Trauma care and case fatality during a period of frequent, violent terror attacks and thereafter.

    PubMed

    Rivkind, Avraham I; Blum, Rony; Gershenstein, Irena; Stein, Yael; Coleman, Shula; Mintz, Yoav; Zamir, Gideon; Richter, Elihu D

    2012-09-01

    From September 1999 through January 2004 during the second Intifada (al-Aqsa), there were frequent terror attacks in Jerusalem. We assessed the effects on case fatality of introducing a specialized, intensified approach to trauma care at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Hospital Shock Trauma Unit (HHSTU) and other level I Israeli trauma units. This approach included close senior supervision of prehospital triage, transport, and all surgical procedures and longer hospital stays despite high patient-staff ratios and low hospital budgets. Care for lower income patients also was subsidized. We tracked case fatality rates (CFRs) initially during a period of terror attacks (1999-2003) in 8,127 patients (190 deaths) at HHSTU in subgroups categorized by age, injury circumstances, and injury severity scores (ISSs). Our comparisons were four other Israeli level I trauma centers (n = 2,000 patients), and 51 level I U.S. trauma centers (n = 265,902 patients; 15,237 deaths). Detailed HHSTU follow-up continued to 2010. Five-year HHSTU CFR (2.62 %) was less than half that in 51 U.S. centers (5.73 %). CFR progressively decreased; in contrast to a rising trend in the US for all age groups, injury types, and ISS groupings, including gunshot wounds (GSW). Patients with ISS > 25 accounted for 170 (89 %) of the 190 deaths in HHSTU. Forty-one lives were saved notionally based on U.S. CFRs within this group. However, far more lives were saved from reductions in low CFRs in large numbers of patients with ISS < 25. CFRs in HHSTU and other Israeli trauma units decreased more through the decade to 1.9 % up to 2010. Sustained reductions in trauma unit CFRs followed introduction of a specialized, intensified approach to trauma care.

  13. Battlefield trauma care then and now: a decade of Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    guide- lines are posted on both the Military Health System and the PHTLS Web sites.12 At 3-year to 4-year intervals, the TCCC guidelines are also...the Prehospital Trauma Life Support Manual; PHTLS is endorsed by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma and the National Association of...versions of the TCCC guidelines are posted on both the Military Health System and the PHTLS Web sites. At 3-year to 4-year intervals, the TCCC guidelines

  14. Coordination and collaboration of violent trauma care.

    PubMed

    King, C A

    1994-10-01

    The STC has the luxury of an all RN staff, capable of functioning in any of the surgical specialities. The PTN is a specialitist at being a generalist to provide care to a critically injured population. The role of the PTN is multifaceted and varied; it can be best described as functioning as a multidisciplinary coordinator and case manager in meeting the demands of the violent trauma patient. The patient often enters the OR severely injured, intubated, and incapable of self-protection or determination. The most important function of perioperative nursing is that of patient advocate. No other member of the trauma team is as focal to the patient's safety and comfort as the nurse. Passage from the scene of violent trauma to the OR requires dynamic assessment skills, critical thinking, and organizational capabilities. As long as interpersonal altercation results in intentional trauma, there will be a need for perioperative trauma nurses with the committement and expertise to mend the wounds of violent trauma victims.

  15. Cost-benefit analysis of telehealth in pre-hospital care.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Alqusairi, Diaa; Kim, Junghyun; Jackson, Adria; Persse, David; Gonzalez, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Objective There has been very little use of telehealth in pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS), yet the potential exists for this technology to transform the current delivery model. In this study, we explore the costs and benefits of one large telehealth EMS initiative. Methods Using a case-control study design and both micro- and gross-costing data from the Houston Fire Department EMS electronic patient care record system, we conducted a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) comparing costs with potential savings associated with patients treated through a telehealth-enabled intervention. The intervention consisted of telehealth-based consultation between the 911 patient and an EMS physician, to evaluate and triage the necessity for patient transport to a hospital emergency department (ED). Patients with non-urgent, primary care-related conditions were then scheduled and transported by alternative means to an affiliated primary care clinic. We measured CBA as both total cost savings and cost per ED visit averted, in US Dollars ($USD). Results In total, 5570 patients were treated over the first full 12 months with a telehealth-enabled care model. We found a 6.7% absolute reduction in potentially medically unnecessary ED visits, and a 44-minute reduction in total ambulance back-in-service times. The average cost for a telehealth patient was $167, which was a statistically significantly $103 less than the control group ( p < .0001). The programme produced a $928,000 annual cost savings from the societal perspective, or $2468 cost savings per ED visit averted (benefit). Conclusion Patient care enabled by telehealth in a pre-hospital environment, is a more cost effective alternative compared to the traditional EMS 'treat and transport to ED' model.

  16. [Prehospital management of very elderly patients with ST segment elevation in Paris by mobile intensive care units (Samu)].

    PubMed

    Leroy, J E; Bensouda, C; Durand, E; Greffet, A; Scemama, A; Carli, P; Danchin, N; Sauval, P

    2005-03-01

    More and more elderly people are hospitalised with myocardial infarction. Little is known on their pre-hospital management. In 2001 and 2002, 105 patients aged 80 years or more with suspected ST elevation infarction were managed by the mobile intensive care unit system of the SAMU de Paris-Necker. Diagnosis of infarction was confirmed in 92 (88%). Over 60% of the patients were women. Median time delay from symptom onset to call to the emergency service was 127 minutes, longer in nonagenarians (175 vs 101 minutes). Prehospital use of aspirin was 81% and 39% received an intravenous bolus of heparin. A reperfusion strategy was decided in only 30% (primary PCI: 23/26). One-month mortality was 21% and was related to older age, time when the call to the Samu was made, and absence of current smoking. Overall, the prehospital management of very elderly patients with suspected ST elevation infarction appears far from optimal.

  17. Pre-hospital care among victims of road traffic accident in a rural area of Tamil Nadu: A cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Saurabh R.; Pandian, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Prateek S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization has estimated that globally almost 1.24 million people die annually on the world's roads. The aim of the study was to assess the attributes of pre-hospital care in road traffic accidents (RTAs) victim brought to the health care establishment and to evaluate the pre-hospital trauma care provided in the rural areas of Kancheepuram district of Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of 3 months duration (June 2014 to August 2014) was conducted in the Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram. The method of sampling was universal sampling and all RTA victims satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in the study. During the entire study duration, total 200 RTA victims were included. A pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit the desired information after the victims of RTAs are stabilized. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee prior to the start of the study. Written informed consent was obtained from the study participants (patient/guardian of children) before obtaining any information from them. Data entry and statistical analysis were done using SPSS version 18. Frequency distributions and percentages were computed for all the variables. Results: Majority of the RTA victims 158 (79%) were from the age-group of 15-45 years. Most of the accidents were reported in night time [77 (38.5%)], on week-ends [113 (56.5%)], and involved two-wheelers [153 (76.5%)]. Almost 66 (33%) of the victims were not aware of the existence of emergency ambulance services. Also, only 15 (7.5%) victims were brought to the hospital in the emergency ambulance, of which only 3 victims were accompanied by a doctor. Conclusion: To conclude, the study indicates that a significant proportion of people were unaware about the emergency trauma ambulance services and the existing pre-hospital care services lack in multiple dimensions in a rural

  18. [Nursing and pre-hospital care: dead-ends and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Martins, Pedro Paulo; do Prado, Marta Lenise

    2003-01-01

    The present paper is about a reflection related to the emerging of Pre-Hospital Care in Brazil ant its respective models of care during the last few decades. By drawing out a basic historical trajectory we were able to point out the successful and dead end paths of this modality of health assistance in our country. The most recent attempts of standardization at a national level of this kind of service were analyzed, especially the Health Ministry Decree no. 2048/02, which constitutes itself as a starting point, offering subsidies to institutions and to those involved in this specific field of health knowledge, in order to remake the path within another perspective.

  19. Developing process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients: results from a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In organised trauma systems the process of care is the key to quality. Nevertheless, the optimal process of trauma care remains unclear due to lack of or inconclusive evidence. Because monitoring and improving the performance of a trauma system is complex, this study aimed to develop consensus-based process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients. Methods A five-round Delphi study was conducted with 141 participants that represent all professions involved in trauma care. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate whether consensus extended across all professions and to detect possible bias. Results Consensus was reached on 21 guidelines within 4 categories: timeliness, actions, competent teams and interdisciplinary process. Timeliness guidelines set specific critical limits and definitions for 10 time intervals in the time period from an emergency call until the patient leaves the trauma room. Action guidelines reflect aspects of appropriate care and strongly rely on the international Advanced Trauma Life Support principles. Competence guidelines include flow charts to assess the competence of prehospital and emergency department teams. Essential to competent teams are education and experience of all team members. The interdisciplinary process guideline focuses on cooperation, communication and feedback within and between all professions involved. Consensus was extended across all professions and no bias was detected. Conclusions In this Delphi study, a large expert panel agreed on a set of guidelines describing the optimal process of care for severely injured trauma patients in the Netherlands. In addition to time intervals and appropriate actions, these guidelines emphasise the importance of team competence and interdisciplinary processes in trauma care. The guidelines can be seen as a description of a best practice and a new field standard in the Netherlands. The next step is to implement the guidelines and

  20. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Jane H.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Rose, Kathryn M.; Suchindran, Chirayath M.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prior assessments of emergency medical services (EMS) stroke capacity found deficiencies in education and training, use of protocols and screening tools, and planning for the transport of patients. A 2001 survey of North Carolina EMS providers found many EMS systems lacked basic stroke services. Recent statewide efforts have sought to standardize and improve prehospital stroke care. The objective of this study was to assess EMS stroke care capacity in North Carolina and evaluate statewide changes since 2001. Methods In June 2012, we conducted a web-based survey on stroke education and training and stroke care practices and policies among all EMS systems in North Carolina. We used the McNemar test to assess changes from 2001 to 2012. Results Of 100 EMS systems in North Carolina, 98 responded to our survey. Most systems reported providing stroke education and training (95%) to EMS personnel, using a validated stroke scale or screening tool (96%), and having a hospital prenotification policy (98%). Many were suboptimal in covering basic stroke educational topics (71%), always communicating stroke screen results to the destination hospital (46%), and always using a written destination plan (49%). Among 70 EMS systems for which we had data for 2001 and 2012, we observed significant improvements in education on stroke scales or screening tools (61% to 93%, P < .001) and use of validated stroke scales or screening tools (23% to 96%, P < .001). Conclusion Major improvements in EMS stroke care, especially in prehospital stroke screening, have occurred in North Carolina in the past decade, whereas other practices and policies, including use of destination plans, remain in need of improvement. PMID:24007677

  1. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic.

  2. Impact of pre-hospital care on the outcome of children arriving with agonal breathing to a pediatric emergency service in South India

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Debasis Das; Mahathi, Krishna; Ghosh, Urmi; Agarwal, Indira; Chacko, Anila; Jacob, Ebor; Ebenezer, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on the prehospital interventions received by critically ill children at arrival to Paediatric Emergency Services (PES) is limited in developing countries. This study aims to describe the pre-hospital care scenario, transport and their impact on outcome in non-traumatic, acutely ill children presenting in PES with agonal breathing. Methods: Prospective observational study done on children aged below 15 years arriving in PES with agonal breathing due to non-trauma related causes. Results: Out of 75 children studied, 69% were infants. The duration of illness among 65% of them (75) was less than 3 days. Majority of them (81%) had received treatment prior to arrival. Government sector physicians (72%), half of them (51%) being pediatricians were the major treating doctors. 37% of the children had arrived to the Emergency in an ambulance. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) was given to 27% on arrival in PES. Other interventions included fluid boluses to correct shock (92%) and inotrope infusion (56%). Sepsis (24%) and pneumonia (24%) were the most common diagnoses. Out of 75, 57 (76%) children who were stabilized and shifted to PICU and among them 27 (47%) survived to discharge. Normal blood pressure (p=0.0410) and non-requirement of CPR (0.0047) and inotropic infusion (0.0459) in PES were associated with a higher chance of survival. Conclusion: 36% (27/75) of children who arrived to our PES with agonal breathing survived to hospital discharge. Survival was significantly better among those who did not need CPR. PMID:28217595

  3. Advanced Technologies in Trauma Critical Care Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    casualty care.94 Damage Control Closure Temporary closure techniques of the open abdomen have evolved significantly since the introduction of damage...Cullinane DC, Dutton WD, et al. The management of the open abdomen in trauma and emergency general surgery: part 1—damage control. J Trauma 2010;68(6...1425–38. Cannon et al922 97. Campbell AM, Kuhn WP, Barker P. Vacuum-assisted closure of the open abdomen in a resource-limited setting. S Afr J Surg

  4. Military-to-civilian translation of battlefield innovations in operative trauma care.

    PubMed

    Haider, Adil H; Piper, Lydia C; Zogg, Cheryl K; Schneider, Eric B; Orman, Jean A; Butler, Frank K; Gerhardt, Robert T; Haut, Elliott R; Mather, Jacques P; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Schwartz, Diane A; Geyer, David W; DuBose, Joseph J; Rasmussen, Todd E; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2015-12-01

    Historic improvements in operative trauma care have been driven by war. It is unknown whether recent battlefield innovations stemming from conflicts in Iraq/Afghanistan will follow a similar trend. The objective of this study was to survey trauma medical directors (TMDs) at level 1-3 trauma centers across the United States and gauge the extent to which battlefield innovations have shaped civilian practice in 4 key domains of trauma care. Domains were determined by the use of a modified Delphi method based on multiple consultations with an expert physician/surgeon panel: (1) damage control resuscitation (DCR), (2) tourniquet use, (3) use of hemostatic agents, and (4) prehospital interventions, including intraosseous catheter access and needle thoracostomy. A corresponding 47-item electronic anonymous survey was developed/pilot tested before dissemination to all identifiable TMD at level 1-3 trauma centers across the US. A total of 245 TMDs, representing nearly 40% of trauma centers in the United States, completed and returned the survey. More than half (n = 127; 51.8%) were verified by the American College of Surgeons. TMDs reported high civilian use of DCR: 95.1% of trauma centers had implemented massive transfusion protocols and the majority (67.7%) tended toward 1:1:1 packed red blood cell/fresh-frozen plasma/platelets ratios. For the other 3, mixed adoption corresponded to expressed concerns regarding the extent of concomitant civilian research to support military research and experience. In centers in which policies reflecting battlefield innovations were in use, previous military experience frequently was acknowledged. This national survey of TMDs suggests that military data supporting DCR has altered civilian practice. Perceived relevance in other domains was less clear. Civilian academic efforts are needed to further research and enhance understandings that foster improved trauma surgeon awareness of military-to-civilian translation. Copyright © 2015

  5. Standardized mortality ratio analysis on a sample of severely injured patients from a large Canadian city without regionalized trauma care.

    PubMed

    Sampalis, J S; Lavoie, A; Williams, J I; Mulder, D S; Kalina, M

    1992-08-01

    Flora's Z statistic and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as indicators of excess mortality were calculated for a sample of 355 patients with major trauma. A statistically significant overall excess mortality was observed in this sample (Z = 6.77, SMR = 1.81, p less than 0.05). Advanced life support provided by physicians at the scene (MD-ALS) was not associated with reduced excess mortality. A significant trend toward lower excess mortality was associated with a higher level of trauma care at the receiving hospital (p less than 0.05). Total prehospital time over 60 minutes was associated with a significant increase in excess mortality (p less than 0.001). These results support regionalization of trauma care and failed to show any benefit associated with MD-ALS.

  6. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. Methods This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. Results The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. Conclusions In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders. PMID:24886096

  7. Novel wireless electroencephalography system with a minimal preparation time for use in emergencies and prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Andrei; Kulkas, Antti; Salpavaara, Timo; Kauppinen, Pasi; Verho, Jarmo; Heikkilä, Hannu; Jäntti, Ville

    2014-05-08

    Although clinical applications such as emergency medicine and prehospital care could benefit from a fast-mounting electroencephalography (EEG) recording system, the lack of specifically designed equipment restricts the use of EEG in these environments. This paper describes the design and testing of a six-channel emergency EEG (emEEG) system with a rapid preparation time intended for use in emergency medicine and prehospital care. The novel system comprises a quick-application cap, a device for recording and transmitting the EEG wirelessly to a computer, and custom software for displaying and streaming the data in real-time to a hospital. Bench testing was conducted, as well as healthy volunteer and patient measurements in three different environments: a hospital EEG laboratory, an intensive care unit, and an ambulance. The EEG data was evaluated by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists and compared with recordings from a commercial system. The bench tests demonstrated that the emEEG system's performance is comparable to that of a commercial system while the healthy volunteer and patient measurements confirmed that the system can be applied quickly and that it records quality EEG data in a variety of environments. Furthermore, the recorded data was judged to be of diagnostic quality by two experienced clinical neurophysiologists. In the future, the emEEG system may be used to record high-quality EEG data in emergency medicine and during ambulance transportation. Its use could lead to a faster diagnostic, a more accurate treatment, and a shorter recovery time for patients with neurological brain disorders.

  8. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Mehrara, Mostafa; Tavakoli, Nader; Fathi, Marzieh; Mahshidfar, Babak; Zare, Mohammad Amin; Asadi, Azita; Hosseinzadeh, Saeedeh; Safdarian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC), there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC). Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards. Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78) were audited (55.4% male). 61 (60.3%) patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7%) cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%), O2 therapy (32.8%), nitroglycerin administration (60.7%), and aspirin administration (52.5%) in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%), O2 therapy (75%), cardiac monitoring (25%), pupils examination (25%), bedside glucometery (50%), and assessing for naloxone administration (55%) in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor. Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting. PMID:28286847

  9. Advance Directives and Communication Skills of Prehospital Physicians Involved in the Care of Cardiovascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Gigon, Fabienne; Merlani, Paolo; Ricou, Bara

    2015-12-01

    Advance directives (AD) were developed to respect patient autonomy. However, very few patients have AD, even in cases when major cardiovascular surgery is to follow. To understand the reasons behind the low prevalence of AD and to help decision making when patients are incompetent, it is necessary to focus on the impact of prehospital practitioners, who may contribute to an increase in AD by discussing them with patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate self-rated communication skills and the attitudes of physicians potentially involved in the care of cardiovascular patients toward AD.Self-administered questionnaires were sent to general practitioners, cardiologists, internists, and intensivists, including the Quality of Communication Score, divided into a General Communication score (QOCgen 6 items) and an End-of-life Communication score (QOCeol 7 items), as well as questions regarding opinions and practices in terms of AD.One hundred sixty-four responses were received. QOCgen (mean (±SD)): 9.0/10 (1.0); QOCeol: 7.2/10 (1.7). General practitioners most frequently start discussions about AD (74/149 [47%]) and are more prone to designate their own specialty (30/49 [61%], P < 0.0001). Overall, only 57/159 (36%) physicians designated their own specialty; 130/158 (82%) physicians ask potential cardiovascular patients if they have AD and 61/118 (52%) physicians who care for cardiovascular patients talk about AD with some of them.The characteristics of physicians who do not talk about AD with patients were those who did not personally have AD and those who work in private practices.One hundred thirty-three (83%) physicians rated the systematic mention of patients' AD in the correspondence between physicians as good, while 114 (71%) at the patients' first registration in the private practice.Prehospital physicians rated their communication skills as good, whereas end-of-life communication was rated much lower. Only half of those surveyed speak about AD

  10. Computer-assisted trauma care prototype.

    PubMed

    Holzman, T G; Griffith, A; Hunter, W G; Allen, T; Simpson, R J

    1995-01-01

    Each year, civilian accidental injury results in 150,000 deaths and 400,000 permanent disabilities in the United States alone. The timely creation of and access to dynamically updated trauma patient information at the point of injury is critical to improving the state of care. Such information is often non-existent, incomplete, or inaccurate, resulting in less than adequate treatment by medics and the loss of precious time by medical personnel at the hospital or battalion aid station as they attempt to reassess and treat the patient. The Trauma Care Information Management System (TCIMS) is a prototype system for facilitating information flow and patient processing decisions in the difficult circumstances of civilian and military trauma care activities. The program is jointly supported by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and a consortium of universities, medical centers, and private companies. The authors' focus has been the human-computer interface for the system. We are attempting to make TCIMS powerful in the functions it delivers to its users in the field while also making it easy to understand and operate. To develop such a usable system, an approach known as user-centered design is being followed. Medical personnel themselves are collaborating with the authors in its needs analysis, design, and evaluation. Specifically, the prototype being demonstrated was designed through observation of actual civilian trauma care episodes, military trauma care exercises onboard a hospital ship, interviews with civilian and military trauma care providers, repeated evaluation of evolving prototypes by potential users, and study of the literature on trauma care and human factors engineering. This presentation at MedInfo '95 is still another avenue for soliciting guidance from medical information system experts and users. The outcome of this process is a system that provides the functions trauma care personnel desire in a manner that can be easily and

  11. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    PubMed Central

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Petroni, Gustavo J.; Ballarini, Nicolás M.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Depetris, María Alejandra; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Fabio, Anthony; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0–18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] < 13 or with GCS 14–15 and abnormal head CT scan within 48 hours of admission, and head AIS > 0). Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC). Results Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0) years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7%) of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients) were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73%) patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9%) TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours). Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%). For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]). There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC. Conclusion This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that

  12. Mobile prehospital emergency care: an analysis of implementation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Machado, Cristiani Vieira; Alves, Renan Paes; Salvador, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-06-01

    Mobile prehospital care is a key component of emergency care. The aim of this study was to analyze the implementation of the State of Rio de Janeiro's Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU, acronym in Portuguese). The methodology employed included document analysis, visits to six SAMU emergency call centers, and semistructured interviews conducted with 12 local and state emergency care coordinators. The study's conceptual framework was based on Giddens' theory of structuration. Intergovernmental conflicts were observed between the state and municipal governments, and between municipal governments. Despite the shortage of hospital beds, the SAMUs in periphery regions were better integrated with the emergency care network than the metropolitan SAMUs. The steering committees were not very active and weaknesses were observed relating to the limited role played by the state government in funding, management, and monitoring. It was concluded that the SAMU implementation process in the state was marked by political tensions and management and coordination weaknesses. As a result, serious drawbacks remain in the coordination of the SAMU with the other health services and the regionalization of emergency care in the state.

  13. A synthesis of the literature on trauma-informed care.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a history of traumatic life events can become distressed or re-traumatized as the result of healthcare experiences. These patients can benefit from trauma-informed care that is sensitive to their unique needs. However, despite the widespread prevalence of traumatic life experiences such as sexual assault and intimate partner violence, trauma-informed care has not been widely researched or implemented. The purpose of this synthesis of the literature is to examine existing research on trauma-informed care for survivors of physical and sexual abuse. The following themes are discussed: trauma screening and patient disclosure, provider-patient relationships, minimizing distress and maximizing autonomy, multidisciplinary collaboration and referrals, and trauma-informed care in diverse settings. This synthesis also explores implications for trauma-informed care research, practice and policy. The themes identified here could be used as a framework for creating provider and survivor educational interventions and for implementing trauma-informed care across disciplines. The findings of this synthesis support further research on patient and provider experiences of trauma-informed care, and research to test the efficacy of trauma-informed care interventions across healthcare settings. Universal implementation of trauma-informed care can ensure that the unique needs of trauma survivors as patients are met, and mitigate barriers to care and health disparities experienced by this vulnerable population.

  14. [First aid and management of multiple trauma: in-hospital trauma care].

    PubMed

    Boschin, Matthias; Vordemvenne, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Injuries remain the leading cause of death in children and young adults. Management of multiple trauma patients has improved in recent years by quality initiatives (trauma network, S3 guideline "Polytrauma"). On this basis, strong links with preclinical management, structured treatment algorithms, training standards (ATLS®), clear diagnostic rules and an established risk- and quality management are the important factors of a modern emergency room trauma care. We describe the organizational components that lead to successful management of trauma in hospital.

  15. [Modern concepts of trauma care and multiple trauma management in oral and maxillofacial region].

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinghui

    2015-06-01

    Multiple trauma management requires the application of modem trauma care theories. Optimal treatment results can be achieved by reinforcing cooperation and stipulating a treatment plan together with other disciplines. Based on modem theories in trauma care and our understanding of the theoretical points, this paper analyzes the injury assessment strategies and methods in oral and maxillofacial multiple trauma management. Moreover, this paper discusses operating time and other influencing factors as well as proposed definitive surgical timing and indications in comprehensive management of oral and maxillofacial multiple trauma patients associated with injuries in other body parts. We hope that this paper can help stomatological physicians deepen their understanding of modem trauma care theories and improve their capacity and results in the treatment of oral and maxillofacial multiple trauma.

  16. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. Objectives This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data Sources Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. Data Selection All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. Data Extraction To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study’s objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. Results A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. Conclusions The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary. PMID:27626016

  17. TEAM: A Low-Cost Alternative to ATLS for Providing Trauma Care Teaching in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Kurdin, Anton; Caines, Andrew; Boone, Darrell; Furey, Andrew

    2017-08-23

    Trauma resuscitation protocols have unified the care of trauma patients and significantly improved outcomes. However, the success of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course is difficult to reproduce in developing countries due to set-up costs, limitations of resources, and variations of practice. The objective of this study is to assess the Trauma Evaluation and Management (TEAM) course as a low-cost alternative for trauma resuscitation teaching in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). As part of the Team Broken Earth initiative, TEAM course was provided to the health care professionals in Haiti. At its conclusion, participants were asked to complete a survey evaluating the course. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed to evaluate the perception of the course. The course was provided in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A total of 80 health care professionals participated in the course. Response was obtained from 69 participants, which comprised of 32 physicians, 10 Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), 22 nurses, and 5 medical trainees. The course was well received by physicians, nurses, and EMT with an average score of 90.6%. Question analysis revealed a lower satisfaction of physicians for the course manual and teaching materials, and information related to decisions for transfer of patients. EMT consistently felt that the course was not tailored to their learning and practice needs. Written feedback demonstrated several areas of weaknesses including need for improvements in translations, hands-on practice, and educational materials. Overall, the TEAM course was well received. Analysis demonstrated a need for adjustments specific to LMIC including a focus on prehospital assessment, increased nursing responsibilities, and unavailability of specialist's referrals. Team Broken Earth intends to take these findings into consideration and continue to provide the TEAM course to other LMIC. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  18. Evaluation of care of dentoalveolar trauma

    PubMed Central

    FARINIUK, Luiz Fernando; de SOUSA, Maria Helena; WESTPHALEN, Vânia Portela Dietzel; CARNEIRO, Everdan; SILVA NETO, Ulisses X; ROSKAMP, Liliane; CAVALI, Ana Égide

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate cases of dental trauma treated at the specialized center of Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil, during a period of 2 years. Material and Methods A total of 647 patients were evaluated and treated between 2003 and 2005. Data obtained from each patient were tabulated and analyzed as to gender, age, etiology, time elapsed after the injury, diagnosis (type of trauma), and affected teeth. Results The results revealed that male individuals aged 7 to 13 years presented the highest prevalence of injury, and falling was the main causal factor. In most cases, the time elapsed between the accident and the first care ranged from 4 to 24 h. A total of 1,747 teeth were affected, with higher incidence of concussion/subluxation and coronal fracture, followed by lateral luxation and avulsion. The permanent maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth. Conclusion The frequency and causes of dentoalveolar trauma should be investigated for identification of risk groups, treatment demands and costs in order to allow for the establishment of effective preventive measures that can reduce the treatment duration and costs for both patients and oral health services. PMID:20835567

  19. Evaluation of care of dentoalveolar trauma.

    PubMed

    Fariniuk, Luiz Fernando; Souza, Maria Helena de; Westphalen, Vânia Portela Dietzel; Carneiro, Everdan; Silva Neto, Ulisses X; Roskamp, Liliane; Cavali, Ana Egide

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cases of dental trauma treated at the specialized center of Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil, during a period of 2 years. A total of 647 patients were evaluated and treated between 2003 and 2005. Data obtained from each patient were tabulated and analyzed as to gender, age, etiology, time elapsed after the injury, diagnosis (type of trauma), and affected teeth. The results revealed that male individuals aged 7 to 13 years presented the highest prevalence of injury, and falling was the main causal factor. In most cases, the time elapsed between the accident and the first care ranged from 4 to 24 h. A total of 1,747 teeth were affected, with higher incidence of concussion/subluxation and coronal fracture, followed by lateral luxation and avulsion. The permanent maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth. The frequency and causes of dentoalveolar trauma should be investigated for identification of risk groups, treatment demands and costs in order to allow for the establishment of effective preventive measures that can reduce the treatment duration and costs for both patients and oral health services.

  20. Where do I go? A trauma victim's plea in an informal trauma system

    PubMed Central

    Radjou, Angeline N; Mahajan, Preetam; Baliga, Dillip K

    2013-01-01

    Background: The three pillars of a good trauma system are the prehospital care, definitive care, and rehabilitative services. The prehospital care is a critical component of the efforts to lower trauma mortality. Objective: To study the prehospital profile of patients who died due to trauma, compute the time taken to reach our facility, find the cause of delay, and make feasible recommendations. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based study was performed at a trauma center in Puducherry from June 2009 to August 2010. Puducherry is a union territory of India in the geographical terrain of the state of Tamil Nadu. A total of 241deaths due to trauma were included. Apart from the demographic and injury characteristics, a detailed prehospital log was constructed regarding the time of incident, the referral patterns, care given in the prehospital phase, the distance travelled, and the total time taken to reach our center. Results: The majority (59%) of patients were referred, with stopovers at two consecutive referral centers (30%), needing at least two vehicles to transport to definitive care (70%), clocking unnecessary distances (67%), and delayed due to non therapeutic intervention (87%). The majority of deaths (66%) were due to head injury. Only 2.96% of referred cases reached us within the first hour. Few of the patients coming directly to us had vehicle change due to local availability and lack of knowledge of predestined definitive care facility. Overall, 94.6% of direct cases arrived within 4 h whereas 93.3% of referred cases required up to 7 h to arrive at definitive care. Conclusions: Seriously injured patients lose valuable prehospital time because there is no direction regarding destination and interfacility transfer, a lack of seamless transport, and no concept of initial trauma care. The lack of direction is compounded in geographical areas that are situated at the border of political jurisdictions. PMID:23960371

  1. EMS Attitudes Towards Geriatric Prehospital Care And Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N.; Fairbanks, Rollin J.; Hettinger, Aaron Z.; Shah, Manish N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To understand the opinions of emergency medical service (EMS) providers regarding their ability to care for older adults, the domains of geriatric medicine in which they need more training, and the modality through which continuing education could be best delivered. Design Qualitative study using key informant interviews. Setting Prehospital EMS system in Rochester, New York. Participants EMS providers, EMS instructors and administrators, emergency physicians, and geriatricians. Outcome Measures Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide that addressed the following domains: 1)knowledge and skill deficiencies; 2)recommendations for improvement of geriatrics continuing education; 3)delivery methods of education. Results Participant responses were generally congruous despite the diverse backgrounds, and redundancy was achieved rapidly. All participants perceived a deficit in EMS education on the care of older adults, particularly related to communications with patients and skilled nursing facility staff. All desired more geriatric continuing education for EMS providers, especially in communications and psychosocial issues. Education was desired in various modalities. Conclusion Further geriatrics continuing education for EMS providers is needed. Some specific topics relate to medical issues, but a large proportion involve communications and psychosocial issues. Education should be delivered in a variety of modalities to meet the needs of the EMS community. Emerging online video technologies may bridge the gap between learners preferring classroom based modailities and those preferring self-study modules. PMID:19170777

  2. Telepresence and telemedicine in trauma and emergency care management.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat; Peck, Kim; Porter, John M; Poropatich, Ron; Geare, Ted; Nassi, Richard B

    2004-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only recently has been applied to the specialties of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Subsequently the concepts of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery have evolved and are being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This chapter will review the current applications and future endeavors of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application.

  3. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds to improve trauma patient care-A quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Fiona L; Mitchell, Marion

    2017-06-01

    Trauma patient management is complex and challenging for nurses in the Intensive Care Unit. One strategy to promote quality and evidence based care may be through utilising specialty nursing experts both internal and external to the Intensive Care Unit in the form of a nursing round. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds have the potential to improve patient care, collaboration and nurses' knowledge. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to improve trauma patient care and evaluate the nurses perception of improvement. The project included structured, weekly rounds that were conducted at the bedside. Nursing experts and others collaborated to assess and make changes to trauma patients' care. The rounds were evaluated to assess the nurse's perception of improvement. There were 132 trauma patients assessed. A total of 452 changes to patient care occurred. On average, three changes per patient resulted. Changes included nursing management, medical management and wound care. Nursing staff reported an overall improvement of trauma patient care, trauma knowledge, and collaboration with colleagues. Inter Specialty Trauma Nursing Rounds utilizes expert nursing knowledge. They are suggested as an innovative way to address the clinical challenges of caring for trauma patients and are perceived to enhance patient care and nursing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings.

  5. A critical care helicopter system in trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L. M.; Bennett, B.

    1989-01-01

    Civilian helicopters and emergency medical services in the United States have been in existence for approximately 15 years. The rapid growth of this type of health care delivery coupled with an increasing number of accidents has prompted professional and lay scrutiny of these programs. Although they have a demonstrated history of benefit to patients, the type and severity of injuries to patients who are eligible for helicopter transportation need further definition. The composition of the medical crews and the benefits that particular crew members bring to the patients require ongoing evaluation. Significant questions regarding the number of pilots in a helicopter and in a program remain to be answered. This article reviews the role of emergency medical air transport services in providing care to trauma patients, staff training and evaluation, and safety criteria and offers recommendations to minimize risks to patients and crews. PMID:2695653

  6. Better trauma care. How Maryland does it.

    PubMed

    Wish, John R; Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F

    2005-01-01

    In March, 1970, the Maryland State Police, in cooperation with the University of Maryland, started the first statewide airborne transportation system. It was modeled after the army's success in Korea and Vietnam, where battlefield injuries were flown to front-line MASH units. The world's premier statewide medical aviation division was made possible through a cooperative effort between the Maryland State Police Aviation Division and Dr. R Adams Cowley at the University of Maryland Hospital as a public service to the citizens of the state. The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS) has five components: (1) aircraft, (2) state troopers, (3) system communications (SYSCOM) center, (4) ambulance and fire emergency rescue, and (5) Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers and a regional burn center. The Maryland State Police Aviation Division now has 12 Aerospace Dauphin AS365N helicopters that operate out of eight fixed points throughout the state. Each helicopter has a two-person crew that consists of a pilot and a paramedic. Since 1993, the overall coordination of emergency medical services (EMS) has been under the purview of MIEMSS, an independent executive-level state agency that is governed by an appointed board and advisory council. To ensure stable funding for Maryland's world renowned emergency medical services (EMS) system, including med-evac helicopters, ambulances, fire equipment, rescue squads, and trauma units, a "surcharge" of $13.50 per year is collected with the automobile registration fee where applicable. The SYSCOM center in Baltimore coordinates the helicopter transport to the scene of the accident as well as referral to the specialty care facility: Adult Level I Trauma Center, Pediatric Level I Trauma Center, and Regional Burn Center. An on-the-scene evaluation of this exemplary emergency medical system in Maryland provides further convincing evidence of the performance of the Maryland State Police Aviation Division as

  7. Trauma exposure and PTSD among older adolescents in foster care.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Amy M; Keller, Thomas E; Gowen, L Kris; Courtney, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    Youth in foster care represent a highly traumatized population. However, trauma research on this population has focused primarily on maltreatment rather than the full spectrum of trauma experiences identified within the DSM-IV. The current study aims to fill this gap by reporting the prevalence of exposure to specific types of traumatic events for a large sample of youth with foster care experience. The study also reports the likelihood of lifetime PTSD diagnoses associated with each specific type of trauma. Data are from a longitudinal panel study of 732 adolescents aged 17 and 18 who were in foster care. Lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD diagnosis were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Statistical comparisons were made using logistic regressions. The majority of respondents had experienced at least one trauma in their lifetime. While overall trauma prevalence did not differ by gender, males were more likely to experience interpersonal violence and environmental trauma, while females were more likely to experience sexual trauma. Caucasian participants reported higher rates of trauma exposure than African-American participants did. The types of trauma associated with the highest probability of a lifetime PTSD diagnosis were rape, being tortured or a victim of terrorists, and molestation. Youth in foster care are a highly traumatized population and meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD at higher rates than general youth populations. The ongoing impact of trauma may be particularly problematic for these young people given their abrupt transition to independence.

  8. Albumin for Prehospital Fluid Resuscitation of Hemorrhagic Shock in Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

    PubMed

    Studer, Nicholas M; April, Michael D; Bowling, F; Danielson, Paul D; Cap, Andrew P

    Optimal fluid resuscitation on the battlefield in the absence of blood products remains unclear. Contemporary Combat medics are generally limited to hydroxyethyl starch or crystalloid solutions, both of which present significant drawbacks. Obtaining US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved freeze-dried plasma (FDP) is a top casualty care research priority for the US Military. Interest in this agent reflects a desire to simultaneously expand intravascular volume and address coagulopathy. The history of FDP dates to the Second World War, when American expeditionary forces used this agent frequently. Also fielded was 25% albumin, an agent that lacks coagulation factors but offers impressive volume expansion with minimal weight to carry and requires no reconstitution in the field. The current potential value of 25% albumin is largely overlooked. Although FDP presents an attractive future option for battlefield prehospital fluid resuscitation once FDA approved, this article argues that in the interim, 25% albumin, augmented with fibrinogen concentrate and tranexamic acid to mitigate hemodilution effects on coagulation capacity, offers an effective volume resuscitation alternative that could save lives on the battlefield immediately. 2017.

  9. Medical and prehospital care training in UK fire and rescue services.

    PubMed

    Quinn, L; Challen, K; Walter, D

    2009-08-01

    Fire fighters are often in a position to provide immediate medical assistance to casualties at the incidents they attend. Fire service national standards require competence in casualty stabilisation but the scope of practice is variably interpreted. To determine the current level and nature of medical training being delivered to UK firefighters. A postal questionnaire dispatched to the 62 fire and rescue services (FRS) of the UK, with telephone follow-up for non-responders and for clarification. Examination of syllabuses for healthcare training. The majority (66%) of UK FRS are training their fire fighters in first aid (beyond statutory first aid at work) and prehospital emergency care. However, the level of this advanced aid is not standardised across the FRS that provide it. Medical training of fire fighters shows considerable variance across the UK. An adequate and appropriate level of medical training should be decided and agreed across all the UK FRS. In partnership with the Chief Fire Officers' Association, a national standard should be established so that all UK fire fighters acquire a common set of medical competencies.

  10. [Trauma-Informed Peer Counselling in the Care of Refugees with Trauma-Related Disorders].

    PubMed

    Wöller, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Providing adequate culture-sensitive care for a large number of refugees with trauma-related disorders constitutes a major challenge. In this context, peer support and trauma-informed peer counselling can be regarded as a valuable means to complement the psychosocial care systems. In recent years, peer support and peer education have been successfully implemented e. g. in health care education, in psychiatric care, and in the treatment of traumatized individuals. Only little research data is available for traumatized refugees. However, results are encouraging. A program is presented which integrates trauma-informed peer educators (TIP) with migration background in the care of traumatized refugees. Peers' responsibility includes emotional support and understanding the refugees' needs, sensitizing for trauma-related disorders, providing psychoeducation, and teaching trauma-specific stabilization techniques under supervision of professional psychotherapists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Massachusetts health care reform and orthopaedic trauma: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mitchel B

    2014-10-01

    Massachusetts was the first state to implement its own version of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), when it passed the Massachusetts Health Care Reform (MHR) in 2006. Similar to the ACA, its explicit purpose was universal access to health care to all residents of Massachusetts. We believe that the influence of MHR on orthopaedic trauma in Massachusetts will have implications on trauma systems across the country, given the similarities between ACA and MHR. Therefore, in this article, we discuss our experiences as Orthopaedic trauma surgeons with regard to MHR. In this regard, we reviewed the effects of the implementation of MHR on the orthopaedic trauma services at 3 of the 4 level one trauma centers in Boston, MA. Our results demonstrate a dramatic reduction in the proportion of uncompensated care at these centers in addition to the number of uninsured patients with orthopaedic trauma injuries.

  12. Trauma-Informed Care: Helping Patients with a Painful Past.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Life trauma is highly correlated with an increased risk of mortality from chronic disease. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is an evidence-based approach to deliver healthcare in a way that recognizes and responds to the long-term health effects of the experience of trauma in patients' lives. Four essential features and six defining concepts delineate a TIC approach to healthcare. Nurses can realize the benefits and learn the tenets of TIC to deliver superior care to patients with chronic illness.

  13. Foster care and healing from complex childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Forkey, Heather; Szilagyi, Moira

    2014-10-01

    Children enter foster care with many forms of adversity and trauma beyond maltreatment that impact their short- and long-term physical, mental, and developmental health and their adaptation to their new care environment. Applying an understanding of the impact of toxic stress on the developing brain and body allows the health care provider to understand findings in this vulnerable population. Complex trauma alters immune response, neurodevelopment, and the genome, resulting in predictable and significant cognitive, behavioral, and physical consequences. Pediatric care of children in foster care must be trauma informed to meet their medical, mental health, and developmental needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The research agenda for trauma critical care.

    PubMed

    Asehnoune, Karim; Balogh, Zsolt; Citerio, Giuseppe; Cap, Andre; Billiar, Timothy; Stocchetti, Nino; Cohen, Mitchell J; Pelosi, Paolo; Curry, Nicola; Gaarder, Christine; Gruen, Russell; Holcomb, John; Hunt, Beverley J; Juffermans, Nicole P; Maegele, Mark; Midwinter, Mark; Moore, Frederick A; O'Dwyer, Michael; Pittet, Jean-François; Schöchl, Herbert; Schreiber, Martin; Spinella, Philip C; Stanworth, Simon; Winfield, Robert; Brohi, Karim

    2017-07-29

    In this research agenda on the acute and critical care management of trauma patients, we concentrate on the major factors leading to death, namely haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury (TBI). In haemostasis biology, the results of randomised controlled trials have led to the therapeutic focus moving away from the augmentation of coagulation factors (such as recombinant factor VIIa) and towards fibrinogen supplementation and administration of antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid. Novel diagnostic techniques need to be evaluated to determine whether an individualised precision approach is superior to current empirical practice. The timing and efficacy of platelet transfusions remain in question, while new blood products need to be developed and evaluated, including whole blood variants, lyophilised products and novel red cell storage modalities. The current cornerstones of TBI management are intracranial pressure control, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure and avoidance of secondary insults (such as hypotension, hypoxaemia, hyperglycaemia and pyrexia). Therapeutic hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy are controversial therapies. Further research into these strategies should focus on identifying which subgroups of patients may benefit from these interventions. Prediction of the long-term outcome early after TBI remains challenging. Early magnetic resonance imaging has recently been evaluated for predicting the long-term outcome in mild and severe TBI. Novel biomarkers may also help in outcome prediction and may predict chronic neurological symptoms. For trauma in general, rehabilitation is complex and multidimensional, and the optimal timing for commencement of rehabilitation needs investigation. We propose priority areas for clinical trials in the next 10 years.

  15. Impact of Sexual Trauma on HIV Care Engagement: Perspectives of Female Patients with Trauma Histories in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Watt, Melissa H; Dennis, Alexis C; Choi, Karmel W; Ciya, Nonceba; Joska, John A; Robertson, Corne; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2016-11-19

    South African women have disproportionately high rates of both sexual trauma and HIV. To understand how sexual trauma impacts HIV care engagement, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 15 HIV-infected women with sexual trauma histories, recruited from a public clinic in Cape Town. Interviews explored trauma narratives, coping behaviors and care engagement, and transcripts were analyzed using a constant comparison method. Participants reported multiple and complex traumas across their lifetimes. Sexual trauma hindered HIV care engagement, especially immediately following HIV diagnosis, and there were indications that sexual trauma may interfere with future care engagement, via traumatic stress symptoms including avoidance. Disclosure of sexual trauma was limited; no women had disclosed to an HIV provider. Routine screening for sexual trauma in HIV care settings may help to identify individuals at risk of poor care engagement. Efficacious treatments are needed to address the psychological and behavioral sequelae of trauma.

  16. Facilitators and barriers in pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care.

    PubMed

    Berben, Sivera A A; Meijs, Tineke H J M; van Grunsven, Pierre M; Schoonhoven, Lisette; van Achterberg, Theo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study is to give insight into facilitators and barriers in pain management in trauma patients in the chain of emergency care in the Netherlands. A qualitative approach was adopted with the use of the implementation Model of Change of Clinical Practice. The chain of emergency care concerned prehospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Emergency Departments (EDs). We included two EMS ambulance services and three EDs and conducted five focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Stakeholders and managers of organisations were interviewed individually. Focus group participants were selected based on availability and general characteristics. Transcripts of the audio recordings and field notes were analysed in consecutive steps, based on thematic content analysis. Each step was independently performed by the researchers, and was discussed afterwards. We analysed differences and similarities supported by software for qualitative analysis MaxQDA. This study identified five concepts as facilitators and barriers in pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care. We described the concepts of knowledge, attitude, professional communication, organisational aspects and patient input, illustrated with quotes from the interviews and focus group sessions. Furthermore, we identified whether the themes occurred in the chain of care. Knowledge deficits, attitude problems and patient input were similar for the EMS and ED settings, despite the different positions, backgrounds and educational levels of respondents. In the chain of care a lack of professional communication and organisational feedback occurred as new themes, and were specifically related to the organisational structure of the prehospital EMS and EDs. Identified organisational aspects stressed the importance of organisational embedding of improvement of pain management. However, change of clinical practice requires a comprehensive approach focused at all five concepts. We think a shift

  17. Evaluating trauma care capabilities in Mexico with the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Mock, Charles; Vega Rivera, Felipe; Romero Hicks, Eduardo; Guzmán Solana, Felipe; Porras Ramírez, Giovanni; Montiel Amoroso, Gilberto; de Boer, Melanie

    2006-02-01

    To identify affordable, sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities in Mexico, using the standards in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care, a publication that was developed by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Surgery to provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place in the various levels of health facilities in all countries. The Guidelines publication was used as a basis for needs assessments conducted in 2003 and 2004 in three Mexican states. The states were selected to represent the range of geographic and economic conditions in the country: Oaxaca (south, lower economic status), Puebla (center, middle economic status), and Nuevo León (north, higher economic status). The sixteen facilities that were assessed included rural clinics, small hospitals, and large hospitals. Site visits incorporated direct inspection of physical resources as well as interviews with key administrative and clinical staff. Human and physical resources for trauma care were adequate in the hospitals, especially the larger ones. The survey did identify some deficiencies, such as shortages of stiff suction tips, pulse oximetry equipment, and some trauma-related medications. All of the clinics had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation, even though some received substantial numbers of trauma patients. In all levels of facilities there was room for improvement in administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and uniform in-service training. This study identified several low-cost ways to strengthen trauma care in Mexico. The study also highlighted the usefulness of the recommended norms in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication in providing a standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities in nations worldwide.

  18. Pre-Hospital Care Management of a Potential Spinal Cord Injured Patient: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Singh, Jeffrey; Nathens, Avery; MacDonald, Russell D.; Travers, Andrew; Tallon, John; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An interdisciplinary expert panel of medical and surgical specialists involved in the management of patients with potential spinal cord injuries (SCI) was assembled. Four key questions were created that were of significant interest. These were: (1) what is the optimal type and duration of pre-hospital spinal immobilization in patients with acute SCI?; (2) during airway manipulation in the pre-hospital setting, what is the ideal method of spinal immobilization?; (3) what is the impact of pre-hospital transport time to definitive care on the outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury?; and (4) what is the role of pre-hospital care providers in cervical spine clearance and immobilization? A systematic review utilizing multiple databases was performed to determine the current evidence about the specific questions, and each article was independently reviewed and assessed by two reviewers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Guidelines were then created related to the questions by a national Canadian expert panel using the Delphi method for reviewing the evidence-based guidelines about each question. Recommendations about the key questions included: the pre-hospital immobilization of patients using a cervical collar, head immobilization, and a spinal board; utilization of padded boards or inflatable bean bag boards to reduce pressure; transfer of patients off of spine boards as soon as feasible, including transfer of patients off spinal boards while awaiting transfer from one hospital institution to another hospital center for definitive care; inclusion of manual in-line cervical spine traction for airway management in patients requiring intubation in the pre-hospital setting; transport of patients with acute traumatic SCI to the definitive hospital center for care within 24 h of injury; and training of emergency medical personnel in the pre-hospital setting to apply criteria to clear patients of cervical spinal injuries, and immobilize patients

  19. Do they really care? How trauma patients perceive nurses' caring behaviors.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Alison S; Hayes, Janice S; Clukey, Lory; Curtis, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Applying the theory of Nursing as Caring can help the nurse provide care that is perceived as caring by moderately to severely injured trauma patients. The Caring Behaviors Inventory was administered in a 1-to-1 interview format to hospitalized trauma patients in a level 2 trauma center. Nurses were positively perceived in their caring behaviors with some variation based on gender and ethnicity. The modified Caring Behaviors Inventory is quick to use and is reliable and valid.

  20. Prehospital emergency care and medical preparedness for the 2005 World Championship Games in Athletics in Helsinki.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Tuomas; Kuisma, Markku; Määttä, Teuvo; Tennilä, Arto; Hari, Tuomo; Bäckman, Riitta; Väyrynen, Taneli

    2007-01-01

    International mass gatherings can cause great challenges to local healthcare system and emergency medical services (EMS). Traditionally, planning has been based on retrospective reports of previous events, but there still is a need for prospective studies in order to make the process more evidence-based. The aim of this study was to analyze the success of medical preparedness, ambulance patient characteristics, emergency care, and the use of pre-hospital resources during the 2005 World Championship Games in Athletics in Helsinki, Finland. The study was a prospective, observational study conducted within the Helsinki EMS. Data from all emergency calls at the sport venues and Games village between 05 and 14 August 2005 were collected. Data from the organizations responsible for the health care and first aid of spectators and accredited persons (e.g., athletes, coaches, the press, very important persons and personnel working in the Games area) also were collected. The Institutional Review Board of Helsinki University Central Hospital approved the study plan. A total of 479,000 persons visited the Games. The ambulance call incidence at the Olympic Stadium was 0.50 per 10,000 people and 0.7 per 10,000 when the Games Village was included. The overall need for ambulance transportation to the emergency department was 0.52 per 10,000. No patients needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation or other immediate, life-saving procedures on-site. First aid was provided to 554 spectators (0.17 per 10,000 people). The three medical organizations cared for 1,586 patients of which 25 (1.6%) were transported to a hospital by an ambulance. The number of patients needing transportation and the overall patient load for the healthcare system was well-anticipated. Accredited persons sought health care a total of 1,009 times. The number of patients treated was associated closely with the number of spectators (p = 0.05). The number of ambulance calls in the city increased 5.9 % as compared to the

  1. A pilot study of quality of life in German prehospital emergency care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G.; Sand, Daniel; Vorstius, Christian; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life in patients represents an important area of assessment. However, attention to health professionals should be equally important. The literature on the quality of life (QOL) of emergency physicians is scarce. This pilot study investigated QOL in emergency physicians in Germany. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to June in 2015. We approached the German Association of Emergency Medicine Physicians and two of the largest recruitment agencies for emergency physicians in Germany and invited their members to participate. We used the WHO Q-BREF to obtain QOL scores in four domains that included physical, mental, social, and environmental health. Results: The 478 German emergency physicians included in the study held board certifications in general medicine (n = 40; 8.4%), anesthesiology (n = 243; 50.8%), surgery (n = 63; 13.2%), internal medicine (n = 81; 17.0%), or others (n = 51; 10.7%). The women surveyed tended to report a better QOL but worse general health than the men. Regarding specific domains, women scored worse in physical health, particularly energy during everyday work (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.98 [1.21–3.24]). Both men and women scored worse in psychological health than general health, particularly young women. Women were also more likely to view their safety (RRR: 1.87 [1.07–3.28]) and living place (RRR: 2.51 [1.10–5.73]) as being poor than their male counterparts. Conclusion: QOL in German prehospital emergency care physicians is satisfactory for the included participants; however, there were some negative effects in the psychological health domain. This is particularly obvious in young female emergency physicians. PMID:28331519

  2. A pilot study of quality of life in German prehospital emergency care physicians.

    PubMed

    Sand, Michael; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G; Sand, Daniel; Vorstius, Christian; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life in patients represents an important area of assessment. However, attention to health professionals should be equally important. The literature on the quality of life (QOL) of emergency physicians is scarce. This pilot study investigated QOL in emergency physicians in Germany. We conducted a cross-sectional study from January to June in 2015. We approached the German Association of Emergency Medicine Physicians and two of the largest recruitment agencies for emergency physicians in Germany and invited their members to participate. We used the WHO Q-BREF to obtain QOL scores in four domains that included physical, mental, social, and environmental health. The 478 German emergency physicians included in the study held board certifications in general medicine (n = 40; 8.4%), anesthesiology (n = 243; 50.8%), surgery (n = 63; 13.2%), internal medicine (n = 81; 17.0%), or others (n = 51; 10.7%). The women surveyed tended to report a better QOL but worse general health than the men. Regarding specific domains, women scored worse in physical health, particularly energy during everyday work (relative risk ratio [RRR]: 1.98 [1.21-3.24]). Both men and women scored worse in psychological health than general health, particularly young women. Women were also more likely to view their safety (RRR: 1.87 [1.07-3.28]) and living place (RRR: 2.51 [1.10-5.73]) as being poor than their male counterparts. QOL in German prehospital emergency care physicians is satisfactory for the included participants; however, there were some negative effects in the psychological health domain. This is particularly obvious in young female emergency physicians.

  3. [Preclinical treatment of multiple trauma : what is important?].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Hoffmann, R

    2013-09-01

    Multiple trauma is still the most common cause of death in the age group below 40 years but rarely occurs in prehospital emergencies in Germany. Therefore, personal experience of emergency physicians in prehospital treatment of multiple trauma is often limited. Priority-based therapy according to standardized algorithms and advances in clinical and intensive care have reduced hospital mortality down to 13 %. Time factors, treatment and transport by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services seem to have had a significant impact on the outcome. The current German multiple trauma S3 guidelines provide algorithms for preclinical treatment. The underlying scientific evidence in this respect is, however, low.

  4. Time for a change in injury and trauma care delivery: a trauma death review analysis.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Michael; Caldwell, Erica; D'Amours, Scott; Crozier, John; Wyllie, Peter; Flabouris, Arthas; Sheridan, Mark; Jalaludin, Bin

    2008-11-01

    Safety and error reduction in medical care is crucial to the future of medicine. This study evaluates trauma patients dying at a level 1 trauma centre to determine the adequacy of care. All trauma deaths at a level 1 trauma centre between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed by an eight-member multidisciplinary death review panel. Errors in care were classified according to their location, nature, impact, outcome and whether the deaths were avoidable or non-avoidable. Avoidable deaths were categorized as potentially, probably and definitely avoidable. Between 1996 and 2003, there were 17 157 trauma admissions, including 307 trauma deaths. The mean patient age was 47.7 years +/- 24.8 years, mean injury severity score 38.1 +/- 19.6. Of all deaths, 69 (22.5%) were deemed avoidable. Of the avoidable deaths, 61 (88%) were potentially avoidable, 7 (10%) probably avoidable and 1 (1.4%) definitely avoidable. Avoidable deaths were associated with patients with increased age, lower injury severity score, admissions to intensive care unit, longer hospital stay and treatment by a non-trauma surgeon (P < 0.05). Of the 307 trauma deaths, 271 (89.3%) patients experienced a total of 1063 errors, an overall error rate of 3.5 per patient. The error rate in the non-avoidable group was 2.9 per patient and 5.3 per patient in the avoidable group (P < 0.0001). Most errors occurred in the resuscitation area. Age, severity of injury, hospital length of stay and care by a non-trauma surgeon are factors associated with avoidable deaths. A new approach to trauma and injury care is required.

  5. Disparities in trauma care and outcomes in the United States: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Adil H.; Weygandt, Paul Logan; Bentley, Jessica M.; Monn, Maria Francesca; Rehman, Karim Abdur; Zarzaur, Benjamin L.; Crandall, Marie L.; Cornwell, Edward E.; Cooper, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    , prehospital factors, hospital/provider factors, and factors associated with postacute care and rehabilitation. While there are many proposed mechanisms, we believe that there are several interventions that could be particularly effective in combatting trauma disparities. These include trauma prevention programs targeting vulnerable populations, expansion of healthcare coverage, relocation of trauma centers to better provide for vulnerable populations, and restructuring clinical training to address implicit biases. While much work still remains to fully elucidate the mechanisms underlying trauma disparities, we can and should now act to begin to reduce or eliminate these disparities that still plague our healthcare system. Level of Evidence Two. PMID:23609267

  6. Trauma-Informed Care for Youth in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Carolyn M

    2016-06-01

    For decades, evidence has shown an undeniable connection between childhood trauma and chronic adverse reactions across the lifespan (Bilchik & Nash, 2008; Perry, 2001; Perry, 2006). Childhood traumatic experiences are associated with serious and persistent, long-term physical, psychological, and substance abuse issues. In addition to adverse effects on physical health, research indicates that early childhood trauma has particularly adverse effects on adolescent self-esteem, coping skills, school performance, self-regulation, critical thinking, self-motivation, and the ability to build healthy relationships (O'Connell, Boat, & Warner, 2009). A traumatic event is a dangerous or distressing experience, outside the range of usual human experience that overwhelms the capacity to cope and frequently results in intense emotional and physical reactions, feelings of helplessness and terror, and threatens serious injury or death (The National Child Traumatic Stress Network [NCTSNET], 2014). Approximately five million children each year in the United States experience some type of traumatic experience (Perry, 2006). Nationwide community studies estimate between 25% and 61% of children and adolescents have a history of at least one exposure to a potentially traumatic event and 38.5% of American adults claim to have experienced at least one traumatic event before the age of 13 (Briggs et al., 2012; Gerson & Rappaport, 2013). According to results of a 2002-2003 survey of 900 New York City adolescents, 24% reported a history of witnessing someone being shot, 12% reported exposure to someone being killed, and 51% reported witnessing someone being beaten or mugged (O'Connell et al., 2009). Each year, 2-3 million children are victims of maltreatment, a type of trauma, including physical and/or sexual abuse (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2014; Perry, 2006). Compared to the general population, youth in foster care are significantly more likely to have experienced

  7. Trauma system development.

    PubMed

    Lendrum, R A; Lockey, D J

    2013-01-01

    The word 'trauma' describes the disease entity resulting from physical injury. Trauma is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and deaths due to injury look set to increase. As early as the 1970s, it became evident that centralisation of resources and expertise could reduce the mortality rate from serious injury and that organisation of trauma care delivery into formal systems could improve outcome further. Internationally, trauma systems have evolved in various forms, with widespread reports of mortality and functional outcome benefits when major trauma management is delivered in this way. The management of major trauma in England is currently undergoing significant change. The London Trauma System began operating in April 2010 and others throughout England became operational this year. Similar systems exist internationally and continue to be developed. Anaesthetists have been and continue to be involved with all levels of trauma care delivery, from the provision of pre-hospital trauma and retrieval teams, through to chronic pain management and rehabilitation of patients back into society. This review examines the international development of major trauma care delivery and the components of a modern trauma system.

  8. Nurse-Led Trauma-Informed Correctional Care for Women.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Elizabeth; Brage Hudson, Diane

    2016-07-01

    Incarcerated women are a vulnerable and unique population of special concern to nurses as they have high rates of mental illness. In this article, the authors discuss how trauma exposure contributes to mental illness in incarcerated women through abuse, socioeconomic factors, and the prison environment, how this trauma exposure manifests in the inmate survivor, and the related implications for practice. A history of trauma and victimization is related to complex mental health issues which affect the majority of justice-involved women. The correctional environment can exacerbate these issues. Nursing implications include discussion of the trauma-informed care model. The authors recommend a model of trauma-informed care named "the 4 Es" that can guide nurses in preparing a trauma-informed correctional environment and discuss the importance of nurse-led policy change in finding alternatives to incarceration for women with mental illness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of Trauma Care capabilities in four countries using the WHO-IATSIC Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles; Nguyen, Son; Quansah, Robert; Arreola-Risa, Carlos; Viradia, Ramesh; Joshipura, Manjul

    2006-06-01

    We sought to identify affordable and sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities globally, especially in developing countries, using the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. These guidelines were created by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Society of Surgery and provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place at the range of health facilities globally. The guidelines were used as a basis for needs assessments in 4 countries selected to represent the world's range of geographic and economic conditions: Mexico (middle income; Latin America); Vietnam (low income; east Asia); India (low income; south Asia); and Ghana (low income; Africa). One hundred sites were assessed, including rural clinics (n=51), small hospitals (n=34), and large hospitals (n=15). Site visits utilized direct inspection and interviews with administrative and clinical staff. Resources were partly adequate or adequate at most large hospitals, but there were gaps that could be improved, especially in low-income settings, such as shortages of airway equipment, chest tubes, and trauma-related medications; and prolonged periods where critical equipment (e.g., X-ray, laboratory) were unavailable while awaiting repairs. Rural clinics everywhere had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation even though some received significant trauma volumes. In all settings, there was a dearth of administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and regular in-service training. This study identified several low-cost ways in which to strengthen trauma care globally. It also has demonstrated the usefulness of the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care in providing an internationally applicable, standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities.

  10. Data quality of a wearable vital signs monitor in the pre-hospital and emergency departments for enhancing prediction of needs for life-saving interventions in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Holcomb, John B; Wade, Charles E; Darrah, Mark I; Salinas, Jose

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the quality of data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments when using a wearable vital signs monitor and examine the efficacy of a combined model of standard vital signs and respective data quality indices (DQIs) for predicting the need for life-saving interventions (LSIs) in trauma patients. It was hypothesised that prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients is associated with data quality. Also, a model utilizing vital signs and DQIs to predict the needs for LSIs would be able to outperform models using vital signs alone. Data from 104 pre-hospital trauma patients transported by helicopter were analysed, including means and standard deviations of continuous vital signs, related DQIs and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores for LSI and non-LSI patient groups. DQIs involved percentages of valid measurements and mean deviation ratios. Various multivariate logistic regression models for predicting LSI needs were also obtained and compared through receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Demographics of patients were not statistically different between LSI and non-LSI patient groups. In addition, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction of LSI needs in patients using heart rate and DQIs (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.86) than using heart rate alone (AUC of 0.73). Likewise, ROC curves demonstrated better prediction using heart rate, total GCS score and DQIs (AUC of 0.99) than using heart rate and total GCS score (AUC of 0.92). AUCs were statistically different (p < 0.05). This study showed that data quality could be used in addition to continuous vital signs for predicting the need for LSIs in trauma patients. Importantly, trauma systems should incorporate processes to regulate data quality of physiologic data in the pre-hospital and emergency departments. By doing so, data quality could be improved and lead to better prediction of needs for LSIs in trauma patients.

  11. Patient Preferences for Discussing Childhood Trauma in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellen; Athale, Ninad; Sciolla, Andrés F; Catz, Sheryl L

    2017-01-01

    Context: Exposure to traumatic events is common in primary care patients, yet health care professionals may be hesitant to assess and address the impact of childhood trauma in their patients. Objective: To assess patient preferences for discussing traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with clinicians in underserved, predominantly Latino primary care patients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Main Outcome Measure: We evaluated patients with a questionnaire assessing comfort to discuss trauma exposure and symptoms using the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study questionnaire and the Primary Care-PTSD screen. The questionnaire also assessed patients’ confidence in their clinicians’ ability to help with trauma-related issues. Surveys were collected at an integrated medical and behavioral health care clinic. Results: Of 178 adult patients asked, 152 (83%) agreed to participate. Among participants, 37% screened positive for PTSD, 42% reported 4 or more ACEs, and 26% had elevated scores on both measures. Primary Care-PTSD and ACE scores were strongly positively correlated (r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Most patients agreed they were comfortable being asked about trauma directly or through screening questionnaires and did not oppose the inclusion of trauma-related information in their medical record. In addition, most patients perceived their clinician as comfortable asking questions about childhood trauma and able to address trauma-related problems. Conclusion: Screening is acceptable to most primary care patients regardless of trauma exposure or positive PTSD screening. Findings may aid primary care clinicians to consider screening regularly for ACEs and PTSD to better serve the health care needs of trauma-exposed patients. PMID:28333604

  12. Patient Preferences for Discussing Childhood Trauma in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellen; Athale, Ninad; Sciolla, Andrés F; Catz, Sheryl L

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to traumatic events is common in primary care patients, yet health care professionals may be hesitant to assess and address the impact of childhood trauma in their patients. To assess patient preferences for discussing traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with clinicians in underserved, predominantly Latino primary care patients. Cross-sectional study. We evaluated patients with a questionnaire assessing comfort to discuss trauma exposure and symptoms using the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study questionnaire and the Primary Care-PTSD screen. The questionnaire also assessed patients' confidence in their clinicians' ability to help with trauma-related issues. Surveys were collected at an integrated medical and behavioral health care clinic. Of 178 adult patients asked, 152 (83%) agreed to participate. Among participants, 37% screened positive for PTSD, 42% reported 4 or more ACEs, and 26% had elevated scores on both measures. Primary Care-PTSD and ACE scores were strongly positively correlated (r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Most patients agreed they were comfortable being asked about trauma directly or through screening questionnaires and did not oppose the inclusion of trauma-related information in their medical record. In addition, most patients perceived their clinician as comfortable asking questions about childhood trauma and able to address trauma-related problems. Screening is acceptable to most primary care patients regardless of trauma exposure or positive PTSD screening. Findings may aid primary care clinicians to consider screening regularly for ACEs and PTSD to better serve the health care needs of trauma-exposed patients.

  13. Assessing trauma care provider judgement in the prediction of need for life-saving interventions.

    PubMed

    Anazodo, Amechi N; Murthi, Sarah B; Frank, M Kirsten; Hu, Peter F; Hartsky, Lauren; Imle, P Cristina; Stephens, Christopher T; Menaker, Jay; Miller, Catriona; Dinardo, Theresa; Pasley, Jason; Mackenzie, Colin F

    2015-05-01

    Human judgement on the need for life-saving interventions (LSI) in trauma is poorly studied, especially during initial casualty management. We prospectively examined early clinical judgement and compared clinical experts' predictions of LSI to their later occurrence. Within 10-15 min of direct trauma admission, we surveyed the predictions of pre-hospital care providers (PHP, 92% paramedics), trauma centre nurses (RN), and attending or fellow trauma physicians (MD) on the need for LSI. The actual outcomes including fluid bolus, intubation, transfusion (<1h and 1-6h), and emergent surgical interventions were observed. Cohen's kappa statistic (K) and percentage agreement were used to measure agreement among provider responses. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated to compare clinical judgement to actual patient interventions. Among 325 eligible trauma patient admissions, 209 clinical judgement of LSIs were obtained from all three providers. Cohen's kappa statistic for agreement between pairs of provider groups demonstrated no "disagreement" (K<0) between groups, "fair" agreement for fluid bolus (K=0.12-0.19) and blood transfusion 0-6h (K=0.22-0.39), and "moderate" (K=0.45-0.49) agreement between PHP and RN regarding intubation and surgical interventions, but no "excellent" (K ≥ 0.81) agreement between any pair of provider groups for any intervention. The percentage agreement across the different clinician groups ranged from 50% to 83%. NPV was 90-99% across providers for all interventions except fluid bolus. Expert clinical judgement provides a benchmark for the prediction of major LSI use in unstable trauma patients. No excellent agreement exists across providers on LSI predictions. It is possible that quality improvement measures and computer modelling-based decision-support could reduce errors of LSI commission and omission found in resuscitation at major trauma centres and enhance decision

  14. The syndemic illness of HIV and trauma: implications for a trauma-informed model of care.

    PubMed

    Brezing, Christina; Ferrara, Maria; Freudenreich, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    People living with HIV infection are disproportionately burdened by trauma and the resultant negative health consequences, making the combination of HIV infection and trauma a syndemic illness. Despite the high co-occurrence and negative influence on health, trauma and posttraumatic sequelae in people living with HIV infection often go unrecognized and untreated because of the current gaps in medical training and lack of practice guidelines. We set out to review the current literature on HIV infection and trauma and propose a trauma-informed model of care to target this syndemic illness. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, and Cochrane review databases for articles that contained the following search terms: HIV AND either trauma (specifically violent trauma), PTSD, intimate partner violence (IPV), abuse, or trauma-informed care. Articles were limited to primary clinical research or metanalyses published in English. Articles were excluded if they referred to HIV-associated posttraumatic stress disorder or HIV-associated posttraumatic growth. We confirm high, but variable, rates of trauma in people living with HIV infection demonstrated in multiple studies, ranging from 10%-90%. Trauma is associated with (1) increased HIV-risk behavior, contributing to transmission and acquisition of the virus; (2) negative internal and external mediators also associated with poor health and high-risk HIV behavior; (3) poor adherence to treatment; (4) poor HIV-related and other health outcomes; and (5) particularly vulnerable special populations. Clinicians should consider using a model of trauma-informed care in the treatment of people living with HIV infection. Its adoption in different settings needs to be matched to available resources. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding and Addressing the Global Need for Orthopaedic Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Agarwal-Harding, Kiran J; von Keudell, Arvind; Zirkle, Lewis G; Meara, John G; Dyer, George S M

    2016-11-02

    ➤The burden of musculoskeletal trauma is high worldwide, disproportionately affecting the poor, who have the least access to quality orthopaedic trauma care.➤Orthopaedic trauma care is essential, and must be a priority in the horizontal development of global health systems.➤The education of surgeons, nonphysician clinicians, and ancillary staff in low and middle income countries is central to improving access to and quality of care.➤Volunteer surgical missions from rich countries can sustainably expand and strengthen orthopaedic trauma care only when they serve a local need and build local capacity.➤Innovative business models may help to pay for care of the poor. Examples include reducing costs through process improvements and cross-subsidizing from profitable high-volume activities.➤Resource-poor settings may foster innovations in devices or systems with universal applicability in orthopaedics. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  16. Fire Engine Support and On-scene Time in Prehospital Stroke Care - A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Puolakka, Tuukka; Väyrynen, Taneli; Erkkilä, Elja-Pekka; Kuisma, Markku

    2016-06-01

    Introduction On-scene time (OST) previously has been shown to be a significant component of Emergency Medical Services' (EMS') operational delay in acute stroke. Since stroke patients are managed routinely by two-person ambulance crews, increasing the number of personnel available on the scene is a possible method to improve their performance. Hypothesis Using fire engine crews to support ambulances on the scene in acute stroke is hypothesized to be associated with a shorter OST. All patients transported to hospital as thrombolysis candidates during a one-year study period were registered by the ambulance crews using a case report form that included patient characteristics and operational EMS data. Seventy-seven patients (41 [53%] male; mean age of 68.9 years [SD=15]; mean Glasgow Coma Score [GCS] of 15 points [IQR=14-15]) were eligible for the study. Forty-five cases were managed by ambulance and fire engine crews together and 32 by the ambulance crews alone. The median ambulance response time was seven minutes (IQR=5-10) and the fire engine response time was six minutes (IQR=5-8). The number of EMS personnel on the scene was six (IQR=5-7) and two (IQR=2-2), and the OST was 21 minutes (IQR=18-26) and 24 minutes (IQR=20-32; P =.073) for the groups, respectively. In a following regression analysis, using stroke as the dispatch code was the only variable associated with short (<22 minutes) OST with an odds ratio of 3.952 (95% CI, 1.279-12.207). Dispatching fire engine crews to support ambulances in acute stroke care was not associated with a shorter on-scene stay when compared to standard management by two-person ambulance crews alone. Using stroke as the dispatch code was the only variable that was associated independently with a short OST. Puolakka T , Väyrynen T , Erkkilä E-P , Kuisma M . Fire engine support and on-scene time in prehospital stroke care - a prospective observational study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(3):278-281.

  17. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  18. Prior Trauma Exposure for Youth in Treatment Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorsey, Shannon; Burns, Barbara J.; Southerland, Dannia G.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Wagner, H. Ryan; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Very little research has focused on rates of trauma exposure for youth in treatment foster care (TFC). Available research has utilized record review for assessing exposure, which presents limitations for the range of trauma types examined, as records are predominantly focused on abuse and neglect. The current study examines exposure rates and…

  19. Impact of trauma societies on the clinical care of polytrauma patients.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, A; Boffard, K D

    2012-06-01

    Trauma societies have an influence on the management and outcome of polytrauma. Its contributions include setting up standard definitions, trauma registries, evidence-based medicine guidelines, and the creation of educational tools such as specific courses of trauma care and decision-making. Literature and web-based search of definitions and available information. The history of and accomplishments of trauma societies in the above-mentioned domains are reviewed, including the major trauma registries (Major Trauma Outcome Study, National Trauma Data Bank, The American Pediatric Surgical Association, the American Burn Association trauma, and the German Trauma Society trauma registries). Several learned societies in the field of trauma have created recommendations and/or guidelines concerning polytrauma (the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, The Society of Critical Care Medicine, and the German Trauma Society, Brain Trauma Foundation, and the Essential Trauma Care (EsTC) Guidelines). Several practical, hands-on courses and scoring systems for improving the quality of management of polytrauma patients have been founded and implemented in the past 35 years, including the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS(®)) Course of the American College of Surgeons, the Definitive Surgical Trauma Care (DSTC(TM)) Course, the National Trauma Management Course (NTMC(TM) Course,) the Advanced Trauma Operative Management (ATOM) Course, and the European Trauma Course (ETC). Trauma and emergency care societies have made an elaborate, substantial contribution by developing trauma registries and creating specific guidelines courses on trauma care and decision-making.

  20. Outcome following physician supervised prehospital resuscitation: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Krüger, Andreas J; Zwisler, Stine T; Brøchner, Anne C

    2015-01-01

    Background Prehospital care provided by specially trained, physician-based emergency services (P-EMS) is an integrated part of the emergency medical systems in many developed countries. To what extent P-EMS increases survival and favourable outcomes is still unclear. The aim of the study was thus to investigate ambulance runs initially assigned ‘life-saving missions’ with emphasis on long-term outcome in patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark Methods All MECU runs are registered in a database by the attending physician, stating, among other parameters, the treatment given, outcome of the treatment and the patient's diagnosis. Over a period of 80 months from May 1 2006 to December 31 2012, all missions in which the outcome of the treatment was registered as ‘life saving’ were scrutinised. Initial outcome, level of competence of the caretaker and diagnosis of each patient were manually established in each case in a combined audit of the prehospital database, the discharge summary of the MECU and the medical records from the hospital. Outcome parameters were final outcome, the aetiology of the life-threatening condition and the level of competences necessary to treat the patient. Results Of 25 647 patients treated by the MECU, 701 (2.7%) received prehospital ‘life saving treatment’. In 596 (2.3%) patients this treatment exceeded the competences of the attending emergency medical technician or paramedic. Of these patients, 225 (0.9%) were ultimately discharged to their own home. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that anaesthesiologist administrated prehospital therapy increases the level of treatment modalities leading to an increased survival in relation to a prehospital system consisting of emergency medical technicians and paramedics alone and thus supports the concept of applying specialists in anaesthesiology in the prehospital setting especially when treating patients with cardiac arrest, patients in

  1. [Intensive care in chest trauma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopp, K H; Blanig, I; Rabenschlag, R; Vogel, W

    1979-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the case material at the Intensive Care Unit, Freiburg, for the years 1975 and 1976 established that 40% and 39% respectively of patients with multiple injuries had also suffered a chest trauma and that the latter was the direct cause of respiratory insufficiency in 61% (1975) and 57% (1976) of patients in need of controlled respiration, i.e. respiratory insufficiency dominated the clinical and pathophysiological picture. The causes were: restricted respiratory movements due to pain, compression of the lungs or pathological changes in the injured lung, and they affected the normal gaseous exchange in a variety of ways. Alveolar hypoventilation with disturbance of ventilation-perfusion, increase in the functional shunt volume, rise in the functional dead space combined with reduced functional residual capacity and compliance result, if left uncorrected, in a drastic increase of resistance on the part of the pulmonary vessels and finally in, often fatal, hyoxaemia and hypercapnia. Regular estimations of the arterial blood gases in air and pure oxygen, of the arterio-alveolar difference in oxygen pressure, shunt volume, dead space and effective compliance of the chest wall and lungs are, therefore, essential. Treatment in an intensive care unit comprises the relief of any acute condition, such as tension pneumothorax, haemothorax, and general measures. Means to relieve pain in patients whose chest injuries are not sufficiently severe to require artificial ventilation are: intercostal blocking, acupuncture or peridural analgesia; efficient breathing exercises are important. The indications for artificial ventilation should be interpreted generously and the decision to perform it should be made at an early stage. The technique is determined by the type of pathological changes in the gaseous exchange and should aim at restoring normal conditions as far as possible.

  2. (Non-)utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kietzmann, Diana; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the utilization and non-utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants, and the factors that influence this behaviour. A cross-sectional representative German survey was conducted in a sample of 2.175 people, 295 of whom had a migration background. An additional sample of 50 people with Turkish migration background was conducted, partially in the Turkish language. Apart from socio-demographics, the utilization of emergency services and the reasons for non-utilization were assessed. Migrants had a higher utilization rate of pre-hospital emergency care (RR = 1.492) than non-migrants. Furthermore, migrants who were not born in Germany had a lower utilization rate (RR = 0.793) than migrants who were born in Germany. Regarding non-utilization, the most frequently stated reasons belonged to the categories initial misjudgment of the emergency situation and acting on one's own behalf, with the latter stated more frequently by migrants than by non-migrants. To prevent over-, under-, and lack of supply, it is necessary to transfer knowledge about the functioning of the medical emergency services, including first aid knowledge.

  3. Imaging of prehospital stroke therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle P; Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant quality improvement efforts to streamline in-hospital acute stroke care in the conventional model, there remain inherent layers of treatment delays, which could be eliminated with prehospital diagnostics and therapeutics administered in a mobile stroke unit. Early diagnosis using Telestroke and neuroimaging while in the ambulance may enable targeted routing to hospitals with specialized care, which will likely improve patient outcomes. Key clinical trials in Telestroke, mobile stroke units with prehospital neuroimaging capability, prehospital ultrasound and co-administration of various classes of neuroprotectives, antiplatelets and antithrombin agents with intravenous thrombolysis are discussed in this article. PMID:26308602

  4. Trauma Collaborative Care Intervention: Effect on Surgeon Confidence in Managing Psychosocial Complications After Orthopaedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Stephen T; Carroll, Eben A; Gary, Joshua L; McKinley, Todd O; OʼToole, Robert V; Sietsema, Debra L; Castillo, Renan C; Frey, Katherine P; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Huang, Yanjie; Collins, Susan C J; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-08-01

    The impact of the Trauma Collaborative Care (TCC) program on surgeon confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae of orthopaedic trauma was evaluated as part of a larger prospective, multisite, cluster clinical trial. We compared confidence and perceived resource availability among surgeons practicing in trauma centers that implemented the TCC program with orthopaedic trauma surgeons in similar trauma centers that did not implement the TCC. Prospective cohort design. Level-I trauma centers. Attending surgeons and fellows (N = 95 Pre and N = 82 Post). Self-report 10-item measure of surgeon confidence in managing psychosocial issues associated with trauma and perceived availability of support resources. Analyses, performed on the entire sample and repeated on the subset of 52 surgeons who responded to the survey at both times points, found surgeons at intervention sites experienced a significantly greater positive improvement (P < 0.05) in their (1) belief that they have strategies to help orthopaedic trauma patients change their psychosocial situation; (2) confidence in making appropriate referrals for orthopaedic trauma patients with psychosocial problems; and (3) belief that they have access to information to guide the management of psychosocial issues related to recovery. Initial data suggest that the establishment of the TCC program can improve surgeons' perceived availability of resources and their confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae after injury. Further studies will be required to determine if this translates into beneficial patient effects. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  5. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  6. A Descriptive Analysis of US Prehospital Care Response to Law Enforcement Tactical Incidents.

    PubMed

    Aberle, Sara J; Lohse, Christine M; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Law enforcement tactical incidents involve high-risk operations that exceed the capabilities of regular, uniformed police. Despite the existence of tactical teams for 50 years, little is known about the frequency or nature of emergency medical services (EMS) response to tactical events in the United States. The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive analysis of tactical events reported to a national EMS database. Descriptive analysis of the 2012 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public Release research data set, containing EMS emergency response data from 41 states. A total of 17,479,328 EMS events were reported, of which 3,953 events were coded as "Activation-Tactical or SWAT Specialty Service/Response Team." The most common level of prehospital care present on scene was basic life support (55.2%). The majority (72.3%) of tactical incident activations involved a single patient; mass casualty incidents occurred in 0.5% of events. The most common EMS response locations were homes (48.4%), streets or highways (37.0%), and public buildings (6.3%). The mean age of treated patients was 44.1 years ± 22.0 years; 3.5% of tactical incident activation patients were aged 8 years or less. Injuries were coded as firearm assault in 14.8% and as chemical exposure in 8.9% of events. Cardiac arrest occurred in 5.1% of patients, with the majority (92.2%) occurring prior to EMS arrival. The primary symptoms reported by EMS personnel were pain (37.4%), change in responsiveness (13.1%), and bleeding (8.1%). Advanced airway procedures occurred in 30 patients. No patients were documented as receiving tourniquets or needle thoracostomy. Approximately 11 EMS responses in support of law enforcement tactical operations occur daily in the United States. The majority occur in homes and involve a single patient. Advanced airway procedures are required in a minority of patients. Cardiac arrest is rare and occurs prior to EMS response in the majority of

  7. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention for patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: process improvements in rural prehospital care delivered by emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Michael E; Conley, Sheila M; Anderson, Tamara A; Brown, Jeremiah R; Yanofsky, Norman N; Niles, Nathaniel W

    2010-01-01

    Safe and effective patient care for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) relies on prompt emergency medical service (EMS) and established care coordination with receiving hospitals to conduct primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Likewise, a new emphasis has been placed on first medical contact-to-balloon (E2B) times as opposed to door-to-balloon times, identifying prehospital care as an important contributing factor for high-quality STEMI care. Therefore, we evaluated EMS processes of care before and after a period of continuous quality improvement to improve E2B times in our rural tertiary care medical center. A retrospective, consecutive cohort study was conducted on 177 patients who received primary PCI at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, a rural hospital, from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2009. This cohort was stratified from January 1, 2008 to May 1, 2008 (n = 88) and May 1, 2008 to October 31, 2009 (n = 89), to acknowledge periods of no improvement (pre) and continuous quality improvement (post) in STEMI care. Primary outcome measures included frequency of non-PCI-capable hospital bypass, E2B, and frequency of prehospital electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) activation. Descriptive statistics and log-rank tests were used to determine whether measures differed significantly by time period. A time-to-event analysis was conducted using a Cox proportional hazards model to assess the impact of outcomes measures on E2B pre/post-May 1, 2008. Patients who presented before May 1, 2008 had longer E2B times compared with patients in the post-May 1, 2008 cohort (145.1 minutes vs 115.2 minutes, t test P = .01). A log-rank test confirmed this (pre: 130 minutes vs post: 106 minutes, χ(2) = 5.3, log-rank P = .02). Similarly, patients who presented before May 1, 2008 had lower percentages of prehospital ECGs (49% vs 80%, P = .001) and CCL activations (4% vs 32%, P < .001). When prehospital ECGs (140 minutes vs 106

  8. Prehospital pain management in children with traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Anna; Skotnicka-Klonowicz, Grażyna

    2015-05-01

    Damage that arises as a result of injuries is one of the most common causes of children presenting to hospital emergency departments. The aim of the study was to assess the implementation of recommendations for prehospital pain management in injured children provided by various health care centers. A total of 7146 children aged 0 to 18 years because of injury were admitted to the Department of Paediatric Emergency Medicine in the Maria Konopnicka Memorial University Teaching Hospital No. 4 in Lodz within the period of 12 months. From this group, 1493 children received prehospital emergency care from various health care centers. Health care centers provided prehospital aid to 21% of all children with injuries. Boys (60.3%) and children older than 5 years (80%) predominated among pediatric trauma cases. Prehospital emergency aid was most frequently administered to children by emergency medical services personnel (42.7%) and a primary health care physician (28.1%). Injuries of head (42.1%), neck (1.1%), chest (1.7%), abdomen (2.5%), upper (32.2%), and lower (19.9%) limbs as well as burns (5.3%) were diagnosed in pediatric patients. Indications for prehospital analgesia were found in 489 of 1493 patients (32.7%). Analgesia was administered to 159 children (32%), pain medication was not given to 223 children (46%), and in 107 cases (22%), there was a lack of information on that subject. Despite the training of medical staff, provision of analgesia for children with burns and traumatic injuries of the osteoarticular system is inadequate.

  9. The development and features of the Spanish prehospital advanced triage method (META) for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael; Cuartas Alvarez, Tatiana; Garijo Gonzalo, Gracia; Martinez Monzon, Carlos; Pelaez Corres, Nieves; Rodriguez Soler, Alberto; Turegano Fuentes, Fernando

    2016-04-29

    This text describes the process of development of the new Spanish Prehospital Advanced Triage Method (META) and explain its main features and contribution to prehospital triage systems in mass casualty incidents. The triage META is based in the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols, patient's anatomical injuries and mechanism of injury. It is a triage method with four stages including early identification of patients with severe trauma that would benefit from a rapid evacuation to a surgical facility and introduces a new patient flow by-passing the advanced medical post to improve evacuation. The stages of triage META are: I) Stabilization triage that classifies patients according to severity to set priorities for initial emergency treatment; II) Identifying patients requiring urgent surgical treatment, this is done at the same time than stage I and creates a new flow of patients with high priority for evacuation; III) Implementation of Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols to patients previously classified according to stablished priority; and IV) Evacuation triage, stablishing evacuation priorities in case of lacks of appropriate transport resources. The triage META is to be applied only by prehospital providers with advanced knowledge and training in advanced trauma life support care and has been designed to be implemented as prehospital procedure in mass casualty incidents (MCI).

  10. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    PubMed Central

    Heimberg, Ellen; Hoffmann, Florian; Heinzel, Oliver; Kirschner, Hans-Joachim; Heinrich, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM) educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance. PMID:28286528

  11. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  12. Educating the Educator: Use of Advanced Bleeding Control Mechanisms in Athletic Training: A Shift in the Thought Process of Prehospital Care. Part 2: Hemostatic Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Part 1 of this series [see: EJ1044392], the concepts of hemorrhaging, shock, and controlling bleeding as they relate to athletic training and prehospital emergency care along with the use of tourniquets were presented for athletic training educators (ATEs) to teach the skill in the classroom. This article, Part 2 of advanced bleeding control,…

  13. Sexual Trauma: Women Veterans Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States reported experiencing an attempted or completed rape at some time in their lives. Sexual violence, ... the CDC .* Military Sexual Trauma VA refers to sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment during military service ...

  14. Prehospital curriculum development: a learning objective approach.

    PubMed

    Schafermeyer, R W

    1993-02-01

    Prehospital curriculum development is a time-consuming, yet essential, component of emergency medical technician and paramedic education. Over the past several years, much has changed within the EMS system and with the approach to educating the prehospital care provider. Learning is defined as a permanent change in behavior that comes about as a result of a planned experience. This planned experience must include learning objectives that incorporate assessment of presenting signs and symptoms and demonstrate the prehospital care providers' psychomotor skills in providing prehospital care based on that assessment.

  15. Triage in the Tower of Babel: interpreter services for children in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Tate, Ramsey C; Kelley, Maureen C

    2013-12-01

    Minority pediatric populations have higher rates of emergency medical services use than the general pediatric population, and prior studies have documented that limited-English proficiency patients are more likely to undergo invasive procedures, require more resources, and be admitted once they arrive in the emergency department. Furthermore, limited-English proficiency patients may be particularly vulnerable because of immigration or political concerns. In this case report, we describe an infant with breath-holding spells for whom a language barrier in the prehospital setting resulted in an escalation of care to the highest level of trauma team activation. This infant underwent unnecessary, costly, and harmful interventions because of a lack of interpreter services. In a discussion of the legal, ethical, and medical implications of this case, we conclude that further investigation into prehospital strategies for overcoming language barriers is required to provide optimal prehospital care for pediatric patients.

  16. [Prehospital teamwork life support service for traffic accident victims].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Waleska Antunes da Porciúncula; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize prehospital teamwork service for traffic accident victims, identifying the actors' activities, the teamwork and the relations with actors from other areas. This is a qualitative study, in which data collection took place by observing the events that occurred at a public service in the city of Porto Alegre, in addition to interviews with each professional involved in the service. The results showed that prehospital care is founded on teamwork and that the understanding among professionals should go beyond the historical hierarchic relation existing in health organizations. There is a need to value the broad field of knowledge, which is associated with the core of care activities that meet most trauma victim needs.

  17. The use of cognitive interviews to revise the Quality of Trauma Care Patient-Reported Experience Measure (QTAC-PREM).

    PubMed

    Bobrovitz, Niklas; Santana, Maria J; Kline, Theresa; Kortbeek, John; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-08-01

    The "Quality of Trauma Care Patient-Reported Experience Measure" is the first measure of patient experiences with overall injury care. The objective of this study was to use cognitive interviews to inform revision of the measure into a parsimonious set of items that function as intended, in preparation for multicenter testing. Concurrent and retrospective cognitive interviews with injured patients (n = 17) and family members (n = 13) using semi-structured interview guides. Responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Six broad themes were identified and guided revisions: (1) participants did not have the information to answer items (n = 9); (2) items were ambiguous or were inconsistently interpreted (n = 13); (3) items did not measure the intended constructs (n = 6); (4) items included assumptions about healthcare processes (n = 4); (5) items measured non-priority aspects of injury care (n = 8); and (6) items were redundant (n = 5). Two issues resulted in key conceptual and content changes: participants' difficulty to evaluate pre-hospital, emergency department, and intensive care unit services due to recall issues and the challenge to evaluate the effectiveness and equity of care. In total, 39 items were deleted, 28 new items developed, and the final instrument included 63 items. Our results informed changes to item content, format, and response options. This study highlights key issues to consider when incorporating patient/family perspectives into quality measurement, most notably, that few participants can assess the quality of care in the pre-hospital and emergency department phases of care and that novel methods are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and equity of care.

  18. The role of the emergency medical dispatch centre (EMDC) and prehospital emergency care safety: results from an incident report (IR) system.

    PubMed

    Mortaro, Alberto; Pascu, Diana; Zerman, Tamara; Vallaperta, Enrico; Schönsberg, Alberto; Tardivo, Stefano; Pancheri, Serena; Romano, Gabriele; Moretti, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    The role of the emergency medical dispatch centre (EMDC) is essential to ensure coordinated and safe prehospital care. The aim of this study was to implement an incident report (IR) system in prehospital emergency care management with a view to detecting errors occurring in this setting and guiding the implementation of safety improvement initiatives. An ad hoc IR form for the prehospital setting was developed and implemented within the EMDC of Verona. The form included six phases (from the emergency call to hospital admission) with the relevant list of potential error modes (30 items). This descriptive observational study considered the results from 268 consecutive days between February and November 2010. During the study period, 161 error modes were detected. The majority of these errors occurred in the resource allocation and timing phase (34.2%) and in the dispatch phase (31.0%). Most of the errors were due to human factors (77.6%), and almost half of them were classified as either moderate (27.9%) or severe (19.9%). These results guided the implementation of specific corrective actions, such as the adoption of a more efficient Medical Priority Dispatch System and the development of educational initiatives targeted at both EMDC staff and the population. Despite the intrinsic limits of IR methodology, results suggest how the implementation of an IR system dedicated to the emergency prehospital setting can act as a major driver for the development of a "learning organization" and improve both efficacy and safety of first aid care.

  19. Prehospital Naloxone Administration as a Public Health Surveillance Tool: A Retrospective Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Heather A; Clemency, Brian M; Snyder, Ryan; Consiglio, Joseph D; May, Paul R; Moscati, Ronald M

    2015-08-01

    Abuse or unintended overdose (OD) of opiates and heroin may result in prehospital and emergency department (ED) care. Prehospital naloxone use has been suggested as a surrogate marker of community opiate ODs. The study objective was to verify externally whether prehospital naloxone use is a surrogate marker of community opiate ODs by comparing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) naloxone administration records to an independent database of ED visits for opiate and heroin ODs in the same community. A retrospective chart review of prehospital and ED data from July 2009 through June 2013 was conducted. Prehospital naloxone administration data obtained from the electronic medical records (EMRs) of a large private EMS provider serving a metropolitan area were considered a surrogate marker for suspected opiate OD. Comparison data were obtained from the regional trauma/psychiatric ED that receives the majority of the OD patients. The ED maintains a de-identified database of narcotic-related visits for surveillance of narcotic use in the metropolitan area. The ED database was queried for ODs associated with opiates or heroin. Cross-correlation analysis was used to test if prehospital naloxone administration was independent of ED visits for opiate/heroin ODs. Naloxone was administered during 1,812 prehospital patient encounters, and 1,294 ED visits for opiate/heroin ODs were identified. The distribution of patients in the prehospital and ED datasets did not differ by gender, but it did differ by race and age. The frequency of naloxone administration by prehospital providers varied directly with the frequency of ED visits for opiate/heroin ODs. A monthly increase of two ED visits for opiate-related ODs was associated with an increase in one prehospital naloxone administration (cross-correlation coefficient [CCF]=0.44; P=.0021). A monthly increase of 100 ED visits for heroin-related ODs was associated with an increase in 94 prehospital naloxone administrations (CCF=0.46; P=.0012

  20. Controversies in Spinal Trauma and Evolution of Care.

    PubMed

    Harrop, James S; Rymarczuk, George N; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Steinmetz, Michael P; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-03-01

    Management of spinal trauma is a complex and rapidly evolving field. To optimize patient treatment algorithms, an understanding of and appreciation for current controversies and advancing technologies in the field of spinal trauma is necessary. Therefore, members of the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Trauma initiative used a modified Delphi method to compile a list of controversial issues and emerging technologies in the field of spinal trauma, and a list of the 14 most relevant topics was generated. A total of 45 440 manuscripts covering the breadth of spine and spinal trauma were initially identified. This broad search was then refined using the 14 categories felt to be most relevant to the current field of spinal trauma. The results were further pared down using inclusion criteria to select for the most relevant topics. The 8 remaining topics were classification schemes, treatment of vertebral compression fractures, treatment of burst fractures, timing of surgery in spinal trauma, hypothermia, the importance of global sagittal balance, lumbar subarachnoid drainage, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. These 8 topics were felt to be the most relevant, controversial, rapidly evolving, and most deserving of inclusion in this summary. In summary, despite recent advances, the field of spinal trauma has many ongoing points of controversy. We must continue to refine our ability to care for this patient population through education, research, and development. It is anticipated that the new AOSpine fracture classification system will assist with prospective research efforts.

  1. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    PubMed

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error.

  2. Optimizing trauma system design: the GEOS (Geospatial Evaluation of Systems of Trauma Care) approach.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan O; Morrison, Jonathan J; Wang, Handing; Lawrenson, Robin; Egan, Gerry; He, Shan; Campbell, Marion K

    2014-04-01

    Trauma systems have been shown to reduce death and disability from injury but must be appropriately configured. A systematic approach to trauma system design can help maximize geospatial effectiveness and reassure stakeholders that the best configuration has been chosen. This article describes the GEOS [Geospatial Evaluation of Systems of Trauma Care] methodology, a mathematical modeling of a population-based data set, which aims to derive geospatially optimized trauma system configurations for a geographically defined setting. GEOS considers a region's spatial injury profile and the available resources and uses a combination of travel time analysis and multiobjective optimization. The methodology is described in general and with regard to its application to our case study of Scotland. The primary outcome will be trauma system configuration. GEOS will contribute to the design of a trauma system for Scotland. The methodology is flexible and inherently transferable to other settings and could also be used to provide assurance that the configuration of existing trauma systems is fit for purpose.

  3. A Decade Evaluation of a State Trauma System: Has Access to Inpatient Trauma Care at Designated Trauma Centers Improved?

    PubMed

    Ashley, Dennis W; Pracht, Etienne E; Medeiros, Regina S; Atkins, Elizabeth V; Nesmith, Elizabeth G; Johns, Tracy J; Dunne, James R; Nicholas, Jeffrey M

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the trauma center component of the Georgia trauma system was evaluated demonstrating a 10 per cent probability of increased survival for severely injured patients treated at designated trauma centers (DTCs) versus nontrauma centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a state trauma system to provide access to inpatient trauma care at DTCs for its residents. We reviewed 371,786 patients from the state's discharge database and identified 255,657 treated at either a DTC or a nontrauma center between 2003 and 2012. Injury severity was assigned using the International Classification Injury Severity Score method. Injury was categorized as mild, moderate, or severe. Patients were also categorized by age and injury type. Access improved over time in all severity levels, age groups, and injury types. Although elderly had the largest improvement in access, still only 70 per cent were treated at a DTC. During the study period, increases were noted for all age groups, injury severity levels, and types of injury. A closer examination of the injured elderly population is needed to determine the cause of lower utilization by this age group. Overall, the state's trauma system continues to mature by providing patients with increased access to treatment at DTCs.

  4. [A sociological evaluation of medical care measures in craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Babenko, A I; Orekhova, G G

    2003-01-01

    According to a questionnaire of 830 patients and 153 neurologists, both a timely asking for medical care and a timely treatment at specialized neurology hospitals are the key factor that cuts the rate of complications in craniocerebral trauma. Finally, a differential approach to treatment schemes with due respect to a trauma severity, availability of rehabilitation centers and application of new medical technologies, e.g. cranio-sacral therapy, are equally important.

  5. Surgeon commitment to trauma care decreases missed injuries.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Chia-Ju; Chan, Hon-Man; Lee, Wei-Che; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Cheng, Yuan-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries sustain an important issue concerning patient safety and quality of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of surgeon commitment to trauma care on missed injuries. We hypothesised that surgeons committed to the trauma service has less missed injuries than surgeons not committed to the trauma service would have. By retrospective analysis of 976 adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at an urban, university-based trauma centre. Missed injuries were compared between two groups; in group 1 the patients were evaluated and treated by the surgeons who were committed to the trauma service and in group 2 the patients were evaluated and treated by surgeons practicing mainly in other specialties. Patients had significantly lower rates of missed major or life-threatening injuries when treated by group 1 surgeons. Logistic regression model revealed significant factors associated with missed major or life-threatening injuries including ISS and groups in which patients were treated by different group surgeons. Physicians will perform better when they are trained and interested in a specific area than those not trained, or even not having any particular interest in that specific area. Surgeons committed to the trauma service had less missed injuries in severely injured patients, and it is vital to improve patient safety and quality of care for trauma patients. Staff training and education for assessing severely injured patients and creating an open culture with detection and reduction of the potential for error are important and effective strategies in decreasing missed injuries and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre-hospital care time intervals among victims of road traffic injuries in Iran. A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Mohammadi, Reza

    2010-07-09

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a major public health problem, requiring concerted efforts both for their prevention and a reduction of their consequences. Timely arrival of the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) at the crash scene followed by speedy victim transportation by trained personnel may reduce the RTIs' consequences. The first 60 minutes after injury occurrence--referred to as the "golden hour"--are vital for the saving of lives. The present study was designed to estimate the average of various time intervals occurring during the pre-hospital care process and to examine the differences between these time intervals as regards RTIs on urban and interurban roads. A retrospective cross-sectional study was designed and various time intervals in relation to pre-hospital care of RTIs identified in the ambulance dispatch centre in Urmia, Iran from 20 March 2005 to 20 March 2007. All cases which resulted in ambulance dispatches were reviewed and those that had complete data on time intervals were analyzed. In total, the cases of 2027 RTI victims were analysed. Of these, 61.5% of the subjects were injured in city areas. The mean response time for city locations was 5.0 minutes, compared with 10.6 minutes for interurban road locations. The mean on-scene time on the interurban roads was longer than on city roads (9.2 vs. 6.1 minutes, p < 0.001). Mean transport times from the scene to the hospital were also significantly longer for interurban incidents (17.1 vs. 6.3 minutes, p < 0.001). The mean of total pre-hospital time was 37.2 (+/-17.2) minutes with a median of 32.0. Overall, 72.5% of the response interval time was less than eight minutes. The response, transport and total time intervals among EMS responding to RTI incidents were longer for interurban roads, compared to the city areas. More research should take place on needs-to and access-for EMS on city and interurban roads. The notification interval seems to be a hidden part of the post-crash events and

  7. Development of an Emergency Medical Video Multiplexing Transport System (EMTS): aiming at the nation-wide prehospital care in ambulance.

    PubMed

    Nagatuma, Hideaki

    2003-06-01

    The Emergency Medical Video Multiplexing Transport System (EMTS) is designed to support prehospital care by delivering high quality patient's live video streams in an ambulance to emergency doctors in a remote hospital on the basis of satellite communications. The feature is that EMTS divides a patient's live video scene into four pieces and transports the four video streams on four separate network channels. By multiplexing the four video streams, EMTS is able to transport high quality videos through low data transmission rate networks such as satellite communications and cellular phone networks. In order to transport live video streams constantly, EMTS adopts Real-Time Transport Protocol/Real-Time Control Protocol as a network protocol, and video stream data are compressed by Moving Picture Experts Group 4 format. As EMTS combines four video streams with checking video frame numbers, it uses a refresh packet that initializes server's frame numbers to synchronize the four video streams.

  8. Development of an emergency medical video multiplexing transport system. Aiming at the nation wide prehospital care on ambulance.

    PubMed

    Nagatuma, Hideaki

    2003-04-01

    The Emergency Medical Video Multiplexing Transport System (EMTS) is designed to support prehospital cares by delivering high quality live video streams of patients in an ambulance to emergency doctors in a remote hospital via satellite communications. The important feature is that EMTS divides a patient's live video scene into four pieces and transports the four video streams on four separate network channels. By multiplexing four video streams, EMTS is able to transport high quality videos through low data transmission rate networks such as satellite communications and cellular phone networks. In order to transport live video streams constantly, EMTS adopts Real-time Transport Protocol/Real-time Control Protocol as a network protocol and video stream data are compressed by Moving Picture Experts Group 4 format. As EMTS combines four video streams with checking video frame numbers, it uses a refresh packet that initializes server's frame numbers to synchronize the four video streams.

  9. LSCI in Trauma-Informed Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecser, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that many children who present behavioral challenges have experienced relational trauma. These youngsters are not well served by traditional interventions in schools, treatment settings, and communities. Adults responsible for these young people often get drawn into conflict cycles and coercive interventions that only…

  10. LSCI in Trauma-Informed Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fecser, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that many children who present behavioral challenges have experienced relational trauma. These youngsters are not well served by traditional interventions in schools, treatment settings, and communities. Adults responsible for these young people often get drawn into conflict cycles and coercive interventions that only…

  11. Blood and coagulation support in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Hess, John R

    2007-01-01

    Injuries are common and account for almost 15% of all blood use in the U.S. The historic view that the coagulopathy associated with severe injury was largely dilutional is being replaced by epidemiologic and molecular evidence for a distinct syndrome of trauma-associated coagulopathy. This coagulopathy of trauma is the sum of the effects of blood loss and dilution, coagulation factor and platelet consumption, hypothermic platelet dysfunction and acidosis-induced decreases in coagulation factor activity, and fibrinolysis. Preventing the coagulopathy of trauma is best accomplished by preventing injury and hypothermia. Treating the coagulopathy of trauma requires its early recognition, prompt control of hemorrhage with local and systemic treatments, including in some patients the use of plasma instead of crystalloid solutions, and the prompt treatment of acidosis and hypothermia. The planned early use of allogenic plasma to treat many tens of thousands of massively transfused patients each year creates new demands for the immediate availability and improved safety of plasma products.

  12. The effect of a national quality improvement collaborative on prehospital care for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in England.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan; Shaw, Deborah; Essam, Nadya; Togher, Fiona Jayne; Davy, Zowie; Spaight, Anne; Dewey, Michael

    2014-01-23

    Previous studies have shown wide variations in prehospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) for improving ambulance care for AMI and stroke. We used an interrupted time series design to investigate the effect of a national QIC on change in delivery of care bundles for AMI (aspirin, glyceryl trinitrate [GTN], pain assessment and analgesia) and stroke (face-arm-speech test, blood pressure and blood glucose recording) in all English ambulance services between January 2010 and February 2012. Key strategies for change included local quality improvement (QI) teams in each ambulance service supported by a national coordinating expert group that conducted workshops educating staff in QI methods to improve AMI and stroke care. Expertise and ideas were shared between QI teams who met together at three national workshops, between QI leads through monthly teleconferences, and between the expert group and participants. Feedback was provided to services using annotated control charts. We analyzed change over time using logistic regression with three predictor variables: time, gender, and age. There were statistically significant improvements in care bundles in nine (of 12) participating trusts for AMI (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04, 1.04), nine for stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05, 1.07), 11 for either AMI or stroke, and seven for both conditions. Overall care bundle performance for AMI increased in England from 43 to 79% and for stroke from 83 to 96%. Successful services all introduced provider prompts and individualized or team feedback. Other determinants of success included engagement with front-line clinicians, feedback using annotated control charts, expert support, and shared learning between participants and organizations. This first national prehospital QIC led to significant improvements in ambulance care for AMI and stroke in England. The use of care

  13. Evaluation of Wireless Vital Signs Monitor in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients). An additional 23 prehospital patients were excluded because of missing or incomplete data...tool (J Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9.), and is among the important findings from this project...Trauma Acute Care Surgery 2014 Mar;76(3):743-9 2) Van Haren RM, Ryan ML, Thorson CM, Namias N, Livingstone AS, Proctor KG: Bilateral near infrared

  14. Current state and future perspectives of trauma care system in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Zong, Zhao-wen; Li, Nan; Cheng, Tian-min; Ran, Xin-ze; Shen, Yue; Zhao, Yu-feng; Guo, Qing-shan; Zhang, Lian-yang

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the current state of trauma care in mainland China, and to propose possible future suggestions for the development of the trauma care system in mainland China. An extensive Medline/PubMed search on the topic of trauma care or trauma care system was conducted. Publications in Chinese that could best describe the state of trauma care in China were also included. In addition, two meetings were held by Group for Trauma Emergency Care and Multiple Injuries, Trauma Society of Chinese Medical Association to discuss the development and perspectives of trauma care system in mainland China. Important conclusions from the two meetings were included in this publication. Trauma has become an increasing public health problem in mainland China in association with the rapid growth of the economy over the past 30 years. Although great progress has been made in regards to the care of the injured, there is still no government agency dedicated to deal with trauma-related issues, or a national trauma care system operating on the Chinese mainland. Various trauma prevention measures have been taken, but with little effect. Funds contributed to trauma-related research has increased in recent years and promoted rapid development in this field, but further improvement in research is needed. However, many groups such as the Trauma Society of the Chinese Medical Association have continued to explore mechanisms for the treatment of trauma patients and have developed various types of regional trauma care systems, resulting in improved trauma care and a better outcome for the injured. Although great progress has been made in trauma care in mainland China, there are many failings. To improve trauma care in China, the establishment of a sophisticated trauma system and various enhancements on trauma prevention are urgently required. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. History and development of trauma care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Trunkey, D D

    2000-05-01

    Until recently the development of systems for trauma care in the United States has been inextricably linked to wars. During the Revolutionary War trauma care was based on European trauma principles particularly those espoused by the Hunter brothers. Surgical procedures were limited mostly to soft tissue injuries and amputations. The American Civil War was remarkable because of the contributions that were made to the development of systems for trauma care. The shear magnitude of casualties required extensive infrastructure to support the surgeons at the battlefield and to care for the wounded. For the first time in an armed conflict, anaesthetics were used on a routine basis. Despite these major contributions, hospital gangrene was a terrible problem and was the cause of many mortalities. World War I and World War II were noteworthy because of the contributions made by surgeons in the use of blood. One of the major lessons of World War II was the reemphasis of how frequently lessons have to be relearned regarding the treatment and care of wounds. Between the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam War the discovery was made of the tremendous fluid shifts into the cell after severe hemorrhagic shock. As a consequence, the treatment of patients with shock was altered during the Vietnam Conflict, which resulted in better outcomes and less renal failure. The first trauma centers for civilians were started in the United States in 1966. Since 1988 the number of states with mature trauma systems has expanded from two to 35. During the same period, many studies have documented the efficacy of trauma systems in reducing unnecessary mortality and disability.

  16. Teamwork training improves the clinical care of trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Capella, Jeannette; Smith, Stephen; Philp, Allan; Putnam, Tyler; Gilbert, Carol; Fry, William; Harvey, Ellen; Wright, Andi; Henderson, Krista; Baker, David; Ranson, Sonya; Remine, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We investigated these questions: Does formal team training improve team behaviors in the trauma resuscitation bay? If yes, then does improved teamwork lead to more efficiency in the trauma bay and/or improved clinical outcomes? This intervention study used a pretraining/posttraining design. The intervention was TeamSTEPPS augmented by simulation. The evaluation instrument, which was the Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT), was used by trained evaluators to assess teams' performance during trauma resuscitations. From November 2008 to February 2009, a convenience sample (n = 33) of trauma resuscitations was evaluated. From February to April 2009, team training was conducted. From May to July 2009, another sample (n = 40) of resuscitations were evaluated. Clinical data were gathered from our trauma registry. The clinical parameters included time from arrival to computed tomography (CT) scanner, arrival to intubation, arrival to operating room, arrival to Focused Assessment Sonography in Trauma (FAST) examination, time in emergency department (ED), hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit LOS, complications, and mortality. Comparing pretraining and posttraining resuscitations, we calculated means, standard deviations, and p values for teamwork ratings and clinical parameters, and we determined significance using the independent samples t-test. Level I Trauma Center. The trauma team included surgery residents, faculty, and nurses. Our trauma team showed significant improvement in all teamwork domain ratings and overall ratings from pretraining to posttraining-leadership (2.87-3.46, p = 0.003), situation monitoring (3.30-3.91, p = 0.009), mutual support (3.40-3.96, p = 0.004), communication (2.90-3.46, p = 0.001), and overall (3.12-3.70, p < 0.001). The times from arrival to the CT scanner (26.4-22.1 minutes, p = 0.005), endotracheal intubation (10.1-6.6 minutes, p = 0.49) and the operating room (130.1-94.5 minutes, p = 0.021) were decreased

  17. Moving from "optimal resources" to "optimal care" at trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Shahid; Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Gentilello, Larry M; Ballard, David

    2012-04-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Program has shown that risk-adjusted mortality rates at some centers are nearly 50% higher than at others. This "quality gap" may be due to different clinical practices or processes of care. We have previously shown that adoption of processes called core measures by the Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not improve outcomes of trauma patients. We hypothesized that improved compliance with trauma-specific clinical processes of care (POC) is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. Records of a random sample of 1,000 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center who met Trauma Quality Improvement Program criteria (age ≥ 16 years and Abbreviated Injury Scale score 3) were retrospectively reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific POC (T-POC) that were evidence-based or expert consensus panel recommendations. Multivariate regression was used to determine the relationship between T-POC compliance and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, gender, injury type, and severity. Median age was 41 years, 65% were men, 88% sustained a blunt injury, and mortality was 12%. Of these, 77% were eligible for at least one T-POC and 58% were eligible for two or more. There was wide variation in T-POC compliance. Every 10% increase in compliance was associated with a 14% reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality. Unlike adoption of core measures, compliance with T-POC is associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients. Trauma centers with excess in-hospital mortality may improve patient outcomes by consistently applying T-POC. These processes should be explored for potential use as Core Trauma Center Performance Measures.

  18. Understanding the burden and outcome of trauma care drives a new trauma systems model.

    PubMed

    Laing, G L; Skinner, D L; Bruce, J L; Aldous, C; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2014-07-01

    The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) attempts to provide care for a whole city and hence is referred to as a service rather than a center. As part of a multifaceted quality improvement program, the PMTS has developed and implemented a robust electronic surgical registry (ESR). This review of the first year's data from the ESR forms part of a situational analysis to assess the burden of trauma managed by the service and the quality of care delivered within the constraints of the available resources. Formal ethical approval was obtained prior to design and development of this study, and appropriate commercial software was sourced. The exercise of data capture was integrated into the process of service delivery and was accomplished at the endpoint of patient care. 12 months after implementation of the registry, the data were extracted and audited. A total of 2,733 patients were admitted over the 12 month study period. The average patient age was 28.3 years. There were 2,255 (82.5 %) male patients and 478 (17.5 %) female patients. The average monthly admission rate was 228 patients, with a peak of 354 admissions over the December period. The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 12 [interquartile range (IQR) 6.7-23.2]. A quarter (24.8 %) of all new emergency admissions had an ISS > 15. The average duration of stay for patients was 5.12 days (IQR 2.3-13.2 days). Some 2,432 (92.1 %) patients survived, and 208 (7.9 %) died. A total of 333 (13 %) patients required admission to either the intensive care unit (ICU) or the high dependency unit. From the city mortuary data a further 362 deaths were identified. These included 290 deaths that occurred on scene and 72 that occurred within Pietermaritzburg hospitals other than Greys and Edendale. The total trauma-related mortality for the entire city in 2012 was 570 (51 % on-scene deaths and 49 % in-hospital deaths). Blunt trauma accounted for 62 % of deaths. The PMTS treats a significant volume and spectrum of

  19. Characteristics and prognoses of patients treated by an anaesthesiologist-manned prehospital emergency care unit. A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lossius, Hans Morten; Toft, Palle; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2017-01-01

    Objective When planning and dimensioning an emergency medical system, knowledge of the population serviced is vital. The amount of literature concerning the prehospital population is sparse. In order to add to the current body of literature regarding prehospital treatment, thus aiding future public health planning, we describe the workload of a prehospital anaesthesiologist-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU) and the total population it services in terms of factors associated with mortality. Participants The study is a register-based study investigating all missions carried out by a MECU operating in a mixed urban/rural area in Denmark from 1 May 2006 to 31 December 2014. Information on missions was extracted from the local MECU registry and linked at the individual level to the Danish population-based databases, the National Patient Registry and the Civil Registration System. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measures were number of missions and number of patient contacts. Secondary patient variables were mortality and association between mortality and age, sex, comorbidity, prior admission to hospital and response time. Results The MECU completed 41 513 missions (mean 13.1 missions/day) having 32 873 patient contacts, corresponding to 19.2 missions and 15.2 patient encounters per 1000 patient years. Patient variables: the median age was 57 years (range 0–108 years), 42.8% (42.3% to 43.4%) were women. For patients admitted to hospital alive, 30-day mortality was 5.7% (5.4% to 6.0%); 90-day mortality was 8.1% (7.8% to 8.5%) while 2-year mortality was 16.4% (16.0% to 16.8%). Increasing age, male sex, comorbidity and prior admission to hospital but not response time were associated with mortality. Conclusions Mortality following an incident requiring the assistance of a MECU was high in the first 2 years following the incident. MECU response time assessed as a continuous parameter was not associated with patient outcome. PMID

  20. Protection against cold in prehospital care-thermal insulation properties of blankets and rescue bags in different wind conditions.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Otto; Lundgren, J Peter; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar; Bjornstig, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    In a cold, wet, or windy environment, cold exposure can be considerable for an injured or ill person. The subsequent autonomous stress response initially will increase circulatory and respiratory demands, and as body core temperature declines, the patient's condition might deteriorate. Therefore, the application of adequate insulation to reduce cold exposure and prevent body core cooling is an important part of prehospital primary care, but recommendations for what should be used in the field mostly depend on tradition and experience, not on scientific evidence. The objective of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulation properties in different wind conditions of 12 different blankets and rescue bags commonly used by prehospital rescue and ambulance services. The thermal manikin and the selected insulation ensembles were setup inside a climatic chamber in accordance to the modified European Standard for assessing requirements of sleeping bags. Fans were adjusted to provide low (< 0.5 m/s), moderate (2-3 m/s) and high (8-9 m/s) wind conditions. During steady state thermal transfer, the total resultant insulation value, Itr (m2 C/Wclo; where C = degrees Celcius, and W = watts), was calculated from ambient air temperature (C), manikin surface temperature (C), and heat flux (W/m2). In the low wind condition, thermal insulation of the evaluated ensembles correlated to thickness of the ensembles, ranging from 2.0 to 6.0 clo (1 clo = 0.155 m2 C/W), except for the reflective metallic foil blankets that had higher values than expected. In moderate and high wind conditions, thermal insulation was best preserved for ensembles that were windproof and resistant to the compressive effect of the wind, with insulation reductions down to about 60-80% of the original insulation capacity, whereas wind permeable and/or lighter materials were reduced down to about 30-50% of original insulation capacity. The evaluated insulation ensembles might all be used for prehospital

  1. Multicenter Evaluation of Prehospital Opioid Pain Management in Injured Children.

    PubMed

    Browne, Lorin R; Shah, Manish I; Studnek, Jonathan R; Ostermayer, Daniel G; Reynolds, Stacy; Guse, Clare E; Brousseau, David C; Lerner, E Brooke

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Emergency Medical Services Physicians' (NAEMSP) Position Statement on Prehospital Pain Management and the joint National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) Evidence-based Guideline for Prehospital Analgesia in Trauma aim to improve the recognition, assessment, and treatment of prehospital pain. The impact of implementation of these guidelines on pain management in children by emergency medical services (EMS) agencies has not been assessed. Determine the change in frequency of documented pain severity assessment and opiate administration among injured pediatric patients in three EMS agencies after adoption of best practice recommendations. This is a retrospective study of children <18 years of age with a prehospital injury-related primary impression from three EMS agencies. Each agency independently implemented pain protocol changes which included adding the use of age-appropriate pain scales, decreasing the minimum age for opiate administration, and updating fentanyl dosing. We abstracted data from prehospital electronic patient records before and after changes to the pain management protocols. The primary outcomes were the frequency of administration of opioid analgesia and documentation of pain severity assessment as recorded in the prehospital patient care record. A total of 3,597 injured children were transported prior to pain protocol changes and 3,743 children after changes. Opiate administration to eligible patients across study sites regardless of documentation of pain severity was 156/3,089 (5%) before protocol changes and 175/3,509 (5%) after (p = 0.97). Prior to protocol changes, 580 (18%) children had documented pain assessments and 430 (74%) had moderate-to-severe pain. After protocol changes, 644 (18%) patients had pain severity documented with 464 (72%) in moderate-to-severe pain. For all study agencies, pain severity was documented in 13%, 19%, and 22% of

  2. Does increased prehospital replacement volume lead to a poor clinical course and an increased mortality? A matched-pair analysis of 1896 patients of the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery who were managed by an emergency doctor at the accident site.

    PubMed

    Hussmann, Bjoern; Lefering, Rolf; Waydhas, Christian; Touma, Alexander; Kauther, Max D; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Lendemans, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Severe bleeding after trauma frequently leads to a poor outcome. Prehospital fluid replacement therapy is regarded as an important primary treatment option. Our study aimed to assess the influence of prehospital fluid replacement therapy on the post-traumatic course of severely injured patients in a retrospective analysis of matched pairs. The data of 51,425 patients of the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery were analysed. The following patients were included: Injury Severity Score ≥ 16 points, primary admission, age ≥ 16 years, no isolated brain injury, transfusion of at least one unit of packed red blood cells (pRBC), systolic blood pressure ≥ 60 mmHg at the accident site. The patients were divided into two groups according to the following matched-pair criteria (low-volume: 0-1500 ml prehospital volume replaced; high-volume: ≥ 1501 ml prehospital volume): intubation at the accident site (yes/no), time from injury to hospital ± 10 min., means of rescue (emergency helicopter, MICU), Abbreviated Injury Scale (body regions), injury year, systolic blood pressure and age (years). All patients were managed by an emergency doctor at the accident site. A total of 948 patients in each group met the inclusion criteria. Increasing replacement volume was associated with an increased need for transfusion (pRBCs: low-volume: 7 units, high-volume: 8.3 units; p<0.001) and a reduced ability to coagulate (prothrombin ratio (PR): low-volume: 68%, high-volume: 61.5%; p<0.001). Patients in shock (systolic BP<90 mmHg) upon admission to the hospital were equally in both groups (25.6%; p=0.98). Significantly higher lethality was observed in cases of increasing volume (low-volume: 22.7%, high-volume: 27.6%; p<0.01). Excessive prehospital fluid replacement leads to an increased mortality rate. The results of this study support the concept of restrained volume replacement in the prehospital treatment of patients with severe trauma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  3. A Thailand case study based on quantitative assessment: does a national lead agency make a difference in pre-hospital care development in middle income countries?

    PubMed

    Suriyawongpaisal, Paibul; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Tansirisithikul, Rassamee

    2014-12-12

    Emergency Medical Institute of Thailand (EMIT) has been established as a national lead agency to improve emergency medical service systems since December 2008. However up to now, there has not been any published systematic assessment of its performance to guide further policy decisions. This study assesses the 4-year pre-hospital care coverage and performance in Thailand after EMIT establishment. The assessment makes use of 1,171,564 records from a national data set for pre-hospital care i.e., Information Technology for Emergency Medical Service System (ITEMS) in 2012. Comparing with historical data, we found evidence indicating the national lead agency making differences in two basic requirements of pre-hospital care i.e., the coverage was increased by at least 1.4 times higher than the majority reported figures among 11 out of the total 13 regions of the country at baseline; and mean total response time for critical-coded patients, the longest in our study, is 1.6 times shorter than previously reported figure in 2008 (48.46 minutes). Analysis of the national data set also revealed quite substantial missing values indicating a need for further improvement. When historical data was not available, we compared our findings with international figures. Over triage rate of 28.4% for advanced life support (ALS) ambulance was found which is roughly a third of that reported in Taiwan. Almost all patients were stabilized and/or treated regardless of being transferred to hospitals in contrast to the scenarios in the U.S. systems which may probably be due to different payment mechanism. Relying on circumstantial evidences, we identified probable stagnation in pre-hospital care coverage for patients visiting emergency department after the establishment of the lead agency. This national data assessment shows progression in certain basic pre-hospital care requirements in Thailand. However, it needs regular systematic evaluation and there is still room for improvement of pre-hospital

  4. Impact of helicopters on trauma care and clinical results.

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, J A

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the development of civilian helicopter ambulance program as a component of a total emergency medical services (EMS) system. Current literature demonstrates significant reduction in trauma mortality for those patients transported by air either from the scene of the accident or from an outlying hospital to a trauma center. The primary factor is not the speed of the transport but administration of life-saving care by the helicopter medical crew at the scene of the accident or at the outlying hospital. Regulations have been developed to assure proper patient selection, quality care, safety, and minimization of misuse of this expensive resource. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3058056

  5. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence-based Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Eric C.; Sporer, Karl A.; Lemieux, Justin M.; Brown, John F.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.; Gilbert, Greg H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. Methods We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33) of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33) for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33) have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33) of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33) have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33) allow benzodiazepines to be administered

  6. Cost Benefit Analysis of Providing Level II Trauma Care at William Beaumont Army Medical Center (WBAMC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Bronx Municipal Hospital, a 776 bed, Level I trauma center, lost $441,700 in only one month caring for 209 trauma victims ( Legorreta , 1993). Thomason...176165.shtml Legorreta , A., Mikos, J., Sullivan, A., & Delany, H. (1993). The high cost of hospital Trauma Cost Analysis 68 trauma care: An analysis

  7. Femoral Traction Splints in Mountain Rescue Prehospital Care: To Use or Not to Use? That Is the Question.

    PubMed

    Runcie, Harriet; Greene, Mike

    2015-09-01

    To determine the incidence of femur fractures in mountain rescue in England and Wales. To investigate the attitudes of rescuers toward the use of femoral traction splints. To review the literature for evidence on the use of traction splints in prehospital medicine and test the hypothesis that femoral traction splints reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with a fractured femur. The Mountain Rescue England and Wales database was searched for cases of suspected fractured femur occurring between 2002 and 2012, a questionnaire was sent to all mountain rescue teams in England and Wales, and a literature review was performed. Relevant articles were critically reviewed to identify the evidence base for the use of femoral traction splints. Femur fractures are uncommon in mountain rescue, with an incidence of suspected femur fractures on scene at 9.3 a year. Traction splints are used infrequently; 13% of the suspected femur fractures were treated with traction. However, rescuers have a positive attitude toward traction splints and perceive few disadvantages to their use. No trials demonstrate that traction splints reduce morbidity or mortality, but a number describe complications resulting from their use. Femur fractures are rare within mountain rescue. Traction splints may be no more effective than other methods of splinting in prehospital care. We failed to identify evidence that supports the hypothesis that traction splints reduce morbidity or mortality. We advocate the use of a femoral traction splints but recognize that other splints may also be appropriate in this environment. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [The Ulm trauma track : Trauma care and research as focal points for medical students].

    PubMed

    Huber-Lang, M; Radermacher, P; Palmer, A; Geiler, S; Grab, C; Wachter, U; Georgieff, M; Gebhard, F; Öchsner, W

    2017-03-01

    As part of the expansion of the site-specific education profile of the medical curriculum MED@ULM of the University of Ulm, a new track "trauma care and trauma research" was established in the winter semester 2012/2013. The acceptance of the track was evaluated during the winter semester 2013/2014. The 6-semester track extends the existing curriculum by offering subjects in trauma management and trauma research to students of human medicine. A central aim of the track is to promote medical professional competence, expertise in emergency care and competence in trauma-related scientific work and research. Central learning contents could be intensified in newly established emergency simulation training. Additionally, participating students have to perform a doctoral thesis on an obligatory trauma-related experimental subject. A first analysis study focusing on the learning style of the participating students (n = 17) and a control group consisting of members of the same semester (n = 20) was performed using the Kolb learning style inventory. In a validated evaluation in the winter semesters 2013/2014 and 2014/2015, the students were asked about their expectations and experience with the track, criticisms, suggestions and satisfaction with the study conditions. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The analysis of the students' preferred learning styles revealed no differences between track students and the control group. Most of the students considered the track as a form of personal further education. The students had high expectations of practical skills with relevance to the clinical daily routine, learning scientific methods and preparing their thesis. The track students were more critical with regard to the study conditions than the control group students, although the track students of the third semester still judged their studies to be more interesting than the track students of the first semester and the control group. With the

  9. Who will cover the cost of undocumented immigrant trauma care?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher D; Truitt, Michael S; Shifflette, Vanessa K; Johnson, Van; Mangram, Alicia J; Dunn, Ernest L

    2012-03-01

    Health care reform under the "Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act" (PPACA) will lead to changes in reimbursement. Although this legislation provides a mechanism for uninsured Americans to obtain coverage, it excludes undocumented immigrants (UDI). Reimbursement for UDIs comes from the disproportionate share hospital (DSH) program and was previously supported by Section-1011 of the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act (S1011). The PPACA details a cut of DSH funds starting in 2014. This could impose a significant financial burden on trauma centers. From May 2005 to May 2008, we retrospectively reviewed all trauma-related emergency room visits by UDIs. We quantified charges for three entities: emergency department physicians, trauma surgeons, and the hospital. We applied our average institutional collection rate to these charges and compared these projected collections with the actual collections. Over a three-year period, we identified 1,325 trauma UDIs. The financial records revealed a projected emergency department physicians collection of $452,686, a projected trauma surgeons collection of $1.2 million, and a projected hospital collection of $6.9 million (total $8.6 million). Actual funding from S1011 provided $1.7 million and DSH provided $1.9 million (total $3.6 million). Texas State Funding and UDI self-payment contributed $611,082. Overall, our institution had a reimbursement discrepancy of $4.3 million with DSH/S1011 assistance. This increased to $6.0 million after the termination of S1011 and may increase to $7.9 million under PPACA. These figures underestimate the total cost of UDI trauma care as it only includes three entities. Our data represent a fraction of national figures. Failure to address these issues could result in ongoing financial problems for trauma centers. II, economic and decision analysis.

  10. Association of educational level with delay of prehospital care before reperfusion in STEMI.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ju Yeon; Hong, Ki Jeong; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ro, Young Sun

    2015-12-01

    Rapid access to reperfusion is important in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The goal of this study is to assess the association of the educational level of patients with STEMI and prehospital and inhospital delay before reperfusion. We used a nationwide database of 31 emergency departments for cardiovascular disease surveillance operated by the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction cases registered from November 2007 to December 2012 were enrolled. Cases younger than 18 years old or missing educational history were excluded. Educational level was characterized as low (completion of elementary school or less), medium (completion of middle or high school), and high (completion of a bachelor's degree or higher). We compared prehospital and inhospital delay for 3 educational groups. A general linear regression was used to assess the association of educational level with the time from symptom to hospital arrival. A total of 9028 patients with STEMI were included. The median time from symptom to hospital arrival was 144, 76, and 68 minutes in the low, medium, and high education groups, respectively (P < .01). Educational level had no significant effect on the door-to-balloon time. Low and medium education groups experienced significant delays of symptom to hospital to high education group (low: β = 27.2 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 15.9-38.5; medium: β = 19.1 minutes; 95% confidence interval, 15.9-38.5). In patients with STEMI, the time from symptom to hospital arrival increased as educational level decreased, but educational level had no significant association with the inhospital delay to reperfusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prehospital research in sub-saharan Africa: establishing research tenets.

    PubMed

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Sasser, Scott M; Wallis, Lee A

    2013-12-01

    Prehospital care constitutes an important link in the continuum of emergency care and confers a survival benefit to injured and ill persons. As development of acute and emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa expands, there is a strong need to improve the delivery of prehospital care to help relieve the overwhelming regional morbidity and mortality attributable to time-sensitive, life-threatening conditions. Effective research is integral to prehospital care development, as it helps quantify the need for prehospital care and tests effective solutions. Unfortunately, there is limited consensus guiding such research in the low-resource nations of sub-Saharan Africa that face unique challenges. This article aims to assimilate the current pertinent literature to demonstrate research success stories and challenges, and ultimately to build on previous efforts to establish prehospital research priorities for sub-Saharan Africa. Region-specific obstacles hindering prehospital research include the lack of epidemiologic data on emergency conditions, the underdevelopment of in-hospital emergency care, confusing prehospital terminology, poorly defined prehospital research priorities, the lack of qualified local prehospital researchers, and a poor understanding of local prehospital care systems. Solutions are offered to overcome each challenge by building on previous recommendations, by proposing new guiding principles, and by identifying areas where further consensus-building is needed. These guiding principles and suggestions are designed to steer discussions and output from future global health meetings targeted at improving prehospital research and development in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Developing Self-Care Practices in a Trauma Treatment Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Patricia J.; Simmelink-McCleary, Jennifer; Im, Hyojin; Becher, Emily; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of self-care practices of social work students who were part of a larger study of students' experiences in a graduate course on the treatment of trauma. Consensual qualitative research methods were used to analyze 17 participant journals submitted at 4 times during the course. Findings indicated that…

  13. [Assessment of an educational maze for major trauma care teaching].

    PubMed

    Cuisinier, A; Schilte, C; Declety, P; Baudrant, M; Picard, J; Berger, K; Bouzat, P; Gay, S; Falcon, D; Bosson, J-L; Payen, J-F; Albaladejo, P

    2012-11-01

    Assess efficacy, satisfaction and usefulness of an educational maze based on posters and audioguide for major trauma care teaching to medical students. The educational maze consists of posters with audio comments recorded in an audioguide. This tool was part of a larger educational program including medical simulation. Prospective, interventional, observational, monocentric study. STUDENT: Medical student of Grenoble University Hospital, in the four last years of medical school, following a training course in anesthesia, emergency medical services and intensive care units. Forty essentials key messages for major trauma management were included in 10 posters and audioguides. A first assessment with short opened answers was handed to the students at the end of the educational maze to assess their memorization. A second assessment with simple choice answers regarding satisfaction and usefulness of this new educational tool was realized at the end of the entire program. One hundred and eighty-four medical students attending the major trauma program were included in this study. On the first test, 75% of essential knowledge on major trauma management was memorized by more than 50% of the medical students. On the second test, 94% of medical students had a high satisfaction level of this educational maze. An educational maze based on posters and audioguides seems to be an efficient, useful tool for teaching essential knowledge on major trauma management to medical students. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma care.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, J. G.; McGowan, J. J.; Ricci, M. A.; McFarlane, G.

    1997-01-01

    Research has shown that diagnostic quality images for most teleradiology applications requires a sophisticated telemedicine system and access to a large amount of bandwidth. While the ideal standards have been set by those involved in evaluating teleradiology, these standards are impractical for many small rural health centers which deliver routine trauma care. While there is no disagreement about the ultimate need for this level of teleradiology support, the purpose of this research was to determine whether Orthopedists would be able to read plain radiographs of orthopedic trauma injuries using a desktop teleradiology system in support of rural trauma care. METHOD: Two radiology residents and two orthopedic residents viewed forty radiographs, twenty through a desktop teleradiology system and twenty in person. Diagnostic findings and certainty of diagnosis were recorded. FINDINGS: There was no statistically significant difference between modalities in orthopedic residents' ability to correctly diagnose orthopedic trauma injuries. Further, for those instances when the diagnosis was imprecise, the residents were aware of their inability to make an accurate diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Although the study was relatively limited and further research needs to be done, the use of desktop teleradiology in support of rural orthopedic trauma consultation is a promising alternative to the more expensive forms of telemedicine technology. PMID:9357657

  15. The Combat Medic Aid Bag: 2025. CoTCCC Top 10 Recommended Battlefield Trauma Care Research, Development, and Evaluation Priorities for 2015.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Gross, Kirby

    2015-01-01

    While the list presented here is by no means a comprehensive list of all of the research areas of interest in battlefield trauma care, much less a list of research needs across the entire continuum of combat casualty care, it does provide the collective judgment of the CoTCCC about the highest priorities for RDT&E that relate to battlefield trauma care. Two additional observations should be made regarding that point: (1) As the landmark Eastridge et al. 2012 study convincingly documented, most combat fatalities occur in the prehospital phase of care, so research efforts that enable Combat medics, corpsmen, and PJs to care for their casualties more effectively will convey the highest probability of further reducing the case fatality rate and preventable deaths among US Combat casualties; and (2) inasmuch as the mission of the CoTCCC is to update the TCCC Guidelines as needed, this group has excellent visibility of the most important current research questions in battlefield trauma care.

  16. Fast Neural Networks Decision Algorithm for Pre-Hospital Trauma Care. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    identification of high risk patients [19, 12, 14] and for earthquake prediction [16, 17]. During Phase I SQI developed a prototype of a computer-assisted...Statistical Meetings, ASA, 7 pp. 15. Katz S., Aki K, 1992, Experiments with a neural net based earthquake prediction , EOS, Transactions, American Geoph

  17. Strategic Assessment of Trauma Care Capacity in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Barclay T; Quansah, Robert; Gyedu, Adam; Ankomah, James; Donkor, Peter; Mock, Charles

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess availability of trauma care technology in Ghana. In addition, factors contributing to deficiencies were evaluated. By doing so, potential solutions to inefficient aspects of health systems management and maladapted technology for trauma care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) could be identified. Thirty-two items were selected from the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. Direct inspection and structured interviews with administrative, clinical, and biomedical engineering staff were used to assess the challenges and successes of item availability at 40 purposively sampled district, regional, and tertiary hospitals. Hospital assessments demonstrated marked deficiencies. Some of these were low cost, such as basic airway supplies, chest tubes, and cervical collars. Item non-availability resulted from several contributing factors, namely equipment absence, lack of training, frequent stock-outs, and technology breakage. A number of root causes for these factors were identified, including ineffective healthcare financing by way of untimely national insurance reimbursements, procurement and stock-management practices, and critical gaps in local biomedical engineering and trauma care training. Nonetheless, local examples of successfully overcoming deficiencies were identified (e.g., public-private partnering, ensuring company engineers trained technicians on-the-job during technology installation or servicing). While availability of several low-cost items could be better supplied by improvements in stock-management and procurement policies, there is a critical need for redress of the national insurance reimbursement system and trauma care training of district hospital staff. Further, developing local service and technical support capabilities is more and more pressing as technology plays an increasingly important role in LMIC healthcare systems.

  18. Norwegian trauma care: a national cross-sectional survey of all hospitals involved in the management of major trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Uleberg, Oddvar; Vinjevoll, Ole-Petter; Kristiansen, Thomas; Klepstad, Pål

    2014-11-12

    Approximately 10% of the Norwegian population is injured every year, with injuries ranging from minor injuries treated by general practitioners to major and complex injuries requiring specialist in-hospital care. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the caseload of potentially severely injured patients in Norwegian hospitals. Aim of the study was to describe the current status of the Norwegian trauma system by identifying the number and the distribution of contributing hospitals and the caseload of potentially severely injured trauma patients within these hospitals. A cross-sectional survey with a structured questionnaire was sent in the summer of 2012 to all Norwegian hospitals that receive trauma patients. These were defined by number of trauma team activations in the included hospitals. A literature review was performed to assess over time the development of hospitals receiving trauma patients. Forty-one hospitals responded and were included in the study. In 2011, four trauma centres and 37 acute care hospitals received a total of 6,570 trauma patients. Trauma centres received 2,175 (33%) patients and other hospitals received 4,395 (67%) patients. There were significant regional differences between health care regions in the distribution of trauma patients between trauma centres and acute care hospitals. More than half (52.5%) of the hospitals received fewer than 100 patients annually. The national rate of hospital admission via trauma teams was 13 per 10,000 inhabitants. There was a 37% (from 65 to 41) reduction in the number of hospitals receiving trauma patients between 1988 and 2011. In 2011, hospital acute trauma care in Norway was delivered by four trauma centres and 37 acute care hospitals. Many hospitals still receive a small number of potentially severely injured patients and only a few hospitals have an electronic trauma registry. Future development of the Norwegian trauma system needs to address the challenge posed by a scattered population and

  19. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: Patient Response to a Primary Care Provider Communication Training.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2016-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders and health outcomes; yet there is little training of primary care providers about trauma's effects, and how to better interact with trauma survivors. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), to evaluate its feasibility and preliminary efficacy. We randomized four primary care sites to training or wait-list conditions; PCPs at wait-list sites were trained after reassessment. Primary care providers (PCPs) were Family Medicine residents (n = 17; 2 sites) or community physicians (n = 13; 2 sites). Outcomes reported here comprised a survey of 400 actual patients seen by the PCPs in the study. Patients, mostly minority, completed surveys before or after their provider received training. Patients rated PCPs significantly higher after training on a scale encompassing partnership issues. Breakdowns showed lower partnership scores for those with trauma or posttraumatic stress symptoms. Future studies will need to include more specific trauma-related outcomes. Nevertheless, this training is a promising initial approach to teaching trauma-informed communication skills to PCPs.

  20. The use of segmented regression in analysing interrupted time series studies: an example in pre-hospital ambulance care.

    PubMed

    Taljaard, Monica; McKenzie, Joanne E; Ramsay, Craig R; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2014-06-19

    An interrupted time series design is a powerful quasi-experimental approach for evaluating effects of interventions introduced at a specific point in time. To utilize the strength of this design, a modification to standard regression analysis, such as segmented regression, is required. In segmented regression analysis, the change in intercept and/or slope from pre- to post-intervention is estimated and used to test causal hypotheses about the intervention. We illustrate segmented regression using data from a previously published study that evaluated the effectiveness of a collaborative intervention to improve quality in pre-hospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. In the original analysis, a standard regression model was used with time as a continuous variable. We contrast the results from this standard regression analysis with those from segmented regression analysis. We discuss the limitations of the former and advantages of the latter, as well as the challenges of using segmented regression in analysing complex quality improvement interventions. Based on the estimated change in intercept and slope from pre- to post-intervention using segmented regression, we found insufficient evidence of a statistically significant effect on quality of care for stroke, although potential clinically important effects for AMI cannot be ruled out. Segmented regression analysis is the recommended approach for analysing data from an interrupted time series study. Several modifications to the basic segmented regression analysis approach are available to deal with challenges arising in the evaluation of complex quality improvement interventions.

  1. [Resources and capacity of emergency trauma care services in Peru].

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Miranda, J Jaime; Lema, Claudia; López, Luis; Paca-Palao, Ada; Luna, Diego; Huicho, Luis

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the resources and capacity of emergency trauma care services in three Peruvian cities using the WHO report Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. This was a cross-sectional study in eight public and private healthcare facilities in Lima, Ayacucho, and Pucallpa. Semi-structured questionnaires were applied to the heads of emergency departments with managerial responsibility for resources and capabilities. Considering the profiles and volume of care in each emergency service, most respondents in all three cities classified their currently available resources as inadequate. Comparison of the health facilities showed a shortage in public services and in the provinces (Ayacucho and Pucallpa). There was a widespread perception that both human and physical resources were insufficient, especially in public healthcare facilities and in the provinces.

  2. Analysis of Prehospital Documentation of Injury-Related Pain Assessment and Analgesic Administration on the Contemporary Battlefield.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Reeves, Patrick T; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Robinson, John B; Butler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In addition to life-saving interventions, the assessment of pain and subsequent administration of analgesia are primary benchmarks for quality emergency medical services care which should be documented and analyzed. Analyze US combat casualty data from the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) with a primary focus on prehospital pain assessment, analgesic administration and documentation. Retrospective cohort study of battlefield prehospital and hospital casualty data were abstracted by DoDTR from available records from 1 September 2007 through 30 June 2011. Data included demographics; injury mechanism; prehospital and initial combat hospital pain assessment documented by standard 0-to-10 numeric rating scale; analgesics administered; and survival outcome. Records were available for 8,913 casualties (median ISS of 5 [IQR 2 to 10]; 98.7% survived). Prehospital analgesic administration was documented for 1,313 cases (15%). Prehospital pain assessment was recorded for 581 cases (7%; median pain score 6 [IQR 3 to 8]), hospital pain assessment was recorded for 5,007 cases (56%; median pain score5 [CI95% 3 to 8]), and 409 cases (5%) had both prehospital and hospital pain assessments that could be paired. In this paired group, 49.1% (201/409) had alleviation of pain evidenced by a decrease in pain score (median 4,, IQR 2 to 5); 23.5% (96/409) had worsening of pain evidenced by an increase in pain score (median 3, CI95 2.8 to 3.7, IQR 1 to 5); 27.4% (112/409) had no change; and the overall difference was an average decrease in pain score of 1.1 (median 0, IQR 0 to 3, p < 0.01). Time-series analysis showed modest increases in prehospital and hospital pain assessment documentation and prehospital analgesic documentation. Our study demonstrates that prehospital pain assessment, management, and documentation remain primary targets for performance improvement on the battlefield. Results of paired prehospital to hospital pain scores and time-series analysis demonstrate

  3. Spine immobilization: prehospitalization to final destination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Care of the combat casualty with spinal column or spinal cord injury has not been previously described, particularly in regards to spinal immobilization. The ultimate goal of spinal immobilization in the combat casualty is to first ``do no further harm'' and then provide a stable, painless spine and an optimal neurologic recovery. The protocol for treatment of the combat casualty with suspected spinal column or spinal cord injury from the battlefield to final arrival at a definitive treatment center is discussed, and the special considerations for medical evacuation off the battlefield and for aeromedical transport are delineated. Selective prehospital spine immobilization, which involves spinal immobilization with backboard, semi-rigid cervical collar, lateral supports, and straps or tape, is recommended if there is suspicion of spinal column or spinal cord injury in the combat casualty and when conditions and resources permit. The authors do not recommend spinal immobilization for the combat casualty with isolated penetrating trauma.

  4. The trauma report nurse: a trauma triage process improvement project.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Lisa; Fahje, Carol; Immermann, Carol; Elsbernd, Terri

    2014-09-01

    Accurate trauma triage is imperative to facilitate appropriate resource mobilization for severely injured trauma patients. A critical window of opportunity exists to prevent secondary injury or death. Timely assessment with a multidisciplinary trauma team is essential to facilitate rapid diagnosis and treatment. However, consistent and accurate trauma triage proved daunting at our institution, resulting in instances of undertriage. A process improvement strategy aimed at improving trauma triage accuracy was implemented. An innovative role, the trauma report nurse (TRN), was created and became the trauma nurse expert. The TRN was responsible for assigning a trauma triage level to all incoming adult and pediatric trauma patients. In parallel, improvements were made to the prehospital report format, increasing standardization and clarifying hand-off verbiage. Undertriage rates dropped from 14% to 4.8%. Qualitative data demonstrated acceptance and support of the TRN role among physicians, nurses and nursing and ancillary staff. Designating trauma triage to an ED registered nurse proved to reduce undertriage rates. By providing staff education, infrastructure improvements, and leadership support, the role continues to thrive, resulting in improved care for severely injured trauma patients. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Using a Checklist to Improve Family Communication in Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Bradley M; Nolan, Tracy L; Brown, Cecil E; Vogel, Robert L; Flowers, Kristin A; Ashley, Dennis W; Nakayama, Don K

    2016-01-01

    Modern concepts of patient-centered care emphasize effective communication with patients and families, an essential requirement in acute trauma settings. We hypothesized that using a checklist to guide the initial family conversation would improve the family's perception of the interaction. Institutional Review Board-approved, prospective pre/post study involving families of trauma patients admitted to our Level I trauma center for >24 hours. In the control group, families received information according to existing practices. In the study group, residents gave patient information to a first-degree family member using a checklist that guided the interaction. The checklist included a physician introduction, patient condition, list of known injuries, admission unit or intensive care unit, any consultants involved, plans for additional studies or operations, and opportunity for family to ask questions. An 11-item survey was administered 24 to 48 hours after admission to each group that evaluated the trauma team's communication in the areas of physician introduction, patient condition, ongoing treatment, and family perception of the interaction. Responses were on a Likert scale and analyzed using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. There were 130 patients in each group. The study group had significantly (P < 0.05) better responses in 8 of 11 items surveyed: physician spoke to family, physician introduction, understanding of their relative's injuries, admitting unit, consultants involved, urgent surgical procedures required, ongoing diagnostic studies, and understanding of the treatment plan. In conclusion, using a checklist improves the perception of the initial communication between the trauma team and family members of trauma patients, especially their understanding of the treatment plan.

  6. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  7. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  8. Trauma admissions into the intensive care unit and outcome of care in a tertiary health facility.

    PubMed

    Olajumoke, T O; Oyebamiji, E O; Afolayan, J M; Adekunle, M

    2014-01-01

    Trauma remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in resource challenged economies I. In Nigeria, the number of deaths due to trauma-induced injuries is on the rise. Major trauma victims are usually from road traffic accidents and are managed at the accident and emergency unit while the severe ones are admitted into the intensive care unit. All trauma admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU) of LAUTECHTeaching Hospital Osogbo over a 5 year period (2008-2012) after ethical approval from the ethical unit of the hospital were reviewed. During the study period, 112 trauma patients were admitted to the ICU, representing 68% of total ICU admissions. The male:female ratio of ICU trauma cases was 3:1. Out of the trauma admissions 83 (74.1%) of the cases came as emergency from the accident and emergency unit while 2.4% and 1.6% respectively came from operating theatre-- and the general ward respectively. 83 (74.1%) of trauma cases admitted were road traffic accidents, while 20 (17.9%) were burns not related to RTA and the remaining 8(9%) were due to falls, fight/ssault. Most of the road traffic accidents related trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit had head injuries (66.3%) while 7% and 12% had multiple fractures and chest injuries respectively. The mean patient age 35 years and the mean duration of ICU stay was 6.3 ± 8.4 days. Survivors had a longer ICU stay Trauma is a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization. It also consumes a significant amount of the health care budget.In most instances it is preventtable.Trauma prevention, the most effective management strategy should include increased public education, improved security, better implementation of legislative measures to ensure safety for all road users, control of firearms, and minimizing domestic and intentional violence. Appropriate, aggressive intensive care in combination with efficient communications,rapid medical evacuation, and an organized emergency

  9. Identification of dynamic prehospital changes with continuous vital signs acquisition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peter; Galvagno, Samuel M; Sen, Ayan; Dutton, Richard; Jordan, Sean; Floccare, Douglas; Handley, Christopher; Shackelford, Stacy; Pasley, Jason; Mackenzie, Colin

    2014-01-01

    In most trauma registries, prehospital trauma data are often missing or unreliable because of the difficult dual task consigned to prehospital providers of recording vital signs and simultaneously resuscitating patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the analysis of continuous vital signs acquired automatically, without prehospital provider input, improves vital signs data quality, captures more extreme values that might be missed with conventional human data recording, and changes Trauma Injury Severity Scores compared with retrospectively compiled prehospital trauma registry data. A statewide vital signs collection network in 6 medevac helicopters was deployed for prehospital vital signs acquisition using a locally built vital signs data recorder (VSDR) to capture continuous vital signs from the patient monitor onto a memory card. VSDR vital signs data were assessed by 3 raters, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to test interrater reliability. Agreement between VSDR and trauma registry data was compared with the methods of Altman and Bland including corresponding calculations for precision and bias. Automated prehospital continuous VSDR data were collected in 177 patients. There was good agreement between the first recorded vital signs from the VSDR and the trauma registry value. Significant differences were observed between the highest and lowest heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and pulse oximeter from the VSDR and the trauma registry data (P< .001). Trauma Injury Severity Scores changed in 12 patients (7%) when using data from the VSDR. Real-time continuous vital signs monitoring and data acquisition can identify dynamic prehospital changes, which may be missed compared with vital signs recorded manually during distinct prehospital intervals. In the future, the use of automated vital signs trending may improve the quality of data reported for inclusion in trauma registries. These data may be used to develop

  10. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  11. Prehospital emergency care training practices regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients in Maryland (USA).

    PubMed

    Jalali, Sara; Levy, Matthew J; Tang, Nelson

    2015-04-01

    Prehospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers are expected to treat all patients the same, regardless of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, or religion. Some EMS personnel who are poorly trained in working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients are at risk for managing such patients incompletely and possibly incorrectly. During emergency situations, such mistreatment has meant the difference between life and death. An anonymous survey was electronically distributed to EMS educational program directors in Maryland (USA). The survey asked participants if their program included training cultural sensitivity, and if so, by what modalities. Specific questions then focused on information about LGBT education, as well as related topics, that they, as program directors, would want included in an online training module. A total of 20 programs met inclusion criteria for the study, and 16 (80%) of these programs completed the survey. All but one program (15, 94%) included cultural sensitivity training. One-third (6, 38%) of the programs reported already teaching LGBT-related issues specifically. Three-quarters of the programs that responded (12, 75%) were willing to include LGBT-related material into their curriculum. All programs (16, 100%) identified specific aspects of LGBT-related emergency health issues they would be interested in having included in an educational module. Most EMS educational program directors in Maryland are receptive to including LGBT-specific education into their curricula. The information gathered in this survey may help guide the development of a short, self-contained, open-access module for EMS educational programs. Further research, on a broader scale and with greater geographic sampling, is needed to assess the practices of EMS educators on a national level.

  12. Tranexamic acid as part of remote damage-control resuscitation in the prehospital setting: A critical appraisal of the medical literature and available alternatives.

    PubMed

    Ausset, Sylvain; Glassberg, Elon; Nadler, Roy; Sunde, Geir; Cap, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Clément; Plang, Soryapong; Sailliol, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Hemorrhage remains the leading cause of preventable trauma-associated mortality. Interventions that improve prehospital hemorrhage control and resuscitation are needed. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has recently been shown to reduce mortality in trauma patients when administered upon hospital admission, and available data suggest that early dosing confers maximum benefit. Data regarding TXA implementation in prehospital trauma care and analyses of alternatives are lacking. This review examines the available evidence that would inform selection of hemostatic interventions to improve outcomes in prehospital trauma management as part of a broader strategy of "remote damage-control resuscitation" (RDCR). The medical literature available concerning both the safety and the efficacy of TXA and other hemostatic agents was reviewed. TXA use in surgery was studied in 129 randomized controlled trials, and a meta-analysis was identified. More than 800,000 patients were followed up in large cohort study. In trauma, a large randomized controlled trial, the CRASH-2 study, recruited more than 20,000 patients, and two cohort studies studied more than 1,000 war casualties. In the prehospital setting, the US, French, British, and Israeli militaries as well as the British, Norwegian, and Israeli civilian ambulance services have implemented TXA use as part of RDCR policies. Available data support the efficacy and the safety of TXA. High-level evidence supports its use in trauma and strongly suggests that its implementation in the prehospital setting offers a survival advantage to many patients, particularly when evacuation to surgical care may be delayed. TXA plays a central role in the development of RDCR strategies.

  13. Prehospital identification of trauma patients requiring transfusion: results of a retrospective study evaluating the use of the trauma induced coagulopathy clinical score (TICCS) in 33,385 patients from the TraumaRegister DGU(®).

    PubMed

    Tonglet, Martin; Lefering, Rolf; Minon, Jean Marc; Ghuysen, Alexandre; D'Orio, Vincenzo; Hildebrand, Frank; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Horst, Klemens

    2017-06-22

    Identifying trauma patients that need emergent blood product transfusion is crucial. The Trauma Induced Coagulopathy Clinical Score (TICCS) is an easy-to-measure score developed to meet this medical need. We hypothesized that TICCS would assist in identifying patients that need a transfusion in a large cohort of severe trauma patients from the TraumaRegister DGU(®) (TR-DGU). A total of 33,385 severe trauma patients were extracted from the TR-DGU for retrospective analysis. The TICCS was adapted for the registry structure. Blood transfusion was defined as the use of at least one unit of red blood cells (RBC) during acute hospital treatment. With an area under the receiving operating curve (AUC) of 0.700 (95% CI: 0.691-0.709), the TICCS appeared to be moderately discriminant for determining the need for RBC transfusion in the trauma population of the TR-DGU. A TICCS cut-off value of ≥12 yielded the best trade-off between true positives and false positives. The corresponding positive predictive value and negative predictive values were 48.4% and 89.1%, respectively. This retrospective study confirms that the TICCS is a useful and simple score for discriminating between trauma patients with and without the need for emergent blood product transfusion.

  14. Pre hospital intensive care in multiple trauma children.

    PubMed

    Hervé, C; Gaillard, M; Petit, J L; Geni, S; Huguenard, P

    1986-01-01

    From January 1979 to December 1984, 1,272 calls, concerning injured children, aged 11 days to 15 years, justified the intervention of a Mobile Medical Emergency and Intensive Care Service, in the department of "Val-de-Marne" near Paris. Three hundred and twenty-two were very serious trauma children (25%); 45 were in cardiac arrest, and 41 died on the scene of the accident despite the intensive cares delivered by the anesthetists or pediatricians. Two hundred and eighty-one children were hospitalized in an intensive multiple trauma pediatric unit (97 cases) or in a neurosurgical pediatric unit (184 cases). The mode of accident was traffic accident (252), fall (48), fire arms (4), knife wounds (7), hanging or strangulation (9), others (2). They concerned 119 females and 203 males. 126 were multiple trauma children (40%). 37% of these accidents happened between May and July, and 40% occurred between 3 to 6 p.m. The 322 children immediately received medical care but 26% died during their hospitalization (17% in the first 24 hours). Thus mortality rate is 35% (114 cases).

  15. Potential impact of Affordable Care Act-related insurance expansion on trauma care reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Neiman, Pooja U; Najjar, Peter A; Tsai, Thomas C; Scott, Kirstin W; Shrime, Mark G; Cutler, David M; Salim, Ali; Haider, Adil H

    2017-05-01

    Nearly one quarter of trauma patients are uninsured and hospitals recoup less than 20% of inpatient costs for their care. This study examines changes to hospital reimbursement for inpatient trauma care if the full coverage expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were in effect. We abstracted nonelderly adults (ages 18-64 years) admitted for trauma from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during 2010-the last year before most major ACA coverage expansion policies. We calculated national and facility-level reimbursements and trauma-related contribution margins using Nationwide Inpatient Sample-supplied cost-to-charge ratios and published reimbursement rates for each payer type. Using US census data, we developed a probabilistic microsimulation model to determine the proportion of pre-ACA uninsured trauma patients that would be expected to gain private insurance, Medicaid, or remain uninsured after full implementation of the ACA. We then estimated the impact of these coverage changes on national and facility-level trauma reimbursement for this population. There were 145,849 patients (representing 737,852 patients nationwide) included. National inpatient trauma costs for patients aged 18 years to 64 years totaled US $14.8 billion (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.5,17.1). Preexpansion reimbursements totaled US $13.7 billion (95% CI, 10.8-14.7), yielding a national margin of -7.9% (95% CI, -10.6 to -5.1). Postexpansion projected reimbursements totaled US $15.0 billion (95% CI, 12.7-17.3), increasing the margin by 9.3 absolute percentage points to +1.4% (95% CI, -0.3 to +3.2). Of the 263 eligible facilities, 90 (34.2%) had a positive trauma-related contribution margin in 2010, which increased to 171 (65.0%) using postexpansion projections. Those facilities with the highest proportion of uninsured and racial/ethnic minorities experienced the greatest gains. Health insurance coverage expansion for uninsured trauma patients has the potential to increase national

  16. Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Society of Trauma Nurses advanced practitioner position paper: Optimizing the integration of advanced practitioners in trauma and critical care.

    PubMed

    Messing, Jonathan; Garces-King, Jasmine; Taylor, Dennis; van Horn, Jonathan; Sarani, Babak; Christmas, A Britton

    2017-07-01

    Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively known as advanced practitioners (APs), enhance the provision of care for the acutely injured patient. Despite their prevalence, institutions employ, train, and utilize these providers with significant variability. The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Society of Trauma Nurses, and the American Association of Surgical Physician Assistants acknowledge the value of APs and support their utilization in the management of injured and critically ill patients. This position paper offers insight into the history of, scope of practice for, and opportunities for optimal utilization of APs in trauma, critical care, and acute care surgery services.

  17. Body temperature of trauma patients on admission to hospital: a comparison of anaesthetised and non-anaesthetised patients.

    PubMed

    Langhelle, Audun; Lockey, David; Harris, Tim; Davies, Gareth

    2012-03-01

    Hypothermia at hospital admission has been found to independently predict increased mortality in trauma patients. Objectives To establish if patients anaesthetised in the prehospital phase of care had a higher rate of hypothermia than non-anaesthetised patients on admission to hospital. Retrospective review of admission body temperature in 1292 consecutive prehospital trauma patients attended by a physician-led prehospital trauma service admitted to The Royal London Hospital between 1 July 2005 and 31 December 2008. 38% had a temperature recorded on admission. There was a significant difference in body temperature between the anaesthetised group (N=207) and the non-anaesthetised group (N=287): mean (SD) 35.0 (2.1) vs 36.2 (1.0)°C, respectively (p<0.001). No significant seasonal body temperature variation was demonstrated. This study confirmed that patients anaesthetised in the prehospital phase of care had a significantly lower admission body temperature. This has led to a change in the author's prehospital practice. Anaesthetised patients are now actively surface heated and have whole body insulation to prevent further heat loss in an attempt to conserve body temperature and improve outcome. This is an example of best in-hospital anaesthetic practice being carried out in the prehospital phase.

  18. Prehospital Sepsis Project (PSP): knowledge and attitudes of United States advanced out-of-hospital care providers.

    PubMed

    Báez, Amado Alejandro; Hanudel, Priscilla; Perez, Maria Teresa; Giraldez, Ediza M; Wilcox, Susan R

    2013-04-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are common and often fatal medical problems. The Prehospital Sepsis Project is a multifaceted study that aims to improve the out-of-hospital care of patients with sepsis by means of education and enhancement of skills. The objective of this Project was to assess the knowledge and attitudes in the principles of diagnosis and management of sepsis in a cohort of United States out-of-hospital care providers. This was cross-sectional study. A 15-item survey was administered via the Web and e-mailed to multiple emergency medical services list-servers. The evaluation consisted of four clinical scenarios as well as questions on the basics of sepsis. For intra-rater reliability, the first and the fourth scenarios were identical. Chi-square and Fisher's Exact testing were used to assess associations. Relative risk (RR) was used for strength of association. Statistical significance was set at .05. A total of 226 advanced EMS providers participated with a 85.4% (n = 193) completion rate, consisting of a 30.7% rural, 32.3% urban, and 37.0% suburban mix; 82.4% were paramedics and 72.5% had worked in EMS >10 years. Only 57 (29.5%) participants scored both of the duplicate scenarios correctly, and only 19 of the 193 (9.8%) responded to all scenarios correctly. Level of training was not a predictor of correctly scoring scenarios (P = .71, RR = 1.25, 95% CI = 0.39-4.01), nor was years of service (P = .11, RR = 1.64, 95% CI = 0.16-1.21). Poor understanding of the principles of diagnosis and management of sepsis was observed in this cohort, suggesting the need for enhancement of education. Survey items will be used to develop a focused, interactive Web-based learning program. Limitations include potential for self-selection and data accuracy.

  19. Epidemiology of trauma in an acute care hospital in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Wui, Lim Woan; Shaun, Goh E; Ramalingam, Ganesh; Wai, Kenneth Mak Seek

    2014-01-01

    Background: Trauma injury is the leading cause of mortality and hospitalization worldwide and the leading cause of potential years of productive life lost. Patients with multiple injuries are prevalent, increasing the complexity of trauma care and treatment. Better understanding of the nature of trauma risk and outcome could lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 1178 trauma patients with Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 9, who were admitted to the Acute and Emergency Care of an acute care hospital between January 2011 and December 2012. The statistical analysis included calculation of percentages and proportions and application of test of significance using Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test where appropriate. Results: Over the study period, 1178 patients were evaluated, 815 (69.2%) males and 363 (30.8%) females. The mean age of patients was 52.08 ± 21.83 (range 5-100) years. Falls (604; 51.3%) and road traffic accidents (465; 39.5%) were the two most common mechanisms of injury. Based on the three most common mechanisms of injury, i.e. fall on the same level, fall from height, and road traffic accident, the head region (484; 45.40%) was the most commonly injured in the body, followed by lower limbs (377; 35.37%) and thorax (299; 28.05%). Conclusion: Fall was the leading cause of injury among the elderly population with road traffic injuries being the leading cause among the younger group. There is a need to address the issues of injury control and prevention in these areas. PMID:25114427

  20. Leading by example: the role of international trauma organizations in global trauma initiatives.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Ross

    2014-01-01

    As road traffic fatalities have emerged among the leading global threats to human health and safety, there is an imminent need for the mobilization of large medical organizations and private companies. Collectively, these partnerships can have a tremendous impact on road traffic safety through garnering funding for important initiatives, lobbying governments for policy reforms, and implementing organizational frameworks that foster the transfer of health-care knowledge to optimize trauma care in developing countries. In particular, concerted efforts by major orthopaedic associations can directly enable overwhelmed health-care systems to improve upon their prehospital care, emergency triage systems, trauma care protocols, and rehabilitation programs. The "SIGN" and "Broken Earth" programs serve as prime examples of the powerful impact international trauma organizations can have on global trauma initiatives.

  1. Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Steven E.; Weisberg, Risa B.; Dolan, Regina T.; Machan, Jason T.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Manchester, Gertrude; Culpepper, Larry; Keller, Martin B.

    2001-01-01

    Background: This article examines the nature of psychological trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 504 patients recruited from primary care settings. Method: Patients were screened for anxiety in waiting rooms at 14 general medical settings, and those with a sufficient number and severity of anxiety symptoms were administered a standardized diagnostic clinical interview. Those who met DSM-IV criteria for an anxiety disorder and who were willing to participate were included in this study. Of the 504 patients, 185 met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD. Results: Results indicated that 418 (83%) of primary care patients in our sample reported at least 1 traumatic event in their lifetime. The most prevalent traumas experienced by the entire sample of participants were witnessing others being seriously injured or killed, serious accidents, and rape. Of those participants with PTSD, rape was the strongest predictor of a PTSD diagnosis. Analyses examining gender differences indicated that, for women, a history of other unwanted sexual contact or witnessing a sexual assault, being attacked with a weapon or with intent to kill, or witnessing someone being injured were found to be risk factors for a PTSD diagnosis. Examination of clinical characteristics indicated a high rate of comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among patients with PTSD, including high rates of alcohol/substance abuse, depression, and suicide attempts. Conclusion: These findings emphasize the continued need to assess patients presenting at general medical facilities about trauma history. PMID:15014575

  2. Trauma informed care: a radical shift or basic good practice?

    PubMed

    Isobel, Sophie

    2016-12-01

    There is significant multidisciplinary work contributing to the implementation of trauma informed care (TIC) into mental health policy and practice in Australia. Within psychiatry, there may be potential confusion about how to navigate the integration of TIC into a speciality built upon treating psychological distress; creating dismissive reactions of a patronising approach and paradoxical radicalism. This paper aims to discuss the need for psychiatry to view TIC as a significant and urgent paradigm shift required to integrate existing knowledge about the prevalence and effects of trauma into a progressive articulation of the relational and interpersonal underpinnings of modern psychiatric practice; and to lead and support its widespread implementation. Active consideration of the intent of TIC may aid in reducing misunderstanding and misaligned resistance while allowing services and individuals an important opportunity to reflect on how to deliver mental health treatment that is universally sensitive to the dynamics of trauma in the care environment. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  3. Adverse childhood experiences and trauma informed care: the future of health care.

    PubMed

    Oral, Resmiye; Ramirez, Marizen; Coohey, Carol; Nakada, Stephanie; Walz, Amy; Kuntz, Angela; Benoit, Jenna; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are related to short- and long-term negative physical and mental health consequences among children and adults. Studies of the last three decades on ACEs and traumatic stress have emphasized their impact and the importance of preventing and addressing trauma across all service systems utilizing universal systemic approaches. Current developments on the implementation of trauma informed care (TIC) in a variety of service systems call for the surveillance of trauma, resiliency, functional capacity, and health impact of ACEs. Despite such efforts in adult medical care, early identification of childhood trauma in children still remains a significant public health need. This article reviews childhood adversity and traumatic toxic stress, presents epidemiologic data on the prevalence of ACEs and their physical and mental health impacts, and discusses intervention modalities for prevention.

  4. Palliative medicine in the surgical intensive care unit and trauma.

    PubMed

    Toevs, Christine C

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of palliative medicine is to prevent and relieve suffering and to help patients and their families set informed goals of care and treatment. Palliative medicine can be provided along with life-prolonging treatment or as the main focus of treatment. Increasingly, palliative medicine has a role in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and trauma. Data show involving palliative medicine in the SICU results in decreased length of stay, improved communication with families and patients, and earlier setting of goals of care, without increasing mortality. The use of triggers for palliative medicine consultation improves patient-centered care in the SICU. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trauma systems and early management of severe injuries in Scandinavia: review of the current state.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Thomas; Søreide, Kjetil; Ringdal, Kjetil G; Rehn, Marius; Krüger, Andreas J; Reite, Andreas; Meling, Terje; Naess, Pål Aksel; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2010-05-01

    Scandinavian countries face common challenges in trauma care. It has been suggested that Scandinavian trauma system development is immature compared to that of other regions. We wanted to assess the current status of Scandinavian trauma management and system development. An extensive search of the Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE and SweMed+ databases was conducted. Wide coverage was prioritized over systematic search strategies. Scandinavian publications from the last decade pertaining to trauma epidemiology, trauma systems and early trauma management were included. The incidence of severe injury ranged from 30 to 52 per 100,000 inhabitants annually, with about 90% due to blunt trauma. Parts of Scandinavia are sparsely populated with long pre-hospital distances. In accordance with other European countries, pre-hospital physicians are widely employed and studies indicate that this practice imparts a survival benefit to trauma patients. More than 200 Scandinavian hospitals receive injured patients, increasingly via multidisciplinary trauma teams. Challenges remain concerning pre-hospital identification of the severely injured. Improved triage allows for a better match between patient needs and the level of resources available. Trauma management is threatened by the increasing sub-specialisation of professions and institutions. Scandinavian research is leading the development of team- and simulation-based trauma training. Several pan-Scandinavian efforts have facilitated research and provided guidelines for clinical management. Scandinavian trauma research is characterised by an active collaboration across countries. The current challenges require a focus on the role of traumatology within an increasingly fragmented health care system. Regional networks of predictable and accountable pre- and in-hospital resources are needed for efficient trauma systems. Successful development requires both novel research and scientific assessment of imported principles of trauma care. (c

  6. Damage control – trauma care in the first hour and beyond: a clinical review of relevant developments in the field of trauma care

    PubMed Central

    Midwinter, M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Trauma provision in the UK is a topic of interest. Regional trauma networks and centres are evolving and research is blossoming, but what bearing does all this have on the care that is delivered to the individual patient? This article aims to provide an overview of key research concepts in the field of trauma care, to guide the clinician in decision making in the management of major trauma. Methods The Ovid MEDLINE®, EMBASE™ and PubMed databases were used to search for relevant articles on haemorrhage control, damage control resuscitation and its exceptions, massive transfusion protocols, prevention and correction of coagulopathy, acidosis and hypothermia, and damage-control surgery. Findings A wealth of research is available and a broad range has been reviewed to summarise significant developments in trauma care. Research has been categorised into disciplines and it is hoped that by considering each, a tailored management plan for the individual trauma patient will evolve, potentially improving patient outcome. PMID:23827287

  7. A human factors subsystems approach to trauma care.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Ken; Ley, Eric; Wiegmann, Doug; Blaha, Jennifer; Shouhed, Daniel; Gangi, Alexandra; Blocker, Renaldo; Karl, Richard; Karl, Cathy; Taggart, Bill; Starnes, Benjamin; Gewertz, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    A physician-centered approach to systems design is fundamental to ameliorating the causes of many errors, inefficiencies, and reliability problems. To use human factors engineering to redesign the trauma process based on previously identified impediments to care related to coordination problems, communication failures, and equipment issues. This study used an interrupted time series design to collect historically controlled data via prospective direct observation by trained observers. We studied patients from a level I trauma center from August 1 through October 31, 2011, and August 1 through October 31, 2012. A range of potential solutions based on previous observations, trauma team engagement, and iterative cycles identified the most promising subsystem interventions (headsets, equipment storage, medication packs, whiteboard, prebriefing, and teamwork training). Five of the 6 subsystem interventions were successfully deployed. Communication headsets were found to be unsuitable in simulation. The primary outcome measure was flow disruptions, with treatment time and length of stay as secondary outcome measures. A total of 86 patients were observed before the intervention and 120 after the intervention. Flow disruptions increased if the patient had undergone computed tomography (CT) (F1200 = 20.0, P < .001) and had been to the operating room (F1200 = 63.1, P < .001), with an interaction among the intervention, trauma level, and CT (F1200 = 6.50, P = .01). For total treatment time, there was an effect of the intervention (F1200 = 21.7, P < .001), whether the patient had undergone CT (F1200 = 43.0, P < .001), and whether the patient had been to the operating room (F1200 = 85.8, P < .001), with an interaction among the intervention, trauma level, and CT (F1200 = 15.1, P < .001), reflecting a 20- to 30-minute reduction in time in the emergency department. Length of stay was reduced significantly for patients with major mortality risk (P = .01) from a median of 8 to 5

  8. Multidisciplinary trauma team care in Kandahar, Afghanistan: current injury patterns and care practices.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Pelletier, Pierre; Mamczak, Christiaan; Benfield, Rodd; Elster, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Multidisciplinary trauma care systems have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Medical care in support of the global war on terror has provided opportunities to refine these systems. We report on the multidisciplinary trauma care system at the Role III Hospital at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. We reviewed the Joint Trauma System Registry, Kandahar database from 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010 and extracted data regarding patient demographics, clinical variables and outcomes. We also queried the operating room records from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. In the study period of 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010, 2599 patients presented to the trauma bay, with the most common source of injury being from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blasts (915), followed by gunshot wounds (GSW) (327). Importantly, 19 patients with triple amputations as a result of injuries from IEDs were seen. 127 patients were massively transfused. The in-hospital mortality was 4.45%. From 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010, 4106.24 operating room hours were logged to complete 1914 patient cases. The mean number of procedures per case in 2009 was 1.27, compared to 3.11 in 2010. Multinational, multidisciplinary care is required for the large number of severely injured patients seen at Kandahar Airfield. Multidisciplinary trauma care in Kandahar is effective and can be readily employed in combat hospitals in Afghanistan and serve as a model for civilian centres. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Determining the composition and benefit of the pre-hospital medical response team in the conflict setting.

    PubMed

    Davis, P R; Rickards, A C; Ollerton, J E

    2007-12-01

    To determine the optimal composition o f the pre-hospital medical response team (MERT) and the value of pre-hospital critical care interventions in a military setting, and specifically to determine both the benefit of including a doctor in the pre-hospital response team and the relevance of the time and distance to definitive care. A comprehensive review of the literature incorporating a range of electronic search engines and hand searches of key journals. There was no level 1 evidence on which to base conclusions. The 15 most relevant articles were analysed in detail. There was one randomized controlled trial (level 2 evidence) that supports the inclusion of a doctor on MERT. Several cohort studies were identified that analysed the benefits of specific critical care interventions in the pre-hospital setting. A doctor with critical care skills deployed on the MERT is associated with improved survival in victims of major trauma. Specific critical care interventions including emergency endotracheal intubation and ventilation, and intercostal drainage are associated with improved survival and functional recovery in certain patients. These benefits appear to be more easily demonstrated for the rural and remote setting than for the urban setting.

  10. Developing a trauma care syllabus for intensive care nurses in the United Kingdom: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Dean; Cole, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    Increased rates of mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) following injury have been associated with a lack of trauma specific training. Despite this, training relevant to nurses is limited. Currently, little consideration has been given to understanding the potential training needs of ICU nurses in caring for critically injured patients. The aim of this study was to construct a consensus syllabus of trauma care for registered nurses working in an intensive care setting. A two round modified Delphi was conducted. Twenty-eight intensive care professionals participated in the study in 2014 in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed using content and descriptive statistics. Round-1 generated 343 subjects. Following analysis these were categorised into 75 subjects and returned to the panel for rating. An 82% (23/28) response rate to round-2 identified high consensus (equal to or greater than 80%) in 55 subjects, which reflected the most severely injured patients needs. There is a requirement for specific training to prepare the ICU nurse for caring for the critically injured patient. This survey presents a potential core syllabus in trauma care and should be considered by educators to develop a meaningful programme of trauma education for ICU nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of motorcycle taxi drivers in the pre-hospital care of road traffic injury victims in rural Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Naira; Mello, Michael J; Clark, Melissa A

    2010-08-01

    This study explored the role of motorcycle taxi drivers in the pre-hospital care of road traffic injury victims in the province of Monte Plata, Dominican Republic. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of 58 motorcycle taxi drivers working at six different highway taxi posts. The majority of drivers surveyed (67.2%) indicated witnessing a motor vehicle crash. The most common type of help drivers reported providing was transportation of crash victims (41%). Only 15.8% of drivers had ever attended a first-aid course but 84.5% expressed interest in attending a course if given the opportunity.

  12. Trauma on the Internet: early experience with a World Wide Web server dedicated to trauma and critical care.

    PubMed

    Block, E F; Mire, E J

    1996-08-01

    The Internet is the newest and one of the most powerful communications media today. This study evaluates the utility of dissemination of educational information and exchange of ideas related to trauma at a single site on the Internet. A World Wide Web server on a desktop computer provided a library of downloadable medical software, trauma prevention information, and patient case studies. Most server accesses came from connections at other educational institutions (29.6%). Connections by foreign clients accounted for 17.9% of use. Over a 6-month period, the usage increased from an average of 80 files transmitted per day to 600 per day (750% increase). A trauma and surgical critical care related data server has shown a progressive increase in use in its initial period. Further development by other trauma care providers will be of value in educating the health care community and lay public.

  13. Anaesthesiologist-provided prehospital airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rognås, Leif; Hansen, Troels M; Kirkegaard, Hans; Tønnesen, Else

    2014-12-01

    Guidelines recommend that patients with brain trauma with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 9 should have an airway established. Hypoxia, hypotension and hypertension as well as hypoventilation and hyperventilation may worsen outcome in these patients. The objectives were to investigate guideline adherence, reasons for nonadherence and the incidences of complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in patients with traumatic brain injury. We prospectively collected data from eight anaesthesiologist-staffed prehospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region according to the Utstein-style template. Among 1081 consecutive prehospital advanced airway management patients, we identified 54 with a traumatic brain injury and an initial GCS score of less than 9. Guideline adherence in terms of airway management was 92.6%. The reasons for nonadherence were the patient's condition, anticipated difficult airway management and short distance to the emergency department. Following rapid sequence intubation (RSI), 11.4% developed oxygen saturation below 90%, 9.1% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg and 48.9% had a first post-RSI systolic blood pressure below 120 mmHg. The incidence of hypertension following prehospital RSI was 4.5%. The incidence of postendotracheal intubation hyperventilation was as high as 71.1%. The guideline adherence was high. The incidences of post-RSI hypoxia and systolic blood pressure below 90 compare with the results reported from other physician-staffed prehospital services. The incidence of systolic blood pressure below 120 as well as that of hyperventilation following prehospital endotracheal intubation in patients with traumatic brain injury call for a change in our current practice.

  14. Trauma-informed medical care: CME communication training for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Bonnie L; Saunders, Pamela A; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and health care costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; wait-list groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were family medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13, 83% family medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient centeredness than did the delayed PCPs, with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient centeredness from before to after training. This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans.

  15. Experiential Learning in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care: A Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Vidar

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of 141 nursing students' diaries and focus group interviews about their work with an ambulance service revealed the following: holistic nursing played a role; they developed appreciation for paramedics' skills; and experiential learning helped them understand the complete care process from the emergency call to patient discharge. (SK)

  16. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. Methods This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Results Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. Conclusions This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies. PMID:26893947

  17. Convergence of Health Level Seven Version 2 Messages to Semantic Web Technologies for Software-Intensive Systems in Telemedicine Trauma Care.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Pedro Monteiro; Cook, Timothy Wayne; Cavalini, Luciana Tricai

    2016-01-01

    To present the technical background and the development of a procedure that enriches the semantics of Health Level Seven version 2 (HL7v2) messages for software-intensive systems in telemedicine trauma care. This study followed a multilevel model-driven approach for the development of semantically interoperable health information systems. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) ABCDE protocol was adopted as the use case. A prototype application embedded the semantics into an HL7v2 message as an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) file, which was validated against an XML schema that defines constraints on a common reference model. This message was exchanged with a second prototype application, developed on the Mirth middleware, which was also used to parse and validate both the original and the hybrid messages. Both versions of the data instance (one pure XML, one embedded in the HL7v2 message) were equally validated and the RDF-based semantics recovered by the receiving side of the prototype from the shared XML schema. This study demonstrated the semantic enrichment of HL7v2 messages for intensive-software telemedicine systems for trauma care, by validating components of extracts generated in various computing environments. The adoption of the method proposed in this study ensures the compliance of the HL7v2 standard in Semantic Web technologies.

  18. Multiple triangulation and collaborative research using qualitative methods to explore decision making in pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maxine; O'Hara, Rachel; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2017-01-24

    Paramedics make important and increasingly complex decisions at scene about patient care. Patient safety implications of influences on decision making in the pre-hospital setting were previously under-researched. Cutting edge perspectives advocate exploring the whole system rather than individual influences on patient safety. Ethnography (the study of people and cultures) has been acknowledged as a suitable method for identifying health care issues as they occur within the natural context. In this paper we compare multiple methods used in a multi-site, qualitative study that aimed to identify system influences on decision making. The study was conducted in three NHS Ambulance Trusts in England and involved researchers from each Trust working alongside academic researchers. Exploratory interviews with key informants e.g. managers (n = 16) and document review provided contextual information. Between October 2012 and July 2013 researchers observed 34 paramedic shifts and ten paramedics provided additional accounts via audio-recorded 'digital diaries' (155 events). Three staff focus groups (total n = 21) and three service user focus groups (total n = 23) explored a range of experiences and perceptions. Data collection and analysis was carried out by academic and ambulance service researchers as well as service users. Workshops were held at each site to elicit feedback on the findings and facilitate prioritisation of issues identified. The use of a multi-method qualitative approach allowed cross-validation of important issues for ambulance service staff and service users. A key factor in successful implementation of the study was establishing good working relationships with academic and ambulance service teams. Enrolling at least one research lead at each site facilitated the recruitment process as well as study progress. Active involvement with the study allowed ambulance service researchers and service users to gain a better understanding of the research

  19. Multiple trauma exposure and psychosocial functioning in Singaporean children in out-of-home care.

    PubMed

    Liu, Denise; Chu, Chi Meng; Neo, Lee Hong; Ang, Rebecca P; Tan, Michelle Yan Ling; Chu, Jeanie

    2016-07-01

    Children in out-of-home care are often exposed to chronic, interpersonal traumas such as abuse and domestic violence. Exposure to more than 1 interpersonal trauma is associated with functional impairments, mental health symptoms, and risk behaviors. Despite the importance of studying trauma in this vulnerable population, very few studies have investigated trauma exposure among children and youth in out-of-home