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Sample records for preliminary antigenic characterisation

  1. Purification and characterisation of antigenic gliadins in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, H; Friis, S U; Norén, O; Anthonsen, D

    1992-05-15

    Two gliadins, known to be especially antigenic in coeliac disease, were purified to homogeneity by a series of ion-exchange chromatography steps. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed minor differences but clearly classified them as gamma-type gliadins. The purified gliadins were further characterised with respect to amino acid composition, molecular mass and E1(1%)cm at 276 nm. Based on these properties it is suggested that one of them is identical to a gamma-type gliadin, earlier characterised by its nucleotide sequence, whereas the other has not previously been described. The purification procedure may form the basis for the development of a more differentiated analysis of circulating antibodies for diagnosis and makes clinical testing of the toxicity of defined gliadin peptides feasible.

  2. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  3. Purification of Piscirickettsia salmonis and partial characterisation of antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, M.N.; Landolt, M.L.; Powell, D.B.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is the etiological agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia, an economically significant disease affecting the salmon aquaculture industry. As with other rickettsial pathogens, antigenic analysis of P. salmonis has been limited by the inherent difficulties of purifying an intracellular organism away from host cell material. In this report, we describe the use of diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium (DMDS) density gradient centrifugation to purify P. salmonis grown in chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cells. Plaque assay titers and total protein assays confirmed that viable P. salmonis was consistently concentrated in a visible band within the DMDS density gradient at a density of 1.15 to 1.16 g ml-1. Recovery of purified, viable organisms from DMDS density gradients varied from 0.6 to 3%. Preparations of uninfected CHSE-214 cells, CHSE-214 cells infected with P. salmonis, and gradient-purified P. salmonis were compared using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to assess the degree of purification and to identify P. salmonis-specific proteins. Although gradient-purified P. salmonis preparations were not completely free of host cell material, 8 bacterial proteins were identified. Polyclonal rabbit antiserum was used in an immunoblot of proteins from purified P. salmonis to identify 3 major and 5 minor antigens. The major antigens of 56, 30 and 20 kDa were potential candidates for experimental vaccines and development of novel diagnostic assays.

  4. Optimization of a micro-neutralisation assay and its application in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yipu; Gu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Whittaker, Lynne; Gregory, Victoria; Li, Xiaoyan; Metin, Simon; Cattle, Nicholas; Daniels, Rodney S; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W

    2015-06-13

    The identification of antigenic variants and the selection of influenza viruses for vaccine production are based largely on antigenic characterisation of the haemagglutinin (HA) of circulating viruses using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. However, additional to evolution related to escape from host immunity, variants emerging as a result of propagation in different cell substrates can complicate interpretation of HI results. The objective was to develop further a micro-neutralisation (MN) assay to complement the HI assay in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses to assess the emergence of new antigenic variants and reinforce the selection of vaccine viruses. A 96-well-plate plaque reduction MN assay based on measurement of the Infected Cell Population (ICP) using a simple imaging technique. Improvements to the plaque reduction MN assay included selection of the most suitable cell line according to virus type or subtype, and optimisation of experimental design and data quantitation. Comparisons of the results of MN and HI assays showed the importance of complementary data in determining the true antigenic relationships among recent human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and type B viruses. Our study demonstrates that the improved MN assay has certain advantages over the HI assay: it is not significantly influenced by the cell-selected amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase (NA) of A(H3N2) viruses, and it is particularly useful for antigenic characterisation of viruses which either grow to low HA titre and/or undergo an abortive infection resulting in an inability to form plaques in cultured cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimisation of a micro-neutralisation assay and its application in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yipu; Gu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Whittaker, Lynne; Gregory, Victoria; Li, Xiaoyan; Metin, Simon; Cattle, Nicholas; Daniels, Rodney S; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The identification of antigenic variants and the selection of influenza viruses for vaccine production are based largely on antigenic characterisation of the haemagglutinin (HA) of circulating viruses using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. However, in addition to evolution related to escape from host immunity, variants emerging as a result of propagation in different cell substrates can complicate the interpretation of HI results. The objective was to develop further a micro-neutralisation (MN) assay to complement the HI assay in antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses to assess the emergence of new antigenic variants and reinforce the selection of vaccine viruses. Design and setting A 96-well-plate plaque reduction MN assay based on the measurement of infected cell population using a simple imaging technique. Sample Representative influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, A(H3N2) and B viruses isolated between 2004 and 2013 Main outcome measures and results Improvements to the plaque reduction MN assay included selection of the most suitable cell line according to virus type or subtype, and optimisation of experimental design and data quantitation. Comparisons of the results of MN and HI assays showed the importance of complementary data in determining the true antigenic relationships among recent human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and type B viruses. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the improved MN assay has certain advantages over the HI assay: it is not significantly influenced by the cell-selected amino acid substitutions in the neuraminidase (NA) of A(H3N2) viruses, and it is particularly useful for antigenic characterisation of viruses which either grow to low HA titre and/or undergo an abortive infection resulting in an inability to form plaques in cultured cells. PMID:26073976

  6. Antigenic and molecular characterisation of Border disease virus associated with high mortality in lambs in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vega, S.; Rosell, R.; Orden, J. A.; Pérez, T.; Marín, C.; González, S.; Marco, I.; Cabezón, O.; de la Fuente, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Border disease virus (BDV) causes congenital disorders in sheep and results in severe, but underestimated, economic losses worldwide. However, information about BDV strains affecting several ruminants worldwide is scarce. Therefore, antigenic and genetic classification of isolates from different geographical regions is important to enhance the knowledge of the epidemiology of BDV. Materials and methods Five pestiviruses isolated from lambs in an epidemic outbreak with an unusually high mortality in Spain in 1997 were characterised antigenically with a panel of monoclonal antibodies and genetically by sequencing within the 50 untranslated (50UTR) region of the genome. Results All the isolates were classified as BDV and showed a high homology with the Aveyron strain (Av), which was associated with an epidemic reported in sheep from the Aveyron region of France in 1984. Conclusions Classification of the isolates from this study provides valuable information on the molecular epidemiology of BDV. PMID:26392884

  7. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2).

  8. Identification and characterisation of citrullinated antigen-specific B cells in peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kerkman, Priscilla F; Fabre, Emeline; van der Voort, Ellen I H; Zaldumbide, Arnaud; Rombouts, Yoann; Rispens, Theo; Wolbink, Gertjan; Hoeben, Rob C; Spits, Hergen; Baeten, Dominique L P; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Scherer, Hans U

    2016-06-01

    Immunity to citrullinated antigens is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We set out to elucidate its biology by identifying and characterising citrullinated antigen-specific B cells in peripheral blood of patients with RA. Differentially labelled streptavidin and extravidin tetramers were conjugated to biotinylated CCP2 or control antigens and used in flow cytometry to identify citrullinated antigen-specific B cells in peripheral blood. Tetramer-positive and tetramer-negative B cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) followed by in vitro culture and analysis of culture supernatants for the presence of antibodies against citrullinated protein antigens (ACPA) by ELISA. Cells were phenotypically characterised by flow cytometry. By combining differentially labelled CCP2 tetramers, we successfully separated citrullinated antigen-specific B cells from non-specific background signals. Isolated tetramer-positive B cells, but not tetramer-negative cells, produced large amounts of ACPA upon in vitro stimulation. Phenotypic analyses revealed that citrullinated antigen-specific B cells displayed markers of class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, whereas only few cells displayed a naïve phenotype. The frequency of tetramer-positive cells was high (up to 1/500 memory B cells with a median of 1/12 500 total B cells) and correlated with ACPA serum titres and spontaneous ACPA production in culture. We developed a technology to identify and isolate citrullinated antigen-specific B cells from peripheral blood of patients with RA. Most cells have a memory phenotype, express IgA or IgG and are present in relatively high frequencies. These data pave the path for a direct and detailed molecular characterisation of ACPA-expressing B cells and could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Characterisation of the native lipid moiety of Echinococcus granulosus antigen B.

    PubMed

    Obal, Gonzalo; Ramos, Ana Lía; Silva, Valeria; Lima, Analía; Batthyany, Carlos; Bessio, María Inés; Ferreira, Fernando; Salinas, Gustavo; Ferreira, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    Antigen B (EgAgB) is the most abundant and immunogenic antigen produced by the larval stage (metacestode) of Echinococcus granulosus. It is a lipoprotein, the structure and function of which have not been completely elucidated. EgAgB apolipoprotein components have been well characterised; they share homology with a group of hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) present exclusively in cestode organisms, and consist of different isoforms of 8-kDa proteins encoded by a polymorphic multigene family comprising five subfamilies (EgAgB1 to EgAgB5). In vitro studies have shown that EgAgB apolipoproteins are capable of binding fatty acids. However, the identity of the native lipid components of EgAgB remains unknown. The present work was aimed at characterising the lipid ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo. EgAgB was purified to homogeneity from hydatid cyst fluid and its lipid fraction was extracted using chloroform∶methanol mixtures. This fraction constituted approximately 40-50% of EgAgB total mass. High-performance thin layer chromatography revealed that the native lipid moiety of EgAgB consists of a variety of neutral (mainly triacylglycerides, sterols and sterol esters) and polar (mainly phosphatidylcholine) lipids. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis showed that 16∶0, 18∶0 and 18∶1(n-9) are the most abundant fatty acids in EgAgB. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography coupled to light scattering demonstrated that EgAgB comprises a population of particles heterogeneous in size, with an average molecular mass of 229 kDa. Our results provide the first direct evidence of the nature of the hydrophobic ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo and indicate that the structure and composition of EgAgB lipoprotein particles are more complex than previously thought, resembling high density plasma lipoproteins. Results are discussed considering what is known on lipid metabolism in cestodes, and taken into account the Echinococcus spp. genomic information regarding both lipid

  10. Characterisation of the Native Lipid Moiety of Echinococcus granulosus Antigen B

    PubMed Central

    Obal, Gonzalo; Ramos, Ana Lía; Silva, Valeria; Lima, Analía; Batthyany, Carlos; Bessio, María Inés; Ferreira, Fernando; Salinas, Gustavo; Ferreira, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    Antigen B (EgAgB) is the most abundant and immunogenic antigen produced by the larval stage (metacestode) of Echinococcus granulosus. It is a lipoprotein, the structure and function of which have not been completely elucidated. EgAgB apolipoprotein components have been well characterised; they share homology with a group of hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) present exclusively in cestode organisms, and consist of different isoforms of 8-kDa proteins encoded by a polymorphic multigene family comprising five subfamilies (EgAgB1 to EgAgB5). In vitro studies have shown that EgAgB apolipoproteins are capable of binding fatty acids. However, the identity of the native lipid components of EgAgB remains unknown. The present work was aimed at characterising the lipid ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo. EgAgB was purified to homogeneity from hydatid cyst fluid and its lipid fraction was extracted using chloroform∶methanol mixtures. This fraction constituted approximately 40–50% of EgAgB total mass. High-performance thin layer chromatography revealed that the native lipid moiety of EgAgB consists of a variety of neutral (mainly triacylglycerides, sterols and sterol esters) and polar (mainly phosphatidylcholine) lipids. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis showed that 16∶0, 18∶0 and 18∶1(n-9) are the most abundant fatty acids in EgAgB. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography coupled to light scattering demonstrated that EgAgB comprises a population of particles heterogeneous in size, with an average molecular mass of 229 kDa. Our results provide the first direct evidence of the nature of the hydrophobic ligands bound to EgAgB in vivo and indicate that the structure and composition of EgAgB lipoprotein particles are more complex than previously thought, resembling high density plasma lipoproteins. Results are discussed considering what is known on lipid metabolism in cestodes, and taken into account the Echinococcus spp. genomic information regarding both lipid

  11. Protective antibody titres and antigenic competition in multivalent Dichelobacter nodosus fimbrial vaccines using characterised rDNA antigens.

    PubMed

    Raadsma, H W; O'Meara, T J; Egerton, J R; Lehrbach, P R; Schwartzkoff, C L

    1994-03-01

    The relationship between K-agglutination antibody titres and protection against experimental challenge with Dichelobacter nodosus, the effect of increasing the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, and the importance of the nature of additional antigens in multivalent vaccines on antibody response and protection against experimental challenge with D. nodosus were examined in Merino sheep. A total of 204 Merino sheep were allocated to one of 12 groups, and vaccinated with preparations containing a variable number of rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial antigens. The most complex vaccine contained ten fimbrial antigens from all major D. nodosus serogroups, while the least complex contained a single fimbrial antigen. In addition to D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, other bacterial rDNA fimbrial antigens (Moraxella bovis Da12d and Escherichia coli K99), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used in some vaccines. Antibody titres to fimbrial antigens and BSA were measured by agglutination and ELISA tests, respectively. Antibody titres were determined on five occasions (Weeks 0, 3, 6, 8, and 11 after primary vaccination). All sheep were exposed to an experimental challenge with virulent isolates of D. nodosus from either serogroup A or B, 8 weeks after primary vaccination. For D. nodosus K-agglutinating antibody titres, a strong negative correlation between antibody titre and footrot lesion score was observed. This relationship was influenced by the virulence of the challenge strain. Increasing the number of fimbrial antigens in experimental rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial vaccines resulted in a linear decrease in K-agglutinating antibody titres to individual D. nodosus serogroups. Similarly, a linear decrease in protection to challenge with homologous serogroups was observed as the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens represented in the vaccine increased. The reduction in antibody titres in multicomponent vaccines is thought to be due to antigenic competition. The level of competition

  12. Genetic and antigenic characterisation of serotype A FMD viruses from East Africa to select new vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Fufa D.; Parida, Satya; Tekleghiorghis, Tesfaalem; Dekker, Aldo; Sangula, Abraham; Reeve, Richard; Haydon, Daniel T.; Paton, David J.; Mahapatra, Mana

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine strain selection for emerging foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outbreaks in enzootic countries can be addressed through antigenic and genetic characterisation of recently circulating viruses. A total of 56 serotype A FMDVs isolated between 1998 and 2012, from Central, East and North African countries were characterised antigenically by virus neutralisation test using antisera to three existing and four candidate vaccine strains and, genetically by characterising the full capsid sequence data. A Bayesian analysis of the capsid sequence data revealed the viruses to be of either African or Asian topotypes with subdivision of the African topotype viruses into four genotypes (Genotypes I, II, IV and VII). The existing vaccine strains were found to be least cross-reactive (good matches observed for only 5.4–46.4% of the sampled viruses). Three bovine antisera, raised against A-EA-2007, A-EA-1981 and A-EA-1984 viruses, exhibited broad cross-neutralisation, towards more than 85% of the circulating viruses. Of the three vaccines, A-EA-2007 was the best showing more than 90% in-vitro cross-protection, as well as being the most recent amongst the vaccine strains used in this study. It therefore appears antigenically suitable as a vaccine strain to be used in the region in FMD control programmes. PMID:25171846

  13. Genetic and antigenic characterisation of serotype A FMD viruses from East Africa to select new vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Bari, Fufa D; Parida, Satya; Tekleghiorghis, Tesfaalem; Dekker, Aldo; Sangula, Abraham; Reeve, Richard; Haydon, Daniel T; Paton, David J; Mahapatra, Mana

    2014-10-07

    Vaccine strain selection for emerging foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) outbreaks in enzootic countries can be addressed through antigenic and genetic characterisation of recently circulating viruses. A total of 56 serotype A FMDVs isolated between 1998 and 2012, from Central, East and North African countries were characterised antigenically by virus neutralisation test using antisera to three existing and four candidate vaccine strains and, genetically by characterising the full capsid sequence data. A Bayesian analysis of the capsid sequence data revealed the viruses to be of either African or Asian topotypes with subdivision of the African topotype viruses into four genotypes (Genotypes I, II, IV and VII). The existing vaccine strains were found to be least cross-reactive (good matches observed for only 5.4-46.4% of the sampled viruses). Three bovine antisera, raised against A-EA-2007, A-EA-1981 and A-EA-1984 viruses, exhibited broad cross-neutralisation, towards more than 85% of the circulating viruses. Of the three vaccines, A-EA-2007 was the best showing more than 90% in-vitro cross-protection, as well as being the most recent amongst the vaccine strains used in this study. It therefore appears antigenically suitable as a vaccine strain to be used in the region in FMD control programmes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunochemical characterisation of species-specific antigens in bovine crude heparin.

    PubMed

    Rivera, V; Levieux, A; Levieux, D

    2002-07-01

    In order to develop immunoassays for the control of the species origin of crude heparins, polyclonal antisera were produced in rabbits against samples obtained from the last purification steps of bovine intestinal crude heparin. The reactivity of the antisera was analysed by agar gel double immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, crossed and line immunoelectrophoresis. Up to 13 antigenic components were detected in the effluents of the ion-exchange chromatographic step, and three in the final crude heparin. The major and most anodic antigen (Ag1) was recovered in bovine crude heparin purified by the two different industrial processes. This bovine specific antigen was found in high concentrations in lung, liver, small intestine, spleen and kidney. It displayed an apparent molecular weight of 45 kDa by size-exclusion chromatography. Though the identification of Ag1 is not yet fully elucidated, a single radial immunodiffusion assay has been developed for the quantification of this antigen, allowing the detection of 6 p 1000 bovine crude heparin in porcine heparin (50 mg/ml) after 2 h diffusion.

  15. Molecular characterisation and stage-specific expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kilbey, B J; Fraser, I; McAleese, S; Goman, M; Ridley, R G

    1993-01-25

    The gene encoding the malarial homologue of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA, has been identified and characterised. It is located on chromosome 13. The coding sequence of 825 nucleotides predicts a protein of 30,586 Da. There are no introns and northern analysis reveals a transcript of approximately 1.6kb. The conserved residues which characterise the PCNAs of human, Drosophila, Saccharomyces and Xenopus are present in PfPCNA but the overall identity of PfPCNA with human and yeast PCNAs is low; 34% and 31% respectively. PfPCNA is longer than the PCNAs of these other species by about 16 amino acids, most of which are present in a block near the carboxy terminus. Antibodies against a purified PfPCNA-glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein recognise a single band in western blots of parasite extracts at 32kDa. The same antiserum has been used to demonstrate that the expression of PfPCNA is regulated during the intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. Expression increases dramatically in late trophozoites and is maintained during the subsequent nuclear divisions which produce schizonts.

  16. Expression and immunological characterisation of Eimeria tenella glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigen-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sue-Kim; Nathan, Sheila; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Eimeria tenella is the most pathogenic of the Eimeria species that infect chickens and causes huge economic losses to the poultry industry. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigen-5 (SAG5) found on the surface of the parasite has been shown to activate the chicken's immune system. In this study, recombinant SAG5 was expressed, purified and used to investigate the immune-inducing characteristics of the molecule. Chickens were immunized with purified recombinant SAG5 and sera were subjected to Enzyme-linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA). Results indicated that specific antibodies against rSAG5 were produced, with IgG detected at a higher level compared to IgA and IgM. Information on the immunological responses elicited by SAG5 provides essential knowledge that will contribute towards the effort to develop more effective strategies against coccidiosis.

  17. Characterisation of maternal human leukocyte antigen class I antibodies in suspected foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Refsum, E; Mörtberg, A; Dahl, J; Meinke, S; Auvinen, M-K; Westgren, M; Reilly, M; Höglund, P; Wikman, A

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the specificities and level of HLA class I antibodies in selected cases referred for suspected foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). FNAIT occurs in 1 : 1-2000 live births, whereas maternal immunisation against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is common. Whether HLA class I antibodies alone can cause FNAIT is debatable. A total of 260 patient samples were referred between 2007 and 2012. Referrals with maternal HLA class I antibodies and no other cause for the neonatal thrombocytopenia were included for analysis (cases, n = 23). HPA-1a negative mothers were excluded. Control groups were screened positive mothers of healthy neonates (controls, n = 33) and female blood donors (blood donors, n = 19). LABScreen single antigen HLA class I beads was used for antibody analysis. Clinical records were reviewed for cases. All groups had broad antibody reactivity. Cases had more antibodies with high SFI levels compared with the controls (SFI>9999; medians 26, 6 and 0; P < 0·05) and higher overall median HLA-ABC and HLA-B SFI (P < 0·05). Many of the antibodies were reactive with rare alleles. When reviewing the clinical records, several of the cases had other contributing factors to the thrombocytopenia. There was no correlation between foetal platelet count and antibody levels. Mothers of thrombocytopenic neonates had higher levels of HLA class I antibodies compared with control groups of women with healthy children and female blood donors. However, clinical outcome and antibody response correlated poorly in the heterogeneous case group, indicating a multifactorial cause to the thrombocytopenia in the majority of cases. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  18. Antibodies to the GABAB receptor in limbic encephalitis with seizures: case series and characterisation of the antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Lai, Meizan; Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan; Constantinescu, Radu; Raizer, Jeffrey; Friedman, Daniel; Skeen, Mark B; Grisold, Wolfgang; Kimura, Akio; Ohta, Kouichi; Iizuka, Takahiro; Guzman, Miguel; Graus, Francesc; Moss, Stephen J; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Some encephalitides or seizure disorders once thought idiopathic now seem to be immune mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of one such disorder and to identify the autoantigen involved. Methods 15 patients who were suspected to have paraneoplastic or immune-mediated limbic encephalitis were clinically assessed. Confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the autoantigen. An assay of HEK293 cells transfected with rodent GABAB1 or GABAB2 receptor subunits was used as a serological test. 91 patients with encephalitis suspected to be paraneoplastic or immune mediated and 13 individuals with syndromes associated with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 were used as controls. Findings All patients presented with early or prominent seizures; other symptoms, MRI, and electroencephalography findings were consistent with predominant limbic dysfunction. All patients had antibodies (mainly IgG1) against a neuronal cell-surface antigen; in three patients antibodies were detected only in CSF. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry showed that the antibodies recognise the B1 subunit of the GABAB receptor, an inhibitory receptor that has been associated with seizures and memory dysfunction when disrupted. Confocal microscopy showed colocalisation of the antibody with GABAB receptors. Seven of 15 patients had tumours, five of which were small-cell lung cancer, and seven patients had non-neuronal autoantibodies. Although nine of ten patients who received immunotherapy and cancer treatment (when a tumour was found) showed neurological improvement, none of the four patients who were not similarly treated improved (p=0.005). Low levels of GABAB1 receptor antibodies were identified in two of 104 controls (p<0.0001). Interpretation GABAB receptor autoimmune encephalitis is a potentially treatable disorder characterised by seizures and, in some patients, associated with small-cell lung cancer and

  19. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  20. Improving influenza virological surveillance in Europe: strain-based reporting of antigenic and genetic characterisation data, 11 European countries, influenza season 2013/14

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Eeva; Hungnes, Olav; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Prosenc, Katarina; Daniels, Rod; Guiomar, Raquel; Ikonen, Niina; Kossyvakis, Athanasios; Pozo, Francisco; Puzelli, Simona; Thomas, Isabelle; Waters, Allison; Wiman, Åsa; Meijer, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data are crucial for influenza vaccine composition decision making. Previously, aggregate data were reported to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control by European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries. A system for collecting case-specific influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data was established for the 2013/14 influenza season. In a pilot study, 11 EU/EEA countries reported through the new mechanism. We demonstrated feasibility of reporting strain-based antigenic and genetic data and ca 10% of influenza virus-positive specimens were selected for further characterisation. Proportions of characterised virus (sub)types were similar to influenza virus circulation levels. The main genetic clades were represented by A/StPetersburg/27/2011(H1N1)pdm09 and A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2). A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were more prevalent in age groups (by years) < 1 (65%; p = 0.0111), 20–39 (50%; p = 0.0046) and 40–64 (55%; p = 0.00001) while A(H3N2) viruses were most prevalent in those ≥ 65 years (62%*; p = 0.0012). Hospitalised patients in the age groups 6–19 years (67%; p = 0.0494) and ≥ 65 years (52%; p = 0.0005) were more frequently infected by A/Texas/50/2012 A(H3N2)-like viruses compared with hospitalised cases in other age groups. Strain-based reporting enabled deeper understanding of influenza virus circulation among hospitalised patients and substantially improved the reporting of virus characterisation data. Therefore, strain-based reporting of readily available data is recommended to all reporting countries within the EU/EEA. PMID:27762211

  1. Characterisation of the 33kDa piroplasm surface antigen of Theileria orientalis/sergenti/buffeli isolates from West Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Govaerts, Marc; Verhaert, Peter; Jongejan, Frans; Goddeeris, Bruno M

    2002-03-01

    The immunodominant 33/35kDa antigen of a Theileria isolate from West Java, Indonesia, was characterised and immuno-affinity purified by use of a monoclonal antibody, KUL-a4, and was shown to be representative of the T. orientalis/sergenti/buffeli group. The aminoterminal sequence of the purified 35kDa peptide (20 residues) was determined by automated Edman degradation and found to correspond to the predicted amino acid sequence of a prospective p33 gene previously sequenced from the same isolate. The cleavage site of a putative signal peptide was identified and conforms the (-3, -1) rule for signal peptidases. The existence of dimeric and trimeric forms of the p33/35 antigen is hypothesised from Western blot profiles. KUL-a4 appeared specific for the T. orientalis/sergenti/buffeli group. It did not recognise in indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT), intraerythrocytic bodies of Anaplasma marginale or piroplasms and schizonts of T. mutans, T. parva and T. annulata, whereas cattle antisera raised to these species showed cross-reactivity in IFAT. It however, appeared weakly cross-reactive in Western blot and ELISA, with the 34kDa piroplasm antigen of one T. annulata (Gharb) isolate. The present study indicates that the isolated antigen belongs to the p33/34 antigen family described within the T. sergenti/orientalis/buffeli group, and documents the group-specificity of one of its epitopes.

  2. Characterising Developmental Language Impairment in Serbian-Speaking Children: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukovic, Mile; Stojanovik, Vesna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article is to provide preliminary data on the use of auxiliaries and clitics in Serbian-speaking children with developmental language impairment. Two groups of children (a group of 30 children with developmental language impairment and a group of 30 typically developing children) aged between 48 and 83 months and matched on IQ took…

  3. Preliminary characterisation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-10 responses to Chlamydia pecorum infection in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Mathew, Marina; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Debilitating infectious diseases caused by Chlamydia are major contributors to the decline of Australia's iconic native marsupial species, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). An understanding of koala chlamydial disease pathogenesis and the development of effective strategies to control infections continue to be hindered by an almost complete lack of species-specific immunological reagents. The cell-mediated immune response has been shown to play an influential role in the response to chlamydial infection in other hosts. The objective of this study, hence, was to provide preliminary data on the role of two key cytokines, pro-inflammatory tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 (IL10), in the koala Chlamydia pecorum response. Utilising sequence homology between the cytokine sequences obtained from several recently sequenced marsupial genomes, this report describes the first mRNA sequences of any koala cytokine and the development of koala specific TNFα and IL10 real-time PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes from koala samples. In preliminary studies comparing wild koalas with overt chlamydial disease, previous evidence of C. pecorum infection or no signs of C. pecorum infection, we revealed strong but variable expression of TNFα and IL10 in wild koalas with current signs of chlamydiosis. The description of these assays and the preliminary data on the cell-mediated immune response of koalas to chlamydial infection paves the way for future studies characterising the koala immune response to a range of its pathogens while providing reagents to assist with measuring the efficacy of ongoing attempts to develop a koala chlamydial vaccine.

  4. Preliminary Characterisation of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin-10 Responses to Chlamydia pecorum Infection in the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Marina; Beagley, Kenneth W.; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Debilitating infectious diseases caused by Chlamydia are major contributors to the decline of Australia's iconic native marsupial species, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). An understanding of koala chlamydial disease pathogenesis and the development of effective strategies to control infections continue to be hindered by an almost complete lack of species-specific immunological reagents. The cell-mediated immune response has been shown to play an influential role in the response to chlamydial infection in other hosts. The objective of this study, hence, was to provide preliminary data on the role of two key cytokines, pro-inflammatory tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and anti-inflammatory interleukin 10 (IL10), in the koala Chlamydia pecorum response. Utilising sequence homology between the cytokine sequences obtained from several recently sequenced marsupial genomes, this report describes the first mRNA sequences of any koala cytokine and the development of koala specific TNFα and IL10 real-time PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes from koala samples. In preliminary studies comparing wild koalas with overt chlamydial disease, previous evidence of C. pecorum infection or no signs of C. pecorum infection, we revealed strong but variable expression of TNFα and IL10 in wild koalas with current signs of chlamydiosis. The description of these assays and the preliminary data on the cell-mediated immune response of koalas to chlamydial infection paves the way for future studies characterising the koala immune response to a range of its pathogens while providing reagents to assist with measuring the efficacy of ongoing attempts to develop a koala chlamydial vaccine. PMID:23527290

  5. Characterisation and differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains by their protein and antigen profiles.

    PubMed

    Walochnik, J; Sommer, K; Obwaller, A; Haller-Schober, E-M; Aspöck, H

    2004-03-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba are the causative agents of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis. Acanthamoebae occur ubiquitously in the environment and are thus a constant cause of antigenic stimulation. In a previous study we have shown that compared to control sera, AK patients exhibit markedly lower immunoreactivities to whole cell antigen of Acanthamoeba spp. As the pathogenicity of acanthamoebae primarily relies on the excretion of proteins, it was the aim of the present study to investigate the immunoreactivity of metabolic antigen from different Acanthamoeba strains of varying pathogenicity. Three Acanthamoeba strains, one highly pathogenic, one non-pathogenic but thermophilic and one non-thermophilic non-pathogenic, were used for antigen extraction. The antigen was harvested before and after contact with human cells and all strains were tested with AK sera and with sera from healthy individuals. It was shown that the somatic protein profiles of the Acanthamoeba strains correlated to the morphological groups, and that within morphological group II-the group associated with AK-the profiles of the metabolic antigens correlated to strain pathogenicity. Moreover, it was shown that the control sera showed markedly higher immunoreactivities than the sera of the AK patients and that this immunoreactivity was generally higher to the non-pathogenic strains than to the pathogenic strain. Altogether our results once again raise the question of whether there is an immunological predisposition in AK. To our knowledge this is the first study on the immunoreactivity of metabolic antigen of acanthamoebae.

  6. a Preliminary Characterisation of SYMBIODINIUM Diversity in Some Common Corals from Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa Tanzil, Jani Thuaibah; Ng, Abigayle Pek Kaye; Tey, Yi Qing; Tan, Beverly Hsin Yi; Yun, Eric Yao; Huang, Danwei

    The symbiosis between corals and Symbiodinium dinoflagellates is considered a major driver of the distribution and health of reefs worldwide. This study investigated the genetic identities and diversity of Symbiodinium in seven coral species (Porites lutea, Porites lobata, Acropora millepora, Merulina ampliata, Diploastrea heliopora, Pachyseris speciosa, Pocillopora acuta) from three shallow reefs around Singapore (Kusu Island, Pulau Tekukor, Pulau Satumu). Analyses of 31 colonies using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer region indicated the dominance of C and D Symbiodinium clades. The latter clade was the predominant symbiont in Pachyseris speciosa collected from Pulau Tekukor but those sampled from Pulau Satumu hosted C27, providing evidence for variable symbiosis in this species. The prevalence of the D clade - noted for their stress tolerance (e.g. to elevated temperatures and sedimentation) - in three of seven coral species examined could underlie the importance of this particular symbiotic relationship for the persistence of Singapore’s impacted reefs. Further characterisation of Symbiodinium communities may provide insights into corals’ response to stress and their bleaching patterns in the future.

  7. Preliminary Characterisation Of Proteins In Aquatic Samples: A Key To Understanding The Organic Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, V.; Ruddell, C. J.; Wainwright, G.; Jaffe, R.; Wolff, G. A.

    When discussing the nitrogen cycle, the dissolved organic nitrogen pool is often treated as a 'black box', due to the analytical difficulties associated with the character- isation of its components. Proteins contain a significant portion of the organic nitro- gen in aquatic systems and recent studies have suggested that certain protein species present in the aquatic environment are not as labile as it was originally thought (e.g. Suzuki et al., 1999) and may therefore form an important part of the long term nitro- gen cycle. The aim of this work is to apply extremely sensitive techniques, recently developed in the biochemical / biomedical field, to characterise proteins in aquatic samples. Two analytical approaches are followed: sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) with silver staining and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (peptide mapping). In this poster, we concentrate on SDS PAGE. Large volume water samples were collected at the Everglades National Park, Florida, which encompasses a wide array of ecosystems, ranging from freshwater canals to a shallow marine bay. Samples were concentrated and desalted by tangential flow filtration and proteins were isolated by repeated trichloroacetic acid precipitation. Leaf extracts of the dominant vegetation at each site were prepared. Application of SDS PAGE revealed a large number of distinct protein bands for all sites, corresponding to approximate molecular weights ranging from 30kDa to 250kDa. Protein distributions varied between sites, although bands corresponding to approximate molecular weights of 37kDa, 41kDa, 45kDa, 58kDa and 145kDa were ubiquitous. The 37kDa band in particular was also observed in all leaf extracts pre- pared, suggesting it may represent a recalcitrant molecule, which originates in the higher plant vegetation.

  8. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-01-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  9. Channel characterisation for future Ka-band Mobile Satellite Systems and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Mario; Buonomo, Sergio; Arbesser-Rastburg, Bertram

    1994-08-01

    Mobile satellite systems (MSS) are presently designed or planned to operate, with the exception of OMNITRACKS, in the lower part of the frequency spectrum (UHF to S-bands). The decisions taken at the last World Administrative Radio Conference in 1992 to increase the allocated L- and S-bands for MSS services will only partly alleviate the problem of system capacity. In addition the use of L-and S-band frequencies generally requires large antenna apertures on board the satellite terminal side. The idea of exploiting the large spectrum resources available at higher frequencies (20-30 GHz) and the perspective of reducing user terminal size (and possibly price too) have spurred the interest of systems designers and planners. On the other hand, Ka-band frequencies suffer from increased slant path losses due to atmospheric attenuation phenomena. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently embarked on a number of activities aimed at studying the effect of the typical mobile propagation impairments at Ka-band. This paper briefly summarizes ESA efforts in this field of research and presents preliminary experimental results.

  10. Catalogue of the main gas manifestation of Greece: Geochemical characterisation and preliminary gas hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Calabrese, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Like other geodynamically active areas, the Hellenic territory is also affected by a large number of geogenic gas manifestations. These occur either in form of point sources (fumaroles, mofettes, bubbling gases) or as diffuse soil gas emanations. The present work produced a first catalogue of the geogenic gas manifestations of the whole Hellenic territory also considering a few literature data. All collected samples were analysed for their chemical composition (He, Ne, Ar, O2, N2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4 and CO2) and isotopic composition (He, CO2-C, CH4-C, N2-N). Geogenic sources release huge amounts of gases, which, apart from having important influences on the global climate, could have strong impact on human health. Gases have both acute and chronic effects. Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulphide are the main gases responsible for acute mortality due to their asphyxiating and/or toxic properties. Methane instead represents a risk for its explosive properties. Gas hazard is often disregarded because in fatal episodes connected to geogenic gases the death cause is often not correctly attributed. Due to the fact that geodynamic active areas can release geogenic gases for million years over wide areas, it is important not to underestimate potential risks. A preliminary estimation of the gas hazard has been made for the time period of the last 20 years considering the whole population of Greece. In this period at least two fatal episodes with a total of three victims could be certainly attributed to geogenic gases (specifically CO2). This would give a risk of 1.3×10-8 fatality from geogenic gas manifestations per annum. Such value, although probably underestimated, is much lower than most other natural or anthropogenic risks. Nevertheless this risk, being unevenly distributed along the whole territory, should not be overlooked especially in areas with high density of gas manifestations and high soil gas fluxes.

  11. Peptide mapping and characterisation of glycation patterns of the glima 38 antigen recognised by autoantibodies in Type I diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Roll, U; Turck, C W; Gitelman, S E; Rosenthal, S M; Nolte, M S; Masharani, U; Ziegler, A G; Baekkeskov, S

    2000-05-01

    Glima 38 is an N-glycated neuroendocrine membrane protein of M(r) 38,000, which is recognised by autoantibodies in approximately 20% of patients with Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to characterise the carbohydrate moiety and generate peptide maps of glima 38. Sera of high immunoreactivity to glima 38 were used to isolate 35-S methionine-labelled protein from betaTC-3 cells and a neuronal cell line GT1.7. Tunicamycin was used to inhibit N-glycation of glima 38 and define the core protein. The carbohydrate moiety was characterised for tunicamycin sensitivity, lectin binding and susceptibility to different endoglycosidases. The protein moiety was subjected to digestion by proteases to define peptide maps. The autoreactive epitopes in glima 38 recognised by Type I diabetic sera are conformational and independent of the carbohydrate moiety. Inhibition of N-glycation of glima 38 in vivo, shows a protein core of M(r) 22,000 in both pancreatic beta-(betaTC3) and neuronal (GT1.7) cell lines. The carbohydrate moieties in the two cell types are distinct but contain a similar amount of terminal sialic acid residues and at least five oligosaccharide chains Glima 38 binds Triticum vulgare and Ricinus communis I lectins. Endoproteinase treatment of the M(r) 22,000 core protein results in peptides of M(r) 4500 and M(r) 20,000 with Lys-C, and peptides of M(r) 4000 and M(r) 11,000-12,000 with Glu-C/V8 and Asp-N proteases. The biochemical properties of glima 38 define it as a new autoantigen in Type I diabetes and provide a basis for its purification.

  12. Characterisation of Antigen B Protein Species Present in the Hydatid Cyst Fluid of Echinococcus canadensis G7 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Folle, Ana Maite; Kitano, Eduardo S.; Lima, Analía; Gil, Magdalena; Cucher, Marcela; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Iwai, Leo K.; Rosenzvit, Mara; Batthyány, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The larva of cestodes belonging to the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) complex causes cystic echinococcosis (CE). It is a globally distributed zoonosis with significant economic and public health impact. The most immunogenic and specific Echinococcus-genus antigen for human CE diagnosis is antigen B (AgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the hydatid cyst fluid (HF). The AgB protein moiety (apolipoprotein) is encoded by five genes (AgB1-AgB5), which generate mature 8 kDa proteins (AgB8/1-AgB8/5). These genes seem to be differentially expressed among Echinococcus species. Since AgB immunogenicity lies on its protein moiety, differences in AgB expression within E. granulosus s.l. complex might have diagnostic and epidemiological relevance for discriminating the contribution of distinct species to human CE. Interestingly, AgB2 was proposed as a pseudogene in E. canadensis, which is the second most common cause of human CE, but proteomic studies for verifying it have not been performed yet. Herein, we analysed the protein and lipid composition of AgB obtained from fertile HF of swine origin (E. canadensis G7 genotype). AgB apolipoproteins were identified and quantified using mass spectrometry tools. Results showed that AgB8/1 was the major protein component, representing 71% of total AgB apolipoproteins, followed by AgB8/4 (15.5%), AgB8/3 (13.2%) and AgB8/5 (0.3%). AgB8/2 was not detected. As a methodological control, a parallel analysis detected all AgB apolipoproteins in bovine fertile HF (G1/3/5 genotypes). Overall, E. canadensis AgB comprised mostly AgB8/1 together with a heterogeneous mixture of lipids, and AgB8/2 was not detected despite using high sensitivity proteomic techniques. This endorses genomic data supporting that AgB2 behaves as a pseudogene in G7 genotype. Since recombinant AgB8/2 has been found to be diagnostically valuable for human CE, our findings indicate that its use as antigen in immunoassays could contribute to false negative results in

  13. Characterisation of Antigen B Protein Species Present in the Hydatid Cyst Fluid of Echinococcus canadensis G7 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Folle, Ana Maite; Kitano, Eduardo S; Lima, Analía; Gil, Magdalena; Cucher, Marcela; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Iwai, Leo K; Rosenzvit, Mara; Batthyány, Carlos; Ferreira, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    The larva of cestodes belonging to the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) complex causes cystic echinococcosis (CE). It is a globally distributed zoonosis with significant economic and public health impact. The most immunogenic and specific Echinococcus-genus antigen for human CE diagnosis is antigen B (AgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the hydatid cyst fluid (HF). The AgB protein moiety (apolipoprotein) is encoded by five genes (AgB1-AgB5), which generate mature 8 kDa proteins (AgB8/1-AgB8/5). These genes seem to be differentially expressed among Echinococcus species. Since AgB immunogenicity lies on its protein moiety, differences in AgB expression within E. granulosus s.l. complex might have diagnostic and epidemiological relevance for discriminating the contribution of distinct species to human CE. Interestingly, AgB2 was proposed as a pseudogene in E. canadensis, which is the second most common cause of human CE, but proteomic studies for verifying it have not been performed yet. Herein, we analysed the protein and lipid composition of AgB obtained from fertile HF of swine origin (E. canadensis G7 genotype). AgB apolipoproteins were identified and quantified using mass spectrometry tools. Results showed that AgB8/1 was the major protein component, representing 71% of total AgB apolipoproteins, followed by AgB8/4 (15.5%), AgB8/3 (13.2%) and AgB8/5 (0.3%). AgB8/2 was not detected. As a methodological control, a parallel analysis detected all AgB apolipoproteins in bovine fertile HF (G1/3/5 genotypes). Overall, E. canadensis AgB comprised mostly AgB8/1 together with a heterogeneous mixture of lipids, and AgB8/2 was not detected despite using high sensitivity proteomic techniques. This endorses genomic data supporting that AgB2 behaves as a pseudogene in G7 genotype. Since recombinant AgB8/2 has been found to be diagnostically valuable for human CE, our findings indicate that its use as antigen in immunoassays could contribute to false negative results in

  14. A novel ex vivo immunoproteomic approach characterising Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens identified using immune antibody from resistant sheep.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Timothy C; Cooke, Ira; Faou, Pierre; Toet, Hayley; Piedrafita, David; Young, Neil; Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Beddoe, Travis; Anderson, Glenn; Dempster, Robert; Spithill, Terry W

    2017-08-01

    A more thorough understanding of the immunological interactions between Fasciola spp. and their hosts is required if we are to develop new immunotherapies to control fasciolosis. Deeper knowledge of the antigens that are the target of the acquired immune responses of definitive hosts against both Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica will potentially identify candidate vaccine antigens. Indonesian Thin Tail sheep express a high level of acquired immunity to infection by F. gigantica within 4weeks of infection and antibodies in Indonesian Thin Tail sera can promote antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against the surface tegument of juvenile F. gigantica in vitro. Given the high protein sequence similarity between F. hepatica and F. gigantica, we hypothesised that antibody from F. gigantica-infected sheep could be used to identify the orthologous proteins in the tegument of F. hepatica. Purified IgG from the sera of F. gigantica-infected Indonesian Thin Tail sheep collected pre-infection and 4weeks p.i. were incubated with live adult F. hepatica ex vivo and the immunosloughate (immunoprecipitate) formed was isolated and analysed via liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry to identify proteins involved in the immune response. A total of 38 proteins were identified at a significantly higher abundance in the immunosloughate using week 4 IgG, including eight predicted membrane proteins, 20 secreted proteins, nine proteins predicted to be associated with either the lysosomes, the cytoplasm or the cytoskeleton and one protein with an unknown cellular localization. Three of the membrane proteins are transporters including a multidrug resistance protein, an amino acid permease and a glucose transporter. Interestingly, a total of 21 of the 38 proteins matched with proteins recently reported to be associated with the proposed small exosome-like extracellular vesicles of adult F. hepatica, suggesting that the Indonesian Thin Tail week

  15. Characterisation and analysis of thioredoxin peroxidase as a potential antigen for the serodiagnosis of sarcoptic mange in rabbits by dot-ELISA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scabies caused by Sarcoptes scabiei is a widespread but a neglected tropical zoonosis. In this study, we characterised a S. scabiei thioredoxin peroxidase (SsTPx) and evaluated a recombinant SsTPx as a diagnostic antigen in rabbits. Methods The open reading frame of the gene encoding SsTPx-2 was amplified and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified. SsTPx was localized in mite tissue by immunolocalisation using the purified recombinant protein. Serodiagnosis assays were carried out in 203 New Zealand White rabbit serum samples by dot-ELISA. Result The open reading frame (489 bp) of the gene encodes an 18.11 kDa protein, which showed highly homology to that of Psoroptes cuniculi (98.77% identity) and belongs to the 2-Cys family of peroxiredoxins. SsTPx was mainly distributed in muscle tissues of mites, integument of the epidermis and the anterior end of S. scabiei. Although SsTPx cross-reactivity with psoroptic mites was observed, the SsTPx dot-ELISA showed excellent diagnostic ability, with 95.3% sensitivity and 93.8% specificity in mange-infected and uninfected groups. Conclusions This study showed that the purified SsTPx is a highly sensitive antigen for the diagnosis of mange infection by dot-ELISA. This technique is a rapid and convenient method that can be used worldwide for the clinical diagnosis of sarcoptic mange in rabbits, and is especially useful in developing regions. PMID:23875925

  16. Establishment and characterisation of a novel bovine SV40 large T-antigen-transduced foetal hepatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Gleich, Alexander; Kaiser, Bastian; Schumann, Julia; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2016-06-01

    Due to lack of in vitro models for bovine hepatocytes apart from primary cells, there is demand for a bovine hepatocyte-derived cell line. Transduction of bovine foetal hepatocytes with SV40 large T-antigen was performed using the vector pRetro-E2 SV40. Phase contrast microscopy was carried out to evaluate morphology. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to study expression of keratins, tight junction proteins zona occludens-1 and claudin-1, glucose transporter-2 and P-glycoprotein as well as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Urea and triglyceride production was quantified photometrically. Histochemical staining of glycogen by Periodic acid-Schiff stain and of lipids with Oil red O was performed after 24 h incubation with 20 mM glucose and 85 μM palmitic acid, respectively. Gene expression analysis of hepatocyte-typical genes was conducted by reverse transcription PCR. We obtained a SV40LTAg-transduced extended passage cell line, referred to as BFH12. Polygonal growth, keratins, tight junction proteins zona occludens-1 and claudin-1 and glucose transporter-2 as well as P-glycoprotein and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were attested positively. Urea production calculated as cell-specific rate was 14.2 ± 2.0 fmol/h (early passage) and 17.6 ± 3.7 fmol/h (late passage). Cell-specific triglyceride production was 1.6 ± 0.5 fmol/h (early passage) and 2.1 ± 0.3 fmol/h (late passage). Additionally, cells were positive for glycogen and lipid storage and showed a gene expression pattern resembling foetal hepatocytes. With the properties described here, the novel cell line BFH12 is a hepatocyte-derived cell line which can be used as an in vitro whole cell model.

  17. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-01-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  18. Encephalitis with refractory seizures, status epilepticus, and antibodies to the GABAA receptor: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and analysis of the effects of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Armangue, Thaís; Peng, Xiaoyu; Bataller, Luis; Cellucci, Tania; Davis, Rebecca; McCracken, Lindsey; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Mason, Warren P; Kruer, Michael C; Ritacco, David G; Grisold, Wolfgang; Meaney, Brandon F; Alcalá, Carmen; Sillevis-Smitt, Peter; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that seizures and status epilepticus can be immune-mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of a new epileptic disorder, and to establish the target antigen and the effects of patients' antibodies on neuronal cultures. In this observational study, we selected serum and CSF samples for antigen characterisation from 140 patients with encephalitis, seizures or status epilepticus, and antibodies to unknown neuropil antigens. The samples were obtained from worldwide referrals of patients with disorders suspected to be autoimmune between April 28, 2006, and April 25, 2013. We used samples from 75 healthy individuals and 416 patients with a range of neurological diseases as controls. We assessed the samples using immunoprecipitation, mass spectrometry, cell-based assay, and analysis of antibody effects in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with confocal microscopy. Neuronal cell-membrane immunoprecipitation with serum of two index patients revealed GABAA receptor sequences. Cell-based assay with HEK293 expressing α1/β3 subunits of the GABAA receptor showed high titre serum antibodies (>1:160) and CSF antibodies in six patients. All six patients (age 3-63 years, median 22 years; five male patients) developed refractory status epilepticus or epilepsia partialis continua along with extensive cortical-subcortical MRI abnormalities; four patients needed pharmacologically induced coma. 12 of 416 control patients with other diseases, but none of the healthy controls, had low-titre GABAA receptor antibodies detectable in only serum samples, five of them also had GAD-65 antibodies. These 12 patients (age 2-74 years, median 26.5 years; seven male patients) developed a broader spectrum of symptoms probably indicative of coexisting autoimmune disorders: six had encephalitis with seizures (one with status epilepticus needing pharmacologically induced coma; one with epilepsia partialis continua), four had stiff-person syndrome (one with seizures

  19. Encephalitis with refractory seizures, status epilepticus, and antibodies to the GABAA receptor: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and analysis of the effects of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Armangue, Thaís; Peng, Xiaoyu; Bataller, Luis; Cellucci, Tania; Davis, Rebecca; McCracken, Lindsey; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Mason, Warren P; Kruer, Michael C; Ritacco, David G; Grisold, Wolfgang; Meaney, Brandon F; Alcalá, Carmen; Sillevis-Smitt, Peter; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increasing evidence suggests that seizures and status epilepticus can be immune-mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of a new epileptic disorder, and to establish the target antigen and the effects of patients’ antibodies on neuronal cultures. Methods In this observational study, we selected serum and CSF samples for antigen characterisation from 140 patients with encephalitis, seizures or status epilepticus, and antibodies to unknown neuropil antigens. The samples were obtained from worldwide referrals of patients with disorders suspected to be autoimmune between April 28, 2006, and April 25, 2013. We used samples from 75 healthy individuals and 416 patients with a range of neurological diseases as controls. We assessed the samples using immunoprecipitation, mass spectrometry, cell-based assay, and analysis of antibody effects in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with confocal microscopy. Findings Neuronal cell-membrane immunoprecipitation with serum of two index patients revealed GABAA receptor sequences. Cell-based assay with HEK293 expressing α1/β3 subunits of the GABAA receptor showed high titre serum antibodies (>1:160) and CSF antibodies in six patients. All six patients (age 3–63 years, median 22 years; five male patients) developed refractory status epilepticus or epilepsia partialis continua along with extensive cortical-subcortical MRI abnormalities; four patients needed pharmacologically induced coma. 12 of 416 control patients with other diseases, but none of the healthy controls, had low-titre GABAA receptor antibodies detectable in only serum samples, five of them also had GAD-65 antibodies. These 12 patients (age 2–74 years, median 26·5 years; seven male patients) developed a broader spectrum of symptoms probably indicative of coexisting autoimmune disorders: six had encephalitis with seizures (one with status epilepticus needing pharmacologically induced coma; one with epilepsia partialis continua), four

  20. Characterisation of 0.22 caliber rimfire gunshot residues by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Coumbaros, J; Kirkbride, K P; Klass, G; Skinner, W

    2001-06-01

    The application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) for the characterisation of gunshot residue (GSR) from 0.22 caliber rimfire ammunition is reported. Results obtained by TOF-SIMS were compared with conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. As could be expected, TOF-SIMS exhibited greater elemental sensitivity than SEM equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detection (SEM-EDX), and was also capable of detecting fragments characteristic of inorganic compounds. This preliminary study indicates that TOF-SIMS offers substantial potential for forensic GSR examinations as a complementary technique to SEM-EDX. In addition TOF-SIMS is applicable to the analysis of individual particles in the typical size range encountered in GSR casework.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a surface antigen glycoprotein, SAG19, from Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Ramly, Nur Zazarina; Rouzheinikov, Sergey N; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E; Baker, Patrick J; Chow, Yock Ping; Wan, Kiew Lian; Nathan, Sheila; Rice, David W

    2013-12-01

    Coccidiosis in chickens is caused by the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella and is thought to involve a role for a superfamily of more than 20 cysteine-rich surface antigen glycoproteins (SAGs) in host-parasite interactions. A representative member of the family, SAG19, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. Crystals of SAG19 diffracted to beyond 1.50 Å resolution and belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 108.2, c = 37.5 Å. Calculation of possible values of VM suggests that there is a single molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  2. Preliminary protective capacity study of a Dicrocoelium dendriticum antigenic protein in hamsters.

    PubMed

    González-Lanza, C; Manga-González, M Y; Revilla-Nuín, B

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protective capacity of 130 kDa Dicrocoelium dendriticum protein in hamsters experimentally infected with this parasite. Forty hamsters divided into four groups of ten animals each were used: G1 (control), G2 (infected), G3 (immunized with Freund's adjuvant and infected), G4 (130 kDa protein vaccinated + adjuvant and infected). Infection with 40 metacercariae/hamster was carried out 4 weeks after the last immunization. Parasitological studies [number of eggs per gram (epg) and worm burden] and biochemical parameters (total proteins, albumin, and total bilirubin), hepatic enzymes [aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT)], and total IgG levels were determined. A reduction in epg in G3 and G4 was observed 16 weeks postinfection with the higher reduction percentage in the latter (25.2%). No statistically significant differences were detected in the number of recovered worms among groups, although the mean was slightly less in G4 (12.2 +/- 2.08, mean +/- SE) than in G2 (15.4 +/- 2.90). In G4, global protection was 20.9% and an increase in AST and ALT levels was observed. Total IgG levels were similar in the three infected groups. The protection obtained was inadequate, so the antigen dose, immunization-infection period, adjuvants, and immunization route must be optimized.

  3. The Functional Response of B Cells to Antigenic Stimulation: A Preliminary Report of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Willem J.; Kleynhans, Léanie; du Plessis, Nelita; Stanley, Kim; Malherbe, Stephanus T.; Maasdorp, Elizna; Ronacher, Katharina; Chegou, Novel N.; Walzl, Gerhard; Loxton, Andre G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) remains a successful pathogen, causing tuberculosis disease numbers to constantly increase. Although great progress has been made in delineating the disease, the host-pathogen interaction is incompletely described. B cells have shown to function as both effectors and regulators of immunity via non-humoral methods in both innate and adaptive immune settings. Here we assessed specific B cell functional interaction following stimulation with a broad range of antigens within the LTBI milieu. Our results indicate that B cells readily produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (including IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17, IL-21 and TNF-α) in response to stimulation. TLR4 and TLR9 based stimulations achieved the greatest secreted cytokine-production response and BCG stimulation displayed a clear preference for inducing IL-1β production. We also show that the cytokines produced by B cells are implicated strongly in cell-mediated communication and that plasma (memory) B cells (CD19+CD27+CD138+) is the subset with the greatest contribution to cytokine production. Collectively our data provides insight into B cell responses, where they are implicated in and quantifies responses from specific B cell phenotypes. These findings warrant further functional B cell research with a focus on specific B cell phenotypes under conditions of active TB disease to further our knowledge about the contribution of various cell subsets which could have implications for future vaccine development or refined B cell orientated treatment in the health setting. PMID:27050308

  4. Characterisation of medical-waste sterilisation-plant wastewater and a preliminary study of coagulation-flocculation treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, O; Mihçiokur, H; Azgin, S T; Ozdemir, O

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater from a medical-waste sterilisation plant (MWSP) contains unique pollutants and requires on-site treatment to prevent contamination of the municipal sewage system and receiving water bodies. Therefore, to meet the prescribed discharge standards and comply with the legal regulations, pre-treatment must be applied to MWSP wastewater. In this study, the capabilities of coagulation-flocculation processes were investigated for MWSP wastewater treatment. Processes using ferric chloride, ferrous sulfate and aluminium sulfate as coagulants were characterised. During the coagulation experiments, seven different coagulant dosages and four different pH values were evaluated to determine the optimum coagulant dosage and pH value. The highest removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was obtained using 300 mg/L of ferric chloride at pH 10. A COD removal of about 60% as well as considerable reductions in the amounts of suspended solids, nitrogen and phosphorus were realised.

  5. Maine Coon renal screening: ultrasonographical characterisation and preliminary genetic analysis for common genes in cats with renal cysts.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Karine; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Lang, Johann; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of renal cysts and other renal abnormalities in purebred Maine Coon cats, and to characterise these through genetic typing. Voluntary pre-breeding screening programmes for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are offered for this breed throughout Switzerland, Germany and other northern European countries. We performed a retrospective evaluation of Maine Coon screening for renal disease at one institution over an 8-year period. Renal ultrasonography was performed in 187 healthy Maine Coon cats. Renal changes were observed in 27 of these cats. Renal cysts were found in seven cats, and were mostly single and unilateral (6/7, 85.7%), small (mean 3.6 mm) and located at the corticomedullary junction (4/6, 66.7%). Sonographical changes indicating chronic kidney disease (CKD) were observed in 10/187 (5.3%) cats and changes of unknown significance were documented in 11/187 (5.9%) cats. All six cats genetically tested for PKD1 were negative for the mutation, and gene sequencing of these cats did not demonstrate any common genetic sequences. Cystic renal disease occurs with a low prevalence in Maine Coons and is unrelated to the PKD observed in Persians and related breeds. Ultrasonographical findings compatible with CKD are not uncommon in juvenile Maine Coons.

  6. Strong Magnetic Field Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    coils were driven by a pulsed-power system to generate the fields. All the sources were characterised through a series of measurements and modelling... generated for the coils. Options for further investigation were provided. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED This...investigation. The desired field strength was based on assessments [1] from preliminary magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ) modelling and while not achievable by

  7. Ruthenium(II) piano stool coordination compounds with aminomethylphosphanes: Synthesis, characterisation and preliminary biological study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Płotek, Michał; Starosta, Radosław; Komarnicka, Urszula K; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Kołoczek, Przemysław; Kyzioł, Agnieszka

    2017-05-01

    Reaction of {[Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl]2(μ-Cl)2} (1) with aminomethylphosphane derived from morpholine (P{CH2N(CH2CH2)2O}3 (A), PPh2{CH2N(CH2CH2)2O} (B)) or piperazine (P{CH2N(CH2CH2)2NCH2CH3}3 (C), PPh2{CH2N(CH2CH2)2NCH2CH3} (D)) results in four new piano stool ruthenium(II) coordination compounds: [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(A)] (2A), [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(B)] (2B), [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(C)] (2C) and [Ru(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(D)] (2D). Every complex was fully characterized using spectroscopic methods ((1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H} NMR and ESI-MS), elemental analysis, X-ray single crystal diffraction and DFT calculations. Preliminary studies of in vitro cytotoxicity on the A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) and MCF7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cell lines revealed 2A-2D activity in the same order of magnitude as in the case of cisplatin. Additionally, the study confirmed the ability of 2A-2D to interact with DNA helix and transferrin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary study of thyroid and colon cancers-associated antigens and their cognate autoantibodies as potential cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kiyamova, Ramziya; Garifulin, Oleg; Gryshkova, Vitalina; Kostianets, Olga; Shyian, Maksym; Gout, Ivan; Filonenko, Valeriy

    2012-06-01

    Autoantibodies, which are produced against tumor-associated antigens, are potential tumor markers and attract a growing interest for cancer detection, differential diagnostics and prognosis. To evaluate the diagnostic significance of 40 antigens identified by immunoscreening of cDNA libraries from thyroid and colon cancers by allogenic screening with different tumor types patients' sera. Plaque-spot serological assay. Increased frequency of antibody response in sera of cancer patients compared with that of healthy donors was shown toward 14 antigens, 8 of which (CG016, BTN3A3, FKBP4, XRCC4, TSGA2, ACTR1A, FXYD3 and CTSH) have revealed exclusively cancer-related serological profile. Allogenic screening of 40 SEREX-antigens with sera from cancer patients and healthy donors allowed us to reveal 14 antigens with potential diagnostic significance. These antigens and their cognate autoantibodies could be considered as valuable targets for further analysis as potential cancer biomarkers.

  9. Application of the pMHC Array to Characterise Tumour Antigen Specific T Cell Populations in Leukaemia Patients at Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Suzanne E; Bonney, Stephanie A; Lee, Cindy; Publicover, Amy; Khan, Ghazala; Smits, Evelien L; Sigurdardottir, Dagmar; Arno, Matthew; Li, Demin; Mills, Ken I; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H; van Tendeloo, Viggo; Mufti, Ghulam J; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Elliott, Tim J; Orchard, Kim H; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy treatments for cancer are becoming increasingly successful, however to further improve our understanding of the T-cell recognition involved in effective responses and to encourage moves towards the development of personalised treatments for leukaemia immunotherapy, precise antigenic targets in individual patients have been identified. Cellular arrays using peptide-MHC (pMHC) tetramers allow the simultaneous detection of different antigen specific T-cell populations naturally circulating in patients and normal donors. We have developed the pMHC array to detect CD8+ T-cell populations in leukaemia patients that recognise epitopes within viral antigens (cytomegalovirus (CMV) and influenza (Flu)) and leukaemia antigens (including Per Arnt Sim domain 1 (PASD1), MelanA, Wilms' Tumour (WT1) and tyrosinase). We show that the pMHC array is at least as sensitive as flow cytometry and has the potential to rapidly identify more than 40 specific T-cell populations in a small sample of T-cells (0.8-1.4 x 10(6)). Fourteen of the twenty-six acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients analysed had T cells that recognised tumour antigen epitopes, and eight of these recognised PASD1 epitopes. Other tumour epitopes recognised were MelanA (n = 3), tyrosinase (n = 3) and WT1(126-134) (n = 1). One of the seven acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) patients analysed had T cells that recognised the MUC1(950-958) epitope. In the future the pMHC array may be used provide point of care T-cell analyses, predict patient response to conventional therapy and direct personalised immunotherapy for patients.

  10. Antigenic and genetic characterisation of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from outbreaks in domestic fowl and turkeys in Great Britain during 1997.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D J; Banks, J; Collins, M S; Manvell, R J; Frost, K M; Speidel, E C; Aldous, E W

    1999-10-09

    Antigenic and genetic analyses of viruses from the 11 outbreaks of Newcastle disease in Great Britain, 12 of the outbreaks in Northern Ireland and the single outbreak in the Republic of Ireland which occurred in 1997, indicated that they were all essentially similar. In addition, the viruses from the British Isles were very similar to viruses isolated from three outbreaks in pheasants in Denmark between August and November 1996, from a goosander in Finland in September 1996, from an outbreak in chickens in Norway in February 1997, and from an outbreak in chickens in Sweden in November 1997. Viruses from outbreaks in other countries during 1995 to 1997 could be distinguished antigenically and/or genetically from the 1996 to 1997 Scandinavian/British Isles isolates, as could viruses responsible for two separate outbreaks in caged birds in quarantine premises in Great Britain in March 1997. Minor nucleotide differences in the 413-base region of the fusion gene and the 187-base region of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene sequenced in this study allowed the 1996 to 1997 Scandinavian/British Isles isolates to be divided into groups. These groups broadly corresponded to the clusters of disease outbreaks, but suggested that the discrete outbreak in Scotland was probably the result of virus spread from Northern Ireland. Overall, the antigenic and genetic analyses of these viruses were consistent with the theory that the virus was introduced into the British Isles by migratory birds moving from north-east Europe. However, it was not possible to rule out other sources, such as the movement of pheasants from Denmark.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum genetic diversity can be characterised using the polymorphic merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA-2) gene as a single locus marker.

    PubMed

    Prescott, N; Stowers, A W; Cheng, Q; Bobogare, A; Rzepczyk, C M; Saul, A

    1994-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Solomon Island Plasmodium falciparum isolates was examined using MSA-2 as a single locus marker. Amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments showed size polymorphism and the presence of mixed infections. Sequence analysis indicated a global representation of MSA-2 alleles with representatives of 3D7/CAMP allelic subfamilies and the FCQ-27 allelic family being identified. A simplified method of characterisation, utilising PCR-RFLPs of MSA-2 gene fragments, was developed. The RFLPs allowed identification of allelic families and further distinction within the 3D7/CAMP family. The amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments from culture derived lines revealed a loss of diversity for a number of Solomon Island isolates. Genomic diversity was confirmed for Solomon Island lines, along with Papua New Guinean and Thai lines, by the generation of 7H8/6 fingerprints. All lines were distinct and band sharing frequencies and Wagner tree construction failed to identify any geographic clustering.

  12. Pathogenicity and preliminary antigenic characterization of six infectious bursal disease virus strains isolated in France from acute outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Eterradossi, N; Picault, J P; Drouin, P; Guittet, M; L'Hospitalier, R; Bennejean, G

    1992-11-01

    Six isolates originating from acute outbreaks of infectious bursal disease recently reported in broiler and pullet flocks in France were studied with respect to their pathogenicity and their antigenic relatedness to the Faragher 52/70 reference strain. Although the mortality experimentally induced in susceptible chickens by the field strains was sometimes four times higher than that which followed the inoculation of the reference strain (16 to 48% versus 12%), neither mortality nor morbidity were observed in chickens previously vaccinated with a commercial live vaccine and then challenged under the same conditions. Agar gel precipitation tests demonstrated the existence of common antigens in the different strains, and high cross-neutralization indices measured in embryonated specific pathogen free eggs showed them all to belong to serotype I. These data are discussed with reference to previous European and North-American studies on the antigenic status of infectious bursal disease virus.

  13. The antigenic character of zinc-binding proteins and their localization in boar reproductive tract--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Mogielnicka-Brzozowska, Marzena; Fraser, Leyland; Strzeżek, Jerzy; Kordan, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    In this study immunoelectrophoretic and double immunodiffusion analyses were used to investigate the antigenic character of zinc-binding proteins (ZnBPs), whereas the indirect immunofluorescence technique was used to identify their origin in boar reproductive tract. The mmunoelectrophoretic analysis of ZnBPs of the seminal plasma resulted in the appearance of three antigenic protein complexes, while specific immunoreactivity patterns of the anti-ZnBP serum were detected by double immunodiffusion analysis. Indirect immunofluorescence technique confirmed that ZnBPs were secreted by different reproductive tract tissues, suggesting their contributions to the seminal plasma.

  14. Sweet characterisation of prostate specific antigen using electrochemical lectin-based immunosensor assay and MALDI TOF/TOF analysis: Focus on sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Pihikova, Dominika; Pakanova, Zuzana; Nemcovic, Marek; Barath, Peter; Belicky, Stefan; Bertok, Tomas; Kasak, Peter; Mucha, Jan; Tkac, Jan

    2016-12-01

    The construction of a sensitive electrochemical lectin-based immunosensor for detection of a prostate specific antigen (PSA) is shown here. Three lectins with different carbohydrate specificities were used in this study to glycoprofile PSA, which is the most common biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. The biosensor showed presence of α-L-fucose and α-(2,6)-linked terminal sialic acid within PSA´s glycan with high abundance, while only traces of α-(2,3)-linked terminal sialic acid were found. MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was applied to validate results obtained by the biosensor with a focus on determination of a type of sialic acid linkage by two methods. The first direct comparison of electrochemical immunosensor assay employing lectins for PSA glycoprofiling with mass spectrometric techniques is provided here and both methods show significant agreement. Thus, electrochemical lectin-based immunosensor has potential to be applied for prostate cancer diagnosis.

  15. Covalent modification of a melanoma-derived antigenic peptide with a natural quinone methide. Preliminary chemical, molecular modelling and immunological evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Douat-Casassus, Céline; Marchand-Geneste, Nathalie; Diez, Elisabeth; Aznar, Céline; Picard, Philippe; Geoffre, Serge; Huet, Aline; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Gervois, Nadine; Jotereau, Francine; Quideau, Stéphane

    2006-05-01

    A LigandFit shape-directed docking methodology was used to identify the best position at which the melanoma-derived MHC class-I HLA-A2-binding antigenic peptide ELAGIGILTV could be modified by attaching a small molecule capable of fitting at the interface of complementary determining regional (CDR) loops of a T-cell receptor (TCR) while triggering T-cell responses. The small molecule selected here for determining the feasibility of this alternative track to chemical alteration of antigenic peptides was the electrophilic quinone methide (+)-puupehenone (), a natural product that belongs to a family of marine metabolites capable of expressing immunomodulatory activities. A preliminary chemical reactivity model study revealed the efficacy of the thiol group of a cysteine (C) side-chain in its nucleophilic addition reaction with in a regio- and diastereoselective manner. The best TCR/HLA-A2 ligand [i.e., ELAGCGILTV-S-puupehenol ()] then identified by the LigandFit docking procedure was synthesized and used to pulse HLA-A2(+) T2 cells for T-cell stimulation. Among the ELAGIGILTV-specific T-cell clones we tested, five of them recognized the conjugate in spite of its low binding affinity for the HLA-A2 molecules. The resulting T-cell stimulation was determined through the intracytoplasmic secretion of IFN-gamma and the percentage of T-cells thus activated. These highly encouraging results indicate that small non-peptidic natural product-derived molecules attached onto the central part of an antigenic peptide can fit at the TCR/HLA-A2 interface with induction of T-cell responses.

  16. A novel non-rapid-eye movement and rapid-eye-movement parasomnia with sleep breathing disorder associated with antibodies to IgLON5: a case series, characterisation of the antigen, and post-mortem study.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Lidia; Gaig, Carles; Gelpi, Ellen; Bataller, Luis; Lewerenz, Jan; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Contreras, Angeles; Giometto, Bruno; Compta, Yaroslau; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Iranzo, Alex; Santamaría, Joan; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity might be associated with or implicated in sleep and neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to describe the features of a novel neurological syndrome associated with prominent sleep dysfunction and antibodies to a neuronal antigen. In this observational study, we used clinical and video polysomnography to identify a novel sleep disorder in three patients referred to the Sleep Unit of Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Spain, for abnormal sleep behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea. These patients had antibodies against a neuronal surface antigen, which were also present in five additional patients referred to our laboratory for antibody studies. These five patients had been assessed with polysomnography, which was done in our sleep unit in one patient and the recording reviewed in a second patient. Two patients underwent post-mortem brain examination. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the antigen and develop an assay for antibody testing. Serum or CSF from 298 patients with neurodegenerative, sleep, or autoimmune disorders served as control samples. All eight patients (five women; median age at disease onset 59 years [range 52-76]) had abnormal sleep movements and behaviours and obstructive sleep apnoea, as confirmed by polysomnography. Six patients had chronic progression with a median duration from symptom onset to death or last visit of 5 years (range 2-12); in four the sleep disorder was the initial and most prominent feature, and in two it was preceded by gait instability followed by dysarthria, dysphagia, ataxia, or chorea. Two patients had a rapid progression with disequilibrium, dysarthria, dysphagia, and central hypoventilation, and died 2 months and 6 months, respectively, after symptom onset. In five of five patients, video polysomnography showed features of obstructive sleep apnoea, stridor, and abnormal sleep architecture (undifferentiated non-rapid-eye-movement [non-REM] sleep or poorly structured

  17. [Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen in general population of coast, mountain and forest regions of Peru. A preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Vildósola, H; Farfán, G; Colan, E; Delgado, G; Mendoza, L; Pineda, R; Linares, O; Miyasato, D; Lescano, R

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study was performed in order to establish HBsAg prevalence on population living in urban areas of three geographical regions of Peru. There were included 100 apparently healthy people of each city, with a residence major to 5 years, no migrate neither transitory. Each subdivided group in 50 adults and 50 children. Of these last ones 15 between 1 to 7 years old and 20 cases between 7 to 14 years old. Samples were obtained by venipuncture, then they were centrifuged and the serum obtained was stored at -20 degrees C before being sent to Lima for processing. Determination of HBsAg was made by the Elisa's technic (Abbott Lab-III.-USA). In this preliminary report we informed about results in 7 cities (Lima, Iquitos, Chiclayo, Arequipa,Ica, Chachapoyas y Tarapoto) that include 680 persons of which 373 were adults and 307 children. The HBsAg, was positive in 26 cases (3.8%). In the adult group were 13 positives (3.4%), and in the children also 13 cases (4.2%). Result of all sample shows figures of prevalence (3.8%) major to that reported before at national level. The same phenomenon was observed in the cost while in the jungle our results were similar to those found before. In the andean area not studied previously there were obtained similar results to the rest of the country. It is also interesting to mention the high percentages of prevalence in children. These results indicate that hepatitis B is a serious problem of public health in our country that merit to take immediate prophylactic measures.

  18. Preparation and characterisation of poly p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole fibre-reinforced resin matrix composite for endodontic post material: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chen; Wang, Feng; Yang, Huiyong; Ai, Jun; Wang, Linlin; Jing, Dongdong; Shao, Longquan; Zhou, Xingui

    2014-12-01

    Currently used fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) intracanal posts possess low flexural strength which usually causes post fracture when restoring teeth with extensive loss. To improve the flexural strength of FRC, we aimed to apply a high-performance fibre, poly p-phenylene-2, 6-benzobisoxazole (PBO), to FRCs to develop a new intracanal post material. To improve the interfacial adhesion strength, the PBO fibre was treated with coupling agent (Z-6040), argon plasma, or a combination of above two methods. The effects of the surface modifications on PBO fibre were characterised by determining the single fibre tensile strength and interfacial shear strength (IFSS). The mechanical properties of PBO FRCs were characterised by flexural strength and flexural modulus. The cytotoxicity of PBO FRC was evaluated by the MTT assay. Fibres treated with a combination of Z-6040 and argon plasma possessed a significantly higher IFSS than untreated fibres. Fibre treated with the combination of Z-6040-argon-plasma FRC had the best flexural strength (531.51 ± 26.43MPa) among all treated fibre FRCs and had sufficient flexural strength and appropriate flexural moduli to be used as intracanal post material. Furthermore, an in vitro cytotoxicity assay confirmed that PBO FRCs possessed an acceptable level of cytotoxicity. In summary, our study verified the feasibility of using PBO FRC composites as new intracanal post material. Although the mechanical property of PBO FRC still has room for improvement, our study provides a new avenue for intracanal post material development in the future. To our knowledge, this is the first study to verify the feasibility of using PBO FRC composites as new intracanal post material. Our study provided a new option for intracanal post material development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis, characterisation, and preliminary anti-cancer photodynamic therapeutic in vitro studies of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Patrick; Magnusen, Anthony R.; Moffett, Erick T.; Meyer, Kyle; Hong, Yiling; Ramsdale, Stuart E.; Gordon, Michelle; Stubbs, Javelyn; Seymour, Luke A.; Acharya, Dhiraj; Weber, Ralph T.; Smith, Paul F.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Ji, Ping; Menocal, Laura; Bai, Fengwei; Williams, Jennie L.; Cropek, Donald M.; Jarrett, William L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes, which were used as potential photodynamic therapeutic agents for melanoma cell growth inhibition. The novel complexes, [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)](PF6)2•1.5H2O 1 (where phen2DTT = 1,4-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-5-ylsulfanyl)butane-2,3-diol and pbt = 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole) and [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)](PF6)2•3H2O 2 (where tpphz = tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c:3″,2″-h:2‴,3‴-j]phenazine) were synthesised and characterised. Compound 1 was reacted with [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] (where sal-L-tryp = N-salicylidene-L-tryptophanate) to produce [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•5H2O 4; while [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] was reacted with compound 2 to produce [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2•6H2O 3. All complexes were characterised by elemental analysis, HRMS, ESI MS, UV-visible absorption, ESR spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, where appropriate. In vitro cell toxicity studies (with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) via dark and light reaction conditions were carried out with sodium diaqua-4,4',4”,4”'tetrasulfophthalocyaninecobaltate(II) (Na4[Co(tspc)(H2O)2]), [VO(sal-L-tryp)(phen)]•H2O, and the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4. Such studies involved A431, human epidermoid carcinoma cells; human amelanotic malignant melanoma cells; and HFF, non-cancerous human skin fibroblast cells. Both chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 were found to be more toxic to melanoma cells than to non-cancerous fibroblast cells, and preferentially led to apoptosis of the melanoma cells over non-cancerous skin cells. The anti-cancer property of the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 was further enhanced when treated cells were exposed to light, while no such effect was observed on non-cancerous skin fibroblast cells. ESR and 51V NMR spectroscopic studies were also used to assess the stability of the chloride salts of

  20. Piezoelectric sensor functionalised by a self-assembled bipyridinium derivative: characterisation and preliminary applications in the detection of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Casilli, Serena; Malitesta, Cosimino; Conoci, Sabrina; Petralia, Salvatore; Sortino, Salvatore; Valli, Ludovico

    2004-12-15

    The synthesis of a molecule, 1-(11-dodecylsulfanyl-undecyl)-[4,4']bipyridinium bromide (1), suitable at the same time to form a covalent bond with gold electrodes of a piezoelectric quartz crystal and to interact with heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions, has been successfully accomplished. A commercial quartz crystal microbalance instrument has been modified in order to perform a Flow-Injection Analysis. The behaviour of the system follows the Kanazawa-Gordon equation as demonstrated by measurements with glucose solutions. The self-assembled layer of 1 onto a gold electrode has been characterised by Atomic Force Microscopy before and after the sensing tests. The sensing performances of the modified gold electrode were investigated by monitoring the frequency variation induced by the presence of heavy metal ions, such as lead, cadmium and mercury, in aqueous media. The explored concentrations ranged between 10(-4) and 10(-2) M and the corresponding frequency variations ranged between 10 and 50 Hz. All responses observed were fast, reproducible and reversible. In particular, the response to mercury appears significantly higher in comparison with the other analytes. To the best of our knowledge, this contribution represents the first example of sensing layer based on bipyridinium receptor showing reversible and, at some extent, differentiated response towards heavy metal ions.

  1. Chemical Characterisation of the Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Environment of an Underground Railway System: Cytotoxic Effects and Oxidative Stress—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. Method: We collected the coarse fraction (5–10 µm) and the fine fractions (1–2.5 µm; 0.5–1 µm; 0.25–0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. Results: The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5–10 µm and 1–2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air. PMID:25872016

  2. Chemical characterisation of the coarse and fine particulate matter in the environment of an underground railway system: cytotoxic effects and oxidative stress-a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-04-13

    Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. We collected the coarse fraction (5-10 µm) and the fine fractions (1-2.5 µm; 0.5-1 µm; 0.25-0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5-10 µm and 1-2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air.

  3. Chemical synthesis, characterisation, and biocompatibility of nanometre scale porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes for use as a cell culture substrate for the vero cell line: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Le, Xuan Thi; O'Dea, Mark; Becker, Thomas; Fawcett, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In this preliminary study we investigate for the first time the biomedical potential of using porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes as a cell substrate for culturing the Cercopithecus aethiops (African green monkey) Kidney (Vero) epithelial cell line. One advantage of using the inorganic AAO membrane is the presence of nanometre scale pore channels that allow the exchange of molecules and nutrients across the membrane. The size of the pore channels can be preselected by adjusting the controlling parameters of a temperature controlled two-step anodization process. The cellular interaction and response of the Vero cell line with an in-house synthesised AAO membrane, a commercially available membrane, and a glass control were assessed by investigating cell adhesion, morphology, and proliferation over a 72 h period. The number of viable cells proliferating over the respective membrane surfaces revealed that the locally produced in-house AAO membrane had cells numbers similar to the glass control. The study revealed evidence of focal adhesion sites over the surface of the nanoporous membranes and the penetration of cellular extensions into the pore structure as well. The outcome of the study has revealed that nanometre scale porous AAO membranes have the potential to become practical cell culture scaffold substrates with the capability to enhance adhesion and proliferation of Vero cells.

  4. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  5. The persistent infection of a canine thymus cell line by equine infectious anaemia virus and preliminary data on the production of viral antigens.

    PubMed

    Bouillant, A M; Nielsen, K; Ruckerbauer, G M; Samagh, B S; Hare, W C

    1986-07-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) was adapted to the Cf2Th cell line, a heterologous malignant line from canine thymus. A persistent infection was monitored for 100 serial passages by demonstrating the presence of virus and viral antigens at each 10th passage by electron-microscopy, immunodiffusion and immunofluorescence. Chromosome analysis of EIAV-infected cells indicated they had a karyotype resembling the control cells of similar passage history. Virus-infected cells, grown in roller cultures for 65 days without subculturing, continuously produced viral antigens into supernatant fluids which were harvested every 3-4 days. Antigen peaks were observed at approximately 12-day intervals. Immunoprecipitin lines of identity were demonstrated between ether-extracted antigens from virus-infected canine cell line and known positive EIAV antigen extracted from infected equine spleen and a commercial source. Replication of a non-oncogenic retrovirus (EIAV) resulted in the continuous release of viral antigens from a persistently infected and infinite cell line.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterisation of Ts8B1, Ts8B2 and Ts8B3, three new members of the Taenia solium metacestode 8 kDa diagnostic antigen family.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Elizabeth; Bonay, Pedro; Foster-Cuevas, Mildred; González, Luis Miguel; Dávila, Iris; Cortéz, María Milagros; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Gárate, Teresa

    2007-03-01

    Antibody screening of a lambdaZAP-XR Taenia solium metacestode cDNA library yielded a clone (Ts8B1), with an insert of 345 bp, and an open reading frame of 258 bp, that coded for a protein with 85 amino acid residues. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequence with sequences from SWISSPROT revealed an 88% identity with TcA5.5, a 10 kDa immunodiagnostic antigen of T. crassiceps, 75% identity with CyDA a T. solium metacestode antigen, 40-50% identity with several variants of the 8 kDa subunit of antigen B of Echinococcus spp. and with members of the T. solium metacestode 8 kDa antigen family. Two other Ts8B1 related molecules, Ts8B2 and Ts8B3, were identified in the metacestode cDNA library by PCR, coding for 85 and 66 amino acid polypeptides, respectively. Both Ts8B1 and Ts8B2 were characterized as E/S antigens through their subcellular localisation in the secretory membrane system when expressed in NRK cells. The three cDNA inserts were expressed, purified and probed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with sera and cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with confirmed neurocysticercosis, and with sera from pigs infected with T. solium. The most promising antigen, Ts8B2, performed with a sensitivity of 96.8% and specificity of 93.1% in the detection of active NCC when using serum samples in the assay and performed similarly in the porcine system. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Female tick Hyalomma marginatum marginatum salivary glands: preliminary study on protein changes during feeding process and antigens recognized by repeatedly infested cattle.

    PubMed

    Tikki, N; Rhalem, A; Sadak, A; Sahibi, H

    1999-12-01

    Proteins extracted from salivary glands of unfed, three days and five days fed adult Hyalomma marginatum marginatum were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We have noticed changes during the three feeding steps. Some proteins disappeared during feeding process (23, 38, 39, 40 to 50, 95 and 112 kDa), they might be proteins which were converted in other substances and are secreted. Other antigens (13 to 14, 20, 25, 29, 165 and 210 kDa) were synthesized as a result of tick attachment and feeding. They may be related to growth and development or are the ciment which fixed the adult. Also, three Holstein calves were infested five times with 100 pairs of adult ticks of the same species. The five infestations were performed two weeks from the previous infestation. The sera before infestations and after each infestation were used in western-blot analyses to identify antigens from five days salivary gland extracts of the primary infestation of ticks. Three antigens (18.7, 50 and 80 kDa) were revealed weakly after the first and the second infestations by sera samples but not at infestation onward. Others (13.5, 17 to 18.5, 25, 30, 70, 133, 176 and 193 kDa) were revealed only by sera taken after manifestation of resistance (third infestation). A 13.5 kDa antigen was particularly revealed when resistance had appeared and became more evident after the fourth and fifth infestations. The late antigens recognized might be associated with establishment of calves resistance against ticks.

  8. Emergence of antigenic variants of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O in Ecuador and preliminary evaluation of a field strain as a vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Maradei, Eduardo; Malirat, Viviana; Beascoechea, Claudia Perez; Espinoza, Ana María; Novo, Sabrina Galdo; Smitsaart, Eliana; Salgado, Gustavo; Mattion, Nora; Toledo, Jorge Rodriguez; Bergmann, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus serotype O has been circulating regularly throughout most provinces of Ecuador, one of the two South American countries that still remain endemic, although satisfactory vaccination coverage was reported. This study concentrates in the characterization of isolates collected during 2008-2011, focusing particularly on the antigenic and immunogenic relationships of the field viruses with the O1/Campos vaccine strain in use in the region and with an experimental vaccine formulated with a representative strain of the 2010 epidemic. The results established that antigenically divergent variants poorly protected by the vaccine in use emerged and co-circulated in a limited period of time. A monovalent vaccine formulated with the representative 2010 strain elicited high antibody titers and protected against challenge with homologous virus. In addition, cross-reactive antibodies to predominant viruses in the region were established. In overall this study indicates the ability of the virus to diversify under field conditions in which a vaccine strain with poor match is applied, and the potential of the selected 2010 field virus as a vaccine candidate for incorporation into strategic antigen banks and/or for addition to current formulations for systematic vaccination, in order to prevent the emergence of even more divergent isolates in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary studies by ELISA on the antigen and antibody dynamics in the early stages of experimental infections with Trypanosoma evansi in cattle.

    PubMed

    Thammasart, S; Kanitpun, R; Saithasao, M; Kashiwazaki, Y

    2001-05-01

    Six 6-month-old bulls were experimentally infected with five different isolates of Trypanosoma evansi; two received the same isolate and the other four received different isolates. The parasitaemias and serum antigen levels were monitored regularly by the haematocrit centrifuge technique (HCT) and antigen-detection ELISA (Ag-ELISA), respectively. Trypanosomal antigen was demonstrated by the Ag-ELISA by 10-14 days post inoculation in four cattle, while parasitaemias were first found to be positive in individual cattle over a longer period of time post inoculation (6-28 days). In two cattle, the Ag-ELISA values were also positive when the animals were found to harbour trypanosomes by the HCT and only turned negative 3 days after treatment, while the ELISA values fluctuated during the experiment in another two bulls. The remaining two cattle never produced positive ELISA results despite positive parasitological results. The antibody titres in all six cattle started to rise around 10 days post inoculation and then stayed high throughout the experiment. It was concluded that the Ag-ELISA would produce some false negative results in the early stages of T. evansi infection owing to variations in the balance of parasitaemia and antibody levels in the circulation, and in the pathogenicity of parasite strains.

  10. DETECTION OF HUMAN ANTI-ZIKA VIRUS IgG BY ELISA USING AN ANTIGEN FROM in vitro INFECTED VERO CELLS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    SUMITA, Laura Masami; RODRIGUES, Jaqueline Polizeli; FERREIRA, Noely Evangelista; FELIX, Alvina Clara; SOUZA, Nathalia Caroline Santiago; MACHADO, Clarisse Martins; JÚNIOR, Heitor Franco de ANDRADE

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Zika virus (ZKV) infection is a huge public health problem in Brazil because of the increased incidence of microcephaly in neonates from infected mothers. Detection of specific IgG antibodies in maternal serum samples constitutes an important approach for diagnosing ZKV infection and evaluating its relationship with neonatal microcephaly. However, as there is no serological test produced in Brazil to detect IgM and IgG antibodies against ZKV, we sought to examine specific IgG in serum samples from patients or suspected mothers to detect previous infection and to test for specificity with regard to flaviviral infections occurring in the same area. Brazilian Zika virus native antigens were obtained from infected Vero cell layers or free virions in the culture medium and then used in ELISA. We tested sera from eight ZKV RNA-diagnosed infected patients (ZKVR), seven neonates with microcephaly and their mothers after delivery (MM), 140 dengue virus IgM-positive (DM) and IgG (DG)-positive patients, and 100 yellow fever (YF)-vaccinated patients. According to the ELISA, ZKVR samples were mostly positive (7/8), and all the MM serum samples were positive for ZKV IgG (7/7). In contrast, cross-reactions for dengue or yellow fever-vaccinated patients were observed, including DM (48/95), DG (10/45) or YF (3/100) serum samples; however, these cross-reactions exhibited low antigen avidity so that 6 M urea largely removed this cross-reactivity, with only a few cross-reacting samples remaining (8/140). ELISA based on extracted virions was much more specific, with all ZKVR (8/8) and MM sera being positive for ZKV IgG (7/7) and only borderline cross-reactivity found for DM (6/95), DG (3/45) or YF (4/100)-vaccinated serum samples. This technique (ELISA) can identify specific IgG in ZKV-infected patients and may be helpful in diagnosing congenital infetions after maternal RNA virus clearance or in epidemiological studies. PMID:27982355

  11. DETECTION OF HUMAN ANTI-ZIKA VIRUS IgG BY ELISA USING AN ANTIGEN FROM in vitro INFECTED VERO CELLS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS.

    PubMed

    Sumita, Laura Masami; Rodrigues, Jaqueline Polizeli; Ferreira, Noely Evangelista; Felix, Alvina Clara; Souza, Nathalia Caroline Santiago; Machado, Clarisse Martins; Júnior, Heitor Franco de Andrade

    2016-12-08

    Zika virus (ZKV) infection is a huge public health problem in Brazil because of the increased incidence of microcephaly in neonates from infected mothers. Detection of specific IgG antibodies in maternal serum samples constitutes an important approach for diagnosing ZKV infection and evaluating its relationship with neonatal microcephaly. However, as there is no serological test produced in Brazil to detect IgM and IgG antibodies against ZKV, we sought to examine specific IgG in serum samples from patients or suspected mothers to detect previous infection and to test for specificity with regard to flaviviral infections occurring in the same area. Brazilian Zika virus native antigens were obtained from infected Vero cell layers or free virions in the culture medium and then used in ELISA. We tested sera from eight ZKV RNA-diagnosed infected patients (ZKVR), seven neonates with microcephaly and their mothers after delivery (MM), 140 dengue virus IgM-positive (DM) and IgG (DG)-positive patients, and 100 yellow fever (YF)-vaccinated patients. According to the ELISA, ZKVR samples were mostly positive (7/8), and all the MM serum samples were positive for ZKV IgG (7/7). In contrast, cross-reactions for dengue or yellow fever-vaccinated patients were observed, including DM (48/95), DG (10/45) or YF (3/100) serum samples; however, these cross-reactions exhibited low antigen avidity so that 6 M urea largely removed this cross-reactivity, with only a few cross-reacting samples remaining (8/140). ELISA based on extracted virions was much more specific, with all ZKVR (8/8) and MM sera being positive for ZKV IgG (7/7) and only borderline cross-reactivity found for DM (6/95), DG (3/45) or YF (4/100)-vaccinated serum samples. This technique (ELISA) can identify specific IgG in ZKV-infected patients and may be helpful in diagnosing congenital infetions after maternal RNA virus clearance or in epidemiological studies.

  12. The testing of antibodies raised against poultry red mite antigens in an in vitro feeding assay; preliminary screen for vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Wright, Harry W; Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; McDevitt, Regina M; Sparks, Nickolas H C; Brocklehurst, Sarah; Huntley, John F

    2009-06-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), the poultry red mite, is a blood-feeding ectoparasite that infests many bird species. We have used an in vitro feeding assay to allow the identification of protective D. gallinae antigens that may have potential as vaccine candidates. Homogenised mites were extracted sequentially with PBS, Tween 20, Triton X100 and urea giving four protein fractions. Five experimental groups of Lohmann Brown hens were used to generate antibodies; four groups were injected with one of each of the protein fractions in QuilA adjuvant and a control group was injected with adjuvant only. Booster injections were administered 2 and 4 weeks after initial immunisation. Eggs were collected throughout the experiment and soluble IgY antibodies were extracted from a pool of egg yolks collected at week six post-injection. Western blots, performed using post vaccination antibodies from test and control groups, revealed a strong antibody response against a range of injected proteins. Fresh chicken blood, supplemented with antibodies raised against these protein fractions, was fed to mites in an in vitro feeding assay in order to determine whether the antibodies had an anti-mite effect. Although there was variability in the numbers of feeding mites, it was found that the strongest anti-mite effect was seen with the PBS protein fraction, which had a cumulative average mortality of 34.8% 14 days after feeding compared with 27.3% for the control group (P = 0.043).

  13. [A preliminary study on the effects of feto-maternal microchimerism in activated human leukocyte antigen haploidentical mobilized peripheral blood stem cells on treatment of solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shui; Yu, Jin-pu; Li, Hui; An, Xiu-mei; Xin, Ning; Ren, Xiu-bao

    2009-10-01

    To study the effect of feto-maternal microchimerism in the treatment of activated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical mobilized peripheral blood cells against solid tumors. Genomic DNA samples of 25 pairs of HLA haploidentical donors and recipients were extracted. The donor-derived HLA-DRB loci were detected with nested PCR-sequence specific primer (SSP) typing. The mixed lymphocyte proliferation action between the patients and respective donors, the engraftment of donor's cells and the serum levels of Th1/Th2 type of cytokines were measured with MTT, FISH and ELISA method respectively. The survival time of patients with or without feto-maternal microchimerism were compared as well. Using nested PCR-SSP typing, the positive rates of feto-maternal microchimerism in the 25 pairs of HLA haploidentical donors and recipients were 40% in the maternal/children pairs and 0 in the paternal/children pairs. The chimerism positive patients showed less proliferation activity when cocultured with respective donors as compared with unrelated ones (P = 0.03). Only one chimerism positive patient experienced the engraft of donor's cell 3 months after treatment as the donor derived XX chromosome was identified with FISH. When the data of chimerism positive patients were deleted, the serum levels of IFNgamma 1 month after treatment dropped dramatically from 171.4 (26.3 approximately 258.4) ng/L to 29.4 (1.2 approximately 39.9) ng/L. The survival time in chimerism positive patients of the maternal/children pairs was significantly longer than that in chimerism negative patients, which was (31.2 +/- 4.3) months and (11.1 +/- 3.3) months, respectively (P = 0.036). Feto-maternal microchimerism might induce anergy in the HLA haploidentical donors, favor the engraftment of donor's progenitors and maintenance of positive microenvironment and prolong the survival time.

  14. ANTIGENIC MODULATION

    PubMed Central

    Old, Lloyd J.; Stockert, Elisabeth; Boyse, Edward A.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1968-01-01

    Antigenic modulation (the loss of TL antigens from TL+ cells exposed to TL antibody in the absence of lytic complement) has been demonstrated in vitro. An ascites leukemia, phenotype TL.1,2,3, which modulates rapidly and completely when incubated with TL antiserum in vitro, was selected for further study of the phenomenon. Over a wide range of TL antibody concentrations modulation at 37°C was detectable within 10 min and was complete within approximately 1 hr. The cells were initially sensitized to C' by their contact with antibody, thereafter losing this sensitivity to C' lysis together with their sensitivity to TL antibody and C' in the cytotoxic test. The capacity of the cells to undergo modulation was abolished by actinomycin D and by iodoacetamide, and by reducing the temperature of incubation to 0°C. Thus modulation apparently is an active cellular process. Antigens TL. 1,2, and 3 are all modulated by anti-TL.1,3 serum and by anti-TL.3 serum. This modulation affects all three TL components together, even when antibody to one or two of them is lacking. aAnti-TL.2 serum does not induce modulation and in fact impairs modulation by the other TL antibodies. The influence of the TL phenotype of cells upon the demonstrable content of H-2 (D region) isoantigen, first shown in cells modulated in vivo, has been observed with cells modulated in vitro. Cells undergoing modulation show a progressive increase in H-2 (D region) antigen over a period of 4 hr, with no change in H-2 antigens of the K region. Restoration of the TL+ phenotype of modulated cells after removal of antibody is less rapid than TL+ → TL- modulation and may require several cell divisions. PMID:5636556

  15. Preliminary characterisation of new glass reference materials (GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G) by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm wavelengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillong, M.; Hametner, K.; Reusser, E.; Wilson, S.A.; Gunther, D.

    2005-01-01

    New glass reference materials GSA-1G, GSC-1G, GSD-1G and GSE-1G have been characterised using a prototype solid state laser ablation system capable of producing wavelengths of 193 nm, 213 nm and 266 nm. This system allowed comparison of the effects of different laser wavelengths under nearly identical ablation and ICP operating conditions. The wavelengths 213 nm and 266 nm were also used at higher energy densities to evaluate the influence of energy density on quantitative analysis. In addition, the glass reference materials were analysed using commercially available 266 nm Nd:YAG and 193 nm ArF excimer lasers. Laser ablation analysis was carried out using both single spot and scanning mode ablation. Using laser ablation ICP-MS, concentrations of fifty-eight elements were determined with external calibration to the NIST SRM 610 glass reference material. Instead of applying the more common internal standardisation procedure, the total concentration of all element oxide concentrations was normalised to 100%. Major element concentrations were compared with those determined by electron microprobe. In addition to NIST SRM 610 for external calibration, USGS BCR-2G was used as a more closely matrix-matched reference material in order to compare the effect of matrix-matched and non matrix-matched calibration on quantitative analysis. The results show that the various laser wavelengths and energy densities applied produced similar results, with the exception of scanning mode ablation at 266 nm without matrix-matched calibration where deviations up to 60% from the average were found. However, results acquired using a scanning mode with a matrix-matched calibration agreed with results obtained by spot analysis. The increased abundance of large particles produced when using a scanning ablation mode with NIST SRM 610, is responsible for elemental fractionation effects caused by incomplete vaporisation of large particles in the ICP.

  16. The antigens - Volume VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sela, M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four chapters. They are: Ir Genes: Antigen-Specific Genetic Regulation of the Immune Response; Molecular Genetics of Class II (Ia) Antigens; Antigen-Specific T Cell Clones and T Cell Factors; and Infection and Autoimmunity.

  17. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation.

  18. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis.

  19. Characterisation of gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Hammond, Ceri; Veith, Gabriel M; Wang, Di; Manzoli, Maela; Prati, Laura; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-09-21

    Au-based catalysts have established a new important field of catalysis, revealing specific properties in terms of both high activity and selectivity for many reactions. However, the correlation between the morphology and the activity of the catalyst is not always clear although much effort has been addressed to this task. To some extent the problem relates to the complexity of the characterisation techniques that can be applied to Au catalyst and the broad range of ways in which they can be prepared. Indeed, in many reports only a few characterization techniques have been used to investigate the potential nature of the active sites. The aim of this review is to provide a critical description of the techniques that are most commonly used as well as the more advanced characterization techniques available for this task. The techniques that we discuss are (i) transmission electron microscopy methods, (ii) X-ray spectroscopy techniques, (iii) vibrational spectroscopy techniques and (iv) chemisorption methods. The description is coupled with developing an understanding of a number of preparation methods. In the final section the example of the supported AuPd alloy catalyst is discussed to show how the techniques can gain an understanding of an active oxidation catalyst.

  20. Characterisation and simulation of an active microvalve for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Sassetti, F; Guarnieri, F A; Garelli, L; Storti, M A

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma drainage device (GDD) has the potential to eliminate hypotony but still suffers from poor flow control and fibrosis. The ideal shunt should change its hydraulic resistance to achieve the desired intraocular pressure (IOP). In this study, the characterisation of a preliminary design of a new GDD is presented. This is activated by means of a diaphragm, which is actuated by conducting polymers. The valve can be manufactured employing microelectromechanical system technology by soft lithography. The characterisation process is performed by numerical simulation using the finite element method, considering the coupling between the fluid and the structure (diaphragm) obtaining the hydraulic resistance for several positions of the diaphragm. To analyse the hydraulic system of the microvalve implanted in a human eye, an equivalent circuit model was used. The parameters of the equivalent circuit model were obtained from numerical simulation. The hydraulic resistance of the designed GDD varies in the range of 13.08-0.36 mmHg min/μl compared with 3.38-0.43 mmHg min/μl for the Ahmed valve. The maximum displacement of the diaphragm in the vertical direction is 18.9 μm, and the strain in the plane is 2%. The proposed preliminary design allows to control the IOP by varying the hydraulic resistance in a greater range than the existing passive valves, and the numerical simulation facilitates the characterisation and the improvement of the design before its construction, reducing time and costs.

  1. Promiscuous antibodies characterised by their physico-chemical properties: From sequence to structure and back.

    PubMed

    Laffy, Julie M J; Dodev, Tihomir; Macpherson, Jamie A; Townsend, Catherine; Lu, Hui Chun; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Fraternali, Franca

    2017-09-01

    Human B cells produce antibodies, which bind to their cognate antigen based on distinct molecular properties of the antibody CDR loop. We have analysed a set of 10 antibodies showing a clear difference in their binding properties to a panel of antigens, resulting in two subsets of antibodies with a distinct binding phenotype. We call the observed binding multiplicity 'promiscuous' and selected physico-chemical CDRH3 characteristics and conformational preferences may characterise these promiscuous antibodies. To classify CDRH3 physico-chemical properties playing a role in their binding properties, we used statistical analyses of the sequences annotated by Kidera factors. To characterise structure-function requirements for antigen binding multiplicity we employed Molecular Modelling and Monte Carlo based coarse-grained simulations. The ability to predict the molecular causes of promiscuous, multi-binding behaviour would greatly improve the efficiency of the therapeutic antibody discovery process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondrial antigens, molecular mimicry and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Baum, H

    1995-05-24

    The immune system is normally tolerant to mitochondrial self-antigens, but responsive against bacteria. Low-titre anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) might be involved in this discrimination. Tolerance is broken in diseases characterised by high titre AMA. Some of these AMA, against cardiolipin, cross-react with DNA. The best studied AMA are those characterising primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). These are directed against E2 subunits of the oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes, and also against subunits E1 alpha, E1 beta and X of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. AMA of PBC patients also react with bacterial E2s. Reactivities are primarily peptide-specific but with cross-reactivity between mitochondrial and microbial antigens and between E2s of respective complexes. Immunodominant epitopes, for anti E2 AMA, include the conserved sequence flanking the site of lipoyl attachment. It is proposed that the initial stimulus for antibody production is chronic urinary tract infection. AMA themselves are not pathogenic, but CD4+ T-cells would be primed, recognising the lipoyl domain epitope in association with class II HLA. Inappropriate expression of class II antigens on bile duct epithelia, (as found in PBC), might lead to presentation of a particular fragment of HLA-DR alpha, known to be a major MHC presented self-peptide in the mouse. That sequence strongly mimics the lipoyl domain and might be recognised by primed T-cells, initiating the autoimmune cascade. In the mouse, a peptide of ND1 of Complex I is presented in association with class I MHC. Cells exhibiting somatic mutation of such a peptide might thus be subject to attack by CD8+ T-cells. If such peptides were presented by class II HLA, autoimmune diseases might arise, related to mimicry between such peptides and microbial sequences and/or self-antigens. These considerations might apply in Leber's disease and in age-related pathology.

  3. Immunisation with ID83 fusion protein induces antigen-specific cell mediated and humoral immune responses in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth J.; Steinbach, Sabine; Clifford, Derek; Baldwin, Susan L.; Ireton, Gregory C.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.; Vordermeier, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the potential of mycobacterial proteins as candidate subunit vaccines for bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we have explored the use of TLR-ligands as potential adjuvants in cattle. In vitro screening assays with whole blood from M. bovis-infected and BCG-vaccinated cattle demonstrated that fusion protein constructs were most commonly recognised, and the ID83 fusion protein was selected for further immunisation studies. Furthermore, glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) and resiquimod (R848), agonists for TLR4 and TLR7/8 respectively, stimulated cytokine production (IL-12, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-10) in bovine dendritic cell cultures, and these were formulated as novel oil-in-water emulsions (GLA-SE and R848-SE) for immunisation studies. Immunisation with ID83 in a water-in-oil emulsion adjuvant (ISA70) induced both cell mediated and humoral immune responses, as characterised by antigen-specific IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, IgG1 and IgG2 antibody production. In comparison, ID83 immunisation with the novel adjuvants induced weaker (ID83/R848-SE) or no (ID83/GLA-SE) antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell proliferation. However, both did induce ID83-specific antibody production, which was restricted to IgG1 antibody isotype. Overall, these results provide encouraging preliminary data for the further development of ID83 in vaccine strategies for bovine TB. PMID:24012566

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2703 complexed with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-04-01

    The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. A pocket of the molecule, two HLA-B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized and data sets were collected to high resolution using synchrotron radiation. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2703 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by a single amino acid at heavy-chain residue 59 that is involved in anchoring the peptide N-terminus within the A pocket of the molecule. Two B*2703–peptide complexes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} (pVIPR peptide) or P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pLMP2 peptide). Data sets were collected to 1.55 Å (B*2703–pVIPR) or 2.0 Å (B*2703–pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With B*2705–pVIPR as a search model, a clear molecular-replacement solution was found for both B*2703 complexes.

  5. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    PubMed

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  6. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, John A. S.; Semple, Sean; Duffin, Rodger; Kelly, Frank; Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  7. Molecular Mimics of the Tumour Antigen MUC1

    PubMed Central

    James, Tharappel C.; Bond, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as “self”, and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as ‘proof of principle’ we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1) from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides. PMID:23166757

  8. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  9. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PsaA, the adhesive pilin subunit that forms the pH 6 antigen on the surface of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Sadhukhan, Annapurna; Nair, Manoj K M; Schifferli, Dieter M; Xia, Di

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout human history. Like all other bacterial infections, the pathogenesis of Y. pestis begins with the attachment of bacteria to the surface of host cells. At least five surface proteins from Y. pestis have been shown to interact with host cells. Psa, the pH 6 antigen, is one of them and is deployed on the surface of bacteria as thin flexible fibrils that are the result of the polymerization of a single PsaA pilin subunit. Here, the crystallization of recombinant donor-strand complemented PsaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.9 Å resolution from a native crystal and to 1.5 Å resolution from a bromide-derivatized crystal. These crystals displayed the symmetry of the orthorhombic space group P222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 26.3, b = 54.6, c = 102.1 Å. Initial phases were derived from single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments, resulting in an electron-density map that showed a single molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignment was aided by residues binding to bromide ions of the heavy-atom derivative.

  11. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals from the recombinantly expressed human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*2704 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, Bernhard; Biesiadka, Jacek; Saenger, Wolfram

    2005-10-01

    Crystallization of HLA-B*2704 in complex with two peptides. The product of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene HLA-B*2704 differs from that of the prototypical subtype HLA-B*2705 by three amino acids at heavy-chain residues 77 (Ser instead of Asp), 152 (Glu instead of Val) and 211 (Gly instead of Ala). In contrast to the ubiquitous HLA-B*2705 subtype, HLA-B*2704 occurs only in orientals. Both subtypes are strongly associated with spondyloarthropathies and the peptides presented by these subtypes are suspected to play a role in disease pathogenesis. HLA-B*2704 was crystallized in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitant. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Data sets were collected to 1.60 Å (complex with the self-peptide pVIPR) or to 1.90 Å (complex with the viral peptide pLMP2) resolution using synchrotron radiation. With HLA-B*2705 complexed with pVIPR as a search model, unambiguous molecular-replacement solutions were found for the complexes of HLA-B*2704 with both peptides.

  12. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  13. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human major histocompatibility antigen HLA-B*1402 in complex with a viral peptide and with a self-peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pravin; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Volz, Armin; Ziegler, Andreas; Saenger, Wolfram

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of HLA-B*1402 in complex with two peptides is reported. The product of the human major histocompatibility (HLA) class I allele HLA-B*1402 only differs from that of allele HLA-B*1403 at amino-acid position 156 of the heavy chain (Leu in HLA-B*1402 and Arg in HLA-B*1403). However, both subtypes are known to be differentially associated with the inflammatory rheumatic disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in black populations in Cameroon and Togo. HLA-B*1402 is not associated with AS, in contrast to HLA-B*1403, which is associated with this disease in the Togolese population. The products of these alleles can present peptides with Arg at position 2, a feature shared by a small group of other HLA-B antigens, including HLA-B*2705, the prototypical AS-associated subtype. Complexes of HLA-B*1402 with a viral peptide (RRRWRRLTV, termed pLMP2) and a self-peptide (IRAAPPPLF, termed pCatA) were prepared and were crystallized using polyethylene glycol as precipitant. The complexes crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1} (pLMP2) and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (pCatA) and diffracted synchrotron radiation to 2.55 and 1.86 Å resolution, respectively. Unambiguous solutions for both data sets were obtained by molecular replacement using a peptide-complexed HLA-B*2705 molecule (PDB code) as a search model.

  14. Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    EDX Analysis. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Surface Analysis Auger , XPS and SIMS SEIC Measurement Techniques -Visible -Optical Microscopy -Electron... spectroscopy at specific sites. When we vary the interaction, we can do chemical analyses at different sites, of non- conducting surfaces. This opens up a...window of opportunity for surface science A finely sharpened tungsten wire is positioned within 2nm of the specimen by a piezoelectric transducer. At

  15. Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and a tumor-extracted carcinoembryonic antigen-related antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shively, J E; Spayth, V; Chang, F F; Metter, G E; Klein, L; Presant, C A; Todd, C W

    1982-06-01

    Levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and a tumor-extracted CEA-related antigen (TEX) were determined in sera from patients with carcinomas of the breast, colon, lung, head and neck, and a number of miscellaneous categories. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of each antigen at various stages of malignant disease. Competitive radioimmunoassays developed in our laboratory were shown to be sufficiently specific to detect either of these two antigens independent of each other. The results indicate that: (a) with our specific assays, CEA was not significantly elevated in smoker controls, but TEX was elevated in 29% of smoker controls; (b) TEX was equivalent to CEA as a tumor marker for colonic cancer. TEX was better than CEA as a marker for lung cancer and, based on limited data, there is a possibility that TEX is a significantly better tumor marker than is CEA in early lung cancer; (c) TEX was superior to CEA as a tumor marker for breast and head and neck cancers; (d) there is a strong indication that serial determinations of TEX can be used as effectively as CEA in the monitoring of disease progress. These preliminary results must be confirmed by increasing the number of cancer patients and including nonmalignant disease controls.

  16. Characterisation of ethoxylated fatty chains of anionic surfactants and determination of residual ethoxylated fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Morvan, Julien; Saluden, Magali; Agasse, Valérie; Barbot, Florence; Cardinael, Pascal; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Decock, Gautier

    2006-03-01

    Bachus et al. [1] recently described a new derivatisation method using 2-furoyl chloride for the characterisation of mixtures of polyethoxylated alcohols and their corresponding sulfates. This paper deals with the control of the derivatisation steps; hydrolysis and extraction conditions were optimised. The method is extended to the characterisation of alkyl sulfosuccinates, alkyl sulfoacetates and alkyl phosphates and to the analysis of residual polyethoxylated alcohols in surfactants. Extraction of non-ionic compounds using solid-phase extraction cartridges was performed before derivatisation. Residual amounts of alcohol were determined in five commercial anionic surfactants. Moreover, direct derivatisation without preliminary SPE in the same anionic surfactants proved to be efficient for dry samples.

  17. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  18. Stable reagent for the detection of antibody to the specific fraction I antigen of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Rust, J H; Berman, S; Habig, W H; Marshall, J D; Cavanaugh, D C

    1972-04-01

    A stable hemagglutinating antigen for detection of fraction I (FR-I) antibody of Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis) is described. The antigen was prepared by sensitizing tanned, pyruvaldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes (PAT SRBC) with FR-I antigen. Preliminary standardization by titration of each lot of FR-I was required to minimize the effect of molecular heterogeneity of specific FR-I antigen and to eliminate nonspecific reactions caused by the presence of a minor antigenic contaminant. In tests with sera from rabbits, dogs, and humans, FR-I PAT SRBC were as reactive as the previously employed standard antigen, FR-I-sensitized tanned erythrocytes. Fluid suspensions of FR-I PAT SRBC stored at 4 C for 3 months, or lyophilized preparations stored at ambient temperature for 6 months, showed no loss in antigenic activity.

  19. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, J. Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. Availability and implementation: http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D Contact: wan@cvm.msstate.edu; wanhenry@yahoo.com PMID:22399675

  20. Characterising exotic matter driving wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chianese, Marco; Di Grezia, Elisabetta; Manfredonia, Mattia; Miele, Gennaro

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we develop an iterative approach to span the whole set of exotic matter models able to drive a traversable wormhole. The method, based on a Taylor expansion of metric and stress-energy tensor components in a neighbourhood of the wormhole throat, reduces the Einstein equation to an infinite set of algebraic conditions, which can be satisfied order by order. The approach easily allows the implementation of further conditions linking the stress-energy tensor components among each other, like symmetry conditions or equations of state. The method is then applied to some relevant examples of exotic matter characterised by a constant energy density and that also show an isotropic behaviour in the stress-energy tensor or obeying to a quintessence-like equation of state.

  1. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  2. Brillouin characterisation of optical microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, Kazi Tasneem

    The sleek shape of microfiber helps it to confine the light tightly and generate high nonlinear effect, which is 1000 times higher than the standard fiber. This project focuses on fabricating microfiber samples with different taper lengths and different waist diameter from three different kinds of fiber, single mode fiber (SMF), Gedoped and Ga-doped. All the samples were characterised in terms of Brillouin scattering and Brillouin gain and Brillouin lasing, and compared to each other and to the SMF fiber. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) has been demonstrated for short microfibers of length less than 10cm. The nonlinear effects of long tapers have not been reported yet. The theoretical perspective related to microfibers indicate the possibility of generation of stronger signals and newer frequencies. Among the many nonlinear effects Brillouin scattering is the easiest to observe and has not been studied using long microfibers until now. In this project microfibers of different lengths and waist diameter are fabricated. The microfibers were made from three different kinds of fiber: SMF, Germanium doped (Ge-doped) and Gallium doped (Ga-doped). The shapes of the fabricated samples are profiled to match the shape with the numerically simulated shape. The power performances are studied so that samples with minimum losses are used for Brillouin characterisation. The first experiment uses the microfiber samples for testing and recording the changes in Stokes generation for the different dimensions of each sample in a Brillouin scattering setup. These microfibers are tested in s second experiment of Brillouin laser setup to explore their possibilities of lasing. In the third experiment the microfibers are used in a pump probe technique setup to spatially measure the Brillouin gain along the length of each sample.

  3. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  4. Engineering Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kulemzin, S. V.; Kuznetsova, V. V.; Mamonkin, M.; Taranin, A. V.; Gorchakov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are recombinant protein molecules that redirect cytotoxic lymphocytes toward malignant and other target cells. The high feasibility of manufacturing CAR-modified lymphocytes for the therapy of cancer has spurred the development and optimization of new CAR T cells directed against a broad range of target antigens. In this review, we describe the main structural and functional elements constituting a CAR, discuss the roles of these elements in modulating the anti-tumor activity of CAR T cells, and highlight alternative approaches to CAR engineering. PMID:28461969

  5. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  6. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  7. Antigen detection systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  8. Antigen detection systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  9. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  10. AntigenDB: an immunoinformatics database of pathogen antigens.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Flower, Darren R; Raghava, G P S

    2010-01-01

    The continuing threat of infectious disease and future pandemics, coupled to the continuous increase of drug-resistant pathogens, makes the discovery of new and better vaccines imperative. For effective vaccine development, antigen discovery and validation is a prerequisite. The compilation of information concerning pathogens, virulence factors and antigenic epitopes has resulted in many useful databases. However, most such immunological databases focus almost exclusively on antigens where epitopes are known and ignore those for which epitope information was unavailable. We have compiled more than 500 antigens into the AntigenDB database, making use of the literature and other immunological resources. These antigens come from 44 important pathogenic species. In AntigenDB, a database entry contains information regarding the sequence, structure, origin, etc. of an antigen with additional information such as B and T-cell epitopes, MHC binding, function, gene-expression and post translational modifications, where available. AntigenDB also provides links to major internal and external databases. We shall update AntigenDB on a rolling basis, regularly adding antigens from other organisms and extra data analysis tools. AntigenDB is available freely at http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/antigendb and its mirror site http://www.bic.uams.edu/raghava/antigendb.

  11. Electrical test structures for the characterisation of optical proximity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiamis, Andreas; Smith, Stewart; McCallum, Martin; Hourd, Andrew C.; Stevenson, J. Tom M.; Walton, Anthony J.

    2007-02-01

    Simple electrical test structures have been designed that will allow the characterisation of corner serif forms of optical proximity correction. The structures measure the resistance of a short length of conducting track with a right angled corner. Varying amounts of OPC can be applied to the outer and inner corners of the feature and the effect on the resistance of the track measured. These structures have been simulated and the results are presented in this paper. In addition a preliminary test mask has been fabricated which has test structures suitable for on-mask electrical measurement. Measurement results from these structures are also presented. Furthermore structures have been characterised using an optical microscope, a dedicated optical mask metrology system, an AFM scanner and finally a FIB system. In the future the test mask will be used to print the structures using a step and scan lithography tool so that they can be measured on-wafer. Correlation of the mask and wafer results will provide a great deal of information about the e ects of OPC at the CAD level and the impact on the final printed features.

  12. Characterisation of chocolate eating behaviour.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-da-Silva, A M; Van Damme, I; Wolf, B; Hort, J

    2011-10-24

    Knowledge concerning variation in chocolate eating behaviour amongst consumers, and the impact that differences in the physical properties of chocolate could have on such behaviour is limited. The eating behaviour of individuals, consuming two chocolate samples (A and B), of comparable melt viscosity but with different textural attributes, was investigated. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to evaluate masticator muscle activity and electroglottography (EGG) was used to record swallowing events. Results showed that observed differences in mouthcoating affected the in-mouth residence time: chocolate A, perceived as more mouthcoating, showed an increased total chewing time and time of last swallow. Key differences across subjects were: time and number of chews, time of last swallow and total number of swallows. Subjects were grouped into three clusters of eating behaviour characterised as, "fast chewers", "thorough chewers" and "suckers". The main differences between clusters were the time chocolate was kept in mouth, chew rate and muscle work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunisation with ID83 fusion protein induces antigen-specific cell mediated and humoral immune responses in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth J; Steinbach, Sabine; Clifford, Derek; Baldwin, Susan L; Ireton, Gregory C; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2013-10-25

    In this study we have investigated the potential of mycobacterial proteins as candidate subunit vaccines for bovine tuberculosis. In addition, we have explored the use of TLR-ligands as potential adjuvants in cattle. In vitro screening assays with whole blood from Mycobacterium bovis-infected and BCG-vaccinated cattle demonstrated that fusion protein constructs were most commonly recognised, and the ID83 fusion protein was selected for further immunisation studies. Furthermore, glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) and resiquimod (R848), agonists for TLR4 and TLR7/8 respectively, stimulated cytokine production (IL-12, TNF-α, MIP-1β and IL-10) in bovine dendritic cell cultures, and these were formulated as novel oil-in-water emulsions (GLA-SE and R848-SE) for immunisation studies. Immunisation with ID83 in a water-in-oil emulsion adjuvant (ISA70) induced both cell mediated and humoral immune responses, as characterised by antigen-specific IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, IgG1 and IgG2 antibody production. In comparison, ID83 immunisation with the novel adjuvants induced weaker (ID83/R848-SE) or no (ID83/GLA-SE) antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell proliferation. However, both did induce ID83-specific antibody production, which was restricted to IgG1 antibody isotype. Overall, these results provide encouraging preliminary data for the further development of ID83 in vaccine strategies for bovine TB. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  15. Roll Damping Characterisation Program: User Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    sallying test. The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) have developed a software-based tool called the Roll Damping Characterisation...Murray Riding Maritime Division Murray obtained a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Degree from the

  16. Dual redundant sequencing strategy: Full-length gene characterisation of 1056 novel and confirmatory HLA alleles.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, V; Zweiniger, C; Surendranath, V; Lang, K; Schöfl, G; Dahl, A; Winkler, S; Lange, V; Böhme, I; Schmidt, A H

    2017-08-01

    The high-throughput department of DKMS Life Science Lab encounters novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles on a daily basis. To characterise these alleles, we have developed a system to sequence the whole gene from 5'- to 3'-UTR for the HLA loci A, B, C, DQB1 and DPB1 for submission to the European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Nucleotide Archive (EMBL-ENA) and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. Our workflow is based on a dual redundant sequencing strategy. Using shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq instrument and single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing on a PacBio RS II instrument, we are able to achieve highly accurate HLA full-length consensus sequences. Remaining conflicts are resolved using the R package DR2S (Dual Redundant Reference Sequencing). Given the relatively high throughput of this strategy, we have developed the semi-automated web service TypeLoader, to aid in the submission of sequences to the EMBL-ENA and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database. In the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database release 3.24.0 (April 2016; prior to the submission of the sequences described here), only 5.2% of all known HLA alleles have been fully characterised together with intronic and UTR sequences. So far, we have applied our strategy to characterise and submit 1056 HLA alleles, thereby more than doubling the number of fully characterised alleles. Given the increasing application of next generation sequencing (NGS) for full gene characterisation in clinical practice, extending the HLA database concomitantly is highly desirable. Therefore, we propose this dual redundant sequencing strategy as a workflow for submission of novel full-length alleles and characterisation of sequences that are as yet incomplete. This would help to mitigate the predominance of partially known alleles in the database. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Characterisation of the Gaia photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Voss, H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our team at the University of Barcelona has contributed since the early phases of the mission to the definition, evaluation and calibration modelling of the Gaia photometry. To maximise the Gaia scientific exploitation, we have frequently shared many different tools and data with the astronomical community. Among this information we have defined several relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos, Tycho and 2MASS) for several types of stars (including white dwarfs). These relationships can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary validation data. During the commissioning phase our team (as part of the Payload Experts group) has been intensively checking the first photometric data to analyse the health and properties of the real instrument. These preliminary analyses allowed us to monitor the throughput variations with time, assess the spectral resolution and re-evaluate the performances of the end-of-mission photometry. The Payload Experts group activities continue beyond the commissioning phase aiming to optimize the operations onboard for maximizing the scientific return. Some example of first spectra and photometry are shown.

  18. Urinary antigens as markers of papillary toxicity. I. Identification and characterization of rat kidney papillary antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, F W; Hildebrand, H; Lutte, L; Schwengberg, S; Henke, B; Greshake, D; Schmidt, B; Friederich, A; Rinke, M; Schlüter, G; Bomhard, E

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared in an attempt to develop diagnostic tools for the identification of toxic damage to the rat renal papilla. One IgG and five IgM monoclonal antibodies, reacting with antigens localized in the papilla were obtained. Three of the IgM class and the IgG class monoclonal antibodies were found to be specific for antigens localized in collecting ducts, two of them staining papillary collecting ducts more intensely than cortical collecting ducts. The IgG class antibody, termed Pap X 5C10, recognizes an antigen located at high density on the luminal side of papillary collecting duct epithelial cells and at lower density in cortical collecting duct cells. One of the IgM class monoclonal antibodies reacts with an antigen localized in epithelial cells as ascending and descending loops of Henle and of connecting tubules. Another of the IgM class monoclonal antibodies reacts with an antigen localized in the interstices of the inner medulla. All these monoclonal antibodies react with their antigens in native frozen as well as in Bouin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue slices. Molecular properties of the Pap X 5C10 antigen have been investigated by gel permeation chromatography, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and isoelectric focusing. The results indicate that the antigen in both its tissue-derived and urinary form is of large (150-200 kDa) molecular size and can be separated into two molecular species with isoelectric points of pH 7.2 and 7.3 respectively. In the urine the antigens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies form large complexes with Tamm-Horsfall protein. The antigen-containing complexes can be extracted from urine by adsorption to diatomaceous earth and elution with SDS-containing buffer. Using sandwich ELISA-type assays it is possible to determine the concentration of the antigens. In preliminary experiments we were able to show that at least three of the antigens are detected in the urine following toxic insults to the kidney. The

  19. Stable Reagent for the Detection of Antibody to the Specific Fraction I Antigen of Yersinia pestis1

    PubMed Central

    Rust, James H.; Berman, Sanford; Habig, William H.; Marshall, John D.; Cavanaugh, Dan C.

    1972-01-01

    A stable hemagglutinating antigen for detection of fraction I (FR-I) antibody of Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis) is described. The antigen was prepared by sensitizing tanned, pyruvaldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes (PAT SRBC) with FR-I antigen. Preliminary standardization by titration of each lot of FR-I was required to minimize the effect of molecular heterogeneity of specific FR-I antigen and to eliminate nonspecific reactions caused by the presence of a minor antigenic contaminant. In tests with sera from rabbits, dogs, and humans, FR-I PAT SRBC were as reactive as the previously employed standard antigen, FR-I-sensitized tanned erythrocytes. Fluid suspensions of FR-I PAT SRBC stored at 4 C for 3 months, or lyophilized preparations stored at ambient temperature for 6 months, showed no loss in antigenic activity. PMID:5062977

  20. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  1. Detection and characterisation of papillomavirus in skin lesions of giraffe and sable antelope in South Africa.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, E; Bosman, A M; van Wilpe, E; Williams, J H; Bengis, R G; van Heerden, J; Venter, E H

    2011-06-01

    Papillomavirus was detected electron microscopically in cutaneous fibropapillomas of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger). The virus particles measured 45 nm in diameter. Histopathologically, the lesions showed histopathological features similar to those of equine sarcoid as well as positive immunoperoxidase-staining of tissue sections for papillomavirus antigen. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected bovine papillomavirus (BPV) DNA. Bovine papillomavirus-1 was characterised by real-time PCR in the sable and giraffe, and cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed a similarity to BPV-1. As in the 1st giraffe, the lesions from a 2nd giraffe revealed locally malignant pleomorphism, possibly indicating the lesional end-point of papilloma infection. Neither virus particles nor positively staining papillomavirus antigen could be demonstrated in the 2nd giraffe but papillomavirus DNA was detected by real-time PCR which corresponded with BPV-1 and BPV-2.

  2. Genetic and antigenic characterisation of Bungowannah virus, a novel pestivirus causing myocarditis in pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In June 2003 a syndrome of sudden death in sucker pigs, an elevation in the proportion of stillborn foetuses, increased preweaning losses and to a lesser extent increased mummification rates was recognised on a property in NSW, Australia [1]. This disease has been described as the porcine myocarditi...

  3. Characterising insomnia: A graph spectral theory approach.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Vargas, Ramiro; Ahmed, Beena; Penzel, Thomas; Cvetkovic, Dean

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a computational approach to characterise healthy controls and insomniacs based on graph spectral theory. Based upon expert-generated hypnograms of sleep onset periods, a network of sleep stages transitions is derived to compute four similarity distances amongst subjects' sleeping patterns. A subsequent statistical analysis is performed to differentiate the 16-subject healthy group from a 16-patient disordered cohort. Our findings demonstrated that the similarity distances based on eigenvalues determination, i.e. d1 and d4 were the most reliable and robust measures to characterise insomniacs, discriminating 93% and 87% of the affected population, respectively.

  4. Detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis viral antigen in avian blood by enzyme immunoassay: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Scott, T W; Olson, J G

    1986-05-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was evaluated for its efficacy at detecting eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in avian blood and brain specimens. Preliminary analysis of blood from experimentally infected house sparrows and naturally infected whooping cranes showed that EEE antigen could be detected with the EIA. Polyclonal mouse antibodies were selected for antigen capture, and rabbit antibodies were selected for antigen detection. Overnight antigen incubation increased sensitivity. The lower limit of EEE antigen detection was 10(3.5) TCID50/ml for a stock of virus. Sensitivity was 10% (2/20) for antigen detection in the blood of chicks inoculated with EEE virus less than 24 hr earlier. At 24 and 48 hr after infection, sensitivity was 100% (10/10). Sensitivity and specificity of antigen detection were excellent (100% for both) in house sparrows experimentally inoculated with EEE, Highlands J (HJ), western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE), or St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus and bled at 24 hr intervals. Cross-reactivity was observed, however, with high concentrations (10(5.5) TCID50/ml) of HJ virus. EEE antigen was detected in avian blood by the EIA after infectious virus had declined to undetectable levels. The EIA is a useful alternative to virus isolation in cell culture for diagnosis or detection of EEE virus infections in birds. The test has the advantages of being simple, rapid, and capable of detecting antigen in the absence of infectious virus.

  5. Agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic characterisation of Sicilian Origanum vulgare (L.) ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Martinelli, Federico; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Leto, Claudio; Maggio, Antonella; La Bella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Although Origanum vulgare (L.) has been deeply analysed at phytochemical level, poor knowledge is available regarding non-volatile compounds such as lipids. The aim of this work was to characterise five wild Sicilian Origanum ecotypes from an agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic perspective. Serradifalco presented higher dry weight and inflorescences/plant than the others while Favara had a significantly higher number of branches per plant and more extensive flowered stratum. Metabolomic analysis, performed with LC-MS-TOF, allowed a preliminary characterisation of the non-volatile metabolome of the five oregano ecotypes Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum. Twenty-five metabolites were identified belonging to organic acids, amino acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, carnithines, nucleic bases and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. Lipidomic analysis identified 115 polar plant membrane glycerolipid species. Thirteen of them were differentially present in the two chosen ecotypes. The role of these metabolites in plant physiology from a qualitative and pharmacological point of view was discussed.

  6. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  7. Attribution and Characterisation of Sclerophyll Forested Landscapes Over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Simon; Soto-Berelov, Mariela; Suarez, Lola; Wilkes, Phil; Woodgate, Will; Haywood, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    conducted a total of 67 ground-based method-to-method pairwise comparisons across 11 plots in five sites, incorporating the previously mentioned LAI methods. Out of the 67 comparisons, 29 had an RMSE ≥ 0.5 LAIe. This has important implications for the validation of remotely sensed products since ground based techniques themselves exhibit LAI variations greater than internationally recommended guidelines for satellite product accuracies. 2. Two methods of canopy height derivation are proposed and tested over a large area (4 Million Ha). 99th percentile maximum height achieved a RMSE of 6.6%, whilst 95th percentile dominant height a RMSE = 10.3%. Vertical canopy complexity (i.e. the number of forest layers of strata) was calculated as the local maxima of vegetation density within the LiDAR canopy profile and determined using a cubic spline smoothing of Pgap. This was then validated against in-situ and LiDAR observations of canopy strata with an RMSE 0.39 canopy layers. 3. Preliminary results are presented of landcover characterisation using LandTrendr analysis of Landsat LEDAPS data. kNN is then used to link these features to a dense network of 800 field plots sites.

  8. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOPIC Peptic Ulcers Stool Tests Stool Test: Bacteria Culture Stool Test: Giardia Antigen Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Helicobacter pylori X-Ray Exam: Upper Gastrointestinal Tract (Upper GI) Ugh! Ulcers Ulcers Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines ...

  9. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  10. Culture and characterisation of equine peripheral blood mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Jan H; De Schauwer, Catharina; Cornillie, Pieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Van Soom, Ann; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for the treatment of orthopaedic injuries in horses has been reported, no official guidelines exist that classify a particular cell as an equine MSC. Given the limited characterisation of peripheral blood (PB)-derived equine MSCs in particular, this study aimed to provide more detailed information in relation to this cell type. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from equine PB samples and colony forming unit (CFU) assays as well as population doubling times (PDTs) (from P(0) to P(10)) were performed. Two types of colonies, 'fingerprint' and dispersed, could be observed based on macroscopic and microscopic features. Moreover, after an initial lag phase (as indicated by a negative PDT at P(0) to P(1)) the MSCs divided rapidly as indicated by a positive PDT at all further passages. Immunophenotyping was carried out with trypsin- as well as with accutase-detached MSC to evaluate potential trypsin-sensitive epitope destruction on particular antigens. Isolated MSC were positive for CD29, CD44, CD90 and CD105, and negative for CD45, CD79α, MHC II and a monocyte/macrophage marker, irrespective of the cell detaching agent used. Trilineage differentiation of the MSCs towards osteoblasts, chondroblasts and adipocytes was confirmed using a range of histochemical stains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterisation of the local inflammatory response in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Puri, P; Reen, D J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have characterised the local inflammatory response in acute suppurative appendicitis (S), focal appendicitis (F), and normal appendices (C). Enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, cells expressing IL-2 receptor, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes and plasma cell isotypes and subclasses infiltrating the lamina propria was carried out on all specimens using immunoperoxidase staining procedures. Total T cells were significantly increased in both acute suppurative appendicitis and focal appendicitis compared with controls (p < 0.001). Cells infiltrating the lamina propria expressed IL-2 receptor in all appendiceal specimens but were significantly increased in both acute and focal appendicitis (p < 0.01). IgG and IgA plasma cell isotypes were significantly increased in all S and F appendiceal specimens (p < 0.001). Monocyte and NK cell numbers, however, were only increased in acute suppurative appendiceal specimens. The increased lymphocyte and plasma cell isotypes seen in focal appendicitis occurred throughout the entire organ even through the inflammatory focus was confined to only three to seven serial sections. These results clearly show a differential pattern of cellular infiltration in focal appendicitis from that seen in acute suppurative appendicitis. The selective lymphocyte and plasma cell nature of the cellular infiltrate in the lamina propria of focal appendicitis may reflect the presence of a specific immune response to an as yet unidentified luminal antigen as a possible cause of appendicitis.

  12. Characterisation of circulating chromogranin A in human cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Corti, A.; Gasparri, A.; Chen, F. X.; Pelagi, M.; Brandazza, A.; Sidoli, A.; Siccardi, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of circulating chromogranin A (CgA) of phaeochromocytoma patients was characterised and compared with that of CgA extracted from tumours. Size exclusion chromatography experiments provided evidence that CgA is present in the blood of different patients, as well as in tumour extracts, as multiple forms having different hydrodynamic sizes of 600 kDa (CgA-I), 100 kDa (CgA-II) and 55 kDA (CgA-III). The amount of each CgA form as a proportion of the total antigenic material was different in different patients. Western blot analysis of chromatographic fractions indicated that these forms are made up by polypeptides of similar molecular weight (about 60-70 kDa). All CgA forms express the epitopes recognised by two monoclonal antibodies (A11 and B4E11), directed against residues 68-70 and 81-90 of human CgA. However, their relative immunoreactivity was markedly different. No evidence for the presence of multimeric complexes in the CgA-I fraction was obtained by various immunological and biochemical methods. These results suggest that circulating CgA in phaeochromocytoma patients consists of at least three forms that appear to be made up by polypeptides with similar molecular weight and different hydrodynamic properties and immunoreactivity. We hypothesise that different conformations and shapes contribute to the heterogeneity of circulating CgA. Images Figure 4 PMID:8611427

  13. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  14. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  15. Characterisation of local immune responses induced by a novel nano-particle based carrier-adjuvant in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gamvrellis, Anita; Gloster, Simone; Jefferies, Meryem; Mottram, Patricia L; Smooker, Peter; Plebanski, Magdalena; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2013-09-01

    Most adjuvants require danger signals to promote immune responses against vaccine antigens. Our previous studies have characterised a powerful nano-particulate antigen delivery system, which by itself does not induce inflammation, and which further appears to induce substantial immune responses in mice and sheep without the requirement for added stimulators of toll like receptors or other pathogen recognition receptors. In the present study we dissect the nature of the early induction phase of the immune response stimulated by such a vaccine comprising 40 nm polystyrene nano-particles conjugated to the antigen. We analyse the kinetics of export from an individual draining lymph node from the sheep, of antibodies and cytokines as well as antigen responsive CD4 and CD8 T cells. Our results indicate that simple inert nano-bead based antigen delivery into the draining area of the lymph node is highly efficient at priming combined humoral and T cell antigen specific immunity without the need for added 'danger signals'. Furthermore this nano-bead adjuvant is a potent agent capable of promoting cross-priming for CD8 T cell induction in sheep. Interestingly, using nano-beads, similarly to what has been observed with natural pathogen based lymph node stimulation, a phase of CD4 T cell priming and export preceded CD8 T cell induction, suggesting the engagement of natural priming processes and kinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ATCA characterisation of first BETA fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feain, Ilana; Johnston, Simon

    2011-04-01

    To fully characterise 2 30 square degree fields that will become the first science fields observed on BETA and at the same time to extract new science from the ATCA observations. The fields are centred on the Circinus galaxy and the Fornax cluster (and including Fornax A)

  17. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors. Graphical abstractDetermination of hydrophobicity character of nanomaterials by measuring their affinity to engineered surfaces.

  18. Ullage Tank Fuel-Air Mixture Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    5 1.3 SOLID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION ........................................................................ 7 1.4...National Institute of Standards and Testing PDMS Polydimethylsiloxane RPM Revolutions per minute SPME Solid-Phase Microextraction VOC...Mayfield, 1996). The technique chosen to characterise the vapour was headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME), interfaced with a gas

  19. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine.

  20. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  1. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  2. Equine infectious anemia: preparation of a liquid antigen extract for the agar-gel immunodiffusion and complement-fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, P; Bannister, G L; Carrier, S P

    1972-04-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test.

  3. Equine Infectious Anemia: Preparation of a Liquid Antigen Extract for the Agar-gel Immunodiffusion and Complement-fixation Tests

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, P.; Bannister, G. L.; Carrier, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    An agar-gel immunodiffusion test recommended for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia was evaluated. Our preliminary observations confirmed those of Coggins concerning the mechanism of the test and the results obtained. Furthermore, emphasis was put on the difficulties encountered in the production of spleen antigens with an optimum amount of reactivity. Acetone-ether extraction procedures for the preparation of a liquid antigen extract are described. This type of antigen was reactive in the complement-fixation test in 1:8 or greater dilution and it is proposed to use the complement-fixation test in assessing and standardizing the liquid antigen extract activity to be used in the immunodiffusion test. This antigen can also be concentrated or diluted, if required, to meet the reactivity of a standard antigen used in the test. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4259924

  4. K99 surface antigen of Escherichia coli: antigenic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    K99 prepared by acid precipitation hemagglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes, whereas K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex did not. K99 purified by either procedure hemagglutinated horse erythrocytes. K99 prepared by acid precipitation contained a second antigen not presnet in the K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. This antigen could be detected by immunoprecipitation with some, but not all, sera prepared against K99-positive Escherichia coli strains. It was assumed that this second antigen is not K99 and is responsible for the guinea pig erythrocyte hemagglutination reaction. Furthermore, the second antigen has an isoelectric point of 4.2, which has been reported by Morris and co-workers to be the isoelectric point of K99. Images PMID:83300

  5. Characterisation of lab in typical Salento Pecorino cheese.

    PubMed

    Cappello, M S; Laddomada, B; Poltronieri, P; Zacheo, G

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Lactic Acid Bacteria isolated from the typical Pecorino cheese of the Salento area of Italy, were identified and grouped according to their genetic similarity. A preliminary characterisation of the strains was conducted by means of morphological and biochemical analysis, but molecular approaches were necessary for the clear identification of the species. For the species detection, the amplification and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene was employed In addition, restriction analysis of amplified rDNA (ARDRA) and PCR and AFLP fingerprinting enabled inter- and intra-specific variation to be estimated UPGMA cluster analysis was used to divide the strains into distinct clusters which corresponded with the species delineation obtained by molecular identification. The data obtained show that the community of lactobacilli responsible for the fermentation and aging of Pecorino cheese is composed of a limited number of species. The main identified strains were Lactobacillus brevis, L. plantarum, L. casei, L. sakei, L. pentosus, L. farciminis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

  6. The antigenic repertoire of premalignant and high-risk lesions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Juan Pablo; Stanton, Sasha E; Disis, Mary L

    2015-04-01

    Prophylactic vaccines have been a major advance in preventing the development of infections after exposure to pathogens. When contemplating an effective approach to cancer prevention, vaccines offer unique advantages over other more standard approaches: First, once appropriately stimulated, antigen-specific T cells will travel to all sites of disease and eradicate cells bearing the proteins to which the T cells have been primed by vaccination. Second, successful immunization will further result in the development of immunologic memory, providing lifelong immunologic surveillance. There is evidence of an adaptive tumor immune infiltrate even at the earliest stages of breast and colon cancer development. Furthermore, there is measurable immunity to lesion-associated antigens present in patients who will eventually develop malignancy even before cancer is clinically evident. Recent studies are beginning to unmask the preinvasive antigenic repertoire for these two malignancies. Preliminary experiments in transgenic mouse models of mammary and intestinal tumors suggest that immunization against antigens expressed in preinvasive and high-risk lesions may be effective in preventing the development of invasive malignancy.

  7. Material characterisation of nanowires with intrinsic stress.

    PubMed

    Mills, S; Sader, J E; Boland, J J

    2017-09-01

    When fabricating nanowires (NWs) in a doubly-clamped beam configuration it is possible for a residual axial stress to be generated. Here, we show that material characterisation of metal and semiconductor NWs subjected to residual axial stress can be problematic. Benchmark measurements of the Young's modulus of NWs are performed by sectioning a doubly-clamped NW into two cantilevered wires, eliminating residual axial stress. Use of models for doubly-clamped beams that incorporate the effects of residual stress are found to lead to ambiguity in the extracted Young's modulus as a function of displacement fit range, even for NWs with no residual stress. This is due to coupling of bending and axial stress effects at small displacements, and the limited displacement range of force curves prior to fracture or plastic deformation. This study highlights the importance of fabricating metal and semiconductor NWs that exhibit little or no residual axial stress for materials characterisation.

  8. Material characterisation of nanowires with intrinsic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S.; Sader, J. E.; Boland, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    When fabricating nanowires (NWs) in a doubly-clamped beam configuration it is possible for a residual axial stress to be generated. Here, we show that material characterisation of metal and semiconductor NWs subjected to residual axial stress can be problematic. Benchmark measurements of the Young’s modulus of NWs are performed by sectioning a doubly-clamped NW into two cantilevered wires, eliminating residual axial stress. Use of models for doubly-clamped beams that incorporate the effects of residual stress are found to lead to ambiguity in the extracted Young’s modulus as a function of displacement fit range, even for NWs with no residual stress. This is due to coupling of bending and axial stress effects at small displacements, and the limited displacement range of force curves prior to fracture or plastic deformation. This study highlights the importance of fabricating metal and semiconductor NWs that exhibit little or no residual axial stress for materials characterisation.

  9. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant.

  10. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  11. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  12. A predictive typology for characterising hydromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, H. G.; Large, A. R. G.; Newson, M. D.; Walsh, C. L.

    2008-08-01

    Whilst traditionally poorly quantified, the link between physical habitat and ecological response in rivers is widely recognised, and is currently rising up legislative and policy agendas. In Europe, this is reflected in the Water Framework Directive which dictates that 'hydromorphological' condition of water bodies should be capable of supporting 'Good Ecological Status'. Methods are developed that integrate river system hydrology, geomorphology and ecology (and the complex interplay between these three variables). Whilst hydrological and biological methods for characterisation are relatively well established, geomorphological methods are not. Effective characterisation of geomorphology (physical habitat) with full spatial coverage, at a range of scales, can be used to explore spatial interactions between habitat and biological data and potentially further our understanding of ecological response. Managers need to know what aspects of physical habitat and at which critical locations intervention will lead to greatest improvements in ecological condition. This requires information on hydromorphological character and condition. Existing applied approaches for capturing geomorphological data are highly dependent on intensive fieldwork, which is unlikely to be resourced at sufficiently extensive scales to meet management needs. This paper outlines a typology approach for characterising the physical template of rivers. It draws on a range of hydromorphological data to develop a framework for a channel typology; with data collation from secondary sources followed by targeted fieldwork to (i) assess to what extent individual channel types are characteristic of field conditions and (ii) to collect information on reach-scale variability within each type. Results suggest that characterisation of channel types based on stream power, floodplain width and stream order does result in a distinct set of channel types. Field survey subsequently found that these types had a

  13. Defect Characterisation of Ultra-Small Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-20

    characterisation of electronic devices. An operational electrically-detected magnetic resonance ( EDMR ) spectrometer constructed has been installed based on...previous studies. Evidence that the origin of the EDMR signal is due to platinum is assessed with the aid of spectral simulation. Electron paramagnetic...reported EPR spectra and the measured and reported EDMR spectra was found. The long- term aim of the work is to study localisation in quantum confined

  14. Microstructural characterisation of nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. N.; Hall, G. N.; Joyce, M.; Hodgkins, A.; Wen, K.; Marrow, T. J.; Marsden, B. J.

    2008-10-01

    Field emission and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterise the microstructure and morphology of baked carbon block and graphitized grades (from the same carbon block stock) of nuclear graphite. Quantitative analysis using Raman and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the decrease of crystallinity with graphitization and sample purity. Both baked carbon and graphitized nuclear graphites show no sensitivity of the Raman band shift to strain, consistent with strain accommodation by the porous structure.

  15. Development of an anti-ferret CD4 monoclonal antibody for the characterisation of ferret T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Layton, Daniel S; Xiao, Xiaowen; Bentley, John D; Lu, Louis; Stewart, Cameron R; Bean, Andrew G D; Adams, Timothy E

    2017-05-01

    The ferret is an established animal model for a number of human respiratory viral infections, such as influenza virus and more recently, Ebola virus. However, a paucity of immunological reagents has hampered the study of cellular immune responses. Here we describe the development and characterisation of a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the ferret CD4 antigen and the characterisation of ferret CD4 T lymphocytes. Recombinant production and purification of the ferret CD4 ectodomain soluble protein allowed hybridoma generation and the generation of a mAb (FeCD4) showing strong binding to ferret CD4 protein and lymphoid cells by flow cytometry. FeCD4 bound to its cognate antigen post-fixation with paraformaldehyde (PFA) which is routinely used to inactivate highly pathogenic viruses. We have also used FeCD4 in conjunction with other immune cell markers to characterise ferret T cells in both primary and secondary lymphoid organs. In summary, we have developed an important reagent for the study of cellular immunological responses in the ferret model of infectious disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterisation of rollator use using inertial sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurence; Amor, James David; Thies, Sibylle Brunhilde; Costamagna, Eleonora; James, Christopher; Holloway, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The use of walking aids is prevalent among older people and people with mobility impairment. Rollators are designed to support outdoor mobility and require the user to negotiate curbs and slopes in the urban environment. Despite the prevalence of rollators, analysis of their use outside of controlled environments has received relatively little attention. This Letter reports on an initial study to characterise rollator movement. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to measure the motion of the rollator and analytical approaches were developed to extract features characterising the rollator movement, properties of the surface and push events. The analytics were tested in two situations: first, a healthy participant used a rollator in a laboratory using a motion capture system to obtain ground truth. Second, the IMU was used to measure the movement of a rollator being used by a user with multiple sclerosis on a flat surface, cross-slope, up and down slopes and up and down a step. The results showed that surface inclination and distance travelled measured by the IMU have close approximation to the results from ground truth; therefore, demonstrating the potential for IMU-derived metrics to characterise rollator movement and user's pushing style in the outdoor environment. PMID:28008367

  17. The characterisation of commercial lubricant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, J.; Yates, H.; Bunn, A.

    1995-12-31

    Modern lubricant formulations are complex mixtures of base esters, antiwear additives, corrosion inhibitors and other modifiers. Their characterisation poses a difficult analytical challenge. A major market for these products is in the replacement of traditional CFC based refrigerants by modern alternatives. Conventional lubricants such as mineral oil are incompatible with the new refrigerants. Soft ionisation mass spectrometry (CI, LSIMS and FID), coupled with tandem mass spectrometry where required, has been used in conjunction with GC-MS and NMR in order to characterise these formulations. Statistical analysis of the soft ionisation data has provided further information regarding the detailed composition of the complex esters. This combination of experimental approaches provides a powerful method for the characterisation of these materials. A number of different types of polyol are used in the manufacture of the base esters with tetra- and hexa-esters the most common. The acids used, in general, vary in carbon number and in isomeric distribution and this leads to considerable complexity in the product.

  18. Characterisation of rollator use using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsu-Jui; Kenney, Laurence; Amor, James David; Thies, Sibylle Brunhilde; Costamagna, Eleonora; James, Christopher; Holloway, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    The use of walking aids is prevalent among older people and people with mobility impairment. Rollators are designed to support outdoor mobility and require the user to negotiate curbs and slopes in the urban environment. Despite the prevalence of rollators, analysis of their use outside of controlled environments has received relatively little attention. This Letter reports on an initial study to characterise rollator movement. An inertial measurement unit (IMU) was used to measure the motion of the rollator and analytical approaches were developed to extract features characterising the rollator movement, properties of the surface and push events. The analytics were tested in two situations: first, a healthy participant used a rollator in a laboratory using a motion capture system to obtain ground truth. Second, the IMU was used to measure the movement of a rollator being used by a user with multiple sclerosis on a flat surface, cross-slope, up and down slopes and up and down a step. The results showed that surface inclination and distance travelled measured by the IMU have close approximation to the results from ground truth; therefore, demonstrating the potential for IMU-derived metrics to characterise rollator movement and user's pushing style in the outdoor environment.

  19. Characterisation of protein stability in rod-insert vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Pattani, Aditya; Lowry, Deborah; Curran, Rhonda M; McGrath, Stephanie; Kett, Vicky L; Andrews, Gavin P; Malcolm, R Karl

    2012-07-01

    A major goal in vaccine development is elimination of the 'cold chain', the transport and storage system for maintenance and distribution of the vaccine product. This is particularly pertinent to liquid formulation of vaccines. We have previously described the rod-insert vaginal ring (RiR) device, comprising an elastomeric body into which are inserted lyophilised, rod-shaped, solid drug dosage forms, and having potential for sustained mucosal delivery of biomacromolecules, such as HIV envelope protein-based vaccine candidates. Given the solid, lyophilised nature of these insert dosage forms, we hypothesised that antigen stability may be significantly increased compared with more conventional solubilised vaginal gel format. In this study, we prepared and tested vaginal ring devices fitted with lyophilised rod inserts containing the model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). Both the RiRs and the gels that were freeze-dried to prepare the inserts were evaluated for BSA stability using PAGE, turbidimetry, microbial load, MALDI-TOF and qualitative precipitate solubility measurements. When stored at 4 °C, but not when stored at 40 °C/75% RH, the RiR formulation offered protection against structural and conformational changes to BSA. The insert also retained matrix integrity and release characteristics. The results demonstrate that lypophilised gels can provide relative protection against degradation at lower temperatures compared to semi-solid gels. The major mechanism of degradation at 40 °C/75% RH was shown to be protein aggregation. Finally, in a preliminary study, we found that addition of trehalose to the formulation significantly reduces the rate of BSA degradation compared to the original formulation when stored at 40 °C/75% RH. Establishing the mechanism of degradation, and finding that degradation is decelerated in the presence of trehalose, will help inform further development of RiRs specifically and polymer based freeze-dried systems in general.

  20. Characterisation of a new mouse monoclonal antibody (ONS-M21) reactive with both medulloblastomas and gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Moriuchi, S.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Hayakawa, T.

    1993-01-01

    We developed an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (ONS-M21) directed against a cell surface antigen of medulloblastomas and gliomas in immunisation of mice with the ONS-76 medulloblastoma cell line. The antibody specifically reacted with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours (SPNETs) and gliomas, but not with other neuroectodermally derived tumours (neuroblastoma and melanoma) or with other kinds of tumours (meningioma, neurinoma, leukaemia, and small cell lung cancer). No reactivity was identified with normal body tissues, including peripheral blood cells. Characterisation of the ONS-M21 antigen showed that it was a trypsin-sensitive glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 80 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The pattern of reactivity and the biochemical properties of this antigen were different from those of other markers of medulloblastoma. These results indicate that ONS-M21 detects a new tumour-associated cell surface antigen specifically expressed by medulloblastomas, SPNETs, and gliomas. This is the first report that medulloblastomas may share common cell surface antigens with gliomas, although most studies have concluded that medulloblastoma has a predominantly neuronal phenotype. The lack of reactivity with normal tissue implies that ONS-M21 has potential applications as both a diagnostic tool and a therapeutic agent. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8217597

  1. Antibody-antigen exchange equilibria in a field of an external force: design of reagentless biosensors.

    PubMed

    Monson, Christopher F; Driscoll, Laura N; Bennion, Eliot; Miller, Cary J; Majda, Marcin

    2009-09-01

    This correspondence presents a new strategy for detecting biological molecules that relies on competitive exchange interactions of an analyte with two-component molecular tethers attaching superparamagnetic microspheres (4 microm in diameter) to a sensor surface. The individual tethers consist of an antibody-antigen complex and are designed to selectively detect antigenic proteins in a sensitive reagentless fashion. In order to impart a driving force to the otherwise free energy neutral antibody-antigen exchange equilibrium, a small mechanical force of approximately 10 pN was applied to stretch the antibody-antigen tethers using a massively parallel magnetic tweezers device. The experimental work was carried out with human cardiac troponin I. This serum heart attack marker was used as an example of analytes of credible relevance to biomedical diagnostics. The initial results illustrate the functioning of a cardiotroponin sensor and offer a preliminary estimate of its sensitivity of 16 pM.

  2. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  3. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  4. Characterisation of an urban bus network for environmental purposes.

    PubMed

    André, Michel; Villanova, André

    2004-12-01

    Since pollutant emissions are closely related to the operating conditions of vehicles, their evaluation usually involves studying these operating conditions (through bus instrumentation and monitoring under actual operation), the design of representative driving or engine test cycles and the measurement of pollutant emissions. A preliminary characterisation of the routes on a bus network should make it possible to identify typical routes, the driving conditions and pollutant emissions of which are then studied. Two approaches are envisaged and applied to the Paris area, for which a wealth of information is available, which should be transferable to other bus networks. Both approaches are based on factorial analysis and automatic clustering, to allow optimum description and the identification of a pertinent typology of the bus routes in several classes. The first attempt at characterisation is based on statistics relating to bus operations: route characteristics (length, dedicated bus lanes, number of stops, location of stops: schools, tourist sites, hospitals, railways or underground stations), travel time, commercial speed, annual statistics (number of passengers, number of vehicles per hour, total kilometres), the irregularity of travel (variation of travel times, injuries, congestion.), as well as information on the problems encountered (congestion, distribution of the passenger load, junctions, bends). A second approach is based on the analysis of the "urban context" in which buses are driven. Population, employment, housing, road network, traffic and places that generate or disturb traffic (schools, railway stations, shopping areas, etc.) are calculated for the Ile de France region, by cells of 100 x 100 m, and collected in a geographical information system (GIS). Statistical analyses enable a typology of these urban cells to be established, the main parameters being density, type of housing, road types and traffic levels. The bus routes are then analysed

  5. Constructing a Professional Identity: Some Preliminary Findings from Students of Early Years Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Bridget A.

    2004-01-01

    In this article some preliminary data from an ongoing exploration of student teachers' development of professional identities are explored. This project uses hermeneutic techniques to develop a set of categories which characterise students' articulation of their understanding. This is related to the Aristotelian categories of "praxis",…

  6. How does antigen retrieval work?

    PubMed

    Leong, Trishe Y-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of antigen retrieval has enabled immunohistology to become an integral component of morphologic diagnosis, routinely employed in cancer diagnosis, and for the identification of therapeutic and prognostic markers. The mechanism of antigen retrieval, however, remains speculative with the key to our understanding embedded in the actions of formaldehyde on proteins. One commonly held concept is that heat primarily breaks down protein cross-linkages that occur with aldehyde fixation, thus "unmasking" protein epitopes of interest. Enzymatic pretreatment is also thought to have a similar action whereas such "breakages" are the result of extremely rapid molecular movement induced by microwaves and ultrasound. The formation of rigid cagelike calcium complexes during formaldehyde fixation is another suggested mechanism of antigen masking requiring chelating agents for reversal. A more recent suggestion for the antigen retrieval phenomenon has evoked the Mannich reaction, which occurs with the cross-linking of some proteins. Such cross-linkages can be hydrolyzed by heat or alkalis so that the process of antigen retrieval may be the simple removal of such cross-linked proteins that are sterically interfering with the binding of antibodies to linear protein epitopes in the tissue section. We are clearly not yet in possession of all the answers to the problem.

  7. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  8. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  9. Mechanically induced residual stresses: Modelling and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranart, Jean-Claude E.

    Accurate characterisation of residual stress represents a major challenge to the engineering community. This is because it is difficult to validate the measurement and the accuracy is doubtful. It is with this in mind that the current research program concerning the characterisation of mechanically induced residual stresses was undertaken. Specifically, the cold expansion of fastener holes and the shot peening treatment of aerospace alloys, aluminium 7075 and titanium Ti-6Al-4V, are considered. The objective of this study is to characterise residual stresses resulting from cold working using three powerful techniques. These are: (i) theoretical using three dimensional non-linear finite element modelling, (ii) semi-destructive using a modified incremental hole drilling technique and (iii) nondestructive using a newly developed guided wave method supplemented by traditional C-scan measurements. The three dimensional finite element results of both simultaneous and sequential cold expansion of two fastener holes revealed the importance of the separation distance, the expansion level and the loading history upon the development and growth of the plastic zone and unloading residual stresses. It further showed that the commonly adopted two dimensional finite element models are inaccurate and incapable of predicting these residual stresses. Similarly, the dynamic elasto-plastic finite element studies of shot peening showed that the depth of the compressed layer, surface and sub-surface residual stresses are significantly influenced by the shot characteristics. Furthermore, the results reveal that the separation distance between two simultaneously impacting shots governs the plastic zone development and its growth. In the semi-destructive incremental hole drilling technique, the accuracy of the newly developed calibration coefficients and measurement techniques were verified with a known stress field and the method was used to measure peening residual stresses. Unlike

  10. First principles characterisation of aluminium trifluoride catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, C. L.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Wander, A.; Searle, B. G.; Harrison, N. M.

    2008-06-01

    The recently discovered high surface area AlF3 catalyst is characterised with respect to surface composition and structure using calculations based on density functional theory. Under typical reaction conditions the surfaces are found to expose five fold coordinated Al reaction centres and to preferentially adsorb water. The acidic centres are probed using NH3 adsorption which binds strongly indicating strong Lewis acidity. The predicted temperature probed desorption spectrum has features from competing surfaces and features due to strong intermolecular interactions, which are used to interpret the observed spectrum.

  11. Hyphenated analytical techniques for materials characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Gordon; Kailas, Lekshmi

    2017-09-01

    This topical review will provide a survey of the current state of the art in ‘hyphenated’ techniques for characterisation of bulk materials, surface, and interfaces, whereby two or more analytical methods investigating different properties are applied simultaneously to the same sample to better characterise the sample than can be achieved by conducting separate analyses in series using different instruments. It is intended for final year undergraduates and recent graduates, who may have some background knowledge of standard analytical techniques, but are not familiar with ‘hyphenated’ techniques or hybrid instrumentation. The review will begin by defining ‘complementary’, ‘hybrid’ and ‘hyphenated’ techniques, as there is not a broad consensus among analytical scientists as to what each term means. The motivating factors driving increased development of hyphenated analytical methods will also be discussed. This introduction will conclude with a brief discussion of gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis in electron microscopy as two examples, in the context that combining complementary techniques for chemical analysis were among the earliest examples of hyphenated characterisation methods. The emphasis of the main review will be on techniques which are sufficiently well-established that the instrumentation is commercially available, to examine physical properties including physical, mechanical, electrical and thermal, in addition to variations in composition, rather than methods solely to identify and quantify chemical species. Therefore, the proposed topical review will address three broad categories of techniques that the reader may expect to encounter in a well-equipped materials characterisation laboratory: microscopy based techniques, scanning probe-based techniques, and thermal analysis based techniques. Examples drawn from recent literature, and a concluding case study, will be used to explain the

  12. Mechanism of antigen presentation after hypertonic loading of soluble antigens

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Georg A

    2002-01-01

    Hypertonic loading of proteins into cells has been used to introduce soluble proteins into the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway of antigen presentation followed by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction. The precise mechanism for this pathway is not completely understood. The antigen is either processed and presented by/on the same cell or by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) after taking up the antigen from damaged or apoptotic cells. After loading labelled ovalbumin (OVA), it could be co-precipitated with the proteasome complex, supporting the role of this pathway for antigen processing. The processing speed however, appeared to be slow since intact OVA could be detected inside the cells even after 18 hr. This corresponded well with the processing of OVA by isolated proteasomes. On the other hand, enough peptides for recognition of target cells by CTLs were generated in this reaction. One reason for the low level of processing might be that hypertonic loading may damage the cells and inhibit direct processing. In fact, at least 50% of the cells became positive for Annexin V binding after hypertonic loading which indicates severe membrane alterations usually associated with the progress of apoptosis. Annexin V binds to phosphatidylserine residues which also serve as ligand for CD36 expressed on monocytes and some immature dendritic cells. This may direct the phagocytic pathway to hypertonically loaded cells and thus enable professional APCs to present OVA-peptides. Therefore, in addition to the direct processing of OVA, CTLs can be primed by professional APC after uptake of apoptotic, OVA-loaded cells. PMID:12153514

  13. Freeform surface characterisation: theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P. J.; Jiang, X.

    2014-03-01

    The specification and characterisation of freeform surfaces is immature: many CAD packages only allow the nominal freeform geometry to be specified. To control manufacturing and function, the allowable geometric variability also needs to be specified. Currently International standards specify allowable geometry through geometrical tolerancing. Geometrical tolerancing has proved to be a very blunt instrument with many cases, particularly in the aerospace and biomedical industries, of failure of the function of freeform surfaces due to inadequate specification. The paper begins by discussing the importance of the decomposition of the surface geometry into different scales for both specification and characterisation. The three main types of geometrical decomposition: linear, morphological and segmentation are briefly discussed. The Laplace-Beltrami operator (LBO) is the generalization of the Laplace operator to manifolds (i.e. freeform surfaces). By taking Eigenfunctions/Eigenvalues of the LBO a spectral decomposition of the freeform geometry can be realized. The Eigenfunctions are called manifold harmonics and are a direct generalization of Fourier harmonics for freeform surfaces. Tolerancing the Eigenfunctions provides a very powerful and flexible system to control geometrical variability of freeform surfaces; extending the geometrical tolerancing system by allowing decomposition of the geometrical shapes within tolerance zones. Further a generalized Gaussian filter can also be realized by Gaussian weighting the LBO spectra and reconstructing the weighted Eigenfunctions.

  14. MONDO: a neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Gasparini, L.; Mirabelli, R.; Pinci, D.; Patera, V.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.; Stoppa, D.; Traini, G.; Sarti, A.

    2017-04-01

    Tumour control is performed in particle therapy using particles and ions, whose high irradiation precision enhances the effectiveness of the treatment, while sparing the healthy tissue surrounding the target volume. Dose range monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interacting with the patient’s body have already been proposed, but no attempt has been made yet to exploit the detection of the abundant neutron component. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region, precise measurements of their flux, production energy and angle distributions are eagerly sought in order to improve the treatment planning system (TPS) software. It will thus be possible to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region, but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. The aforementioned issues underline the importance of an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterisation of neutron production, aimed at the measurement of their abundance, emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aimed at high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision are addressed within the MONDO (monitor for neutron dose in hadrontherapy) project, whose main goal is to develop a tracking detector that can target fast and ultrafast neutrons. A full reconstruction of two consecutive elastic scattering interactions undergone by the neutrons inside the detector material will be used to measure their energy and direction. The preliminary results of an MC simulation performed using the FLUKA software are presented here, together with the DSiPM (digital SiPM) readout implementation. New detector readout implementations specifically tailored to the MONDO tracker are also discussed, and the neutron detection efficiency attainable with the proposed neutron tracking strategy are reported.

  15. MONDO: a neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission characterisation.

    PubMed

    Marafini, M; Gasparini, L; Mirabelli, R; Pinci, D; Patera, V; Sciubba, A; Spiriti, E; Stoppa, D; Traini, G; Sarti, A

    2017-04-21

    Tumour control is performed in particle therapy using particles and ions, whose high irradiation precision enhances the effectiveness of the treatment, while sparing the healthy tissue surrounding the target volume. Dose range monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interacting with the patient's body have already been proposed, but no attempt has been made yet to exploit the detection of the abundant neutron component. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumour region, precise measurements of their flux, production energy and angle distributions are eagerly sought in order to improve the treatment planning system (TPS) software. It will thus be possible to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region, but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. The aforementioned issues underline the importance of an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterisation of neutron production, aimed at the measurement of their abundance, emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aimed at high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision are addressed within the MONDO (monitor for neutron dose in hadrontherapy) project, whose main goal is to develop a tracking detector that can target fast and ultrafast neutrons. A full reconstruction of two consecutive elastic scattering interactions undergone by the neutrons inside the detector material will be used to measure their energy and direction. The preliminary results of an MC simulation performed using the FLUKA software are presented here, together with the DSiPM (digital SiPM) readout implementation. New detector readout implementations specifically tailored to the MONDO tracker are also discussed, and the neutron detection efficiency attainable with the proposed neutron tracking strategy are reported.

  16. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  17. SCREENING OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC O2 -EVOLVING PROKARYOTES FOR AN INSULIN-LIKE ANTIGEN(1).

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Saima; Anwer, Razique; Zutshi, Sunaina; Fatma, Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM), a metabolic disorder, is becoming a major health problem worldwide. Insulin is the single hope for management of type 1 diabetes, but it is not always available or suitable. For finding additional bioresources, the present study was performed. ELISA-based preliminary screening of cyanobacterial biomass using antihuman insulin antibody have detected an insulin-like antigen in Spirulina platensis S-5, Spirulina NCCU-482, and Spirulina NCCU-483. Their similarity with insulin-like antigen was further confirmed by electrophoretic mobility using bovine insulin as marker. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Encapsulation of poly(D,L-lactide) microparticles with polyelectrolyte multilayers for antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul Yueh-Jen; Yang, Ya-Wun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) microparticles containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model antigen were prepared by the double-emulsion and solvent evaporation method, followed by encapsulation with alternating layers of the polyelectrolytes, consisting of protamine sulfate and dextran sulfate of various molecular weights. The physicochemical properties, including particle size and zeta potentials, were characterised. Treatment of mouse macrophages with surface-modified PLA microparticles stimulated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, which was detected by the fluorescent probes, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and hydroethidine (HE). Incubation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) with the encapsulated PLA microparticles enhanced the presentation of OVA soluble antigens in B3Z cells, an OVA-specific CD8(+) T cell hybridoma. Results obtained in this study demonstrated the potential use of polyelectrolyte-encapsulated biodegradable microparticles for delivery of soluble antigens to the antigen-presenting cells and stimulation of effective antigen presentation in the context of class I major histocompatibility complex.

  19. IgG responses to antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae in healthy and atopic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Chun; Pemberton, Alan; Nuttall, Tim; Hill, Peter B

    2005-06-15

    In this study, we used a semi-quantitative electrophoresis and immunoblotting technique to characterise the IgG response to antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae in 20 healthy and 20 atopic dogs. Both groups mounted an IgG response to multiple antigens from the mite. There was no significant difference in the number of bands recognised, or the molecular weights of the bands, between the two groups. The two most obvious bands in both groups were proteins with molecular weights of 98 kDa (likely to be the high molecular weight allergen Der f 15) and 44 kDa, although dogs in both groups recognised a similar pattern of other antigens. The magnitude of the IgG response was greater in the atopic group although this was not statistically significant. The results indicate that the immune system of both healthy and atopic dogs generates an IgG response to multiple antigens from D. farinae. As some of these antigens (such as the 98 and 44 kDa proteins) are also targeted by IgE in atopic dogs, immunoglobulin class switching in response to Th2 cytokines may not be as dominant a process as has been proposed.

  20. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  1. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria lactamica and N eisseria meningitidis outer membrane vesicle vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Thomas E; Skipp, Paul J; O'Connor, C David; Hudson, Michael J; Vipond, Richard; Elmore, Michael J; Gorringe, Andrew R

    2006-06-19

    Vaccines to prevent meningococcal disease have been developed from the outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Neisseria meningitidis and the related commensal organism Neisseria lactamica. In addition to lipopolysaccharide and the major porins, these vaccines contain a large number of proteins that are incompletely characterised. Here we describe comparative proteomic analyses of the N. lactamica OMV vaccine and OMVs from a serogroup B strain of N. meningitidis. Tandem mass-spectrometry data for trypsinised N. lactamica OMV vaccine were matched to an incompletely assembled genome sequence from the same strain to give 65 robust protein identifications and a further 122 single- or two-peptide matches. Fifty-seven N. meningitidis K454 proteins were identified robustly (and a further 68 from single- or two-peptide matches) by inference from the N. meningitidis MC58 genome. The results suggest that OMVs have a hitherto unappreciated complexity and pinpoint novel candidate antigens for further characterisation.

  2. Extraction Methods in Soil Phosphorus Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinne, Helena

    2010-05-01

    Extraction methods are widely used to assess the bioavailability of P and to characterise soil P reserves. Even though new and more sophisticated methods to characterise soil P are constantly developed the use of extraction methods is not likely to be replaced because of the relatively simple analytical equipment needed for the analysis. However, the large variety of extractants, pre-treatments and sample preparation procedures complicate the comparison of published results. In order to improve our understanding of the behaviour and cycling of P in soil, it is important to know the role of extracted P in the soil P cycle. The knowledge of the factors affecting the analytical outcome is a prerequisite for justified interpretation of the results. In this study, the effect of sample pre-treatment and properties of the used extractant on extractable molybdate-reactive phosphorus (MRP) and molybdate-unreactive phosphorus (MUP) was studied. Furthermore, the effect of sample preparation procedures prior the analysis on measured MRP and MUP was studied. Two widely used sequential extraction procedures were compared on their ability to show management induced differences on soil P. These results revealed that pre-treatments changed soil properties and air-drying was found to affect soil P, particularly extractable MUP, thought to represent organic P, by disrupting organic matter. This was evidenced by an increase in the water-extractable small-sized (<0.2 µm) P that, at least partly, took place at the expense of the large-sized (>0.2 µm) P. In addition to the effects of sample pre-treatment, the results showed that extractable organic P was sensitive to the chemical nature of the used extractant and to the sample preparation procedures employed prior to P analysis, including centrifugation and filtering of soil suspensions. Filtering may remove a major proportion of extractable MUP; therefore filtering cannot be recommended in the characterisation of solubilised MUP

  3. Neem oil nanoemulsions: characterisation and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Federica; Hanieh, Patrizia Nadia; Longhi, Catia; Carradori, Simone; Secci, Daniela; Zengin, Gokhan; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Mattia, Elena; Del Favero, Elena; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop nanoemulsions (NEs), nanosized emulsions, manufactured for improving the delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In particular, nanoemulsions composed of Neem seed oil, contain rich bioactive components, and Tween 20 as nonionic surfactant were prepared. A mean droplet size ranging from 10 to 100 nm was obtained by modulating the oil/surfactant ratio. Physicochemical characterisation was carried out evaluating size, ζ-potential, microviscosity, polarity and turbidity of the external shell and morphology, along with stability in simulated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), activity of Neem oil alone and in NEs, HEp-2 cell interaction and cytotoxicity studies. This study confirms the formation of NEs by Tween 20 and Neem oil at different weight ratios with small and homogenous dimensions. The antioxidant activity of Neem oil alone and in NEs was comparable, whereas its cytotoxicity was strongly reduced when loaded in NEs after interaction with HEp-2 cells.

  4. Modal noise characterisation of a hybrid reformatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaleniak, Izabela; MacLachlan, David G.; Gris-Sánchez, Itandehui; Choudhury, Debaditya; Harris, Robert J.; Arriola, Alexander; Allington-Smith, Jeremy R.; Birks, Timothy A.; Thomson, Robert R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the modal noise characterisation of a hybrid reformatter. The device consists of a multicore-fibre photonic lantern and an ultrafast laser-inscribed slit reformatter. It operates around 1550 nm and supports 92 modes. Photonic lanterns transform a multimode signal into an array of single-mode signals, and thus combine the high coupling efficiency of multimode fibres with the diffraction-limited performance of single-mode fibres. This paper presents experimental measurements of the device point spread function properties under different coupling conditions, and its throughput behaviour at high spectral resolution. The device demonstrates excellent scrambling but its point spread function is not completely stable. Mode field diameter and mode bary-centre position at the device output vary as the multicore fibre is agitated due to the fabrication imperfections.

  5. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  6. Functional Piezocrystal Characterisation under Varying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaochun; Qiu, Zhen; Jiang, Tingyi; Sadiq, Muhammad R.; Huang, Zhihong; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Piezocrystals, especially the relaxor-based ferroelectric crystals, have been subject to intense investigation and development within the past three decades, motivated by the performance advantages offered by their ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients and higher electromechanical coupling coefficients than piezoceramics. Structural anisotropy of piezocrystals also provides opportunities for devices to operate in novel vibration modes, such as the d36 face shear mode, with domain engineering and special crystal cuts. These piezocrystal characteristics contribute to their potential usage in a wide range of low- and high-power ultrasound applications. In such applications, conventional piezoelectric materials are presently subject to varying mechanical stress/pressure, temperature and electric field conditions. However, as observed previously, piezocrystal properties are significantly affected by a single such condition or a combination of conditions. Laboratory characterisation of the piezocrystal properties under these conditions is therefore essential to fully understand these materials and to allow electroacoustic transducer design in realistic scenarios. This will help to establish the extent to which these high performance piezocrystals can replace conventional piezoceramics in demanding applications. However, such characterisation requires specific experimental arrangements, examples of which are reported here, along with relevant results. The measurements include high frequency-resolution impedance spectroscopy with the piezocrystal material under mechanical stress 0–60 MPa, temperature 20–200 °C, high electric AC drive and DC bias. A laser Doppler vibrometer and infrared thermal camera are also integrated into the measurement system for vibration mode shape scanning and thermal conditioning with high AC drive. Three generations of piezocrystal have been tested: (I) binary, PMN-PT; (II) ternary, PIN-PMN-PT; and (III) doped ternary, Mn

  7. GNSS station characterisation for ionospheric scintillation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Vincenzo; Spogli, Luca; Aquino, Marcio; Dodson, Alan; Hancock, Craig; Forte, Biagio

    2013-10-01

    Ionospheric scintillations are fluctuations in the phase and amplitude of the signals from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) occurring when they cross regions of electron density irregularities in the ionosphere. Such disturbances can cause serious degradation of several aspects of GNSS system performance, including integrity, accuracy and availability. The two indices adopted worldwide to characterise ionospheric scintillations are: the amplitude scintillation index, S4, which is the standard deviation of the received power normalised by its mean value, and the phase scintillation index, σΦ, which is the standard deviation of the de-trended carrier phase. Collaborative work between NGI and INGV supports a permanent network of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor) receivers that covers a wide range of latitudes in the northern European sector. Data from this network has contributed significantly to several papers during the past few years (see e.g. De Franceschi et al., 2008; Aquino et al., 2009; Spogli et al., 2009, 2010; Alfonsi et al., 2011). In these investigations multipath effects and noise that contaminate the scintillation measurements are largely filtered by applying an elevation angle threshold. A deeper analysis of the data quality and the development of a more complex filtering technique can improve the results obtained so far. The structures in the environment of each receiver in the network which contaminate scintillation measurements should be identified in order to improve the quality of the scintillation and TEC data by removing error sources due to the local environment. The analysis in this paper considers a data set characterised by quiet ionospheric conditions of the mid-latitude station located in Nottingham (UK), followed by a case study of the severe geomagnetic storm, which occurred in late 2003, known generally as the "Halloween Storm".

  8. IBIS detector performance during calibration - preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Laurent, P.; Malaguti, G.; Quadrini, E. M.; Segreto, A.; Volkmer, R.; del Santo, M.; Gabriele, M.; Tikkanen, T.

    2003-11-01

    The IBIS telescope is a high angular resolution gamma-ray imager due to be launched on the INTEGRAL satellite on October 17, 2002. The scientific goal of IBIS is to study astrophysical processes from celestial sources and diffuse regions in the hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray domains. IBIS features a coded aperture imaging system and a novel large area (~3000cm2) multilayer pixellated detector which utilises both cadmium telluride (16,384 detectors) and caesium iodide elements (4096 detectors) surrounded by a BGO active veto shield. We present an overview of, and preliminary analysis from, the IBIS calibration campaign. The performance of each pixel has been characterised, and hence the scientific performance of the IBIS detector system as a whole can now be established.

  9. Preliminary characterisation of CdTe M-π-n diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiffenberg, D.; Fauler, A.; Zwerger, A.; Baumbach, T.; Fiederle, M.

    2011-05-01

    Due to the high Z, 1 mm CdTe (Z=52, 48) offers a high absorption probability for photons with energies up to 100 keV [1] (Zwerger and Fiederle, 2007). In order to further reduce the dark current flowing through the sensor when applying high voltage, CdTe diode structures (M-π-n) have been processed at the Freiburg Materials Research Center (FMF). As comparison, CdTe sensors with ohmic contacts, working as photoresistors have also been produced. The different sensor structures have been flip-chip bonded on Medipix2 readout electronics [5] (Llopart and Campbell, 2002). This work reports on the I-V characteristics of the different sensor structures, confirming the improved leakage current flowing through the diode structure. Furthermore, the imaging capabilities of the diode structures with respect to their spatial resolution are presented.

  10. Isotopic and elemental characterisation of Slovenian apple juice according to geographical origin: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bizjak Bat, Karmen; Eler, Klemen; Mazej, Darja; Mozetič Vodopivec, Branka; Mulič, Ines; Kump, Peter; Ogrinc, Nives

    2016-07-15

    This study examined the applicability of stable isotope and multi-element data for determining the geographical origin of fresh apple juices. Samples included three apple cultivars (Idared, Golden Delicious and Topaz) harvested in 2011 and 2012 from five different geographical regions of Slovenia. Regional discrimination of the juice samples was most successful when using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and taking into account the following parameters: δ(2)H and δ(18)O content of juice water; δ(15)N and δ(13)C content of the pulp, (D/H)I and (D/H)II in ethanol and the concentration of S, Cl, Fe, Cu, Zn and Sr. Overall prediction ability was 83.9%. The factors that best distinguished the different types of cultivar were the δ(2)H and δ(18)O content of fruit juice water; the δ(13)C and (D/H)I content of ethanol; and the concentration of S, Mg, K, Cu, and Ti. Prediction ability, taking into account all ten parameters, was 75.8%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design, modelling and preliminary characterisation of microneedle-based electrodes for tissue electroporation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mahony, Conor; Houlihan, Ruth; Grygoryev, Konstantin; Ning, Zhenfei; Williams, John; Moore, Tom

    2016-10-01

    We analysed the use of microneedle-based electrodes to enhance electroporation of mouse testis with DNA vectors for production of transgenic mice. Different microneedle formats were developed and tested, and we ultimately used electrodes based on arrays of 500 μm tall microneedles. In a series of experiments involving injection of a DNA vector expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and electroporation using microneedle electrodes and a commercially available voltage supply, we compared the performance of flat and microneedle electrodes by measuring GFP expression at various timepoints after electroporation. Our main finding, supported by both experimental and simulated data, is that needles significantly enhanced electroporation of testis.

  12. Meteorite nanoparticles as models for interstellar grains: synthesis and preliminary characterisation.

    PubMed

    Mautner, M N; Abdelsayed, V; El-Shall, M S; Thrower, J D; Green, S D; Collings, M P; McCoustra, M R S

    2006-01-01

    Dust particles and their interaction with gases play important roles in star formation and in solar nebulae. Appropriate model dust grains are needed for the laboratory simulation of gas-grain interactions. Nanoparticles formed from carbonaceous meteorites may be particularly suitable, as these particles are formed from materials that were formed originally from interstellar/nebula dust. Extending our previous studies with grounded meteorite powders, we demonstrate here the production of nanoparticles formed from meteorites using the laser desorption/controlled condensation method developed in our laboratory. The product nanoparticle aggregates have porous, web-like morphologies similar to interstellar dust grains, indicating that they can present large specific surface areas for gas/grain interactions. In this paper, we present polarisation modulation reflection-absorption infrared spectra (PM-RAIRS) of supported thin films and compare these spectra with the known silicate bands in the spectra of interstellar dust recorded during the ISO mission. We also report an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) temperature programmed desorption (TPD) study of the adsorption of CO on the supported nanoparticle films. The latter allow us to estimate the CO binding energy on the meteorite nanoparticles as 13.5 +/- 3.0 kJ mol(-1), cf. a value of 9.8 +/- 0.2 kJ mol(-1) for CO binding to a water ice substrate. Such thermochemical data can be useful for computational modelling of gas-grain interactions under the diverse conditions in interstellar clouds and solar nebulae.

  13. A preliminary proteomic characterisation of extracellular vesicles released by the ovine parasitic nematode, Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    PubMed

    Tzelos, Thomas; Matthews, Jacqueline B; Buck, Amy H; Simbari, Fabio; Frew, David; Inglis, Neil F; McLean, Kevin; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Knox, David P; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-05-15

    Teladorsagia circumcincta is a major cause of ovine parasitic gastroenteritis in temperate climatic regions. The development of high levels of anthelmintic resistance in this nematode species challenges its future control. Recent research indicates that many parasite species release extracellular vesicles into their environment, many of which have been classified as endocytic in origin, termed exosomes. These vesicles are considered to play important roles in the intercellular communication between parasites and their hosts, and thus represent potentially useful targets for novel control strategies. Here, we demonstrate that exosome-like extracellular vesicles can be isolated from excretory-secretory (ES) products released by T. circumcincta fourth stage larvae (Tci-L4ES). Furthermore, we perform a comparative proteomic analysis of vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free Tci-L4ES. Approximately 73% of the proteins identified in the vesicle-enriched fraction were unique to this fraction, whilst the remaining 27% were present in both vesicle-enriched and vesicle-free fraction. These unique proteins included structural proteins, nuclear proteins, metabolic proteins, proteolytic enzymes and activation-associated secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that molecules present within the vesicles-enriched material are targets of the IgA and IgG response in T. circumcincta infected sheep, and could potentially represent useful targets for future vaccine intervention studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A preliminary study on characterisation of finger interface kinetics using a pressure and shear sensor system.

    PubMed

    Hale, Nicholas; Valero, Maria; Tang, Jinghua; Moser, David; Jiang, Liudi

    2017-08-01

    Our hands constantly handle objects throughout our lives, where a crucial component of this interaction is the detection of grasping (pressure) and slipping (shear) of the object. While there have been a large amount of studies using pressure sensors for grasping detection, synchronised pressure and shear detection at the finger/object interface is still needed. This study aims to assess the feasibility of a sensor system designed to detect both pressure and shear at the fingertip/object interface via a single subject test. Descriptive study, proof of concept. One healthy subject participated in the study and was asked to perform a single finger test protocol and a simple hand test protocol. The corresponding multidirectional loads at the fingertip/object interface were measured in real time using a pressure and shear sensor system. Results from the finger test protocol show peak values of up to approximately 50 kPa (5 N) and 30 kPa (3 N) of pressure for each test, respectively. Results from the hand test protocol show a pressure and shear profile that shows a large increase in grip force during the initial grasping of the object, with a peak pressure of approximately 50 kPa (5 N). The pressure and shear profile demonstrates that the load is not evenly distributed across all digits. This study provides evidence that the reported sensor system has sufficient resolution, dynamic response and load capability to capture biomechanical information during basic protocols and hand-grasping tasks. Clinical relevance The presented sensor system could be potentially used as a tool for measuring and evaluating hand function and could be incorporated into a prosthetic hand as a tactile feedback system.

  15. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  16. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  17. Meningococcal protein antigens and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feavers, Ian M; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2009-06-24

    The development of a comprehensive vaccine against meningococcal disease has been challenging. Recent developments in molecular genetics have provided both explanations for these challenges and possible solutions. Since genome sequence data became available there has been a marked increase in number of protein antigens that have been suggested as prospective vaccine components. This review catalogues the proposed vaccine candidates and examines the evidence for their inclusion in potential protein vaccine formulations.

  18. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hillyer, G V

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni. A genus-specific Fasciola antigen was found in F. hepatica tegument. Finally, F. hepatica tegument contained antigens which protected mice from challenge infection with S. mansoni. Images PMID:6792216

  19. Allergy to cockroach antigens in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Romański, B; Dziedziczko, A; Pawlik-Miskiewicz, K; Wilewska-Klubo, T; Zbikowska-Gotz, M

    1981-01-01

    Cockroach allergy was investigated in a group of 56 patients with atopic bronchial asthma (37 men and 19 women with ages ranging from 16 to 65) all allergic to house dust antigen. In all patients, both intracutaneous tests and bronchial provocation tests were performed with cockroach antigen prepared from the species most common in Poland, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis. Positive skin reactions to cockroach antigen were found in 17 patients while an immediate bronchoconstrictive response was noted in 11. In the authors opinion, cockroach antigens may be partly responsible for the antigenic properties of house dust and may play a causative role in some cases of atopic asthma.

  20. ANTIGENIC STRUCTURE OF CELL SURFACES

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Tadao; Hämmerling, Ulrich; de Harven, Etienne; Boyse, Edward A.; Old, Lloyd J.

    1969-01-01

    The representation of mouse alloantigens belonging to three systems, H-2, θ and TL, on the surface of cells from thymus, spleen, lymph nodes, and peritoneal cavity, was studied by electron microscopy with ferritin-labeled antibody. As expected from earlier serological data, TL was confined to thymocytes, θ was found on thymocytes and lymphocytes, and H-2 occurred to some extent on all cell types observed. On reticular cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils, the majority of the cell surface was occupied by H-2; thymocytes had considerably less H-2, and erythrocytes and peritoneal macrophages least of all. In every instance the representation of antigen was discontinuous, the fraction of the cell surface covered being characteristic both of the antigen and of the type of cell. H-2 and θ provide a striking example of this; H-2 is present in far higher amounts on lymphocytes than on thymocytes, whereas the converse is true of θ. Within areas positive for H-2 or θ, protuberances of the surface membrane were often antigen-negative. A better definition of cell surface structure, gained from studies such as this, is necessary for further inquiry into how the cell surface is assembled, and into selective gene action in relation to cellular differentiation. PMID:5347699

  1. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  2. Synthesis and characterisation of self-assembled and self-adjuvanting asymmetric multi-epitope lipopeptides of ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Sharareh; Stephenson, Rachel J; Fuaad, Abdullah Ahmad; Apte, Simon H; Doolan, Denise L; Toth, Istvan

    2015-01-12

    Designing a lipopeptide (LP) vaccine with a specific asymmetric arrangement of epitopes may result in an improved display of antigens, increasing host-cell recognition and immunogenicity. This study aimed to synthesise and characterise the physicochemical properties of a library of asymmetric LP-based vaccine candidates that contained multiple CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes from the model protein antigen, ovalbumin. These fully synthetic vaccine candidates were prepared by microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis. The C12 or C16 lipoamino acids were coupled to the N or C terminus of the OVA CD4 peptide epitope. The OVA CD4 LPs and OVA CD8 peptide constructs were then conjugated using azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition to give multivalent synthetic vaccines. Physiochemical characterisation of these vaccines showed a tendency to self-assemble in aqueous media. Changes in lipid length and position induced self-assembly with significant changes to their morphology and secondary structure as shown by transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism.

  3. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  4. Regulation of antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Rivero, Fernando D; Luján, Hugo D

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic variation, a clonal phenotypic variation developed by microorganisms, involves the permanent switching of homologous, antigenically different cell surface molecules. In pathogenic microorganisms, antigenic variation is often described as a mechanism to evade the host immune system and therefore is responsible for the generation of chronic and/or recurrent infections. However, antigenic variation has also been involved in expanding host diversity and differential courses of the diseases. The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation through the continuous exchange of approximately 200 variant-specific surface proteins. Here we review the principal issues regarding the significance of antigenic variation during Giardia infections, the particular features of the variant-specific surface proteins, and the current knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate this process, as well as the relevance of disrupting antigenic variation as a novel approach to design effective antiparasitic vaccines.

  5. Testing new methodologies and assessing their potential for reservoir characterisation: Geoelectrical studies in the Northwest Carboniferous Basin (Ireland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, Xènia; Campanyà, Joan; Rath, Volker; Jones, Alan G.; Reay, Derek; Raine, Rob; McConnell, Brian; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The overarching objective of this study is to improve our methods of characterising saline aquifers by integrating newly acquired electromagnetic data with existing geophysical and geological data. The work presented here is part of an ongoing project to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration (IRECCSEM; funded by Science Foundation Ireland). The methodology presented in this characterisation work is not only relevant for studying the potential for onshore carbon sequestration, but is generally applicable for aquifer characterisation, particularly for the evaluation of geothermal resources in appropriate geological settings. We present first results of the three-dimensional (3D) modelling and inversion of the magnetotelluric (MT) data acquired in the Northwest Carboniferous Basin (Ireland) in summer 2015. The electrical resistivity distribution beneath the survey area is constrained using a joint inversion of three different types of electromagnetic data: MT impedance tensor responses (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (GTF) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (HMT). The preliminary 3D resistivity model obtained reveals the geoelectrical structure of the subsurface, which is translated into parameters relevant to fluid flow. The electromagnetic data were acquired along profiles linking four wells drilled in the area and the available well log data from those wells are used to evaluate some of the existing petrophysical relationships and calibrate them for the study area. This allows us to interpolate the rock physical properties from one well to another well, using the computed geoelectrical model as a reference. The obtained results are compared to available independent geological and geophysical data in order to analyse the validity of this technique, to characterise the uncertainties inherent to our approach, and to assess the potential of this methodology for reservoir characterisation.

  6. Thermophysical characterisation of ZrCxNy ceramics fabricated via carbothermic reduction-nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R.; Ridd, O.; Jayaseelan, D. D.; Lee, W. E.

    2014-11-01

    Thermophysical properties of ZrCxNy ceramics prepared from powders produced via a two-step carbothermic reduction-nitridation of zirconia were characterised to 2200 K. Preliminary evidence for the mechanism of nitridation shows a gas-solid phase reaction at the ZrC particle surface which is the first such observation with this system. Electrical and thermal conductivities were higher than commercially available ZrC and ZrN. Thermal conductivity values of the ZrCxNy phases at room temperature were between 35 and 43 Wm-1 K-1, increasing with nitrogen content due to increased electronic contribution to thermal conduction and increased to 40-50 Wm-1 K-1 with temperature. Electrical conductivity also increased with nitrogen content and values were in the range of 100-450 × 104 Ω-1 m1, but decreased with increasing temperature showing metallic behaviour.

  7. Characterisation of commercial Perna canaliculus samples and development of extemporaneous oral veterinary paste formulations containing Perna.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Claudia; Manconi, Paola; Cossu, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Perna canaliculus is a nutritional supplement recently studied and highly recommended for its anti-inflammatory effects in both animals and humans. In this study, the physicochemical properties, the microbiological quality, the total lipid content and fatty acids composition of three commercial samples of Perna powder were determined. Subsequently, three simple formulations of extemporaneous oral pastes containing Perna were prepared and designed for veterinary use. Their microbiological stability was assessed after 1-month storage at either room temperature or 35 °C. The results demonstrated that commercial Perna samples lack homogeneity, in regard to some technological properties and fatty acid composition; therefore, a preliminary characterisation of commercial Perna samples is recommended to assure the quality of formulations containing this nutritional supplement. Oral paste formulations are easy and simple to prepare and show good physical and microbiological stability, suggesting their large-scale production.

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of zirconium complexes for cell tracking with Zr-89 by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Trevor J; Charoenphun, Putthiporn; Meszaros, Levente K; Mullen, Gregory E D; Blower, Philip J; Went, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    The increasing availability of the long half-life positron emitter Zr-89 (half life 78.4 h) suggests that it is a strong candidate for cell labelling and hence cell tracking using positron emission tomography. The aim was to produce a range of neutral ZrL4 lipophilic complexes for cell labelling which could be prepared under radiopharmaceutical conditions. This was achieved when the ligand was oxine, tropolone or ethyl maltol. The complexes can be prepared in high yield from zirconium(iv) precursors in hydrochloric or oxalic acid solution. The oxinate and tropolonate complexes were the most amenable to chromatographic characterisation, and HPLC and ITLC protocols have been established to monitor their radiochemical purity. The radiochemical synthesis and quality control of (89)Zr(oxinate)4 is reported as well as preliminary cell labelling data for the oxinate, tropolonate and ethyl maltolate complexes which indicates that (89)Zr(oxinate)4 is the most promising candidate for further evaluation.

  9. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 5. Stedman's Online Medical Dictionary . www.stedmansonline.com/content.aspx?id=mirA1400011566&termtype=t. Accessed Sept. 9, 2015.

  10. Detection of HP10 antigen in serum for diagnosis and follow‐up of subarachnoidal and intraventricular human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, A; Hernández, M; Avila, M; Cárdenas, G; Bobes, R J; Huerta, M; Fragoso, G; Uribe‐Campero, L; Harrison, L J S; Parkhouse, R M E; Sciutto, E

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Neurocysticercosis (NC), a parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium, may be either asymptomatic or show a mild to severe clinical picture with intracranial hypertension. The most severe form of the disease is caused when viable cysticerci are localised in the ventricles or in subarachnoidal cisterns at the base of the skull. Detection of the secreted metacestode antigen HP10 in cerebrospinal fluid is a sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis of these severe NC cases. Objective and methods To evaluate the validity of HP10 antigen detection ELISA when applied to serum, using paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples from 116 radiologically and clinically characterised NC patients. Results The HP10 antigen assay exhibited a similarly high sensitivity in identifying severe NC cases from sera (84.8%) and CSF (91.3%). In contrast, HP10 antigen was rarely detected in asymptomatic or mild NC cases (3 of 57). Importantly, the HP10 antigen assay applied to serum showed high specificity (94%) when used in 126 serum samples of non‐NC subjects from an endemic community with a confirmed coproparasitological diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Finally, the HP10 assay also proved to be of value in the follow‐up of treated patients. Conclusion This study confirms that detection of the metacestode HP10 antigen in serum is a useful tool for diagnosis and follow‐up of patients with severe forms of NC treated with cysticidal drugs. PMID:17337467

  11. Cellular, Molecular and Functional Characterisation of YAC Transgenic Mouse Models of Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Pook, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene. We have previously established and performed preliminary characterisation of several human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing GAA repeat expansions, Y47R (9 GAA repeats), YG8R (90 and 190 GAA repeats) and YG22R (190 GAA repeats). Methodology/Principal Findings We now report extended cellular, molecular and functional characterisation of these FXN YAC transgenic mouse models. FXN transgene copy number analysis of the FRDA mice demonstrated that the YG22R and Y47R lines each have a single copy of the FXN transgene while the YG8R line has two copies. Single integration sites of all transgenes were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We identified significant functional deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8R and YG22R FRDA mice compared to Y47R and wild-type control mice. We also confirmed increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the cerebellum and brain of YG22R and YG8R mice, together with significantly reduced levels of FXN mRNA and protein in the brain and liver of YG8R and YG22R compared to Y47R. Conclusions/Significance Together these studies provide a detailed characterisation of our GAA repeat expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mouse models that will help investigations of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25198290

  12. Molecular mobility of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) films characterised by thermally stimulated currents (TSC) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Ware, Samuel K; Boateng, Joshua; Jordan, Daniel; Portefaix, Sara; Tasseto, Renata; Ramano, Camila D; Antonijević, Milan D

    2016-01-30

    Molecular mobility has long been established to relate to textural properties and stability of polymer films and is therefore an important property to characterise to better understand pharmaceutical film formulations. The molecular mobility of solvent cast hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) films has been investigated by means of thermally stimulated current (TSC) below the temperature at which the film was formed. Preliminary physical characterisation of the films was performed using XRPD, TGA, DSC and texture analysis (tensile properties). XRPD results showed the films to be completely amorphous with Tg determined by DSC to be 127 ± 1°C. TGA analysis showed the films to contain 8 ± 1% water and film was dried to only 0.06 ± 0.01% water content when heated to 160°C. Application of TSC detected molecular mobility in HEC films at sub-zero temperatures. Two motional transitions with average relaxation time of 50 ± 3s were identified; a β-relaxation at -57 ± 2°C, attributed to localised non-cooperative orientation of HEC polymer chain ends and the hydroxyethyl side groups and an α-relaxation, originating from cooperative segmental mobility, at -20 ± 2°C. The tensile properties i.e., elongation, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the HEC film have been related to the molecular relaxation processes detected by TSC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterisation of medieval yellow silver stained glass from Convento de Cristo in Tomar, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J.; Vilarigues, M.; Ruivo, A.; Corregidor, V.; Silva, R. C. da; Alves, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    Yellow decoration effects in stained glasses using silver staining were first applied in the beginning of the 14th century. The glass piece being decorated was usually painted on its side intended to be facing the exterior environment, and then fired to temperatures between 500 and 650 °C, resulting in colours ranging from pale lemon to deep orange. Stained glass fragments painted by this process and belonging to the Convento de Cristo, in Tomar, Portugal, were characterised using micro-PIXE, and complemented with other analytical techniques, namely UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRF. Preliminary analysis showed that a mixture of Ag and Cu was used for the production of the yellow staining. In order to understand this staining process and the influence of the firing temperature on the resulting colours, several soda and potash glasses with compositions similar to those of medieval glasses were produced and characterised. The role played by the addition of Cu in the final colours was also investigated.

  14. Computed tomography characterisation of additive manufacturing materials.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Richard; Thompson, Darren; Winder, John

    2011-06-01

    Additive manufacturing, covering processes frequently referred to as rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing, provides new opportunities in the manufacture of highly complex and custom-fitting medical devices and products. Whilst many medical applications of AM have been explored and physical properties of the resulting parts have been studied, the characterisation of AM materials in computed tomography has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the CT number of commonly used AM materials. There are many potential applications of the information resulting from this study in the design and manufacture of wearable medical devices, implants, prostheses and medical imaging test phantoms. A selection of 19 AM material samples were CT scanned and the resultant images analysed to ascertain the materials' CT number and appearance in the images. It was found that some AM materials have CT numbers very similar to human tissues, FDM, SLA and SLS produce samples that appear uniform on CT images and that 3D printed materials show a variation in internal structure.

  15. Characterising Cold Weather for the UK mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradley, Kate; Dacre, Helen; Ambaum, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Excess Winter Mortality is a peak in the population's mortality rate during winter months and is correlated with low outdoor temperatures. Excess Winter Mortality has adverse impacts, including increased demand on health services. The management of resources for such increased demands maybe improved through incorporation of weather forecasting information to advanced warnings. For the UK, prolonged cold periods are associated with easterly advection, and high pressure systems. Characterisation of the synoptic conditions associated with cold periods is important to understand forecast performance. Principal Component Analysis has been used with mean sea level pressure from 35 years of ERA interim reanalysis to capture synoptic variability on a continuous scale. Cold events in the North and South of the UK mainland have been identified as having different synoptic variability using this method. Furthermore extending the Principal Component Analysis to investigate the skill of forecasts has identified systematic under prediction of some cold weather synoptic conditions. Ensemble forecasts are used to quantify the uncertainty associated with these cold weather synoptic conditions. This information maybe be used to improve the value of existing weather warnings.

  16. Materials characterisation with the associated particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, Bertrand; Carasco, Cedric; Deyglun, Clement; Eleon, Cyrille; Mariani, Alain; Ma, Jean-Luc

    2012-07-01

    Since the last past years, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache, France, together with Partners from European and National projects, has been studying the application of fast neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique for material identification in different areas of homeland and maritime security, and for the characterisation of the materials constituting radioactive waste. Fast 14 MeV neutrons are produced from the H-3(H-2,n)alpha fusion reaction in a sealed tube neutron generator embedding an alpha detector. The alpha particle is used to tag neutron direction and emission time, thus allowing the electronic selection of neutron-induced gamma spectra in the voxels of interest. Gamma rays emitted by tagged neutron interactions on the present nuclei (C, O, N, Fe, Al, Si, Cl, etc.) are recorded with spectroscopic detectors and analysed to determine elemental proportions, thus allowing material identification. Investigations have been conducted for the detection of explosives, illicit drugs and contraband materials in cargo containers, for the inspection of objects lying on the sea floor suspected to contain explosives like mines, bombs, torpedoes, etc., for the recognition of an improvised chemical device, and for material identification in radioactive waste packages. Recently the detection of special nuclear materials is being investigated using time correlation analysis between induced fission particles, instead of gamma-ray spectroscopy. The paper presents an overview of these studies and last results. (authors)

  17. In situ characterisation of non linear capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudebat, L.; Bley, V.; Lebey, T.; Schneider, H.; Tounsi, P.

    2001-05-01

    Multilayers ceramic capacitors (MLCC) presenting non linear behaviours of their C(V) characteristics may have interesting applications in power electronics. Most of them have already been described. Nevertheless, the choice of a particular type instead of another one is all the more so difficult since, on one hand the physical mechanisms able to explain this behaviour is far from being understood. On the other hand, C(V) characteristics are in general obtained for low voltage values different from the ones they are going to be involved in. In this paper, direct in situ characterisations of different BaTiO3 based capacitors commercially available are achieved. The role of the capacitors' type (X7R,Z5U), of the temperature and of the voltage waveform (and more particularly its polarity) is demonstrated. Temperature values up to 200 oC are measured during normal operations in a RCD dissipative snubber without any alterations of the C(V) characteristics. All these results are discussed as regards the main physical properties of the constitutive materials in order to reach an optimisation of their use through an appropriate dimensioning.

  18. Graphene Triangular Ballistic Rectifier: Fabrication and Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Gregory; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Hill, Ernie; Song, Aimin

    2017-07-01

    It has been shown that graphene can demonstrate ballistic transport at room temperature. This opens up a range of practical applications that do not require graphene to have a band gap, which is one of the most significant challenges for its use in the electronics industry. Here, the very latest high mobility graphene (>100,000 cm2 V-1 s-1) fabrication techniques will be demonstrated so that one such device, called the triangular ballistic rectifier (TBR), can be characterised. The TBR is a four-terminal device with a triangular anti-dot at their intersection; two sides of the triangle are positioned and angled such that ballistic carriers from the two input electrodes are redirected like billiard balls to one of the two output contacts irrespective of the instantaneous polarity of the input. A responsivity of 2400 mV mW-1 is demonstrated at room temperature from a low-frequency input signal. The ballistic nature of the device is justified and explained in more detail with low-temperature measurements.

  19. CHEOPS: CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, K. G.

    2015-10-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry of bright stars already known to host planets. CHEOPS will provide the unique capability of determining radii to ~10% accuracy for a subset of those planets in the super-Earth to Neptune mass range. The high photometric precision of CHEOPS will be achieved using a photometer covering the 0.4 - 1.1um waveband and designed around a single frame-transfer CCD which is mounted in the focal plane of a 30 cm equivalent aperture diameter, f/5 on-axis Ritchey-Chretien telescope. Key to reaching the required performance is rejection of straylight from the Earth that is achieved using a specially designed optical baffle. CHEOPS is the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, and is currently planned to be launch-ready by the end of 2017. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. In this presentation I will give a scientific and technical overview of the mission, as well as an update on the status of the project.

  20. Pharmacoepidemiological characterisation of zolpidem and zopiclone usage.

    PubMed

    Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Feuillet, F; Wainstein, L; Grall-Bronnec, M; Pivette, J; Chaslerie, A; Sébille, V; Jolliet, P

    2013-11-01

    Zolpidem and zopiclone are two widely used non-benzodiazepine hypnotics whose usage seems to be associated to pharmacodependence. However, to our knowledge, there has as yet been no published epidemiological study which has compared their abuse or dependence potential. We used a pharmacoepidemiological approach to identify and characterise zolpidem and zopiclone users in real life situations. Regular users of zolpidem or zopiclone were identified in the database of a French regional health insurance organisation. A latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify different subgroups of users of these two hypnotics. The study cohort comprised 25,168 patients who regularly used zolpidem and 21,860 who regularly used zopiclone. The results of the latent class analysis, which enables subgroups with similar patterns of response to be identified, revealed four clinical subtypes of users of zolpidem: non-problematic users, users with associations with hypnotics/anxiolytics or with associated mental disorders, and problematic users. Only three subgroups were identified for zopiclone, and LCA did not discriminate a special class of problematic users for this drug. Our analysis indicates that there is a subclass of zolpidem user suggestive of abuse; this was not the case for zopiclone. This methodology is very interesting because it allows analysis of databases and determination of a specific signature of drugs potentially leading to abuse or dependence.

  1. Graphene Triangular Ballistic Rectifier: Fabrication and Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Gregory; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Hill, Ernie; Song, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that graphene can demonstrate ballistic transport at room temperature. This opens up a range of practical applications that do not require graphene to have a band gap, which is one of the most significant challenges for its use in the electronics industry. Here, the very latest high mobility graphene (>100,000 cm2 V-1 s-1) fabrication techniques will be demonstrated so that one such device, called the triangular ballistic rectifier (TBR), can be characterised. The TBR is a four-terminal device with a triangular anti-dot at their intersection; two sides of the triangle are positioned and angled such that ballistic carriers from the two input electrodes are redirected like billiard balls to one of the two output contacts irrespective of the instantaneous polarity of the input. A responsivity of 2400 mV mW-1 is demonstrated at room temperature from a low-frequency input signal. The ballistic nature of the device is justified and explained in more detail with low-temperature measurements.

  2. Characterisation of Supra- and Infratentorial ICP Profiles.

    PubMed

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Ros, Maxime; Marhar, Fouad; Swider, Pascal; Schmidt, Eric Albert

    2016-01-01

    In pathophysiology and clinical practice, the intracranial pressure (ICP) profiles in the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments are unclear. We know that the pressure within the skull is unevenly distributed, with demonstrated ICP gradients. We recorded and characterised the supra- and infratentorial ICP patterns to understand what drives the transtentorial ICP gradient.A 70-year-old man was operated on for acute cerebellar infarction. One supratentorial probe and one cerebellar probe were implanted. Both signals were recorded concurrently and analysed off-line. We calculated mean ICP, ICP pulse amplitude, respiratory waves, slow waves and the RAP index of supra- and infratentorial ICP signals. Then, we measured transtentorial difference and performed correlation analysis for every index.Supratentorial ICP mean was 8.5 mmHg lower than infratentorial ICP, but the difference lessens for higher values. Both signals across the tentorium showed close correlation. Supra- and infratentorial pulse amplitude, respiratory waves and slow waves also showed a high degree of correlation. The compensatory reserve (RAP) showed good correlation. In this case report, we demonstrate that the mean value of ICP is higher in the posterior fossa, with a strong correlation across the tentorium. All other ICP-derived parameters display a symmetrical profile.

  3. CHEOPS: CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, Kate

    2017-04-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry of bright stars already known to host planets, with launch readiness foreseen by the end of 2018. It is also the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from 10 other member states. It will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for a subset of those planets in the super- Earth to Neptune mass range, for which the mass has already been estimated from ground- based spectroscopic surveys. It will also provide precision radii for new planets discovered by the next generation of ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The high photometric precision of CHEOPS will be achieved using a photometer covering the 0.35 - 1.1um waveband, designed around a single frame-transfer CCD which is mounted in the focal plane of a 30 cm equivalent aperture diameter, f/5 on-axis Ritchey-Chretien telescope. 20% of the observing time in the 3.5 year nominal mission will be available to Guest Observers from the Community. Proposals will be requested through open calls from ESA that are foreseen to be every year, with the first 6 months before launch. In this poster I will give a scientific and technical overview of the CHEOPS mission.

  4. Optical detection of CA 15.3 breast cancer antigen using CdS quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Elakkiya, Venugopal; Menon, Mridula Prakash; Nataraj, Devaraj; Biji, Pullithadathil; Selvakumar, Rajendran

    2017-04-01

    The present study focus on optical sensing of breast cancer antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) using cadmium sulphide quantum dot (CdS-QD) in saline and serum samples spiked with antigen. The surface of CdS-QD was modified by cysteamine capping followed by tagging of CA 15.3 antibody. The samples were characterised using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-VIS Spectroscopy), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, phase contrast inverted epi-fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry (EDS). The CdS-QD showed a mean diameter of 3.02 ± 0.6 nm. The complex formed after antigen-antibody interaction resulted in distinguishable optical and fluorescence intensity with respect to varying concentration of antigen. The PL study revealed that CA 15.3 antibody labelled CdS QD can detect CA 15.3 tumour marker even at very low concentration of 0.002 KU/L with a constant response time of 15 min. This study clearly indicates that detection of CA 15.3 at low concentration is possible using surface modified CdS QD in serum samples and can find immense applications in biosensor development for detection of breast cancer marker similar to various automated detection kits available in market.

  5. Multi-antigen print immunoassay for seroepidemiological surveillance of bovine tuberculosis on Indian cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Veerasami, Maroudam; Reddy, D Sunil K; Sugumar, Parthasarathy; Naidu, S Satyam; Bahekar, Vijay; Mahesh Kumar, Etikela K; Mukherjee, Falguni; Rana, Samir K; Chandran, Dev; Das, Dipankar; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2012-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a zoonotic disease that is responsible for significant economic losses in many countries. The standard diagnostic method, the tuberculin test (TST) that is used in control programmes has serious shortcomings and, given the complex nature and the economic impact of the disease, a number of other diagnostic methods have been examined. The authors have attempted to characterise antibody response using the multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA). A total of 511 serum samples were collected from farms in India on which bovine tuberculosis was prevalent and on farms with low incidence. These were tested using the MAPIA against a panel of five defined M. bovis recombinant antigens and two purified protein derivatives (bovine PPD and avian PPD) to study the seroprevalence of the disease on Indian cattle farms. Results indicated that the fusion protein of antigen CFP-10:MPB83 showed a positive response in 142 out of 298 serum samples from tuberculosis-prevalent farms, thereby indicating the serological dominance of the proteins post infection. The antigen selected could be used further in the development of a simple, rapid and accurate serological diagnostic test, paired with TST, for use in bovine tuberculosis control programmes.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of unimolecular pentavalent and hexavalent antigenic constructs targeting prostate and breast cancer: a synthetic route to anticancer vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Ragupathi, Govind; Koide, Fusataka; Livingston, Philip O; Cho, Young Shin; Endo, Atsushi; Wan, Qian; Spassova, Maria K; Keding, Stacy J; Allen, Jennifer; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2006-03-01

    Several novel, fully synthetic, carbohydrate-based antitumor vaccines have been assembled. Each construct consists of multiple cancer-related antigens displayed on a single polypeptide backbone. Recent advances in synthetic methodology have allowed for the incorporation of a complex oligosaccharide terminating in a sialic acid residue (i.e., GM2) as one of the carbohydrate antigens. Details of the vaccine synthesis as well as the results of preliminary immunological investigations are described herein.

  7. Thermal architecture of the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgante, G.; Terenzi, L.; Eccleston, P.; Bradshaw, T.; Crook, M.; Focardi, M.; Hunt, T.; Winter, B.; Malaguti, G.; Micela, G.; Pace, E.; Tinetti, G.

    2014-08-01

    The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is a space project currently under study by ESA in the context of a medium class mission within the Cosmic Vision programme for launch post 2020. The EChO main scientific objectives are based on spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets over a wide range of wavelengths, from visible to mid-infrared. The high sensitivity requirements of the mission need an extremely stable thermo-mechanical platform. In this paper we describe the thermal architecture of the payload and discuss the main requirements that drive the design. The instrument is passively cooled to a temperature close to 45K, together with the telescope, to achieve the required sensitivity and photometric stability. Passive cooling is achieved by a V-Groove based design that exploits the L2 orbit favorable thermal conditions. The Visible and short-IR wavelength detectors are maintained at the operating temperature of 40K by a dedicated radiator coupled to cold space. The mid-IR channels require lower temperature references for both the detectors and part of the optical units. These colder stages are provided by an active cooling system based on a Neon Joule-Thomson cold end, fed by a mechanical compressor, able to reach temperatures <30K. The design has to be compliant with the severe requirements on thermal stability of the optical and detector units. The periodical perturbations due to orbital changes, to the cooling chain or to other internal instabilities make the temperature control one of the most critical issues of the whole architecture. The thermal control system design, based on a combination of passive and active solutions needed to maintain the required stability at the detector stages level is described. We report here about the baseline thermal architecture at the end of the Study Phase, together with the main trade-offs needed to enable the EChO exciting science in a technically feasible payload design. Thermal modeling results and preliminary

  8. Characterisation and distribution of heavy metals at Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, M.; Rymer, H.; Gillman, M.; Blake, S.

    2011-12-01

    Activity at Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, is characterised by periodic cycles of intense gas emission that last years to decades. The volcano entered its current phase of degassing in 1993, which resulted in a low-level persistent gas plume. As a result of this continuous emission, the substantial deposition of heavy metals onto the surrounding soils (andosols) is thought to be occurring (Delfosse et al., 2003). The deposition of these heavy metal plume components, and their incorporation into soil, is of key interest because once discharged to the environment they accumulate throughout the food chain and may pose a serious ecological threat (Alloway, 1995). Although many studies have focused on the impacts of volcanic gases on the environment, few have addressed the fate of the metals released by persistent gas plumes. This study therefore investigates the patterns of heavy metal transport, deposition and distribution at Masaya in order to provide additional information on the processes that govern the behaviour of volcanic heavy metals. A number of agricultural and non-agricultural soils at two horizons (A: 0-10 cm and B: 20-30 cm) were collected and their trace metal content analysed. Twenty sites were sampled from the active vent to ~5 km downwind, as well as two control sites upwind of the volcano. Preliminary data suggest that a rapid deposition of metals occurs close to the source, with metal concentrations in the soil generally decreasing with distance away from the active vent. Cr and As clearly follow this trend, with maximum concentrations of 20.71 and 7.61 mg/kg respectively occurring closest to the vent. Concentration peaks for Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn (959.30, 21.57, 13.44, 152.85, and 72.73 mg/kg respectively) occur slightly further away from the vent, implying that these metals are transported further. The concentration of Cr, Co, Al, Ni and Mn was found to increase from soil horizon A to B, whereas the abundance of Zn decreases with depth. Heavy metal

  9. Delta 37Cl and Characterisation of Petroleum-gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulé Ebongué, V.; Jendrzejewski, N.; Walgenwitz, F.; Pineau, F.; Javoy, M.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemical characterisation of formation waters from oil/gas fields is used to detect fluid-flow barriers in reservoirs and to reconstruct the system dynamic. During the progression of the reservoir filling, the aquifer waters are pushed by hydrocarbons toward the reservoir bottom and their compositions evolve due to several parameters such as water-rock interactions, mixing with oil-associated waters, physical processes etc. The chemical and isotopic evolution of these waters is recorded in irreducible waters that have been progressively "fossilised" in the oil/gas column. Residual salts precipitated from these waters were recovered. Chloride being the most important dissolved anion in these waters and not involved in diagenetic reactions, its investigation should give insights into the different transport or mixing processes taking place in the sedimentary basin and point out to the formation waters origins. The first aim of our study was to test the Cl-RSA technique (Chlorine Residual Salts Analysis) based on the well-established Sr-RSA technique. The main studied area is a turbiditic sandstone reservoir located in the Lower Congo basin in Angola. Present-day aquifer waters, irreducible waters from sandstone and shale layers as well as drilling mud and salt dome samples were analysed. Formation waters (aquifer and irreducible trapped in shale) show an overall increase of chlorinity with depth. Their δ37Cl values range from -1.11 ppm to +2.30 ppm ± 0.05 ppm/ SMOC. Most Cl-RSA data as well as the δ37Cl obtained on a set of water samples (from different aquifers in the same area) are lower than -0.13 ppm with lower δ37Cl values at shallower depths. In a δ37Cl versus chlorinity diagram, they are distributed along a large range of chlorinity: 21 to 139 g/l, in two distinct groups. (1) Irreducible waters from one of the wells display a positive correlation between chlorinity and the δ37Cl values. (2) In contrary, the majority of δ37Cl measured on aquifers

  10. Antigenic Variation of Campylobacter Flagella

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Cultures were grown at 37"C zation, the flagellum is a major antigen of the campylobacter in anaerobic jars on chocolate -blood agar plates. An atmo- cell...Protein epitopes to the serospecificity of the LIO 8 serogroup. This solubilized in sample buffer was stacked in 4.5% acrylamide thermolabile serogroup...were grown for 24 h and then streaked ELISA. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on one side of a chocolate -blood agar plate from which a was

  11. 2016 TRI Preliminary Dataset

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The TRI preliminary dataset includes the most current TRI data available and reflects toxic chemical releases and pollution prevention activities that occurred at TRI facilities during the 2016 calendar year.

  12. Preliminary Drill Sites

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Preliminary locations for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or resource confirmation wells based on compilation of geological, geophysical and geochemical data prior to carrying out the DOE-funded reflection seismic survey.

  13. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  14. HLA antigens in patients with adrenocortical hyperfunction.

    PubMed

    Lada, G; Gyódi, E; Gláz, E

    1977-01-01

    The HLA antigen frequencies in 100 Caucasian patients with adrenocortical hyperfunction were compared with those found in 352 healthy unrelated subjects. Fourteen antigens on the HLA--A locus, seventeen antigens on the HLA--B locus and three antigens on the HLA--C locus were determined using the standard NIH microlymphocytotoxicity test. The frequency of HLA--A1 antigen in the patient group was 49% as compared with 28% in the controls (pcorr less than 0.01). An increased frequency of HLA--B8 and HLA-BW35 antigens was also found, but the difference was not significant. Increased A1--B8 and A1--BW35 haplotype frequencies were observed. The relationship between the HLA system and various endogenous and exogenous factors eliciting hypercorticism, together with complementary family studies indicate that the HLA system may be a useful genetic marker of the disease susceptibility gene.

  15. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  16. Antigenic heterogeneity of vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Page, C.; Rose, M.; Yacoub, M.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic status of vascular endothelium from different sites of the normal adult and fetal human cardiovascular system was investigated. Tissues included aorta (n = 9), pulmonary artery (n = 8), coronary artery (n = 6), ventricle/atrium (n = greater than 10), lymph node (n = 2), fetal whole heart (n = 3), and umbilical cord (n = 7). Frozen sections were studied using monoclonal antibodies recognizing endothelial markers (EN4, vWf, Pal-E, and 44G4), vascular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM, VCAM, and PECAM), the monocyte/endothelial marker (OKM5), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (class I and class II). Results demonstrate that capillary endothelium is phenotypically different from endothelial cells (EC) lining large vessels. Capillary EC strongly express MHC classes I and II, ICAM, and OKM5, which are variably weak to undetectable on large vessels. In contrast, the large vessels strongly express vWf and appear to constitutively express ELAM-1. This suggests that the capillary EC may be more efficient at antigen presentation or more susceptible to immune attack in vivo. Interestingly, normal coronary arteries, unlike all other large vessels, express MHC class II and VCAM molecules. Future studies should concentrate on comparative functional studies between capillary, coronary, and large vessel EC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519671

  17. Intradermal antigen tests in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J P; Powles, A V; Baker, B S; Valdimarsson, H; Fry, L

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether elicitation of delayed hypersensitivity may be superior to trauma in inducing the Koebner reaction in psoriasis, 12 affected patients and 9 control subjects were tested with 0.1 ml intradermal injections of streptokinase/streptodornase (20 mu/5 mu per 0.1 ml), PPD (1 in 1000) and saline control solutions in a double-blind study; Koebner status was also established in the psoriatic patients. Injected sites were examined at 48 h and 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for local development of psoriasis, erythema and induration (diameter). One patient was Koebner-positive and developed psoriasis at all three injection sites. The other, Koebner-negative psoriatic subjects did not develop psoriasis locally. However, compared with non-psoriatic controls they showed a marked delay in resolution of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the PPD antigen and a similar but less marked phenomenon was observed for streptokinase/streptodornase. These findings indicate that intradermal antigen, of the nature and amount used in this study, is no more effective in inducing the Koebner phenomenon than injury alone. However, the ability of psoriasis patients to switch off cell-mediated immune reaction appears to be impaired.

  18. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  19. Sources, isolation, characterisation and evaluation of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Luis; Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gil, Angel

    2013-01-01

    According to the FAO and the WHO, probiotics are 'live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host'. The strains most frequently used as probiotics include lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria, which are isolated from traditional fermented products and the gut, faeces and breast milk of human subjects. The identification of microorganisms is the first step in the selection of potential probiotics. The present techniques, including genetic fingerprinting, gene sequencing, oligonucleotide probes and specific primer selection, discriminate closely related bacteria with varying degrees of success. Additional molecular methods, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis/temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridisation, are employed to identify and characterise probiotics. The ability to examine fully sequenced genomes has accelerated the application of genetic approaches to the elucidation of the functional roles of probiotics. One of the best-demonstrated clinical benefits of probiotics is the prevention and treatment of acute and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea;however, there is mounting evidence for a potential role for probiotics in the treatment of allergies and intestinal, liver and metabolic diseases. There are various mechanisms by which probiotics exert their beneficial effects: regulation of intestinal permeability, normalisation of host intestinal microbiota, improvement of gut immune barrier function, and adjustment between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The number of studies carried out to test the effects of probiotics in vitro and in animals is enormous. However, the most reliable method of assessing the therapeutic benefits of any probiotic strain is the use of randomised, placebo-controlled trials, which are reviewed in this article [corrected].

  20. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large.

  1. Electronic cigarettes: product characterisation and design considerations

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher J; Cheng, James M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence regarding electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) product characterisation and design features in order to understand their potential impact on individual users and on public health. Methods Systematic literature searches in 10 reference databases were conducted through October 2013. A total of 14 articles and documents and 16 patents were included in this analysis. Results Numerous disposable and reusable e-cigarette product options exist, representing wide variation in product configuration and component functionality. Common e-cigarette components include an aerosol generator, a flow sensor, a battery and a nicotine-containing solution storage area. e-cigarettes currently include many interchangeable parts, enabling users to modify the character of the delivered aerosol and, therefore, the product's ‘effectiveness’ as a nicotine delivery product. Materials in e-cigarettes may include metals, rubber and ceramics. Some materials may be aerosolised and have adverse health effects. Several studies have described significant performance variability across and within e-cigarette brands. Patent applications include novel product features designed to influence aerosol properties and e-cigarette efficiency at delivering nicotine. Conclusions Although e-cigarettes share a basic design, engineering variations and user modifications result in differences in nicotine delivery and potential product risks. e-cigarette aerosols may include harmful and potentially harmful constituents. Battery explosions and the risks of exposure to the e-liquid (especially for children) are also concerns. Additional research will enhance the current understanding of basic e-cigarette design and operation, aerosol production and processing, and functionality. A standardised e-cigarette testing regime should be developed to allow product comparisons. PMID:24732162

  2. Gas flare characterisation with Sentinel-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ruecker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2017-04-01

    Gas Flaring (GF) is the process of burning waste gases at the tip of a stack. It is widely used in the upstream oil and gas industry. It is a contributor to the imbalance of the greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration in the earth's atmosphere, which prompts global warming. Besides GHG, GF also emits black carbon (BC), a known carcinogen and climate active species. At higher latitudes, GF has been estimated as the main input of atmospheric BC, alongside vegetation fires. The consideration of GF as a source to global budgets has been hindered by technical difficulties of in-situ measurements and the inexistence of a systematic reporting system. Remote sensing offers the possibility of a continuous, global and systematic monitoring of GF over extended periods. Being a high temperature process, GF can be detected from space using measurements at appropriate wavelengths. Considering 1800K as a typical GF temperature and Wien's displacement law, the peak emission will be in the short-wave infrared region. This spectral region is observed by two channels (S5 and S6) of the SLSTR instrument aboard ESA's newly launched Sentinel-3 satellite. Because of solar contamination, only night-time observations are used. In order to characterise the identified gas flares in terms of temperature and area, two Planck curves are fitted to SLSTR radiance observations in five spectral channels (S5 through S9, with F1 and F2). In this work, we present the methodology in detail as well as results for known flaring regions around the world. A comparison with VIIRS on Suomi-NPP and with HSRS on TET-1 over known GF locations is also considered.

  3. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds.

  4. Pea dehydrins: identification, characterisation and expression.

    PubMed

    Roberton, M; Chandler, P M

    1992-09-01

    An antiserum raised against dehydrin from maize (Zea mays) recognised several polypeptides in extracts of pea (Pisum sativum) cotyledons. A cDNA expression library was prepared from mRNA of developing cotyledons, screened with the antiserum and positive clones were purified and characterised. The nucleotide sequence of one such clone, pPsB12, contained an open reading frame which would encode a polypeptide with regions of significant amino acid sequence similarity to dehydrins from other plant species. The deduced amino acid sequence of the pea dehydrin encoded by B12 is 197 amino acids in length, has a high glycine content (25.9%), lacks tryptophan and is highly hydrophilic. The polypeptide has an estimated molecular mass of 20.4 kDa and pI = 6.4. An in vitro synthesised product from the clone comigrates with one of the in vivo proteins recognised by the antiserum. A comparison of the pea dehydrin sequence with sequences from other species revealed conserved amino acid regions: an N-terminal DEYGNP and a lysine-rich block (KIKEKLPG), both of which are present in two copies. Unexpectedly, pea dehydrin lacks a stretch of serine residues which is conserved in other dehydrins. B12 mRNA and dehydrin proteins accumulated in dehydration-stressed seedlings, associated with elevated levels of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Applied ABA induced expression of dehydrins in unstressed seedlings. Dehydrin expression was rapidly reversed when seedlings were removed from the stress or from treatment with ABA and placed in water. During pea cotyledon development, dehydrin mRNA and proteins accumulated in mid to late embryogenesis. Dehydrin proteins were some of the most actively synthesised at about the time of maximum fresh weight and represent about 2% of protein in mature cotyledons.

  5. Comprehensive Chemical Characterisation of Byzantine Glass Weights

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine; Meek, Andrew; Tobias, Bendeguz; Entwistle, Chris; Avisseau-Broustet, Mathilde; Da Mota, Henrique; Gratuze, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the glass trade in the first millennium CE relies on the characterisation of well-dated compositional groups and the identification of their primary production sites. 275 Byzantine glass weights from the British Museum and the Bibliothèque nationale de France dating to the sixth and seventh century were analysed by LA-ICP-MS. Multivariate statistical and graphical data analysis discriminated between six main primary glass types. Primary glass sources were differentiated based on multi-dimensional comparison of silica-derived elements (MgO, Al2O3, CaO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ZrO2) and components associated with the alkali source (Li2O, B2O3). Along with Egyptian and Levantine origins of the glassmaking sands, variations in the natron source possibly point to the exploitation of two different natron deposits. Differences in strontium to calcium ratios revealed variations in the carbonate fractions in the sand. At least two cobalt sources were employed as colouring agents, one of which shows strong correlations with nickel, indicating a specific post-Roman cobalt source. Typological evidence identified chronological developments in the use of the different glass groups. Throughout the sixth century, Byzantine glass weights were predominately produced from two glasses that are probably of an Egyptian origin (Foy-2 and Foy-2 high Fe). Towards the second half of the sixth century a new but related plant-ash glass type emerged (Magby). Levantine I was likewise found among the late sixth- to early seventh-century samples. The use of different dies for the same batch testifies to large-scale, centralised production of the weights, while the same die used for different primary production groups demonstrates the co-existence of alternative sources of supply. Given the comprehensive design of our study, these results can be extrapolated to the wider early Byzantine glass industry and its changes at large. PMID:27959963

  6. Characterising superclusters with the galaxy cluster distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Collins, Chris A.; Krause, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Superclusters are the largest observed matter density structures in the Universe. Recently, we presented the first supercluster catalogue constructed with a well-defined selection function based on the X-ray flux-limited cluster survey, REFLEX II. To construct the sample we proposed a concept to find large objects with a minimum overdensity such that it can be expected that most of their mass will collapse in the future. The main goal is to provide support for our concept here by using simulation that we can, on the basis of our observational sample of X-ray clusters, construct a supercluster sample defined by a certain minimum overdensity. On this sample we also test how superclusters trace the underlying dark matter distribution. Our results confirm that an overdensity in the number of clusters is tightly correlated with an overdensity of the dark matter distribution. This enables us to define superclusters within which most of the mass will collapse in the future. We also obtain first-order mass estimates of superclusters on the basis of the properties of the member clusters. We also show that in this context the ratio of the cluster number density and dark matter mass density is consistent with the theoretically expected cluster bias. Our previous work provided evidence that superclusters are a special environment in which the density structures of the dark matter grow differently from those in the field, as characterised by the X-ray luminosity function. Here we confirm for the first time that this originates from a top-heavy mass function at high statistical significance that is provided by a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We also find in close agreement with observations that the superclusters only occupy a small volume of a few per cent, but contain more than half of the clusters in the present-day Universe.

  7. [Characterisation of Suicide in Colombia, 2000 2010].

    PubMed

    Cardona Arango, Doris; Medina-Pérez, Óscar Adolfo; Cardona Duque, Deisy Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem worldwide, affecting all population groups, regardless of age, gender, or area of residence. The aim of this investigation was to characterise the recorded suicides in Colombia, between the years 2000 and 2010, according to the variables of the person, time and place. Descriptive quantitative study with information from secondary sources, from the death certificates of deceased people by suicide registered with the National Bureau of Statistics. The behaviour of the deaths and mortality, were determined using the denominator population projections of Colombia and the Amazon, Andean, Atlantic Coast, Eastern Plains and Pacific regions. Descriptive measurements and mortality rates were calculated using these. A total of 24,882 suicides were recorded in the eleven years studied, with a mean of 6.2 people per day, which increased to 8.0 during holidays The mean age of death was 34.5 years (men 36.4, women 27.7), with male deaths (78.1%) and urban areas (66%) predominating. The greatest risk of dying from this cause was recorded in the Eastern Plains, in young adults and seniors, and residents in rural areas. Suicide rates in Colombia show a downward trend, with a mean of 5.3/100,000 inhabitants, and with an increased risk in men (3.7 times the risk in women, in young adults (9/100,000). A higher death rate was recorded in single people in the months of December and January, and at weekends. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterisation of spectrophotometers used for spectral solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Gröbner, J

    2001-01-01

    Spectrophotometers used for spectral measurements of the solar ultraviolet radiation need to be well characterised to provide accurate and reliable data. Since the characterisation and calibration are usually performed in the laboratory under conditions very different from those encountered during solar measurements, it is essential to address all issues concerned with the representativity of the laboratory characterisation with respect to the solar measurements. These include among others the instrument stability, the instrument linearity, the instrument responsivity, the wavelength accuracy, the spectral resolution, stray light rejection and the instrument dependence on ambient temperature fluctuations. These instrument parameters need to be determined often enough so that the instrument changes only marginally in the period between successive characterisations and therefore provides reliable data for the intervening period.

  9. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  10. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  11. [Infectious hepatitis. I. Presence of HBs antigen].

    PubMed

    Calderón, E; Ridaura, C; Legorreta, J; Gómez, D; Ruiz, M; Kassian, A

    1975-01-01

    A prospective study in 268 patients of different pediatric ages affected with icteric hepatitis is presented, with a longitudinal follow-up of one year minimum. Different types of clinical evolution are described and related to the presence of HBs antigen. In 34 of the 268 patients HBs antigen was positive; in 20 of 28 patients with acute and long evolution, positivity of the antigen was transitory with an average of 46 days; in the remaining 8 of 28 patients it extended from 6 months to less than 2 years. The presence of HBs antigen is a risk that may be correlated with the tendency to extend the prolonged.

  12. [Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces strains (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N

    1980-01-01

    The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces strains and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces strains in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama strains and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six strains of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.

  13. Electro-Optic Characterisation of Extremely Wide Bandwidth Electrical Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    In this report an ultrafast electro - optic sampling system suitable for applications such as device characterisation is described. The aperture time of the sampler is calculated to be about 290 fs, implying an attainable device bandwidth in excess of 300 GHz. The sampler was characterised using a test pulse with approximately 12 GHz of frequency content, and the results compared to those obtained from an 18 GHz digital sampling oscilloscope. Signal Processing, Bandwidth, Frequencies, Oscilloscopes.

  14. Radial immunodiffusion: a simple and rapid method for detection of Marek's disease antigen(s).

    PubMed

    Marquardt, W W

    1972-05-01

    A qualitative radial immunodiffusion technique is described which detects antigen(s) in feathers from live or dead chickens infected with Marek's disease herpesvirus. Antiserum, which is incorporated into a support medium, reacts with antigen(s) in the feather tip producing a radial precipitin ring. Antigen(s) was detected in 93.3% of experimentally inoculated chickens 21 days postinoculation and in 100% of infected birds subsequently tested through 6 weeks. No antigen was detectable in the feathers of uninoculated control chickens. The technique is simple and rapid to perform. Positive tests could be detected after 1 to 2 hours of incubation. Antigen detection by the radial immunodiffusion test correlated well with other criteria of infection. This technique should have application as a laboratory research tool and as an adjunct for a rapid flock diagnosis of Marek's disease.

  15. Development of a surveillance scheme for equine influenza in the UK and characterisation of viruses isolated in Europe, Dubai and the USA from 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Alana L; Rash, Adam S; Blinman, Donna; Bowman, Samantha; Chambers, Thomas M; Daly, Janet M; Damiani, Armando; Joseph, Sunitha; Lewis, Nicola; McCauley, John W; Medcalf, Liz; Mumford, Jenny; Newton, J Richard; Tiwari, Ashish; Bryant, Neil A; Elton, Debra M

    2014-03-14

    Equine influenza viruses are a major cause of respiratory disease in horses worldwide and undergo antigenic drift. Several outbreaks of equine influenza occurred worldwide during 2010-2012, including in vaccinated animals, highlighting the importance of surveillance and virus characterisation. Virus isolates were characterised from more than 20 outbreaks over a 3-year period, including strains from the UK, Dubai, Germany and the USA. The haemagglutinin-1 (HA1) sequence of all isolates was determined and compared with OIE-recommended vaccine strains. Viruses from Florida clades 1 and 2 showed continued divergence from each other compared with 2009 isolates. The antigenic inter-relationships among viruses were determined using a haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay with ferret antisera and visualised using antigenic cartography. All European isolates belonged to Florida clade 2, all those from the USA belonged to Florida clade 1. Two subpopulations of clade 2 viruses were isolated, with either substitution A144V or I179V. Isolates from Dubai, obtained from horses shipped from Uruguay, belonged to Florida clade 1 and were similar to viruses isolated in the USA the previous year. The neuraminidase (NA) sequence of representative strains from 2007 and 2009 to 2012 was also determined and compared with that of earlier isolates dating back to 1963. Multiple changes were observed at the amino acid level and clear distinctions could be made between viruses belonging to Florida clade 1 and clade 2.

  16. Yersinia outer proteins (YOPS) E, K and N are antigenic but non-protective compared to V antigen, in a murine model of bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Leary, S E; Griffin, K F; Galyov, E E; Hewer, J; Williamson, E D; Holmström, A; Forsberg, A; Titball, R W

    1999-03-01

    The pathogenic Yersiniae produce a range of virulence proteins, encoded by a 70 kb plasmid, which are essential for infection, and also form part of a contact-dependent virulence mechanism. One of these proteins, V antigen, has been shown to confer a high level of protection against parenteral infection with Y. pestis in murine models, and is considered to be a protective antigen. In this study, the protective efficacy of V antigen has been compared in the same model with that of other proteins (YopE, YopK and YopN), which are part of the contact-dependent virulence mechanism. Mice immunised with two intraperitoneal doses of V antigen or each of the Yops, administered with either Alhydrogel or interleukin-12, produced high antigen-specific serum IgG titres. As shown in previous studies, V+Alhydrogel was fully protective, and 5/5 mice survived a subcutaneous challenge with 90 or 9x10(3) LD50's of Y. pestis GB. In addition, these preliminary studies also showed that V+IL-12 was partially protective: 4/5 or 3/5 mice survived a challenge with 90 or 9x10(3) LD50's, respectively. In contrast, none of the mice immunised with the Yops survived the challenges, and there was no significant delay in the mean time to death compared to mice receiving a control protein. These results show that using two different vaccine regimens, Yops E, K and N, failed to elicit protective immune responses in a murine model of plague, whereas under the same conditions, V antigen was fully or partially protective. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. SvSXP: a Strongylus vulgaris antigen with potential for prepatent diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses. Strongylus vulgaris, the most pathogenic of the large strongyles, is known for its extensive migration in the mesenteric arterial system. The lifecycle of S. vulgaris is characterised by a long prepatent period where the migrating larvae are virtually undetectable as there currently is no test available for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Presence of S. vulgaris larvae in the arterial system causes endarteritis and thrombosis with a risk of non-strangulating intestinal infarctions. Emergence of anthelmintic resistance among cyathostomins has led to recommendations of reduced treatment intensity by targeting horses that exceed a predetermined strongyle faecal egg count threshold. One study suggests an apparent increase in prevalence of S. vulgaris on farms where reduced anthelmintic treatment intensity has been implemented. These issues highlight the need for an accurate and reliable assay for diagnosing prepatent S. vulgaris infection. Methods Immunoscreening of a larval S. vulgaris cDNA library using hyperimmune serum raised against S. vulgaris excretory/secretory antigens was performed to identify potential diagnostic antigens. Immunoreactive clones were sequenced, one potential antigen was characterised, expressed as a recombinant protein, initially evaluated by western blot (WB) analysis, the diagnostic potential of the IgG subclasses was evaluated by ELISA, and the diagnostic accuracy evaluated using serum from 102 horses with known S. vulgaris infection status. Results The clone expressing the potential antigen encoded a S. vulgaris SXP/RAL2 homologue. The recombinant protein, rSvSXP, was shown to be a potential diagnostic antigen by WB analysis, and a target of serum IgGa, IgG(T) and total IgG in naturally infected horses, with IgG(T) antibodies being the most reliable indicator of S. vulgaris infection in horses. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA resulted in a

  18. Antigen-Presenting Cells and Antigen Presentation in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Benson, Robert A.; Bedaj, Marija; Maffia, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) form in territorialized niches of peripheral tissues characterized by the presence of antigens; however, little is known about mechanism(s) of antigen handling by ectopic lymphoid structures. In this mini review, we will discuss the role of antigen-presenting cells and mechanisms of antigen presentation in TLOs, summarizing what is currently known about this facet of the formation and function of these tissues as well as identifying questions yet to be addressed. PMID:27872626

  19. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligands for Imaging and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Matthias; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Rowe, Steven P; Calais, Jeremie; Hofman, Michael S; Maurer, Tobias; Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M; Kratowchil, Clemens; Herrmann, Ken; Giesel, Frederik L

    2017-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed on most prostate cancer (PC) cells. Therefore, the targeting of PSMA has become increasingly important over the last decade. Glu-urea-based PSMA ligands used for both imaging and radioligand therapy are the mainstays of the current success. For PET imaging, both (68)Ga- and (18)F-labeled agents have been successfully translated to clinical applications. Mainly retrospective cohort studies have shown a high value in the setting of biochemical recurrence, with high detection rates even in the presence of low prostate-specific antigen levels. Preliminary data indicated that radioguided surgery with PSMA ligands may help to further improve patient outcomes because it facilitates the removal of small tumor deposits that are otherwise difficult to detect. For primary PC, PSMA ligand PET imaging has been shown to be superior to cross-sectional imaging for the detection of metastatic lymph nodes. In addition, it promises to also provide intraprostatic tumor localization, especially when used in combination with multiparametric MRI. Increasing numbers of studies have reported considerable changes in management resulting from PSMA ligand PET imaging for both biochemical recurrence and primary disease. The use of (177)Lu-PSMA-based radioligand therapy has demonstrated a reasonable response, mainly as defined by a prostate-specific antigen response of more than 50%, comparable to other recently introduced agents. Especially given the high level of safety of (177)Lu-PSMA radioligand therapy, with only minimal grade 3 and 4 toxicities reported so far, it has the potential to expand options for metastatic castration-resistant PC. This review is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the current literature on low-molecular-weight PSMA ligands for both PET imaging and therapeutic approaches, with a focus on agents that have been clinically adopted. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular

  20. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  1. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  2. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  3. De novo transcriptome assembly facilitates characterisation of fast-evolving gene families, MHC class I in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus).

    PubMed

    Migalska, M; Sebastian, A; Konczal, M; Kotlík, P; Radwan, J

    2017-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in nonmodel organism has not been fully explored. In this study we evaluated the usefulness of de novo transcriptome assembly in characterisation of MHC sequence diversity. We found that although de novo transcriptome assembly of MHC I genes does not reconstruct sequences of individual alleles, it does allow the identification of conserved regions for PCR primer design. Using the newly designed primers, we characterised MHC I sequences in the bank vole. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial MHC I coding sequence (2-4 exons) of the bank vole revealed a lack of orthology to MHC I of other Cricetidae, consistent with the high gene turnover of this region. The diversity of expressed alleles was characterised using ultra-deep sequencing of the third exon that codes for the peptide-binding region of the MHC molecule. High allelic diversity was demonstrated, with 72 alleles found in 29 individuals. Interindividual variation in the number of expressed loci was found, with the number of alleles per individual ranging from 5 to 14. Strong signatures of positive selection were found for 8 amino acid sites, most of which are inferred to bind antigens in human MHC, indicating conservation of structure despite rapid sequence evolution.

  4. A Computational Framework for Influenza Antigenic Cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:20949097

  5. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  6. Characterisation of DEFB107 by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bryan J.; Eastwood, Hayden; Clark, Dave J.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Dorin, Julia A.; Maxwell, Alison; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Bernstein, Summer L.; Bowers, Michael T.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian defensins are small endogenous cationic proteins which form a class of antimicrobial peptides that is part of the innate immune response of all mammalian species [R. Lehrer, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (9) (2004) 727; T. Ganz, R.I. Lehrer, Curr. Opin. Immunol. 6 (4) (1994) 584] [1] and [2]. We have developed mass spectrometry based strategies for characterising the structure-activity relationship of defensins [D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, N.C. Polfer, P.E. Barran, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (47) (2004) 48671; P.E. Barran, N.C. Polfer, D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, P.R.R. Langridge-Smith, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, R.P. Millar, M.T. Bowers, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 240 (2005) 273] [3] and [4], and here we present data obtained from a five cysteine containing [beta]-defensin, DEFB107. The synthetic product of this human defensin exists with a glutathione capping group, its oxidation state and disulphide connectivity have been determined via accurate mass measurements and peptide mass mapping respectively, and despite possessing three disulphide bridges, it does not fit the [beta]-defensin canonical motif. With the use of molecular modelling, we have generated candidate geometries to discern the influence of disulphide bridging on the overall tertiary structure of DEFB107. These are compared with experimental results from ion mobility measurements. Defensins display activity against a wide variety of pathogens including both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Their mechanism of mode of action is unknown, but is believed to involve defensin aggregation at cell surfaces, followed by cell permeabilisation and hence deathE To probe this mechanism, the localisation of DEFB107 in synthetic vesicles was studied using H/D exchange and mass spectrometry. The results obtained are used to analyse the antimicrobial activity of DEFB107.

  7. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  8. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., preservative content, sensitivity, homogeneity, and hydrogen ion concentration. A serial found unsatisfactory... percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity requirements. (1) Each serial of antigen shall be compared with a reference antigen of known sensitivity using...

  9. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., preservative content, sensitivity, homogeneity, and hydrogen ion concentration. A serial found unsatisfactory... percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity requirements. (1) Each serial of antigen shall be compared with a reference antigen of known sensitivity using...

  10. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  11. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., preservative content, sensitivity, homogeneity, and hydrogen ion concentration. A serial found unsatisfactory...) Nephelometric determination of bacterial density. The bacterial density shall be 80 ±15 times McFarland No. 1 standard for stained antigen K's and 50 ±10 times McFarland No. 1 standard for tube antigen. (c...

  12. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., preservative content, sensitivity, homogeneity, and hydrogen ion concentration. A serial found unsatisfactory...) Nephelometric determination of bacterial density. The bacterial density shall be 80 ±15 times McFarland No. 1 standard for stained antigen K's and 50 ±10 times McFarland No. 1 standard for tube antigen. (c...

  13. Difficulties in Immunohaematology : The Weak D Antigen.

    PubMed

    Kumar, H; Mishra, D K; Sarkar, R S; Jaiprakash, M

    2005-10-01

    The Rh blood system is one of the most polymorphic and immunogenic systems known to humans. The expression of Rh blood group antigen is complex. The Rh D antigen is the most important of the antigens that constitute the Rh antigen system. In most cases, D antigen can easily be detected. However, due to variability of expression, weak forms antigen are encountered. The reactivity of weak D with antisera is variable and presents as a problem in blood banking. A retrospective analysis for a five-year period was done. Blood samples that were negative for Rh D by immediate spin tube method were tested for weak D antigen by additional lab tests. Of 34932 serial Rh grouping tests done in our Blood Bank, the incidence of weak D Rh antigen was 0.189%. All these were confirmed by the antiglobulin test. These patients present as a problem for the blood banker and a curiosity to the clinician. Although uncommon, all health care workers should be aware of this entity to avoid anti D alloimmunisation.

  14. CD1 antigen presentation: how it works.

    PubMed

    Barral, Duarte C; Brenner, Michael B

    2007-12-01

    The classic concept of self-non-self discrimination by the immune system focused on the recognition of fragments from proteins presented by classical MHC molecules. However, the discovery of MHC-class-I-like CD1 antigen-presentation molecules now explains how the immune system also recognizes the abundant and diverse universe of lipid-containing antigens. The CD1 molecules bind and present amphipathic lipid antigens for recognition by T-cell receptors. Here, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of how the processes of CD1 assembly, trafficking, lipid-antigen binding and T-cell activation are achieved and the new insights into how lipid antigens differentially elicit CD1-restricted innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

  15. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  16. NE1: a new neutrophil specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Claas, F H; Langerak, J; Sabbe, L J; van Rood, J J

    1979-02-01

    The sera of three children with chronic benign neutropenia, due to anti-neutrophil antibodies, were studied with respect to their antibody specificity. This was done by screening the sera against a panel of leukocyte donors in the EDTA micro-agglutination test and in the indirect fluorescence test. Two of the sera contained antibodies against the known neutrophil-specific antigen NA2. The third serum was directed against a new neutrophil-specific antigen. Genetic analysis showed no correlation between this antigen and the already known neutrophil-specific antigens: 9A, NA1, NA2, NB1, and NC1. In the Dutch population the frequency of the new antigen, tentatively called NE1, is 23%, which gives a gene frequency of 0.12.

  17. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  18. Antigenicity of two turkey astrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saif, Y M

    2004-12-01

    Astroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. These viruses cause gastroenteritis in humans and in a variety of animal species, including turkey poults. Only human astroviruses are well characterized antigenically. In the current study, two turkey astrovirus isolates, TAstV1987 and TAstV2001, were antigenically compared using cross-neutralization tests in turkey embryos, as well as cross-reactivity of the two isolates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antigenic relatedness values (R) were calculated using the Archetti and Horsfall formula. The R value based on the cross-neutralization tests was 0.56%, which indicates that TAstV1987 and TAstV2001 belong to different serotypes; the R value of the two viruses based on ELISA was 70.7%, which suggests these two viruses share common antigen(s).

  19. Characterisation of neuronal and glial populations of the visual system during zebrafish lifespan.

    PubMed

    Arenzana, F J; Santos-Ledo, A; Porteros, A; Aijón, J; Velasco, A; Lara, J M; Arévalo, R

    2011-06-01

    During visual system morphogenesis, several cell populations arise at different time points correlating with the expression of specific molecular markers We have analysed the distribution pattern of three molecular markers (zn-1, calretinin and glial fibrillary acidic protein) which are involved in the development of zebrafish retina and optic tectum. zn-1 is a neural antigen expressed in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Calretinin is the first calcium-binding protein expressed in the central nervous system of vertebrates and it is widely distributed in different neuronal populations of vertebrate retina, being a valuable marker for its early and late development. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), which is an astroglial marker, is a useful tool for characterising the glial environment in which the optic axons develop. We describe the expression profile changes in these three markers throughout the zebrafish lifespan with special attention to ganglion cells and their projections. zn-1 is expressed in the first postmitotic ganglion cells of the retina. Calretinin is observed in the ganglion and amacrine cells of the retina in neurons of different tectal bands and in axons of retinofugal projections. GFAP is localised in the endfeet of Müller cells and in radial processes of the optic tectum after hatching. A transient expression of GFAP in the optic nerve, coinciding with the arrival of the first calretinin-immunoreactive optic axons, is observed. As axonal growth occurs in these regions of the zebrafish visual pathway (retina and optic tectum) throughout the lifespan, a relationship between GFAP expression and the correct arrangement of the first optic axons may exist. In conclusion we provide valuable neuroanatomical data about the best characterised sensorial pathway to be used in further studies such as teratology and toxicology.

  20. Trimming of two major type 1 diabetes driving antigens, GAD65 and IA-2, allows for successful expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Robert, S; Van Huynegem, K; Gysemans, C; Mathieu, C; Rottiers, P; Steidler, L

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterised by excessive immune reactions against auto-antigens of pancreatic β-cells. Restoring auto-antigen tolerance remains the superior therapeutic strategy. Oral auto-antigen administration uses the tolerogenic nature of the gut-associated immune system to induce antigen-specific tolerance. However, due to gastric degradation, proper mucosal product delivery often imposes a challenge. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis have proven to be effective and safe carriers for gastrointestinal delivery of therapeutic products: L. lactis secreting diabetes-associated auto-antigens in combination with interleukin (IL)-10 have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a well-defined mouse model for T1D. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant L. lactis secreting the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and tyrosine phosphatase-like protein ICA512 (IA-2), two major T1D-related auto-antigens. Attempts to secrete full size human GAD65 and IA-2 protein by L. lactis were unsuccessful. Trimming of GAD65 and IA-2 was investigated to optimise antigen secretion while maintaining sufficient bacterial growth. GAD65370-575 and IA-2635-979 showed to be efficiently secreted by recombinant L. lactis. Antigen secretion was verified by immunoblotting. Plasmid-derived GAD65 and IA-2 expression was combined in single strains with human IL-10 expression, a desired combination to allow tolerance induction. This study reports the generation of recombinant L. lactis secreting two major diabetes-related auto-antigens: human GAD65 and IA-2, by themselves or combined with the anti-inflammatory cytokine human IL-10. Prohibitive sequence obstacles hampering antigen secretion were resolved by trimming the full size proteins.

  1. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  2. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Clever, W.; Divan, P.; Dunn, K.; Kojima, J.

    1981-01-01

    Computerization of aerodynamic theory has progressed to state where analysis of complete aircraft configurations can be performed in single program. Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System, APAS, is comprehensive aerodynamic analysis system, based on linearized potential theory. Three-dimensional configurations (with or without jet flaps) having multiple nonplanar surfaces of arbitrary planform and open or closed slender bodies of noncircular contour may be analyzed with APAS. As preliminary design aid, APAS allows designer to survey systematically large number of alternative configurations and component geometries economically.

  3. Diverse Endogenous Antigens for Mouse Natural Killer T Cells: Self-Antigens That Are Not Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T cells with an invariant antigen receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-antigens presented by the CD1d antigen-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-antigens are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. Here we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian antigens for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these antigens required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-antigen is acquired. Extracts of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) contain a self-antigen that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, recombinant CD1d molecules. The antigen(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-antigen that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-antigen for iNKT cells, that the self-antigens comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs. PMID:21191069

  4. A time-dependent model for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation.

    PubMed

    Chandler, J H; Culmer, P R; Jayne, D G; Neville, A

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of the passive electrical resistance of biological tissues through biogalvanic characterisation has been proposed as a simple means of distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. This method has the potential to provide valuable real-time information when integrated into surgical tools. Characterised tissue resistance values have been shown to be particularly sensitive to external load switching direction and rate, bringing into question the stability and efficacy of the technique. These errors are due to transient variations observed in measurement data that are not accounted for in current electrical models. The presented research proposes the addition of a time-dependent element to the characterisation model to account for losses associated with this transient behaviour. Influence of switching rate has been examined, with the inclusion of transient elements improving the repeatability of the characterised tissue resistance. Application of this model to repeat biogalvanic measurements on a single ex vivo human colon tissue sample with healthy and cancerous (adenocarcinoma) regions showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between tissue types. In contrast, an insignificant difference (p > 0.05) between tissue types was found when measurements were subjected to the current model, suggesting that the proposed model may allow for improved biogalvanic tissue characterisation. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Production of a panel of recombinant gliadins for the characterisation of T cell reactivity in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Arentz-Hansen, E; McAdam, S; Molberg, O; Kristiansen, C; Sollid, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Coeliac disease is a chronic intestinal disorder most probably caused by an abnormal immune reaction to wheat gliadin. The identification of the HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 as the molecules responsible for the HLA association in coeliac disease strongly implicates a role for CD4 T cells in disease pathogenesis. Indeed, CD4 T cells specific for gliadin have been isolated from the small intestine of patients with coeliac disease. However, identification of T cell epitopes within gliadin has been hampered by the heterogeneous nature of the gliadin antigen. To aid the characterisation of gliadin T cell epitopes, multiple recombinant gliadins have been produced from a commercial Nordic wheat cultivar.
METHODS—The α-gliadin and γ-gliadin genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction from cDNA and genomic DNA, cloned into a pET expression vector, and sequenced. Genes encoding mature gliadins were expressed in Escherichia coli and tested for recognition by T cells.
RESULTS—In total, 16 α-gliadin genes with complete open reading frames were sequenced. These genes encoded 11 distinct gliadin proteins, only one of which was found in the Swiss-Prot database. Expression of these gliadin genes produced a panel of recombinant α-gliadin proteins of purity suitable for use as an antigen for T cell stimulation.
CONCLUSION—This study provides an insight into the complexity of the gliadin antigen present in a wheat strain and has defined a panel of pure gliadin antigens that should prove invaluable for the future mapping of epitopes recognised by intestinal T cells in coeliac disease.


Keywords: gliadin; coeliac disease; small intestine; protein expression; T lymphocyte; gluten PMID:10601054

  6. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  7. Preliminary Cruise Report - Iguana Expedition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A preliminary cruise report of Expedition Iguana , 31 March 1972-11 May 1972, gives some preliminary results, list of equipment and, personnel, stations and data gathered, and track and topographic plots. (Author)

  8. Preliminary AirMSPI Datasets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-06

    ... Preliminary AirMSPI Datasets   The data files available through this web page and ftp links are preliminary ... geometric corrections. Caution should be used for science analysis. At a later date, more qualified versions will be made public.   ...

  9. Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-29

    ISS029-E-011867 (29 Sept. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 29 commander, works with the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) control box in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station in preparation for another session with the Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment (PACE) hardware.

  10. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Benjamin S; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Bernstein, Charles N; Duck, L Wayne; Mannon, Peter J; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C; Elson, Charles O

    2015-11-01

    Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  12. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  13. Serological analysis of human tumor antigens: molecular definition and implications.

    PubMed

    Türeci, O; Sahin, U; Pfreundschuh, M

    1997-08-01

    Specific vaccines for the immunotherapy of human neoplasms require specific human tumor antigens. While efforts to identify such antigens by the analysis of the T-cell repertoire have yielded few antigens, the application of SEREX, the serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning, has brought a cornucopia of new antigens. Several specific antigens have been identified in each tumor tested, suggesting that many human tumors elicit multiple immune responses in the autologous host. The frequency of human tumor antigens, which can be readily defined at the molecular level, facilitates the identification of T-cell-dependent antigens and provides a basis for peptide and gene-therapeutic vaccine strategies.

  14. Antigen Retrieval Causes Protein Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Carol B.; Evers, David L.; O’Leary, Timothy J.; Mason, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Antigen retrieval (AR), in which formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections are briefly heated in buffers at high temperature, often greatly improves immunohistochemical staining. An important unresolved question regarding AR is how formalin treatment affects the conformation of protein epitopes and how heating unmasks these epitopes for subsequent antibody binding. The objective of the current study was to use model proteins to determine the effect of formalin treatment on protein conformation and thermal stability in relation to the mechanism of AR. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify the presence of protein formaldehyde cross-links, and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry was used to determine the effect of formalin treatment and high-temperature incubation on the secondary and tertiary structure of the model proteins. Results revealed that for some proteins, formalin treatment left the native protein conformation unaltered, whereas for others, formalin denatured tertiary structure, yielding a molten globule protein. In either case, heating to temperatures used in AR methods led to irreversible protein unfolding, which supports a linear epitope model of recovered protein immunoreactivity. Consequently, the core mechanism of AR likely centers on the restoration of normal protein chemical composition coupled with improved accessibility to linear epitopes through protein unfolding. PMID:21411808

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  16. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-04-07

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process.

  17. Serum immunoglobulin levels in Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J.; Johnson, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    Ig levels were determined by radial immunodiffusion in uncomplicated cases of acute hepatitis with or without Australia antigenaemia. Initial sera from Australia antigen negative cases showed a striking elevation in IgM levels when compared to Australia antigen positive cases (6·5 versus 1·9 mg/ml). None of twenty-four Australia antigen positive cases exceeded 3 mg/ml IgM, and only 3/58 Australia antigen negative cases exhibited values below 3 mg/ml. Intial sera from Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative subjects did not differ in concentration of IgG, IgA, or IgD. Serial determinations of IgG revealed a transient fall in patients with Australia antigen positive hepatitis, and a rise in Australia antigen negative cases. Asymptomatic, Australia antigen positive, Guaymi Indian subjects were compared to matched Australia antigen negative controls from the same indigenous group and no differences in the concentration of IgG, IgM, IgA or IgD were found, although elevations of IgG and IgM were common in both groups. No evidence of abnormal proteins was found when sera were tested by cellulose acetate electrophoresis or by immunoelectrophoresis versus immunoglobulin-specific antisera. Ultracentrifugal analysis failed to detect `7S' IgM. PMID:4625396

  18. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  19. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  20. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  1. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  2. Quantitative characterisation of deltaic and subaqueous clinoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patruno, Stefano; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Hampson, Gary J.

    2016-04-01

    Clinoforms are ubiquitous deltaic, shallow-marine and continental-margin depositional morphologies, occurring over a range of spatial scales (1-104 m in height). Up to four types of progressively larger-scale clinoforms may prograde synchronously along shoreline-to-abyssal plain transects, albeit at very different rates. Paired subaerial and subaqueous delta clinoforms (or 'delta-scale compound clinoforms'), in particular, constitute a hitherto overlooked depositional model for ancient shallow-marine sandbodies. The topset-to-foreset rollovers of subaqueous deltas are developed at up to 60 m water depths, such that ancient delta-scale clinoforms should not be assumed to record the position of ancient shorelines, even if they are sandstone-rich. This study analyses a large dataset of modern and ancient delta-scale, shelf-prism- and continental-margin-scale clinoforms, in order to characterise diagnostic features of different clinoform systems, and particularly of delta-scale subaqueous clinoforms. Such diagnostic criteria allow different clinoform types and their dominant grain-size characteristics to be interpreted in seismic reflection and/or sedimentological data, and prove that all clinoforms are subject to similar physical laws. The examined dataset demonstrates that progressively larger scale clinoforms are deposited in increasingly deeper waters, over progressively larger time spans. Consequently, depositional flux, sedimentation and progradation rates of continental-margin clinoforms are up to 4-6 orders of magnitude lower than those of deltas. For all clinoform types, due to strong statistical correlations between these parameters, it is now possible to calculate clinoform paleobathymetries once clinoform heights, age spans or progradation rates have been constrained. Muddy and sandy delta-scale subaqueous clinoforms show many different features, but all share four characteristics. (1) They are formed during relative sea-level stillstands (e.g., Late

  3. Killing spinors as a characterisation of rotating black hole spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael J.; Valiente Kroon, Juan A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the implications of the existence of Killing spinors in a spacetime. In particular, we show that in vacuum and electrovacuum a Killing spinor, along with some assumptions on the associated Killing vector in an asymptotic region, guarantees that the spacetime is locally isometric to the Kerr or Kerr-Newman solutions. We show that the characterisation of these spacetimes in terms of Killing spinors is an alternative expression of characterisation results of Mars (Kerr) and Wong (Kerr-Newman) involving restrictions on the Weyl curvature and matter content.

  4. Three-dimensional microstructure characterisation of thermoplastic polyolefin blends.

    PubMed

    Lin, J-C; Huang, Y; Harris, J; Weinlander, B; Jones, M A

    2017-09-01

    The size, shape and distribution of different phases in thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) blends and composites are critical to the properties of the materials, but can be difficult to characterise. Here we report the combination of heavy metal staining and focused ion beam - scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to reveal the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an elastomer-modified poly(propylene) and a talc filled elastomer-modified poly(propylene). High-quality, high-resolution serial images were collected and the 3D structures were characterised quantitatively. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Characterisation of Black Carbon (BC) mixing state and flux in Beijing using single particle measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Rutambhara; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh; Flynn, Michael; Broda, Kurtis; Olfert, Jason; Irwin, Martin; Sun, Yele; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; Mullinger, Neil

    2017-04-01

    BC is generated by the incomplete combustion of carbonaceous fuels and it is an important component of fine PM2.5. In the atmosphere BC particles have a complex structure and its mixing state has crucial impact on optical properties. Quantifying the sources and emissions of black carbon in urban environments is important and presently uncertain, particularly in megacities undergoing rapid growth and change in emissions. During the winter of 2016 (10th Nov-10th Dec) the BC was characterised as part of a large joint UK-China field experiment in Beijing. This paper focuses on understanding the mixing state of BC as well as identification and quantification of BC sources. We used a combination of a Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyser (CPMA) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to uniquely quantify the morphology independent mass of single refractory BC particles and their coating content. The CPMA allows us to select pre-charged aerosol particles according to their mass to charge ratio and the SP2 provides information on the mass of refractory BC through a laser-induced incandescence method. Furthermore, another SP2 was used to measure the BC flux at 100m height using the Eddy Covariance method. We have successfully gathered 4 weeks of continuous measurements which include several severe pollution events in Beijing. Here we present preliminary results, characterising the distribution of coating mass on BC particles in Beijing and linking this to the main sources of BC in the city. We will provide initial estimates of the BC flux over a several kilometre footprint. Such analysis will provide important information for the further investigation of source distribution, emission, lifetime and optical properties of BC under complex environments in Beijing.

  6. B cell antigen extraction is regulated by physical properties of antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Antibody production and affinity maturation are driven by B cell extraction and internalization of antigen from immune synapses. However, the extraction mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we develop DNA-based nanosensors to interrogate two previously proposed mechanisms, enzymatic liberation and mechanical force. Using antigens presented by either artificial substrates or live cells, we show that B cells primarily use force-dependent extraction and resort to enzymatic liberation only if mechanical forces fail to retrieve antigen. The use of mechanical forces renders antigen extraction sensitive to the physical properties of the presenting cells. We show that follicular dendritic cells are stiff cells that promote strong B cell pulling forces and stringent affinity discrimination. In contrast, dendritic cells are soft and promote acquisition of low-affinity antigens through low forces. Thus, the mechanical properties of B cell synapses regulate antigen extraction, suggesting that distinct properties of presenting cells support different stages of B cell responses. PMID:27923880

  7. Immunological control of ticks through vaccination with Boophilus microplus gut antigens.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, J; Rodríguez, M; García-García, J C

    2000-01-01

    The control of tick infestations and the transmission of tick-borne diseases remain a challenge for the scientific community. Traditional control methods have been only partially successful. Recently, vaccination with recombinant Boophilus microplus gut antigens has been shown to control tick infestations. Our Bm86-containing vaccine formulation (Gavac) has been effective for the control of artificial infestations of B. annulatus, B. decoloratus, and chemically sensitive and resistant B. microplus strains from Australia, Africa, America, and Iran. Preliminary results with Hyalomma spp. and Rhipicephalus spp. suggest partial cross protection. In field trials, vaccination with Gavac controlled B. microplus and B. annulatus infestations and reduced the transmission of babesiosis, resulting in important savings for the cattle industry. Different degrees of susceptibility to the vaccination with Bm86 and sequence variations in the Bm86 locus have been reported. The Bm95 antigen was isolated from the Argentinean Bm86-resistant B. microplus strain A. A Bm95-based vaccine was used to protect cattle against tick infestations under production conditions with similar results to that obtained with Gavac. The Bm95 antigen from strain A was able to protect against infestations with Bm86-sensitive and Bm86-resistant tick strains, thus suggesting that Bm95 could be a more universal antigen in protecting cattle against infestations by B. microplus strains from different geographical areas. These results clearly demonstrate the advantage and possibilities for the immunological control of ticks.

  8. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  10. The Antigenicity of Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shanta S.; Shahani, Savitri K.

    1961-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is antigenic in rabbits when injected with Freund's adjuvant. The HCG used for immunization showed the presence of five antigens in the Ouchterlony plates against the homologous antiserum. Three of these antigens were common to human serum and one of these three to normal human urine. Rabbit antiserum to HCG absorbed with human serum did not form any antigen-antibody precipitin line with either normal human serum or normal human urine. It formed two precipitin lines with HCG. One ml. of the rabbit antiserum to HCG could inhibit even 150 I.U. of HCG as tested by the Aschheim-Zondek test in mice and ovarian hyperaemia test in rats. The absorbed antiserum could inhibit hormonal activity of HCG even when the antiserum and HCG were injected simultaneously at separate sites. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:13739538

  11. [Positive urine pneumococcal antigen test and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Botrán, Alejandro; Martín-Rico, Patricia; Valdivia, Antonio; Pellicer, Ángel; Esparcia, Óscar

    2016-04-15

    Although urine pneumococcal antigen is an useful test, it has false positives such as pneumococcal vaccination. Positive urine pneumococcal antigen in Hospital de Denia (January-February/2015). We studied epidemiological, radiological and microbiological variables as well as previous pneumococcal vaccination (neumo-23 and/or neumo-13). Urine pneumococcal antigen test was positive in 12.4% of 385 cases. Only 33.3% of positive cases had pneumonia in chest X-ray, and 35.4% of patients had previous pneumococcal vaccination. In most cases (87.5%), an antibiotic was prescribed. Pneumococcal vaccination can produce a false positive result in the urine pneumococcal antigen test in clinical practice, leading to an unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwater in a small watershed in a discontinuous permafrost zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochand, Marion; Molson, John; Barth, Johannes A. C.; van Geldern, Robert; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Fortier, Richard; Therrien, René

    2017-04-01

    Impacts of climate change can already be seen in northern regions. However, the influence of increasing temperature and permafrost degradation on groundwater dynamics is still poorly understood. This study aims to improve knowledge on hydrogeological interactions in degrading permafrost environments using hydrogeochemical characterisation of groundwater. This study is being conducted in a small 2-km2 watershed, in a discontinuous permafrost zone located close to the Inuit community of Umiujaq, on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay in northern Québec, Canada. Two aquifers are being investigated, an unconfined shallow sandy aquifer located in the upper part of the watershed, and a deeper confined aquifer in sands and gravels located below the permafrost mounds. Precipitation, stream and surface water as well as ice-rich permafrost lenses were also sampled during field investigations. Various hydrogeochemical tracers including major ions, water stable isotopes (δ18OH2O and δ2HH2O), carbon phases (DIC, DOC, POC), their stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) and dating tracers (radiocarbon, tritium-helium and CFC/SF6) were analyzed. This characterisation has contributed to further understanding groundwater origin, evolution and residence time in the watershed. Preliminary results show that groundwater has a mainly Ca-HCO3 geochemical signature, typical for young and poorly evolved water. Furthermore, sample mineralisation is low, and is likely linked to limited bedrock weathering caused by short residence times, slow reaction rates as well as low levels of dissolved CO2 due to suppressed biological activity in the catchment. Inter-annual variation of major ions in the deeper aquifer is low. All groundwater samples have significant tritium concentrations, around 8.5 TU, reflecting modern recharge. Ice-rich permafrost lenses within the top four meters of permafrost have a water stable isotope signature close to modern precipitation and groundwater. This indicates that either

  13. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  14. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  15. Antigen presentation by Hodgkin's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Cossman, J; Diehl, V; Volkman, D J

    1985-11-01

    The L428 tumor cell line is a long-term tissue culture of Reed-Sternberg cells which was derived from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The L428 cells express all known cell surface antigens, cytochemical staining, and cytologic features of freshly explanted Reed-Sternberg cells. In addition to the previously described HLA-DR cell surface antigens, the L428 cells are now demonstrated to express both DS and SB alloantigens. Thus, the L428 cells express all of the known subclasses of the human immune response genes that are located in the major histocompatibility complex. Furthermore, the L428 cells are capable of presenting soluble antigen to T cells in a genetically restricted fashion. T cell lines were established from normal donors previously immunized with tetanus toxoid. The T cells utilized were incapable of tetanus toxoid-induced proliferation unless antigen-presenting cells were added to the cultures. However, T cells from the two normal donors, which like the L428 cells expressed HLA-DR 5, demonstrated significant proliferative responses when cultured with tetanus toxoid and L428 cells. No proliferative response was observed when the L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells for a DR (4,-), DR (2,-) or DR (1,7) T cell line. The tetanus toxoid dose-response curve was similar regardless of whether autologous mononuclear leukocytes or L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells. The T cell proliferation induced by soluble antigen was also blocked by anti-HLA-DR antibody. Thus, functionally, Hodgkin's disease may be classified as a tumor of antigen-presenting cells.

  16. Immunological unresponsiveness to protein antigens in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J. H.

    1964-01-01

    Rabbits made immunologically unresponsive by neonatal administration of HSA, HGG or BSA were given a course of intravenous injections of the respective antigens, adsorbed on alum, after a lapse of 13–27 months since the last administration of antigen. 8/12 responded to HSA, 4/5 to HGG, 9/10 to BSA, as judged by immune elimination of antigen, but this was delayed in onset and slow compared with that in previously untreated rabbits. The antibody formed was small in quantity and usually failed to precipitate with antigen. The sedimentation coefficients of 131I-labelled antigens, in the presence of excess antibody, were measured by ultracentrifugation through a sucrose density gradient. These showed that only small complexes were formed in some of the non-precipitating antisera. In one instance the diffusion coefficient of the complex was also measured, by a technique based on diffusion through agar gel. The calculated molecular weight of the complex, 330,000 indicated the presence of only two combining sites on the antigen. Combination of the anti-HSA sera with an HSA fragment was also measured. Whereas the amount of the fragment bound by ordinary hyperimmune anti-HSA sera was about one-fifth the HSA bound, the amounts bound by the test sera were relatively much less. Some non-precipitating sera failed to bind the fragment, although they bound HSA. These findings indicate that following neonatally induced immunological unresponsiveness the capacity to respond to antigen returns piecemeal in respect of different parts of the antigenic mosaic, and that it may be severely restricted. The theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:14193158

  17. In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT).

    PubMed

    Rollins, Sean M; Peppercorn, Amanda; Hang, Long; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Calderwood, Stephen B; Handfield, Martin; Ryan, Edward T

    2005-01-01

    In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) is a technique that identifies pathogen antigens that are immunogenic and expressed in vivo during human infection. IVIAT is complementary to other techniques that identify genes and their products expressed in vivo. Genes and gene pathways identified by IVIAT may play a role in virulence or pathogenesis during human infection, and may be appropriate for inclusion in therapeutic, vaccine or diagnostic applications.

  18. Quantitative non-invasive cell characterisation and discrimination based on multispectral autofluorescence features

    PubMed Central

    Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Menon Perinchery, Sandeep; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol A.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous autofluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from autofluorescence imaging has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent. Label-free classifications are validated by the analysis of Classification Determinant (CD) antigen expression. The versatility of our method is illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. PMID:27029742

  19. Genetic Characterisation and Analysis of Infectious Bronchitis Virus Isolated from Brazilian flocks between 2010 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Claudia; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Santander Parra, Silvana H; Nuñez, Luis F N; Penzes, Zoltan; Chacón, Jorge L; Sesti, Luiz; Chacón, Ruy D; Piantino Ferreira, Antonio J

    2017-08-14

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) variants in Brazil were isolated during 2010-2015 for epidemiological and molecular analysis to characterise the different variants and perform a bioinformatic analysis to compare with sequences of variants collected over the previous 40 years. Of the 453 samples examined, 61.4% were positive for IBV and 75.9% of these were considered to have the BR-I genotype and were detected in birds of all ages distributed in all five Brazilian regions. The ratio of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous site (dN) to synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (dS), i.e. dN/dS, revealed a predominance of codons with non-synonymous substitutions in the first third of the S1 gene and a dN/dS ratio of 0.67. Additionally, prediction of N-glycosylation sites showed that most of the BR-I variants (from 2003 to early 2014) had an extra site at amino acid position 20, whereas the newest variants lacked this extra site. These results suggest that Brazilian IBV variants probably underwent drastic mutations at various points between 1983 and 2003 and that the selection processes became silent after achieving a sufficiently effective antigenic structure for invasion and replication in their hosts. Brazilian IBV genotype BR-I is currently the predominant genotype circulating in Brazil and South America.

  20. The production and characterisation of an antibody to detect the coccidiostat toltrazuril and its metabolite ponazuril.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Elliott, Christopher T

    2003-05-01

    The production of an antibody to detect toltrazuril or its metabolite ponazuril is complicated due to structural constraints of conjugating these coccidiostats to a carrier protein. Therefore a search was carried out for a compound that shared a common substructure to use as an antigen mimic. The chosen compound, trifluoraminoether, was conjugated to two carrier proteins (HSA and BTG) and used in the immunisation of six rabbits. Two immunogen doses (1 mg and 0.1 mg) were also used. All six rabbits produced an immunological response to the hapten regardless of the carrier protein or immunogen dose used. The most sensitive polyclonal antibody produced, designated R609, was subsequently characterised. This antiserum exhibited an IC50 of 18 ng ml(-1) using a competitive ELISA format. Cross reactivity studies show that this serum is specific for toltrazuril and its metabolites (toltrazuril sulfoxide and toltrazuril sulfone) but does not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, nitroimidazoles or nicarbazin. This is the first reported production of an antibody capable of specifically binding toltrazuril and ponazuril.

  1. Geological and structural characterisation of deformation zones of deep seated rockslides in metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauhal, T.; Zangerl, C.; Fellin, W.; Brandner, R.

    2012-04-01

    Generally, deep-seated slowly moving rockslides, characterised by average slope velocities in the range of some mm to dm per year, are frequently observed in foliated metamorphic rock masses such as gneisses, schists and phyllites. Many case studies show that this activity behaviour results from deformation, i.e. sliding/creeping along one or several discrete deformation zones which originate from initial rockslide formation processes. From a geological and structural point of view such deformation zones are extremely heterogeneous and are composed of uncemented fault breccias and gouges. The material that is newly formed through cataclasis and fragmentation of the rock during shearing processes possesses soil-like mechanical as well as hydraulical properties. Consequently, slope stability and temporal deformation behaviour of rockslides is dominated by hydro-mechanical deformation zone characteristics rather than by the properties of the overall mass movement. In this study preliminary investigation results about the geological structure and mechanical behaviour of deformation zones of deep-seated rock slides are presented. The case studies herein are located in paragneissic rock masses of the polymetamorphic Austroalpine Ötztal-Stubai complex (Tyrol, Austria). In order to focus on the characterisation of the structure of deformation zones the degree of fragmentation, the spatial distribution of clay-gouges and breccias, moisture content and porosity, the distribution of shear planes, the mineralogical composition and grain shapes as well as grain alignment are investigated. Furthermore the shear strength properties (residual friction angles) are determined by ring shear tests. The results obtained are analysed in combination with geological, structural and geometrical observations of the rockslides from detailed field mapping, borehole and investigation adit data as well as slope deformation measurements. Preliminary results show a complex geological and

  2. Effect of glycoamphiphiles on the solubilization and dendritic cell uptake of a lipopeptide: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Dominique; Angyalosi, Gerhild; Demory, Alexandra; Santraine, Valérie; Boulet, Arnaud; Spriet, Corentin; Héliot, Laurent; Gras-Masse, Hélène; Grandjean, Cyrille

    2005-01-01

    The selective delivery of antigens to professional antigen-presenting cells represents a promising approach to improve vaccine efficacy. Addition of a glycoamphiphile to a lipopeptide, whose interest for vaccination is now well-established, greatly favors its solubilization in aqueous solutions through the formation of mixed vesicles. Flow cytometry experiments indicate that this formulation does not diminish the uptake of the lipopeptide by the dendritic cells (DCs). These preliminary results suggest a possible straightforward, noncovalent targeting of cocktail-lipopeptide vaccines to the DCs via carbohydrate receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  3. Genesis Preliminary Examination Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, K. M.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of preliminary examination of the Genesis sample collectors is to provide information on the condition and availability of collector materials to the science community as a basis for allocation requests. Similarly, the information will be used by the Genesis Sample Allocation sub-committee of CAPTEM to determine the optimum allocation scheme, and by the Genesis Curator to determine the processing sequence for allocation production. The plan includes a decision process and detailed examination and documentation protocol for whole arrays and individual collectors (wafers, concentrator targets, bulk metallic glass, gold foil, and polished aluminum). It also includes a plan for communicating the information obtained to the scientific community. The plan does not include a detailed plan for preliminary examination of the SRC lid foil collectors, the process for removal of individual collectors from their frames, or for the subsequent subdivision of collector materials for allocation.

  4. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  5. Computer aided selection of candidate vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunoinformatics is an emergent branch of informatics science that long ago pullulated from the tree of knowledge that is bioinformatics. It is a discipline which applies informatic techniques to problems of the immune system. To a great extent, immunoinformatics is typified by epitope prediction methods. It has found disappointingly limited use in the design and discovery of new vaccines, which is an area where proper computational support is generally lacking. Most extant vaccines are not based around isolated epitopes but rather correspond to chemically-treated or attenuated whole pathogens or correspond to individual proteins extract from whole pathogens or correspond to complex carbohydrate. In this chapter we attempt to review what progress there has been in an as-yet-underexplored area of immunoinformatics: the computational discovery of whole protein antigens. The effective development of antigen prediction methods would significantly reduce the laboratory resource required to identify pathogenic proteins as candidate subunit vaccines. We begin our review by placing antigen prediction firmly into context, exploring the role of reverse vaccinology in the design and discovery of vaccines. We also highlight several competing yet ultimately complementary methodological approaches: sub-cellular location prediction, identifying antigens using sequence similarity, and the use of sophisticated statistical approaches for predicting the probability of antigen characteristics. We end by exploring how a systems immunomics approach to the prediction of immunogenicity would prove helpful in the prediction of antigens. PMID:21067543

  6. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antigen Masking During Fixation and Embedding, Dissected.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Carla Rossana; Boi, Giovanna; Bolognesi, Maddalena Maria; Riva, Lorella; Manzoni, Marco; DeSmedt, Linde; Bosisio, Francesca Maria; Ronchi, Susanna; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Antigen masking in routinely processed tissue is a poorly understood process caused by multiple factors. We sought to dissect the effect on antigenicity of each step of processing by using frozen sections as proxies of the whole tissue. An equivalent extent of antigen masking occurs across variable fixation times at room temperature. Most antigens benefit from longer fixation times (>24 hr) for optimal detection after antigen retrieval (AR; for example, Ki-67, bcl-2, ER). The transfer to a graded alcohol series results in an enhanced staining effect, reproduced by treating the sections with detergents, possibly because of a better access of the polymeric immunohistochemical detection system to tissue structures. A second round of masking occurs upon entering the clearing agent, mostly at the paraffin embedding step. This may depend on the non-freezable water removal. AR fully reverses the masking due both to the fixation time and the paraffin embedding. AR itself destroys some epitopes which do not survive routine processing. Processed frozen sections are a tool to investigate fixation and processing requirements for antigens in routine specimens.

  8. Murine cell-mediated immune response recognizes an enterovirus group-specific antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Beck, M A; Tracy, S M

    1989-01-01

    Splenocytes taken from mice inoculated with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) (Nancy) developed an in vitro proliferative response against CVB3 antigen. This response could not be detected earlier than 8 days postinoculation but could be detected up to 28 days after exposure to CB3. CVB3-sensitized splenocytes responded not only to the CVB3 antigen but to other enteroviruses as well. This response was found to be enterovirus specific in that no response was detected to a non-enteroviral picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or to an unrelated influenza virus. The generation of a splenocyte population capable of responding to an enterovirus group antigen(s) was not limited to inoculation of mice with CVB3, as similar responses were generated when mice were inoculated with CVB2. Cell subset depletions revealed that the major cell type responding to the enterovirus group antigen(s) was the CD4+ T cell. Current evidence suggests that the group antigen(s) resides in the structural proteins of the virus, since spleen cells from mice inoculated with a UV-inactivated, highly purified preparation of CVB3 virions also responded in vitro against enteroviral antigens. PMID:2476566

  9. Characterization and storage of malaria antigens: Localization and chemical characterization of Plasmodium knowlesi schizont antigens

    PubMed Central

    Deans, J. A.; Cohen, S.

    1979-01-01

    The identification of malarial antigens that induce protective immunity could provide a rational basis for developing an effective antimalarial vaccine as well as specific serodiagnostic tests indicative of clinical immune status. Since protective immunity is probably induced by stage-dependent rather than stage-independent antigens, the antigenic composition of different stages of Plasmodium knowlesi has been compared, and a limited chemical characterization undertaken. This information should provide some insight into the types of preparative procedure appropriate for the purification of functionally important malarial antigens. PMID:120777

  10. TL antigen as a transplantation antigen recognized by TL-restricted cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to broadly expressed classical class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, structurally closely related TL antigens are expressed in a highly restricted fashion. Unlike classical class I antigens, TL antigens are not known to be targets of cytotoxic T cells or to mediate graft rejection. Whereas classical class I antigens function as antigen-presenting molecules to T cell receptors (TCR), the role of TL is yet to be defined. To elucidate the function of TL, we have derived transgenic mice expressing TL in most tissues including skin by introducing a TL gene, T3b of C57BL/6 mouse origin, driven by the H-2Kb promoter. By grafting the skin of transgenic mice, we demonstrate that TL can serve as a transplantation antigen and mediate a TCR-alpha/beta+ CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. This T cell recognition of TL does not require antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. Furthermore, we show that C57BL/6 F1 mice develop CD8+ T cells that are cytotoxic for C57BL/6 TL+ leukemia cells, providing further support for the concept that aberrantly expressed nonmutated proteins such as TL can be recognized as tumor antigens. PMID:8113675

  11. Analytical Characterisation of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron: A ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) have been widely tested as they are showing significant promise for environmental remediation. However, many recent studies have demonstrated that their mobility and reactivity in subsurface environments are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. Both the mobility and reactivity of nZVI mainly depends on properties such as particle size, surface chemistry and bulk composition. In order to ensure efficient remediation, it is crucial to accurately assess and understand the implications of these properties before deploying these materials into contaminated environments. Many analytical techniques are now available to determine these parameters and this paper provides a critical review of their usefulness and limitations for nZVI characterisation. These analytical techniques include microscopy and light scattering techniques for the determination of particle size, size distribution and aggregation state, and X-ray techniques for the characterisation of surface chemistry and bulk composition. Example characterisation data derived from commercial nZVI materials is used to further illustrate method strengths and limitations. Finally, some important challenges with respect to the characterisation of nZVI in groundwater samples are discussed. In recent years, manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted increasing interest for their potential applications in the treatment of contaminated soil and water. In compar

  12. Superficially located enlarged lymphoid follicles characterise nodular gastritis.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takuma; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Hoshino, Hitomi; Iwaya, Yugo; Tanaka, Eiji; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Nodular gastritis is a form of chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis affecting the gastric antrum and characterised endoscopically by the presence of small nodular lesions resembling gooseflesh. It is generally accepted that hyperplasia of lymphoid follicles histologically characterises nodular gastritis; however, quantitative analysis in support of this hypothesis has not been reported. Our goal was to determine whether nodular gastritis is characterised by lymphoid follicle hyperplasia.The number, size, and location of lymphoid follicles in nodular gastritis were determined and those properties compared to samples of atrophic gastritis. The percentages of high endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels were also evaluated.The number of lymphoid follicles was comparable between nodular and atrophic gastritis; however, follicle size in nodular gastritis was significantly greater than that seen in atrophic gastritis. Moreover, lymphoid follicles in nodular gastritis were positioned more superficially than were those in atrophic gastritis. The percentage of MECA-79 HEV-like vessels was greater in areas with gooseflesh-like lesions in nodular versus atrophic gastritis.Superficially located hyperplastic lymphoid follicles characterise nodular gastritis, and these follicles correspond to gooseflesh-like nodular lesions observed endoscopically. These observations suggest that MECA-79 HEV-like vessels could play at least a partial role in the pathogenesis of nodular gastritis.

  13. Characterisation of Balance Capacity in Prader-Willi Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capodaglio, Paolo; Menegoni, Francesco; Vismara, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Grugni, Graziano; Galli, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Being severely overweight is a distinctive clinical feature of Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). This explorative study aims to characterise balance capacity in PWS as compared to non-genetically obese patients (O) and to a group of normal-weight individuals (CG). We enrolled 14 PWS patients: 8 females and 6 males (BMI = 41.3 [plus or minus] 7.3…

  14. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF A FUNGAL Beta-MANNANASE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A mannanase from ’ Cellulase 36’, a commercial preparation of Aspergillus enzymes, has been purified and characterised. The purified enzyme contains...traces of cellulase and laminarinase activities. The purification factor is 61 and the enzyme yield 11%. The molecular weight was determined. A

  15. Characterisation of Balance Capacity in Prader-Willi Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capodaglio, Paolo; Menegoni, Francesco; Vismara, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Grugni, Graziano; Galli, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Being severely overweight is a distinctive clinical feature of Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). This explorative study aims to characterise balance capacity in PWS as compared to non-genetically obese patients (O) and to a group of normal-weight individuals (CG). We enrolled 14 PWS patients: 8 females and 6 males (BMI = 41.3 [plus or minus] 7.3…

  16. Analytical Characterisation of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron: A ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) have been widely tested as they are showing significant promise for environmental remediation. However, many recent studies have demonstrated that their mobility and reactivity in subsurface environments are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. Both the mobility and reactivity of nZVI mainly depends on properties such as particle size, surface chemistry and bulk composition. In order to ensure efficient remediation, it is crucial to accurately assess and understand the implications of these properties before deploying these materials into contaminated environments. Many analytical techniques are now available to determine these parameters and this paper provides a critical review of their usefulness and limitations for nZVI characterisation. These analytical techniques include microscopy and light scattering techniques for the determination of particle size, size distribution and aggregation state, and X-ray techniques for the characterisation of surface chemistry and bulk composition. Example characterisation data derived from commercial nZVI materials is used to further illustrate method strengths and limitations. Finally, some important challenges with respect to the characterisation of nZVI in groundwater samples are discussed. In recent years, manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted increasing interest for their potential applications in the treatment of contaminated soil and water. In compar

  17. Characterisation of 3D printers using fibre Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Hossain, Md. Arafat; Han, Chunyang; Chartier, Loic; Athanaze, Tristan

    2017-04-01

    The extrusion nozzles of three low cost desktop 3D printers are characterised using optical fibre Bragg gratings. Temperature profiles show remarkably consistent distributions pointing to operation as good quality micro-furnaces potentially not only for 3D printing but also optical fibre drawing.

  18. Characterising atmospheric optical turbulence using stereo-SCIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, James; Butterley, Tim; Föhring, Dora; Wilson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Stereo-SCIDAR (SCIntillation Detection and Ranging) is a development to the well known SCIDAR method for characterisation of the Earth's atmospheric optical turbulence. Here we present some interesting capabilities, comparisons and results from a recent campaign on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma.

  19. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  20. Optimal conditions for elution of hepatitis B antigen after absorption onto colloidal silica.

    PubMed Central

    Pillot, J; Goueffon, S; Keros, R G

    1976-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBSAg) adsorbed from sera onto colloidal silica could be completely eluted through the use of 0.25% sodium deoxycholate in 0.01 M borax, pH 9.3, at 56 degrees C. The HBSAg recovered in the eluate represented 100% of that present in the original serum, and it was contaminated by only trace amounts of serum proteins (in decreasing amounts: beta-lipoprotein, immunoglobulin G, albumin). This preliminary step greatly facilitates purification of large amounts of HBSAg and provides small volumes of highly concentrated material for subsequent purification by density gradient centrifugation. PMID:9423

  1. The laboratory support to the Earth orbit environment characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, G.; Colangeli, L.; Palomba, E.; Palumbo, P.; Rotundi, A.

    Particulate environment around Earth represents a potential risk to orbiting spacecraft. In this environment velocity of impacts between a small solid particle, of both natural and man-made origin, and the external structure of a spacecraft is in the hypervelocity range. Depending on the size of the particle, the hazard to a spacecraft ranges from the degradation of surfaces, for impacts with sub-micron particles, to the fatal break-up, for impacts with objects larger than 10-20 cm. The risk of collision between meteoroids/space debris and a spacecraft is proportional to the fluxes of impacting particles. Such fluxes can be estimated if the particulate environment is well characterised. At present this type of information is provided by complex models describing the meteoroids and orbital debris in Earth orbits. Some of these are developed by simulating the mechanisms responsible for a fixed event of dust production; others are supported by observational data and in situ measurements. Both kinds of models receive an important contribution from the laboratory analysis of craters on surfaces returned to Earth and characterisation of particles collected in space. Laboratory analyses, performed following a standard procedures which include mineralogy characterisation by means of micro-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopy, microanalysis by means of Energy Dispersive X-Ray technique and morphology characterisation by means of high spatial resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy, provide complete information on chemical-physical, dynamical and orbital properties of particles. Here we present our laboratory techniques for the characterisation of solid particles and for the analyses of surfaces returned from space to be used in support of meteoroids and space debris environment understanding. Examples of their application is also reported.

  2. Complete structural characterisation of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P; Ramsden, D B; Williams, A C

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To clone and characterise the complete structural gene for the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). This gene, located on chromosome 7, encodes a cytosolic receptor protein which, upon activation by various xenobiotic ligands, translocates to the nucleus, where it acts as a specific transcription factor. Methods—Primers, based on the AhR cDNA sequence, were used in conjunction with recently developed long range PCR techniques to amplify contiguous sections of the cognate gene. The amplicons produced were then cloned and characterised. A cDNA probe was also used to screen a human P1 library. Results—Using the cDNA primers, DNA fragments which mapped the entire coding region of the gene were amplified and cloned. All but one of these fragments were amplified directly from human genomic DNA. The remaining fragment was amplified using DNA prepared from a P1 clone as the PCR template. This P1 clone, obtained by screening a human P1 library, also contained the entire Ah locus. Characterisation of amplified and cloned DNA fragments provided sufficient information for the construction of a complete structural map of the gene. This also included 150 base pairs of nucleotide sequence data at all intronic termini. Conclusions—These data indicate that the human AhR gene is about 50 kilobases long and contains 11 exons. The overall intron/exon structure of the human gene is homologous to that of the previously characterised mouse gene; however, it is probably some 20 kilobases larger. These results demonstrate the need for further characterisation and provide the data to facilitate this. Images PMID:16696038

  3. A reflectometer for at-wavelength characterisation of gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggenstein, F.; Schäfers, F.; Erko, A.; Follath, R.; Gaupp, A.; Löchel, B.; Senf, F.; Zeschke, T.

    2013-05-01

    The design for an UHV-reflectometer for XUV-radiation is presented, which is dedicated to at-wavelength characterisation on high precision gratings. At-Wavelength Metrology is a powerful and necessary characterisation tool for the development and characterisation of optical elements. Since the optical constants of the coating materials involved are dependent on wavelength, information on e.g. reflectivity can only be obtained at-wavelength and cannot be provided by ex-situ methods. In our institute a technology centre for production and characterisation of highly efficient precision gratings is established. Within this project a reflectometer for at-wavelength characterisation of the fabricated blazed gratings is developed and manufactured. This reflectometer complements the SXR-metrology instrumentation at BESSY-II: the existing reflectometer and the polarimeter/ellipsometer chamber for polarisation studies on magneto-optical samples or non-magnetic multilayers. The main feature of the reflectometer is the possibility to incorporate real gratings with a length up to 600 mm, adjustable in six degrees of freedom by a custom designed tripod system. The reflectivity is measured between -180° and +180° incidence angle for both s- and p-polarisation geometry. A variety of detectors with a high dynamic range is accessible. The reflectometer is coupled permanently to the new optics beamline on a BESSY-II bending magnet operating in the UV, EUV and soft x-ray range with the polarisation adjustable to either linear or elliptical. The station will be available by the end of 2013.

  4. Antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccines of various antigenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Monto, A S; Foster, D A

    1990-02-01

    Four inactivated influenza vaccines (containing the recommended antigens for the 1985-1986 influenza season) of various antigenic concentration levels were randomly administered to 140 study participants. The effect of the increasing antigen concentration resulted in significantly higher influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels 3 weeks after vaccination for the A/H1N1 antigen but not for the A/H3N2 or B antigens. Also, at 3 weeks after vaccination, there were significantly lower antibody titer levels associated with increasing age for the A/H1N1 and B antigens (adjusting for the prevaccination antibody titer and antigen content).

  5. Characterisation of copia-like retrotransposons in oil palm ( Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Price, Z.; Dumortier, F.; MacDonald, W.; Mayes, S.

    2002-04-01

    The work aimed to isolate and characterise copia-like sequences from Elaeis guineensis. Thirty-two different RT (reverse transcriptase) sequences were isolated from a single oil palm genome using degenerate primers. Extreme sequence heterogeneity was observed. The DNA and protein sequences were assigned to three different classes (A, B, C) on the basis of bootstrapping. We estimated the copy number of the three different classes by using a dot-blot analysis. The comparative results suggest that class-B RT sequences occur at a higher copy number in Cocos nucifera than in Elaeis guineensis and E. oleifera. Class-C RT sequences, which comprise the bulk of isolated sequences, occur in much higher copy number in Elaeis guineensis than in Cocos nucifera, and E. oleifera. Class-A sequences, which have low copy number in Elaeis guineensis and Cocos nucifera, are not present in E. oleifera. Our preliminary results suggest that class-C sequences represent about 5% of the E. guineensis genome, class B, 1% and class A, 0.1%. The methylation status of genomic domains specified by the RT probes was analysed using two pairs of restriction enzymes, each pair having the same recognition sites but different methylation sensitivities ( MspI, HpaII and Sau3AI, MboI). Results from these experiments showed clearly that the genomic domains specified by the RT probes are methylated. These also suggest that a higher copy number appears to correlate to a higher degree of methylation. Our preliminary results suggest that copia-like retrotransposons, because of their ubiquity and diversity, have great potential as genetic markers for plant genome and biodiversity analysis in E. guineensis.

  6. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  7. Antigen Cross-Presentation of Immune Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α+ DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8+ T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8− DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets. PMID:24744762

  8. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  9. Characterisation of fatty acids in drying oils used in paintings on canvas by GC and GC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Cartoni, G; Russo, M V; Spinelli, F; Talarico, F

    2001-01-01

    Of the various binding media used in paintings, this work examines drying oils. During the initial phase of polymerisation and the progressive ageing process, the fraction of unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids undergoes various changes (reticulation, oxidation, etc.), that give rise to characteristic compounds. Within a broader research project, aimed at the characterisation of binding media, a preliminary study was made of the ageing process of linseed oil. In this regard, linseed oil was spread on a glass or canvas support and then dried in the open air. The ageing of the spread linseed oil was monitored by taking samples of the material at regular intervals. After the fatty acids had changed into methylesters, the samples were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results obtained have been reported as a ratio between the areas of the chromatographic peaks of the different fatty acids found.

  10. The antigenic relationship between Brettanomyces-Debaryomyces strains and the Salmonella cholerae-suis O antigen.

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N; Sağanak, I; Wells, G

    1978-01-01

    The immune sera for Brettanomyces lambicus, B. claussenii, Debaryomyces hansenii and D. marama agglutinated Salmonella cholerae-suis (0:6(2), 7). The immune serum for S. cholerae-suis agglutinated B. lambicus, B. clausenni, D. hansenii and D. marama. Absorption and agglutination cross-tested demonstrated common antigen factor(s) in the tested yeasts and Salmonella 0:7 antigen.

  11. Mechanical DT and NDT: characterisation of building stones and research of correlation for in situ analysis of ancient masonries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanelli, E.; Calia, A.; Aiello, M. A.; Sileo, M.; Leucci, G.

    2012-04-01

    Restoration works of the historical-architectural built heritage move from the typological and mechanical qualification of the buildings. Minimum destructive impact is required in preliminary diagnostic studies for the interventions, as it is possible. The use of the undestructive and non-invasive diagnostic techniques has always advantages in the activities on pre-existing buildings, in terms of sustainability; moreover, it is a need with respect to the conservation constraints when we act on the historical-architectural heritage. This work deals with destructive and non-destructive tests for the mechanical characterisation of some traditional soft stones, used as building materials in the Southern Italy; it is a part of a larger activity devoted to set up non-invasive diagnostic procedures for the mechanical analysis and qualification of ancient masonries. The laboratory experimental activity is based on the use of mechanical compressive tests, ultrasonic and Schmidt-Hammer tests, and the research of correlation between the results obtained by these crossed tests. It is aimed to verify the effectiveness and/or to point out critical aspects and limits of the above mentioned non-destructive tests - already applied in the field of the concrete and compact stones - with reference to the characterisation of the soft stones. The research of correlations between the results of destructive and non destructive tests has the final aim to reduce the use of destructive analyses on the masonries, by acquiring substitutive information derivable from performing NDT in laboratory, as well as in situ conditions. Finally, data gathered by the mechanical characterisation give reference values for the evaluation and control of the effectiveness of restoration interventions and their monitoring. This activity is carried out in an interdisciplinary way within the AITECH network (Applied Innovation Technologies for Diagnosis and Conservation of Built Heritage), a regional research

  12. Antigen negative red blood cell inventory of Indian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Swati; Vasantha, K; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-08-01

    Screening the donor population for clinically important antigens and creating a database of phenotyped donors will eliminate the tedious task of large scale screening for antigen negative units. The aim of the present study is to identify donors lacking common antigens and a combination of common antigens to establish an antigen negative inventory. Blood samples of 1221 regular blood donors were phenotyped for the clinically important common antigens of the Rh, Duffy, Kell, Kidd and MNS blood group systems using standard tube technique. Out of 1221 total donors tested, we observed that 261 donors lacked a combination of clinically important common antigens (C, D, e, Fya, Jka, s). After excluding the RhD negative donors in this study 15.56% lacked a combination of two or three common antigens. Of all donors, 3.2% lacked Fya and Jka antigens, 1.96% Fya and s, 1.88% Jka and s antigens and 0.57% lacked three common antigens. An antigen negative inventory of donors who lack a single common antigen or a combination of common antigens was prepared from regular donors which will prove useful for efficient management of transfusion therapy in patients with multiple antibodies against common antigens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Emerging Technology for Multiparametric Analysis of Tissue Antigens.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Robert W; McLachlin, Katherine M; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K; Hutchinson, James A

    2015-09-01

    New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS-based bioimaging instruments for general users.

  14. TSOL18/HP6-Tsol, an immunogenic Taenia solium oncospheral adhesion protein and potential protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, R Michael E; Bonay, Pedro; González, Luis Miguel; Ferrer, Elizabeth; Gárate, Teresa; Aguilar, Cruz M; Cortez A, Milagros M; Harrison, Leslie J S

    2008-04-01

    In this study, we employed Taenia solium mRNA extracted from a tapeworm of Venezuelan origin to clone express and test the recombinant protein of the T. solium homologue of the 18-kDa oncospheral adhesion molecule of Taenia saginata (HP6-Tsag/TSA18). We first confirm the conserved nature of the sequence of the T. solium homologue (TSOL18/HP6-Tsol) and demonstrate that the recombinant protein, which, as with its T. saginata homologue, is characterised by a fibronectin type III homology region, functions as an adhesion molecule. This emphasises the possible importance of TSOL18/HP6-Tsol in tissue invasion, thus providing a rational explanation for its efficacy as a vaccine. As protection against Taenia spp., oncospheres is antibody mediated, logically, therefore, TSOL18/HP6-Tsol may also serve as a diagnostic antigen, as is indeed the case for recombinant HP6-Tsag/TSA18.

  15. Neural antigen-specific autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lennon, Vanda A

    2012-07-01

    Neural-specific autoantibodies have been documented and their diagnostic utility validated in diseases affecting the neuraxis from cerebral cortex to the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous system and skeletal muscle. These neurological disorders occur both idiopathically and in a paraneoplastic context. Molecular identification of the antigens has expedited development of confirmatory and high-throughput tests for serum and cerebrospinal fluid, which permit early diagnosis and reveal the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms. The autoantibodies are classifiable on the basis of antigen location: intracellular (nuclear or cytoplasmic) or plasma membrane. Immunohistopathological studies of patients' biopsied and autopsied tissues suggest that effector T cells mediate the autoimmune neurological disorders for which defining autoantibodies recognize intracellular antigens. Antigens within intact cells are inaccessible to circulating antibody, and the associated neurological deficits rarely improve with antibody-depleting therapies. Tumoricidal therapies may arrest neurological progression, but symptom reversal is rare. In contrast, autoantibodies specific for plasma membrane antigens have pathogenic potential, and the associated neurological deficits are often amenable to antibody-depleting immunotherapy, such as plasma exchange and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy. These reversible neurological disorders are frequently misdiagnosed as neurodegenerative. The focus of this review is the immunobiology, pathophysiology, and clinical spectrum of autoimmune neurological disorders accompanied by neural-specific IgGs.

  16. Antigenic Analysis of Rhizobium japonicum by Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Dudman, W. F.

    1971-01-01

    Immunodiffusion reactions were studied with seven strains of Rhizobium japonicum and three strains of the cowpea miscellany by using antisera against eight of the strains. Most strains yielded only weak precipitin bands when untreated cell suspensions were used as antigens in the diffusions. Ultrasonic disruption or heat treatment of the cells led to stronger bands, and immersion in boiling water for 20 min was used as the standard procedure for preparing these bacteria for immunodiffusion analysis. Heat-labile antigens were detected in only a few strains; the major antigens of all of the strains appeared to be heat-stable. Many of the strains cross-reacted, sometimes in a nonreciprocal manner; unheated cell suspensions cross-reacted more widely but more weakly than the heated suspensions. Heat-treated crushed nodule preparations reacted well in immunodiffusions. The antigens of cultured cell and nodule extract (bacteroid) forms of three strains were compared. In one of these strains, an antigen present in the cultured cells was absent from the bacteroids. Unknown strains present in soybean root nodules were readily identified by immunodiffusion. Images PMID:4998353

  17. T lymphocyte recognition of insolubilized peptide antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Solvay, M J

    1986-12-01

    To study the role of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in T lymphocyte responses, the stimulation requirements of a murine T cell hybridoma specific for the peptide antigen human fibrinopeptide B (hFPB)/I-Ak was examined. The fine specificity of T cell recognition of this peptide was determined by using several hFPB homologs and analogs, which indicated that the intact 14-amino acid peptide must remain intact to preserve the antigenic determinant, and that the carboxyl terminal Arg14 was important for T cell responses. Of particular interest was the finding that APC-associated hFPB failed to stimulate the T cells, and that activation was only observed with soluble peptide or by brief hFPB treatment of the T cells and APC mixed together. In addition, hFPB covalently bound to agarose beads was able to cause T cell activation, provided that I-Ak+ APC were also present in the culture. A number of control experiments were performed that showed that hFPB was not released from the bead and that the antigenic peptide involved in T cell responses remained bound to the beads. These results indicate that the form of the hFPB peptide antigen recognized by this T cell can be provided separately from APC.

  18. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Tyson J.; Zmolek, Andrew C.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2016-01-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  19. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  20. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  1. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  2. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  3. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  4. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  5. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Preliminary results of DISTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedfer, Y.

    1998-05-01

    DISTO is a spectrometer experiment installed at Saturne in Saclay to study strangeness production in p¯p reactions. It has entered its production phase in the second semester of 1996 and is to complete it by the time Saturne closes at the end of 1997. Preliminary results bearing on the two main items of its physics program. viz. polarization in associated hyperon production and OZ1 rule assessment in vector meson production, and obtained at 2.85 GeV are presented.

  7. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  9. Spectroscopic Characterisation of CARMENES Target Candidates from FEROS, CAFE and HRS High-Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passegger, Vera Maria; Reiners, Ansgar; Jeffers, Sandra V.; Wende, Sebastian; Schöfer, Patrick; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, Jose A.; Montes, David; Mundt, Reinhard; Ribas, Ignasi; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Échelle Spectrographs) started a new planet survey on M-dwarfs in January this year. The new high-resolution spectrographs are operating in the visible and near-infrared at Calar Alto Observatory. They will perform high-accuracy radial-velocity measurements (goal 1 m s-1) of about 300 M-dwarfs with the aim to detect low-mass planets within habitable zones. We characterised the candidate sample for CARMENES and provide fundamental parameters for these stars in order to constrain planetary properties and understand star-planet systems. Using state-of-the-art model atmospheres (PHOENIX-ACES) and χ2-minimization with a downhill-simplex method we determine effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity [Fe/H] for high-resolution spectra of around 480 stars of spectral types M0.0-6.5V taken with FEROS, CAFE and HRS. We find good agreement between the models and our observed high-resolution spectra. We show the performance of the algorithm, as well as results, parameter and spectral type distributions for the CARMENES candidate sample, which is used to define the CARMENES target sample. We also present first preliminary results obtained from CARMENES spectra.

  10. An in vivo and in vitro toxicological characterisation of realistic nanoscale CeO₂ inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Demokritou, Philip; Gass, Samuel; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Cohen, Joel M; Goldsmith, William; McKinney, Walt; Frazer, David; Ma, Jane; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Brain, Joseph; Castranova, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    Nanoscale CeO₂ is increasingly used for industrial and commercial applications, including catalysis, UV-shielding and as an additive in various nanocomposites. Because of its increasing potential for consumer and occupational exposures, a comprehensive toxicological characterisation of this nanomaterial is needed. Preliminary results from intratracheal instillation studies in rats point to cytotoxicity and inflammation, though these studies may not accurately use realistic nanoscale exposure profiles. By contrast, published in vitro cellular studies have reported limited toxicological outcomes for the case of nano-ceria. Here, the authors present an integrative study evaluating the toxicity of nanoscale CeO₂ both in vitro, using the A549 lung epithelial cell line, and in vivo using an intact rat model. Realistic nano-ceria exposure atmospheres were generated using the Harvard Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES), and rats were exposed via inhalation. Finally, the use of a nanothin amorphous SiO₂ encapsulation coating as a means of mitigating CeO₂ toxicity was assessed. Results from the inhalation experiments show lung injury and inflammation with increased PMN and LDH levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the CeO₂-exposed rats. Moreover, exposure to SiO₂-coated CeO₂ did not induce any pulmonary toxicity to the animals, representing clear evidence for the safe by design SiO₂-encapsualtion concept.

  11. Polarimetry as a tool to find and characterise habitable planets orbiting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Luca; Bagnulo, Stefano; Haswell, Carole A.; Patel, Manish R.; Busuttil, Richard; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Shukyak, Denis V.; Sterzik, Michael F.; Valyavin, Gennady

    2015-10-01

    There are several ways planets can survive the giant phase of the host star, hence one can consider the case of Earth-like planets orbiting white dwarfs. As a white dwarf cools from 6000 K to 4000 K, a planet orbiting at 0.01 AU from the star would remain in the continuous habitable zone (CHZ) for about 8 Gyr. Polarisation due to a terrestrial planet in the CHZ of a cool white dwarf (CWD) is 102 (104) times larger than it would be in the habitable zone of a typical M-dwarf (Sun-like star). Polarimetry is thus a powerful tool to detect close-in planets around white dwarfs. Multi-band polarimetry would also allow one to reveal the presence of a planet atmosphere, even providing a first characterisation. With current facilities a super-Earth-sized atmosphereless planet is detectable with polarimetry around the brightest known CWD. Planned future facilities render smaller planets detectable, in particular by increasing the instrumental sensitivity in the blue. Preliminary habitability study show also that photosynthetic processes can be sustained on Earth-like planets orbiting CWDs and that the DNA-weighted UV radiation dose for an Earth-like planet in the CHZ is less than the maxima encountered on Earth, hence white dwarfs are compatible with the persistence of complex life from the perspective of UV irradiation.

  12. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  13. Microbially synthesized modular virus-like particles and capsomeres displaying group A streptococcus hypervariable antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Yap P; Wibowo, Nani; Connors, Natalie K; Wu, Yang; Hughes, Fiona K; Batzloff, Michael R; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-01

    Effective and low-cost vaccines are essential to control severe group A streptococcus (GAS) infections prevalent in low-income nations and the Australian aboriginal communities. Highly diverse and endemic circulating GAS strains mandate broad-coverage and customized vaccines. This study describes an approach to deliver cross-reactive antigens from endemic GAS strains using modular virus-like particle (VLP) and capsomere systems. The antigens studied were three heterologous N-terminal peptides (GAS1, GAS2, and GAS3) from the GAS surface M-protein that are specific to endemic strains in Australia Northern Territory Aboriginal communities. In vivo data presented here demonstrated salient characteristics of the modular delivery systems in the context of GAS vaccine design. First, the antigenic peptides, when delivered by unadjuvanted modular VLPs or adjuvanted capsomeres, induced high titers of peptide-specific IgG antibodies (over 1 × 10(4) ). Second, delivery by capsomere was superior to VLP for one of the peptides investigated (GAS3), demonstrating that the delivery system relative effectiveness was antigen-dependant. Third, significant cross-reactivity of GAS2-induced IgG with GAS1 was observed using either VLP or capsomere, showing the possibility of broad-coverage vaccine design using these delivery systems and cross-reactive antigens. Fourth, a formulation containing three pre-mixed modular VLPs, each at a low dose of 5 μg (corresponding to <600 ng of each GAS peptide), induced significant titers of IgGs specific to each peptide, demonstrating that a multivalent, broad-coverage VLP vaccine formulation was possible. In summary, the modular VLPs and capsomeres reported here demonstrate, with promising preliminary data, innovative ways to design GAS vaccines using VLP and capsomere delivery systems amenable to microbial synthesis, potentially adoptable by developing countries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Immune responses to vaccines involving a combined antigen-nanoparticle mixture and nanoparticle-encapsulated antigen formulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xiaoming; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Qiu, Shaohui; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-07-01

    Many physicochemical characteristics significantly influence the adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles; one critical factor is the kinetics of antigen exposure to the immune system by particle-adjuvanted vaccines. Here, we investigated how various antigen-nanoparticle formulations impacted antigen exposure to the immune system and the resultant antigen-specific immune responses. We formulated antigen with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by encapsulating antigen within nanoparticles or by simply mixing soluble antigen with the nanoparticles. Our results indicated that the combined formulation (composed of antigen encapsulated in nanoparticles and antigen mixed with nanoparticles) induced more powerful antigen-specific immune responses than each single-component formulation. Mice immunized with the combined vaccine formulation displayed enhanced induction of antigen-specific IgG antibodies with high avidity, increased cytokine secretion by splenocytes, and improved generation of memory T cell. Enhanced immune responses elicited by the combined vaccine formulation might be attributed to the antigen-depot effect at the injection site, effective provision of both adequate initial antigen exposure and long-term antigen persistence, and efficient induction of dendritic cell (DC) activation and follicular helper T cell differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Understanding the effect of antigen-nanoparticle formulations on the resultant immune responses might have significant implications for rational vaccine design.

  15. Antigen sampling in the fish intestine.

    PubMed

    Løkka, Guro; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Antigen uptake in the gastrointestinal tract may induce tolerance, lead to an immune response and also to infection. In mammals, most pathogens gain access to the host though the gastrointestinal tract, and in fish as well, this route seems to be of significant importance. The epithelial surface faces a considerable challenge, functioning both as a barrier towards the external milieu but simultaneously being the site of absorption of nutrients and fluids. The mechanisms allowing antigen uptake over the epithelial barrier play a central role for maintaining the intestinal homeostasis and regulate appropriate immune responses. Such uptake has been widely studied in mammals, but also in fish, a number of experiments have been reported, seeking to reveal cells and mechanisms involved in antigen sampling. In this paper, we review these studies in addition to addressing our current knowledge of the intestinal barrier in fish and its anatomical construction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  17. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  18. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Maksim V; Ter Beest, Martin; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here, we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for the podosomes of dendritic cells.

  19. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  20. Characterising the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Goudelis, Andreas; Kraml, Sabine; Mawatari, Kentarou; Sengupta, Dipan

    2016-05-01

    We study kinematic distributions that may help characterise the recently observed excess in diphoton events at 750 GeV at the LHC Run 2. Several scenarios are considered, including spin-0 and spin-2 750 GeV resonances that decay directly into photon pairs as well as heavier parent resonances that undergo three-body or cascade decays. We find that combinations of the distributions of the diphoton system and the leading photon can distinguish the topology and mass spectra of the different scenarios, while patterns of QCD radiation can help differentiate the production mechanisms. Moreover, missing energy is a powerful discriminator for the heavy parent scenarios if they involve (effectively) invisible particles. While our study concentrates on the current excess at 750 GeV, the analysis is general and can also be useful for characterising other potential diphoton signals in the future.

  1. Characterising latency for AO optical sensors: an implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Thomas; Bennet, Francis; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois

    2016-07-01

    The latency of electro-optical components is of high importance in the design of Adaptive Optics systems, as it limits the performance of the control loop. There exists a need for a latency measurement method that can be constructed with simple components found in most Adaptive Optics labs that still provides a measurement accurate to sub-microseconds. Through a combination of research and experimentation, potential methodologies were investigated with the aim of producing reliable latency measurements. This document will discuss one such method, involving coupling a LED pulse output and detected pulse input signals to the same clock for easy comparison. For this method, a proof-of-concept was developed using MATLAB and small analogue electronics, and the performance characterised. This characterisation showed that although there is some merit to the method, improvements are necessary to increase the precision of the measurement to a level usable in Adaptive Optics systems.

  2. Enhanced test methods to characterise automotive battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Grietus; Omar, Noshin; Pauwels, Stijn; Leemans, Filip; Verbrugge, Bavo; De Nijs, Wouter; Van den Bossche, Peter; Six, Daan; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    This article evaluates the methods to characterise the behaviour of lithium ion cells of several chemistries and a nickel metal hydride cell for automotive applications like (plug-in) hybrid vehicles and battery electric vehicles. Although existing characterisation test methods are used, it was also indicated to combine test methods in order to speed up the test time and to create an improved comparability of the test results. Also, the existing capacity tests ignore that cells can be charged at several current rates. However, this is of interest for, e.g. fast charging and regenerative braking. Tests for high power and high energy application have been integrated in the enhanced method. The article explains the rationale to ameliorate the test methods. The test plan should make it possible to make an initial division in a group of cells purchased from several suppliers.

  3. Bi-directional electrical characterisation of microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Degrenne, N; Ledezma, P; Bevilacqua, P; Buret, F; Allard, B; Greenman, J; Ieropoulos, I A

    2013-01-01

    The electrical performance of microbial fuel cells in steady-state is usually investigated by standard characterisation methods that reveal many important parameters e.g. maximum power. This paper introduces a novel "bi-directional" method to study how the acquisition parameters (i.e. sweep rate and sweep regime) can influence measurements and consequently performance estimations. The investigation exhibited considerable differences (hysteresis) between the forward and backward characterisation regimes, indicating a difficulty to reach steady-state under certain conditions. Moreover, it is found that fast sweep rates (time-step of 2 min) can lead to an overestimation of the short-circuit currents, while prolonged operation with high external loads leads to maximum power overestimation and extended conditioning at high currents can result in its underestimation.

  4. Structural characterisation of a histone domain by projection-decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Jonas; Bermel, Wolfgang; Billeter, Martin

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate that two projection experiments, a (15)N-HSQC-NOESY-(15)N-HSQC and a (13)C-HSQC-NOESY-(15)N-HSQC, recorded for a histone domain from yeast, contain enough information to support a structural characterisation of the protein. At the temperature used, 298 K, the histone domain exhibits a very high extent of chemical shift degeneracy that is uncharacteristic for a fully folded domain. Nonetheless, a structured core of 67 residues, which is formed by three α-helices and a two-stranded β-sheet is defined by this NOESY data; this core structure was shown earlier to be present at lower temperature. The above two experiments, which together required 18 h of instrument time, are part of a set of five projection experiments acquired during 2.5 days with the goal of complete characterisation of proteins, including full resonance assignment and structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detecting and characterising ramp events in wind power time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Cristóbal; Cuerva, Álvaro; Costa, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    In order to implement accurate models for wind power ramp forecasting, ramps need to be previously characterised. This issue has been typically addressed by performing binary ramp/non-ramp classifications based on ad-hoc assessed thresholds. However, recent works question this approach. This paper presents the ramp function, an innovative wavelet- based tool which detects and characterises ramp events in wind power time series. The underlying idea is to assess a continuous index related to the ramp intensity at each time step, which is obtained by considering large power output gradients evaluated under different time scales (up to typical ramp durations). The ramp function overcomes some of the drawbacks shown by the aforementioned binary classification and permits forecasters to easily reveal specific features of the ramp behaviour observed at a wind farm. As an example, the daily profile of the ramp-up and ramp-down intensities are obtained for the case of a wind farm located in Spain.

  6. EChOSim: The Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory software simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, E.; Waldmann, I. P.; MacTavish, C. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Amaral-Rogers, A.; Varley, R.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Griffin, M. J.; Ollivier, M.; Sarkar, S.; Spencer, L.; Swinyard, B. M.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2015-12-01

    EChOSim is the end-to-end time-domain simulator of the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) space mission. EChOSim has been developed to assess the capability of the EChO mission concept to detect and characterise the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets. Here we discuss the details of the EChOSim implementation and describe the models used to represent the instrument and to simulate the detection. Software simulators have assumed a central role in the design of new instrumentation and in assessing the level of systematics affecting the measurements of existing experiments. Thanks to its high modularity, EChOSim can simulate basic aspects of several existing and proposed spectrometers including instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. A discussion of different uses of EChOSim is given, including examples of simulations performed to assess the EChO mission.

  7. Characterising stationary and translating vortex flow using magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallatos, Antoine; Wilson, Mark C. T.; Taylor, Annette F.; Britton, Melanie M.

    2012-09-01

    We report magnetic resonance (MR) velocity and diffusion maps in three directions for stationary vortices (Taylor vortex flow —TVF) and velocity maps for translating vortices (vortex flow reactor —VFR) produced in a Couette cell. Motion artefacts in the translating vortex flow are removed by synchronising data acquisition with the translation period of the vortices. MR propagator experiments, which measure the conditional probability density for displacement, were performed to characterise molecular displacements in these systems. Simulations were performed using the experimental velocity and diffusion maps to aid interpretation of experimentally measured propagators and enable characterisation of the macro-mixing and transport properties within TVF and VFR systems. These simulations enabled molecular transport and mixing to be assessed over longer-time scales than are accessible experimentally, allowing plug flow, by-pass flow and inter-vortex mixing to be quantified.

  8. Diffraction grating interferometers for mechanical characterisations of advanced fabric laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Molimard, Jérôme; Vautrin, Alain; Surrel, Yves

    2006-02-01

    It is demonstrated that two grating interferometers with high spatial resolutions can successfully be applied for the mechanical characterisation of the advanced fabric composite materials. Based on these two techniques, the mechanical properties of two kinds of fabric laminates are obtained without assumption of uniform strain fields to be used in the characterisation approaches using the local strain sensors. The degree of the yarn crimp effects of the two laminates is compared in terms of the out-of-plane displacement derivatives. Especially, it is shown that the grating shearing interferometer is appropriate for the crimped fabric structure requiring a three-dimensional analysis. The modification from moiré interferometer to grating shearing interferometer is performed by introducing a Michelson interferometer modified for image shearing.

  9. Agronomic characterisation of different types of sewage sludge: policy implications.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Losada, M R; Muñoz-Ferreiro, N; Rigueiro-Rodríguez, A

    2010-03-01

    Spain is one of the main municipal sewage sludge producers of Europe. This paper aims to agronomically characterise different types of sewage sludge stabilised by different methods (anaerobically digested, composted, and pelletised) and deliver policy recommendations from the results of this characterisation. Anaerobic sewage sludge quality is found to be better in plants with a lower volume of water processing. Composted sludge shows the best quality from a heavy metal point of view, but its low available nitrogen content increases the input of heavy metals when spread, as compared to digested or pelletised sludge. Pelletised sludge has higher heavy metal content than anaerobically digested sludge. Despite the good quality of the sludges, future regulations, especially with regard to Cd levels, will limit the use of this waste in agriculture.

  10. Rapid characterisation of Candida albicans by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    White, G C; Sisson, P R; Freeman, R; Cookson, B D

    1994-08-01

    Clinical isolates (41) of Candida spp. from three possible outbreaks of nosocomially-acquired infection were compared by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PMS) and by a combined morphotyping and resistotyping (M-R typing) method. Both systems characterised all the isolates and distinguished one isolate of C. tropicalis and another of C. glabrata from the 39 isolates of C. albicans. Results from both systems suggested that cross-infection with a single strain contributed to two of the outbreaks. In several instances, more than one strain of C. albicans was found amongst multiple isolates from the same patient. PMS is a simple, rapid and objective technique capable of characterising C. albicans isolates; discrimination was similar to M-R typing.

  11. Original antigenic sin: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Anup; Monsalve, Diana M; Pacheco, Yovana; Chang, Christopher; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-09-01

    The concept of "original antigenic sin" was first proposed by Thomas Francis, Jr. in 1960. This phenomenon has the potential to rewrite what we understand about how the immune system responds to infections and its mechanistic implications on how vaccines should be designed. Antigenic sin has been demonstrated to occur in several infectious diseases in both animals and humans, including human influenza infection and dengue fever. The basis of "original antigenic sin" requires immunological memory, and our immune system ability to autocorrect. In the context of viral infections, it is expected that if we are exposed to a native strain of a pathogen, we should be able to mount a secondary immune response on subsequent exposure to the same pathogen. "Original antigenic sin" will not contradict this well-established immunological process, as long as the subsequent infectious antigen is identical to the original one. But "original antigenic sin" implies that when the epitope varies slightly, then the immune system relies on memory of the earlier infection, rather than mount another primary or secondary response to the new epitope which would allow faster and stronger responses. The result is that the immunological response may be inadequate against the new strain, because the immune system does not adapt and instead relies on its memory to mount a response. In the case of vaccines, if we only immunize to a single strain or epitope, and if that strain/epitope changes over time, then the immune system is unable to mount an accurate secondary response. In addition, depending of the first viral exposure the secondary immune response can result in an antibody-dependent enhancement of the disease or at the opposite, it could induce anergy. Both of them triggering loss of pathogen control and inducing aberrant clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preliminary decommissioning study reports

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    This six large gunite storage tanks considered as a group is one of approximately 76 facilities currently managed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). This program, as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) national SFMP, is responsible for the maintenance and surveillance and the final decommissioning of radioactively contaminated surplus ORNL facilities. A long-range planning effort is being conducted that will outline the scope and objectives of the ORNL program and establish decommissioning priorities based on health and safety concerns, budget constraints, and other programmatic constraints. In support of this SFMP planning activity, preliminary engineering assessments are being conducted for each of the ORNL surplus facilities currently managed under the program. These efforts are designed to: (1) provide an initial assessment of the potential decommissioning alternatives, (2) choose a preferred alternative and provide a justification of the decommissioning plan, including cost and schedule estimates. This report presents the results of the preliminary decommission study for the six gunite storage tanks.

  13. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits.

  14. Characterisation of Mg biodegradable stents produced by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmrabet, N.; Botterill, N.; Grant, D. M.; Brown, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Novel Mg-minitubes for biodegradable stent applications have been produced using PVD magnetron sputtering. The minitubes were characterised, as a function of annealing temperature, using a combination of SEM/EDS, XRD and hardness testing. The as-deposited minitubes exhibited columnar grain structures with high levels of porosity. Slight alteration to the crystal structure from columnar to equiaxed grain growth was demonstrated at elevated temperature, along with increased material densification, hardness and corrosion resistance.

  15. Detection and characterisation of anthropogenic pieces by magnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodot, Emilie; Munschy, Marc; Benevent, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Human activities have let many anthropogenic objects buried under our feet. Some of these like explosive devices left after the World Wars turn out to be a threat to safety or environment. Others must be perfectly localised in case of construction work, for example gas pipe. Geophysics and more specifically magnetic cartography (many of these items are magnetic) can obviously help to locate them. We already use this method on daily basis to detect UXO (unexploded ordnance) but less than 10% of the unearthed objects are actually bombs or shells. Detection and mostly characterisation methods must be improved in order to reduce this proportion. On the field there are a few things we can do to increase data qualities. Characterisation may be improved by multiple scale prospections. We search a large area with our usual and rather fast method then we achieve high definition cartographies of small interesting areas (upon the object to characterise). In the case of measurements in an urban environment for example, data are distorted. The traffic (train, tramway, cars…) produces temporal variations of the magnetic field. This effect can be lessened, sometimes even removed by the use of a fixed scalar magnetic sensor. Data treatment is another key as regards the characterisation. Tools such as analytic signal or derivative are frequently used at the first degree. We will see that in a synthetic case the second and third degree bring even more information. A new issue appeared recently about pipes. Can we localise very precisely (less than 10 cm uncertainty) a gas pipe? Horizontally we can but due to our inversion method we still have troubles with the depth accuracy. Our final concern is about the amplitude of some anomalies. Potential methods equations are based on the fact that the anomaly norm must be minor to magnetic field norm. Sometimes this is not the case but vector magnetometry is a lead to solve this problem.

  16. Individual characterisation of the metastatic capacity of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heimann, R; Hellman, S

    2000-08-01

    The clinical implications of understanding the invasive and metastatic proclivities of an individual patient's tumour are substantial because the choice of systemic therapy needs to be guided by the likelihood of occult metastasis as well as by knowing when the metastases will become overt. Malignant potential is dynamic, progressing throughout the natural history of a tumour. Required of tumours is the development of critical phenotypic attributes: growth, angiogenesis, invasion and metastagenicity. Characterisation of the extent of tumour progression with regard to these major tumour phenotypes should allow the fashioning of individual therapy for each patient. To examine the clinical parameters and molecularly characterise the metastatic proclivity we have been studying a series of regionally treated breast cancer patients who received no systemic therapy and have long follow-up. Clinically we describe two parameters: metastagenicity - the metastatic proclivity of a tumour, and virulence--the rate at which these metastases appear. Both attributes increase with tumour size and nodal involvement. However, within each clinical group there is a cured population, even in those with extensive nodal involvement, underscoring the heterogeneity of breast cancers within each group and the need for further molecular characterisation. Using biomarkers that characterise the malignant phenotype we have determined that there is progression in the phenotypic changes. Angiogenesis and loss of nm23 are earlier events than the loss of E-cadherin, or abnormalities in TP53. The strongest biomarkers of poor prognosis are p53 and E-cadherin, but even when both are abnormal 42% of node-negative patients are cured indicating that other determinative steps need to occur before successful metastases are established. Identification of these critical later events will further increase the efficacy of determining the malignant capacities of individual tumours.

  17. Characterisation of longitudinal variation in photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Francis-Jones, Robert J A; Mosley, Peter J

    2016-10-31

    We present a method by which the degree of longitudinal variation in photonic crystal fibre (PCF) may be characterised through seeded four-wave mixing (FWM). Using an iterative numerical reconstruction, we created a theoretical model of the PCF that displays FWM phasematching properties that are similar to experiment across all measured length scales. Our results demonstrate that the structure of our PCF varies by less than ±1 % and that the characteristic length of the variations is approximately 15 cm.

  18. Characterisation of amorphous and nanocrystalline molecular materials by total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon J.L.; Dykhne, Timur; Juhás, Pavol; Boin, Emil; Taylor, Ryan; Florence, Alastair J.; Shankland, Kenneth

    2010-09-17

    The use of high-energy X-ray total scattering coupled with pair distribution function analysis produces unique structural fingerprints from amorphous and nanostructured phases of the pharmaceuticals carbamazepine and indomethacin. The advantages of such facility-based experiments over laboratory-based ones are discussed and the technique is illustrated with the characterisation of a melt-quenched sample of carbamazepine as a nanocrystalline (4.5 nm domain diameter) version of form III.

  19. Geophysical Methodologies for the Characterisation of Gas Hydrate Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, M.; Jackson, P.; Gunn, D.; Rochelle, C.; Bateman, K.; Nelder, V.; Culshaw, M.; Rees, J.; Francis, T.; Roberts, J.; Schultheiss, P.

    2001-12-01

    The study of natural gas hydrate cores in the laboratory is currently limited by their instability at ambient conditions. Proposals to sample hydrates using pressure coring techniques and sample transfer chambers on-board ship are, however, in place and technical developments to enable these are well advanced (c.f. the HYACINTH project and ODP Leg 204). There is, however, a need to try to characterise the nature and extent of any gas hydrate within the pressurised sample prior to depressurising, opening and subsampling. The ability to geophysically characterise gas hydrates remotely while still in the pressurised core barrel may provide a route to detailing their physical extent and nature. With this objective, experiments to manufacture a range of synthetic gas hydrate morphologies in a range of sediments in the laboratory are in progress. To date we have succeeded in manufacturing a range of both pure and sediment-hosted CO2 hydrates. Continuing experiments are developing a range of geometrical and internal structures and fabrics (from massive to disseminated) using different sediment-hosts. These generic hydrate groups will provide a basis for non-invasive geophysical characterisation of hydrate morphologies. From these results protocols will be established to guide the geophysical logging of natural sediment-hydrate core maintained under pressure in lab transfer chambers on board the drillship, using the hyperbaric Geotek Core Logger. This will enable the characterisation and classification of hydrates sampled during ODP Leg 204 (and during subsequent hydrate sampling operations not restricted to ODP). While new insight will be gained into geophysical modelling of hydrate behaviour, it will also guide the development of sampling programs, prior to depressurising and initiating dissociation. This will allow detailed planning of shipboard scientific work utilising these rare and precious samples. This new knowledge will enhance geophysical survey data, better

  20. Targeting carbohydrate antigens in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Anastas; Canziani, Gabriela; Macleod, Stewart; Plaxco, Jason; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-03-18

    Peptide mimotopes provide a strategy to augment human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) specific carbohydrate reactive immune responses. Their antigenic and immunological properties will depend on the optimization of motif clustering and multimerization. We observe that structural variants of the same mimetic motif, linear versus cyclic, can be used to tune the properties of the antibodies elicited. The expansion of the database of mimotope sequence motifs can be increased by analyzing structures that bind to HIV directed monoclonal antibody 2G12 and the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), fostering new mimotope designs. Such analysis indicates that these reagents bind to subsets of mannosyl antigens on the envelope (env) protein.

  1. Characterisation of rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children with HLA-conferred disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, Petra M; Lempainen, Johanna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Vähäsalo, Paula; Ilonen, Jorma; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to characterise rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children recruited from the general population, on the basis of HLA-conferred disease susceptibility. We monitored 7410 HLA-predisposed children participating in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study for the development of beta cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes from birth over a median follow-up time of 16.2 years (range 0.9-21.1 years). Islet cell antibodies (ICA) and autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA) and islet antigen 2 (IA-2A) were assessed as markers of beta cell autoimmunity. Rapid progression was defined as progression to clinical type 1 diabetes within 1.5 years of autoantibody seroconversion. We analysed the association between rapid progression and demographic and autoantibody characteristics as well as genetic markers, including 25 non-HLA SNPs predisposing to type 1 diabetes. Altogether, 1550 children (21%) tested positive for at least one diabetes-associated autoantibody in at least two samples, and 248 (16%) of seroconverters progressed to type 1 diabetes by the end of 2015. The median time from seroconversion to diagnosis was 0.51 years in rapid progressors (n = 42, 17%) and 5.4 years in slower progressors. Rapid progression was observed both among young (<5 years) and early pubertal children (>7 years), resulting in a double-peak distribution of seroconversion age. Compared with slower progressors, rapid progressors had a higher frequency of positivity for multiple (≥2) autoantibodies and had higher titres of ICA, IAA and IA-2A at seroconversion, and there was a higher prevalence of the secretor genotype in the FUT2 gene among those carrying the high-risk HLA genotype. Compared with autoantibody-positive non-progressors, rapid progressors were younger, were more likely to carry the high-risk HLA genotype and a predisposing SNP in the PTPN22 gene, had higher frequency of ICA, IAA, GADA and IA-2A positivity and

  2. Adult Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis Is Characterised by Airway Luminal Th17 Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice C.-H.; Martin, Megan L.; Lourie, Rohan; Rogers, Geraint B.; Burr, Lucy D.; Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; Bowler, Simon D.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Serisier, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis is characterised by chronic airway infection and neutrophilic inflammation, which we hypothesised would be associated with Th17 pathway activation. Methods Th17 pathway cytokines were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and gene expression of IL-17A, IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-23 determined from endobronchial biopsies (EBx) in 41 stable bronchiectasis subjects and 20 healthy controls. Relationships between IL-17A levels and infection status, important clinical measures and subsequent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were determined. Results BALF levels of all Th17 cytokines (median (IQR) pg/mL) were significantly higher in bronchiectasis than control subjects, including IL-17A (1.73 (1.19, 3.23) vs. 0.27 (0.24, 0.35), 95% CI 1.05 to 2.21, p<0.0001) and IL-23 (9.48 (4.79, 15.75) vs. 0.70 (0.43, 1.79), 95% CI 4.68 to 11.21, p<0.0001). However, BALF IL-17A levels were not associated with clinical measures or airway microbiology, nor predictive of subsequent P. aeruginosa infection. Furthermore, gene expression of IL-17A in bronchiectasis EBx did not differ from control. In contrast, gene expression (relative to medians of controls) in bronchiectasis EBx was significantly higher than control for IL1β (4.12 (1.24, 8.05) vs 1 (0.13, 2.95), 95% CI 0.05 to 4.07, p = 0.04) and IL-8 (3.75 (1.64, 11.27) vs 1 (0.54, 3.89), 95% CI 0.32 to 4.87, p = 0.02) and BALF IL-8 and IL-1α levels showed significant relationships with clinical measures and airway microbiology. P. aeruginosa infection was associated with increased levels of IL-8 while Haemophilus influenzae was associated with increased IL-1α. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Established adult non-CF bronchiectasis is characterised by luminal Th17 pathway activation, however this pathway may be relatively less important than activation of non-antigen-specific innate neutrophilic immunity. PMID:25822228

  3. Analysis of the role of human leukocyte antigen class-I genes to understand the etiopathology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bisu; Banerjee, Sikta; Bera, Nirmal K.; Nayak, Chitta R.; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is the paradigmatic illness of psychiatry. The involvement of immunological and immunopathological mechanisms in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia has been a matter of research, with recently increasing effort. Aims: In this study, we investigated the incidence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class I antigens to understand the role of HLA genes in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: India born schizophrenic patients in and around Siliguri who attended outpatient department (OPD) of Department of Psychiatry, North Bengal Medical College and Hospital were considered for the present study. After the longitudinal follow up, 50 patients were enrolled for the study. The same number of age, sex and ethnically matched healthy subjects were considered as control. Low resolution polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method was applied for typing the HLA antigens. Statistics: The phenotype frequencies were calculated by direct count. χ2 test was done to compare the frequency of each antigen among the patients and control group and it was followed by Fisher's exact test. Relative risk was estimated by using Haldane's method. Results: The result showed that some of the HLA antigens are associated with the schizophrenia and significant increase were observed for HLA A*03 antigen along with the significant decrease for HLA A*25, A*31 and HLA B*51. Conclusions: The study provides the evidence for the possible existence of susceptibility locus for schizophrenia within the HLA region. This preliminary observation may help to understand the etiological basis of this disorder and the study may further strengthen the HLA antigens as the marker for schizophrenia. PMID:19742184

  4. Single-frequency reflection characterisation of shock tube excited plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jing; Tang, Pu; Ma, Ping; Li, Lutong; Li, Ruiming; He, Ziyuan; Chen, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Plasma has been of great interest to engineers and scientists during the past few decades due to its wide applications. Besides, the plasma-sheath-caused lose of communication (i.e. re-entry blackout) that happens when a spacecraft re-enters the earth atmosphere is still a problem to be solved. The microwave characterisation of shock tube excited plasma has been an important method for exploring the transmission and reflection of microwave signals in plasma. The existing frequency sweep or multi-frequency technologies are not desirable for the characterisation of high-speed time-varying plasma generated in shock tubes. Hence, in this paper a novel signal-frequency approach is proposed to measure both electron density and collision frequency of plasma in shock tube. As frequency sweep is not required in this method, it is extremely suitable for characterising the shock tube excited high-speed time-varying plasma. The genetic algorithm is applied to extract electron density and collision frequency from the reflection coefficient. Simulation results demonstrate excellent accuracy for electron density within 1 0 10 ˜ 1 0 12 cm-3 and collision frequency within 5 × 1 0 10 ˜1012 Hz. This work paves the way for a fast and compact microwave reflection measurement of shock tube generated plasma.

  5. Characterisation of aerosol combustible mixtures generated using condensation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Aminuddin; Dutta, Nilabza; Wahid, Mazlan A.

    2012-06-01

    An accidental release of a liquid flammable substance might be formed as an aerosol (droplet and vapour mixture). This phenomenon might be due to high pressure sprays, pressurised liquid leaks and through condensation when hot vapour is rapidly cooled. Such phenomena require a fundamental investigation of mixture characterisation prior to any subsequent process such as evaporation and combustion. This paper describes characterisation study of droplet and vapour mixtures generated in a fan stirred vessel using condensation technique. Aerosol of isooctane mixtures were generated by expansion from initially a premixed gaseous fuel-air mixture. The distribution of droplets within the mixture was characterised using laser diagnostics. Nearly monosized droplet clouds were generated and the droplet diameter was defined as a function of expansion time. The effect of changes in pressure, temperature, fuel-air fraction and expansion ratio on droplet diameter was evaluated. It is shown that aerosol generation by expansion was influenced by the initial pressure and temperature, equivalence ratio and expansion rates. All these parameters affected the onset of condensation which in turn affected the variation in droplet diameter.

  6. Uniaxial tensile testing approaches for characterisation of atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M T; Cunnane, E M; Mulvihill, J J; Akyildiz, A C; Gijsen, F J H; Holzapfel, G A

    2014-03-03

    The pathological changes associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques within arterial vessels result in significant alterations to the mechanical properties of the diseased arterial wall. There are several methods available to characterise the mechanical behaviour of atherosclerotic plaque tissue, and it is the aim of this paper to review the use of uniaxial mechanical testing. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, there are nine studies that employ uniaxial testing to characterise mechanical behaviour. A primary concern regarding this limited cohort of published studies is the wide range of testing techniques that are employed. These differing techniques have resulted in a large variance in the reported data making comparison of the mechanical behaviour of plaques from different vasculatures, and even the same vasculature, difficult and sometimes impossible. In order to address this issue, this paper proposes a more standardised protocol for uniaxial testing of diseased arterial tissue that allows for better comparisons and firmer conclusions to be drawn between studies. To develop such a protocol, this paper reviews the acquisition and storage of the tissue, the testing approaches, the post-processing techniques and the stress-strain measures employed by each of the nine studies. Future trends are also outlined to establish the role that uniaxial testing can play in the future of arterial plaque mechanical characterisation.

  7. Solid waste characterisation study in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Zone, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bernache-Pérez, G; Sánchez-Colón, S; Garmendia, A M; Dávila-Villarreal, A; Sánchez-Salazar, M E

    2001-10-01

    The key findings of a solid waste characterisation study conducted at the Guadalajara Metropolitan Zone, Mexico, are reported. Objectives of the study were to estimate the daily generation rate of household (HSW) and municipal solid waste (MSW), characterise and compare their composition by type of material, determine the proportion that HSW contributes to MSW, explore changes in MSW composition through time after final disposal, and estimate the types and amount of MSW that are sorted out for recycling at final disposal sites. HSW generated during seven days by a sample of 300 households chosen through a two-stage stratified sampling design was collected, weighed and classified. MSW entering the four local disposal sites was recorded for 12 weeks, and materials' sorting was quantified. MSW samples taken by excavating trenches in two final disposal sites were also characterised. The average per capita daily HSW generation rate was 508 g. HSW mainly consisted of putrescible waste (53%), paper (10%) and plastic (9%). The average daily generation rate of MSW was 3119.2 metric tonnes. HSW represented 55.9% of MSW, and the main difference between HSW and MSW was a lower proportion of organic materials (53% vs. 16.5%, respectively). The major changes in MSW composition through time after final disposal, were the result of the quick decomposition of putrescible materials. Only 2.2% of total MSW generated in Guadalajara (mainly package waste) was sorted for recycling.

  8. Near-Earth Asteroid Characterisation: Gotta catch 'em All!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegmott, Tarik Joseph; Galache, Jose Luis; Elvis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) are a subject of interest for several reasons: They pose a hazard to Earth through collisions, are prime targets for human exploration missions, and can contain valuable materials such water or Platinum Group Metals (PGMs). Since the 2005 George E. Brown Congressional mandate to find 90% of NEAs >140 m by 2020, the number of NEAs detected has increased to over 1000/year. However the rate of NEA characterisation has not kept pace and is currently only ~10% of the discovery rate. An earlier study (Galache et al. 2014) has shown that most NEAs are found near their brightest and fade below follow-up magnitudes within ~10 days. Moreover small (H>22) NEAs are typically much fainter on any subsequent apparition within 10 years. Hence there is a strong 'need for speed' in making follow-up measurements. We have studied how many NEAs can be characterised per year based on telescope size, location or type, using available ephemeris data from the Minor Planet Centre. We describe how these constraints define strategies for characterising NEAs in bulk.

  9. Mechanical characterisation of additively manufactured material having lattice microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuan-Urquizo, E.; Yang, S.; Bhaskar, A.

    2015-02-01

    Many natural and engineered structures possess cellular and porous architecture. This paper is focused on the mechanical characterisation of additively manufactured lattice structures. The lattice consists of a stack of polylactic acid (PLA) filaments in a woodpile arrangement fabricated using a fused deposition modelling 3D printer. Some of the most promising applications of this 3D lattice material of this type include scaffolds for tissue engineering and the core for sandwich panels. While there is a significant body of work concerning the manufacture of such lattice materials, attempts to understand their mechanical properties are very limited. This paper brings together manufacturing with the need to understand the structure-property relationship for this class of materials. In order to understand the elastic response of the PLA-based lattice structures obtained from the fused deposition modelling process, single filaments manufactured using the same process were experimentally characterised first. The single PLA filaments were manufactured under different temperatures. These filaments were then characterised by using tensile testing. The stress-strain curves are presented. The variability of the measured results is discussed. The measured properties are then taken as input to a finite element model of the lattice material. This model uses simple one-dimensional elements in conjunction with a novel method achieving computational economy which precludes the use of fine meshes. Using this novel model, the apparent elastic modulus of lattice along the filaments has been obtained and is presented in this paper.

  10. Characterisation and modelling of brain tissue for surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, A; Aguinaga, I; Sánchez, E

    2015-05-01

    Interactive surgical simulators capable of providing a realistic visual and haptic feedback to users are a promising technology for medical training and surgery planification. However, modelling the physical behaviour of human organs and tissues for surgery simulation remains a challenge. On the one hand, this is due to the difficulty to characterise the physical properties of biological soft tissues. On the other hand, the challenge still remains in the computation time requirements of real-time simulation required in interactive systems. Real-time surgical simulation and medical training must employ a sufficiently accurate and simple model of soft tissues in order to provide a realistic haptic and visual response. This study attempts to characterise the brain tissue at similar conditions to those that take place on surgical procedures. With this aim, porcine brain tissue is characterised, as a surrogate of human brain, on a rotational rheometer at low strain rates and large strains. In order to model the brain tissue with an adequate level of accuracy and simplicity, linear elastic, hyperelastic and quasi-linear viscoelastic models are defined. These models are simulated using the ABAQUS finite element platform and compared with the obtained experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inverse characterisation of frequency-dependent properties of adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, Lucie; Deü, Jean-François; Legay, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Traditional damping treatments are usually applied to the vibrating structure by means of adhesive layers. Environmental parameters, such as frequencies of excitation, may influence the behaviour of the bonding layer and modify the damping efficiency of the treatment. Therefore it is desired to take into account the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive layer in the finite element model. The goal of this work is to present a procedure to characterise and model the adhesive layer. To that purpose, an experimental-numerical method for inverse characterisation of the frequency dependent properties of the adhesive layer is applied. The proposed inverse approach is based on a four-parameter fractional derivative model whose parameters are identified by minimising the difference between the simulated and the measured dynamic response of a multi-layered structure assembled by bonding. In the finite element model used for the optimisation, the adhesive layer is modelled by interface finite elements. The influence of the adhesive layer on the efficiency of a damping treatment is evidenced by performing dynamic testing on a sandwich structure with a viscoelastic core, assembled by bonding. The proposed approach is applied to the characterisation of a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

  12. Electrochemical synthesis, characterisation and phytogenic properties of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelan, R.; Bangaru Sudarsan Alwar, S.

    2015-11-01

    This work exemplifies a simple and rapid method for the synthesis of silver nanodendrite with a novel electrochemical technique. The antibacterial activity of these silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) against pathogenic bacteria was investigated along with the routine study of optical and spectral characterisation. The optical properties of the silver nanoparticles were characterised by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The optical band gap energy of the electrodeposited Ag NPs was determined from the diffuse reflectance using Kubelka-Munk formula. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the crystalline nature of the silver nanoparticles which confirmed the formation of silver nanocrystals. The XRD pattern revealed that the electrodeposited Ag NPs were in the cubic geometry with dendrite preponderance. The average particle size and the peak broadening were deliberated using Debye-Scherrer equation and lattice strain due to the peak broadening was studied using Williamson-Hall method. Surface morphology of the Ag NPs was characterised by high-resolution scanning electron microscope and the results showed the high degree of aggregation in the particles. The antibacterial activity of the Ag NPs was evaluated and showed unprecedented level antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant strains such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Escherichia coli in combination with Streptomycin.

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  15. URINARY EXCRETION OF FOREIGN ANTIGENS AND RNA FOLLOWING PRIMARY AND SECONDARY INJECTIONS OF ANTIGENS

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Justine S.; Campbell, Dan H.; Das, Manik L.

    1967-01-01

    Two soluble antigens, BSA and KLH labeled with sulfanilate-35S, when injected intravenously into normal animals, were excreted in the urine to over 70% in 24 hr. Over the next 6 days, 25% more was excreted after which time only a trace could be detected. Much of the antigen remaining from the primary injection appeared in the urine following a secondary injection of the unlabeled protein carrier at 7 days after primary injection. The antigen material found in the urine was quite heterogeneous with respect to physical properties and much of it was associated with RNA material as shown by chromatographic analyses. The main difference between the labeled material released following the primary and secondary injection was the higher degree of association of antigen material with nucleotide material after secondary injection as compared with primary injection. Further study is needed to distinguish qualitative from quantitative changes of the components, antigen and nucleic acid, and also the nature of their association. Possible similarities were found for the RNA-antigen material released from tissue after secondary injection of unlabeled antigen, and the material that was isolated previously from liver. PMID:6016894

  16. O-antigen modifications providing antigenic diversity of Shigella flexneri and underlying genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Knirel, Y A; Sun, Qiangzheng; Senchenkova, S N; Perepelov, A V; Shashkov, A S; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    O-Antigens (O-specific polysaccharides) of Shigella flexneri, a primary cause of shigellosis, are distinguished by a wide diversity of chemical modifications following the oligosaccharide O-unit assembly. The present review is devoted to structural, serological, and genetic aspects of these modifications, including O-acetylation and phosphorylation with phosphoethanolamine that have been identified recently. The modifications confer the host with specific immunodeterminants (O-factors or O-antigen epitopes), which accounts for the antigenic diversity of S. flexneri considered as a virulence factor of the pathogen. Totally, 30 O-antigen variants have been recognized in these bacteria, the corresponding O-factors characterized using specific antibodies, and a significant extension of the serotyping scheme of S. flexneri on this basis is suggested. Multiple genes responsible for the O-antigen modifications and the resultant serotype conversions of S. flexneri have been identified. The genetic mechanisms of the O-antigen diversification by acquisition of mobile genetic elements, including prophages and plasmids, followed occasionally by gene mobilization and inactivation have been revealed. These findings further our understanding of the genetics and antigenicity of S. flexneri and assist control of shigellosis.

  17. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8(+) T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  18. Preliminary results from Radiation Environment Investigations on GIOVE-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, C. I.; Taylor, B.; Ryden, K. A.; Rodgers, D. J.; Dyer, C. S.; Evans, H. D. R.; Daly, E. J.

    GIOVE-A is a small satellite build by SSTL UK for the European Space Agency as a first element of its Galileo satellite navigation programme GIOVE-A s primary payload is a navigation payload to secure use of the frequencies allocated by the International Telecommunications Union ITU for the Galileo system and to demonstrate critical technologies for the navigation payload of future operational Galileo satellites It also includes radiation environments and effects experiments constructed by the University of Surrey CEDEX and QinetiQ MERLIN to characterise the hazardous MEO environment GIOVE-A was launched 28 December 2005 into a 24000 km circular orbit with 56 degree inclination The environment experiments contain detectors to register the electron proton and ion signals and also to investigate the resulting total dose and charging environments The payloads will be described and preliminary results will be presented

  19. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies.

  20. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • First review on detection of nanomaterials in complex waste samples. • Focus on nanoparticles in solid, liquid and gaseous waste samples. • Summary of current applicable methods for nanowaste detection and characterisation. • Limitations and challenges of characterisation of nanoparticles in waste. - Abstract: Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while

  1. Comparison of two column characterisation systems based on pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Haghedooren, Erik; Németh, Tamás; Dragovic, Sanja; Noszál, Béla; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2008-05-02

    A useful column characterisation system should help chromatographers to select the most appropriate column to use, e.g. when a particular chromatographic column is not available or when facing the dilemma of selecting a suitable column for analysis according to an official monograph. Official monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia and the United States Pharmacopeia are not allowed to mention the brand name of the stationary phase used for the method development. Also given the overwhelming offer of several hundreds of commercially available reversed-phase liquid chromatographic columns, the choice of a suitable column could be difficult sometimes. To support rational column selection, a column characterisation study was started in our laboratory in 2000. In the same period, Euerby et al. also developed a column characterisation system, which is now released as Column Selector by ACD/Labs. The aim of this project was to compare the two existing column characterisation systems, i.e. the KUL system and the Euerby system. Other research groups active in this field will not be discussed here. Euerby et al. developed a column characterisation system based on 6 test parameters, while the KUL system is based on 4 chromatographic parameters. Comparison was done using a set of 63 columns. For 7 different pharmaceutical separations (fluoxetine, gemcitabine, erythromycin, tetracycline, tetracaine, amlodipine and bisacodyl), a ranking was built based on an F-value (KUL method) or Column Difference Factor value (Euerby method) versus a (virtual) reference column. Both methods showed a similar ranking. The KUL and Euerby methods do not perfectly match, but they yield very similar results, allowing with a relatively high certainty, the selection of similar or dissimilar columns as compared to a reference column. An analyst that uses either of the two methods, will end up with a similar ranking. From a practical point of view, it must be noted that the KUL method only includes 4

  2. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  3. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.; Gerulat, Bernard F.; Pinchuck, Paul

    1964-01-01

    A new group of synthetic random polymers of α-L-amino acids has been studied for immunogenicity. With the glutamic acid and alanine copolymers, those consisting of almost equimolar amounts of the two (G60A40 and G40A60) were effective antigens in rabbits whereas those with higher glutamic acid contents (G75A25, G90A10) were poor antigens. The substitution of alanine by valine or leucine (G75V25 and G80Leu20) produced copolymers which were poor antigens in rabbits but effective in guinea pigs. L70A30, although capable of "non-specifically" precipitating serum proteins, was shown not to be antigenic in either rabbits or guinea pigs. The introduction of alanine into glutamic acid and lysine polymers (GLA series) enhanced the immunogenicity of the terpolymers, i.e., GLA30 > GLA20 > GLA10 > GL. The mechanism by which this may be accomplished is discussed as possibly being related to the reduction of the interactions between glutamyl and lysyl residues which allows the carboxyl groups to act as strong immunogenic determinants. PMID:14176288

  4. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  5. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  6. [Radiocompetitive method of H antigen determination].

    PubMed

    Semenova, G B; Sokolov, Ia A; Liashenko, V A

    1978-06-01

    The authors describe a radiocompetitive method of H-d-monomere determination with the sensitivity of 2 ng/ml in double antibodies modification; this method was used for comparing the immunological affinity of the affiliated H-antigens. A difference between the immunological affinity to the antibodies in a monomere, polymere and the flagellum was shown.

  7. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  8. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  9. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A P; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment. PMID:3068870

  10. Degenerate interfaces in antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Decanniere, K; Transue, T R; Desmyter, A; Maes, D; Muyldermans, S; Wyns, L

    2001-10-26

    In most of the work dealing with the analysis of protein-protein interfaces, a single X-ray structure is available or selected, and implicitly it is assumed that this structure corresponds to the optimal complex for this pair of proteins. However, we have found a degenerate interface in a high-affinity antibody-antigen complex: the two independent complexes of the camel variable domain antibody fragment cAb-Lys3 and its antigen hen egg white lysozyme present in the asymmetric unit of our crystals show a difference in relative orientation between antibody and antigen, leading to important differences at the protein-protein interface. A third cAb-Lys3-hen lysozyme complex in a different crystal form adopts yet another relative orientation. Our results show that protein-protein interface characteristics can vary significantly between different specimens of the same high-affinity antibody-protein antigen complex. Consideration should be given to this type of observation when trying to establish general protein-protein interface characteristics.

  11. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  12. A PRELIMINARY JUPITER MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.; Militzer, B.

    2016-03-20

    In anticipation of new observational results for Jupiter's axial moment of inertia and gravitational zonal harmonic coefficients from the forthcoming Juno orbiter, we present a number of preliminary Jupiter interior models. We combine results from ab initio computer simulations of hydrogen–helium mixtures, including immiscibility calculations, with a new nonperturbative calculation of Jupiter's zonal harmonic coefficients, to derive a self-consistent model for the planet's external gravity and moment of inertia. We assume helium rain modified the interior temperature and composition profiles. Our calculation predicts zonal harmonic values to which measurements can be compared. Although some models fit the observed (pre-Juno) second- and fourth-order zonal harmonics to within their error bars, our preferred reference model predicts a fourth-order zonal harmonic whose absolute value lies above the pre-Juno error bars. This model has a dense core of about 12 Earth masses and a hydrogen–helium-rich envelope with approximately three times solar metallicity.

  13. Immune responses of chickens to dietary protein antigens. I. Induction of systemic and intestinal immune responses following oral administration of soluble proteins in the absence of adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Klipper, E; Sklan, D; Friedman, A

    2000-05-23

    Oral administration of protein antigens in solution leads to the development of oral tolerance in most mammals but rarely so in the chicken. As dietary proteins are not expected to be immunogenic, the present study was undertaken to evaluate immunological consequences following oral exposure to protein antigens in chicks, and to determine whether or not this form of antigen is ignored. Chicks and turkey poults were fed solutions containing bovine serum albumin (BSA), porcine serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin or bovine hemoglobin over a period of 6 days (25mg/chick/day). At different time points after feeding serum and bile were examined for presence of specific antibodies by ELISA. Surprisingly, the fed antigens induced robust antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvant. This immune response was further characterised to show that (1) a daily feeding regimen was more immunogenic than single dose feedings, (2) by using a daily feeding regimen, as little as 2mg/chick/day was fully immunogenic, (3) effective immunization was attained in chicks older than 10 day of age, (4) the main antibody class in the serum was IgG, and (5) high IgA levels were detected in the bile after booster feedings. These observations are difficult to reconcile with current concepts on peripheral tolerance to innocuous antigens, and indicate that the bird regulates tolerance and response in a manner different from that described in mammals.

  14. Antigenic mimicry of Clostridium chauvoei flagella by polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kijima-Tanaka, M; Tamura, Y; Suzuki, S; Nagamine, N; Nakamura, M

    1994-01-01

    Polyclonal rabbit anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies against two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the flagella of Clostridium chauvoei were produced, purified and characterised. Lack of cross-reactivity with heterologous MAbs indicated that the anti-Id antibodies were highly specific. The surface-exposed epitopes of the flagellar filament recognised with protective MAb were further distinguished by the anti-Id antibodies. Moreover, each anti-Id antibody inhibited the binding of its related MAb to flagellar antigens in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that the anti-Id antibodies bore an internal image of the flagellar antigens. The survival rate of mice was increased to nearly twice that of controls by immunisation with anti-Id 41, which had been produced with a protective MAb; in contrast, anti-Id 114, produced with a non-protective MAb, failed to immunise. The results suggest that an anti-Id antibody containing an internal image of C. chauvoei flagella might be used as a vaccine.

  15. Antigen-receptor gene-modified T cells for treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Immunological effector cells and molecules have been shown to access intracranial tumor sites despite the existence of blood brain barrier (BBB) or immunosuppressive mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Recent progress in T-cell biology and tumor immunology made possible to develop strategies of tumor-associated antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as vaccination with defined antigens and adoptive T-cell therapy with antigen-specific T cells including gene-modified T cells for the treatment of patients with brain tumors. An array of recent reports on the trials of active and passive immunotherapy for patients with brain tumors have documented safety and some preliminary clinical efficacy, although the ultimate judgment for clinical benefits awaits rigorous evaluation in trials of later phases. Nevertheless, treatment with lymphocytes that are engineered to express tumor-specific receptor genes is a promising immunotherapy against glioma, based on the significant efficacy reported in the trials for patients with other types of malignancy. Overcoming the relative difficulty to apply immunotherapeutic approach to intracranial region, current advances in the understanding of human tumor immunology and the gene-therapy methodology will address the development of effective immunotherapy of brain tumors.

  16. Phase and Antigenic Variation in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Marjan W.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phase and antigenic variation result in a heterogenic phenotype of a clonal bacterial population, in which individual cells either express the phase-variable protein(s) or not, or express one of multiple antigenic forms of the protein, respectively. This form of regulation has been identified mainly, but by no means exclusively, for a wide variety of surface structures in animal pathogens and is implicated as a virulence strategy. This review provides an overview of the many bacterial proteins and structures that are under the control of phase or antigenic variation. The context is mainly within the role of the proteins and variation for pathogenesis, which reflects the main body of literature. The occurrence of phase variation in expression of genes not readily recognizable as virulence factors is highlighted as well, to illustrate that our current knowledge is incomplete. From recent genome sequence analysis, it has become clear that phase variation may be more widespread than is currently recognized, and a brief discussion is included to show how genome sequence analysis can provide novel information, as well as its limitations. The current state of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to phase variation and antigenic variation are reviewed, and the way in which these mechanisms form part of the general regulatory network of the cell is addressed. Arguments both for and against a role of phase and antigenic variation in immune evasion are presented and put into new perspective by distinguishing between a role in bacterial persistence in a host and a role in facilitating evasion of cross-immunity. Finally, examples are presented to illustrate that phase-variable gene expression should be taken into account in the development of diagnostic assays and in the interpretation of experimental results and epidemiological studies. PMID:15258095

  17. Characterising the transport and preservation of microbial tetraether membrane lipids in Karst Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jex, C.; Blyth, A. J.; Baker, A.; Mcdonald, J. A.; Woltering, M.; Khan, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Stalagmites have the potential to preserve organic biomarkers, proxies for changes in surface climate. Of particular interest is a class of microbial-derived lipids, the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraetheral (GDGT) lipids, which have been identified in cave deposits (Yang et al. 2011). Speleothem GDGT composition has been demonstrated to correlate with surface air temperature using the achaea derived isoprenoid ';(i)GDGT' index of TEX86 and the bacteria derived branched ';(b)GDGT' index of MBT/CBT of modern speleothem samples (Blyth & Schouten, 2013), indicating considerable potential for paleo-temperature reconstructions. These studies have suggested two competing sources for GDGTs in karst systems: 1) A soil derived microbial signal dominated by bGDGTs and 2) An in situ signal dominated by iGDGTs, representative of achaea existing within the cave or overlying bedrock, which dominates the speleothem signal. These findings are yet to be thoroughly tested by characterising the seasonal and spatial nature of GDGTs within caves to establish their sources and transport pathways within these complex fractured rock systems. We address this by presenting the preliminary results of a monitoring study of GDGTs within a single cave system, in South East Australia. Harrie Wood cave in Kosciusko national park is a high altitude, semi-arid site, dominated by discrete infiltration events throughout the year. Above the cave there are thin soils consisting of loose shallow scree, steep slopes and sparse shrub vegetation. We present data obtained from waters and soils immediately above and within Harrie Wood as well as in situ collection of GDGTs formed on filter papers left inside the cave throughout the year. A second cave within the same system provides contrasting surface conditions: thick red clays of moderate to no slope and Eucalypt dominated forest. As such these caves provide ideal test sites to characterise the variability in GDGT signals that may be a result of non

  18. Growth, characterisation and modelling of novel magnetic thin films for engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Arun

    Magnetic materials, especially thin films, are being exploited today in many engineering applications such as magnetic recording heads and media, magnetic sensors and actuators and even magnetic refrigeration due to their smaller form factor or to thin film effects that do not occur in bulk material. Hence there is a need for optimised growth of thin films to suit the requirements of applications. The aim of this research work is two-fold: 1. Growth and characterisation of optimised magnetic thin films using pulsed-laser deposition and 2. Extension of Jiles-Atherton (JA) theory of hysteresis. A series of magnetoelastic thin films based on cobalt ferrite were deposited on SiO2/Si(100) substrates using pulsed-laser deposition at different substrate temperatures and different reactive oxygen pressures. The crystal structure, composition, magnetic properties, microstructure and magnetic domains of cobalt ferrite thin films were investigated. The optimised growth conditions of poly crystalline spinel cobalt ferrite thin films were determined from characterisation results. The Curie point of the optimised cobalt ferrite thin film was determined from moment vs. temperature measurement. The optimised thin film was magnetically annealed in order to induce an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy. The magnetostriction of the optimised sample was determined in the vibrating sample magnetometer using the inverse measurement technique. A special 3-point bender was designed and built for this purpose. The first successful thin film of Gd5Si2Ge2, a magnetocaloric rare earth intermetallic alloy, was deposited on a polycrystalline AlN substrate. The crystal structure, composition and magnetic phase transformation of Gd5Si2Ge2 thin film were investigated. The preliminary results are furnished in this thesis. The JA model of hysteresis was extended to incorporate thermal dependence of magnetic hysteresis. The extended model was validated against measurements made on substituted cobalt ferrite

  19. Molecular characterisation of Escherichia coli isolated from hospitalised children and adults with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, T L; Katouli, M

    2014-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common amongst children and recurs in 10-30 % of cases. The differences between Escherichia coli strains causing UTI among hospitalised children and adults remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the genetic relatedness and virulence gene (VG) profiles of a collection of E. coli causing UTI among hospitalised children and adults. Genetic relatedness among the strains was investigated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and the strains were characterised using a combination of phylogenetic grouping, the ability to form biofilm and the presence of antigen 43 (Ag43) and its five known alleles, as well 20 VGs associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). RAPD analysis resolved six major clusters, with two clusters (A and B) consisting almost exclusively of E. coli isolated from children. Isolates from children had a higher prevalence of alpha-haemolysin (hlyA, p < 0.05) and group II capsular polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMT II, p < 0.01) than adults. In contrast, E. coli strains from adults had a higher prevalence of invasive ibeA (p < 0.05) and Ag43 (agn43) (p < 0.05) genes, and produced significantly (p < 0.001) more biofilm than E. coli from children. Adult isolates also carried significantly (p < 0.05) more agn43 allele RS218 compared to isolates from children, which carried significantly (p < 0.05) more of the agn43 allele bCFT073. Our results suggest that bacterial virulence factors play an important role in UTI among hospitalised children; however, further research will determine whether these findings apply to a larger cohort and other clinical settings for UTI in children and adults.

  20. Characterisation of a Tip60 Specific Inhibitor, NU9056, in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Kelly; Blackburn, Timothy J.; Cook, Susan; Golding, Bernard T.; Griffin, Roger J.; Hardcastle, Ian R.; Hewitt, Lorraine; Huberman, Kety; McNeill, Hesta V.; Newell, David R.; Roche, Celine; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A.; Watson, Anna; Robson, Craig N.

    2012-01-01

    Tip60 (KAT5) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT enzyme) involved in multiple cellular processes including transcriptional regulation, DNA damage repair and cell signalling. In prostate cancer, aggressive cases over-express Tip60 which functions as an androgen receptor co-activator via direct acetylation of lysine residues within the KLKK motif of the receptor hinge region. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterise a Tip60 acetylase inhibitor. High-throughput screening revealed an isothiazole that inhibited both Tip60 and p300 HAT activity. This substance (initially identified as 4-methyl-5-bromoisothiazole) and other isothiazoles were synthesised and assayed against Tip60. Although an authentic sample of 4-methyl-5-bromoisothiazole was inactive against Tip60, in an in vitro HAT assay, 1,2-bis(isothiazol-5-yl)disulfane (NU9056) was identified as a relatively potent inhibitor (IC50 2 µM). Cellular activity was confirmed by analysis of acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in a prostate cancer cell line model. NU9056 treatment inhibited cellular proliferation in a panel of prostate cancer cell lines (50% growth inhibition, 8–27 µM) and induced apoptosis via activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Also, decreased androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, p53 and p21 protein levels were demonstrated in response to treatment with NU9056. Furthermore, pre-treatment with NU9056 inhibited both ATM phosphorylation and Tip60 stabilization in response to ionising radiation. Based on the activity of NU9056 and the specificity of the compound towards Tip60 relative to other HAT enzymes, these chemical biology studies have identified Tip60 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23056207

  1. Characterisation of non-classical MHC class I genes in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial that is under threat of extinction due to an unusual transmissible disease called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Previous studies on the classical MHC genes have provided important insights into immune responses in this endangered species; however, so far, very little is known about the non-classical MHC genes of this species, which can also play significant roles in the immune system. Here, we report characterisation of five non-classical class I genes in the Tasmanian devil, including Saha-UD, -UK, -UM, -MR1 and -CD1. Saha-UD has been isolated previously and is known to have low genetic polymorphism, though its categorisation as classical or non-classical gene has remained undetermined. In this study, we observed tissue-specific expression of Saha-UD, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a non-classical gene. Restricted tissue expression patterns were also observed for other genes, with an exception of Saha-MR1 being ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. Saha-UK, -UM and -MR1 were found to be genetically monomorphic, while four alleles were found at Saha-CD1 with signs of positive selection detected within the α1 domain. Among the four Saha-CD1 alleles, one predominant allele (Saha-CD1*01) showed a high allele frequency of 0.906 in the Tasmanian devil population, resulting in a low heterozygosity (0.188) at this locus. Alternative splicing takes place in Saha-CD1, giving rise to a full-length transcript and a splice variant lacking intact antigen-binding, β2m-binding, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains.

  2. Modulation of Ia and photoreactive antigen on antigen-presenting cells: fun with a photoprobe.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Eades, L; Wilson, C; Solvay, M J

    1985-12-01

    To identify the antigen-specific recognition complex containing elements from T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), a photoactivatable antigen system was developed which could potentially crosslink the complex during the specific cellular responses. In this paper we describe the development of this system using murine T-cell hybridomas responding to stimulator cells chemically conjugated with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) and genetically restricted by I-Ad. In initial experiments it was found that several I-Ad-positive B-cell lines were nonstimulatory when coupled with HSAB, but that I-Ad-positive P388D1 macrophage-like cells were efficient stimulators of HSAB-specific T-cell responses. These results suggested that the relevant HSAB coupled surface structure was not likely I-Ad. To substantiate this point, Ia-positive or Ia-negative P388D1 cells were initially coupled with HSAB and the expression of Ia was modulated by the addition and withdrawal of Con A-stimulated spleen cell supernatant fluid through several days of culture. Under these conditions, efficient stimulation was only observed when Ia was expressed, although the HSAB antigen was continuously present. In other experiments it was found that exposure of HSAB-coupled APC to light selectively eliminated their stimulatory capacity for HSAB-specific T hybridomas, suggesting that the light-induced crosslinking by HSAB directly eliminates the antigenic determinant. This antigen system allows a unique opportunity to manipulate the antigen during specific cellular interactions, and to introduce covalent crosslinking of the specific antigen recognition complex that may allow its isolation and characterization.

  3. Isolation and antigenicity of a 45-kilodalton Paracoccidioides brasiliensis immunodominant antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed human antibody responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cellular antigens by the immunoblot technique to identify specific cellular components and to investigate the existence of antigen profile differences among serological responses of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients. Among the 64 PCM serum samples analyzed, a relatively homogeneous immunoglobulin G response to P. brasiliensis antigens was observed. The polypeptide with a mass of 45 kDa was the most clinically important, since antibody to this antigen was detectable in 90.6% of PCM patients studied and the six individuals who did not produce antibody were either at the end of treatment or in the posttherapy period and had shown clinical recovery. These facts suggested that the presence of this antibody may be an indicator of active disease. The 45-kDa antigen was also the most specific antigen of the PCM humoral immune response, since it reacted with only 2 of 79 (2.5%) heterologous serum samples tested: 1 histoplasmosis case and 1 tuberculosis case. This polypeptide was isolated from gels by electroelution and, when tested by an immunoradiometric assay and immunoblotting, maintained its reactivity with PCM sera and also with anti-P. brasiliensis polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits at the same sensitivity levels as those obtained in immunoblotting with a crude antigen. Since in our assays the 45-kDa polypeptide was the major P. brasiliensis antigen and seemed to be specific for PCM, its use in alternative diagnostic methods is promising, especially in patients suspected of having the juvenile clinical form of PCM often associated with negative double-immunodiffusion results. Images PMID:1612736

  4. Isolation and antigenicity of a 45-kilodalton Paracoccidioides brasiliensis immunodominant antigen.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C

    1992-07-01

    In the present study, we analyzed human antibody responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cellular antigens by the immunoblot technique to identify specific cellular components and to investigate the existence of antigen profile differences among serological responses of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients. Among the 64 PCM serum samples analyzed, a relatively homogeneous immunoglobulin G response to P. brasiliensis antigens was observed. The polypeptide with a mass of 45 kDa was the most clinically important, since antibody to this antigen was detectable in 90.6% of PCM patients studied and the six individuals who did not produce antibody were either at the end of treatment or in the posttherapy period and had shown clinical recovery. These facts suggested that the presence of this antibody may be an indicator of active disease. The 45-kDa antigen was also the most specific antigen of the PCM humoral immune response, since it reacted with only 2 of 79 (2.5%) heterologous serum samples tested: 1 histoplasmosis case and 1 tuberculosis case. This polypeptide was isolated from gels by electroelution and, when tested by an immunoradiometric assay and immunoblotting, maintained its reactivity with PCM sera and also with anti-P. brasiliensis polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits at the same sensitivity levels as those obtained in immunoblotting with a crude antigen. Since in our assays the 45-kDa polypeptide was the major P. brasiliensis antigen and seemed to be specific for PCM, its use in alternative diagnostic methods is promising, especially in patients suspected of having the juvenile clinical form of PCM often associated with negative double-immunodiffusion results.

  5. Strengthened tumor antigen immune recognition by inclusion of a recombinant Eimeria antigen in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Dionisia; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The need for novel, effective adjuvants that are capable of eliciting stronger cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses to antigenic targets is well understood in the vaccine development field. Unfortunately, many adjuvants investigated thus far are either too toxic for human application or too weak to induce a substantial response against difficult antigens, such as tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). In spite of this trend, clinical investigations of recombinant Eimeria antigen (rEA) have revealed this protein to be a non-toxic immunogenic agent with the ability to trigger a Th1-predominant response in both murine and human subjects. Our past studies have shown that the injection of a rEA-encoding adenovirus (rAd5-rEA) alongside an HIV antigen-encoding adenovirus greatly improves the adaptive immune response against this pathogen-derived transgene. In this report, we investigated whether rAd5-rEA could promote and/or alter cytotoxic memory responses toward carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a colorectal cancer-related TAA. We found that the addition of rAd5-rEA to an Ad-based CEA vaccine induced a dose-dependent increase in several anti-CEA T and B cell responses. Moreover, inclusion of rAd5-rEA increased the number of CEA-derived antigenic epitopes that elicited significant cell-mediated and IgG-mediated recognition. These enhanced anti-CEA immune responses also translated into superior CEA-targeted cell killing, as evaluated by an in vivo cytotoxic T lymphocyte assay. Overall, these results suggest that co-administration of rAd5-rEA with a tumor antigen vaccine can substantially boost and broaden the TAA-specific adaptive memory response, thereby validating the potential of rAd5-rEA to be a beneficial adjuvant during therapeutic cancer vaccination.

  6. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  7. A major allogenic leukocyte antigen in the agnathan hagfish.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Hiroyuki; Imai, Takeshi; Miki, Shoji; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Miyashita, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Naoko; Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    All vertebrates, from jawless fish to mammals, possess adaptive immune systems that can detect and inactivate non-self-antigens through a vast repertoire of antigen receptors. Unlike jawed vertebrates, the hagfish utilizes variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are unrelated to immunoglobulin molecules but are diversified by copy-choice gene conversion mechanism. Here, we report that hagfish VLRs react with allogenic leukocyte antigens but not with self-antigens. We found that a highly polymorphic membrane protein, NICIR3, is recognized by VLRs as an allogenic leukocyte antigen (ALA). In a serological cross-reactivity test, a close correlation was observed between the amino acid differences in the protein sequences and the VLR cross-reactivities. This leukocyte antigen was predominantly expressed in phagocytic leukocytes, where it was associated with phagocytosed protein antigens. These findings suggest that a polymorphic leukocyte antigen, NICIR3/ALA, plays a pivotal role in jawless vertebrate adaptive immunity.

  8. A major allogenic leukocyte antigen in the agnathan hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Takaba, Hiroyuki; Imai, Takeshi; Miki, Shoji; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Miyashita, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Naoko; Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    All vertebrates, from jawless fish to mammals, possess adaptive immune systems that can detect and inactivate non-self-antigens through a vast repertoire of antigen receptors. Unlike jawed vertebrates, the hagfish utilizes variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are unrelated to immunoglobulin molecules but are diversified by copy-choice gene conversion mechanism. Here, we report that hagfish VLRs react with allogenic leukocyte antigens but not with self-antigens. We found that a highly polymorphic membrane protein, NICIR3, is recognized by VLRs as an allogenic leukocyte antigen (ALA). In a serological cross-reactivity test, a close correlation was observed between the amino acid differences in the protein sequences and the VLR cross-reactivities. This leukocyte antigen was predominantly expressed in phagocytic leukocytes, where it was associated with phagocytosed protein antigens. These findings suggest that a polymorphic leukocyte antigen, NICIR3/ALA, plays a pivotal role in jawless vertebrate adaptive immunity. PMID:23612706

  9. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  10. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  11. Antigen-binding site anatomy and somatic mutations in antibodies that recognize different types of antigens.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Gopalan; Smart, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Almagro, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-01

    The number of antibody structures co-crystallized with their respective antigens has increased rapidly in the last few years, thus offering a formidable source of information to gain insight into the structure-function relationships of this family of proteins. We have analyzed here 140 unique middle-resolution to high-resolution (<3 Å) antibody structures, including 55 in complex with proteins, 39 with peptides, and 46 with haptens. We determined (i) length variations of the hypervariable loops, (ii) number of contacts with antigen, (iii) solvent accessible area buried upon binding, (iv) location and frequency of antigen contacting residues, (v) type of residues interacting with antigens, and (vi) putative somatic mutations. Except for somatic mutations, distinctive profiles were identified for all the variables analyzed. Compared with contacts, somatic mutations occurred with less abundance at any given position and extended beyond the regions in contact, with no clear difference among antibodies that recognize different types of antigens. This observation is consistent with the fact that although antigen recognition accomplished by shape and physicochemical complementarity is selective in nature, the somatic mutation process is stochastic and selection for mutations leading to improved affinity is not directly related to contact residues. Thus, the knowledge emerging from this study enhances our understanding of the structure-function relationship in antibodies while providing valuable guidance to design libraries for antibody discovery and optimization. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Central Tolerance to Tissue-specific Antigens Mediated by Direct and Indirect Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Alena M.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Intrathymic expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) by medullary thymic epithelial cells (Mtecs) leads to deletion of autoreactive T cells. However, because Mtecs are known to be poor antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for tolerance to ubiquitous antigens, and very few Mtecs express a given TSA, it was unclear if central tolerance to TSA was induced directly by Mtec antigen presentation or indirectly by thymic bone marrow (BM)-derived cells via cross-presentation. We show that professional BM-derived APCs acquire TSAs from Mtecs and delete autoreactive CD8 and CD4 T cells. Although direct antigen presentation by Mtecs did not delete the CD4 T cell population tested in this study, Mtec presentation efficiently deleted both monoclonal and polyclonal populations of CD8 T cells. For developing CD8 T cells, deletion by BM-derived APC and by Mtec presentation occurred abruptly at the transitional, CD4high CD8low TCRintermediate stage, presumably as the cells transit from the cortex to the medulla. These studies reveal a cooperative relationship between Mtecs and BM-derived cells in thymic elimination of autoreactive T cells. Although Mtecs synthesize TSAs and delete a subset of autoreactive T cells, BM-derived cells extend the range of clonal deletion by cross-presenting antigen captured from Mtecs. PMID:15492126

  13. Comparison of Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Cercarial Antigens and Soluble Egg Antigens for Serodiagnosing Schistosome Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Mike; Aitken, Cara; Bailey, Wendi; Ji, Minjun; Dawson, Emily; Gilis, Henk; Spence, Grant; Alexander, Claire; van Gool, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni cercarial antigen preparation (cercarial transformation fluid – SmCTF) was evaluated for detection of anti-schistosome antibodies in human sera in 4 collaborating laboratories. The performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. mansoni egg antigens (SmSEA) in an indirect enzyme-immunoassay (ELISA) antigen assay, the latter being used routinely in 3 of the 4 participating laboratories to diagnose S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. In the fourth laboratory the performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. japonicum egg antigens (SjSEA) in ELISA for detection of anti-S. japonicum antibodies. In all 4 laboratories the results given by SmCTF in ELISA were very similar to those given by the antigen preparation routinely used in the respective laboratory to detect anti-schistosome antibodies in human infection sera. In so far as the ELISA results from SmCTF are thus so little different from those given by schistosome egg antigens and also cheaper to produce, the former is a potentially useful new diagnostic aid for schistosomiasis. PMID:23029577

  14. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    PubMed Central

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  15. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  16. 5T4 oncofoetal antigen: an attractive target for immune intervention in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stern, Peter L; Harrop, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The natural history of a patient's cancer is often characterised by genetic diversity and sequential sweeps of clonal dominance. It is therefore not surprising that identifying the most appropriate tumour-associated antigen for targeted intervention is challenging. The 5T4 oncofoetal antigen was identified by searching for surface molecules shared between human trophoblast and cancer cells with the rationale that they may function to allow survival of the foetus as a semi-allograft in the mother or a tumour in its host. The 5T4 protein is expressed by many different cancers but rarely in normal adult tissues. 5T4 molecules are 72 kD, heavily N-glycosylated proteins with several leucine-rich repeats which are often associated with protein-protein interactions. 5T4 expression is associated with the directional movement of cells through epithelial mesenchymal transition, potentiation of CXCL12/CXCR4 chemotaxis and inhibition of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin while favouring non-canonical pathway signalling; all processes which help drive the spread of cancer cells. The selective pattern of 5T4 tumour expression, association with a tumour-initiating phenotype plus a mechanistic involvement with cancer spread have underwritten the clinical development of different immunotherapeutic strategies including a vaccine, a tumour-targeted superantigen and an antibody drug conjugate. In addition, a chimeric antigen receptor T cell approach targeting 5T4 expressing tumour cells is in pre-clinical development. A key challenge will include how best to combine each 5T4 targeted immunotherapy with the most appropriate standard of care treatment (or adjunct therapy) to maximise the recovery of immune control and ultimately eliminate the tumour.

  17. Partial purification and characterization of protection-inducing antigens from the muscle larva of Trichinella spiralis by molecular sizing chromatography and preparative flatbed isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Despommier, D D

    1981-01-01

    The soluble portion of a large particle fraction which was derived from the muscle larva of T. spiralis was subjected to molecular sizing column chromatography using Sephacryl S-200. Five major peaks of 280 nm absorbing material were obtained. Analysis by immunoelectrophoresis revealed that each peak contained antigens, with the majority of them occurring in peaks 3, 4 and 5. Preliminary studies indicated that peak 4(mol. wt range 20 000--10 000) contained protection-inducing antigens. Crossed-immunoelectrophoretic and single-dimension electrophoretic analysis of peak 4 revealed a minimum of 10 antigens, while analytical isoelectric focusing demonstrated the presence of proteins with widely different pl, ranging from 4.0 to 9.0. Peak 4 was fractionated by preparative flatbed isoelectric focusing (PIEF) using two gradients: one from 3.5 to 9.5 and the other from 3.5 to 5.5. Fused rocket immunoelectrophoretic (FRIEP) analysis of both runs indicated that several antigens were separated from the others: one at pl 4.0 and the other at pl 9.0. The remaining antigens focused between pl 4.3 and 4.9. One hundred micrograms of whole peak 4, pl 9.0 antigen and the group of antigens at pl 4.3--4.9 were each separately injected, along with Freund's complete adjuvant, into mice. In addition, a portion of the pl 4.0 antigen was also assayed for protection. All antigenic preparations induced significant levels of protection. The pl 4.0 was further analysed on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two sharp peaks of antigen, as detected by FRIEP, were eluted isocratically with 65% acetonitrile from a C-18 (aliphatic) column. Both peaks of antigen showed complete cross-reactivity on FRIEP and absorbed at 220 nm. Amino acid analysis of each HPLC peak revealed no detectable differences in composition. Each peak contained predominance of aspartic (13 mol%) and glutamic (18 mol%) acid. This antigen did not contain significant quantities of aromatic amino acids, and absorbed

  18. Characterisation of the ecotoxicity of hospital effluents: a review.

    PubMed

    Orias, Frédéric; Perrodin, Yves

    2013-06-01

    The multiple activities that take place in hospitals (surgery, drug treatments, radiology, cleaning of premises and linen, chemical and biological analysis laboratories, etc.), are a major source of pollutant emissions into the environment (disinfectants, detergents, drug residues, etc.). Most of these pollutants can be found in hospital effluents (HWW), then in urban sewer networks and WWTP (weakly adapted for their treatment) and finally in aquatic environments. In view to evaluating the impact of these pollutants on aquatic ecosystems, it is necessary to characterise their ecotoxicity. Several reviews have focused on the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of pollutants present in HWW. However, none have focused specifically on the characterisation of their experimental ecotoxicity. We have evaluated this according to two complementary approaches: (i) a "substance" approach based on the identification of the experimental data in the literature for different substances found in hospital effluents, and on the calculation of their PNEC (Predicted Non Effect Concentration), (ii) a "matrix" approach for which we have synthesised ecotoxicity data obtained from the hospital effluents directly. This work first highlights the diversity of the substances present within hospital effluents, and the very high ecotoxicity of some of them (minimum PNEC observed close to 0,01 pg/L). We also observed that the consumption of drugs in hospitals was a predominant factor chosen by authors to prioritise the compounds to be sought. Other criteria such as biodegradability, excretion rate and the bioaccumulability of pollutants are considered, though more rarely. Studies of the ecotoxicity of the particulate phase of effluents must also be taken into account. It is also necessary to monitor the effluents of each of the specialised departments of the hospital studied. These steps is necessary to define realistic environmental management policies for hospitals (replacement of

  19. New characterisation method of electrical and electronic equipment wastes (WEEE).

    PubMed

    Menad, N; Guignot, S; van Houwelingen, J A

    2013-03-01

    Innovative separation and beneficiation techniques of various materials encountered in electrical and electronic equipment wastes (WEEE) is a major improvement for its recycling. Mechanical separation-oriented characterisation of WEEE was conducted in an attempt to evaluate the amenability of mechanical separation processes. Properties such as liberation degree of fractions (plastics, metals ferrous and non-ferrous), which are essential for mechanical separation, are analysed by means of a grain counting approach. Two different samples from different recycling industries were characterised in this work. The first sample is a heterogeneous material containing different types of plastics, metals (ferrous and non-ferrous), printed circuit board (PCB), rubber and wood. The second sample contains a mixture of mainly plastics. It is found for the first sample that all aluminium particles are free (100%) in all investigated size fractions. Between 92% and 95% of plastics are present as free particles; however, 67% in average of ferromagnetic particles are liberated. It can be observed that only 42% of ferromagnetic particles are free in the size fraction larger than 20mm. Particle shapes were also quantified manually particle by particle. The results show that the particle shapes as a result of shredding, turn out to be heterogeneous, thereby complicating mechanical separation processes. In addition, the separability of various materials was ascertained by a sink-float analysis and eddy current separation. The second sample was separated by automatic sensor sorting in four different products: ABS, PC-ABS, PS and rest product. The fractions were characterised by using the methodology described in this paper. The results show that the grade and liberation degree of the plastic products ABS, PC-ABS and PS are close to 100%. Sink-float separation and infrared plastic identification equipment confirms the high plastic quality. On the basis of these findings, a global

  20. Characterising root trait variability in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinglong; Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Siddique, Kadambot Hm

    2017-04-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain legume crop but its sustainable production is challenged by predicted climate changes, which are likely to increase production limitations and uncertainty in yields. Characterising the variability in root architectural traits in a core collection of chickpea germplasm will provide the basis for breeding new germplasm with suitable root traits for the efficient acquisition of soil resources and adaptation to drought and other abiotic stresses. This study used a semi-hydroponic phenotyping system for assessing root trait variability across 270 chickpea genotypes. The genotypes exhibited large variation in rooting patterns and branching manner. Thirty root-related traits were characterised, 17 of which had coefficients of variation ≥0.3 among genotypes and were selected for further examination. The Pearson correlation matrix showed a strong correlation among most of the selected traits (P≤0.05). Principal component analysis revealed three principal components with eigenvalues >1 capturing 81.5% of the total variation. An agglomerative hierarchical clustering analysis, based on root trait variation, identified three genotype homogeneous groups (rescaled distance of 15) and 16 sub-groups (rescaled distance of 5). The chickpea genotypes characterised in this study with vastly different root properties could be used for further studies in glasshouses and field trials, and for molecular marker studies, gene mapping, and modelling simulations, ultimately aimed at breeding germplasm with root traits for improved adaptation to drought and other specific environments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  2. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  3. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  4. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  5. Structural Consensus among Antibodies Defines the Antigen Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kunik, Vered; Peters, Bjoern; Ofran, Yanay

    2012-01-01

    The Complementarity Determining Regions (CDRs) of antibodies are assumed to account for the antigen recognition and binding and thus to contain also the antigen binding site. CDRs are typically discerned by searching for regions that are most different, in sequence or in structure, between different antibodies. Here, we show that ∼20% of the antibody residues that actually bind the antigen fall outside the CDRs. However, virtually all antigen binding residues lie in regions of structural consensus across antibodies. Furthermore, we show that these regions of structural consensus which cover the antigen binding site are identifiable from the sequence of the antibody. Analyzing the predicted contribution of antigen binding residues to the stability of the antibody-antigen complex, we show that residues that fall outside of the traditionally defined CDRs are at least as important to antigen binding as residues within the CDRs, and in some cases, they are even more important energetically. Furthermore, antigen binding residues that fall outside of the structural consensus regions but within traditionally defined CDRs show a marginal energetic contribution to antigen binding. These findings allow for systematic and comprehensive identification of antigen binding sites, which can improve the understanding of antigenic interactions and may be useful in antibody engineering and B-cell epitope identification. PMID:22383868

  6. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product...

  7. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  8. Identification and Characterisation of a pH-stable GFP

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tania Michelle; Rudolf, Fabian; Meyer, Andreas; Pellaux, Rene; Whitehead, Ellis; Panke, Sven; Held, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are invaluable tools for modern cell biology. Even though many properties of GFP have been successfully engineered, a GFP retaining brightness at low pH has not emerged. This limits the use of GFP in quantitative studies performed in fluctuating or acidic conditions. We report the engineering and characterisation of tandem dimer GFP (pH-tdGFP), a bright and stable GFP that can be efficiently excited and maintains its fluorescence properties in acidic conditions. Therefore, pH-tdGFP could act as a quantitative marker for cellular processes that occur at low pH, such as endocytosis, autophagy or starvation. PMID:27324986

  9. Characterisation of bubble detectors for aircrew and space radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Green, A R; Bennett, L G I; Lewis, B J; Tume, P; Andrews, H R; Noulty, R A; Ing, H

    2006-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere acts as a natural radiation shield which protects terrestrial dwellers from the radiation environment encountered in space. In general, the intensity of this radiation field increases with distance from the ground owing to a decrease in the amount of atmospheric shielding. Neutrons form an important component of the radiation field to which the aircrew and spacecrew are exposed. In light of this, the neutron-sensitive bubble detector may be ideal as a portable personal dosemeter at jet altitudes and in space. This paper describes the ground-based characterisation of the bubble detector and the application of the bubble detector for the measurement of aircrew and spacecrew radiation exposure.

  10. Organic Phosphorus Characterisation in Agricultural Soils by Enzyme Addition Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosch, Klaus; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2013-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a non-renewable resource and it is a building block of many molecules indispensable for life. Up to 80 per cent of total soil P can be in organic form. Hydrolysability and thereby availability to plants and microorganisms differ strongly among the multitude of chemical forms of soil organic P. A recent approach to characterise organic P classes is the addition of specific enzymes which hydrolyse organic P to inorganic orthophosphate, making it detectable by colorimetry. Based on the substrate specificity of the added enzymes, conclusions about the hydrolysed forms of organic P can then be made. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability of enzyme addition assays for the characterisation of organic P species in soil:water suspensions of soils with differing properties. To this end, ten different soil samples originating from four continents, with variable pH (in water) values (4.2-8.0), land management (grassland or cropped land) and P fertilization intensity were analysed. Three different enzymes were used (acid phosphatase, nuclease and phytase). Acid phosphatase alone or in combination with nuclease was applied to determine the content of P in simple monoesters (monoester-like P) and P in DNA (DNA-like P), while P hydrolysed from myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (Ins6P-like P) was calculated from P release after incubation with phytase minus P release by acid phosphatase. To reduce sorption of inorganic P on soil particles of the suspension, especially in highly weathered soils, soil specific EDTA additions were determined in extensive pre-tests. The results of these pre-tests showed that recoveries of at least 30 per cent could be achieved in all soils. Thus, detection of even small organic P pools, such as DNA-like P, was possible in all soils if a suitable EDTA concentration was chosen. The enzyme addition assays provided information about the hydrolysable quantities of the different classes of soil organic P compounds as affected

  11. New characterisation method of electrical and electronic equipment wastes (WEEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Menad, N.; Guignot, S.; Houwelingen, J.A. van

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► A novel method of characterisation of components contained in WEEE has been developed. ► This technique was applied on several samples generated from different recycling plants. ► Handheld NIR and XRF were used to determine types of plastics and flame retardants. ► WEEE processing flow-sheet was suggested. - Abstract: Innovative separation and beneficiation techniques of various materials encountered in electrical and electronic equipment wastes (WEEE) is a major improvement for its recycling. Mechanical separation-oriented characterisation of WEEE was conducted in an attempt to evaluate the amenability of mechanical separation processes. Properties such as liberation degree of fractions (plastics, metals ferrous and non-ferrous), which are essential for mechanical separation, are analysed by means of a grain counting approach. Two different samples from different recycling industries were characterised in this work. The first sample is a heterogeneous material containing different types of plastics, metals (ferrous and non-ferrous), printed circuit board (PCB), rubber and wood. The second sample contains a mixture of mainly plastics. It is found for the first sample that all aluminium particles are free (100%) in all investigated size fractions. Between 92% and 95% of plastics are present as free particles; however, 67% in average of ferromagnetic particles are liberated. It can be observed that only 42% of ferromagnetic particles are free in the size fraction larger than 20 mm. Particle shapes were also quantified manually particle by particle. The results show that the particle shapes as a result of shredding, turn out to be heterogeneous, thereby complicating mechanical separation processes. In addition, the separability of various materials was ascertained by a sink–float analysis and eddy current separation. The second sample was separated by automatic sensor sorting in four different products: ABS, PC–ABS, PS and rest product. The

  12. Characterising soil surface roughness with a frequency modulated polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Manuel; Gronz, Oliver; Beiske, Joshua; Klein, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness is considered crucial for soil erosion as it determines the effective surface exposed to the raindrop impact. It regulates surface runoff velocity and it causes runoff concentration. But a comprehensive characterisation of the shape of the soils' surface is still difficult to achieve. Photographic systems and terrestrial laser-scanning are nowadays able to generate high resolution DEMs, but the derivation of roughness parameters is still not clear. Spaceborne radar systems are used for about 3 decades for earth survey. Spatial soil moisture distribution, ice sheet monitoring and earth-wide topographic survey are the main objectives of these radar systems, working generally with frequencies <10 GHz. Contrasting with this, technologies emitting frequencies up to 77 GHz are generally used for object tracking purposes. But it is known, that the reflection characteristics, such as intensity and polarisation, strongly depend on the properties of the target object. A new design of a frequency modulated continuous wave radar, emitting a right hand shaped circular polarization and receiving both polarization directions, right and left-hand shaped, is tested here for its ability to detect and quantify different surface roughness. The reflection characteristics of 4 different materials 1) steel, 2) sand (0,5-1 mm), 3) fine (2-4 mm) and 4) coarse (15-30 mm) rock-fragments and different roughness as well as moisture content are analysed. In addition, the signals are taken at 2 different angles to the soil's surface (90° and 70°). For quantification of the roughness, a photographic method (Structure-from-Motion) is applied to generate a detailed DEM and random roughness (RR) is calculated. To characterise the radar signal, different ratios of the reflected channels and polarisations are calculated. The signals show differences for all substrates, also clearly visible between sand and fine rock fragments, despite a wavelength of 1 cm of the

  13. Ratchet effect in an underdamped periodic potential and its characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Shantu

    2017-02-01

    Ratchet effect in a driven underdamped periodic potential system is studied. The presence of a space dependent and periodic friction coefficient, but with a phase difference with the symmetric periodic potential is shown to generate substantial ratchet current. The ratchet performance is characterised in terms of the various parameters of transport. The performance of this ratchet is compared with a ratchet with an underlying periodic and asymmetric potential. It is shown that an optimum combination of inhomogeneity in the system and asymmetry of the potential can substantially enhance the performance of an underdamped ratchet.

  14. Next Generation Characterisation of Cereal Genomes for Marker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Visendi, Paul; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David

    2013-01-01

    Cereal crops form the bulk of the world’s food sources, and thus their importance cannot be understated. Crop breeding programs increasingly rely on high-resolution molecular genetic markers to accelerate the breeding process. The development of these markers is hampered by the complexity of some of the major cereal crop genomes, as well as the time and cost required. In this review, we address current and future methods available for the characterisation of cereal genomes, with an emphasis on faster and more cost effective approaches for genome sequencing and the development of markers for trait association and marker assisted selection (MAS) in crop breeding programs. PMID:24833229

  15. Quantitative characterisation of audio data by ordinal symbolic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenbrenner, T.; Monetti, R.; Amigó, J. M.; Bunk, W.

    2013-06-01

    Ordinal symbolic dynamics has developed into a valuable method to describe complex systems. Recently, using the concept of transcripts, the coupling behaviour of systems was assessed, combining the properties of the symmetric group with information theoretic ideas. In this contribution, methods from the field of ordinal symbolic dynamics are applied to the characterisation of audio data. Coupling complexity between frequency bands of solo violin music, as a fingerprint of the instrument, is used for classification purposes within a support vector machine scheme. Our results suggest that coupling complexity is able to capture essential characteristics, sufficient to distinguish among different violins.

  16. Immunoprotection of Mice against Schistosomiasis Mansoni Using Solubilized Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Noya, Oscar; Brito, Beatríz; Ballén, Diana E.; Cesari, Italo M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis continues to be one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. Despite the existence of a highly effective antischistosome drug, the disease is spreading into new areas, and national control programs do not arrive to complete their tasks particularly in low endemic areas. The availability of a vaccine could represent an additional component to chemotherapy. Experimental vaccination studies are however necessary to identify parasite molecules that would serve as vaccine candidates. In the present work, C57BL/6 female mice were subcutaneously immunized with an n-butanol extract of the adult worm particulate membranous fraction (AWBE) and its protective effect against a S. mansoni challenge infection was evaluated. Methodology and Findings Water-saturated n-butanol release into the aqueous phase a set of membrane-associated (glyco)proteins that are variably recognized by antibodies in schistosome-infected patients; among the previously identified AWBE antigens there is Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP) which has been associated with resistance to the infection in mice. As compared to control, a significantly lower number of perfuse parasites was obtained in the immunized/challenged mouse group (P<0.05, t test); and consequently, a lower number of eggs and granulomas (with reduced sizes), overall decreasing pathology. Immunized mice produced high levels of sera anti-AWBE IgG recognizing antigens of ∼190-, 130-, 98-, 47-, 28-23, 14-, and 9-kDa. The ∼130-kDa band (the AP dimer) exhibited in situ SmAP activity after addition of AP substrate and the activity was not apparently inhibited by host antibodies. A preliminary proteomic analysis of the 25-, 27-, and 28-kDa bands in the immunodominant 28–23 kDa region suggested that they are composed of actin. Conclusions Immunization with AWBE induced the production of specific antibodies to various adult worm membrane molecules (including AP) and a partial (43%) protection against a

  17. Immunoprotection of mice against Schistosomiasis mansoni using solubilized membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Noya, Oscar; Brito, Beatríz; Ballén, Diana E; Cesari, Italo M

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis continues to be one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. Despite the existence of a highly effective antischistosome drug, the disease is spreading into new areas, and national control programs do not arrive to complete their tasks particularly in low endemic areas. The availability of a vaccine could represent an additional component to chemotherapy. Experimental vaccination studies are however necessary to identify parasite molecules that would serve as vaccine candidates. In the present work, C57BL/6 female mice were subcutaneously immunized with an n-butanol extract of the adult worm particulate membranous fraction (AWBE) and its protective effect against a S. mansoni challenge infection was evaluated. Water-saturated n-butanol release into the aqueous phase a set of membrane-associated (glyco)proteins that are variably recognized by antibodies in schistosome-infected patients; among the previously identified AWBE antigens there is Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP) which has been associated with resistance to the infection in mice. As compared to control, a significantly lower number of perfuse parasites was obtained in the immunized/challenged mouse group (P<0.05, t test); and consequently, a lower number of eggs and granulomas (with reduced sizes), overall decreasing pathology. Immunized mice produced high levels of sera anti-AWBE IgG recognizing antigens of ∼190-, 130-, 98-, 47-, 28-23, 14-, and 9-kDa. The ∼130-kDa band (the AP dimer) exhibited in situ SmAP activity after addition of AP substrate and the activity was not apparently inhibited by host antibodies. A preliminary proteomic analysis of the 25-, 27-, and 28-kDa bands in the immunodominant 28-23 kDa region suggested that they are composed of actin. Immunization with AWBE induced the production of specific antibodies to various adult worm membrane molecules (including AP) and a partial (43%) protection against a challenging S. mansoni infection by mechanism(s) that

  18. Characterisation of kidney lesions in early schistosomal-specific nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sobh, M A; Moustafa, F E; Sally, S M; Deelder, A M; Ghoniem, M A

    1988-01-01

    In this work 42 patients with active Schistosoma mansoni infection and renal involvement were examined. Of these, 16 had asymptomatic proteinuria (group I) and 26 had the nephrotic syndrome (group II). Fifteen nonschistosomal patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome were included as control cases (group III). Renal biopsy specimens were obtained from all patients and controls. These were examined by light microscopy (LM), by direct immunofluorescence microscopy using antisera against human IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4, C1q, and fibrinogen, and by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using monoclonal antibodies directed against the circulating schistosome antigens, circulating anodic antigen (CCA) and circulating cathodic antigen (CCA). Schistosomal-specific deposits were seen in the renal glomeruli in 24 of the 42 schistosomal patients but in none of the 15 control patients. Although schistosomal-specific deposits were seen in seven of the 16 patients presenting with asymptomatic proteinuria, no morphological changes could be seen by LM. On the other hand, schistosomal-specific deposits could be seen in the kidneys of 17 of the 26 patients presenting with the nephrotic syndrome. All but one specimen showed morphological changes when examined by LM. These were consistent with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis in seven, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in five, mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis in two, membranous glomerulonephritis in one, and focal segmental hyalinosis in one patient. The present study clearly suggests that (a) schistosomal-specific nephropathy does exist in human settings, (b) it is an immune complex disease, and (c) CAA and CCA are major responsible antigens.

  19. Preliminary Analysis of Photoreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Danielle S.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide a preliminary analysis of a reading strategy called PhotoReading. PhotoReading is a technique developed by Paul Scheele that claims to increase reading rate to 25,000 words per minute (Scheele, 1993). PhotoReading itself involves entering a "relaxed state" and looking at, but not reading, each page of a text for a brief moment (about I to 2 seconds). While this technique has received attention in the popular press, there had been no objective examinations of the technique's validity. To examine the effectiveness of PhotoReading, the principal investigator (i.e., trainee) participated in a PhotoReading workshop to learn the technique. Parallel versions of two standardized and three experimenter-created reading comprehension tests were administered to the trainee and an expert user of the PhotoReading technique to compare the use of normal reading strategies and the PhotoReading technique by both readers. The results for all measures yielded no benefits of using the PhotoReading technique. The extremely rapid reading rates claimed by PhotoReaders were not observed; indeed, the reading rates were generally comparable to those for normal reading. Moreover, the PhotoReading expert generally showed an increase in reading time when using the PhotoReading technique in comparison to when using normal reading strategies to process text. This increase in reading time when PhotoReading was accompanied by a decrease in text comprehension.

  20. Preliminary decommissioning study reports

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    Twenty-one low-level liquid radioactive waste collection and storage tanks are part of approximately 76 facilities currently managed by the ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). This program, as part of the DOE national SFMP, is responsible for the maintenance and surveillance and the final decommissioning of radioactively contaminated surplus ORNL facilities. A long range planning effort is being conducted that will outline the scope and objectives of the ORNL program and establish decommissioning priorities based on health and safety concerns, budget constraints, and other programmatic constraints. In support of this SFMP planning activity, preliminary engineering assessments are being conducted for each of the ORNL surplus facilities currently managed under the program. These efforts are designed to: (1) provide an initial assessment of the potential decommissioning alternatives; (2) choose a preferred alternative and provide a justification of the decommissioning plan, including cost and schedule estimates. D D of eight of the nine groups of surplus tanks are considered in this report.

  1. Preliminary reference Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziewonski, Adam M.; Anderson, Don L.

    1981-06-01

    A large data set consisting of about 1000 normal mode periods, 500 summary travel time observations, 100 normal mode Q values, mass and moment of inertia have been inverted to obtain the radial distribution of elastic properties, Q values and density in the Earth's interior. The data set was supplemented with a special study of 12 years of ISC phase data which yielded an additional 1.75 × 10 6 travel time observations for P and S waves. In order to obtain satisfactory agreement with the entire data set we were required to take into account anelastic dispersion. The introduction of transverse isotropy into the outer 220 km of the mantle was required in order to satisfy the shorter period fundamental toroidal and spheroidal modes. This anisotropy also improved the fit of the larger data set. The horizontal and vertical velocities in the upper mantle differ by 2-4%, both for P and S waves. The mantle below 220 km is not required to be anisotropic. Mantle Rayleigh waves are surprisingly sensitive to compressional velocity in the upper mantle. High S n velocities, low P n velocities and a pronounced low-velocity zone are features of most global inversion models that are suppressed when anisotropy is allowed for in the inversion. The Preliminary Reference Earth Model, PREM, and auxiliary tables showing fits to the data are presented.

  2. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tallóczy, Zsolt; Martinez, Jose; Joset, Danielle; Ray, Yonaton; Gácser, Attila; Toussi, Sima; Mizushima, Noboru; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Nosanchuk, Josh; Goldstein, Harris; Loike, John; Sulzer, David; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-02-08

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  3. Methamphetamine Inhibits Antigen Processing, Presentation, and Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Joset, Danielle; Ray, Yonaton; Gácser, Attila; Toussi, Sima; Mizushima, Noboru; Nosanchuk, Josh; Goldstein, Harris; Loike, John; Sulzer, David; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal–lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology. PMID:18282092

  4. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  5. Recovery of antigenically reactive HIV-2 cores.

    PubMed

    Chrystie, I L; Almeida, J D

    1989-03-01

    Negative staining studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been hampered by the fragile nature of the particles. Although detergent treatment is capable of releasing cores from HIV-2 particles, these are unstable and do not retain morphological integrity. Addition of glutaraldehyde will stabilise these structures but, if used at too high a concentration, will destroy their antigenicity. This study shows that if both detergent and glutaraldehyde are used in correct proportions, antigenically reactive cores can be recovered from HIV-2 cell cultures. More specifically we show that a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P40 and 0.1% glutaraldehyde produces preparations of HIV-2 cores that are suitable for immune electron microscopy. These cores reacted positively, that is, formed immune complexes, with both human HIV-2 antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody that, although directed against p24 (HIV-1), reacts also with p25 (HIV-2).

  6. Prevalence of Pilus Antigens, Enterotoxin Types, and Enteropathogenicity Among K88-Negative Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from Neonatal Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Moon, H. W.; Kohler, E. M.; Schneider, R. A.; Whipp, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that were isolated from neonatal pigs and that did not react in preliminary tests for pilus antigen K88 were subjected to additional tests for K88 and for pilus antigens K99 and 987P. Four such isolates produced K88, 9 isolates produced K99, 55 isolates produced 987P, and the remaining 43 isolates produced none of the three pilus antigens (3P−). Immunofluorescence tests of ileal sections from pigs were more sensitive for 987P detection than was serum agglutination of bacteria grown from the ileum. Most ETEC that produced K88, K99, or 987P were enteropathogenic (adhered to ileal villi, colonized intensively, and caused profuse diarrhea) when given to neonatal pigs. In contrast, only 3 of the 43 ETEC that produced none of the pilus antigens were enteropathogenic. The isolates were also tested for the type of enterotoxin produced. The K88+ isolates all produced heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) detectable in cultured adrenal cells (i.e., were LT+). None of the 987P+, K99+, or enterpathogenic 3P− isolates produced LT. However (except for a single K99+ isolate), they all produced heat-stable enterotoxin detectable in infant mice (STa+). Sixteen isolates produced neither LT nor STa but did produce enterotoxin detectable in ligated intestinal loops of pigs (STb). Most of these LT− STa− STb+ isolates were also K88−, K99−, and 987P− and non-enteropathogenic. One of them was K99+ and enteropathogenic. Our conclusions are as follows. (i) Most enteropathogenic ETEC from neonatal pigs produce either K88, 987P, or K99; however, there are some that produce none of the three antigens. (ii) Immunofluorescence tests for pilus antigens produced in vivo are recommended for the diagnosis of ETEC infections. (iii) Reports of LT− STa− STb+ swine ETEC are confirmed; furthermore, such isolates can be enteropathogenic. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6102079

  7. The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the signal transduction and antigen processing functions of the B cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Chaohong; FALLEN, Margaret K.; MILLER, Heather; UPADHYAYA, Arpita; SONG, Wenxia

    2014-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is the sensor on the B cell surface that surveys foreign molecules (antigen) in our bodies and activates B cells to generate antibody responses upon encountering cognate antigen. The binding of antigen to the BCR induces signaling cascades in the cytoplasm, which provides the first signal for B cell activation. Subsequently, BCRs internalize and target bound antigen to endosomes, where antigen is processed into T cell recognizable forms. T helper cells generate the second activation signal upon binding to antigen presented by B cells. The optimal activation of B cells requires both signals, thereby depending on the coordination of BCR signaling and antigen transport functions. Antigen binding to the BCR also induces rapid remodeling of the cortical actin network of B cells. While being initiated and controlled by BCR signaling, recent studies reveal that this actin remodeling is critical for both the signaling and antigen processing functions of the BCR, indicating a role for actin in coordinating these two pathways. Here we will review previous and recent studies on actin reorganization during BCR activation and BCR-mediated antigen processing, and discuss how actin remodeling translates BCR signaling into rapid antigen uptake and processing while providing positive and negative feedback to BCR signaling. PMID:24999354

  8. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferroir, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grün, E.; Hoppe, P.; Kearsley, A.; Lemelle, L.; Leroux, H.; Lettieri, R.; Marchant, W.; Mendez, B.; Nittler, L. R.; Ogliore, R.; Postberg, F.; Sandford, S. A.; Schmitz, S.; Silversmit, G.; Simionovici, A.; Srama, R.; Stadermann, F. J.; Stephan, T.; Stroud, R. M.; Susini, J.; Sutton, S.; Trieloff, M.; Tsou, P.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Tyliczszak, T.; Vekemans, B.; Vincze, L.; Warren, J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the Stardust interstellar dust collection and collector using non-destructive techniques. We summarize the status of the ISPE.

  9. Synthesis, characterisation and preliminary investigation of the haemocompatibility of polyethyleneimine-grafted carboxymethyl chitosan for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Mo, Yunfei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming; Wang, Changyong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-05-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. In the present study, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) was prepared by chitosan (CS) alkalisation and carboxymethylation reactions. Then polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted to the backbone of CMCS by an amidation reaction. The CMCS-PEI copolymer showed strong complexation capability with DNA to form nanoparticles, and achieved lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency compared with PEI (25 kDa) towards 293T and 3T3 cells. Moreover, the haemocompatibility of the CMCS-PEI copolymer was investigated through the aggregation, morphology and lysis of human red blood cells (RBCs), along with the impact on the clotting function with activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT) and thromboelastographic (TEG) assays. The results demonstrated that the CMCS-PEI copolymer with a concentration lower than 0.05 mg/mL had little impact on the aggregation, morphology or lysis of RBCs, or on blood coagulation. Therefore, the copolymer may be a strong alternative candidate as an effective and safe non-viral vector.

  10. The radiometal makes a difference. Synthesis and preliminary characterisation of DOTA-minigastrin analogue complexes with Ga, Lu and Y.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Michał; Garnuszek, Piotr; Baran, Piotr; Pawlak, Dariusz; Mikołajczak, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The minigastrin analogue - CP04: DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 has been developed for CCK2R targeting. This analogue can be radiolabelled with 111In or 68Ga for imaging, or with 90Y and 177Lu for therapy. However, affinity of the chelator-peptide conjugates to the cell membrane receptors may vary depending on the metal incorporated into the complex. So far, there are no such studies for the ligands of gastrin/cholecystokinin receptor CCK2R. It is supposed that the reason for the differentiation of receptor affinity to the respective receptors is in the changes of structure of chelating system and their influence on the bioactive conformations of the metal conjugated peptides. Herein, we report on the radiolabeling of CP04 with 90Y, 177Lu and 68Ga and synthesis of cold CP04 complexes with respective stable metals for further structural and physico-chemical and biological studies. From 200 to 600 MBq of 90Y, 177Lu or 68Ga were used for radiolabelling of 20 μg of CP04 dissolved in ascorbic acid solution (50 mg/mL, pH 4.5). Non-radioactive complexes with Lu and Ga were synthesized in milligram amounts starting from 0.5 mg up to 5 mg of CP04 dissolved in ascorbic acid solution (50 mg/mL, pH 4.5) when using 2-molar excess of the metal ions. Complex formation needed 5 min in microwave oven or 12 min in thermo-block at 95°C. RP-HPLC isocratic method (Kinetex 150/4.6 mm; 25% AcN/0.1% TFA, 1 mL/min) with UV/Vis and radiometric detection was developed for investigation of the radiolabelled and "cold" complexes. For LC-MS investigations, HPLC method was modified replacing TFA by formic acid. Yields of CP04 radiolabelling were greater than 90% for all three radionuclides. The HPLC method enabled identification of these radio-complexes based on comparison to their non-radioactive equivalents. In all cases, chromatograms revealed peaks that could be attributed to the metal-CP04 complexes and to impurities (including methionine oxidation). LC-MS analysis of Ga and Lu complexes revealed conformity of the observed molecular ions to the predicted formulas (m/z 2116 and 2220 Da for Ga and Lu, respectively). Different chromatographic behaviour observed for Ga-CP04 complex comparing to Lu- and Y- labelled peptide (relative retention to CP04: 1.08, 0.86 and 0.85, respectively) suggest different coordination of the metal ions. Therefore, further studies are planned using the non-radioactive complexes in order to assess their structural conformations.

  11. Synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation of a new class of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs).

    PubMed

    Lolli, Marco L; Rolando, Barbara; Tosco, Paolo; Chaurasia, Shilpi; Di Stilo, Antonella; Lazzarato, Loretta; Gorassini, Eva; Ferracini, Riccardo; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2010-04-01

    A new series of bisphosphonates bearing either the nitrogen-containing NO-donor furoxan (1,2,5-oxadiazole 2-oxide) system or the related furazan (1,2,5-oxadiazole) in lateral chain has been developed. pK(a) values and affinity for hydroxyapatite were determined for all the compounds. The products were able to inhibit osteoclastogenesis on RAW 246.7 cells at 10microM concentration. The most active compounds were further assayed on human PBMC cells and on rat microsomes. Unlike most nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates which target farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, experimental and theoretical investigations suggest that the activity of our derivatives may be related to different mechanisms. The furoxan derivatives were also tested for their ability to relax rat aorta strips in view of their potential NO-dependent vasodilator properties.

  12. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garion, C.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Machiocha, W.; Morrone, M.

    2015-12-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb-1). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the supporting system that has to minimise the heat inleak into the cold mass. The behaviour during a magnet quench is also presented.

  13. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Boisen, Matt L; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B; Millett, Molly M; Nelson, Diana S; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Fusco, Marnie L; Abelson, Dafna M; Oda, Shun-Ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W; Geisbert, Joan B; Geisbert, Thomas W; Kulakosky, Peter C; Grant, Donald S; Shaffer, Jeffery G; Schieffelin, John S; Wilson, Russell B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F; Khan, S Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R

    2015-10-01

    Throughout the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus-specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726