Science.gov

Sample records for prenatal record revision

  1. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    Title 44 US Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ``Management and Use of Information and Records,`` and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA`s General Records Schedule (dated August 1995).

  2. Effectiveness of the Revised Ontario School Record System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Edward H.; Elwood, Bryan C.

    Results of a study conducted for the Ministry of Education (Ontario) and designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Ontario School Record System (OSR) as revised in 1973 are reported in this paper. In order to evaluate the OSR's effectiveness, the study team examined educators', parents and students' perceived needs for student information,…

  3. 77 FR 15835 - Privacy Act of 1974: Revision of Privacy Act System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974: Revision of Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of Revision of Privacy Act Systems of Records. SUMMARY: SBA is revising the Privacy Act Systems of Records for the Loan System, SBA 21 (``SOR 21'') and the Suspension and...

  4. Relationship between Revised Graduated Index (R-GINDEX) of prenatal care utilization & preterm labor and low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, Tahereh; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Ahmad Shirvani, Marjan; Dayhimi, Marjaneh; Danesh, Mahmonir

    2014-02-28

    Prenatal care refers to accurate and consistent performance of the principles important to maintain healthy pregnancy outcomes and also for mother and child health. One of the new indices to assess the adequacy of care is Revised Graduated Index of Prenatal Care Utilization (R-GINDEX).The study aims to assess the relationship between quantitative prenatal care factors and preterm labor and low birth weight using R-GINDEX. This historical cohort study has been conducted on 420 mothers during the first two years after delivery in 2010. The adequacy of care was calculated by R-GINDEX. Based on this index, participants have been divided into three care groups including inadequate, adequate and intensive care groups. A significant relationship has been found between R-GINDEX and preterm birth and low birth weight (P<0.05). Thus the probability of premature labor in inadequate care group (RR=3.93) and low birth weight (RR= 2.53) was higher than that of the adequate and intensive care group. The results showed that the quantity of prenatal care is effective in reducing preterm birth and low birth weight.

  5. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Initially published by the Children's Bureau in 1913, this pamphlet has been revised frequently. Its purpose is to point out the importance of medical care during pregnancy. Comfortable pregnancies, easy labor, and better care for their new infants are the usual concerns of prospective mothers. Consequently, this 1962 edition of "Prenatal Care"…

  6. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility computer software release cover sheet and revision record

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, R.J.

    1994-11-28

    This supporting document contains the computer software release cover sheet and revision records for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). The previous revision was controlled by CH2M Hill which developed the software. A 7-page listing of the contents of directory C:{backslash}TEDF is contained in this report.

  7. 75 FR 8731 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Revisions to the Existing System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Revisions to the Existing System of Records... Privacy Act System of Records Notice in its inventory of records systems subject to the Privacy Act of...) database and related files, as well as add their system owner and system location to the existing...

  8. 78 FR 65884 - 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record Certification Criteria: Revision to the Definition of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB91 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record Certification Criteria: Revision to the Definition of ``Common Meaningful Use (MU) Data...

  9. The Early Cretaceous Sulfur Isotope Record: New Data, Revised Ages, and Updated Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristall, B.; Hurtgen, M.; Sageman, B. B.; Jacobson, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Early Cretaceous is a time of significant transformation with the continued break-up of Pangea, the emplacement of several LIPs, and a climatic shift from a cool greenhouse to a warm greenhouse. The timing of these major events and their relationship to seawater geochemistry (as recorded in isotope records) is critical for understanding changes in global biogeochemical cycles during this time. Within this context, recent revisions to the Cretaceous portion of the geologic timescale necessitate a reevaluation of the Cretaceous S isotope record as recorded in marine barite (Paytan et al., 2004). We present a revised Early Cretaceous S isotope record and present new δ34Sbarite data that extend the record further back in time and provide more detail during two major S isotope shifts of the Early Cretaceous. The new data maintain the major ~5‰ negative shift but raise questions on the timing and structure of this perturbation. Furthermore, recently updated estimates for global rates of marine microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) (Bowles et al., 2014) and sulfate burial during the Phanerozoic (Halevy et al., 2012) require notable revisions in the fluxes and isotopic values used to model the global S cycle. We present a revised global S cycle box model and reconstruct the evolution of the Early Cretaceous S isotope record primarily through perturbations in volcanic and hydrothermal fluxes (e.g., submarine LIPs). Changes to the weathering and pyrite burial fluxes and the global integrated fractionation factor for MSR are also used to modulate, balance, and smooth the LIP-driven perturbation. The massive evaporite burial during the Late Aptian post dates the major -5‰ shift and has little affect on the modeled S isotope composition of seawater sulfate, despite causing a major drop in sulfate concentration. The S cycle box model is coupled to a Sr cycle box model to provide additional constraints on the magnitude and timing of perturbations within the S isotope record.

  10. Pregnancy Outcome following Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Anomaly: A Record Linkage Study of 26,261 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Sally-Ann; McGowan, Ruth; Nelson, Scott M.; Pell, Jill P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the influence of changes in the age at which women give birth, and of developments in prenatal screening and diagnosis on the number of pregnancies diagnosed and terminated with chromosomal anomalies. However, we are unaware of any population studies examining pregnancy terminations after diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies that has included all aneuploidies and the influence of maternal factors. The aims of this study were to examine the association between results of prenatal tests and pregnancy termination, and the proportion of foetuses with and without chromosomal anomalies referred for invasive diagnostic tests over time. Diagnostic information of 26,261 prenatal invasive tests from all genetic service laboratories in Scotland from 2000 to 2011 was linked to Scottish Morbidity Records to obtain details on pregnancy outcome. Binary logistic regression was carried out to test the associations of year and type of diagnosis with pregnancy termination, while controlling for maternal age, neighbourhood deprivation and parity. There were 24,155 (92.0%) with no chromosomal anomalies, 1,483 (5.6%) aneuploidy diagnoses, and 623 (2.4%) diagnoses of anomaly that was not aneuploidy (including translocations and single chromosome deletions). In comparison with negative test results, pregnancies diagnosed with trisomy were most likely to be terminated (adjusted OR 437.40, 95% CI 348.19–549.46) followed by other aneuploid anomalies (adjusted OR 95.94, 95% CI 69.21–133.01). During the study period, fewer pregnancies that were diagnosed with aneuploidy were terminated, including trisomy diagnoses (adjusted OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26–0.73). Older women were less likely to terminate (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.28, 0.42), and parity was also an independent predictor of termination. In keeping with previous findings, while the number of invasive diagnostic tests declined, the proportion of abnormal results increased from 6.09% to 10.88%. Systematic

  11. The Impact of the Revised Sunspot Record on Solar Irradiance Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Krivova, N.; Wu, C. J.; Lean, J.

    2016-11-01

    Reliable historical records of the total solar irradiance (TSI) are needed to assess the extent to which long-term variations in the Sun's radiant energy that is incident upon Earth may exacerbate (or mitigate) the more dominant warming in recent centuries that is due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. We investigate the effects that the new Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (SILSO) sunspot-number time series may have on model reconstructions of the TSI. In contemporary TSI records, variations on timescales longer than about a day are dominated by the opposing effects of sunspot darkening and facular brightening. These two surface magnetic features, retrieved either from direct observations or from solar-activity proxies, are combined in TSI models to reproduce the current TSI observational record. Indices that manifest solar-surface magnetic activity, in particular the sunspot-number record, then enable reconstructing historical TSI. Revisions of the sunspot-number record therefore affect the magnitude and temporal structure of TSI variability on centennial timescales according to the model reconstruction methods that are employed. We estimate the effects of the new SILSO record on two widely used TSI reconstructions, namely the NRLTSI2 and the SATIRE models. We find that the SILSO record has little effect on either model after 1885, but leads to solar-cycle fluctuations with greater amplitude in the TSI reconstructions prior. This suggests that many eighteenth- and nineteenth-century cycles could be similar in amplitude to those of the current Modern Maximum. TSI records based on the revised sunspot data do not suggest a significant change in Maunder Minimum TSI values, and from comparing this era to the present, we find only very small potential differences in the estimated solar contributions to the climate with this new sunspot record.

  12. [Precariousness of records of prenatal care in a basic health unit in the city of Ribeirao Preto-SP].

    PubMed

    do Oba M das, D; Tavares, M S

    1998-01-01

    This survey aimed at characterizing the population of pregnant women utilizing prenatal care services of a Basic Health Unit in the city of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil in July 1995 and analyzing the records of the service given to pregnant women who went to this Unit in terms of general and specific anamnesis, general and tocogynecological physical examination and the diagnostic procedures used in this service. The records showed a lack of information about patients' general and specific anamnesis, general and tocogynecological physical examination and clinical condition, characterizing a more ritualistic procedure. Therefore, records did not meet the objectives proposed by the Program for Comprehensive Women Health Care of the Ribeirão Preto City Health Department with the São Paulo State Health Department and the Health Ministry: to ensure good quality in women's care service regarding their clinical, gynecological, obstetric and mental needs; to identify, prevent, and control risk factors which may affect women's health; to diagnose and treat women's pathologies as soon as possible, among others.

  13. Record of Technical Change - Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-04-13

    Record of Technical Change, Technical Change No. CAP-1, dated April 13, 2005 for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, September 2004, DOE/NV--1003.

  14. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses: Relationships between annual limits on intake and prenatal doses. Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    This addendum describes approaches for calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from maternal intakes of radionuclides at levels corresponding to fractions or multiples of the Annual Limits on Intake (ALI). Information, concerning metabolic or dosimetric characteristics and the placental transfer of selected, occupationally significant radionuclides was presented in NUREG/CR-5631, Revision 1. That information was used to estimate levels of radioactivity in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry. Extension of MIRD methodology to accommodate gestational-stage-dependent characteristics allowed dose calculations for the simplified situation based on introduction of 1 {mu}Ci into the woman`s transfer compartment (blood). The expanded scenarios in this addendum include repeated or chronic ingestion or inhalation intakes by a woman during pregnancy and body burdens at the beginning of pregnancy. Tables present dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus relative to intakes of these radionuclides in various chemical or physical forms and from preexisting maternal burdens corresponding to ALI; complementary intake values (fraction of an ALI and {mu}Ci) that yield a dose equivalent of 0.05 rem are included. Similar tables give these measures of dose equivalency to the uterus from intakes of radionuclides for use as surrogates for embryo/fetus dose when biokinetic information is not available.

  15. Revising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, Linda, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    In focusing on recursive writing, the nine articles in this journal issue suggest that student writing should be taken seriously. The first article states that revision should occur throughout the writing process while the second discusses how to invite writers to become active readers of their own texts. The third article presents methods of…

  16. 76 FR 66950 - Privacy Act; Notice of Revision of System of Records, the Single Family Housing Enterprise Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act; Notice of Revision of System of Records, the Single Family Housing... Federal Register about one of its record systems, the Single Family Housing Enterprise Data Warehouse... (202) 402-8087 or Mary Jo Sullivan, System Owner, Director, Office of Single Family Program...

  17. The Impact of the Revised Sunspot Record on Solar Irradiance Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Krivova, N.; Lean, J.; Wu, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the expected effects of the new sunspot number time series on proxy model based reconstructions of the total solar irradiance (TSI), which is largely explained by the opposing effects of dark sunspots and bright faculae. Regressions of indices for facular brightening and sunspot darkening with time series of direct TSI observations during the recent 37-year spacecraft TSI measurement era determine the relative contributions from each. Historical TSI reconstructions are enabled by extending these proxy models back in time prior to the start of the measurement record using a variety of solar activity indices including the sunspot number time series alone prior to 1882. Such reconstructions are critical for Earth climate research, which requires knowledge of the incident energy from the Sun to assess climate sensitivity to the natural influence of solar variability. Two prominent TSI reconstructions that utilize the sunspot record starting in 1610 are the NRLTSI and the SATIRE models. We review the indices that each currently uses and estimate the effects the revised sunspot record has on these reconstructions.

  18. Keeping the Business Records. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 15. Research & Development Series No. 240CB15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on keeping business records, the 15th of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the other materials at…

  19. 75 FR 34714 - Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure Realignment Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure Realignment Decisions AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of availability (NOA). SUMMARY:...

  20. Revised Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Summit/Westward Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-10-21

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to amend its July 25, 2003, Record of Decision (ROD) regarding the proposed Summit/Westward Project (Project) to offer contract terms for an optional interconnection of this Project into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Under this optional interconnection plan, BPA would integrate electric power from the Project into the FCRTS at a point adjacent to Clatskanie People's Utility District (CPUD) existing Wauna Substation. In order to deliver power to this location, CPUD would develop a new substation (Bradbury Substation) at a site near the Project and a new 230-kV transmission line from there to CPUD's Wauna Substation, which is already connected to the FCRTS. As part of this revised decision, BPA will facilitate CPUD development of the Bradbury-Wauna transmission line by allowing joint use of BPA right-of-way. This will involve reconstructing a section of BPA's 115-kV Allston-Astoria No. 1 transmission line from single-circuit H-frame wood-pole design to double-circuit single metal pole design. Terms of BPA participation in CPUD's development of the Bradbury-Wauna transmission line will be documented in a Construction Agreement. This optional interconnection plan is in addition to BPA's previous offer for interconnection of the Project at BPA's Allston Substation, as documented in the July 25, 2003, ROD. As with the initial interconnection plan, the decision to offer terms to interconnect the Project through the optional interconnection plan is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 1995). This decision thus is similarly tiered to the Business Plan ROD.

  1. Revised estimates of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ variations based on the tree ring /sup 13/C record

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, T.H.; Freyer, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    The composite mean /sup 13/C record for the Northern Hemisphere was revised. The overall decrease of delta /sup 13/C from 1800 to 1980 was estimated to be about -1.5/sup 0///sub 00/, which is 0.5/sup 0///sub 00/ less than the previous estimate. Therefore, the contribution of /sup 13/C-depleted CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere from the forest and soil source was reevaluated, using the modified box-diffusion ocean model and Freyer's revised /sup 13/C record. On the basis of the assumption that this revised tree ring /sup 13/C record represents changes in the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio induced in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ due to deforestation and soil manipulation and combustion of fossil fuels, the following results are obtained: (1) the magnitude of the integrated CO/sub 2/ release from the terrestrial biosphere since 1800 is about 90% of that from fossil fuel; (2) over the two-decade period covered by the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO/sub 2/ record, the input from the forest plus soil source is about 15% of that from fossil fuels; (3) the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C trend over the last two decades has been dominated by the input of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/; and (4) the pre-1850 atmospheric CO/sub 2/ content is estimated to be about 266 x 10/sup -6/ atm. 15 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  2. Copyright Information: Record Maintenace and Retention Procedures; Revised Interlibrary Loan Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catholic Library World, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are discussed for the creation, use, and retention of a form for interlibrary loans which meets the requirements of the new copyright laws. A facsimile of the revised interlibrary loan form is included. (MBR)

  3. Revision of the Afrotropical Mayrellinae (Cynipoidea, Liopteridae), with the first record of Paramblynotus from Madagascar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Paramblynotus Cameron from the Afrotropical region is revised including the description of the following eight new species: Paramblynotus alexandriensis Buffington & van Noort sp. nov.; Paramblynotus bayangensis van Noort & Buffington sp. nov.; Paramblynotus behara van Noort & Buffington s...

  4. Revision and Validation of the Individual Child Engagement Record: A Practitioner-Friendly Measure of Learning Opportunities for Children with Disabilities in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Yuriko; Kemp, Coral; Carter, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to revise and validate the "Individual Child Engagement Record" (ICER), an instrument designed to observe and measure the engagement of children with disabilities in early childhood settings. Method: The ICER was revised with reference to pilot study results and the literature. Inter-observer…

  5. Reliability of Reported Maternal Smoking: Comparing the Birth Certificate to Maternal Worksheets and Prenatal and Hospital Medical Records, New York City and Vermont, 2009.

    PubMed

    Howland, Renata E; Mulready-Ward, Candace; Madsen, Ann M; Sackoff, Judith; Nyland-Funke, Michael; Bombard, Jennifer M; Tong, Van T

    2015-09-01

    Maternal smoking is captured on the 2003 US Standard Birth Certificate based on self-reported tobacco use before and during pregnancy collected on post-delivery maternal worksheets. Study objectives were to compare smoking reported on the birth certificate to maternal worksheets and prenatal and hospital medical records. The authors analyzed a sample of New York City (NYC) and Vermont women (n = 1,037) with a live birth from January to August 2009 whose responses to the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey were linked with birth certificates and abstracted medical records and maternal worksheets. We calculated smoking prevalence and agreement (kappa) between sources overall and by maternal and hospital characteristics. Smoking before and during pregnancy was 13.7 and 10.4% using birth certificates, 15.2 and 10.7% using maternal worksheets, 18.1 and 14.1% using medical records, and 20.5 and 15.0% using either maternal worksheets or medical records. Birth certificates had "almost perfect" agreement with maternal worksheets for smoking before and during pregnancy (κ = 0.92 and 0.89) and "substantial" agreement with medical records (κ = 0.70 and 0.74), with variation by education, insurance, and parity. Smoking information on NYC and Vermont birth certificates closely agreed with maternal worksheets but was underestimated compared with medical records, with variation by select maternal characteristics. Opportunities exist to improve birth certificate smoking data, such as reducing the stigma of smoking, and improving the collection, transcription, and source of information.

  6. Effectiveness of Revised Pharmacology Record Books as a Teaching-Learning Method for Second Year Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhar, Reneega

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The goal of teaching medical undergraduates Pharmacology is to form a sound foundation of therapeutics. The pharmacology record books are maintained as a part of the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to obtain feedback of the medical students about the new record adopted in the institution after major revision Materials and Methods This was a questionnaire based study done in a Government Medical College of Kerala in February 2013. The data was analysed using SPSS. The feedback on clinical pharmacology exercises was given positive and negative scores. Results Majority (64.5%) opined that the content in pharmacology record was good. A total of 78.1% completed the record during discussions in practical classes. Majority wrote the records for understanding pharmacology. For 79.8% General Pharmacology exercises were most relevant, 33.8% considered Clinical Pharmacology exercises to be the most thought provoking. Drug use in special groups received the maximum positive score. Conclusion The new improved pharmacology record is an effective teaching-learning method. Inclusion of more clinically oriented exercises has increased the interest of the students in the subject. PMID:26894083

  7. 75 FR 43709 - Privacy Act of 1974; New and Revised Systems of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... to republish and update all existing systems of records in their entirety, to change the name of one system of records and to publish three new systems of records. DATES: These changes become effective as... Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB). ADDRESSES: Send comments to Beatrice...

  8. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Screening Tests FAQ165, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  9. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ164, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  10. School Administration Handbook for Approved Schools for Medical Record Technicians. Revised April 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Medical Record Librarians, Chicago, IL.

    These guidelines are for the development and operation of approved programs to prepare medical record technicians. "School Approval" discusses the cooperative roles of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education and the American Association of Medical Record Librarians (AAMRL) in connection with program approval,…

  11. 77 FR 62059 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Revisions to Existing Systems of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... management functions of the NTSB; 3. Disclosure to the National Finance Center for the Thrift Savings Plan... support of the function for which the NTSB collects and maintains the records, or for related personnel management functions or manpower studies. In addition, the NTSB may use these records to locate...

  12. 78 FR 20108 - Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of Revised System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... to ensure that they are relevant, necessary, accurate, up-to-date, and covered by the appropriate legal or regulatory authority. This notice is an updated Privacy Act system of records notice. DATES... reviewed this Privacy Act system of records notice to ensure that it is relevant, necessary, accurate,...

  13. 76 FR 62035 - Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of Proposed Privacy Act System of Records Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... of a system of records that is maintained for the purpose of the Radiation Safety Management System (RSMS). The RSMS was developed by the Radiation Safety Division, a component of USDA's DM, as a tool for the management of the USDA's radiation safety information and records. The RSMS is an online,...

  14. Supervised Occupational Experience Record Forms for Ornamental Horticulture. (Revised) Master Set. 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, R. W.; And Others

    The worksheets have been developed for use with any production occupational or work experience record book for high school vocational agriculture programs. Separate units have been developed for each of 11 areas in ornamental horticulture, so the student and teacher can select the appropriate one, or several, for the experiences planned by the…

  15. A revised 1000 year atmospheric δ13C-CO2 record from Law Dome and South Pole, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Allison, C. E.; Battle, M. O.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, L. P.; Curran, M.; Bender, M.; White, J. W. C.; Jenk, T. M.; Blunier, T.; Francey, R. J.

    2013-08-01

    We present new measurements of δ13C of CO2 extracted from a high-resolution ice core from Law Dome (East Antarctica), together with firn measurements performed at Law Dome and South Pole, covering the last 150 years. Our analysis is motivated by the need to better understand the role and feedback of the carbon (C) cycle in climate change, by advances in measurement methods, and by apparent anomalies when comparing ice core and firn air δ13C records from Law Dome and South Pole. We demonstrate improved consistency between Law Dome ice, South Pole firn, and the Cape Grim (Tasmania) atmospheric δ13C data, providing evidence that our new record reliably extends direct atmospheric measurements back in time. We also show a revised version of early δ13C measurements covering the last 1000 years, with a mean preindustrial level of -6.50‰. Finally, we use a Kalman Filter Double Deconvolution to infer net natural CO2 fluxes between atmosphere, ocean, and land, which cause small δ13C deviations from the predominant anthropogenically induced δ13C decrease. The main features found from the previous δ13C record are confirmed, including the ocean as the dominant cause for the 1940 A.D. CO2 leveling. Our new record provides a solid basis for future investigation of the causes of decadal to centennial variations of the preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentration. Those causes are of potential significance for predicting future CO2 levels and when attempting atmospheric verification of recent and future global carbon emission mitigation measures through Coupled Climate Carbon Cycle Models.

  16. Project Records Information System (PRIS) user`s manual. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Cline, B.E.; Smith, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    The Project Records Information System (PRIS) is an interactive system developed for the Information Services Division (ISD) of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to perform indexing, maintenance, and retrieval of information about Engineering project record documents for which they are responsible. This PRIS User`s Manual provides instruction on the use of this system. Section 2.0 of this manual presents an overview of PRIS, describing the system`s purpose; the data that it handles; functions it performs; hardware, software, and access; and help and error functions. Section 3.0 describes the interactive menu-driven operation of PRIS. Appendixes A, B, and C contain help screens, report descriptions, and the data dictionary, respectively.

  17. Taxonomic Changes, Revised Occurrence Records and Notes on the Culicidae of Thailand and Neighboring Countries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    previously has not been recorded from Thailand, Gass ct al. (1982, 1983) reported this species to be the dominant Mansonia species in their study site in...On a collection ofanopheline and culicine mosquitoes from Siam. Rec. Malaria Surv. India 2:269-285. Bhat, H.R. 1975a. A survey of haematophagous arthro ...ecological notes. Indian J. Med. Res. 63:1583-1608. Bhat, H.R. 1975h. A survey of haematophagous arthro - pods in Western Himalayas, Sikkim and Hill

  18. Revision of the Afrotropical Lycorininae (Ichneumonidae; Hymenoptera) II. Three new Lycorina species and additional distribution records.

    PubMed

    Rousse, P; Van Noort, S

    2014-11-14

    Three new Afrotropical Lycorina species are described: L. horstmanni sp. nov., L. jacksonfive sp. nov. and L. riftensis sp. nov. The description of L. globiceps is expanded to include the large variability of the colour pattern. New distribution records are provided for L. fici and L. globiceps. An illustrated dichotomous key, and an online interactive matrix key available on www.waspweb.org, are provided for the identification of the seven known Afrotropical Lycorininae species.

  19. Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    This booklet is the first in a series of publications designed to provide parents with useful information about childrearing. Contents are organized into three parts. Part I focuses on the pregnancy, prenatal care, development of the baby, pregnant lifestyles, nutrition, common discomforts, and problems of pregnancy. Part II provides information…

  20. [Prenatal medicine and prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Valero de Bernabé Martín de Eugenio, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis universalization allows knowing the prognostic possibilities in a situation of limited therapeutical resources. Therefore, besides permitting the peace of a normal fetal development, in other circumstances it can provoke parent's requirement to interrupt pregnancy in cases of malformation or chromosomal alteration, situations that parents may conceive as difficult for child's life and family environment. Diagnostic tests reliability and risks, information given to the parents, conversion in an eugenic practice of prenatal diagnosis and OMS recommendations in relation to the optional and voluntary character that this diagnosis should have are analysed.

  1. New leafhopper species of Jikradia from Mesoamerica with new records, revised key to species, distribution, origin, and checklist (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Coelidiinae: Teruliini).

    PubMed

    Nielson, Mervin W; Zack, Richard S; Poggi, Francesco; Nickel, Herbert

    2014-12-01

    The following four new species of leafhoppers are described and illustrated: Jikradia dentata n. sp. and J. trispinata n. sp. from Guatemala, J. variabilis n. sp. from Belize, and J. exilis n. sp. from Costa Rica. Jikradia basipendula Nielson and J. krameri Nielson are new records for Guatemala. Belize is a new record for the genus. A record of the first introduction of the genus in the Old World is reviewed. A revised key to the known species is provided with a review of its possible origin. A checklist of all known species is also given.

  2. Prenatal screening for clubfoot: What factors predict prenatal detection?

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, Susan T.; Yazdy, Mahsa M.; Kasser, James R.; Werler, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Routine prenatal ultrasound has often resulted in the early detection of musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine which socioeconomic factors are associated with prenatal detection of clubfoot. Methods The Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University identified infants in three states (MA, NY, NC) who were reported as having a clubfoot. Mothers of these children were contacted, interviewed, and medical records obtained. Data were analyzed by using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results Overall detection of the clubfoot prenatally was 62.3% (421/676) but this varied considerably by state: 81.1% in Massachusetts (154/190), 58.5% in New York (124/212), and 52.2% in North Carolina (143/274). Multivariate analysis revealed the strongest predictors for prenatal detection were maternal age ≥ 35 years (OR: 3.54), non-Hispanic black race (OR: 0.49), the presence of another birth defect (OR: 2.61), residing in Massachusetts (OR: 2.64) and the presence of a bilateral clubfoot (OR: 1.90). Conclusions We found a statistically significantly increase higher rate of prenatal detection of clubfoot in Massachusetts and decrease lower rate in younger mothers (age<35) and black mothers, even after adjustment for other sociodemographic variables. PMID:24395154

  3. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-08

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--515.

  4. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}2 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-03-16

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical informatioin provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--532.

  5. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 1, DOE/NV 506

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-07-21

    This Record of Technical Change updates the technical information provided in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-506

  6. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-01

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV--543

  7. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-05-12

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0

  8. Barriers to adequate prenatal care utilization in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Nicola L; Brown, Carolyn; Nu’usolia, Ofeira; Ah-Ching, John; Muasau-Howard, Bethel; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the utilization of prenatal care in American Samoan women and to identify socio-demographic predictors of inadequate prenatal care utilization. Methods Using data from prenatal clinic records, women (n=692) were categorized according to the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index as having received adequate plus, adequate, intermediate or inadequate prenatal care during their pregnancy. Categorical socio-demographic predictors of the timing of initiation of prenatal care (week of gestation) and the adequacy of received services were identified using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and independent samples t-tests. Results Between 2001 and 2008 85.4% of women received inadequate prenatal care. Parity (P=0.02), maternal unemployment (P=0.03), and both parents being unemployed (P=0.03) were negatively associated with the timing of prenatal care initation. Giving birth in 2007–2008, after a prenatal care incentive scheme had been introduced in the major hospital, was associated with earlier initiation of prenatal care (20.75 versus 25.12 weeks; P<0.01) and improved adequacy of received services (95.04% versus 83.8%; P=0.02). Conclusion The poor prenatal care utilization in American Samoa is a major concern. Improving healthcare accessibility will be key in encouraging women to attend prenatal care. The significant improvements in the adequacy of prenatal care seen in 2007–2008 suggest that the prenatal care incentive program implemented in 2006 may be a very positive step toward addressing issues of prenatal care utilization in this population. PMID:24045912

  9. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  10. Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal Genetic Testing Chart (Infographic) PFSI010 ››› Weeks 1–4 Weeks ...

  11. Prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome: a registry study.

    PubMed Central

    Gravholt, C. H.; Juul, S.; Naeraa, R. W.; Hansen, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study prevalence of Turner's syndrome in Denmark and to assess validity of prenatal diagnosis. DESIGN--Study of data on prenatal and postnatal Turner's syndrome in Danish Cytogenetic Central Register. SUBJECTS--All registered Turner's syndrome karyotypes (100 prenatal cases and 215 postnatal cases) during 1970-93. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of Turner's syndrome karyotypes among prenatally tested fetuses and Turner's syndrome among liveborn infants. RESULTS--Among infant girls, prevalence of Turner's syndrome was 32/100,000. Among female fetuses tested by amniocentesis, prevalence of Turner's syndrome karyotypes was 176/100,000 (relative risk of syndrome, 6.74 compared with prevalence among untested pregnancies). Among female fetuses tested by chorion villus sampling, prevalence of syndrome karyotypes was 392/100,000 (relative risk, 16.8). We excluded prenatal tests referred because of results of ultrasound scanning: among fetuses tested by amniocentesis revised relative risk was 5.68, while revised relative risk among fetuses tested by chorion villus sampling was 13.3. For 29 fetuses with prenatal diagnosis of possible Turner's syndrome, pregnancy was allowed to continue and 24 children were live born. Thirteen of these children were karyotyped postnatally, and diagnosis of Turner's syndrome had to be revised for eight, seven being normal girls and one boy. This gives tentative predictive value of amniocentesis in diagnosing Turner's syndrome of between 21% and 67%. There was no significant relation between mother's age and risk of Turner's syndrome. CONCLUSIONS--Discrepancy between prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome challenges specificity of prenatal examination in diagnosing Turner's syndrome. PMID:8555850

  12. [Access to dental care during prenatal assistance].

    PubMed

    dos Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2012-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the self-perceived response to dental care during prenatal assistance in the Unified Health System (SUS) in the Metropolitan Region of Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil. 1032 postpartum women were interviewed and 1006 prenatal records copied. Postpartum women's self-perceived response was measured by the Oral Health Index Profile-14. When an impact was identified, dental care rendered in educational, preventive and curative terms was considered adequate. When there was no impact, assistance was considered adequate in educational and preventive terms. The Chi-square test revealed an association between prenatal care and dental care. Oral health impact on quality of life was 14.7%. Dental care received by mothers in educational terms was rated at 41.3%, while in preventive terms it was 21% and in curative terms it was 16.6%. Six or more prenatal appointments coupled with educational activities was closely associated with adequate dental care (p < 0.05). Access to dental care is facilitated when pregnant women attend health services and become involved in educational activities during the prenatal period. Consequently, educational measures appear to indicate an improvement in prenatal care in the SUS.

  13. Prenatal Genetic Counselling

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Barbara C.

    1986-01-01

    Genetic concerns and indications for prenatal diagnosis are first recognized by the family physician. Review of personal, pregnancy and family history may indicate concerns beyond that of advanced maternal age. Amniocentesis is still the most frequently used modality for prenatal diagnosis, but detailed ultrasound is valuable for structural abnormalities, and chorionic villus sampling is now being tested as an alternative to amniocentesis. PMID:21267316

  14. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation at Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between ground water and surface water in the area.

  15. Re-evaluation of the Bispingen palaeolake record - a revised chronology for the Eemian in Northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterbach, S.; Brauer, A.; Litt, T.; Schettler, G.

    2012-04-01

    Detailed studies of climate development during past interglacials, i.e. prior to significant human interference, can provide important information about natural climate variability and thus the extent of anthropogenic impact on present and future climate. However, comparison of palaeoclimate records from different regions and archives is often hampered by chronological uncertainties. For example, an asynchronous climate development with a several-thousand-year-long steep climatic gradient in Central Europe at the end of the Last Interglacial has been inferred from differences in the duration of the Eemian in German and French palaeoclimate records (Kukla et al. 1997). One of the key sites in this context is the Bispingen palaeolake sequence in Northern Germany, where a length of about 11 000 years for the Eemian has been estimated from varve counting (Müller 1974), which is a couple of thousand years shorter than in other sediment records in the North Atlantic realm (cf. Kukla et al. 2002). Here we present detailed microfacies analyses on new sediment cores from the Bispingen palaeolake combined with geochemical and pollen analyses, documenting changes in the depositional environment and vegetation during the Last Interglacial. Microscopic varve counting in the distinctly laminated lower part and sedimentation rate estimates for the faintly laminated upper part of the sequence enable a better assessment of the length of the Eemian in Northern Germany than in previous studies. Detailed lithological and palynological comparison of the new Bispingen cores with the record from Müller (1974) indicates the existence of major gaps in the old profile, leading to an underestimation of the duration of the Eemian in Northern Germany. The duration of about 17 000 years obtained from the new Bispingen cores is in good accordance with results from a marine record off Portugal (Shackleton et al. 2002) and the varve-dated Lake Monticchio record in southern Italy (Brauer et al

  16. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation at Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between ground water and surface water in the area. Data collection objectives (DCO) identify reasons for collecting data. The following are DCOs for the Gunnison ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation project: long-term continuous ground water level data and periodic ground water samples will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site; water level and water quality data will eventually be used in future ground water modeling to more firmly establish numerical model boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Gunnison processing site; and modeling results will be used to demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

  17. Revised paleoenvironmental analysis of the Holocene portion of the Barbados sea-level record: Cobbler's Reef revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscano, Marguerite A.

    2016-06-01

    Sample elevations corrected for tectonic uplift and assessed relative to local modeled sea levels provide a new perspective on paleoenvironmental history at Cobbler's Reef, Barbados. Previously, 14C-dated surface samples of fragmented Acropora palmata plotted above paleo sea level based on their present (uplifted) elevations, suggesting supratidal rubble deposited during a period of extreme storms (4500-3000 cal BP), precipitating reef demise. At several sites, however, A. palmata persisted, existing until ~370 cal BP. Uplift-corrected A. palmata sample elevations lie below the western Atlantic sea-level curve, and ~2 m below ICE-6G-modeled paleo sea level, under slow rates of sea-level rise, negating the possibility that Cobbler's Reef is a supratidal storm ridge. Most sites show limited age ranges from corals likely damaged/killed on the reef crest, not the mixed ages of rubble ridges, strongly suggesting the reef framework died off in stages over 6500 yr. Reef crest death assemblages invoke multiple paleohistoric causes, from ubiquitous hurricanes to anthropogenic impacts. Comparison of death assemblage ages to dated regional paleotempestological sequences, proxy-based paleotemperatures, recorded hurricanes, tsunamis, European settlement, deforestation, and resulting turbidity, reveals many possible factors inimical to the survival of A. palmata along Cobbler's Reef.

  18. Historical seismicity of the Texas Panhandle from an examination of Lubbock seismographic station records: Revision 2: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1987-09-01

    Seismicity data for the Texas Panhandle area are based on instrumental data and felt reports. Sparse population density and poor instrumental coverage of the area suggest that the data base may not be complete or reliable for small earthquakes. Film chips from the Lubbock Seismographic Station for the period of 1963-1980 were, therefore, examined to identify all earthquakes that had occurred in the Texas Panhandle during that period. Film chips of known events were also used to aid investigators in identifying characteristics of signals from earthquakes that occurred in the Panhandle. This examination identified 40 earthquakes that occurred within approximately 360 km of Lubbock during 1963-1980. These 40 earthquakes were not recorded by many stations and 38 of these were not located earlier. First motion amplitude and direction on all three components were measured for these earthquakes. Earthquakes that occurred north of Lubbock were identified on the basis of azimuth computation and were then approximately located using the time interval between the arrival of P and S phases. Application of a magnitude duration relationship that was developed in Oklahoma suggests a range of 1.6 to 4.5 for these earthquakes. This study suggests an activity rate of two to three earthquakes per year within about 360 km of Lubbock during 1963-1980. The study, therfore, shows that the area north of Lubbock Station, including the Texas Panhandle, is an area of low seismicity. 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Understanding Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... several things, particularly the risk of Down Syndrome. Rh Incompatibility This test determines whether the mother and ... at the first prenatal visit. If there is Rh incompatibility, treatments can help prevent later complications. Ultrasound ...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golbus, M S; Hall, B D; Filly, R A; Poskanzer, L B

    1977-09-01

    Severe rhizomelic and mesomelic dwarfism was demonstrated in a 20-week gestation fetus by amniography. A systematic progressive approach to prenatal diagnosis in the absence of a definitive diagnosis and the use of contrast radiography is discussed.

  1. First verified record of the ant genus Calyptomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) from India, along with a revised key to known Indomalayan species

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Himender

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The members of genus Calyptomyrmex are mostly encountered under rotten logs, in the soil, under stones and in leaf litter samples. These ants are seldom in collections making estimation of their true distributional patterns problematic (Shattuck 2011). The deep antennal scrobes and the unique configuration of the clypeus are distinct to the genus (Bolton 1981). New information Herein Calyptomyrmex wittmeri Baroni Urbani, 1975 is redescribed and reported for the first time from India. This also confirms the first valid published record of the genus from the country. The image hosted by AntWeb as C. vedda (CASENT0280817; AntWeb 2015b) collected by Besuchet, Löbl, Mussard from Kerala, India and identified by Brown is actually C. wittmeri (Brown was uncertain of his determination of C. vedda and cautiously inserted an interrogation point in front of his determination). Two workers recently collected at Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary, Kerala present similarities to the specimen identified by Brown. However, characters as the lack of well-developed promesonotal suture, absence of clavate setae, and narrow petiolar node, concur with the diagnosis of C. wittmeri. A revised key to known Indomalayan species of the genus is provided herewith. PMID:26696759

  2. Prenatal music exposure induces long-term neural effects.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Eino; Kujala, Teija; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural correlates induced by prenatal exposure to melodies using brains' event-related potentials (ERPs). During the last trimester of pregnancy, the mothers in the learning group played the 'Twinkle twinkle little star'-melody 5 times per week. After birth and again at the age of 4 months, we played the infants a modified melody in which some of the notes were changed while ERPs to unchanged and changed notes were recorded. The ERPs were also recorded from a control group, who received no prenatal stimulation. Both at birth and at the age of 4 months, infants in the learning group had stronger ERPs to the unchanged notes than the control group. Furthermore, the ERP amplitudes to the changed and unchanged notes at birth were correlated with the amount of prenatal exposure. Our results show that extensive prenatal exposure to a melody induces neural representations that last for several months.

  3. Prenatal Music Exposure Induces Long-Term Neural Effects

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Eino; Kujala, Teija; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural correlates induced by prenatal exposure to melodies using brains' event-related potentials (ERPs). During the last trimester of pregnancy, the mothers in the learning group played the ‘Twinkle twinkle little star’ -melody 5 times per week. After birth and again at the age of 4 months, we played the infants a modified melody in which some of the notes were changed while ERPs to unchanged and changed notes were recorded. The ERPs were also recorded from a control group, who received no prenatal stimulation. Both at birth and at the age of 4 months, infants in the learning group had stronger ERPs to the unchanged notes than the control group. Furthermore, the ERP amplitudes to the changed and unchanged notes at birth were correlated with the amount of prenatal exposure. Our results show that extensive prenatal exposure to a melody induces neural representations that last for several months. PMID:24205353

  4. Prenatal Influences on the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Lise

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of embryology and prenatal brain, sensory, and motor development. Includes discussion of maternal nutrition, chemical exposure, prenatal drug and alcohol hazards, cigarette smoking, and some causes of neural tube defects and premature birth. (Author/KB)

  5. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Genetic Counseling Print ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  6. Prenatal Care: Third Trimester Visits

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week During the third trimester, prenatal care might include vaginal exams to check the baby's ... 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/prenatal-care/art- ...

  7. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart ...

  8. Prenatal Intuitive Coparenting Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Darwiche, Joëlle; Fivaz-Depeursinge, Elisabeth; Corboz-Warnery, Antoinette

    2016-01-01

    Micro-analytic research on intuitive parenting behaviors has shed light on the temporal dynamics of parent and child interactions. Observations have shown that parents possess remarkable implicit communicative abilities allowing them to adapt to the clues infants give and therefore stimulate the development of many of the infants’ abilities, such as communication skills. This work focused on observing intuitive parenting behaviors that were synchronized and coordinated between the parents. We call them “prenatal intuitive coparenting behaviors” and used an observation task – the Prenatal Lausanne Trilogue Play procedure – to observe them. For this task, the parents role-play their first encounter with their future baby, represented by a doll. Two cases from a study on pregnancy after assisted reproductive technology are provided to illustrate how these behaviors manifest themselves. The observations from the first case suggest that expectant parents can offer the baby a coparental framework, whereas the observations from the second case show that opportunities for episodes of prenatal intuitive coparenting can be missed due to certain relationship dynamics. These kinds of observations deepen our knowledge of the prenatal emergence of the coparenting relationship and allow us to hone our strategies for intervening during pregnancy with couples who experience coparenting difficulties. Furthermore, these observations provide a novel and complementary perspective on prenatal intuitive parenting and coparenting behaviors. PMID:27833576

  9. Human prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Filkins, K.; Russo, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the field of prenatal diagnosis have been rapid during the past decade. Moreover, liberal use of birth control methods and restriction of family size have placed greater emphasis on optimum outcome of each pregnancy. There are many prenatal diagnostic techniques of proven value; the risks, including false negatives and false positives, are known. With the rapid proliferation of new and experimental techniques, many disorders are potential diagnosable or even treatable; however, risk factors are unknown and issues relating to quality control have not been resolved. These problems are readily appreciated in the dramatic new techniques involving recombinant DNA, chorion villus sampling, and fetal surgery. Unfortunately, clinicians may not appreciate the difficulties that may also be encountered in the more mundane prenatal diagnostic tests such as ultrasonography or enzymatic testing. The aim of this volume is to clarify and rationalize certain aspects of diagnosis, genetic counseling, and intervention. New and experimental techniques are presented in the light of current knowledge.

  10. Prenatal and Perinatal Factors Associated with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilder, Deborah A.; Pinborough-Zimmerman, Judith; Bakian, Amanda V.; Miller, Judith S.; Dorius, Josette T.; Nangle, Barry; McMahon, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal and perinatal risk factors associated with intellectual disability (ID) were studied in 8-year-old Utah children from a 1994 birth cohort (N = 26,108) using broad ascertainment methods and birth records following the most current recording guidelines. Risk factor analyses were performed inclusive and exclusive of children with a known or…

  11. The Fourth International Network of Twin Registries: Overview from Osaka/Research Reviews: Familial Fraternal Twinning; Twin Study of Masculine Faces; Physical Aggression and Epigenetics; Prenatal Education for Parents of Twins/Current Events: 2016 Guinness Book of World Records; Oldest Living Male Twins; Twins Reunited at Sixty-Nine; Panda Twins; Twins.com.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2015-12-01

    The 4th International Network of Twin Registries (INTR) Consortium Meeting took place in Osaka, Japan, September 28-29, 2015. The venue was the Osaka Medical Center for Medical Innovation and Translational Research. An overview of presentations and other activities is provided. Next, 1930s research on familial fraternal twinning, preference for masculine faces, physical aggression and epigenetics, and a prenatal education program for parents of multiples are described. Current twin-related events include the 2016 Guinness Book of World Records (GWR), the oldest living male twins, newly reunited twins, the birth of panda twins and a controversial twin-based website.

  12. Contractual Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Mary F.; Sawyer, Thomas M.

    Contractual revision promotes cooperation between teachers and tutors and, being student initiated, provides a method to increase student control over the revision process and encourage students to communicate their strengths and weaknesses in writing to their teachers or tutors. The contractual revision process requires students to form contracts…

  13. Prenatal diagnosis: whose right?

    PubMed Central

    Heyd, D

    1995-01-01

    The question who is the subject of the right to prenatal diagnosis may be answered in four ways: the parents, the child, society, or no one. This article investigates the philosophical issues involved in each of these answers, which touch upon the conditions of personal identity, the principle of privacy, the scope of social responsibility, and the debate about impersonalism in ethics. PMID:8558544

  14. Prenatal Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Donley, Greer; Hull, Sara Chandros; Berkman, Benjamin E.

    2014-01-01

    With whole genome sequencing set to become the preferred method of prenatal screening, we need to pay more attention to the massive amount of information it will deliver to parents—and the fact that we don't yet understand what most of it means. PMID:22777977

  15. Prenatal Care Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Michael

    Described is the development and evaluation of a prenatal instructional program designed to prevent birth defects. It is explained that the program, composed of five slide tape units on such topics as nutrition and environmental factors, was field tested and found effective with 97 participants (pregnant high school students, nursing students, and…

  16. [Prenatal care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Vetter, K; Goeckenjan, M

    2013-12-01

    Prenatal care in Germany is based on a nationwide standardized program of care for pregnant women. Besides support and health counseling, it comprises prevention or early detection of diseases or unfavorable circumstances with risks for mother and child. Prenatal care is regulated by law and structured by directives and standard procedures in maternity guidelines (Mutterschafts-Richtlinien). This includes information and counseling of future mothers on offers of psychosocial and medical assistance in normal pregnancies as well as in unplanned or unwanted pregnancies. Further aspects are clinical examinations and risk determinations for genetic variations or direct genetic analysis. During pregnancy, medical history, clinical examination, and blood testing are part of the sophisticated program, which includes at least three standardized sonographic examinations at 10, 20, and 30 weeks of gestation. The maternity passport allows a pregnant woman to carry the most relevant information on her pregnancy and her personal risks with her. For 45 years now, women in Germany are used to carrying their Mutterpass. Societal changes have influenced the central goals of maternity care: In the beginning, the mortality of mother and child had to be reduced. Today, maternal morbidity and impaired development of the child are the center of interest, with expansion to familial satisfaction. The reduction in the mortality and morbidity of both the mother and the child during pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum can be attributed to prenatal care. Thus, investment in a program of nationwide structured prenatal care seems to be worthwhile-despite the lack of evidence concerning its effectiveness.

  17. Prenatal risk factors for childhood CKD.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Christine W; Yamamoto, Kalani T; Henry, Rohan K; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Flynn, Joseph T

    2014-09-01

    Development of CKD may be programmed prenatally. We sought to determine the association of childhood CKD with prenatal risk factors, including birth weight, maternal diabetes mellitus (DM), and maternal overweight/obesity. We conducted a population-based, case-control study with 1994 patients with childhood CKD (<21 years of age at diagnosis) and 20,032 controls in Washington state. We linked maternal and infant characteristics in birth records from 1987 to 2008 to hospital discharge data and used logistic regression analysis to assess the association of prenatal risk factors with childhood CKD. The prevalence of CKD was 126.7 cases per 100,000 births. High birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated nominally with CKD, with respective crude odds ratios (ORs) of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.03 to 1.34) and 1.97 (95% CI, 1.15 to 3.37); however, adjustment for maternal confounders attenuated these associations to 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79 to 1.21) and 1.19 (95% CI, 0.51 to 2.81), respectively. The adjusted ORs for CKD associated with other prenatal factors were 2.88 (95% CI, 2.28 to 3.63) for low birth weight, 1.54 (95% CI, 1.13 to 2.09) for maternal gestational DM, 1.24 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.48) for maternal overweight, and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.52) for maternal obesity. In subgroup analysis by CKD subtype, low birth weight and maternal pregestational DM associated significantly with increased risk of renal dysplasia/aplasia. Low birth weight, maternal gestational DM, and maternal overweight/obesity associated significantly with obstructive uropathy. These data suggest that prenatal factors may impact the risk of CKD. Future studies should aim to determine if modification of these factors could reduce the risk of childhood CKD.

  18. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  19. Prenatal surgery for myelomeningocele and the need for cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement

    PubMed Central

    Tulipan, Noel; Wellons, John C.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Gupta, Nalin; Sutton, Leslie N.; Burrows, Pamela K.; Farmer, Diana; Walsh, William; Johnson, Mark P.; Rand, Larry; Tolivaisa, Susan; D’Alton, Mary E.; Adzick, N. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Object The Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS) was a multicenter randomized trial comparing the safety and efficacy of prenatal and postnatal closure of myelomeningocele. The trial was stopped early because of the demonstrated efficacy of prenatal surgery, and outcomes on 158 of 183 pregnancies were reported. Here, the authors update the 1-year outcomes for the complete trial, analyze the primary and related outcomes, and evaluate whether specific prerandomization risk factors are associated with prenatal surgery benefit. Methods The primary outcome was a composite of fetal loss or any of the following: infant death, CSF shunt placement, or meeting the prespecified criteria for shunt placement. Primary outcome, actual shunt placement, and shunt revision rates for prenatal versus postnatal repair were compared. The shunt criteria were reassessed to determine which were most concordant with practice, and a new composite outcome was created from the primary outcome by replacing the original criteria for CSF shunt placement with the revised criteria. The authors used logistic regression to estimate whether there were interactions between the type of surgery and known prenatal risk factors (lesion level, gestational age, degree of hindbrain herniation, and ventricle size) for shunt placement, and to determine which factors were associated with shunting among those infants who underwent prenatal surgery. Results Ninety-one women were randomized to prenatal surgery and 92 to postnatal repair. The primary outcome occurred in 73% of infants in the prenatal surgery group and in 98% in the postnatal group (p < 0.0001). Actual rates of shunt placement were only 44% and 84% in the 2 groups, respectively (p < 0.0001). The authors revised the most commonly met criterion to require overt clinical signs of increased intracranial pressure, defined as split sutures, bulging fontanelle, or sunsetting eyes, in addition to increasing head circumference or hydrocephalus. Using

  20. Prenatal findings of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuko; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Sugiura, Tokio; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2015-08-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a rare brain abnormality characterized by an incomplete cleavage of the primitive prosencephalon of forebrain during early embryogenesis. To determine the clinical characteristics and outcome of fetuses with HPE, we retrospectively analyzed nine patients who were prenatally diagnosed as fetal HPE by ultrasounds. The mean diagnostic weeks were 20 weeks of gestation. Two cases died within one day after birth. The chromosomal examinations were performed in seven cases (trisomy 18: n = 2; trisomy 13: n = 2; 45,XX,der(18)t(18;21)(p10;p10)mat: n = 1; normal karyotype: n = 2). In our HPE cases, most cases had serious facial anomalies and poor prognosis. Our data suggested that the early prenatal diagnosis of HPE allowed time for parental counseling and delivery planning.

  1. Human prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Filkins, K.; Russo, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The multiauthor text is written as a ''guide to rationalize and clarify certain aspects of diagnosis, general counseling and intervention'' for ''health professionals who provide care to pregnant women.'' The text is not aimed at the ultrasonographer but rather at the physicians who are clinically responsible for patient management. Chapters of relevance to radiologists include an overview of prenatal screening and counseling, diagnosis of neural tube defects, ultrasonographic (US) scanning of fetal disorders in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, US scanning in the third trimester, multiple gestation and selective termination, fetal echo and Doppler studies, and fetal therapy. Also included are overviews of virtually all currently utilized prenatal diagnostic techniques including amniocentesis, fetal blood sampling, fetoscopy, recombinant DNA detection of hemoglobinopathies, chorionic villus sampling, embryoscopy, legal issues, and diagnosis of Mendelian disorders by DNA analysis.

  2. A national perspective on prenatal testing for mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Victoria; Alston, Charlotte L; Blakely, Emma L; Fratter, Carl; Feeney, Catherine L; Poulton, Joanna; Brown, Garry K; Turnbull, Doug M; Taylor, Robert W; McFarland, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial diseases affect >1 in 7500 live births and may be due to mutations in either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA). Genetic counselling for families with mitochondrial diseases, especially those due to mtDNA mutations, provides unique and difficult challenges particularly in relation to disease transmission and prevention. We have experienced an increasing demand for prenatal diagnostic testing from families affected by mitochondrial disease since we first offered this service in 2007. We review the diagnostic records of the 62 prenatal samples (17 mtDNA and 45 nDNA) analysed since 2007, the reasons for testing, mutation investigated and the clinical outcome. Our findings indicate that prenatal testing for mitochondrial disease is reliable and informative for the nuclear and selected mtDNA mutations we have tested. Where available, the results of mtDNA heteroplasmy analyses from other family members are helpful in interpreting the prenatal mtDNA test result. This is particularly important when the mutation is rare or the mtDNA heteroplasmy is observed at intermediate levels. At least 11 cases of mitochondrial disease were prevented following prenatal testing, 3 of which were mtDNA disease. On the basis of our results, we believe that prenatal testing for mitochondrial disease is an important option for couples where appropriate genetic analyses and pre/post-test counselling can be provided.

  3. "Makin' Somethin' Outta Little-to-Nufin'': Racism, Revision and Rotating Records--The Hip-Hop DJ in Composition Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Prompted by a moment in the classroom in which the DJ becomes integral for the writing instructor, this article looks at how the hip-hop DJ and hip-hop DJ/Producer become the intrinsic examples for first-year college writing students to think about how they conduct revision in their writing. After a review of two seminal hip-hop books and other…

  4. Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) ( 10 ) diagnosis code of V22 (supervision of normal pregnancy) or V23 ( ... high-risk pregnancy) or a reason for visit code of 3205.0 (prenatal examination, routine) ( 11 – ...

  5. America Revising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Myron

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Frances FitzGerald's book, "America Revised," and discusses FitzGerald's critique of recent revisions in secondary-level U.S. history textbooks. The author advocates the implementation of a core curriculum for U.S. history which emphasizes political and local history. (AM)

  6. Selective abortion after prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schubert-Lehnhardt, V

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the main arguments in Europe against selective abortion after prenatal diagnoses and against using prenatal diagnoses as a whole from an ethical point of view. The different experiences from the Eastern and the Western parts of Germany are used as examples. The paper suggests that using ethics could promote multicultural experiences and different strategies of decision-making.

  7. The Place of Prenatal Clases

    PubMed Central

    Enkin, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The past 20 years has shown an exponential rise in both obstetrical intervention and family centred maternity care. Prenatal classes, although not as yet fully integrated into prenatal care, fill a vital role in teaching couples the information, skills, and attitudes required to participate actively in their reproductive care, and to recognize both their rights and their responsibilities. PMID:21301557

  8. Prenatal Cell-Free DNA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prenatal cell-free DNA screening Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Prenatal cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening, also known as noninvasive prenatal screening, is ... in a developing baby. During prenatal cell-free DNA screening, DNA from the mother and fetus is ...

  9. Prenatal vitamins: what is in the bottle?

    PubMed

    Duerbeck, Norman B; Dowling, David D; Duerbeck, Jillinda M

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all obstetricians routinely prescribe prenatal vitamins to their pregnant patients at the time of the first prenatal visit. Many times, patients' understanding of the health benefits of prenatal vitamins differs substantially from that of the prescribing physician. The following is a review of the most common ingredients found in prenatal vitamins and their purported health benefits.

  10. Cytogenetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, S A

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. I summarize the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. I explore the effect of molecular genetics on these issues and its possible future effects on the entire practice of prenatal diagnosis as it relates to the risk for chromosome nondisjunction (trisomy). I also discuss the use of cytogenetic analysis in the prenatal diagnosis of certain inherited genetic diseases. Images PMID:8236978

  11. Prenatal management of anencephaly.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rebecca J; Erdman, Joanna N; Hevia, Martin; Dickens, Bernard M

    2008-09-01

    About a third of anencephalic fetuses are born alive, but they are not conscious or viable, and soon die. This neural tube defect can be limited by dietary consumption of foliates, and detected prenatally by ultrasound and other means. Many laws permit abortion, on this indication or on the effects of pregnancy and prospects of delivery on a woman's physical or mental health. However, abortion is limited under some legal systems, particularly in South America. To avoid criminal liability, physicians will not terminate pregnancies, by induced birth or abortion, without prior judicial approval. Argentinian courts have developed means to resolve these cases, but responses of Brazilian courts are less clear. Ethical concerns relate to late-term abortion, meaning after the point of fetal viability, but since anencephalic fetuses are nonviable, many ethical concerns are overcome. Professional guidance is provided by several professional and institutional codes on management of anencephalic pregnancies.

  12. Prenatal Care: First Trimester Visits

    MedlinePlus

    ... your partner in the appointment as well. Medical history Your health care provider will ask many questions, ... pregnancy-week-by-week/in-depth/prenatal-care/art-20044882 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  13. Prenatal meditation influences infant behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ka Po

    2014-11-01

    Meditation is important in facilitating health. Pregnancy health has been shown to have significant consequences for infant behaviors. In view of limited studies on meditation and infant temperament, this study aims to explore the effects of prenatal meditation on these aspects. The conceptual framework was based on the postulation of positive relationships between prenatal meditation and infant health. A randomized control quantitative study was carried out at Obstetric Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Hong Kong. 64 pregnant Chinese women were recruited for intervention and 59 were for control. Outcome measures were cord blood cortisol, infant salivary cortisol, and Carey Infant Temperament Questionnaire. Cord blood cortisol level of babies was higher in the intervention group (p<0.01) indicates positive health status of the newborns verifies that prenatal meditation can influence fetal health. Carey Infant Temperament Questionnaire showed that the infants of intervention group have better temperament (p<0.05) at fifth month reflects the importance of prenatal meditation in relation to child health. Present study concludes the positive effects of prenatal meditation on infant behaviors and recommends that pregnancy care providers should provide prenatal meditation to pregnant women.

  14. Deglacial 14C plateau suites recalibrated by Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record - Revised 14C reservoir ages from three ocean basins corroborate extreme surface water variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, M.; Balmer, S.; Grootes, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) reservoir/ventilation ages (Δ14C) provide unique insights into the dynamics of ocean water masses over LGM and deglacial times. The 14C plateau-tuning technique enables us to derive both an absolute chronology for marine sediment records and a high-resolution record of changing Δ14C values for deglacial surface and deep waters (Sarnthein et al., 2007; AGU Monogr. 173, 175). We designate as 14C plateau a sediment section in the age-depth profile with several almost constant planktic 14C ages - variation less than ×100 to ×300 yr - which form a plateau-shaped scatter band that extends over ~5 to 50 and up to 200 cm in sediment cores with sedimentation rates of >10 cm/ky. Previously, a suite of >15 plateau boundary ages were calibrated to a joint reference record of U/Th-dated 14C time series measured on coral samples, the Cariaco sediment record, and speleothems (Fairbanks et al., 2005, QSR 24; Hughen et al., 2006, QSR 25; Beck et al., 2001, Science 292). We now used the varve-counted atmospheric 14C record of Lake Suigetsu (Ramsey et al., 2012, Science 338, 370) to recalibrate the boundary ages and average ages of 14C plateaus and apply the amended plateau-tuning technique to a dozen Δ14C records from the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. Main results are: (1) The Suigetsu atmospheric 14C record reflects all 14C plateaus, their internal structures and relative length previously identified, but implies a rise in the average plateau age by <200 14C yr during the LGM, >700 yr at its end, and <200 yr in the Bølling-Allerød. (2) Based on different 14C ages of coeval atmospheric and planktic 14C plateaus surface water Δ14C may have temporarily dropped to an equivalent of 200 yr in low-latitude stratified waters, such as off northwestern South America, and in turn reached values corresponding to an age difference of >2500 14C yr in stratified subpolar regions and upwelled waters such as in the South China Sea, values that differ significantly from a

  15. Revision Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Loyo, Myriam; Wang, Tom D

    2016-01-01

    Revision rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging operations the facial plastic surgeon performs given the complex 3-dimensional anatomy of the nose and the psychological impact it has on patients. The intricate interplay of cartilages, bone, and soft tissue in the nose gives it its aesthetic and function. Facial harmony and attractiveness depends greatly on the nose given its central position in the face. In the following article, the authors review common motivations and anatomic findings for patients seeking revision rhinoplasty based on the senior author's 30-year experience with rhinoplasty and a review of the literature.

  16. Revision of Poa L. (Poaceae, Pooideae, Poeae, Poinae) in Mexico: new records, re-evaluation of P. ruprechtii, and two new species, P. palmeri and P. wendtii

    PubMed Central

    Soreng, Robert J.; Peterson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A revision and key to the 23 species and eight subspecies of Poa (including Dissanthelium) known to occur in Mexico is provided. All voucher specimens seen are cited for accepted taxa, except Poa annua for which one voucher per state is provided. Taxa not previously known from, or poorly understood in, Mexico are discussed.Poa palmeri sp. nov. is endemic to forested slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental, and we distinguished it from Poa ruprechtii s.s., a species of central Mexico that is here emended to include Poa sharpii (syn. nov.). Poa wendtii sp. nov. is described from the Sierra Santa Rosa in northern Coahuila. Poa tacanae is placed in synonymy in Poa seleri. Poa gymnantha and Poa occidentalis are newly reported for Mexico, and material historically identified as Poa villaroelii areplaced in Poa chamaeclinos.The genus Dissanthelium is considered to belong within Poa, and the Mexican taxa, Dissanthelium calycina subsp. mathewsii and Dissanthelium californicum, are treated as Poa calycina var. mathewsii and Poa thomasii, respectively. Poa subsect. Papillopoa subsect. nov. is erected for Poa mulleri. Lectotypes are designated for Poa conglomerata and Poa seleri. PMID:23185125

  17. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise.

  18. Revision of Ernst Antevs' New England Varve Chronology: A Record of Meltwater Production and Southeastern LIS Recession: 18.2-12.5 kyr BP (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    runoff, vegetation, and erosion on a recently deglaciated paraglacial landscape. However, in this case cooling events are recognized by higher sediment input and thicker varves. Comparison of varve thickness records to GISP2 ice core records (δ18O original measurements with GICC05 time scale applied) show that from 15.0-12.5 kyr BP climate changes of decadal and longer scale recorded in both records appear identical in spacing and magnitude. Independent time scales for both records (varve 14C calibration and ice core layer counts) are different by 55 yr (well within time scale uncertainties) when similar features in the two records are matched. Varves and the Greenland ice cores appear to simultaneously record the same regional climate changes or, less likely, there is a consistent offset at all scales. After 15.0 yr BP there appears to have been a link between North Atlantic climate and glacial processes (ablation, meltwater production, and ice recession/advance). Prior to 15.0 kyr BP, glacial events are marked by more subtle changes in varve thickness but there is only a weak relationship between varve thickness and Greenland climate.

  19. Prenatal arsenic exposure and drowning among children in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahfuzar; Sohel, Nazmul; Kumar Hore, Samar; Yunus, Mohammad; Bhuiya, Abbas; Kim Streatfield, Peter

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding adverse effects of prenatal arsenic exposure on the neurodevelopment of children. We analyzed mortality data for children, who were born to 11,414 pregnant women between 2002 and 2004, with an average age of 5 years of follow-up. Individual drinking-water arsenic exposure during pregnancy was calculated using tubewell water arsenic concentration between last menstrual period and date of birth. There were 84 drowning deaths registered, with cause of death ascertained using verbal autopsy (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, codes X65–X70). The prenatal water arsenic exposure distribution was tertiled, and the risk of drowning mortality was estimated by Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for potential confounders. We observed a significant association between prenatal arsenic exposure and drowning in children aged 1–5 years in the highest exposure tertile (HR=1.74, 95% CI: 1.03–2.94). This study showed that in utero arsenic exposure might be associated with excess mortality among children aged 1–5 years due to drowning. PMID:26511679

  20. Child Health USA 2013: Prenatal Care Utilization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed: on 7/31/13 ↑ Back to top Graphs This image is described in the Data section. ... this! Email Print-Friendly Downloads Prenatal Care Utilization Graphs (56k zipped folder of 2 GIFs) Prenatal Care ...

  1. Health information technology: standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology, 2014 edition; revisions to the permanent certification program for health information technology. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-04

    With this final rule, the Secretary of Health and Human Services adopts certification criteria that establish the technical capabilities and specify the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) Technology will need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs beginning with the EHR reporting periods in fiscal year and calendar year 2014. This final rule also makes changes to the permanent certification program for health information technology, including changing the program's name to the ONC HIT Certification Program.

  2. [Communication skills for prenatal counselling].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, J; Tschudin, S; Holzgreve, W; Tercanli, S

    2007-04-18

    Prenatal counselling is characterized by specific characteristics: A):The communication is about the values of the pregnant woman and her relationship with the child to be. B) The communication deals with patient's images and emotions. C) It is a communication about risks, numbers and statistics. D) Physician and patient deal with important ethical issues. In this specific setting of prenatal diagnosis and care physicians should therefore learn to apply basic principles of patient-centred communication with elements of non directive counselling, patient education and shared decision making. These elements are integrated into a process which comprises the following "steps": 1. Clarification of the patient's objectives and the obstetrician's mandate. 2. The providing of individualized information and education about prenatal tests and investigations. 3. Shared decision making regarding tests and investigations 4. Eventually Breaking (bad, ambivalent) news. 5. Caring for patients with an affected child.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of persistent cloaca.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Obayashi, Shintaro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    We report four cases of persistent cloaca diagnosed at 32-33 weeks of gestation. In cases of persistent cloaca, serial prenatal ultrasonography shows transient fetal ascites, enlarged cystic structures arising from the fetal pelvis. Our four cases of persistent cloaca were diagnosed prenatally. Persistent cloaca should be considered in any female fetus presenting with hydronephrosis and a large cystic lesion arising from the pelvis as assessed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Neither pulmonary hypoplasia nor severe oligohydramnios were found in any of our four cases, and they each had a good prognosis. Prenatal diagnosis allows time for parental counseling and delivery planning at a tertiary care center for neonatal intensive care and pediatric surgery.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and telemedicine consultation of fetal urologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Nader Z; Canon, Stephen; Patel, Ashay; Zamilpa, Ismael; Magann, Everett F; Higley, Jared

    2016-06-01

    In Arkansas, telemedicine is used commonly in obstetrics through Antenatal and Neonatal Guidelines, Education and Learning System (ANGELS), the existing statewide telemedicine network. This network is used primarily for tele-ultrasound and maternal-fetal medicine consultation. This study is a retrospective case series, describing all the patients who had a prenatally diagnosed urologic anomaly that required prenatal urologic consultation. From 2009-2013, approximately 1300 anomalies were recorded in the Arkansas Fetal Diagnosis and Management (AFDM) database, 14% of which were urologic anomalies. Twenty-six cases required prenatal urologic consultation, 25 of which were conducted via telemedicine. Teleconsultation allowed patients to combine maternal-fetal medicine and urologic consultations in one visit, saving time and effort and ultimately, for most patients, providing reassurance that delivery could be accomplished locally with postnatal follow-up already arranged. While there are several studies reporting the use of telemedicine for various subspecialty consultations, to our knowledge, this is the first to describe the use of telemedicine for prenatal urology consultation. Future research could randomize patients prospectively to allow comparison of both the outcomes as well as the patient experience.

  5. [Prenatal diagnosis using chorionic villi].

    PubMed

    Vega Hernández, M E; Hicks, J J; González-Angulo, J

    1991-07-01

    Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) has a promising future about early detection of fetal abnormalities. It has the potential to become a major tool in the prenatal diagnosis and therapy of genetic disorders. Villus samples can be analyzed by means of cytogenetic, biochemical or molecular technics. Information available at present indicates fetal loss rate should be in the same proportion than amniocentesis. CVS appears to be a reasonably safe and reliable method of prenatal diagnosis in the first trimester of pregnancy. This procedure is setting as fast as it is possible like an excellent alternative to amniocentesis.

  6. Prenatal prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Triebwasser, Jourdan E; Treadwell, Marjorie C

    2017-03-15

    Pulmonary hypoplasia, although rare, is associated with significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Conditions associated with pulmonary hypoplasia include those which limit normal thoracic capacity or movement, including skeletal dysplasias and abdominal wall defects; those with mass effect, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia and pleural effusions; and those with decreased amniotic fluid, including preterm, premature rupture of membranes, and genitourinary anomalies. The ability to predict severe pulmonary hypoplasia prenatally aids in family counseling, as well as obstetric and neonatal management. The objective of this review is to outline the imaging techniques that are widely used prenatally to assess pulmonary hypoplasia and to discuss the limitations of these methods.

  7. Prenatal Maternal Reactivity to Infant Cries Predicts Postnatal Perceptions of Infant Temperament and Marriage Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Frank A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined cardiac response and ratings of subjective aversiveness to recordings of unfamiliar infant cries in 60 primiparous women at 32 weeks' gestation. Mothers who prenatally rated the crying recordings as more aversive postnatally described their infants as more fussy and unpredictable. Women who showed greater cardiac acceleration to the cries…

  8. Prenatal radiation exposure policy: A labor arbitration

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.J. )

    1990-07-01

    A policy on prenatal radiation exposure at two nuclear power plants was revised to give better assurance of compliance with NCRP recommendations on fetal radiation exposure. This action was taken after publication of NCRP 91 in June 1987 to provide better assurance that a total dose equivalent limit to an embryo-fetus be no greater than 0.5 mSv (0.05 rem) in any month and no more than 5 mSv (500 mrem) for a gestation period. For any female worker to receive radiation exposure greater than 1.5 mSv (0.15 rem) in a month at these nuclear power plants, she was asked to initiate an administrative request for radiation exposure in excess of this limit. In this request, she was asked to acknowledge that she was aware of the guidance in U.S. NRC Regulatory Guide 8.13. A worker who had the potential for radiation exposure in excess of 1.5 mSv (0.15 rem) refused to process this request and was consequently denied overtime work. She filed a grievance for denial of overtime, and this grievance was submitted for labor arbitration in June 1988. The arbitration decision and its basis and related NRC actions are discussed.

  9. [Scientific and practical aspects of prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Baranov, V S

    2003-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostics (PD) is a relatively new branch of medical genetics enjoining presently a rapid practical and scientific progress. The key practical issues related with detecting the pregnant women at high risk of fetal congenital and inherited pathologies have already been solved, and a variety of fetal examinations by non-invasive (ultrasound) and invasive (cytogenetics, biochemistry and molecular tests) methods have been elaborated. Their practical application are totally dependant on the managerial and financial input in the discussed field of medicine. Further advancement in PD are tensely associated with early pregnancy stages (trimester 1), with the molecular diagnostic tools in the diagnosis of chromosomal diseases and with a comprehensive use of Pregnancy Genetic Form worked out and used already at our institute. DP opens up the promising opportunities for analyzing the human genome activity at the initial development stages, which comprises the revision of previously-obtained data on the cytogenetics of human embryo evolution, human chromosomes' functioning and of temporary embryonic organs as observed during the mentioned stages; it also comprises an analysis and application of umbilical and embryonic cells (embryonic cell therapy) and elaboration of scientific fundamentals for embryonic gene therapy. PD should not be referred to only as a set of diagnostic methods for it is also a good starting-ground for research of human embryo-genesis.

  10. [Prenatal genetic diagnosis and related nursing care].

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ya-Ling; Chiu, Tsan-Hung

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnosis plays an important role in eugenics. Early detection of embryo and fetus abnormalities allows preventive precautions to be taken and treatment to begin early in order to reduce the severity and extent of congenital deformities. Advancements in genetic diagnostic techniques infer that nurses are increasingly likely to deal with prenatal genetic diagnosis cases. This essay introduces a few prevalent prenatal genetic diagnosis methods used at different stages of pregnancy; describes in a comprehensive manner the potential physical and psychological responses of the client; and introduces principles of administering prenatal genetic diagnosis to healthcare clients. Ethical issues related to prenatal genetic diagnosis are also discussed.

  11. The impact of group prenatal care on pregnancy and postpartum weight trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Magriples, Urania; Boynton, Marcella H.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Lewis, Jessica; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Epel, Elissa; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of the study was to investigate whether group prenatal care (Centering Pregnancy Plus [CP+]) has an impact on pregnancy weight gain and postpartum weight loss trajectories and to determine whether prenatal depression and distress might moderate these trajectories. STUDY DESIGN This was a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomized trial of CP+ in 14 Community Health Centers and hospitals in New York City. Participants were pregnant women aged 14–21 years (n = 984). Medical record review and 4 structured interviews were conducted: in the second and third trimesters and 6 and 12 months postpartum. Longitudinal mixed modeling was utilized to evaluate the weight change trajectories in the control and intervention groups. Prenatal distress and depression were also assessed to examine their impact on weight change. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups in baseline demographics. Thirty-five percent of the participants were overweight or obese, and more than 50% had excessive weight gain by Institute of Medicine standards. CP+ was associated with improved weight trajectories compared with controls (P < .0001): women at clinical sites randomized to group prenatal care gained less weight during pregnancy and lost more weight postpartum. This effect was sustained among women who were categorized as obese based on prepregnancy body mass index (P < .01). Prenatal depression and distress were significantly associated with higher antepartum weight gain and postpartum weight retention. Women with the highest levels of depression and prenatal distress exhibited the greatest positive impact of group prenatal care on weight trajectories during pregnancy and through 12 months postpartum. CONCLUSION Group prenatal care has a significant impact on weight gain trajectories in pregnancy and postpartum. The intervention also appeared to mitigate the effects of depression and prenatal distress on antepartum weight

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of 47,XXX.

    PubMed

    Khoury-Collado, Fady; Wehbeh, Ammar N; Fisher, Allan J; Bombard, Allan T; Weiner, Zeev

    2005-05-01

    We report 2 cases of 47,XXX that were diagnosed prenatally and were screened positive for trisomy 21 by biochemical and ultrasound markers. These cases underline the importance of discussing the sex chromosome abnormalities during the genetic counseling after an abnormal triple screen test or ultrasound examination.

  13. Prenatal Nutrition and Later Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, T. N.

    1972-01-01

    Text of an affidavit in the case, Kennedy v. Detroit Board of Education. Reports on a study which established that prenatal nutrition is directly related to brain size and volume determined at 48 hours of infancy and at eight months of age. Pinpoints the relationship between inadequate nutrition in pregnancy, infant brain size, and intellectual…

  14. ACL Revision

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Dubois, Julieta Puig; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a series of patients one year after an ACL revision with clinical evaluation and MRI, to consider their condition before returning to sports activities. Methods: A descriptive, prospective and longitudinal study was performed. A series of patients who underwent an ACL revision between March 2014 and March 2015 were evaluated after one year post surgery. They were evaluated using the Lysholm score, IKDC, Tegner, artrometry and MRI (3.0 t). A signal pattern and osteointegration was determined in the MRI. Graft signal intensity of the ACL graft using the signal/noise quotient value (SNQ) was also determined to evaluate the ligamentatization process state. Results: A total of 18 male patients were evaluated with a mean age of 31 years old.Average scores were: Lysholm 88 points, IKDC 80 points, Pre-surgical Tegner 9 points and postoperative 4 points. Artrhometry (KT1000) at 20 newtons showed a side to side difference of less than 3 mm in 88%. Only 44% of patients returned to their previous sport activity one year after revision.The MRI showed a heterogeneous signal in neoligaments in 34% of patients. SNQ showed graft integration in only 28%. Synovial fluid was found in bone-graft interphase in 44% of tunnels, inferring partial osteointegration. The heterogeneous signal was present in 50% of patients who did not return to the previous sport level activity. (Fisher statistics: p = 0.043) There were no meaningful differences in patients with auto or allografts. Conclusion: Although the clinical evaluation was satisfactory, only 44% of patients returned to the previous level of sport activity one year after the ACL surgery. The ligamentatization process was found in 28% of knees evaluated with MRI one year later. Partial osteointegration is inferred in 44%. Results showed a meaningful relation between the signal of neoligaments in the MRI and the return to sport activity in said series of patients. MRI is a useful tool

  15. Prenatal diethylstilbestrol exposure and risk of obesity in adult women.

    PubMed

    Hatch, E E; Troisi, R; Palmer, J R; Wise, L A; Titus, L; Strohsnitter, W C; Ricker, W; Hyer, M; Hoover, R N

    2015-06-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a non-steroidal estrogen that was commonly prescribed during pregnancy from the late 1940s to 1971. A potent endocrine disruptor, prenatal DES exposure has been linked with reproductive tract malformations, adverse pregnancy outcomes, cancer, infertility and earlier menopause. DES was used for years as a growth promoter in animal production. Some animal studies suggest that prenatal DES exposure is associated with obesity and metabolic disturbances. Using data from the National Cancer Institute DES Follow-Up Study, we evaluated the association between DES and adult obesity, weight gain from age 20 to mid-life, central adiposity and height among 2871 prenatally exposed and 1352 unexposed women between 23 and 52 years of age (median 41.5) at baseline in 1994. DES exposure status was confirmed by prenatal medical record review. We used multivariable log-binomial models to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for obesity in 2006, and linear regression to calculate mean differences in body mass index, weight gain, waist circumference and height. The adjusted RR for DES and obesity was 1.09 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97, 1.22], and RRs were 1.23 (CI: 1.07, 1.42) and 1.05 (CI: 0.91, 1.20) for low and high estimated total DES dose, respectively, compared with no exposure. DES-exposed women gained slightly more weight than unexposed women [mean difference, 0.70 kg (CI: -0.27, 1.66)]. This study suggests that prenatal DES exposure may be associated with a small increase in adult obesity.

  16. Revised Late Oligocene to Early Miocene magnetic stratigraphy recorded by drift sediments at Sites U1405 and U1406, IODP Expedition 342 (Newfoundland, NW Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Peer, Tim; Xuan, Chuang; Wilson, Paul; Liebrand, Diederik; Lippert, Peter

    2015-04-01

    to impact the completeness of the spliced magnetostratigraphic record. Rock and mineral magnetic studies of selected samples are currently ongoing to characterise the magnetic mineralogy of the sediments and how it changes across the stratigraphic gaps and intervals with contrasting lithological and/or palaeomagnetic properties. These data will help us understand the origin of the palaeomagnetic signal and test its reliability, while providing insights on the nature of the observed stratigraphic gaps and how they relate to global climate dynamics of the OMT and the Deep Western Boundary Current.

  17. Assessing the quality of last menstrual period date on California birth records.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Michelle; Wier, Megan L; Kharrazi, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Birth certificate last menstrual period (LMP) date is widely used to estimate gestational age in the US. While data quality concerns have been raised, no large population-based study has isolated data quality issues by comparing birth record LMP (Birth LMP) with reliable LMP dates from another source. We assessed LMP data quality in 2002 California singleton livebirth records (n = 515 381) and in a subset of records with linked prenatally collected LMP from California's statewide Prenatal Expanded Alpha-fetoprotein Screening Program (XAFP) (n = 105 936). Missing or incomplete LMP data affected 13% of birth records; 17% of those had complete LMP within XAFP records. Data quality indicators supported XAFP LMP as more accurate than Birth LMP, with a lower prevalence of digit preference, post-term delivery, out-of-range gestational age estimates and implausible birthweight-for-gestational age. The bimodal birthweight distribution evident at 20-31 weeks' gestation based on Birth LMP was nearly absent with XAFP LMP-based gestational age. Approximately 32% of the second birthweight mode was explained by apparent clerical errors in Birth LMP month. Digit preference errors, particularly day 1, were associated with gestational age overestimation. Preterm delivery rates were higher according to Birth (7.6%) vs. XAFP LMP (7.2%). One-fifth of observed preterm and over half of observed post-term births using Birth LMP were not true cases; 15% of true preterm cases were missed. African American or Hispanic, less educated, and publicly or uninsured women were most likely to be misclassified and have large LMP date discrepancies attributable to clerical or digit preference error. The implementation of a revised birth certificate is an opportunity for targeted training and data entry checks that could substantially improve LMP accuracy on birth records.

  18. Effects of Prenatal Social Stress and Maternal Dietary Fatty Acid Ratio on Infant Temperament: Does Race Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Brunst, Kelly J.; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Kannan, Srimathi; Carroll, Kecia N.; Coull, Brent A.; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infant temperament predicts a range of developmental and behavioral outcomes throughout childhood. Both maternal fatty acid intake and psychosocial stress exposures during pregnancy may influence infant temperament. Furthermore, maternal race may modify prenatal diet and stress effects. The goals of this study are to examine the joint effects of prenatal diet and stress and the modifying effects of race on infant behavior. Methods Analyses included N=255 mother-infant dyads, primarily minorities (21% Blacks; 42% Hispanics), enrolled in an urban pregnancy cohort. Maternal prenatal stress was indexed by a negative life events (NLEs) score on the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey. Prenatal total daily intakes of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (n3, n6) were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire; n3:n6 ratios were calculated. Mothers completed the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (IBQ-R), a measure of infant temperament, when the children were 6 months old. Three commonly used dimensions were derived: Orienting & Regulation, Extraversion, and Negative Affectivity. Associations among prenatal stress, maternal n3:n6 ratio, and race/ethnicity on infant temperament, controlling for maternal education and age and child sex, were examined. Results Among Blacks, prenatal stress effects on infant Orienting & Regulation scores were modified by maternal n3:n6 ratios (p=0.03): As NLEs increased, lower n3:n6 ratios predicted lower infant Orienting & Regulation scores, whereas higher n3:n6 ratios attenuated the effect of prenatal stress. There were no main or interaction effects predicting Extraversion or Negative Affectivity. Conclusions An optimal PUFA ratio may protect the fetus from stress effects on infant behavior, particularly among Blacks. These findings may have implications for later neurodevelopment and social functioning predicted by early temperamental characteristics. PMID:25328835

  19. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  20. Prenatal Screening Methods for Aneuploidies

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Madhusudan; Sharma, Sumedha; Aggarwal, Sumita

    2013-01-01

    Aneuploidies are a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is the most common indication for invasive prenatal diagnosis. Initially, screening for aneuploidies started with maternal age risk estimation. Later on, serum testing for biochemical markers and ultrasound markers were added. Women detected to be at high-risk for aneuploidies were offered invasive testing. New research is now focusing on non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation. The advantage of this technique is the ability to reduce the risk of miscarriage associated with invasive diagnostic procedures. However, this new technique has its own set of technical limitations and ethical issues at present and careful consideration is required before broad implementation PMID:23626953

  1. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Cuckle, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs), chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening. PMID:26237388

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, John J

    2005-02-01

    The focus of this communication is to comment on the relative importance of enzymatic and molecular genetics, potential false results and future options for prenatal diagnosis of Sanfilippo syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types IIIA, IIIB, IIIC and IIID). During the provision of an international service over the past 25 years, our department has identified 7 affected out of 49 MPS III prenatal assessments. During this period, the technology used by us and others (Thompson et al., 1993; Kleijer et al., 1996) in these diagnoses has undergone considerable development in evolution. Our policy to maintain a close relationship between the provision of a diagnostic service and research to achieve an overall goal of early diagnosis and effective therapy have progressed both activities.

  3. Prenatal nutrition and birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fowles, Eileen R

    2004-01-01

    The complex relationship between maternal nutritional and birth outcomes emphasizes the need for consistent and thorough assessments of women's diet throughout pregnancy and individualized nutritional education to promote positive birth outcomes. The purpose of this article is to examine the influence of prenatal nutrition on birth outcomes, describe research on the effects of macro- and micronutrients on birth outcomes, and discuss strategies for monitoring diet and implementing nutrition education during pregnancy.

  4. Recording and cataloging hazards information, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A data collection process is described for the purpose of discerning causation factors of accidents, and the establishment of boundaries or controls aimed at mitigating and eliminating accidents. A procedure is proposed that suggests a discipline approach to hazard identification based on energy interrelationships together with an integrated control technique which takes the form of checklists.

  5. Prenatal lead exposure modifies the impact of maternal self-esteem on children's inattention behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Hu, Howard; Wright, Rosalind; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Bellinger, David C.; Park, Sung Kyun; Martínez, Sandra; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Téllez-Rojo, Martha Maria; Wright, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate the association of maternal self-esteem measured when their offspring were toddlers with the subsequent development of attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD)-like behavior in their school-age offspring and the potential modifying effects of prenatal lead exposure. Study design We evaluated a subsample of 192 mother-child pairs from a long-running birth-cohort project that enrolled mothers in Mexico from 1994 to 2011. Prenatal lead exposure was assessed using cord blood lead and maternal bone lead around delivery (tibia and patella lead, measured by K-x-ray-fluorescence). When children were 2 years old, maternal self-esteem was measured using the Coopersmith-Self-esteem-Inventory. When children were 7-to-15 years old, children's blood lead levels and ADHD symptoms were assessed, and Conners’ Parental-Rating-Scales-Revised (CPRS-R) and Behavior-Rating-Inventory-of-Executive-Function-Parent Form (BRIEF-P) were used as measures of ADHD-like behavior. Results Adjusting for family economic status, marital status, maternal education and age, child's age and sex, and children's current blood lead levels, increased maternal self-esteem was associated with reduced child inattention behavior. Compared with those among high prenatal lead exposure (P25-P100), this association was stronger among low prenatal lead exposure groups (P1-P25, p-values for the interaction effects between prenatal lead exposure and maternal self-esteem levels < 0.10). Each 1-point increase in maternal self-esteem scores was associated with 0.6-to-1.3-point decrease in CPRS-R and BRIEF-P T-scores among groups with low cord blood lead and patella lead (P1-P25). Conclusions Children experiencing high maternal self-esteem during toddlerhood were less likely to develop inattention behavior at school-age. Prenatal lead exposure may play a role in attenuating this protective effect. PMID:26047683

  6. MOTHERS' AND FATHERS' PRENATAL REPRESENTATIONS IN RELATION TO MARITAL DISTRESS AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist-Björkroth, Sari; Korja, Riikka; Junttila, Niina; Savonlahti, Elina; Pajulo, Marjukka; Räihä, Hannele; Aromaa, Minna

    2016-07-01

    Marital distress, parental depression, and weak quality of parental representations are all known risk factors for parent-child relationships. However, the relation between marital distress, depressive symptoms, and parents' prenatal representation is uncertain, especially regarding fathers. The present study aimed to explore how mothers' and fathers' prenatal experience of marital distress and depressive symptoms affects the organization of their prenatal representations in late pregnancy. Participants were 153 pregnant couples from a Finnish follow-up study called "Steps to the Healthy Development and Well-being of Children" (H. Lagström et al., ). Marital distress (Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale; D.M. Busby, C. Christensen, D. Crane, & J. Larson, 1995) and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) were assessed at 20 gestational weeks, and prenatal representations (Working Model of the Child Interview; D. Benoit, K.C.H. Parker, & C.H. Zeanah, 1997; C.H. Zeanah, D. Benoit, M. Barton, & L. Hirshberg, 1996) were assessed between 29 and 32 gestational weeks. The mothers' risks of distorted representations increased significantly when they had at least minor depressive symptoms. Marital distress was associated with the fathers' prenatal representations, although the association was weak; fathers within the marital distress group had less balanced representations. Coexisting marital distress and depressive symptoms were only associated with the mothers' representations; lack of marital distress and depressive symptoms increased the likelihood for mothers to have balanced representations. The results imply that marital distress and depressive symptoms are differently related to the organizations of mothers' and fathers' prenatal representations.

  7. Prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy and prenatal syphilis testing in Brazil: Birth in Brazil study

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Szwarcwald, Celia Landmann; Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the coverage rate of syphilis testing during prenatal care and the prevalence of syphilis in pregnant women in Brazil. METHODS This is a national hospital-based cohort study conducted in Brazil with 23,894 postpartum women between 2011 and 2012. Data were obtained using interviews with postpartum women, hospital records, and prenatal care cards. All postpartum women with a reactive serological test result recorded in the prenatal care card or syphilis diagnosis during hospitalization for childbirth were considered cases of syphilis in pregnancy. The Chi-square test was used for determining the disease prevalence and testing coverage rate by region of residence, self-reported skin color, maternal age, and type of prenatal and child delivery care units. RESULTS Prenatal care covered 98.7% postpartum women. Syphilis testing coverage rate was 89.1% (one test) and 41.2% (two tests), and syphilis prevalence in pregnancy was 1.02% (95%CI 0.84;1.25). A lower prenatal coverage rate was observed among women in the North region, indigenous women, those with less education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. A lower testing coverage rate was observed among residents in the North, Northeast, and Midwest regions, among younger and non-white skin-color women, among those with lower education, and those who received prenatal care in public health care units. An increased prevalence of syphilis was observed among women with < 8 years of education (1.74%), who self-reported as black (1.8%) or mixed (1.2%), those who did not receive prenatal care (2.5%), and those attending public (1.37%) or mixed (0.93%) health care units. CONCLUSIONS The estimated prevalence of syphilis in pregnancy was similar to that reported in the last sentinel surveillance study conducted in 2006. There was an improvement in prenatal care and testing coverage rate, and the goals suggested by the World Health Organization were achieved in two regions. Regional

  8. Effects of Prenatal Nicotine Exposure on Infant Language Development: A Cohort Follow Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Voltas Moreso, Núria; Ribot Serra, Blanca; Arija Val, Victoria; Escribano Macías, Joaquín; Canals Sans, Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Objectives To study the longitudinal effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on cognitive development, taking into consideration prenatal and postnatal second-hand smoke exposure. Methods A cohort follow up study was carried out. One hundred and fifty-eight pregnant women and their infants were followed during pregnancy and infant development (at 6, 12, 30 months). In each trimester of pregnancy and during postnatal follow-up, a survey was administered to obtain sociodemographic data and the details of maternal and close familial toxic habits. Obstetric and neonatal data were obtained from hospital medical records. To assess cognitive development, the Bayley Scales of Infant Development were applied at 6, 12 and 30 months; to assess language development, the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories were applied at 12 months and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at 30 months. Results After adjustment for confounding variables, the results showed that infants prenatally exposed to cigarette smoke recorded poor cognitive development scores. Language development was most consistently affected, specifically those aspects related to auditory function (vocalizations, sound discrimination, word imitation, prelinguistic vocalizations, and word and sentence comprehension). Conclusions for Practice Irrespective of prenatal, perinatal and sociodemographic data (including infant postnatal nicotine exposure), prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke and second-hand smoke affect infant cognitive development, especially language abilities.

  9. Conceptions of Prenatal Development: Behavioral Embryology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Gilbert

    1976-01-01

    Describes recent progress in research on prenatal behavioral development and in a systematic fashion the various ways in which prenatal experience can affect the development of behavior in the neonate as well as in the embryo and fetus. (Author/RK)

  10. Prenatal exclusion of the HHH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gray, R G; Green, A; Hall, S; McKeown, C

    1995-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of the hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia, and homocitrullinuria syndrome is described by the analysis of ornithine incorporation in second-trimester cultured amniotic fluid cells. An unaffected fetus was predicted and confirmed in the newborn child. This is the third reported prenatal diagnosis for this disorder and the second predicting an unaffected fetus.

  11. Prenatal Yoga: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... promote your baby's health? Before you start prenatal yoga, understand the range of possible benefits, as well as what a typical class entails ... centering and focused breathing. Research suggests that prenatal yoga is safe ... many benefits for pregnant women and their babies. Research suggests ...

  12. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  13. Primary Pupils' Preconceptions about Child Prenatal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoldosova, Kristina; Prokop, Pavol

    2007-01-01

    The research deals a problem of primary pupils' preconceptions about a child prenatal development. Even the pupils cannot experience the phenomenon and can get only mediate information; their idea about the prenatal development is quite well constructed. The quality of the preconceptions depends mainly upon variety of informational sources kept at…

  14. Prenatal management of disorders of sex development.

    PubMed

    Chitty, Lyn S; Chatelain, Pierre; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P; Aigrain, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) rarely present prenatally but, as they are very complex conditions, management should be directed by highly specialised medical teams to allow consideration of all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and ethical issues. In this brief review, we present an overview of the prenatal presentation and management of DSD, including the sonographic appearance of normal genitalia and methods of determining genetic sex, the prenatal management of pregnancies with the unexpected finding of genital ambiguity on prenatal ultrasound and a review of the prenatal management of pregnancies at high risk of DSD. As this is a rapidly developing field, management options will change over time, making the involvement of clinical geneticists, paediatric endocrinologists and urologists, as well as fetal medicine specialists, essential in the care of these complex pregnancies. The reader should also bear in mind that local social, ethical and legal aspects may also influence management.

  15. Medicaid reimbursement, prenatal care and infant health.

    PubMed

    Sonchak, Lyudmyla

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of state-level Medicaid reimbursement rates for obstetric care on prenatal care utilization across demographic groups. It also uses these rates as an instrumental variable to assess the importance of prenatal care on birth weight. The analysis is conducted using a unique dataset of Medicaid reimbursement rates and 2001-2010 Vital Statistics Natality data. Conditional on county fixed effects, the study finds a modest, but statistically significant positive relationship between Medicaid reimbursement rates and the number of prenatal visits obtained by pregnant women. Additionally, higher rates are associated with an increase in the probability of obtaining adequate care, as well as a reduction in the incidence of going without any prenatal care. However, the effect of an additional prenatal visit on birth weight is virtually zero for black disadvantaged mothers, while an additional visit yields a substantial increase in birth weight of over 20 g for white disadvantaged mothers.

  16. Prenatal microwave exposure and behavior

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The hypotheses for the initial investigation was based on the idea that failure to observe structural teratogenesis following microwave exposure did not preclude the possibility that such exposure would result in behavioral changes. We also proposed that such exposure might specifically alter some aspect of thermoregulatory behavior. The results of these studies support both of these hypotheses. Whether the studies show enhanced thermal sensitivity or enhanced development, they do support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to microwave radiation is more likely to alter postnatal sensitivity to thermally related stimuli or conditions as compared to stimuli that are thermally neutral.

  17. Intraventricular hemorrhage after ventriculoperitoneal shunt revision: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Calayag, Mark; Paul, Alexandra R; Adamo, Matthew A

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The authors review their ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt revisions over a 3-year period to determine the rate of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and subsequent need for re-revision. METHODS Review of medical records identified 35 pediatric patients who underwent 52 VP shunt revisions between 2009 and 2012. The presence and amount of IVH as determined by CT and the time to re-revision were documented. The reason for shunting, catheter position, and time between initial VP shunt placement and subsequent revisions were also recorded. RESULTS After 13 (25%) of the 52 revisions, IVH was evident on postoperative CT scans. The majority of patients had a trace amount of IVH, with only 2% having IVH greater than 5 ml. After 2 (15%) of the 13 revisions associated with IVH, re-revision was required within 1 month. In contrast, the re-revision rate in patients without IVH was 18%. All of the patients who developed IVH had occipital catheters. CONCLUSIONS Some degree of IVH can be expected after approximately one-quarter of all VP shunt revision procedures in pediatric patients, but the rate of significant IVH is low. Furthermore, the presence of IVH does not necessitate an early shunt revision.

  18. Candidate diseases for prenatal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Waddington, Simon N

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal gene therapy aims to deliver genes to cells and tissues early in prenatal life, allowing correction of a genetic defect, before irreparable tissue damage has occurred. In contrast to postnatal gene therapy, prenatal application may target genes to a large population of stem cells, and the smaller fetal size allows a higher vector to target cell ratio to be achieved. Early gestation delivery may allow the development of immune tolerance to the transgenic protein, which would facilitate postnatal repeat vector administration if needed. Moreover, early delivery would avoid anti-vector immune responses which are often acquired in postnatal life. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee considered that a candidate disease for prenatal gene therapy should pose serious morbidity and mortality risks to the fetus or neonate, and not have any effective postnatal treatment. Prenatal gene therapy would therefore be appropriate for life-threatening disorders, in which prenatal gene delivery maintains a clear advantage over cell transplantation or postnatal gene therapy. If deemed safer and more efficacious, prenatal gene therapy may be applicable for nonlethal conditions if adult gene transfer is unlikely to be of benefit. Many candidate diseases will be inherited congenital disorders such as thalassaemia or lysosomal storage disorders. However, obstetric conditions such as fetal growth restriction may also be treated using a targeted gene therapy approach. In each disease, the condition must be diagnosed prenatally, either via antenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis, for example, in the case of hemophilias, or by ultrasound assessment of the fetus, for example, congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In this chapter, we describe some examples of the candidate diseases and discuss how a prenatal gene therapy approach might work.

  19. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  20. Correlation in the Discharges of Neighboring Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells During Prenatal Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Lamberto; Galli-Resta, Lucia

    1990-04-01

    The spontaneous discharges of neighboring retinal ganglion cells were recorded simultaneously in anesthetized prenatal rats between embryonic days 18 and 21. We report here that in the majority of cases the firings of neighboring retinal ganglion cells are strongly correlated during prenatal life. Correlation in the discharges of neighboring cells during development has long been suggested as a way to consolidate synaptic connections with a target cell onto which they converge, a model first proposed by Hebb. Correlation in the activities of neighboring neurons in the retina could be the basis of developmental processes such as refinement of retinotopic maps in the brain and segregation of the inputs from the two eyes.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis in multiple pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Fisk, N M

    2000-08-01

    Fetal abnormality is more common in multiple than in singleton pregnancies. This, together with the requirement to consider the risks with at least two babies to sample correctly each fetus and to undertake accurately-targeted selective termination, amounts to a major challenge for obstetricians involved in prenatal diagnosis. Early determination of chorionicity should be routine, since this influences not only the genetic risks but also the invasive procedure chosen for karyotyping or genotyping. Assessment of nuchal translucency identifies individual fetuses at risk of trisomy. Contrary to expectation, invasive procedures in twins appear to have procedure-related miscarriage rates that are similar to those in singletons. Instead, contamination remains a concern at chorionic villus sampling. Elective late karyotyping of fetuses may have a role in some countries. Whereas management options for discordant fetal abnormality are relatively straightforward in dichorionic pregnancies, monochorionic pregnancies are at risk of co-twin sequelae after any single intrauterine death. Techniques have now been developed to occlude completely the cord vasculature by laser and/or ultrasound guided bipolar diathermy. Given the complexities associated with prenatal diagnosis, all invasive procedures in multiple pregnancies should be performed in tertiary referral centres.

  2. The Yugoslavia Prospective Lead Study: contributions of prenatal and postnatal lead exposure to early intelligence.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, G A; Liu, X; Popovac, D; Factor-Litvak, P; Kline, J; Waternaux, C; LoIacono, N; Graziano, J H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate associations between the timing of lead (Pb) exposure on early intelligence, we examined the results of psychometric evaluations at ages 3, 4, 5, and 7 years, from 442 children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy from a smelter town and a non-lead-exposed town in Yugoslavia. We compared the relative contribution of prenatal blood lead (BPb) with that of relative increases in BPb in either the early (0-2 years) or the later (from 2 years on) postnatal period to child intelligence measured longitudinally at ages 3 and 4 (McCarthy GCI), 5 (Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised, WPPSI-R IQ), and 7 (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-version III, WISC-III IQ), controlling for: Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) quality; maternal age, intelligence, education, and ethnicity; and birthweight and gender. Elevations in both prenatal and postnatal BPb were associated with small decrements in young children's intelligence.

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Caused by P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Nicole; Idkowiak, Jan; Hughes, Beverly A.; Ivison, Hannah E.; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Hendon, Laura G.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Nielsen, Shelly; Harrison, Rachel; Blair, Edward M.; Dhir, Vivek; Krone, Nils; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Mutations in the electron donor enzyme P450 oxidoreductase (POR) result in congenital adrenal hyperplasia with apparent combined 17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase and 21-hydroxylase deficiencies, also termed P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD). Major clinical features present in PORD are disordered sex development in affected individuals of both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency, and multiple skeletal malformations. Objective: The objective of the study was to establish a noninvasive approach to prenatal diagnosis of PORD including assessment of malformation severity to facilitate optimized prenatal diagnosis and timely treatment. Design: We analyzed 20 pregnancies with children homozygous or compound heterozygous for disease-causing POR mutations and 1 pregnancy with a child carrying a heterozygous POR mutation by recording clinical and biochemical presentations and fetal ultrasound findings. In 4 of the pregnancies (3 homozygous and 1 heterozygous for disease-causing POR mutations), prenatal analysis of steroid metabolite excretion in maternal urine was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry during gestational weeks 11–23. Results: Pregnancy complications in our cohort included maternal virilization (6 of 20) with onset in the second trimester. Seven pregnant women presented with low unconjugated estriol at prenatal screening (triple or quadruple antenatal screening test). Overt dysmorphic features were noted in 19 of the 20 babies at birth but observed in only 5 by prenatal ultrasound. These 5 had the most severe malformation phenotypes and poor outcome, whereas the other babies showed normal development. Steroid profiling of maternal urine revealed significantly increased steroids of fetal origin, namely the pregnenolone metabolite epiallopregnanediol and the androgen metabolite androsterone, with concomitant low values for estriol. Diagnostic steroid ratios conclusively indicated PORD as early as gestational week 12. In the heterozygous

  4. The Padua Inventory: Do Revisions Need Revision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonner, Sascha; Ecker, Willi; Leonhart, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties, factorial structure, and validity of the Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision and of the Padua Inventory-Revised in a large sample of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 228) and with anxiety disorders and/or depression (n = 213). The…

  5. Postnatal Evaluation and Outcome of Prenatal Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Ansari-Moghadam, Alireza; Rashidi, Somaye

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prenatal hydronephrosis (PNH) is dilation in urinary collecting system and is the most frequent neonatal urinary tract abnormality with an incidence of 1% to 5% of all pregnancies. PNH is defined as anteroposterior diameter (APD) of renal pelvis ≥ 4 mm at gestational age (GA) of < 33 weeks and APD ≥ 7 mm at GA of ≥ 33 weeks to 2 months after birth. All patients need to be evaluated after birth by postnatal renal ultrasonography (US). In the vast majority of cases, watchful waiting is the only thing to do; others need medical or surgical therapy. Objectives: There is a direct relationship between APD of renal pelvis and outcome of PNH. Therefore we were to find the best cutoff point APD of renal pelvis which leads to surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective cohort study we followed 200 patients 1 to 60 days old with diagnosis of PNH based on before or after birth ultrasonography; as a prenatal or postnatal detected, respectively. These patients were referred to the nephrology clinic in Zahedan Iran during 2011 to 2013. The first step of investigation was a postnatal renal US, by the same expert radiologist and classifying the patients into 3 groups; normal, mild/moderate and severe. The second step was to perform voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) for mild/moderate to severe cases at 4 - 6 weeks of life. Tc-diethylene triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) was the last step and for those with normal VCUG who did not show improvement in follow-up examination, US to evaluate obstruction and renal function. Finally all patients with mild/moderate to severe PNH received conservative therapy and surgery was preserved only for progressive cases, obstruction or renal function ≤35%. All patients’ data and radiologic information was recorded in separate data forms, and then analyzed by SPSS (version 22). Results: 200 screened PNH patients with male to female ratio 3.5:1 underwent first postnatal control US, of whom 65% had normal, 18% mild

  6. Laparoscopic revision surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Celasin, Haydar; Genc, Volkan; Celik, Suleyman Utku; Turkcapar, Ahmet Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a frequently performed procedure for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in surgical clinics. Reflux can recur in between 3% and 30% of patients on whom antireflux surgery has been performed, and so revision surgery can be required due to recurrent symptoms or dysphagia in approximately 3% to 6% of the patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate the mechanism of recurrences after antireflux surgery and to share our results after revision surgery in recurrent cases. From 2001 to 2014, revision surgery was performed on 43 patients (31 men, 12 women) between the ages of 24 and 70 years. The technical details of the first operation, recurrence symptoms, endoscopy, and manometry findings were evaluated. The findings of revision surgery, surgical techniques, morbidity rates, length of hospitalization, and follow-up period were also recorded and evaluated. The first operation was Nissen fundoplication in 34 patients and Toupet fundoplication in 9 patients. Mesh hiatoplasty was performed for enforcement in 18 (41.9%) of these patients. The period between the first operation and the revision surgery ranged from 4 days to 60 months. The most common finding was slipped fundoplication and presence of hiatal hernia during revision surgery. Revision fundoplication and hernia repair with mesh reinforcement were used in 33 patients. The other techniques were Collis gastroplasty, revision fundoplication, and hernia repair without mesh. The range of follow-up period was from 2 to 134 months. Recurrence occurred in 3 patients after revision surgery (6.9%). Although revision surgery is difficult and it has higher morbidity, it can be performed effectively and safely in experienced centers. PMID:28072725

  7. [Prenatal Information System: critical analysis of register in a municipality of São Paulo State].

    PubMed

    Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Isper; Zina, Lívia Guimarães; Yarid, Sérgio Donha; Francisco, Kléryson Martins Soares

    2010-01-01

    The prenatal assistance is one of the health care pillars. This study aimed to conduct a critical evaluation of the SIS Prenatal in a city of São Paulo State, to compare its data with the local assistance and to verify the registry of pregnant women attended at Health Care Centers. It was analyzed the pregnant women records through consultation at Health Regional Unit and municipal health service. There were inconsistencies between the system and local registry. The failures were related to the inadequate filling of attendance files, besides scarce control of pregnant women files and scheduling on health centers. The results suggest the need for better planning of actions for the improvement of prenatal service quality.

  8. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances the trigeminocardiac reflex via serotonin receptor facilitation in brainstem pathways.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Jameson, H; Woerman, A L; Perry, D C; Mendelowitz, D

    2013-08-15

    In this study we used a rat model for prenatal nicotine exposure to test whether clinically relevant concentrations of brain nicotine and cotinine are passed from dams exposed to nicotine to her pups, whether this changes the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), and whether serotonergic function in the TCR brainstem circuitry is altered. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 6 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) of nicotine via osmotic minipumps for the duration of pregnancy. Following birth dams and pups were killed, blood was collected, and brain nicotine and cotinine levels were measured. A separate group of prenatal nicotine-exposed pups was used for electrophysiological recordings. A horizontal brainstem slice was obtained by carefully preserving the trigeminal nerve with fluorescent identification of cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evoked excitatory postsynaptic current in CVNs. Our data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure significantly exaggerates both the TCR-evoked changes in heart rate in conscious unrestrained pups, and the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs upon trigeminal afferent nerve stimulation within this brainstem reflex circuit. Application of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (100 μM) and 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 μM)significantly decreased neurotransmission, indicating an increased facilitation of 5-HT function in prenatal nicotine-exposed animals. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances activation of 5-HT receptors and exaggerates the trigeminocardiac reflex.

  9. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure and Whisker Clipping Disrupt Ultrasonic Vocalizations and Play Behavior in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Jaylyn; Yang, Tianqi; Ho, Eric; Wellmann, Kristen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure can result in social deficits in humans and animals, including altered social interaction and poor communication. Rats exposed to ethanol prenatally show reduced play fighting, and a combination of prenatal ethanol exposure and neonatal whisker clipping further reduces play fighting compared with ethanol exposure alone. In this study, we explored whether expression of hedonic ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) correlated with the number of playful attacks by ethanol-exposed rats, rats subjected to postnatal sensory deprivation by whisker clipping or both compared to control animals. In normally developing rats, hedonic USVs precede such interactions and correlate with the number of play interactions exhibited in dyads. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were fed an ethanol-containing liquid diet or a control diet. After birth, male and female pups from each litter were randomly assigned to the whisker-clipped or non-whisker-clipped condition. Animals underwent a social interaction test with a normally developing play partner during early or late-adolescence. USVs were recorded during play. Prenatal ethanol exposure reduced both play and hedonic USVs in early adolescence compared to control rats and persistently reduced social play. Interestingly, ethanol exposure, whisker clipping and the combination abolished the significant correlation between hedonic USVs and social play detected in control rats in early adolescence. This relationship remained disrupted in late adolescence only in rats subjected to both prenatal ethanol and whisker clipping. Thus, both insults more persistently disrupted the relationship between social communication and social play. PMID:27690116

  10. Reciprocal Relationships: the Genetic Counselor-Patient Relationship Following a Life-Limiting Prenatal Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, S R; Berrier, K L; Redlinger-Grosse, K; Edwards, J G

    2016-10-22

    Utilizing the tenet, "Relationship is integral to the genetic counseling process" from the Reciprocal Engagement Model (REM) of genetic counseling practice, this study sought to explore the relationship between the genetic counselor and patient following a "life-limiting" prenatal diagnosis that resulted in a major loss (termination, stillbirth/miscarriage, or neonatal death). The specific aims of this study were to: 1) Understand and describe aspects of the genetic counselor-patient relationship in the context of the life-limiting prenatal diagnosis, and identify characteristics and actions of the 2) genetic counselor and 3) patient that influence the relationship. Genetic counselor (GC) participants were recruited via a web-based survey distributed by NSGC and the NSGC Prenatal SIG. Eligible GCs maintained a relationship with a patient beyond the prenatal diagnosis and had a willing patient participant. Individual 60-min audio-recorded telephone interviews were conducted with eight GC and 8 respective patients (n = 16) using parallel interview guides (n = 16). Transcriptions underwent thematic content analysis for systematic coding and identification of emergent themes. The GC-patient relationship was characterized by the evolution of communication and promoted by the supportive needs of the patient, the nature of the diagnosis, and characteristics and supportive actions of the participants. This exploratory study highlights the unique service of support offered by genetic counselors in the context of a life-limiting prenatal diagnosis.

  11. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances the trigeminocardiac reflex via serotonin receptor facilitation in brainstem pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Jameson, H.; Woerman, A. L.; Perry, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we used a rat model for prenatal nicotine exposure to test whether clinically relevant concentrations of brain nicotine and cotinine are passed from dams exposed to nicotine to her pups, whether this changes the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), and whether serotonergic function in the TCR brainstem circuitry is altered. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 6 mg·kg−1·day−1 of nicotine via osmotic minipumps for the duration of pregnancy. Following birth dams and pups were killed, blood was collected, and brain nicotine and cotinine levels were measured. A separate group of prenatal nicotine-exposed pups was used for electrophysiological recordings. A horizontal brainstem slice was obtained by carefully preserving the trigeminal nerve with fluorescent identification of cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus. Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evoked excitatory postsynaptic current in CVNs. Our data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure significantly exaggerates both the TCR-evoked changes in heart rate in conscious unrestrained pups, and the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs upon trigeminal afferent nerve stimulation within this brainstem reflex circuit. Application of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (100 μM) and 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist ketanserin (10 μM)significantly decreased neurotransmission, indicating an increased facilitation of 5-HT function in prenatal nicotine-exposed animals. Prenatal nicotine exposure enhances activation of 5-HT receptors and exaggerates the trigeminocardiac reflex. PMID:23766497

  12. Prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-09-15

    The past decade has seen the development of technologies that have revolutionized prenatal genetic testing; that is, genetic testing from conception until birth. Genome-wide single-cell arrays and high-throughput sequencing analyses are dramatically increasing our ability to detect embryonic and fetal genetic lesions, and have substantially improved embryo selection for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Moreover, both invasive and non-invasive mutation scanning of the genome are helping to identify the genetic causes of prenatal developmental disorders. These advances are changing clinical practice and pose novel challenges for genetic counselling and prenatal care.

  13. Ethical issues in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Elkins, T E

    1988-06-01

    Prenatal diagnosis raises complex ethical issues not only in terms of individual decision making, but also in the development of clinical services and the formulation of public policy regarding access and funding. The motivation behind prenatal diagnosis is generally to provide the family with information regarding the pregnancy so that the outcome can be improved or, in the case of severely affected pregnancies, a decision can be made about pregnancy termination. Although many of the ethical issues involved in prenatal diagnosis and treatment overlap those common to all types of diagnostic procedures, the former situation is complicated by controversy about the moral status of the fetus and the use of selective abortion as a form of treatment. While there is general agreement that pregnancy termination after the 2nd trimester can be justified if the fetus is afflicted with a condition that is incompatible with postnatal survival or characterized by the virtual absence of cognitive functioning, the disposition of a fetus afflicted with a non-life-threatening physical or mental disability (e.g., Down's syndrome) is more controversial. An additional concern is that women with positive screening test results may choose elective abortion rather than undergo a definitive work-up. The issue of maternal versus fetal rights is perhaps the single most controversial dilemma. Here, the basic ethical dilemma is the conflict between respecting maternal autonomy versus acting beneficently toward the fetus. As a general rule, the more invasive the medical technique and the less certain the benefit to the fetus (e.g., laparotomy), the more difficult it is to make a convincing argument for forced interventions involving the mother's body. Situations in which compelling arguments can be made for forced interventions against the will of the mother are those where an otherwise healthy infant will die without immediate intervention or failure to perform a procedure will result in the

  14. Neandertals revised

    PubMed Central

    Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant growth of our knowledge of the Neandertals, a population of Pleistocene hunter-gatherers who lived in (western) Eurasia between ∼400,000 and 40,000 y ago. Starting from a source population deep in the Middle Pleistocene, the hundreds of thousands of years of relative separation between African and Eurasian groups led to the emergence of different phenotypes in Late Pleistocene Europe and Africa. Both recently obtained genetic evidence and archeological data show that the biological and cultural gaps between these populations were probably smaller than previously thought. These data, reviewed here, falsify inferences to the effect that, compared with their near-modern contemporaries in Africa, Neandertals were outliers in terms of behavioral complexity. It is only around 40,000 y ago, tens of thousands of years after anatomically modern humans first left Africa and thousands of years after documented interbreeding between modern humans, Neandertals and Denisovans, that we see major changes in the archeological record, from western Eurasia to Southeast Asia, e.g., the emergence of representational imagery and the colonization of arctic areas and of greater Australia (Sahul). PMID:27274044

  15. Prenatal cannibalism in an insect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Thomas; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2007-06-01

    Host selection and infection strategies of parasitoids often correlate with high parental investment and low numbers of progeny. In this study, we investigate how additional internal mechanisms might shape brood size and fitness of the offspring. Emblemasoma auditrix is a parasitoid fly in which about 38 larvae hatch simultaneously in utero. After host location, a single larva is deposited into the host, where it rapidly develops and pupates after about 5 days. The search for hosts can take several weeks, and during that time, the larvae arrest their development and remain in the first larval instar. Nevertheless, the larvae increase in weight within the uterus, and this growth correlates to a decrease in the number of larvae, although no larvae are deposited. Thus, our data indicate a first case of prenatal cannibalism in an invertebrate with larvae feeding on each other within the uterus of the adult.

  16. Prenatal stress, prematurity and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the U.S. and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced “premature asthma”. Prenatal stress may not only cause abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring Th2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: IL-6, which has been associated with premature labor, can promote Th2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing “premature asthma”. If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common co-morbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (e.g. from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  17. 77 FR 11534 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... INVESTMENT BOARD Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records AGENCY: Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. ACTION: Notice of revision to existing systems of records. SUMMARY: The Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board (Agency) is proposing to revise its Privacy Act Systems of Records to reflect the...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 227 - Audiometric Baseline Revision

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... baseline audiograms. B. Although these procedures can be programmed by a computer to identify records for potential revision, the final decision for revision rests with a human being. Because the goal of the guidelines is to foster consistency among different professional reviewers, human override of the...

  19. Sacrococcygeal teratoma: prenatal diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gross, S J; Benzie, R J; Sermer, M; Skidmore, M B; Wilson, S R

    1987-02-01

    Although sacrococcygeal teratoma is a rare and potentially malignant tumor, 10 cases were documented during a 5-year period at the University of Toronto Perinatal Complex. Diagnosis was made in the six cases in which prenatal ultrasound examination was performed. One patient with twins elected to terminate the pregnancy at 19 weeks. In three of the cases diagnosed prenatally, serial ultrasound was performed. There was a 75% cesarean section rate. In all cases diagnosed prenatally, the large tumor size affected the mode of delivery. In the four cases without prenatal diagnosis, two infants were delivered vaginally, and two were delivered abdominally for obstetric reasons. There was one case of neonatal morbidity where tumor vascularity and rupture resulted in hypovolemic shock. All tumors were resected and found to be benign. A plan of management is recommended and, with appropriate obstetric and pediatric care, a good outcome can be anticipated in most cases.

  20. Prenatal Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Predictive Accuracy of Serial Transvaginal Cervical Lengths and Quantitative Vaginal... Article: A possible new approach in the ... Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Prenatal Testing is the National Institute of ...

  1. Family structure and use of prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Alves, Elisabete; Silva, Susana; Martins, Simone; Barros, Henrique

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study intended to assess the use of prenatal care according to the family structure in a population with free universal access to prenatal care. In 2005-2006, the Portuguese birth cohort was assembled by the recruitment of puerperae at public maternity wards in Porto, Portugal. In the current analysis, 7,211 were included. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, obstetric history, and prenatal care were self-reported. Single mothers were considered as those whose household composition did not include a partner at delivery. Approximately 6% of the puerperae were single mothers. These women were more likely to have an unplanned pregnancy (OR = 6.30; 95%CI: 4.94-8.04), an inadequate prenatal care (OR = 2.30; 95%CI: 1.32-4.02), and to miss the ultrasound and the intake of folic acid supplements during the first trimester of pregnancy (OR = 1.71; 95%CI: 1.30-2.27; and OR = 1.67; 95%CI: 1.32-2.13, respectively). The adequacy and use of prenatal care was less frequent in single mothers. Educational interventions should reinforce the use and early initiation of prenatal care.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.Y.F.

    1996-03-01

    I read with great interest the paper on {open_quotes}Prenatal Diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism and 45,X: Implications for Postnatal Outcome{close_quotes} by Koeberl et al. They reported their experience with 12 prenatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism and made a clinical comparison between those 12 cases and their own 41 postnatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism. As expected, they found an overall milder phenotypic manifestation in the prenatal cases than in the postnatal ones. These authors report a lack of previous prognostic information on this type of prenatally diagnosis of mosaicism and offer their findings to fill this need. However, considerable information on this topic has been published. There have been >200 prenatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XX. According to my data on 189 cases with a prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XX mosaicism (Hsu 1992), there are 114 cases with available information on phenotypic outcome. Of these, 12 (10.5%) were reported to have some features of Turner syndrome, 4 had other anomalies probably not related to Turner syndrome, and 2 resulted in stillbirth. The overall rate for an abnormal phenotype in this category was thus 16/114 (14.03%). However, we must realize that, even in patients with a nonmosaic 45,X complement, the major features of Turner syndrome, such as short stature and sexual infantilism, are manifested only later in childhood or in adolescence. 3 refs.

  3. Invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhi; Yang, Yan-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Thalassemia is the most common monogenic inherited disease worldwide, affecting individuals originating from many countries to various extents. As the disease requires long-term care, prevention of the homozygous state presents a substantial global disease burden. The comprehensively preventive programs involve carrier detections, molecular diagnostics, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis. Invasive prenatal diagnosis refers to obtaining fetal material by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) at the first trimester, and by amniocentesis or cordocentesis at the second trimester. Molecular diagnosis, which includes multiple techniques that are aimed at the detection of mutations in the α- or β-globin genes, facilitates prenatal diagnosis and definitive diagnosis of the fetus. These are valuable procedures for couples at risk, so that they can be offered options to have healthy offspring. According to local practices and legislation, genetic counseling should accompany the invasive diagnostic procedures, DNA testing, and disclosure of the results. The most critical issue in any type of prenatal molecular testing is maternal cell contamination (MCC), especially when a fetus is found to inherit a particular mutation from the mother. The best practice is to perform MCC studies on all prenatal samples. The recent successful studies of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may allow future prenatal testing that is non-invasive for the fetus and result in significant reduction of invasive diagnostic procedures.

  4. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  5. Exploring group composition among young, urban women of color in prenatal care: Implications for satisfaction, engagement, and group attendance

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Rosenthal, Lisa; Cunningham, Shayna D.; Kershaw, Trace; Lewis, Jessica; Rising, Sharon; Stasko, Emily; Tobin, Jonathan; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Group models of prenatal care continue to grow in popularity. Yet, little is known about how group composition (similarity or diversity between members of groups) relates to care-related outcomes. The current investigation aimed to explore associations between prenatal care group composition with patient satisfaction, engagement, and group attendance among young, urban women of color. Methods Data were drawn from two studies conducted in New Haven and Atlanta (2001–2004; n=557) and New York City (2008–2011; n=375), designed to evaluate group prenatal care among young, urban women of color. Women aged 14–25 were assigned to group prenatal care and completed surveys during their second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Group attendance was recorded. Data were merged and analyzed guided by the Group Actor-Partner Interdependence Model using multilevel regression. Analyses explored composition in terms of age, race, ethnicity, and language. Main findings Women in groups with others more diverse in age reported greater patient engagement and, in turn, attended more group sessions [b(se)= −0.01(0.01), p=0.04]. Conclusion The composition of prenatal care groups appears to be associated with young women’s engagement in care, ultimately relating to the number of group prenatal care sessions they attend. Creating groups diverse in age may be particularly beneficial for young, urban women of color, who have unique pregnancy needs and experiences. Future research is needed to test the generalizability of these exploratory findings. PMID:26542382

  6. Prenatal x-ray exposure and childhood cancer in twins

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, E.B.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Honeyman, M.; Flannery, J.T.

    1985-02-28

    A case-control study was conducted to investigate the relation between prenatal exposure to x-rays and childhood cancer, including leukemia, in over 32,000 twins born in Connecticut from 1930 to 1969. Twins as opposed to single births were chosen for study to reduce the likelihood of medical selection bias, since twins were often exposed to x-rays to diagnose the twin pregnancy or to determine fetal positioning before delivery and not because of medical conditions that may conceivably pre-dispose to cancer. Each of 31 incident cases of cancer, identified by linking the Connecticut twin and tumor registries, was matched with four twin controls according to sex, year of birth, and race. Records of hospitals, radiologists, and private physicians were searched for histories of x-ray exposure and other potentially important risk factors. Documented prenatal x-ray exposures were found for 39 per cent of the cases (12 of 31) and for 26 per cent of the controls (28 of 109). No other pregnancy, delivery, or maternal conditions were associated with cancer risk except low birth weight: 38 per cent of the cases as compared with 25 per cent of the controls weighed under 2.27 kg at birth. When birth weight was adjusted for, twins in whom leukemia or other childhood cancer developed were twice as likely to have been exposed to x-rays in utero as twins who were free of disease (relative risk, 2.4; 95 per cent confidence interval, 1.0 to 5.9). The results, though based on small numbers, provide further evidence that low-dose prenatal irradiation may increase the risk of childhood cancer.

  7. Prenatal death in Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Jessica M; Putnam, Angelica R; Opitz, John M; Pysher, Theodor J; Szakacs, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Cryptophthalmos may be partial or complete, unilateral or bilateral, apparently nonsyndromal or syndromal. A recent study of 2 stillborn infants at the University of Utah prompted an analysis of the developmental aspects of the syndromal form (Fraser syndrome). We conclude that, per se, cryptophthalmos is a developmental field defect on the basis of heterogeneity (autosomal dominant and recessive forms) and phylogeneity (occurrence also in the pheasant, rabbit, pigeon, dog, and mouse). In humans this autosomal recessive disorder maps to 4q21, is homologous to the bleb (bl/bl) mouse, and is due to mutations in the FRAS1 gene that codes for a 4007 amino acid protein 85% identical to the Fras1 gene of the bleb mouse. Commonest anomalies in humans are cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly of digits, abnormal ears and genitalia, renal agenesis, and congenital heart defects. Almost half of affected infants are stillborn or die in infancy, and mental retardation is common. The pathogenesis evidently involves abnormal epithelial integrity during prenatal life. Older (mostly German) publications, some dating to the 19th century, provide a fascinating historical insight into the process of syndrome delineation.

  8. Prenatal nipple conditioning for breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L D

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-two primigravida women who planned to breastfeed began conditioning their nipples six weeks before their expected delivery date by nipple rolling twice a day for two minutes each time; providing gentle friction against the nipple with a terry cloth towel for 15 seconds once a day; and nipple airing for two hours a day, allowing outer clothing to rub against the nipple. Each woman served as her own control, conditioning one nipple but not the other. No nipple ointments or soap were used on either nipple during the course of the study. Each woman was given instructions on breastfeeding techniques to be used after delivery. The women completed two checklists: One revealed how consistently they followed the nipple-conditioning regime; with the other, they rated nipple pain on each breast, for every nursing, during the first five days postdelivery. Ratings were: 1--negligible pain or no pain, 2--definite pain, 3--extreme pain. Seventeen women successfully completed the study. Effect of skin color on the amount of nipple pain was also investigated. The prenatal nipple-conditioning regime significantly reduced the amount of total nipple pain experienced during the first few days of breastfeeding. The amount of extreme pain experienced on the conditioned nipple was significantly (p less than .01) reduced compared to the control nipple. Fair-skinned women reported more nipple soreness on unconditioned nipples, and olive-complected women reported significantly (p less than .01) less nipple soreness on unconditioned nipples.

  9. Prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure and academic achievement at age 10.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Lidush; Richardson, Gale A; Cornelius, Marie D; Day, Nancy L

    2004-01-01

    The effects of prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure on school achievement at 10 years of age were examined. Women were interviewed about their substance use at the end of each trimester of pregnancy, at 8 and 18 months, and at 3, 6, 10, 14, and 16 years. The women were of lower socioeconomic status, high-school-educated, and light-to-moderate users of marijuana and alcohol. The sample was equally divided between Caucasian and African-American women. At the 10-year follow-up, the effects of prenatal exposure to marijuana or alcohol on the academic performance of 606 children were assessed. Exposure to one or more marijuana joints per day during the first trimester predicted deficits in Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised (WRAT-R) reading and spelling scores and a lower rating on the teachers' evaluations of the children's performance. This relation was mediated by the effects of first-trimester marijuana exposure on the children's depression and anxiety symptoms. Second-trimester marijuana use was significantly associated with reading comprehension and underachievement. Exposure to alcohol during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy predicted poorer teachers' ratings of overall school performance. Second-trimester binge drinking predicted lower reading scores. There was no interaction between prenatal marijuana and alcohol exposure. Each was an independent predictor of academic performance.

  10. [Diagnosis, evolution and prognosis of prenatally diagnosed suprasellar cysts].

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, F; André, A; Roujeau, T; Selek, L; Ville, Y; Garel, C; Zérah, M

    2016-12-01

    Suprasellar arachnoid cysts (SAC) in children are considered rare, but the incidence is increasing due to the improvement of prenatal diagnosis. We present 15 cases of SAC diagnosed during the antenatal period between 2005 and 2015. The records were reviewed retrospectively by specifying the radiological characteristics, treatment modalities, outcomes, and long-term monitoring. Mean follow-up was 71 months. The forms (SAC-1) accounted for 2 cases (13%) with hydrocephalus. We observed 8 (53%) lower forms (SAC-2) with interpeduncular cistern expansion without hydrocephalus. The 5 (33.5%) remaining patients showed asymmetrical forms (SAC-3). Six patients (40%) were treated by ventriculo-cysto-cisternostomy, 1 by fetoscopy, 1 (6.5%) by ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, 2 (13.5%) by pterional craniotomy, and 6 (40%) were simply followed. The surgical outcomes were initially favorable in 9 cases (100%), 1 patient (13%) had to be re-treated later. Non-operated patients were all type 2 and showed no radiological changes. In the long-term, 1 patient (6.5%) had endocrine disruption, 1 had delayed development, 2 (13.5%) had minor neuropsychological impairments, and 1 had epilepsy. Combined monitoring with prenatal MRI and ultrasound can be used to distinguish three subtypes of SAC. SAC-1 and SAC-3 have an excellent prognosis after treatment in the perinatal period. SAC-2 can benefit from simple monitoring and remain asymptomatic in their majority. This classification allows a better prognosis estimation and better treatment decision.

  11. Regional and international prenatal telemedicine network for computerized antepartum cardiotocography.

    PubMed

    Di Lieto, Andrea; De Falco, Marianna; Campanile, Marta; Török, Miklós; Gábor, Spánik; Scaramellino, Mariangela; Schiraldi, Paola; Ciociola, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to review the activity of TOCOMAT, a system for antepartum cardiotocographic telemonitoring. Nine peripheral units recorded the traces, transmitted them via modem to the University operation center, where the computerized analysis was performed, and received the medical report within a few minutes, via fax or e-mail. Traces were classified as reassuring, nonreassuring, or pathological. The parameters of computerized analysis were grouped together for each week of gestation. The perinatal outcome was also evaluated. In 5 years, 5830 traces were analyzed: 4372 (75%) from 1344 high-risk patients and 1458 (25%) from 529 patients at apparent low risk. The system allowed the identification of high-risk patients (32.8% with nonreassuring traces and 7.1% with pathologic traces) and lowrisk patients (16.3% with nonreassuring traces and 4.3% with pathologic traces) that required further evaluation. The neonatal outcome was good overall. At each week of pregnancy, the mean values of computerized parameters resulted in normal ranges. The TOCOMAT system allowed a decentralization of prenatal surveillance and improved the patients quality of life and the level of prenatal care.

  12. Parental decisions of prenatally detected sex chromosome abnormality.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yon-Ju; Park, So-Yeon; Han, Jung-Heol; Kim, Moon-Young; Yang, Jae-Hyug; Choi, Kyu-Hong; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Jin-Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Mee

    2002-01-01

    Because of the widespread use of amniocentesis, the prenatal recognition of sex chromosome abnormality (SCA) has become increasingly common. Recent literature provided an insight into the understanding of the natural history and prognosis for individuals with SCA. Our study was designed to review the parental decision on pregnancy with SCA. Over the last 10 yr, we diagnosed 38 cases (0.50%) with SCA out of 7,498 prenatal cases. We reviewed the records and the results of the pregnancies. We included the cases (n=25) of apparently normal anatomic fetus to analyze the factors influencing parental decision. We excluded 13 cases with obvious anomaly or presumably bad outcome. Fifteen (60%) couples continued their pregnancies and ten (40%) terminated theirs. Nine couples (64%) out of fourteen mosaicism cases continued their pregnancies. All five pregnancies assisted by reproductive technique continued their pregnancies. More pregnancies were continued when counseling was done by an MD geneticist rather than by an obstetrician. A significant trend was observed with a higher rate of pregnancy continuation in recent years. The genetic counseling is important to give appropriate information to the parents. Establishing guidelines and protocols will help both obstetricians and parents to make a decision. PMID:11850589

  13. Callosal agenesis followed postnatally after prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Imataka, George; Nakagawa, Eiji; Kuwashima, Shigeko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Arisaka, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    Callosal agenesis is a congenital brain anomaly caused by embryonal hypogenesis of the corpus callosum. Concerning the neurological prognosis, epilepsy and motor disturbance are noted in some cases, while many cases are asymptomatic and the prognosis is good. We report a fetus tentatively diagnosed with hydrocephaly on prenatal echo-encephalography, which was performed without adequate explanation to and understanding of the parents. The parents had not expected an abnormality before the screening, and were subsequently not psychologically prepared for the discovery of the congenital brain anomaly on imaging. Moreover, they received no guidance on how to deal with any possible abnormalities. The pregnant mother was referred to our hospital. Prenatal MRI was performed after informed consent was obtained, and the fetus was diagnosed with callosal agenesis. The patient was followed for 5 years, and neurological development was normal. However, the parents have remained anxious while raising the child. Thus, the prenatal diagnosis of callosal agenesis in this case caused unnecessary mental burden to the parents. Here, we report the course of the case, and discuss the way prenatal ultrasonography should be used as a prenatal screening method, and the importance of counseling before the test.

  14. Prenatal and newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, C C

    2013-06-01

    The hemoglobinopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of disorders associated with mutations in both the alpha-globin and beta-globin genes. Increased immigration of high-risk populations has prompted the implementation of prenatal and newborn screening programs for hemoglobinopathies across Europe and North America. In Canada, the UK, and other European countries, prenatal screening to identify hemoglobinopathy carriers and offer prenatal diagnostic testing to couples at risk is linked to newborn screening, while in the United States, it is still not universally performed. The structure of screening programs, whether prenatal or postnatal, universal or selective, varies greatly among these countries and within the United States. The laboratory methods used to identify hemoglobinopathies are based on the prevalence of hemoglobinopathies within the population and the type of screening performed. Advances in molecular testing have facilitated the diagnosis of complex thalassemias and sickling disorders observed in ethnically diverse populations. This review summarizes the current approaches and methods used for carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and newborn screening.

  15. Access, quality and costs of prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Luis A; Berkshire, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The background risk of birth defects ranges from 2 to 5%. These birth defects are responsible for 30% of all admissions to pediatric hospitals and are responsible for a large proportion of neonatal and infant deaths. Medicine and Genetics have taken giant steps in their ability to detect and treat genetic disorders in utero. Screening tests for prenatal diagnosis should be offered to all pregnant women to assess their risk of having a baby with a birth defect or genetic disorder. Psychosocial and financial factors, inadequate insurance coverage, and the inability to pay for health care services are some of the known barriers to healthcare. These barriers are particularly magnified when there is a language barrier. From an economical standpoint it has been demonstrated that prenatal diagnosis has the potential of saving millions of dollars to our healthcare system. But when patients do not have the resources to access prenatal care and prenatal diagnosis cost shifting occurs, escalating healthcare costs. Our current healthcare system promotes inequalities in its delivery. With the existing barriers to access, quality, and costs of prenatal diagnosis we are confronted with an inefficient and flawed system.

  16. Prenatal Testosterone and Preschool Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Bethan A; Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    Disruptive Behaviors Disorders (DBD), including Oppositional-Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), are fairly common and highly impairing childhood behavior disorders that can be diagnosed as early as preschool. Prenatal exposure to testosterone may be particularly relevant to these early-emerging DBDs that exhibit a sex-biased prevalence rate favoring males. The current study examined associations between preschool DBD symptom domains and prenatal exposure to testosterone measured indirectly via right 2D:4D finger-length ratios. The study sample consisted of 109 preschool-age children between ages 3 and 6 (64% males;72% with DBD) and their primary caregivers. Primary caregivers completed a semi-structured interview (i.e., Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorder Schedule), as well as symptom questionnaires (i.e., Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, Peer Conflict Scale); teachers and/or daycare providers completed symptom questionnaires and children provided measures of prenatal testosterone exposure, measured indirectly via finger-length ratios (i.e., right 2D:4D). Study results indicated a significant association of high prenatal testosterone (i.e., smaller right 2D:4D) with high hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms in girls but not boys, suggesting that the effect may be driven by, or might only exist in, girls. The present study suggests that prenatal exposure to testosterone may increase risk for early ADHD, particularly hyperactivity-impulsivity, in preschool girls.

  17. NASA records disposition handbook: Procedures governing the retention, retirement, and destruction of agency records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This handbook sets forth the disposition of official records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Its provisions are applicable to NASA Headquarters and all field installations. This revised edition has been enlarged in scope and re-titled to provide guidance in all aspects of records retirements, transfers, destruction, and retrievals from Federal Records Centers. New records control schedules have been added and others revised. Also included are procedures for making recommendations for improved coverage of records categories by additions or revisions. The NASA Records Control Schedules are issued under authority of the NASA Records Management Officer in accordance with Section 101-11.406, Federal Property Management Regulations. They were approved for NASA use by the National Archives and Records Service, the General Accounting Office, and by the Joint Committee on the Disposition of Executive Papers, U.S. Congress.

  18. Writing as Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della-Piana, Gabriel M.; Endo, George T.

    This proposal for a longitudinal experimental study with a treatment intervention focuses on the process of writing as revision. Revision refers to the process which occurs prior to and throughout the writing of a work, rather than the final editing. According to this process, the writer goes through five stages: preconceptions concerning style…

  19. Prenatal Programming and Toxicity (PPTOX) Introduction.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Miller, Mark F

    2015-10-01

    The developmental origin of health and disease hypothesis posits that early-life exposures, including prenatal, can influence disease outcomes throughout the entire lifespan of an organism. Over the past 30 years, scientific researchers have compiled robust epidemiological and mechanistic data showing the effects of early-life nutrition, chemical exposures, and stress on prenatal programing and toxicity. Using novel techniques in genomics and epigenetics, science is now establishing strong links between low-level early-life environmental exposures and the later development of noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease, reproductive effects, immune system function and cancer. Now scientists must engage with communities, industry, policy makers, and clinicians to leverage our newfound understanding of prenatal programing and toxicity into better health outcomes across the lifespan.

  20. Prenatal education in the work place.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, H R

    1993-01-01

    Advances in neonatal care have improved survival rates among premature and low-birth-weight (LBW) infants, but highly technical care for these infants costs more than $2 billion a year in the United States. The incidence of premature and LBW infants can be reduced by prenatal education programs that focus on nutrition, obtaining prenatal care, avoiding dangerous substances, and recognizing preterm labor. In an effort to contain health care costs, many companies self-insure employee health benefits and offer health promotion programs designed to improve life style behaviors. This article examines providing a prenatal education program in the work place as a way of reducing the incidence and costs of prematurity and low birth weight.

  1. [References for prenatal diagnosis of morphological defects including the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Blohmer, J U; Caemmerer, C D; Bollmann, R; Bartho, S

    1993-02-01

    Clinical and autopsy records of 209 stillborn and 81 miscarried infants with 484 congenital defects of the central nervous system were analysed. Sets of more than one defect were retrospectively classified by pathogenetic criteria as syndrome, sequence, association and midline defects. Pathogenetic thinking makes the prenatal diagnosis of further defects easier if one has already been diagnosed. Statements regarding the most probable localisation of neural tube defects have been made.

  2. How prenatal care can improve maternal health.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Prenatal care aims to preserve the health of the fetus and mother. It screens for indications of illness or pregnancy-related complications and tries to prevent them from becoming emergencies. Sufficient referral services are needed for prenatal screening to be effective. Women and their families must be motivated to go to them promptly. Often prenatal care is the first time women receive any medical care. Thus, quality care is imperative so women will again request medical care when necessary. Prenatal care providers must ask women about signs and symptoms of placenta previa and placental abruptio. They should also tell them about the gravity of hemorrhaging in late pregnancy. Referral facilities must have operative capabilities and be able to provide adequate transfusion to treat severe hemorrhage. Health workers must prevent and treat anemia in pregnant women to improve their chances of recovery from blood loss; they must also measure blood pressure and periodically test for proteinuria and edema to diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and hypertension. Health workers must screen women at high risk for cephalopelvic disproportion (e.g. by assessing, height, foot size, and age) and for a malpositioned fetus and multiple pregnancies (e.g. via abdominal examination). They must also educate mothers about the importance of hygienic delivery and provide sanitary delivery kits. Unhygienic delivery conditions and untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause puerperal sepsis. STDs can also have other adverse effects such as ectopic pregnancy and blindness, death, or retardation of the fetus/ infant. STD screening could prevent needless suffering in many women; 5-15% of pregnant women in some developing countries have syphilis. Prenatal care should include screening for urinary tract infections which can cause preterm delivery and low birth weight. Antibiotics can treat these infections. Some pregnant women have infectious diseases which may undetected without

  3. Associations of Prenatal Growth with Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Nutritional Status in Chilean Children

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Francisco; Arnaiz, Pilar; Pacheco, Paz; Dominguez, Angelica; Villarroel, Luis; Eriksson, Johan G.; Barja, Salesa; Farías, Marcelo; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The association of prenatal growth with nutritional status, metabolic syndrome (MS), and insulin resistance (IR) was studied in school-age children. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was designed linking present data of children with perinatal records. 3325 subjects were enrolled. Anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), and pubertal status were assessed. Blood lipids, glucose, and insulin were measured. Linear associations were assessed using the Cochran-Armitage test. Odds ratios and nonlinear associations were computed. Results. 3290 children (52% females, mean age of 11.4 ± 1 years) were analyzed. Prevalence of obesity, stunting, MS, and IR was 16.0%, 3.6%, 7.3%, and 25.5%, respectively. The strongest positive association was between birth weight (BW) and obesity (OR 2.97 (95% CI 2.01–4.40) at BW ≥ 4,000 g compared to BW 2,500–2,999). The strongest inverse association was between birth length (BL) and stunting (OR 8.70 (95% CI 3.66–20.67) at BL < 48 cm compared to BL 52-53 cm). A U-shaped association between BL and BP ≥ 90th percentile was observed. Significant ORs were also found for MS and IR. Adjustments for present fat mass increased or maintained the most prenatal growth influences. Conclusions. Prenatal growth influences MS, IR, and nutritional status. Prenatal growth was more important than present body composition in determining these outcomes. PMID:25025054

  4. Maternal Prenatal Psychological Distress and Preschool Cognitive Functioning: the Protective Role of Positive Parental Engagement.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Julia C; Brennan, Patricia A; Smith, Alicia K; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Johnson, Katrina C

    2017-02-01

    Considerable animal research and available human studies suggest that psychological distress experienced by mothers during gestation is associated with later neurodevelopmental deficits in offspring; however, little research has examined potential protective factors that might mitigate this risk. The current study examined the impact of maternal prenatal psychological distress during pregnancy on cognitive outcomes in preschoolers (ages 2.5-5 years) and positive parenting as a potential protective factor. Mother-child dyads (N = 162, mean child age = 44 months, 49 % female) were recruited from a longitudinal cohort of women who had previously participated in a study of maternal mood disorders during pregnancy. Maternal prenatal distress was assessed with multiple measures collected throughout pregnancy. During a follow-up visit, mothers were interviewed about their psychological symptoms since the birth of the child, parenting behaviors were recorded during a parent-child interaction, and children's cognitive abilities were measured using the Differential Ability Scales, 2nd Edition. Maternal prenatal distress significantly predicted lower general cognitive abilities; however, this relationship was strongest for children whose mothers exhibited low levels of positive engagement and not significant when mothers exhibited high levels of positive engagement. Results suggest that positive parental engagement can protect against the detrimental effects of maternal prenatal distress on preschoolers' cognitive abilities.

  5. Coordinated movement is influenced by prenatal light experience in bobwhite quail chicks (Colinus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Belnap, Starlie C; Lickliter, Robert

    2017-03-27

    Sensory-motor development begins early during embryogenesis and is influenced by sensory experience. Little is known about the prenatal factors that influence the development of motor coordination. Here we investigated whether and to what extent prenatal light experience can influence the development of motor coordination in bobwhite quail hatchlings. Quail embryos were incubated under four light conditions: no light (dark), 2h of total light (2HR), 6h of total light (6HR), and diffused sunlight (controls). Hatchlings were video recording walking down a runway at three developmental ages (12, 24, and 48h). Videos were assessed for forward locomotion, a measurement of motor coordination, falls, a measurement of motor instability, and motivation to complete the task. We anticipated a linear decline of coordination with a reduction in prenatal light experience and improved coordination with age. Furthermore, as motor coordination becomes more laborious we anticipated motivation to complete the task would decline. However, our findings revealed hatchlings did not uniformly improve with age as expected, nor did the reduction of light result in a linear reduction in motor coordination. Instead, we found a more complex relationship with 6HR and 2HR hatchlings showing distinct patterns of stability and instability. Similarly, we found a reduction in motivation within the 6HR light condition. It appears that prenatal light exposure influences the development of postnatal motor coordination and we discuss these finding in light of neurodevelopmental processes influenced by light experience.

  6. Validation of Minimum Data of Archetyped Telehealth Clinical Report for Monitoring Prenatal Care.

    PubMed

    Santos Alves, Danielle; Times, Valéria Cesário; de Araújo Novaes, Magdala

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the validation of minimum data sets from international information standards have drawn the attention of the academic community to the identification of necessary requirements for the development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The primary motivation of such studies is the development of systems using archetypes. The aim of this study was to validate the minimum data set that should be used when constructing an archetyped EHR for prenatal care applications in telehealth. In order to achieve this, a data validation tool was built and used by nine expert obstetricians. The statistical analysis employed was the percentage of agreement and the content validity index. The study was conducted in three steps: 1) Literature review, 2)Instrument development, and 3) Validation of the minimum data set. Of the 179 evaluated pieces of data, 157 of them were validated to be included in the archetyped record of the first prenatal consultation, while 56 of them were allocated for the subsequent consultation record. The benefit of this research is the standardization (data validation for an archetyped system) of prenatal care, with the perspective of employing, both nationally and internationally, an archtyped telehealth system.

  7. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 to ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' Revision 0, DOE/NV-519

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    2000-02-25

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' DOE/NV--519.

  8. Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-12

    This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 500: Test Cell A Septic System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada,'' DOE/NV--528.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis and assessment of congenital spinal anomalies: Review for prenatal counseling

    PubMed Central

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Ketwaroo, Pamela Deaver; Estroff, Judy A; Warf, Benjamin C; Emans, John B; Glotzbecker, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen continuous advances in prenatal ultrasonography and in utero magnetic resonance imaging. These technologies have increasingly enabled the identification of various spinal pathologies during early stages of gestation. The purpose of this paper is to review the range of fetal spine anomalies and their management, with the goal of improving the clinician’s ability to counsel expectant parents prenatally. PMID:27458551

  10. Prenatal radiation exposure: dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Scharwächter, C; Röser, A; Schwartz, C A; Haage, P

    2015-05-01

    .• In case of radiation a suitable hygiene consultation may be necessary.• For risk assessment a three-stage concept is applied, which, depending on the radiation exposure, estimates or calculates the dose for the unborn child.• The radiologist plays a crucial role as a competent advisor and provider of reliable expert information. Citation Format: • Scharwächter C, Röser A, Schwartz CA et al. Prenatal Radiation Exposure: Dose Calculation. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2015; 187: 338 - 346.

  11. Cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rina; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of clinical factors on outcome after acetabular revision with a cementless beaded cup. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary care referral centre. Patients Forty-one patients who underwent acetabular revision with a cementless cup were followed up for a mean of 3.4 years. Interventions Acetabular revision with a beaded cementless cup in all patients. A morcellized allograft was used in 10 patients. Outcome measures A modified Harris hip score (range of motion measurement omitted), the SF-36 health survey, and the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effects of age, gender, morcellized allografting, time to revision from the previous operation, acetabular screw fixation and concurrent femoral revision on outcome. Results Gender accounted for a significant portion of the variation seen in the SF-36 physical component scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.02), with women tending to have worse results. Increasing age was associated with lower WOMAC index function scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.03), whereas concurrent femoral revision tended to have a positive effect on WOMAC index function (r = 0.39, p = 0.01). None of the potential clinical predictors had any significant effect on the SF-36 mental component scores, or WOMAC index pain and stiffness scores. Conclusions In cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty, physical function, as measured by generic and limb-specific scales, may be affected by gender, age and the presence of a concurrent femoral revision. Time to revision from the previous operation, morcellized allografting and screw fixation of the acetabulum did not affect outcomes. This information may provide some prognostic value for patients’ expectations. PMID:10948687

  12. Prenatal diagnosis and prenatal imaging features of fetal monosomy 1p36.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, D; Larkins, S A; Sharif, S; MacPherson, L; Rhodes, C; Kilby, M D

    2007-09-01

    Deletion of the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 1 (1p36) is thought to be a common terminal chromosomal deletion. However, few cases prospectively diagnosed prenatally have been reported. In this case, prenatal ultrasound at 21 weeks of gestation noted the fetus to have mild ventriculomegaly (Vhanterior = 11 mm and Vhposterior = 12 mm) and increased nuchal edema (6 mm). Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein was normal unlike in a majority of previously described cases. The prenatal ultrasound features were further clarified with fetal MRI. Chromosome analysis following amniocentesis demonstrated a 1p36 deletion, which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The syndrome associated with 1p36 deletion is well described in infants and is characterized by typical facial features (prominent forehead, straight eyebrows. deep-set eyes, flat nasal bridge and a pointed chin). Other associated features are neurodevelopmental delay, seizures, cardiomyopathy and neurosensory hearing impairment. This case supplements our knowledge of the prenatal features of 1p36. Identification of this deletion by direct chromosomal analysis can be technically difficult and vigilance is required to improve diagnosis. FISH analysis is an important diagnostic adjunct where the diagnosis is suspected following classical G-banding techniques. However, in this chromosomal anomaly there remain few characteristic prenatal signs that are readily diagnosed with prenatal imaging.

  13. An update on current prenatal testing options: first trimester and noninvasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Latendresse, Gwen; Deneris, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal genetic testing is rapidly evolving and requires that prenatal care providers stay up-to-date with accurate, evidence-based knowledge. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), first trimester maternal serum markers, and fetal nuchal translucency are the most recently developed screening tests added to the testing repertoire for detection of chromosomal disorders such as trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). NIPT is a new, highly accurate technique that uses maternal serum and is rapidly being introduced as a first trimester screening tool and increasingly being requested by pregnant women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that all pregnant women be offered first and second trimester screening options, regardless of risk status, but does not yet recommend NIPT. It is important for prenatal care providers to be aware of and understand these testing options in order to assist women and their families in making well-informed decisions during pregnancy. The purpose of this article is to update midwives and other prenatal care providers on the current prenatal genetic testing options available and how to appropriately offer and discuss them with their clients. We discuss how these tests work; what to do with the results; and most importantly, how to support and communicate accurate information to women and families as they navigate through an increasingly complicated array of testing choices.

  14. An interesting prenatal diagnosis: double aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cetin; Eris, Serenat; Yalcin, Yakup; Sen Selim, Halime

    2013-01-01

    Double aneuploidy, the existence of two chromosomal abnormalities in the same individual, is a rare condition. Early diagnosis of this condition is important to offer termination of pregnancy in genetic counselling. Cytogenetic analysis with amniocentesis and ultrasound examination is valuable for diagnosis of double aneuploidy. In this report we present a case with the karyotype of 48XXY+21 diagnosed prenatally.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of Chinese families with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Kong, X D; Zhao, D H; Wu, Q H; Li, X L; Guo, H F; Cui, L X; Jiang, M; Shi, H R

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability to prenatally diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU) by using phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene mutation analysis combined with short tandem repeat (STR) linkage analysis in 118 fetuses from 112 Chinese families. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood from members of 112 families and the exons and exon-intron boundaries of the PAH gene were amplified by PCR. PCR products were analyzed by bi-directional Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The three variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) markers PAH-1, PAH-26, PAH-32 were used in the prenatal diagnosis for the PKU families. We identified a spectrum of 63 different mutations, including 61 point mutations and indels, two large exon deletion mutations, and five novel mutations. A substantial proportion of mutant alleles were accounted for by p.R243Q (15.62%), EX6-96AG (9.82%), p.V399V (7.59%), p.Y356X (6.70%), and p.R413P (5.36%). The same mutations were identified in 31 prenatally genotyped fetuses. We identified 58 fetuses that carried only one mutant allele and 29 fetuses that carried no mutations of PAH and were presumed normal. PAH gene mutation analysis combined with STR linkage analysis can provide rapid and accurate prenatal diagnosis for PKU families.

  16. Psychiatric Conditions Associated with Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Mary J.; Paley, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Since the identification of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) over 35 years ago, mounting evidence about the impact of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy has prompted increased attention to the link between prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and a constellation of developmental disabilities that are characterized by physical, cognitive, and…

  17. Ethical Considerations in Prenatal Sex Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Leslie Doty

    2005-01-01

    Developments in assisted reproductive technologies have made it possible for couples to select the sex of a child prenatally. This article used the NASW Code of Ethics and information from the Ethics Committee of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine to consider ethical dilemmas related to social justice (for example, reinforcement of…

  18. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  19. Prenatal office practices regarding infant feeding choices.

    PubMed

    Dusdieker, Lois B; Dungy, Claibourne I; Losch, Mary E

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the obstetric care providers' roles in breast-feeding promotion during prenatal care. A questionnaire addressing breast-feeding issues was sent to family practitioners (FP), obstetric-gynecologists (OB/GYN), and nurse midwives (NM) in Iowa, USA. All NM, 97% of FP, and 85% of OB/GYN reported asking infant feeding preference-usually only at the first prenatal visit. NM (73%) were most likely to provide extensive breast-feeding counseling. OB/GYN (68%) and FP physicians (90%) reported doing their own breast-feeding counseling. Breast examinations targeting future breast-feeding problems were done in 82% to 84% of patients. NM practices shared more information supportive of breast-feeding. Nearly all providers offered prenatal classes, but only 41% of FP offered breast-feeding classes. Free formula samples were available in 73% of FP, 54% of OB/GYN, and 36% NM offices. Pamphlets on formula feeding and also breast-feeding were readily available. Overall NM (64%) reported being strong breast-feeding advocates compared to only 13% of FP and 7% of OB/GYN. In conclusion, little promotion of breast-feeding occurs in most prenatal practice settings.

  20. Prenatal care in your second trimester

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Prenatal care in your second trimester URL of this page: // ...

  1. Prenatal Testing: Is It Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... information about a baby's sex and rhesus (Rh) blood type. Diagnostic tests. If a screening test or prenatal cell-free DNA screening indicates a possible problem — or your age, family history or medical history puts you at increased risk ...

  2. [New molecular methods in prenatal invasive diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Łaczmańska, Izabela; Stembalska, Agnieszka

    2013-10-01

    New diagnostic techniques employed in laboratories all over the world enable to create new tests for prenatal genetic diagnosis. They include cytogenetics, molecular-cytogenetics and molecular methods. Chromosomal numerical aberrations (aneuploidies) remain to be the most frequent genetic changes diagnosed prenatally Therefore, our paper presents the latest methods used mainly in prenatal diagnosis of the most common chromosome numerical changes, as well as other methods applicable in detecting chromosome structural changes or gene mutations. One of the main advantages of these new approaches is the short period of time needed to obtain a result. Some of these techniques are used world-wide: QF-PCR (Fluorescence Quantitive Polymerase Chain Reaction)--based on the analysis of the short polymorphic sequences characteristic for each individual; MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification)--based on the probes ligation to complementary genomic fragments in patient DNA; microarray CGH (Comparative Genomic Hybridization)--based on genomic hybridization to microarray, which enables analysis of the entire genome. Other new methods are also gradually introduced to invasive prenatal diagnosis: NGS (Next-generation DNA sequencing)--for the analysis of the whole genome at the DNA level; BoBs (BACS-on-Beads)--molecular-cytogenetic technique based on hybridization of probes immobilized on polystyrene microspheres with fetal DNA. Nowadays, rapid diagnosis of the most common chromosomal aneuploidies is not a standard procedure in Poland, as opposed to cytogenetics (karyotyping). However, for specific clinical indications, fast and reliable methods of genetic analysis present are likely to become standard procedures in prenatal diagnosis.

  3. Prenatal reporting to child protection: Characteristics and service responses in one Australian jurisdiction.

    PubMed

    Taplin, Stephanie

    2017-03-01

    Prenatal reporting to child protection services has been enacted into most jurisdictions across Australia and in other countries, its aims being to intervene early and provide supports which will either identify or prevent the need for a baby to be taken into care and protection once born. Despite indications that there are increasing numbers of prenatal reports, little is known about the characteristics of those reported, the timing and reasons for reports, service responses, and the impacts of being reported. This study is one of the first to use administrative data to examine the characteristics of two samples from one Australian jurisdiction: (i) data from casefiles of 38 cases reported in 2012-13, and (ii) administrative data from 117 cases reported prenatally in 2013. These data showed that women who were reported to child protection services in relation to their pregnancy were predominantly disadvantaged, and were likely to be reported relatively late in their pregnancy due to 'future risk concerns'. Approximately two-thirds of those reported were provided with some prenatal support, as recorded by the child protection system, generally of limited duration. Twelve percent of the babies born to the larger cohort of women were removed within 100days of their birth. It is likely that longer term supportive interventions are needed, to reduce the risk factors evident in women reported during pregnancy, and to improve their ability to safely care for their children. Information on the short and long-term impacts from rigorous evaluations and longer-term intervention trials are also vital to ensure that prenatal reporting and interventions are, in fact, improving outcomes for infants and families.

  4. Revised Total Coliform Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  5. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  6. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  7. Postnatal development of rat pups is altered by prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Slamberová, Romana; Pometlová, Marie; Charousová, Petra

    2006-01-01

    There are studies showing that drug abuse during pregnancy may have impairing effect on progeny of drug-abusing mothers. Methamphetamine (MA) is one of the most common illicit drugs throughout the world. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of prenatal MA exposure on postnatal development of rat pups before the time of separation from their mothers. Female rats were injected with MA (5 mg/kg daily) for the duration of their pregnancy. Pups were then tested throughout the lactation period. They were weighed daily and the ano-genital distance was measured on postnatal day (PD) 1. Development of postural motor reaction was tested by righting reflex on surface between PD 1 and 12, and righting reflex in mid-air after PD 12 until successfully accomplished. On PD 15 homing test was examined as a test of pup acute learning. On PD 23 sensory-motor coordination was examined using the rotarod and bar-holding tests. Additionally, the markers of physical maturation, such as eye opening, testes descent in males and vaginal opening in females were also recorded. The birth weight in prenatally MA-exposed pups was lower than in controls or saline-exposed pups regardless of sex. There were no changes induced by prenatal MA exposure in weight gain or in sexual maturation. In righting reflexes, we demonstrated that pups exposed prenatally to MA were slower in righting reflex on surface and that they accomplished the test of righting reflex in mid-air later than controls or saline-exposed pups. The performance of homing test was not affected by prenatal drug exposure. The sensory-motor coordination was impaired in prenatally MA-exposed pups when testing in the rotarod test. Also, the number of falls in the bar-holding test was higher in MA-exposed pups than in controls. There were no sex differences in any measures. Thus, the present study demonstrated that prenatal MA exposure impairs development of postural motor movements of rat pups during the first 3 weeks

  8. Prenatal Phenol and Phthalate Exposures and Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Mary S.; Engel, Stephanie M.; Berkowitz, Gertrud S.; Ye, Xiaoyun; Silva, Manori J.; Zhu, Chenbo; Wetmur, James; Calafat, Antonia M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Many phthalates and phenols are hormonally active and are suspected to alter the course of development. Objective We investigated prenatal exposures to phthalate and phenol metabolites and their associations with body size measures of the infants at birth. Methods We measured 5 phenol and 10 phthalate urinary metabolites in a multiethnic cohort of 404 women in New York City during their third trimester of pregnancy and recorded size of infants at birth. Results Median urinary concentrations were > 10 μg/L for 2 of 5 phenols and 6 of 10 phthalate monoester metabolites. Concentrations of low-molecular-weight phthalate monoesters (low-MWP) were approximately 5-fold greater than those of high-molecular-weight metabolites. Low-MWP metabolites had a positive association with gestational age [0.97 day gestational age per ln-biomarker; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07–1.9 days, multivariate adjusted] and with head circumference. Higher prenatal exposures to 2,5-dichlorophenol (2,5-DCP) predicted lower birth weight in boys (−210 g average birth weight difference between the third tertile and first tertile of 2,5-DCP; 95% CI, 71–348 g). Higher maternal benzophenone-3 (BP3) concentrations were associated with a similar decrease in birth weight among girls but with greater birth weight in boys. Conclusions We observed a range of phthalate and phenol exposures during pregnancy in our population, but few were associated with birth size. The association of 2,5-DCP and BP3 with reduced or increased birth weight could be important in very early or small-size births. In addition, positive associations of urinary metabolites with some outcomes may be attributable partly to unresolved confounding with maternal anthropometric factors. PMID:18709157

  9. A cost-savings analysis of prenatal interventions.

    PubMed

    Bonifield, S L

    1998-01-01

    Proper prenatal care has long been established as the single most important factor in improving both maternal and infant health (Henderson 1994) yet the United States remains one of only two industrialized nations that have yet to ensure universal healthcare for pregnant women (National Center for Farmworker Health, Inc. 1997). Through clinical innovations, many progressive interventions now available are not only medically effective but also financially prudent. This study addresses the efficacy and feasibility and discusses the policy implications of the following four prenatal programs: universal prenatal screening for the human immunodeficiency virus, prenatal carrier screening for cystic fibrosis, condition-specific care for pregnant diabetics, and prenatal nutrition counseling. The healthcare community is challenged to expand the breadth of routine prenatal care to include those services that are both financially sensible and clinically imperative.

  10. Confirmation of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D E; Kalousek, D K

    1989-04-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism causes problems in interpretation and in genetic counselling. Part of the difficulty with any prenatal diagnosis of mosaicism is interpretation of results without knowing the exact origin, embryonic or extraembryonic, of the abnormal cell line. To confuse the issue in cases of prenatal diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism is the recent demonstration that a diagnosis of 45,X/46,XY made prenatally is not necessarily associated with the same phenotype as when diagnosed postnatally. We present two cases of prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism (45,X/46,XY and 45,X/47,XYY). Posttermination examination of the phenotypically normal male fetuses and their placentas established that the placenta was the most likely source of the 45,X cell line. An approach to confirming the prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosome mosaicism and establishing its origin utilizing detailed cytogenetic examination of both fetus and placenta is suggested.

  11. The challenge of the reference and counter-reference system in the prenatal assistance to pregnant women with infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Elisabeth N; Vianna, Lucila A C; Peixe, Marina B; Ramos, Valdete M; Succi, Regina C M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of infectious diseases, such as syphilis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and hepatitis B and C, in pregnant women who undertook their prenatal care in thirteen basic health units (BHU) in São Paulo city. The efficiency of the reference and counter-reference system in such prenatal infectious diseases was evaluated considering the medical recordings of the final result of the pregnancy and the vertical transmission rates of these diseases. It consists of an epidemiologic study whose observations were based on the notes of the prenatal medical and nurse records of pregnant women who had infectious diseases susceptible to vertical transmission and final infectious status registers of their concepts. Women's syphilis prevalence was 0. 86%, HIV and Hepatitis B was 0. 22% and Hepatitis C was 0. 36%. It's possible to conclude that there is no register of the reference and counter-reference system of these infectious diseases analyzed at the thirteen basic health units of the south-east region of São Paulo city evaluated in 2005. This lack of register makes it impossible to know the preventive measures taken and the vertical transmission rates. Making the professionals and the Health Coordination authorities aware of the importance of the dynamic of the prenatal attendance is necessary.

  12. Outcome of prenatally diagnosed trisomy 6 mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Robert; Oh, Tracey; Durcan, Judy; Abdelhak, Yaakov; Clachko, Mark; Aviv, Hana

    2002-08-01

    We report the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 6 mosaicism via amniocentesis, in which trisomy 6 cells were identified in three of five culture vessels with 33% (5/15) of colonies showing trisomic cells. The pregnancy was electively terminated and examination revealed minor abnormalities (shortening of the femurs, micrognathia, posterior malrotation of the ears, and bilateral camptomelia of the second digit of the hands and fifth digits of the feet). Cytogenetic analysis of the placenta showed trisomy 6 in 100% of 20 cells studied. Karyotype was 46,XX in 100 cells examined from fetal skin. There are relatively few prenatally diagnosed cases of mosaic trisomy 6 at amniocentesis. Confined placental mosaicism (CPM) has been postulated in other cases where follow-up cytogenetic studies were not available. The present case differs from those previously reported, as it appears to represent CPM of chromosome 6 with phenotypic effects to the fetus.

  13. Religious Traditions and Prenatal Genetic Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rebecca Rae

    2009-01-01

    Members of organized religious groups may look to their faith traditions for guidance regarding the moral implications of prenatal diagnosis and intervention. Many denominations have doctrinal statements relevant to these deliberations. In this paper, common spiritual issues arising in the genetic counseling encounter are described. Representative doctrinal positions, derived from the responses of 31 U.S. religious denominations to a survey relating to prenatal genetic counseling, are given. Because the long-term adjustment of patients may be dependent in part on their ability to reconcile their actions with their faith traditions, genetic counselors best serve their patients when they invite discussion of matters of faith. Unless invited, patients may assume these topics are ‘off limits’ or that care providers are indifferent to their beliefs. Although genetics professionals ought not assume the role of spiritual advisor, a working knowledge of doctrinal approaches should help counselors frame the issues, and avoid missteps. PMID:19170093

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Blaumeiser, Bettina; Loquet, Philip; Wuyts, Wim; Nöthen, Markus M

    2004-08-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by coronal craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia, broad thumbs and great toes. On the basis of clinical findings, three subtypes have been delineated. The clinical variability of Pfeiffer syndrome as well as other causes of craniosynostosis can make a prenatal diagnosis based on sonography alone difficult. We describe a fetus in whom sonographic findings (including 3D ultrasound) suggested a Pfeiffer syndrome type II and in which subsequent molecular analysis verified the diagnosis by identifying a de novo mutation in the FGFR2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prenatal molecular diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome in a patient without family history.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, P S; Gross, S J; Cohen, D J; Tiller, G R; Shanske, A L; Bombard, A T; Marion, R W

    1996-12-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder consisting of craniosynostosis, a flattened midface with a beaked nose and ocular proptosis, and broad and medially deviated thumbs and great toes. Recently, based on clinical findings, the disorder has been divided into three subtypes: type 1, characterized by mild expression; type 2, in which clover leaf skull deformity and multiple congenital anomalies are present at birth; and type 3, which is similar to type 2, but lacks the presence of the clover leaf skull at birth. We describe a fetus in whom sonographic findings of clover leaf skull deformity, ocular hypertelorism, and varus deformity of the great toe led to the prenatal diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome type 2. We believe this is the second prenatal diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome, and the first time type 2 has been definitely identified in the second trimester of pregnancy.

  16. Prenatal nutritional influence on skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Elizabeth; Cheah, Jonathan; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that prenatal nutritional factors may have long-term effects on the offspring. Osteoporosis is a worldwide public health problem leading to both morbidity and mortality, through associated bone fractures. Although in clinical practice most effort in fracture prevention is aimed at slowing the rate of age-related bone loss, there is accumulating evidence that peak bone mass, achieved in early adulthood, is an important factor in determining bone strength in later life. A variety of studies have shown that peak bone mass is influenced by early life events, including nutrition in the prenatal period. This chapter will use the example of bone development to consider the effects of maternal diet and nutritional status on the offspring.

  17. 78 FR 17778 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... ``Patient Medical Record--VA'' (24VA19) as set forth in the Federal Register at 74 FR 60040. That notice... of records entitled ``Patient Medical Records-- VA'' (24VA19), which revised the System Number (the... AFFAIRS Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice...

  18. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  19. Prenatal investments, breastfeeding, and birth order.

    PubMed

    Buckles, Kasey; Kolka, Shawna

    2014-10-01

    Mothers have many opportunities to invest in their own or their child's health and well-being during pregnancy and immediately after birth. These investments include seeking prenatal care, taking prenatal vitamins, and breastfeeding. In this paper, we investigate a potential determinant of mothers' investments that has been largely overlooked by previous research-birth order. Data are from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) Child and Young Adult Survey, which provides detailed information on pre- and post-natal behaviors of women from the NLSY79. These women were between the ages of 14 and 22 in 1979, and form a nationally representative sample of youth in the United States. Our sample includes births to these women between 1973 and 2010 (10,328 births to 3755 mothers). We use fixed effects regression models to estimate within-mother differences in pre- and post-natal behaviors across births. We find that mothers are 6.6 percent less likely to take prenatal vitamins in a fourth or higher-order birth than in a first and are 10.6 percent less likely to receive early prenatal care. Remarkably, mothers are 15.4 percent less likely to breastfeed a second-born child than a first, and are 20.9 percent less likely to breastfeed a fourth or higher-order child. These results are not explained by changing attitudes toward investments over time. These findings suggest that providers may want to increase efforts to encourage these behaviors at women with higher parity. The results also identify a potential mechanism for the emergence of differences in health and other outcomes across birth orders.

  20. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  1. Postnatal Depression Prevention Through Prenatal Intervention: A Literature Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-17

    postpartum depression. Despite this knowledge, the prevalence rates of depression are high and prenatal depression (PND) may go unrecognized by the healthcare...depression has a prevalence rate of 20%, while postpartum depression affects 11% of previously pregnant women (Tycbey et al., 2005). One of the goals of...on prenatal care and postpartum depression, however, the issue of prenatal depression is often overlooked and the majority of the studies reviewed

  2. Prenatal care through the eyes of Canadian Aboriginal women.

    PubMed

    Di Lallo, Sherri

    2014-01-01

    The Aboriginal Prenatal Wellness Program (APWP) in Canada represents a culturally safe approach to prenatal care. By understanding the history of colonization and residential schools and how this history has contributed to health disparities, a multidisciplinary team provides culturally competent and integrated prenatal care to Aboriginal women and their families. This article describes the APWP and discusses how increased participation in health care by historically marginalized populations can lead to better maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

  3. In defense of prenatal genetic interventions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-09-01

    Jürgen Habermas has argued against prenatal genetic interventions used to influence traits on the grounds that only biogenetic contingency in the conception of children preserves the conditions that make the presumption of moral equality possible. This argument fails for a number of reasons. The contingency that Habermas points to as the condition of moral equality is an artifact of evolutionary contingency and not inviolable in itself. Moreover, as a precedent for genetic interventions, parents and society already affect children's traits, which is to say there is moral precedent for influencing the traits of descendants. A veil-of-ignorance methodology can also be used to justify prenatal interventions through its method of advance consent and its preservation of the contingency of human identities in a moral sense. In any case, the selection of children's traits does not undermine the prospects of authoring a life since their future remains just as contingent morally as if no trait had been selected. Ironically, the prospect of preserving human beings as they are--to counteract genetic drift--might even require interventions to preserve the ability to author a life in a moral sense. In light of these analyses, Habermas' concerns about prenatal genetic interventions cannot succeed as objections to their practice as a matter of principle; the merits of these interventions must be evaluated individually.

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of Non-Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Johnson, Candice Y.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Correa, Adolfo; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in nearly 1% of live births. We sought to assess factors associated with prenatal CHD diagnosis in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Methods We analyzed data from mothers with CHD-affected pregnancies from 1998–2005. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was defined as affirmative responses to questions about abnormal prenatal ultrasounds and/or fetal echocardiography obtained during a structured telephone interview. Results Fifteen percent (1,097/7,299) of women with CHD-affected pregnancies (excluding recognized syndromes and single-gene disorders) reported receiving a prenatal CHD diagnosis. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was positively associated with advanced maternal age, family history of CHD, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, twin or higher order gestation, CHD complexity and presence of extracardiac defects. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was inversely associated with maternal Hispanic race/ethnicity, prepregnancy overweight or obesity, and pre-existing hypertension. Prenatal CHD diagnosis varied by time to NBDPS interview and NBDPS study site. Conclusions Further work is warranted to identify reasons for the observed variability in maternal reports of prenatal CHD diagnosis and the extent to which differences in health literacy or health system factors such as access to specialized prenatal care and/or fetal echocardiography may account for such variability. PMID:24222433

  5. Tomorrow's prenatal genetic testing. Should we test for 'minor' diseases?

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    1993-11-01

    New genetic knowledge will make it possible to test prenatally for a wide range of fetal genetic characteristics. One consequence will be an expansion of potential reasons for selective abortion following prenatal testing. It will likely become possible for patients to request prenatal testing and abortion not only for serious diseases but also relatively mild diseases, late-onset diseases, treatable diseases, elevated risks for common diseases, and eventually nondisease characteristics, such as height and body build. Two main ethical views concerning prenatal testing have been advocated: (1) Prenatal testing should be restricted to the "most severe" disorders, involving profound retardation, severe physical handicaps, or prolonged physical suffering and (2) Patients' requests for prenatal tests should be honored except for diseases considered to be "too minor." At least two additional views can be identified: (3) Physicians should honor requests for prenatal testing for diseases, including relatively minor ones, but not requests pertaining to nondisease characteristics and (4) All requests for prenatal tests should be honored. A difficulty with the first and second views is that they deviate from the norm of nondirectiveness in prenatal testing and counseling. The problems with the fourth view are that it leads to abortions for morally trivial reasons and that attempts to design our children could adversely affect parent-child relationships and exacerbate current social inequities. These considerations support the third view, which holds that the future role of reproductive genetic testing and counseling should be based on the imperfect, but helpful, distinction between disease and nondisease.

  6. [Prenatal diagnosis. II. Importance of ultrasonographic markers in prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Molero, A; Carrasquero, N; Del Villar, A; González-Ferrer, S; Rojas, A; Brito, J; Mena, R; González, L; Pérez, F; Alvarez, F; Quintero, M; Fulcado, W

    1998-12-01

    The Medical Genetic Unit of the University of Zulia (MGUUZ) has developed a Prenatal Diagnosis Program (PDP) since January-1993, in which Genetic Risk Factors are determined in couples who request prenatal genetic counseling. In this program, different prenatal diagnostic procedures are performed to detect congenital defects during intrauterine life. One of these procedures is the Fetal Sonogram (FS). FS is a non invasive technique which permits the prenatal diagnosis of many genetic dysmorphic syndromes. Through the search of abnormal specific characteristics in the fetus, chromosomopathies may be suspected. These findings are named "Echosonographic Markers of Chromosomal Abnormalities" (EMCA). During three years (January-1993 to December-1996), patients attended in the PDP included 321 pregnant women in which 312 FS were performed. Abnormal outcomes were 22 (17 with isolated congenital malformations and 5 with EMCA). Only one fetus with chromosome abnormality (46,XX21q-) could not be detected by FS. The goals of this paper are: 1) to report 5 patients with sonographic markers suggestive of chromosomal abnormalities and 2) to show the FS usefulness in prenatal diagnosis of chromosompathies. We conclude that, in the search of the EMCA the FS should be offered systematically to all pregnant women without recognizable genetic risk. They are the main group with optimal reproductive age and in consequence, with the possibility of having a relatively major number of conception outcomes with congenital defects, with or without chromosomic etiology. The majority of those defects can be detected by FS and could allow us to select the patients in which the use of an invasive prenatal diagnostic procedure could be justified.

  7. Differential effects of prenatal stress on metabolic programming in diet-induced obese and dietary-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Varde, Pratibha A.; Abdallah, Simon Labib; Najjar, Sonia M.; MohanKumar, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Stress during pregnancy is a known contributing factor for the development of obesity in the offspring. Since maternal obesity is on the rise, we wanted to identify the effects of prenatal stress in the offspring of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and compare them with the offspring of dietary-resistant (DR) rats. We hypothesized that prenatal stress would make both DIO and DR offspring susceptible to obesity, but the effect would be more pronounced in DIO rats. Pregnant DIO and DR rats were divided into two groups: nonstressed controls (control) and prenatal stress (subjected to restraint stress, three times/day from days 14 to 21 of gestation). After recording birth weight and weaning weight, male offspring were weaned onto a chow diet for 9 wk and shifted to a high-fat (HF) diet for 1 wk. At the end of the 10th wk the animals were euthanized, and visceral adipose mass, blood glucose, serum insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured. Prenatal stress resulted in hyperinsulinemia and higher C-peptide levels without altering caloric intake, body weight gain, or fat mass in the DIO offspring after 1 wk of HF intake, but not in DR offspring. To determine the mechanism underlying the hyperinsulinemia, we measured the levels of CEACAM1 that are responsible for insulin clearance. CEACAM1 levels in the liver were reduced in prenatally stressed DIO offspring after the HF challenge, suggesting that preexisting genetic predisposition in combination with prenatal stress increases the risk for obesity in adulthood, especially when offspring are fed a HF diet. PMID:26219866

  8. Prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis: contemporary practices in light of the past.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Ana S

    2016-06-01

    The 20th century eugenics movement in the USA and contemporary practices involving prenatal screening (PNS), prenatal diagnosis (PND), abortion and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) share important morally relevant similarities. I summarise some features of the 20th century eugenics movement; describe the contemporary standard of care in the USA regarding PNS, PND, abortion and PGD; and demonstrate that the 'old eugenics' the contemporary standard of care share the underlying view that social resources should be invested to prevent the birth of people with certain characteristics. This comparison makes evident the difficulty of crafting moral arguments that treat some uses of PNS, PND, abortion and PGD as licit and others as illicit.

  9. The Modular Universal Tumour And Revision System (MUTARS®) in endoprosthetic revision surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gebert, Carsten; Götze, Christian; Gosheger, Georg; Hardes, Jendrik

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the clinical and functional results of revision surgery after failed hip endoprostheses using the Modular Universal Tumour And Revision System (MUTARS®). Functional results of the hip endoprostheses were recorded by applying the Harris hip score. The extent of the presurgical radiological bone defect was measured according to the classification system of the German orthopaedic association (DGOOC). Indications for revision surgery on 45 patients (21 female, 24 male) were aseptic loosening (19 patients), infection (16 patients), or periprosthetic fracture (Vancouver classification B2, B3 and C, in nine patients). Revision surgery was performed after 8.6 years on average (min. 0.6; max. 14.25 years). Large defects of the proximal femur (80% medial or lateral diaphysis; 20% meta-diaphysis according to DGOOC classification) were adequately reconstructed. The average follow-up was 38.6 months. Complications occurred in eight patients: one luxation, two aseptic loosenings, and five reinfections were diagnosed. The Harris hip score (presurgical 30; postsurgical 78) showed significant improvement after revision surgery. Regarding the extent of the patients’ bone defects, good functional results were achieved. The comparatively low number of luxations and loosenings is due to the high modularity of the prosthesis with arbitrary antetorsion in the hip joint. However, high reinfection rates in mega-implants still constitute a problem and should be the subject of further studies. PMID:20379815

  10. The Modular Universal Tumour And Revision System (MUTARS®) in endoprosthetic revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Carsten; Wessling, Martin; Götze, Christian; Gosheger, Georg; Hardes, Jendrik

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to present the clinical and functional results of revision surgery after failed hip endoprostheses using the Modular Universal Tumour And Revision System (MUTARS®). Functional results of the hip endoprostheses were recorded by applying the Harris hip score. The extent of the presurgical radiological bone defect was measured according to the classification system of the German orthopaedic association (DGOOC). Indications for revision surgery on 45 patients (21 female, 24 male) were aseptic loosening (19 patients), infection (16 patients), or periprosthetic fracture (Vancouver classification B2, B3 and C, in nine patients). Revision surgery was performed after 8.6 years on average (min. 0.6; max. 14.25 years). Large defects of the proximal femur (80% medial or lateral diaphysis; 20% meta-diaphysis according to DGOOC classification) were adequately reconstructed. The average follow-up was 38.6 months. Complications occurred in eight patients: one luxation, two aseptic loosenings, and five reinfections were diagnosed. The Harris hip score (presurgical 30; postsurgical 78) showed significant improvement after revision surgery. Regarding the extent of the patients' bone defects, good functional results were achieved. The comparatively low number of luxations and loosenings is due to the high modularity of the prosthesis with arbitrary antetorsion in the hip joint. However, high reinfection rates in mega-implants still constitute a problem and should be the subject of further studies.

  11. Comprehensive Operative Note Templates for Primary and Revision Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, Ali J.; Amanatullah, Derek F.; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat I.; Huddleston, James I.; Maloney, William J.; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adequate preoperative planning is the first and most crucial step in the successful completion of a revision total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the availability, adequacy and accuracy of operative notes of primary surgeries in patients requiring subsequent revision and to construct comprehensive templates of minimum necessary information required in the operative notes to further simplify re-operations, if they should become necessary. Methods: The operative notes of 144 patients (80 revision THA’s and 64 revision TKA’s) who underwent revision total joint arthroplasty at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in the year 2013 were reviewed. We assessed the availability of operative notes and implant stickers prior to revision total joint arthroplasty. The availability of implant details within the operative notes was assessed against the available surgical stickers for adequacy and accuracy. Statistical comparisons were made using the Fischer-exact test and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The primary operative note was available in 68 of 144 revisions (47%), 39 of 80 revision THAs (49%) and 29 of 66 revision TKAs (44%, p = 0.619). Primary implant stickers were available in 46 of 144 revisions (32%), 26 of 80 revision THAs (32%) and 20 of 66 revision TKAs (30%, p = 0.859). Utilizing the operative notes and implant stickers combined identified accurate primary implant details in only 40 of the 80 revision THAs (50%) and 34 of all 66 revision TKAs (52%, p = 0.870). Conclusion: Operative notes are often unavailable or fail to provide the necessary information required which makes planning and execution of revision hip and knee athroplasty difficult. This emphasizes the need for enhancing the quality of operative notes and records of patient information. Based on this information, we provide comprehensive operative note templates for primary and revision total hip and knee

  12. 36 CFR 1224.10 - What must agencies do to implement an effective records disposition program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... necessary, update them. (d) Incorporate records retention and disposition functionality during the design, development, and implementation of new or revised recordkeeping systems (whether paper or electronic)....

  13. NASA records retention schedules: Procedures governing the retention, retirement, and destruction of agency records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This handbook sets forth the minimum retention periods of official records of NASA. Its provisions are applicable to NASA Headquarters and all field installations. This revised edition has been correlated to the 'NASA Uniform Files Index (UFI) (NHB 1442.1B), the General Records Schedules' produced by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), and has been enlarged in scope to cover Privacy Act Systems of Records and record series previously omitted. Guidance is provided in the areas of record retirement, transfer, and retrieval from Federal Record Centers (FRC) and disposal actions. Included are provisions for making changes to these schedules by addition of new items or revision of current items. The NASA Records Retention Schedules (NRRS) were approved for NASA use by NARA, the General Services Administration, and the General Accounting Office.

  14. Prenatal hydrocephalus: outcome and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Renier, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Pierre-Kahn, A; Hirsch, J F

    1988-08-01

    The clinical records of 108 infants presenting with hydrocephalus at birth and operated on from 1971 to 1981 were reviewed in order to evaluate the functional results. Premature newborns and spina bifida patients were excluded. Communicated hydrocephalus (39 cases) and aqueductal stenosis (32 cases, excluding 6 X-linked hydrocephalus and 4 toxoplasmoses) were the two main types of hydrocephalus in this series. Eighty-four percent of the infants were operated on before the age of 3 months. The mean follow-up time was 7 years (range 1 to 14 years). The survival rate, calculated by the life table method, was 62% at 10 years. The functional results were evaluated according to intellectual performance, academic level, and psychological status. Of the 75 surviving children, 28% have an I.Q. over 80 and 50% an I.Q. under 60. The mean I.Q. is 54 (range 0 to 130). Of the 52 children who have now reached school age, only 29% have reached a normal academic level. The psychological status is normal or borderline in 46% of the patients. The importance of head enlargement at birth, ventricular size, and the age at the time of surgery are not related to late functional results. The results were best when there were no associated malformations, no shunt infection, when hydrocephalus was due to aqueductal stenosis (excluding X-linked hydrocephalus and toxoplasmosis), or when the first developmental quotient measured at 6 months was over 80.

  15. Descriptive epidemiology of prenatal and perinatal risk factors in a Chinese population with reading disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfei; Wang, Jia; Shao, Shanshan; Luo, Xiu; Kong, Rui; Zhang, Xiaohui; Song, Ranran

    2016-01-01

    Several prenatal and perinatal factors have been found to be associated with developmental dyslexia (reading disorder) in alphabetic language. Given the absence of relevant studies of Chinese children, the present study tries to investigate these risk factors. A total of 45,850 students were recruited from grades three to six, from seven cities of Hubei province. Dyslexia in Chinese was diagnosed based on children’s clinical symptoms. The clinical symptoms of children’s reading performance were assessed by Dyslexia Checklist for Chinese Children (DCCC) and Pupil Rating Scale Revised Screening for Learning Disabilities (PRS) which were completed by parent/guardian and header teacher respectively. Chinese language exam was used to screen children with poor reading capacity. Questionnaires about prenatal and perinatal factors were completed by parent or guardian. Among the 34,748 eligible participants, 1,200 (3.45%) were diagnosed with dyslexia in Chinese. More boys suffered from dyslexia than the girls and the gender ratio was 3:1. Family history of neuropsychiatric diseases, maternal infectious diseases, difficult vaginal delivery, preterm birth, and neonatal asphyxia were found to increase the risk of developmental dyslexia in China. Closer longitudinal developmental monitoring and preventive measures should be taken for high risk children. PMID:27819320

  16. Prenatal stress alters amygdala functional connectivity in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Sze, Gordon; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal and early-life stress results in alterations in neural connectivity and an increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. In particular, alterations in amygdala connectivity have emerged as a common effect across several recent studies. However, the impact of prenatal stress exposure on the functional organization of the amygdala has yet to be explored in the prematurely-born, a population at high risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. We test the hypothesis that preterm birth and prenatal exposure to maternal stress alter functional connectivity of the amygdala using two independent cohorts. The first cohort is used to establish the effects of preterm birth and consists of 12 very preterm neonates and 25 term controls, all without prenatal stress exposure. The second is analyzed to establish the effects of prenatal stress exposure and consists of 16 extremely preterm neonates with prenatal stress exposure and 10 extremely preterm neonates with no known prenatal stress exposure. Standard resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and seed connectivity methods are used. When compared to term controls, very preterm neonates show significantly reduced connectivity between the amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the brainstem, and the insula (p < 0.05). Similarly, when compared to extremely preterm neonates without exposure to prenatal stress, extremely preterm neonates with exposure to prenatal stress show significantly less connectivity between the left amygdala and the thalamus, the hypothalamus, and the peristriate cortex (p < 0.05). Exploratory analysis of the combined cohorts suggests additive effects of prenatal stress on alterations in amygdala connectivity associated with preterm birth. Functional connectivity from the amygdala to other subcortical regions is decreased in preterm neonates compared to term controls. In addition, these data, for the first time, suggest that prenatal stress exposure amplifies these

  17. Residential Wiring. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark

    This competency-based curriculum guide contains materials for conducting a course in residential wiring. A technically revised edition of the 1978 publication, the guide includes 28 units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of the following basic components: performance objectives, suggested activities for teachers and students,…

  18. Hospital Nurse Aide. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This report presents results of a project to revise the current 120-hour advanced nurse aide course to include all recommended minimum competencies. A three-page description of project objectives, activities, and outcomes is followed by a list of the competencies for the 75-hour nurse aide course for long-term care and for the 120-hour advanced…

  19. School Safety Handbook. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    The revised edition of this handbook represents a concerted effort to bring school safety to the forefront of business managers' daily and long-range planning activities. Although statistics show few fatalities on school grounds, schools appear to have a high frequency and incident rate of nonfatal injuries. According to the introduction, school…

  20. Scar revision - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100098.htm Scar revision - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  1. A qualitative study of the experience of CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care for physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study sought to understand the central meaning of the experience of group prenatal care for physicians who were involved in providing CenteringPregnancy through a maternity clinic in Calgary, Canada. Method The study followed the phenomenological qualitative tradition. Three physicians involved in group prenatal care participated in a one-on-one interview between November and December 2009. Two physicians participated in verification sessions. Interviews followed an open ended general guide and were audio recorded and transcribed. The purpose of the analysis was to identify meaning themes and the core meaning experienced by the physicians. Results Six themes emerged: (1) having a greater exchange of information, (2) getting to knowing, (3) seeing women get to know and support each other, (4) sharing ownership of care, (5) having more time, and (6) experiencing enjoyment and satisfaction in providing care. These themes contributed to the core meaning for physicians of “providing richer care.” Conclusions Physicians perceived providing better care and a better professional experience through CenteringPregnancy compared to their experience of individual prenatal care. Thus, CenteringPregnancy could improve work place satisfaction, increase retention of providers in maternity care, and improve health care for women. PMID:23445867

  2. Prenatal exposure to H2 blockers and to proton pump inhibitors and asthma development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Gorodischer, Rafael; Aviram, Micha; Novack, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Fetal exposure to H2 blockers (H2 Bs) or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been reported to be associated with asthma in children. We evaluated the risk of asthma in offspring following prenatal H2 Bs. We enrolled 91 428 children and their mothers who resided in southern Israel during 1998-2011. The computerized medications database was linked with records from the district hospital. Of the eligible children, 11 227 developed asthma, and overall 5.5% had been exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs prenatally. The risk of developing asthma was slightly higher in the group exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs (RR, 1.09; P = .023). At greater risk were children whose mothers purchased these medications more than 3 times (RR, 1.22; P = .038) or exposed to >20 defined daily doses or prenatally exposed to lansoprazole. The statistical association was significant and depended on magnitude of exposure and specific medication, but the absolute risk was low. The association between maternal consumption of H2 Bs or PPIs and asthma and childhood remained statistically significant 2 years after delivery, raising the possibility of confounding by the indication phenomenon. In view of the findings, a causal relationship could not be ascertained, and an unidentified etiological factor could be operative.

  3. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  4. The effectiveness of an abuse assessment protocol in public health prenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiist, W H; McFarlane, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated whether incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of the prenatal clinics of a large urban public health department led to increased referral for and assessment, identification, and documentation of abuse. METHODS: Evaluation was conducted at 3 matched prenatal clinics serving a total of 12,000 maternity patients per year. Two clinics used the abuse protocol and 1 did not. An audit was performed at the clinics on a randomly selected sample of 540 maternity patient charts for the 15 months before the protocol was initiated and of 540 records for the 15 months after the protocol was introduced. Ninety-six percent of the patients represented in the sample were Latina. RESULTS: At the clinics using the protocol, abuse assessment increased from 0 to 88%. Detection of abuse increased from 0.8% to 7%. There were no changes at the comparison clinic. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of public health department prenatal clinics increases the assessment, identification, and documentation of and referral for abuse among pregnant women. An abuse protocol should be a routine part of maternity care. PMID:10432909

  5. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  6. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-25

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  7. Prenatal Smoking Exposure, Low Birth Weight, and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Breslau, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prenatal problems are among theorized etiologies for child disruptive behavior problems. A key question concerns whether etiological contributors are shared across the broad range of disruptive psychopathology or are partially or largely distinct. Method: We examined prenatal smoking exposure and low birth weight as risk factors for…

  8. Memory and Brain Volume in Adults Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Claire D.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Chen, Xiangchuan; Kable, Julie A.; Johnson, Katrina C.; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on memory and brain development was investigated in 92 African-American, young adults who were first identified in the prenatal period. Three groups (Control, n = 26; Alcohol-related Neurodevelopmental Disorder, n = 36; and Dysmorphic, n = 30) were imaged using structural MRI with brain volume calculated for…

  9. Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Depression and Cortisol Influences Infant Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin; Chicz-Demet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates that prenatal maternal and fetal processes can have a lasting influence on infant and child development. Results from animal models indicate that prenatal exposure to maternal stress and stress hormones has lasting consequences for development of the offspring. Few prospective studies of human pregnancy…

  10. Effects of Prenatal Care on Child Health at Age 5

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Kelly; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The broad goal of contemporary prenatal care is to promote the health of the mother, child, and family through the pregnancy, delivery, and the child’s development. Although the vast majority of mothers giving birth in developed countries receive prenatal care, past research has not found compelling evidence that early or adequate prenatal care has favorable effects on birth outcomes. It is possible that prenatal care confers health benefits to the child that do not become apparent until after the perinatal period. Methods Using data from a national urban birth cohort study in the U.S., we estimate the effects of prenatal care on four markers of child health at age 5—maternal-reported health status, asthma diagnosis, overweight, and height. We implement a number of different strategies to address the issue of potential omitted variables bias as well as a large number of specification checks to validate the findings. Results and Conclusions Prenatal care, defined a number of different ways, does not appear to have any effect on the outcomes examined. The findings are robust and suggest that routine health care encounters during the prenatal period could potentially be used more effectively to enhance children’s health trajectories. However, future research is needed to explore the effects of prenatal care on additional child health and developmental outcomes as well as the effects of preconceptional and maternal lifetime helathcare on child health. PMID:22374319

  11. Does Rural Residence Affect Access to Prenatal Care in Oregon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Beth; Grant, Therese; Schiff, Melissa; Kasehagen, Laurin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying how maternal residential location affects late initiation of prenatal care is important for policy planning and allocation of resources for intervention. Purpose: To determine how rural residence and other social and demographic characteristics affect late initiation of prenatal care, and how residence status is associated…

  12. An Evaluation of an Adolescent Prenatal Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Deborah L.; Peoples-Sheps, Mary D.; Buescher, Paul A.; Bennett, Trude A.; Paul, Melanie V.

    1998-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of a prenatal-education program in increasing prenatal care utilization, improving maternal weight gain, and reducing low-birthweight births among adolescents. Data from weekly program reports and state vital statistics and health services information indicated that program participants were less likely to have…

  13. Prenatal Care: A Content-Based ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Elissa Anne

    A content-based curriculum in English as a Second Language (ESL) focusing on prenatal self-care is presented. The course was designed as a solution to the problem of inadequate prenatal care for limited-English-proficient Mexican immigrant women. The first three sections offer background information on and discussion of (1) content-based ESL…

  14. Effects of prenatal care on child health at age 5.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kelly; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-02-01

    The broad goal of contemporary prenatal care is to promote the health of the mother, child, and family through the pregnancy, delivery, and the child's development. Although the vast majority of mothers giving birth in developed countries receive prenatal care, past research has not found compelling evidence that early or adequate prenatal care has favorable effects on birth outcomes. It is possible that prenatal care confers health benefits to the child that do not become apparent until after the perinatal period. Using data from a national urban birth cohort study in the US, we estimate the effects of prenatal care on four markers of child health at age 5-maternal-reported health status, asthma diagnosis, overweight, and height. Prenatal care, defined a number of different ways, does not appear to have any effect on the outcomes examined. The findings are robust and suggest that routine health care encounters during the prenatal period could potentially be used more effectively to enhance children's health trajectories. However, future research is needed to explore the effects of prenatal care on additional child health and developmental outcomes as well as the effects of preconceptional and maternal lifetime healthcare on child health.

  15. Nonuse of Prenatal Care: Implications for Social Work Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedics, Bonnie C.

    1994-01-01

    Interviewed 44 women who did not obtain prenatal care. Identified four categories of reasons for nonuse: women's lifestyles differed from mainstream; stressful events took priority over prenatal care; women attempted to receive care but were discouraged, turned away, or given poor information by service delivery system personnel; and women did not…

  16. Human Prenatal Effects: Methodological Problems and Some Suggested Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copans, Stuart A.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly reviews the relevant literature on human prenatal effects, describes some of the possible designs for such studies; and discusses some of the methodological problem areas: sample choice, measurement of prenatal variables, monitoring of labor and delivery, and neonatal assessment. (CS)

  17. DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID PARTIALLY AMELIORATES DEFICITS IN SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND ULTRASONIC VOCALIZATIONS CAUSED BY PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Wellmann, Kristen A.; George, Finney; Brnouti, Fares; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts social behavior in humans and rodents. One system particularly important for social behavior is the somatosensory system. Prenatal ethanol exposure alters the structure and function of this area. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is necessary for normal brain development and brains from ethanol-exposed animals are DHA deficient. Thus, we determined whether postnatal DHA supplementation ameliorated behavioral deficits induced by prenatal ethanol exposure. Timed pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to one of three groups: ad libitum access to an ethanol-containing liquid diet, pair fed an isocaloric isonutritive non-alcohol liquid diet, or ad libitum access to chow and water. Pups were assigned to one of two postnatal treatment groups; gavaged intragastrically once per day between postnatal day (P)11 and P20 with DHA (10 g/kg in artificial rat milk) or artificial rat milk. A third group was left untreated. Isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (iUSVs) were recorded on P14. Social behavior and play-induced USVs were tested on P28 or P42. Somatosensory performance was tested with a gap crossing test around P33 or on P42. Anxiety was tested on elevated plus maze around P35. Animals exposed to ethanol prenatally vocalized less, play fought less, and crossed a significantly shorter gap than control-treated animals. Administration of DHA ameliorated these ethanol-induced deficits such that the ethanol-exposed animals given DHA were no longer significantly different to control-treated animals. Thus, DHA administration may have therapeutic value to reverse some of ethanol’s damaging effects. PMID:25746516

  18. Prenatal exposure to fenugreek impairs sensorimotor development and the operation of spinal cord networks in mice.

    PubMed

    Khalki, Loubna; Ba M'hamed, Saadia; Sokar, Zahra; Bennis, Mohamed; Vinay, Laurent; Bras, Hélène; Viemari, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Fenugreek is a medicinal plant whose seeds are widely used in traditional medicine, mainly for its laxative, galactagogue and antidiabetic effects. However, consumption of fenugreek seeds during pregnancy has been associated with a range of congenital malformations, including hydrocephalus, anencephaly and spina bifida in humans. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of prenatal treatment of fenugreek seeds on the development of sensorimotor functions from birth to young adults. Pregnant mice were treated by gavage with 1 g/kg/day of lyophilized fenugreek seeds aqueous extract (FSAE) or distilled water during the gestational period. Behavioral tests revealed in prenatally treated mice a significant delay in righting, cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis responses and the swimming development. In addition, extracellular recording of motor output in spinal cord isolated from neonatal mice showed that the frequency of spontaneous activity and fictive locomotion was reduced in FSAE-exposed mice. On the other hand, the cross-correlation coefficient in control mice was significantly more negative than in treated animals indicating that alternating patterns are deteriorated in FSAE-treated animals. At advanced age, prenatally treated mice displayed altered locomotor coordination in the rotarod test and also changes in static and dynamic parameters assessed by the CatWalk automated gait analysis system. We conclude that FSAE impairs sensorimotor and coordination functions not only in neonates but also in adult mice. Moreover, spinal neuronal networks are less excitable in prenatally FSAE-exposed mice suggesting that modifications within the central nervous system are responsible, at least in part, for the motor impairments.

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Fenugreek Impairs Sensorimotor Development and the Operation of Spinal Cord Networks in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalki, Loubna; Ba M’hamed, Saadia; Sokar, Zahra; Bennis, Mohamed; Vinay, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Fenugreek is a medicinal plant whose seeds are widely used in traditional medicine, mainly for its laxative, galactagogue and antidiabetic effects. However, consumption of fenugreek seeds during pregnancy has been associated with a range of congenital malformations, including hydrocephalus, anencephaly and spina bifida in humans. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of prenatal treatment of fenugreek seeds on the development of sensorimotor functions from birth to young adults. Pregnant mice were treated by gavage with 1g/kg/day of lyophilized fenugreek seeds aqueous extract (FSAE) or distilled water during the gestational period. Behavioral tests revealed in prenatally treated mice a significant delay in righting, cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis responses and the swimming development. In addition, extracellular recording of motor output in spinal cord isolated from neonatal mice showed that the frequency of spontaneous activity and fictive locomotion was reduced in FSAE-exposed mice. On the other hand, the cross-correlation coefficient in control mice was significantly more negative than in treated animals indicating that alternating patterns are deteriorated in FSAE-treated animals. At advanced age, prenatally treated mice displayed altered locomotor coordination in the rotarod test and also changes in static and dynamic parameters assessed by the CatWalk automated gait analysis system. We conclude that FSAE impairs sensorimotor and coordination functions not only in neonates but also in adult mice. Moreover, spinal neuronal networks are less excitable in prenatally FSAE-exposed mice suggesting that modifications within the central nervous system are responsible, at least in part, for the motor impairments. PMID:24224030

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid partially ameliorates deficits in social behavior and ultrasonic vocalizations caused by prenatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Kristen A; George, Finney; Brnouti, Fares; Mooney, Sandra M

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts social behavior in humans and rodents. One system particularly important for social behavior is the somatosensory system. Prenatal ethanol exposure alters the structure and function of this area. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is necessary for normal brain development and brains from ethanol-exposed animals are DHA deficient. Thus, we determined whether postnatal DHA supplementation ameliorated behavioral deficits induced by prenatal ethanol exposure. Timed pregnant Long-Evans rats were assigned to one of three groups: ad libitum access to an ethanol-containing liquid diet, pair fed an isocaloric isonutritive non-alcohol liquid diet, or ad libitum access to chow and water. Pups were assigned to one of two postnatal treatment groups; gavaged intragastrically once per day between postnatal day (P)11 and P20 with DHA (10g/kg in artificial rat milk) or artificial rat milk. A third group was left untreated. Isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations (iUSVs) were recorded on P14. Social behavior and play-induced USVs were tested on P28 or P42. Somatosensory performance was tested with a gap crossing test around P33 or on P42. Anxiety was tested on elevated plus maze around P35. Animals exposed to ethanol prenatally vocalized less, play fought less, and crossed a significantly shorter gap than control-treated animals. Administration of DHA ameliorated these ethanol-induced deficits such that the ethanol-exposed animals given DHA were no longer significantly different to control-treated animals. Thus, DHA administration may have therapeutic value to reverse some of ethanol's damaging effects.

  1. Maternal Prenatal Positive Affect, Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms and Birth Outcomes: The PREDO Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuusinen, Tiina; Tuovinen, Soile; Villa, Pia; Hämäläinen, Esa; Laivuori, Hannele; Kajantie, Eero; Räikkönen, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated whether maternal prenatal emotions are associated with gestational length and birth weight in the large PREDO Study with multiple measurement points of emotions during gestation. Methods Altogether 3376 pregnant women self-assessed their positive affect (PA, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule) and depressive (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D) and anxiety (Spielberger State Anxiety Scale, STAI) symptoms up to 14 times during gestation. Birth characteristics were derived from the National Birth Register and from medical records. Results One standard deviation (SD) unit higher PA during the third pregnancy trimester was associated with a 0.05 SD unit longer gestational length, whereas one SD unit higher CES-D and STAI scores during the third trimester were associated with 0.04–0.05 SD unit shorter gestational lengths (P-values ≤ 0.02), corresponding to only 0.1–0.2% of the variation in gestational length. Higher PA during the third trimester was associated with a significantly decreased risk for preterm (< 37 weeks) delivery (for each SD unit higher positive affect, odds ratio was 0.8-fold (P = 0.02). Mothers with preterm delivery showed a decline in PA and an increase in CES-D and STAI during eight weeks prior to delivery. Post-term birth (≥ 42 weeks), birth weight and fetal growth were not associated with maternal prenatal emotions. Conclusions This study with 14 measurements of maternal emotions during pregnancy show modest effects of prenatal emotions during the third pregnancy trimester, particularly in the weeks close to delivery, on gestational length. From the clinical perspective, the effects were negligible. No associations were detected between prenatal emotions and birth weight. PMID:26919119

  2. 78 FR 70012 - Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, California, Land Management Plan Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, California, Land Management Plan Revision AGENCY: Lake... Management Unit (LTBMU) Land Management Plan Revision available for the 60-day pre-decisional objection... Record of Decision for the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) Land Management Plan...

  3. Culturally sensitive prenatal care for Southeast Asians.

    PubMed

    Mattson, S; Lew, L

    1992-01-01

    The outreach program for Southeast Asian immigrants, chiefly Cambodians who arrived after 1980, begun by St. Mary Medical CEnter of Long Beach California, called the Southeast Asian Health Project (SEAHP) was evaluated by structured interviews of 199 women. The obstacles to full participation by these Asian immigrants in health care are described at length. They range from illiteracy and abuse in refugee camps to the immense cultural barrier involving philosophy of health to language barriers. The SEAHP Outreach services began with door-to-door canvassing, ads in refugee papers, and meetings in temples. Special educational resource materials were printed covering prenatal care, nutrition, child development, and feeding. Oral classes were held in CAmbodian and Lao with Vietnamese translators, as well as babysitters, transportation, and snacks. Class topics were nutrition, parenting skills, labor and delivery, child development, hygiene, and breast feeding. Training was also given to professional staff. 600 clients in prenatal clinics since 1987, 119 were interviewed by 4 workers fluent in Cambodian and Lao. The women were typical of refugees, only 1/2 were literate in native languages. 49% had delivered babies at home in Asia; 39% had delivered in refugee camp clinics. Women cited several different behaviors as a result of SEAHP classes: intake of milk products, use of food substitutes, food preparation, attendance at regular medical care, child care, and bathing. They said that they felt more comfortable at the clinic, and would recommend that friends go to the clinic for prenatal care. The concept of culture broker, and the role of nurses as culture brokers are discussed.

  4. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  5. Brain fibronectin expression in prenatally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Meznarich, H.K.; McCoy, L.S.; Bale, T.L.; Stiegler, G.L.; Sikov, M.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Activation of gene transcription by radiation has been recently demonstrated in vivo. However, little is known on the specificity of these alterations on gene transcription. Prenatal irradiation is a known teratogen that affects the developing mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Altered neuronal migration has been suggested as a mechanism for abnormal development of prenatally irradiated brains. Fibronectin (FN), an extracellular glycoprotein, is essential for neural crest cell migration and neural cell growth. In addition, elevated levels of FN have been found in the extracellular matrix of irradiated lung. To test whether brain FN is affected by radiation, either FN level in insoluble matrix fraction or expression of FN mRNA was examined pre- and postnatally after irradiation. Mice (CD1), at 13 d of gestation (DG), served either as controls or were irradiated with 14 DG, 17 DG, or 5,6, or 14 d postnatal. Brain and liver were collected from offspring and analyzed for either total FN protein levels or relative mRNAs for FN and tubulin. Results of prenatal irradiation on reduction of postnatal brain weight relative to whole are comparable to that reported by others. Insoluble matrix fraction (IMF) per gram of brain, liver, lung, and heart weight was not significantly different either between control and irradiated groups or between postnatal stages, suggesting that radiation did not affect the IMF. However, total amounts of FN in brain IMF at 17 DG were significantly different (p < .02) between normal (1.66 [+-] 0.80 [mu]g) and irradiated brains (0.58 [+-] 0.22 [mu]g). FN mRNA was detectable at 13, 14, and 17 DG, but was not detectable at 6 and 14 d postnatal, indicating that FN mRNA is developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Empowering Women's Prenatal Communication: Does Literacy Matter?

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L; Erby, Lori H; Rimal, Rajiv N; Smith, Katherine C; Larson, Susan; Bennett, Ian M; Cole, Katie Washington; Guan, Yue; Molloy, Matthew; Bienstock, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of an interactive computer program developed to empower prenatal communication among women with restricted literacy skills. A total of 83 women seeing 17 clinicians were randomized to a computer-based communication activation intervention (Healthy Babies Healthy Moms [HBHM]) or prenatal education (Baby Basics [BB]) prior to their prenatal visit. Visit communication was coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System, and postvisit satisfaction was reported. Participants were on average 24 years of age and 25 weeks pregnant; 80% were African American. Two thirds scored ≤8th grade on a literacy screener. Women with literacy deficits were more verbally active, disclosed more medical and psychosocial/lifestyle information, and were rated as more dominant by coders in the HBHM group relative to their counterparts in the BB group (all ps < .05). Clinicians were less verbally dominant and more patient centered with literate HBHM relative to BB group women (p < .05); there was a similar, nonsignificant trend (p < .1) for lower literate women. Clinicians communicated less medical information and made fewer reassurance statements to lower literate women in the HBHM relative to the BB group (p < .05). There was a trend toward lower visit satisfaction for women with restricted literacy in the HBHM relative to the BB group (p < .1); no difference in satisfaction was evident for more literate women. The HBHM intervention empowered communication of all women and facilitated verbal engagement and relevant disclosure of medical and psychosocial information of women with literacy deficits. Satisfaction, however, tended to be lower for these women.

  7. Psychosexual development: an examination of the role of prenatal hormones.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, A A; Meyer-Bahlburg, H F

    Naturally occurring endocrine syndromes and the offspring from steroid-treated pregnancies are the major sources of evidence for a role of prenatal hormones in psychosexual development in man. Effects of prenatal androgens have been established for the sex-dimorphic behaviour clusters of energy expenditure (increased), parenting rehearsal (decreased), peer associations (shifted to male), and grooming-related behaviour (decreased); most of the information was obtained on the syndrome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia and in progestin-induced female hermaphroditism. Studies of children and adults exposed prenatally to exogenous oestrogens and/or progestagens suggest slight demasculinizing effects but cannot yet be considered conclusive. Gender identity is largely dependent on the sex of rearing; a direct role of prenatal hormones in its formation has not been shown. The evidence for the role of prenatal hormones in the development of sexual orientation is inconclusive.

  8. The Motivation-Facilitation Theory of Prenatal Care Access.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Roman, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of services, accessing health care remains a problem in the United States and other developed countries. Prenatal care has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes and decrease health disparities, yet many women struggle with access to care. Current theories addressing access to prenatal care focus on barriers, although such knowledge is minimally useful for clinicians. We propose a middle-range theory, the motivation-facilitation theory of prenatal care access, which condenses the prenatal care access process into 2 interacting components: motivation and facilitation. Maternal motivation is the mother's desire to begin and maintain care. Facilitation represents the goal of the clinic to create easy, open access to person-centered beneficial care. This simple model directs the focus of research and change to the interface of the woman and the clinic and encourages practice-level interventions that facilitate women entering and maintaining prenatal care.

  9. Screening and brief intervention in prenatal care settings.

    PubMed

    Chang, Grace

    Pregnant women continue to drink despite evidence that prenatal alcohol consumption can negatively affect fetal growth and development. Because no universally safe level of prenatal alcohol use has been established, it is beneficial to identify and modify a woman's prenatal alcohol use early in her pregnancy, particularly as her past drinking habits can predict her drinking levels during pregnancy. Some women may voluntarily disclose the extent of their prenatal alcohol consumption. If not, the T-ACE, a four-item screening questionnaire based on the CAGE assessment tool, has been demonstrated to be a valuable and efficient method for identifying a range of alcohol use. Studies have shown that combined with brief interventions, early identification of a woman's prenatal alcohol use could avert its more severe adverse consequences and may be the logical first-line approach.

  10. Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

    PubMed Central

    Scheinost, Dustin; Sinha, Rajita; Cross, Sarah N.; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Sze, Gordon; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain. PMID:27673421

  11. Does prenatal stress alter the developing connectome?

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Sinha, Rajita; Cross, Sarah N; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Sze, Gordon; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2017-01-01

    Human neurodevelopment requires the organization of neural elements into complex structural and functional networks called the connectome. Emerging data suggest that prenatal exposure to maternal stress plays a role in the wiring, or miswiring, of the developing connectome. Stress-related symptoms are common in women during pregnancy and are risk factors for neurobehavioral disorders ranging from autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction, to major depression and schizophrenia. This review focuses on structural and functional connectivity imaging to assess the impact of changes in women's stress-based physiology on the dynamic development of the human connectome in the fetal brain.

  12. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  13. Prenatal protein malnutrition results in increased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in rat CA3 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; Galler, Janina R; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2003-08-01

    Electrophysiological studies have revealed an increase in the level of tonic inhibition in the hippocampus following prenatal protein malnutrition in rats. In the present study, whole cell patch clamp recordings of bipolar interneurons in the stratum radiatum of the CA3 subfield were used to determine whether this increase in inhibition can be accounted for by a change in the electrophysiological properties of GABAergic interneurons. Hippocampal slices were prepared from juvenile rats whose dams were fed either a normal (25% casein) or low (6% casein) protein diet throughout pregnancy. Intrinsic membrane and action potential properties were unaltered by the prenatal nutritional insult. In most respects the characteristics of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and the modulation of such currents by the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem were also similar in cells from the two nutritional groups. While the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory currents was unaltered, miniature (Tetrodotoxin resistant) inhibitory currents occurred at a significantly increased frequency in interneurons from prenatally protein malnourished rats. Thus, while the basic membrane properties of interneurons are preserved, there is a significant increase in the probability of GABA release from interneurons following prenatal protein malnutrition.

  14. Medicare and Medicaid programs; modifications to the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program for 2014 and other changes to EHR Incentive Program; and health information technology: revision to the certified EHR technology definition and EHR certification changes related to standards. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-04

    This final rule changes the meaningful use stage timeline and the definition of certified electronic health record technology (CEHRT) to allow options in the use of CEHRT for the EHR reporting period in 2014. It also sets the requirements for reporting on meaningful use objectives and measures as well as clinical quality measure (CQM) reporting in 2014 for providers who use one of the CEHRT options finalized in this rule for their EHR reporting period in 2014. In addition, it finalizes revisions to the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs to adopt an alternate measure for the Stage 2 meaningful use objective for hospitals to provide structured electronic laboratory results to ambulatory providers; to correct the regulation text for the measures associated with the objective for hospitals to provide patients the ability to view online, download, and transmit information about a hospital admission; and to set a case number threshold exemption for CQM reporting applicable for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) beginning with FY 2013. Finally, this rule finalizes the provisionally adopted replacement of the Data Element Catalog (DEC) and the Quality Reporting Document Architecture (QRDA) Category III standards with updated versions of these standards.

  15. Sensory Processing Disorder in a Primate Model: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study of Prenatal Alcohol and Prenatal Stress Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Gajewski, Lisa L.; Larson, Julie A.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Converse, Alexander K.; DeJesus, Onofre T.

    2008-01-01

    Disrupted sensory processing, characterized by over- or underresponsiveness to environmental stimuli, has been reported in children with a variety of developmental disabilities. This study examined the effects of prenatal stress and moderate-level prenatal alcohol exposure on tactile sensitivity and its relationship to striatal dopamine system…

  16. Exploring the organizational effect of prenatal testosterone upon the sporting brain.

    PubMed

    Golby, Jim; Meggs, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The 2D:4D ratio is a putative marker for prenatal testosterone and has the potential to explain variations in sport performance. To date there has been little research into the association between sporting performance, digit ratio and psychological variables. This study examined the relationship between 2D:4D and mental toughness, optimism, goal orientations, aggression, coping style and their association with sporting achievement. A post facto design was adopted. Participants consisted of an opportunity sample of 122 sports people: male (n =60) and female (n = 62) from a university in North East England. Following informed consent, a Vernier Caliper was used to measure digit ratio hand scans. Participants completed self-reports measures including, the Alternative Psychological Performance Inventory (Golby et al., 2008), Sport Mental Toughness Questionnaire (Sheard et al., 2009), Life Orientation Test-Revised (Scheier et al., 1994), Buss-Perry aggression (Buss-Perry, 1992) and 30 item coping style questionnaire (Joseph et al., 1995). MANOVA revealed significant gender differences in 2D:4D with males demonstrating lower ratios (Manning, 2002). The 2D:4D was found to differentiate eleven of the seventeen measured variables, including mental toughness scores (p < 0.001) and varying levels of sporting achievement i.e. international/national, regional and school levels (p< 0.001). Specifically, this difference was significant when comparing the highest (international/national) and lowest (leisure/school) groups. Perhaps there is a threshold for prenatal testosterone's influence upon sporting ability. Further research is necessary to examine the subtle differences between competitors involved in different achievement levels. It is proposed that high prenatal levels of testosterone may contribute to the development of increased mental toughness, optimism, ego/task goal orientations in individuals, and hence aptitude towards sport. Findings lend support for the tentative

  17. Grafting in revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Bussi, M; Palonta, F; Toma, S

    2013-06-01

    Rhinoplasty is one of the most difficult aesthetic surgery procedures with a high rate of revision. In revision rhinoplasty the surgeon should explore the patient's concerns and then verify the possibility to satisfy expectations after complete internal and external examination of the nose. For the vast majority of complex secondaries, an open approach is the only reasonable method. In fact, in secondary nasal surgery, because of the scarring process following the primary operation, dissection is tedious, and landmarks are lost. One of the main objectives for the surgeon who approaches secondary rhinoplasty is to restore the structural support of the nose and to replace the lost volume of soft tissues. To achieve this purpose, the surgeon must often rely on grafts. An ideal grafting material must be easy to sculpt, resistant to trauma, infection and extrusion, mechanically stable, inert and readily available. For all these reasons, autogenous cartilage grafts harvested from septum, auricular concha and rib represent the first choice in rhinoplasty. In order to obtain a camouflage graft that provides natural contouring to the nose, temporalis fascia can be used. All these carefully trimmed grafts are useful in tip revision surgery, in secondary surgery of the dorsum and to resolve or reduce functional problems.

  18. Prenatal stress changes learning strategies in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Bohbot, Veronique D; Wolf, Oliver T

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that stressful experiences may shape hippocampus-dependent learning and memory processes. However, although most studies focused on the impact of stress at the time of learning or memory testing, very little is known about how stress during critical periods of brain development affects learning and memory later in life. In this study, we asked whether prenatal stress exposure may influence the engagement of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning strategies and caudate nucleus-dependent response learning strategies in later life. To this end, we tested healthy participants whose mothers had experienced major negative life events during their pregnancy in a virtual navigation task that can be solved by spatial and response strategies. We found that young adults with prenatal stress used rigid response learning strategies more often than flexible spatial learning strategies compared with participants whose mothers did not experience major negative life events during pregnancy. Individual differences in acute or chronic stress do not account for these findings. Our data suggest that the engagement of hippocampal and nonhippocampal learning strategies may be influenced by stress very early in life.

  19. Noninvasive screening for prenatal genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two decades a number of methods of prenatal diagnosis have become available and have been used either in laboratory research or in routine genetic counselling. Despite the effectiveness of invasive sampling procedures in diagnosing genetic disorders, their use involves some risk. The advantage of noninvasive methods is that they provide an opportunity to make a genetic diagnosis without risk, and therefore are applicable for use in mass screening programmes. This article reviews three different approaches to noninvasive prenatal genetic diagnosis and offers conclusions and recommendations for their use. Maternal serum screening is a well-understood technique that should be universally offered to pregnant women, regardless of their risk status. Invasive tests can be used, as indicated, once serum testing results have been obtained. Although ultrasonography cannot be recommended for routine use, it can provide a useful adjunct to serum screening and deserves further investigation. Elaboration of fetal cells from maternal blood is a promising technique but can only be considered investigational on the basis of current research, and should not serve as the sole basis of clinical decision-making. PMID:8907774

  20. Prenatal growth of the human tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Bruzewicz, Szymon; Suder, Elzbieta

    2004-06-01

    The questions connected with the morphology of developing tympanic membrane are rather inadequately dealt with in the relevant literature. The aim of this article has been the morphometric analysis of the prenatal growth of human tympanic membrane. The experiment was conducted on 33 fetuses aged from the 4th to 8th month of gestation. Significant individual variability of the tympanic membrane measurements was revealed in the material studied. The growth of the structure discussed was bilaterally symmetric during the whole period investigated. The fourth and 7th month of gestation seem to be the crucial stages for the tympanic membrane development. The measurements of the membrane exhibited the highest variability, simultaneously being negatively correlated with the fetal age in that periods. Relatively more intensive growth of the vertical diameter of the membrane was noted in the 5th and 8th months of gestation. In the 8th month of gestation the tympanic membrane reached a vertically elongated shape, typical of the postnatal period. On the basis of our results it is possible to conclude that the quantitative developmental process takes place in the tympanic membrane till the end of the prenatal period, determining the final functional capacity of the structure discussed.

  1. Environmental noise and human prenatal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    To determine whether chronic exposure to relatively loud noise has demonstrable biological effects in humans, a study was conducted on the effect of mother's exposure to airport noise while pregnant, and of social and biological characteristics of the family upon birthweight and gestation length. The sample of births was drawn from a community located adjacent to an international airport in the U.S., where noise levels had been measured previously. Mother's noise exposure was based upon noise levels near her residence in the community while she was pregnant. Data from 115 births were used, these being from mothers whose noise exposure history was most complete throughout the pregnancy. Using multivariate analysis to correct for family characteristics, the partial correlation coefficient for noise exposure and gestation length was negative, large, and significant in girls (r . -0.49, p less than 0.001). In boys the partial correlation coefficient was also negative but was smaller and did not quite reach statistical significance. Partial correlations with birthweight were smaller in both boys and girls and not significant. These results agree best with previous studies that suggest that noise may reduce prenatal growth. The size of the observed effects may be related to a conservative research design biased towards underestimation, as well as to the real effects of noise upon human prenatal growth.

  2. Mechanobiological simulations of prenatal joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2014-03-21

    Joint morphogenesis is the process in which prenatal joints acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. Despite the clinical importance of the process, it remains unclear how joints acquire their shapes. In this study, we simulate 3D mechanobiological joint morphogenesis for which the effects of a range of movements (or lack of movement) and different initial joint shapes are explored. We propose that static hydrostatic compression inhibits cartilage growth while dynamic hydrostatic compression promotes cartilage growth. Both pre-cavitational (no muscle contractions) and post-cavitational (with muscle contractions) phases of joint development were simulated. Our results showed that for hinge type motion (planar motion from 45° to 120°) the proximal joint surface developed a convex profile in the posterior region and the distal joint surface developed a slightly concave profile. When 3D movements from 40° to -40° in two planes were applied, simulating a rotational movement, the proximal joint surface developed a concave profile whereas the distal joint surface rudiment acquire a rounded convex profile, showing an interlocking shape typical of a ball and socket joint. The significance of this research is that it provides new and important insights into normal and abnormal joint development, and contributes to our understanding of the mechanical factors driving very early joint morphogenesis. An enhanced understanding of how prenatal joints form is critical for developing strategies for early diagnosis and preventative treatments for congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities such as developmental dysplasia of the hip.

  3. [Technical quality of prenatal visits in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Tal-Dia, A; Garnier, P; Toure, K; Mbow, E H; Wone, I

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the quality of antenatal care in Senegal. A survey was conducted in 49 health centers near 70 health workers practising antenatal cares for pregnant women. The quality of cares was assessed on 13 essential actions, which were classified in 4 components. The global score of quality and the specific score of each component were calculated and analysed according to the qualification and the duration of time in the work of the health workers, the location and the equipment of the centers. Global quality of prenatal cares was linked with the qualification of agents. The component "screening for risk factors" had low and worse score and "reception of pregnant women" also. These 2 components were not linked with the qualification of agents, contrary to the 2 others, pregnancy and mother health surveillance. The duration of time in service and the equipment had no influence in global and specific scores. The health workers qualification was linked with many components of quality, but a good basic training is not sufficient to provide prenatal care of high quality. It must be define a framework with screening for unfavorable ends of pregnancy.

  4. ABM Clinical Protocol #19: Breastfeeding Promotion in the Prenatal Setting, Revision 2015

    PubMed Central

    Rosen-Carole, Casey; Hartman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A central goal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient. PMID:26651541

  5. ABM Clinical Protocol #19: Breastfeeding Promotion in the Prenatal Setting, Revision 2015.

    PubMed

    Rosen-Carole, Casey; Hartman, Scott

    2015-12-01

    A central goal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve only as guidelines for the care of breastfeeding mothers and infants and do not delineate an exclusive course of treatment or serve as standards of medical care. Variations in treatment may be appropriate according to the needs of an individual patient.

  6. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses. Interim Recommendations: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.; Meznarich, H.K.; Thrall, K.D.; Traub, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radionuclides in chemical forms that provided a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were estimated for these materials, and were combined with data from biokinetic transfer models to predict radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodologies were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed for representative situations; introduction of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood at successive months of pregnancy was assumed to accommodate the stage dependence of geometric relationships and biological behaviors. Summary tables of results, correlations, and dosimetric relations, and of tentative generalized categorizations, are provided in the report.

  7. 75 FR 39669 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... proposing to revise the system of records notice for the Hotline Complaint Files of the Inspector General... ``Hotline Complaint Files'' in the subject line of your electronic message. During and after the...

  8. 21 CFR 20.26 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indexes of certain records. 20.26 Section 20.26... INFORMATION General Policy § 20.26 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised at... substantially the same records. (b) Each such index will be made available through the Internet at...

  9. 21 CFR 20.26 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indexes of certain records. 20.26 Section 20.26... INFORMATION General Policy § 20.26 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised at... substantially the same records. (b) Each such index will be made available through the Internet at...

  10. 77 FR 74282 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... existing system of records ``Loan Guaranty Home, Condominium and Manufactured Home Loan Applicants Records... to amend its system of records entitled ``Loan Guaranty Home, Condominium and Manufactured Home Loan... revised to add a new Routine Use Number 35 as follows: 55VA26 System name: Loan Guaranty Home,...

  11. Common Bibliographic Standards for Baylor University Libraries. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sharon; And Others

    Developed by a Baylor University (Texas) Task Force, the revised policies of bibliographic standards for the university libraries provide formats for: (1) archives and manuscript control; (2) audiovisual media; (3) books; (4) machine-readable data files; (5) maps; (6) music scores; (7) serials; and (8) sound recordings. The task force assumptions…

  12. The LS Graph: A Methodology for Visualizing Writing Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Eva; Sullivan, Kirk P. H.

    2002-01-01

    Computer keystroke-logging programs, which record all keystrokes and mouse actions, facilitate the collection of quantitative data about text creation during writing revision. Presents the LS graph, a novel way of graphically representing and summarizing the quantitative data collected when keystroke logging. (Author/VWL)

  13. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M; Hannigan, John H; Greenwald, Mark K; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A; Partridge, Robert T; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n=316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use.

  14. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  15. Prenatal Exposure to Bisphenol A and Phthalates and Infant Neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Yolton, Kimberly; Xu, Yingying; Strauss, Donna; Altaye, Mekibib; Calafat, Antonia M.; Khoury, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of prenatal exposure to bisphenol A and select common phthalates with infant neurobehavior measured at 5 weeks. Methods We compared the concentration of maternal urinary metabolites of bisphenol A and phthalates at two distinct time points in pregnancy (16w, 26w) with scores on the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) at 5 weeks of age in a cohort of 350 mother/infant pairs. Results Prenatal exposure to BPA was not significantly associated with neurobehavioral outcomes at 5 weeks. Significant associations between prenatal exposure to measured phthalates and infant neurobehavioral outcomes differed by type of phthalate and were only seen with exposure measured at 26 weeks. Higher total di-butyl phthalate (DBP) metabolites at 26w was associated with improved behavioral organization evidenced by decreased arousal (p=.04), increased self-regulation (p=.052), and decreased handling (p=.02). In males, higher total di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites at 26w was associated with more nonoptimal reflexes (p=.02). Conclusion The association between prenatal phthalate exposure and infant neurobehavior differed by type of phthalate and was evident only with exposure measured at 26w. Prenatal exposure to DBP was associated with improved behavioral organization in 5-week-old infants. Prenatal exposure to DEHP was associated with nonoptimal reflexes in male infants. There was no evidence of an association between prenatal BPA exposure and infant neurobehavior. PMID:21854843

  16. Prenatal Influences on Human Sexual Orientation: Expectations versus Data.

    PubMed

    Breedlove, S Marc

    2017-02-07

    In non-human vertebrate species, sexual differentiation of the brain is primarily driven by androgens such as testosterone organizing the brains of males in a masculine fashion early in life, while the lower levels of androgen in developing females organize their brains in a feminine fashion. These principles may be relevant to the development of sexual orientation in humans, because retrospective markers of prenatal androgen exposure, namely digit ratios and otoacoustic emissions, indicate that lesbians, on average, were exposed to greater prenatal androgen than were straight women. Thus, the even greater levels of prenatal androgen exposure experienced by fetal males may explain why the vast majority of them grow up to be attracted to women. However, the same markers indicate no significant differences between gay and straight men in terms of average prenatal androgen exposure, so the variance in orientation in men cannot be accounted for by variance in prenatal androgen exposure, but may be due to variance in response to prenatal androgens. These data contradict several popular notions about human sexual orientation. Sexual orientation in women is said to be fluid, sometimes implying that only social influences in adulthood are at work, yet the data indicate prenatal influences matter as well. Gay men are widely perceived as under-masculinized, yet the data indicate they are exposed to as much prenatal androgen as straight men. There is growing sentiment to reject "binary" conceptions of human sexual orientations, to emphasize instead a spectrum of orientations. Yet the data indicate that human sexual orientation is sufficiently polarized that groups of lesbians, on average, show evidence of greater prenatal androgen exposure than groups of straight women, while groups of gay men have, on average, a greater proportion of brothers among their older siblings than do straight men.

  17. 77 FR 55221 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Medical Examination and Vaccination Record, Form I-693; Revision of a Currently Approved Collection ACTION...: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the...

  18. Genetic Considerations in the Prenatal Diagnosis of Overgrowth Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Neeta; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2015-01-01

    Large (>90%) for gestational age (LGA) fetuses are usually identified incidentally. Detection of the LGA fetus should first prompt the provider to rule out incorrect dates and maternal diabetes. Once this is done, consideration should be given to certain overgrowth syndromes, especially if anomalies are present. The overgrowth syndromes have significant clinical and molecular overlap, and are associated with developmental delay, tumors, and other anomalies. Although genetic causes of overgrowth are considered postnatally, they are infrequently diagnosed prenatally. Here, we review prenatal sonographic findings in fetal overgrowth syndromes, including Pallister-Killian, Beckwith-Wiedemann, Sotos, Perlman, and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel. We also discuss prenatal diagnosis options and recurrence risks. PMID:19609940

  19. Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Medina, Lissette; Delgado, Jeannette; Hernandez, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Eighty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to yoga, massage therapy or standard prenatal care control groups to determine the relative effects of yoga and massage therapy on prenatal depression and neonatal outcomes. Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale. In addition, the yoga and massage therapy groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight, and those groups, in turn, had greater gestational age and birthweight than the control group.

  20. Korean women's attitudes toward pregnancy and prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Pritham, U A; Sammons, L N

    1993-01-01

    A convenience sample of 40 native-born pregnant Korean women receiving prenatal care at a U.S. military facility in a major metropolitan area in Korea completed a questionnaire about attitudes toward pregnancy and prenatal care. Responses revealed a family life characterized by positive maternal and paternal perceptions of the pregnancy and less preference for a male child than we had anticipated. Traditional beliefs in Tae Mong, a conception dream, and Tae Kyo, rituals for safe childbirth, were followed. Food taboos, including protein sources, were reported. Attitudes toward prenatal care services, care providers, and maternal health habits are described.

  1. Evidence-based prenatal care: Part I. General prenatal care and counseling issues.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Colleen; Harris, Susan; Grzybowski, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    Effective prenatal care should integrate the best available evidence into a model of shared decision making. Pregnant women should be counseled about the risks of smoking and alcohol and drug use. Structured educational programs to promote breastfeeding are effective. Routine fetal heart auscultation, urinalysis, and assessment of maternal weight, blood pressure, and fundal height generally are recommended, although the evidence for these interventions is variable. Women should be offered ABO and Rh blood typing and screening for anemia during the first prenatal visit. Genetic counseling and testing should be offered to couples with a family history of genetic disorders, a previously affected fetus or child, or a history of recurrent miscarriage. All women should be offered prenatal serum marker screening for neural tube defects and aneuploidy. Women at increased risk for aneuploidy should be offered amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Counseling about the limitations and risks of these tests, as well as their psychologic implications, is necessary. Folic acid supplementation beginning in the preconception period reduces the incidence of neural tube defects. There is limited evidence that routine use of other dietary supplements may improve outcomes for the mother and infant.

  2. Student Records: Complying with Federal Privacy Laws May be Simpler than You Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoop, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) was passed in 1974 and revised in 1996. This act, also known as the Buckley Amendment, guarantees parents access to their children's education records and limits the disclosure of those records. The revised law regards most information that teachers, school administrators, and education…

  3. Karyotyping or rapid aneuploidy detection in prenatal diagnosis? The different views of users and providers of prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Boormans, E M A; Birnie, E; Bilardo, C M; Oepkes, D; Bonsel, G J; van Lith, J M M

    2009-09-01

    Developments in prenatal diagnosis raise the question which test strategy should be implemented. However, preferences of women and caregivers are underexposed. This study investigates what kind of prenatal test pregnant women and caregivers prefer and if differences between the groups exist, using self-report questionnaires. Women preferred either karyotyping (50%) or rapid aneuploidy detection (43%). Caregivers opted for the latter (78%). A test targeted on Down syndrome was the least preferred in both groups. We recommend the use of individualised choice for genetic test in prenatal diagnosis, overcoming the existing differences in preferences between women and caregivers.

  4. Prenatal development in fishers (Martes pennanti)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, H.C.; Krohn, W.B.; Bezembluk, E.A.; Lott, R.; Wallace, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and quantified prenatal growth of fishers (Martes pennanti) using ultrasonography. Seven females gave birth to 21 kits. The first identifiable embryonic structures were seen 42 d prepartum; these appeared to be unimplanted blastocysts or gestational sacs, which subsequently implanted in the uterine horns. Maternal and fetal heart rates were monitored from first detection to birth. Maternal heart rates did not differ among sampling periods, while fetal hearts rates increased from first detection to birth. Head and body differentiation, visible limbs and skeletal ossification were visible by 30, 23 and 21 d prepartum, respectively. Mean diameter of gestational sacs and crown-rump lengths were linearly related to gestational age (P < 0.001). Biparietal and body diameters were also linearly related to gestational age (P < 0.001) and correctly predicted parturition dates within 1-2 d. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Prenatal diagnostics and information to parents].

    PubMed

    de la Fuente Hontañón, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    New screening and prenatal diagnostic techniques, require the Medicine professionals have a clear purpose for its realization, since the intention determined the act is determined in accordance with the values of the Medicine or becoming an event eugenics act by means of "therapeutic abortion". The Family Physician information about these techniques to pregnant women must be based on the status of science, facilitating the risk of loss fetal and false data positive informing of therapeutic possibilities and facilitating respect for the pregnant woman's decision of non-fulfillment of the screening. The information update according to the state of science, should be provided in writing and the informed consent of the patient should be obtained by all professionals involved in testing, with respect shows for the autonomy of the patient.

  6. The prenatal development of the human orbit.

    PubMed

    de Haan, A B; Willekens, B; Klooster, J; Los, A A; van Zwieten, J; Botha, C P; Spekreijse, H; IJskes, S G; Simonsz, H J

    2006-03-01

    During the 1970s, as part of his work for a doctor's thesis in which he described the development of the human orbit in great detail, the first author established the largest anatomical collection of embryonic and fetal orbits ever. Unfortunately, he died before the thesis could be finished. The thousands of sections have now been scanned at high resolution and made publicly available on the Internet at www.visible-orbit.org; 3-D reconstruction software is being developed. The Discussion and part of the 'Methods' section of this thesis are published in translation in this article. The conclusions of the first author at the time read as follows: (1) initially, the developing orbit is vaguely indicated by condensations in the mesenchymal connective tissue area; (2) in this connective tissue area, chondral, osseous and muscular structures develop and grow until, in the fully developed stage, the orbital content is surrounded by bony surfaces with a thin layer of connective tissue as periosteum, and by a muscle fragment; (3) the embryonic and early fetal phase, during which one can only speak of a 'regio orbitalis,' is followed by a period in which we can speak of a primordial orbit; (4) the phase of the primordial orbit extends until after birth; (5) the surface area of all orbital walls increases more or less linearly; (6) the 'musculus orbitalis Mülleri' occupies a special place in the orbital wall; (7) the so-called 'regio craniolateralis' is the primordium, which, in the fully developed stage, is occupied by the thick intersection of the frontolateral and the horizontal part of the frontal bone; (8) in the frontal plane, the shape of the primordial orbit, as well as that of the fully developed orbit, is more or less round; (9) the prenatal development of an eye socket is a complex event, characterized by changes in composition, shape and size of the orbital wall; and (10) the orbit can only be denoted by the term "eye socket" when it is fully developed. At the

  7. Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    One widely held view of prenatal screening (PNS) is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. (1) Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. (2) The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, may have unpalatable implications, such as extending choice well beyond health screening. (3) Any sensible version of Public Health Pluralism will be capable of taking on board the moral seriousness of abortion and will advocate, where practicable, alternative means of reducing the prevalence of disease and disability. (4) Public Health Pluralism is at least as well-equipped as the Pure Choice model to deal with autonomy and consent issues. PMID:25521971

  8. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of Aarskog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, W; Dezerega, V; Horvath, E; Aracena, M

    1999-10-01

    In 1970, Aarskog described a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by short stature in association with a variety of structural anomalies involving mainly the face, distal extremities, and external genitalia (faciodigitogenital syndrome). The major facial manifestations of this syndrome include hypertelorism, broad forehead, broad nasal bridge, short nose with anteverted nostrils, long philtrum, widow's peak hair anomaly, and ocular and ear anomalies. Limb abnormalities consist of short broad hands, brachydactyly, interdigital webbing, hypoplasia of the middle phalanges, proximal interphalangeal joint laxity with concomitant flexion and restriction of movement of distal interphalangeal joints, and flat broad feet with bulbous toes. Genital anomalies are characteristics and include shawl scrotum, cryptorchidism, and inguinal hernia. Most affected patients have normal intelligence, but some authors have noted mild neurodevelopmental delay in up to 30% of the cases. We describe a case of Aarskog syndrome diagnosed prenatally by sonography at 28 weeks' gestation in a high-risk pregnancy for this disorder.

  9. Effect of Prenatal Zinc Supplementation on Birthweight

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, Jacques; Beatty, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 pregnant women in Ghana were randomly assigned to receive either a combined supplement of 40 mg of zinc as zinc gluconate and 40 mg of iron as ferrous sulphate or 40 mg of elemental iron as ferrous sulphate. Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179)=5.614, p=0.019]. Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy. PMID:19902797

  10. Communicating risk in prenatal genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Gates, Elena A

    2004-01-01

    Prenatal testing for Down syndrome and neural tube defects has become routine, and testing for other genetic conditions is becoming commonplace. Counseling about these tests involves a discussion of risk information, so pregnant women and their partners can use the information effectively when they make choices about testing. Discussing risk can be challenging, as many individuals, particularly those of lower literacy, have a poor understanding of the numerical concept of risk. Furthermore, whether risk is comprehended accurately or not, it is interpreted by patients in light of their existing knowledge and past experiences. Strategies available to optimize understanding of risk include communication of risk figures as frequencies rather than as probabilities or percentages and explicit discussion of a woman's preconceptions about her risk and about the condition being tested for.

  11. Prenatal diagnosis of androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bianca, S; Cataliotti, A; Bartoloni, G; Torrente, I; Barrano, B; Boemi, G; Lo Presti, M; Indaco, L; Barone, C; Ettore, G

    2009-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) (OMIM 300068) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with an XY karyotype that is caused by androgen receptor (AR) defects. We report a prenatal diagnosis case with clinical and molecular findings. The fetal phenotype was female, moreover the autopsy revealed the presence of abdominal testes confirmed by histopathological examination. The AR gene molecular analysis performed on the fetal DNA showed the presence of a c.2493C>T change in exon 4. The single nucleotide change resulted in a Q711X amino acid substitution within the AR ligand-binding domain of the protein that has never been described before in the literature. AIS is an important consideration in pregnancies that show sex discordance in ultrasonography and karyotype results with the opportunity to perform molecular analysis of the AR gene in order to confirm the diagnosis.

  12. Revision and Validation of the Revised Teacher Beliefs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Jane

    This study revised the Teacher Beliefs Survey (S. Wooley and A. Wooley, 1999; TBS), an instrument to assess teachers beliefs related to constructivist and behaviorist theories of learning, and then studied the validity of the revised TBS. Drawing on a literature review, researchers added items for the existing constructs of the TBS and added a new…

  13. Prenatal development of the bovine oviduct.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, R A-M; Sinowatz, F

    2007-08-01

    In this study the development of the bovine Fallopian tube was investigated using light microscopic methods. Formation and differentiation of the Müllerian duct were studied in mesonephroi of 16 embryos and fetuses with a crown-rump lengths (CRL) of 0.9-8.4 cm. The funnel field, the rostral beginning of the Müllerian duct was first observed at a CRL of 0.9 cm. It appears as a thickening of the mesothelium on the craniolateral side of the mesonephros. During later development the Müllerian duct emerges by caudal outgrowth from the funnel field. Formation of a common basal lamina surrounding the caudal tips of Müllerian and Wolffian ducts could be observed at all stages up to CRL of 2.7 cm. The mesothelium and the epithelium of the Wolffian duct adjacent to the Müllerian duct showed a modification of epithelium height in all examined stages. Probably the Wolffian duct influences the growth of Müllerian duct by epithelio-mesenchymal interactions. Fetuses from a CRL of 12.0 to 94.0 cm were used for investigation of the prenatal differentiation of the oviductal mucosa. Folding of the oviductal mucosa started at a CRL of 29.0 cm and continued until birth. Individual primary, secondary and tertiary folds are formed in special proliferation zones and epithelium-folding buds. The cellular differentiation of the oviductal epithelium involves the formation of ciliated and secretory cells during different times of prenatal development. Ciliogenesis was first detected at a CRL of 33.0 cm. Active secretory cells could be observed in the oviductal epithelium from a CRL of 64.0 cm onwards.

  14. 'New parenting', psychotherapy, prenatal and perinatal care.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Terence

    2007-01-01

    The health of future generations, both physical and psychological, depends upon good parental and early environment, free particularly from malnutrition, toxins and undue stress. Education about these negative influences is urgent, especially to encourage childbearing women in a healthy diet and lifestyle. The detrimental effects of cigarette smoking in pregnancy have been known since the 1970s, yet in Germany, for example, 60% of all children are conceived, carried, born into a household where at least one adult smokes. Even if the father desists from smoking at home, the nicotine in his body tissues is transmitted to anyone near him, for example his wife when they sleep near each other. More than one glass of beer, wine or spirits per week during the pregnancy can be detected at birth. Alcohol in early in the pregnancy--just when many mothers are unaware they are pregnant--an produce significant physical malformation, especially in the face. Prenatal exposure to alcohol has signilfcant effects on the intelligence and behaviour of the child. Many of these children are very restless. Even slight amounts of poisoning during the pregnancy are related to the development of a negative self-image and the compensatory behaviour of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder in later life. The Prenatal Deprivation and Poisoning Syndromes have not only been related to heart disease and eating disorders in the area of general health but also in the area of psychological health to the Borderline Personality Disorder. Undue stress of any kind during the pregnancy leads to problems for the developing child.

  15. The role of FISH in prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kulch, P.; Crandall, B.F.; Hsi, C.

    1994-09-01

    FISH provides a cytogenetic technique which is useful in defining de novo translocations, deletions, insertions, and marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis. While the cytogenetic interpretation may be improved with FISH, it may not resolve questions concerning prognosis and options which are genetic counseling issues. Two recent cases illustrate this. Case 1 involved a 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype from amniocentesis. 22/50 cells had 46,X/46,X+mar; 28/50 cells had 45,X. The marker was smaller than a G. C banding did not confirm this as a Y. The father`s peripheral blood study was normal and his Y did not resemble the marker. It appeared likely that the marker was a structurally abnormal Y since male external genitalia were detected by fetal ultrasound. FISH using alpha- and classical (DYZ1/DYZ3) satellite Y-specific probes did not identify the marker as a Y. Case 2 was a fetus which had a de novo translocation 46,XX,t(3;11)(q26.3;q21) by amniocentesis and confirmed by UBS. FISH for the number 3 and 11 chromosomes confirmed this rearrangement. The parents were advised of the risk associated with a de novo balanced translocation. The possible prognosis for these two different fetuses was not changed by the FISH analysis. FISH, while helpful, is only one aspect of the studies done to provide more accurate genetic counseling to parents; the pregnancy/family history, fetal ultrasound, other possible prenatal studies and pregnancy outcome from perspective studies compose other important aspects that are not mutually exclusive.

  16. Methodological Issues in Assessing the Impact of Prenatal Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Konijnenberg, Carolien

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure is a common public health concern that can result in perinatal complications, birth defects, and developmental disorders. The growing literature regarding the effects of prenatal exposure to specific drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and heroin is often conflicting and constantly changing. This review discusses several reasons why the effects of prenatal drug exposure are so difficult to determine, including variations in dose, timing, duration of exposure, polydrug use, unreliable measures of drug exposure, latent or “sleeper” effects, genetic factors, and socioenvironmental influences. In addition to providing research guidelines, this review also aims to help clinicians and policy makers to identify the strengths and weaknesses in studies investigating the effects of prenatal drug exposure. This knowledge may be used to make better informed decisions regarding the appropriate treatment for pregnant, drug-dependent women and their children. PMID:26604776

  17. Prenatal Diagnosis by Amniocentesis and Chorionic Villus Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis forms only a small part of day-to-day family practice, but the techniques are of critical importance to couples at risk of having a child affected by genetic disorder. Second trimester amniocentesis will probably be replaced by first trimester chorionic villus biopsy and recombinant DNA technology, but the ethical and moral problems related to prenatal diagnosis are not so easily solved. Family physicians need to examine their own attitudes toward the handicapped before they offer counselling to couples at risk of bearing handicapped children. The controversy over abortion is central to the issue of prenatal diagnosis, and may only be resolved by development of prenatal treatments for certain genetic disorders. Sometimes the only thing we can offer patients is to be with them, in whatever their decisions bring. PMID:21274247

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of a fetus with anencephaly and thumb agenesis.

    PubMed

    Barone, Chiara; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Cataliotti, Antonella; Indaco, Lara; Pappalardo, Elisa; Barrano, Barbara; Ettore, Giuseppe; Bianca, Sebastiano

    2012-03-01

    Severe anomalies of the forebrain together with reduction limb anomalies are a rare congenital anomalies association. We report a prenatal diagnosis of acalvaria, anencephaly and thumb agenesis in a voluntary terminated fetus and discuss the role of genetic counseling.

  19. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Seiji; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells to demonstrate: (1) molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, (2) the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and (3) interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26074774

  20. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... March 26, 2014 Disorganized cortical patches suggest prenatal origin of autism NIH-funded study shows disrupted cell ... treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, ...

  1. Caring for Our Future: The Content of Prenatal Care. A Report of the Public Health Service Expert Panel on the Content of Prenatal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This report describes effective approaches for enhancing maternal, infant, and family outcomes based on the scientific and systematic assessment of the content of prenatal care conducted by the Public Health Service's Expert Panel on the Content of Prenatal Care. The range of risks, both medical and psychosocial, that the prenatal care provider…

  2. The comparative effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Emily C; Picklesimer, Amy H; Billings, Deborah L; Covington-Kolb, Sarah; Farber, Naomi; Frongillo, Edward A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the psychosocial outcomes of the CenteringPregnancy (CP) model of group prenatal care to individual prenatal care, we conducted a prospective cohort study of women who chose CP group (N = 124) or individual prenatal care (N = 124). Study participants completed the first survey at study recruitment (mean gestational age 12.5 weeks), with 89% completing the second survey (mean gestational age 32.7 weeks) and 84% completing the third survey (6 weeks' postpartum). Multiple linear regression models compared changes by prenatal care model in pregnancy-specific distress, prenatal planning-preparation and avoidance coping, perceived stress, affect and depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related empowerment, and postpartum maternal-infant attachment and maternal functioning. Using intention-to-treat models, group prenatal care participants demonstrated a 3.2 point greater increase (p < 0.05) in their use of prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies. While group participants did not demonstrate significantly greater positive outcomes in other measures, women who were at greater psychosocial risk benefitted from participation in group prenatal care. Among women reporting inadequate social support in early pregnancy, group participants demonstrated a 2.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.03) in pregnancy-specific distress in late pregnancy and 5.6 point higher mean maternal functioning scores postpartum (p = 0.03). Among women with high pregnancy-specific distress in early pregnancy, group participants had an 8.3 point greater increase (p < 0.01) in prenatal planning-preparation coping strategies in late pregnancy and a 4.9 point greater decrease (p = 0.02) in postpartum depressive symptom scores. This study provides further evidence that group prenatal care positively impacts the psychosocial well-being of women with greater stress or lower personal coping resources. Large randomized studies are needed to establish conclusively the

  3. Mobility Monitoring System and Vehicle Performance Recorder. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    counter/timer. g. Four channel pulse conditioners. h. Four channel analog signal conditioner. i. Floating point math processor. j. Real-time clock . The...bytes of PROM, 2 K bytes of RAM, an 8 level priority interrupt controller, and a system clock . The ADC has 32 single ended channels, with full scale...output of the comparator (a logic level signal) is then either passed on through to the counter, or used to gate a 1 or 2 M z clock (for one period

  4. Revision of some ophiuroid records (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Brogger, Martin I; O'Hara, Timothy D

    2015-06-12

    The taxonomy of some ophiuroids reported from off Argentina, western Antarctica and the SW Atlantic Ocean is reviewed. The species Amphilepis sanmatiensis, known only from the small holotype, is a synonym of Amphioplus lucyae. This synonymy removes the only reported endemic ophiuroid from Argentina. The species name "Ophiacantha ingrata Koehler, 1923" used for specimens from South Georgia is invalid; the specimens are likely to belong to one of two cryptic species within the O. vivipara complex. Specimens of Amphiura joubini reported from Argentina are re-identified as Amphiura princeps, and specimens of Ophiactis amator from the Antarctic Peninsula are re-identified as Ophiactis asperula.

  5. A Randomized Trial of Prenatal versus Postnatal Repair of Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N. Scott; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Brock, John W.; Burrows, Pamela K.; Johnson, Mark P.; Howell, Lori J.; Farrell, Jody A.; Dabrowiak, Mary E.; Sutton, Leslie N.; Gupta, Nalin; Tulipan, Noel B.; D'Alton, Mary E.; Farmer, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prenatal repair of myelomeningocele, the most common form of spina bifida, may result in better neurologic function than repair deferred until after delivery. We compared outcomes of in utero repair with standard postnatal repair. Methods We randomly assigned eligible women to undergo either prenatal surgery before 26 weeks of gestation or standard postnatal repair. One primary outcome was a composite of fetal or neonatal death or the need for placement of a cerebrospinal fluid shunt by the age of 12 months. Another primary outcome at 30 months was a composite of mental development and motor function. Results The trial was stopped for efficacy of prenatal surgery after the recruitment of 183 of a planned 200 patients. This report is based on results in 158 patients whose children were evaluated at 12 months. The first primary outcome occurred in 68% of the infants in the prenatal-surgery group and in 98% of those in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.70; 97.7% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.84; P<0.001). Actual rates of shunt placement were 40% in the prenatal-surgery group and 82% in the postnatal-surgery group (relative risk, 0.48; 97.7% CI, 0.36 to 0.64; P<0.001). Prenatal surgery also resulted in improvement in the composite score for mental development and motor function at 30 months (P = 0.007) and in improvement in several secondary outcomes, including hindbrain herniation by 12 months and ambulation by 30 months. However, prenatal surgery was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery and uterine dehiscence at delivery. Conclusions Prenatal surgery for myelomeningocele reduced the need for shunting and improved motor outcomes at 30 months but was associated with maternal and fetal risks. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00060606.) PMID:21306277

  6. Variation in Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Quartermain, Michael D.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Goldberg, David J.; Huhta, James C.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Jacobs, Marshall L.; Kim, Sunghee; Ungerleider, Ross M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prenatal diagnosis allows for improved peri-operative outcomes of fetuses with certain forms of congenital heart disease (CHD). Variability in prenatal diagnosis has been demonstrated in other countries, leading to efforts to improve fetal imaging protocols and access to care, but has not been examined across the United States. Objective To evaluate national variation in prenatal detection across geographic region and defect type in neonates and infants with CHD undergoing heart surgery. Methods Cardiovascular operations performed in patients ≤ 6 months of age within the United States and included in the STS-CHS Surgical Database (2006–2012) were eligible for inclusion. Centers with >15% missing prenatal diagnosis data were excluded from the study. Prenatal diagnosis rates were compared across geographic location of residence and defect type using the Chi-square test. Results Overall, the study included 31,374 patients from 91 STS-CHS participating centers across the United States. Prenatal detection occurred in 34% and increased every year from 26% (2006) to 42% (2012). There was significant geographic variation in rates of prenatal diagnosis across states (range 11.8 – 53.4%, p < 0.0001). Significant variability by defect type was also observed with higher rates for lesions identifiable on 4-chamber view versus those requiring outflow tract visualization (57% versus 32%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Rates of prenatal CHD detection in the United States remain low for patients undergoing surgical intervention, with significant variability between states and across defect type. Further studies are needed to identify reasons for this variation and the potential impact on patient outcomes. PMID:26216324

  7. Nurse managed prenatal programs affect outcomes for corporations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P E; Bitowski, B E; Bell, P L

    1997-09-01

    Faced with higher medical costs and increased insurance premiums, corporations are focusing on health promotion and wellness. With increasing numbers of women in the workforce, corporations have identified the need for prenatal programs. By developing, initiating, and evaluating outcome-based prenatal programs nurses can target the health care needs of this select population. One such program documented several outcomes including improved employee health and an 86% reduction in maternal/newborn costs.

  8. [Rare case of bilateral pulmonary agenesis and prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Veluppillai, C; Jossic, F; Quéré, M-P; Philippe, H-J; Le Vaillant, C

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary agenesis (BPA) is a rare congenital lung malformation. The prognosis is severe as it is incompatible with extra-uterine life. Although multiple prenatal imaging modalities are developed, the prenatal diagnosis of BPA remains problematic. We report a case of BPA observed in our unity and for which the diagnosis was not clearly identified during the evaluation. This report illustrates the need to consider all the imaging aspects and particularly during US examination suspecting BPA.

  9. Revision of the termite family Rhinotermitidae (Isoptera) in New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Thomas; Roisin, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recently, we completed a revision of the Termitidae from New Guinea and neighboring islands, recording a total of 45 species. Here, we revise a second family, the Rhinotermitidae, to progress towards a full picture of the termite diversity in New Guinea. Altogether, 6 genera and 15 species are recorded, among which two species, Coptotermes gambrinus and Parrhinotermes barbatus, are new to science. The genus Heterotermes is reported from New Guinea for the first time, with two species restricted to the southern part of the island. We also provide the first New Guinea records for six species of the genera Coptotermes and Schedorhinotermes. We briefly describe soldiers and imagoes of each species and provide a key based on soldier characters. Finally, we discuss the taxonomic and biogeographical implication of our results. A replacement name, Schedolimulus minutides Bourguignon, is proposed for the termitophilous staphylinid Schedolimulus minutus Bourguignon, to solve a question of secondary homonymy. PMID:22287891

  10. Multimodal Revision Techniques in Webtexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Cheryl E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how an online scholarly journal, "Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy," mentors authors to revise their webtexts (interactive, digital media scholarship) for publication. Using an editorial pedagogy in which multimodal and rhetorical genre theories are merged with revision techniques found in process-based…

  11. TRICARE reimbursement revisions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    This final rule provides several necessary revisions to the regulation in order for TRICARE to be consistent with Medicare. These revisions affect: Hospice periods of care; reimbursement of physician assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and diagnosis-related group values, removing references to specific numeric diagnosis-related group values and replacing them with their narrative description.

  12. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Wang, Wei-ping; Jia, Li-jing; Mao, Zhuo-feng; Qu, Zhen-zhen; Luan, Shao-qun; Kan, Min-chen

    2012-08-27

    Maternal seizure has adverse effects on brain histology as well as on learning and memory ability in progeny. An enriched environment (EE) is known to promote structural changes in the brain and improve cognitive and motor deficits following a variety of brain injuries. Whether EE treatment in early postnatal periods could restore cognitive impairment induced by prenatal maternal seizure is unknown. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups and were injected intraperitoneally either saline or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) for 30 days. Then the fully kindled rats and control animals were allowed to mate. PTZ administration was continued until delivery, while the control group received saline at the same time. After weaning at postnatal day 22, one-half of the male offspring in the control and in the prenatal maternal group were given the environmental enrichment treatment through all the experiments until they were tested. Morris water maze testing was performed at 8 weeks of age. Western blot and synaptic ultrastructure analysis were then performed. We found that EE treatment reversed spatial learning deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure. An EE also reversed the changes in synaptic ultrastructure following prenatal maternal seizure. In addition, prenatal maternal seizure significantly decreased phosphorylation states of cAMP response element binding (CREB) in the hippocampus, whereas EE reversed this reduced expression. These findings suggest that EE treatment on early postnatal periods could be a potential therapy for improving cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

  13. Prenatal Nutritional Deficiency and Risk of Adult Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alan S.; Susser, Ezra S.

    2008-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that a neurodevelopmental disruption plays a role in the vulnerability to schizophrenia. The authors review evidence supporting in utero exposure to nutritional deficiency as a determinant of schizophrenia. We first describe studies demonstrating that early gestational exposure to the Dutch Hunger Winter of 1944–1945 and to a severe famine in China are each associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring. The plausibility of several candidate micronutrients as potential risk factors for schizophrenia and the biological mechanisms that may underlie these associations are then reviewed. These nutrients include folate, essential fatty acids, retinoids, vitamin D, and iron. Following this discussion, we describe the methodology and results of an epidemiologic study based on a large birth cohort that has tested the association between prenatal homocysteine, an indicator of serum folate, and schizophrenia risk. The study capitalized on the use of archived prenatal serum specimens that make it possible to obtain direct, prospective biomarkers of prenatal insults, including levels of various nutrients during pregnancy. Finally, we discuss several strategies for subjecting the prenatal nutritional hypothesis of schizophrenia to further testing. These approaches include direct assessment of additional prenatal nutritional biomarkers in relation to schizophrenia in large birth cohorts, studies of epigenetic effects of prenatal starvation, association studies of genes relevant to folate and other micronutrient deficiencies, and animal models. Given the relatively high prevalence of nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy, this work has the potential to offer substantial benefits for the prevention of schizophrenia in the population. PMID:18682377

  14. Offering prenatal diagnostic tests: European guidelines for clinical practice [corrected].

    PubMed

    Skirton, Heather; Goldsmith, Lesley; Jackson, Leigh; Lewis, Celine; Chitty, Lyn

    2014-05-01

    For over four decades, it has been possible to offer prenatal diagnostic testing for fetal abnormalities. Prenatal testing is now available for a wide range of monogenic disorders as well as chromosomal abnormalities and should be provided within the ethical framework of informed consent and autonomous choice. However, there are no published guidelines for health professionals from varied disciplines who offer prenatal diagnosis (PND) in a range of possible settings including departments of maternity, obstetrics and clinical genetics. We used an Expert Group technique to develop a set of guidelines for provision of prenatal diagnostic services. Thirteen European health professionals, all experts in PND, participated in a workshop to develop the guidelines, which were then subjected to a wide consultation process. The objective of PND was defined as providing prenatal diagnostic testing services (for genetic conditions) that enable families to make informed choices consistent with their individual needs and values and which support them in dealing with the outcome of such testing. General principles, logistical considerations, clinical care and counselling topics are all described and are equally applicable to invasive and non-invasive testing. These guidelines provide a framework for ethical clinical care; however, they are flexible enough to enable practitioners to adapt them to their particular setting. Ideally, an individualised approach to each family is required to ensure autonomous choice and informed consent regarding prenatal diagnostic testing within the local ethical and legal framework.

  15. 27 CFR 44.142 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... was revised, effective Aug. 26, 2013 through Aug. 26, 2016. Inventories ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Records. 44.142 Section 44.142 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF...

  16. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  17. The Alteration of Neonatal Raphe Neurons by Prenatal-Perinatal Nicotine. Meaning for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Verónica J; Aylwin, María de la Luz O; Beltrán-Castillo, Sebastián; Bravo, Eduardo U; Llona, Isabel R; Richerson, George B; Eugenín, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine may link maternal cigarette smoking with respiratory dysfunctions in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure blunts ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and reduces central respiratory chemoreception in mouse neonates at Postnatal Days 0 (P0) to P3. This suggests that raphe neurons, which are altered in SIDS and contribute to central respiratory chemoreception, may be affected by nicotine. We therefore investigated whether prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure affects the activity, electrical properties, and chemosensitivity of raphe obscurus (ROb) neurons in mouse neonates. Osmotic minipumps, implanted subcutaneously in 5- to 7-day-pregnant CF1 mice, delivered nicotine bitartrate (60 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or saline (control) for up to 28 days. In neonates, ventilation was recorded by head-out plethysmography, c-Fos (neuronal activity marker), or serotonin autoreceptors (5HT1AR) were immunodetected using light microscopy, and patch-clamp recordings were made from raphe neurons in brainstem slices under normocarbia and hypercarbia. Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure decreased the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses at P1-P5, reduced both the number of c-Fos-positive ROb neurons during eucapnic normoxia at P1-P3 and their hypercapnia-induced recruitment at P3, increased 5HT1AR immunolabeling of ROb neurons at P3-P5, and reduced the spontaneous firing frequency of ROb neurons at P3 without affecting their CO2 sensitivity or their passive and active electrical properties. These findings reveal that prenatal-perinatal nicotine reduces the activity of neonatal ROb neurons, likely as a consequence of increased expression of 5HT1ARs. This hypoactivity may change the functional state of the respiratory neural network leading to breathing vulnerability and chemosensory failure as seen in SIDS.

  18. Prenatal zinc prevents communication impairments and BDNF disturbance in a rat model of autism induced by prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago B; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Bernardi, Maria M; Felicio, Luciano F

    2015-06-01

    Aims: Previous investigations by our group have shown that prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS),which mimics infections by Gram-negative bacteria, induced autistic-like behavior. No effective treatment yet exists for autism. Therefore, we used our rat model to test a possible treatment for autism.We selected zinc as the prenatal treatment to prevent or ease the impairments induced by LPS because LPS induces hypozincaemia.Materials and methods:We evaluated the effects of LPS and zinc on female reproductive performance. Communication,which is impaired in autism,was tested in pups by ultrasonic vocalizations. Plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were determined because it has been considered an autism important biomarker.Key findings: Prenatal LPS exposure reduced offspring number and treatment with zinc prevented this reduction.Moreover, pups that were prenatally exposed to LPS spent longer periods without calling their mothers, and posttreatment with zinc prevented this impairment induced by LPS to the same levels as controls. Prenatal LPS also increased BDNF levels in adult offspring, and posttreatment with zinc reduced the elevation of BDNF to the same levels as controls.Significance: BDNF hyperactivity was also found in several studies of autistic patients. Together with our previous studies, our model of prenatal LPS induced autistic-like behavioral, brain, and immune disturbances. This suggests that it is a valid rat model of autism. Prenatal zinc prevented reproductive, communication, and BDNF impairments.The present study revealed a potential beneficial effect of prenatal zinc administration for the prevention of autism with regard to the BDNF pathway.

  19. Attitudes of pregnant women and male partners towards non-invasive prenatal testing and widening the scope of prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    van Schendel, Rachèl V; Kleinveld, Johanna H; Dondorp, Wybo J; Pajkrt, Eva; Timmermans, Danielle R M; Holtkamp, Kim C A; Karsten, Margreet; Vlietstra, Anne L; Lachmeijer, Augusta M A; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-12-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and its potential to test for multiple disorders has received much attention. This study explores attitudes of women and men towards NIPT, and their views on widening the scope of prenatal testing in a country with a low uptake of prenatal screening (The Netherlands). Five focus groups with low-risk pregnant women (n=28), three focus groups with men (n=19) and 13 interviews with high- and low-risk pregnant women were conducted. Participants felt that current prenatal screening has great disadvantages such as uncertain results and risk of miscarriage from follow-up diagnostics. Characteristics of NIPT (accurate, safe and early testing) could therefore diminish these disadvantages of prenatal screening and help lower the barrier for participation. This suggests that NIPT might allow couples to decide about prenatal testing based mostly on their will to test or not, rather than largely based on fear of miscarriage risk or the uncertainty of results. The lower barrier for participation was also seen as a downside that could lead to uncritical use or pressure to test. Widening the scope of prenatal testing was seen as beneficial for severe disorders, although it was perceived difficult to determine where to draw the line. Participants argued that there should be a limit to the scope of NIPT, avoiding testing for minor abnormalities. The findings suggest that NIPT could enable more meaningful decision-making for prenatal screening. However, to ensure voluntary participation, especially when testing for multiple disorders, safeguards on the basis of informed decision-making will be of utmost importance.

  20. Attitudes of pregnant women and male partners towards non-invasive prenatal testing and widening the scope of prenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    van Schendel, Rachèl V; Kleinveld, Johanna H; Dondorp, Wybo J; Pajkrt, Eva; Timmermans, Danielle R M; Holtkamp, Kim C A; Karsten, Margreet; Vlietstra, Anne L; Lachmeijer, Augusta M A; Henneman, Lidewij

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and its potential to test for multiple disorders has received much attention. This study explores attitudes of women and men towards NIPT, and their views on widening the scope of prenatal testing in a country with a low uptake of prenatal screening (The Netherlands). Five focus groups with low-risk pregnant women (n=28), three focus groups with men (n=19) and 13 interviews with high- and low-risk pregnant women were conducted. Participants felt that current prenatal screening has great disadvantages such as uncertain results and risk of miscarriage from follow-up diagnostics. Characteristics of NIPT (accurate, safe and early testing) could therefore diminish these disadvantages of prenatal screening and help lower the barrier for participation. This suggests that NIPT might allow couples to decide about prenatal testing based mostly on their will to test or not, rather than largely based on fear of miscarriage risk or the uncertainty of results. The lower barrier for participation was also seen as a downside that could lead to uncritical use or pressure to test. Widening the scope of prenatal testing was seen as beneficial for severe disorders, although it was perceived difficult to determine where to draw the line. Participants argued that there should be a limit to the scope of NIPT, avoiding testing for minor abnormalities. The findings suggest that NIPT could enable more meaningful decision-making for prenatal screening. However, to ensure voluntary participation, especially when testing for multiple disorders, safeguards on the basis of informed decision-making will be of utmost importance. PMID:24642832

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of female monozygotic twins discordant for Turner syndrome: implications for prenatal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B; Yardin, C; Briault, S; Belin, V; Lienhardt, A; Aubard, Y; Battin, J; Servaud, M; Philippe, H J; Lacombe, D

    2002-08-01

    We describe a set of monozygotic (MZ) female twins, one of whom presented with a typical Turner syndrome (TS) phenotype and the other a normal female phenotype. Prenatal fetal ultrasonographic examination showed a monochorial diamniotic pregnancy with a hygroma colli and growth delay in Twin A and no anomalies in Twin B. Karyotypic analysis performed on fetal blood samples demonstrated a 46,XX/45,X (23/2) mosaicism in Twin A and a normal 46,XX chromosome constitution in Twin B. At birth, Twin A presented with a typical TS and Twin B had a normal female phenotype. Postnatal cytogenetic investigation of blood lymphocytes showed the same 46,XX/45,X mosaicism in both twins: 46,XX/45,X (40/7) in Twin A and 46,XX/45,X (40/5) in Twin B. Further investigations at the age of 10 months showed in Twin A a 46,XX/45,X (98/2) mosaicism in lymphocytes and 100% of 45,X (50 analysed cells) in fibroblasts, and in Twin B a normal 46,XX (100 analysed cells) chromosome constitution in lymphocytes but a mild 46,XX/45,X (78/2) mosaicism in fibroblasts. Monozygosity was confirmed by molecular analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS. Review of reported sets of MZ female twins (eight cases) or triplets (one case) discordant for TS shows, as in the present case, that the phenotype correlates better with the chromosomal distribution of mosaicism in fibroblasts than in lymphocytes. In the blood of MZ twins chimerism may modify the initial allocation of the mosaicism. These results suggest that, in cases of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS, the phenotype of each twin would be better predicted from karyotype analysis of cells from amniotic fluid than from fetal blood.

  2. Prenatal choline supplementation mitigates the adverse effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on development in rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Abou, Elizabeth J; Dominguez, Hector D

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to a range of physical, neurological, and behavioral alterations referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Variability in outcome observed among children with FASD is likely related to various pre- and postnatal factors, including nutritional variables. Choline is an essential nutrient that influences brain and behavioral development. Recent animal research indicates that prenatal choline supplementation leads to long-lasting cognitive enhancement, as well as changes in brain morphology, electrophysiology and neurochemistry. The present study examined whether choline supplementation during ethanol exposure effectively reduces fetal alcohol effects. Pregnant dams were exposed to 6.0g/kg/day ethanol via intubation from gestational days (GD) 5-20; pair-fed and lab chow controls were included. During treatment, subjects from each group received choline chloride (250mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Physical development and behavioral development (righting reflex, geotactic reflex, cliff avoidance, reflex suspension and hindlimb coordination) were examined. Subjects prenatally exposed to alcohol exhibited reduced birth weight and brain weight, delays in eye opening and incisor emergence, and alterations in the development of all behaviors. Choline supplementation significantly attenuated ethanol's effects on birth and brain weight, incisor emergence, and most behavioral measures. In fact, behavioral performance of ethanol-exposed subjects treated with choline did not differ from that of controls. Importantly, choline supplementation did not influence peak blood alcohol level or metabolism, indicating that choline's effects were not due to differential alcohol exposure. These data indicate early dietary supplements may reduce the severity of some fetal alcohol effects, findings with important implications for children of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy.

  3. Prenatal hypoxia impairs circadian synchronisation and response of the biological clock to light in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Vincent; Mamet, Julie; Lee, Fuchun; Dalmaz, Yvette; Van Reeth, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that prenatal hypoxia in rats might lead to consistent changes in the entrainment of the circadian clock by light. Pregnant female rats were placed in a chamber provided with hypoxic gas (10 % O2-90 % N2) at gestational day 5 and returned to normoxia before delivery. Once adult, rats born to hypoxic mothers had significant alterations in their circadian rhythm of locomotor activity (recorded in freely accessible running wheels). Under a regular 12/12 light/dark (LD) cycle, they showed a phase advance of their rhythm of activity (mean phase advance of 87 min) and were less active than control rats. After an abrupt 6 h phase delay in the LD cycle, rats from the prenatal hypoxic group (PNH) took significantly more time to resynchronise to the new LD cycle compared to controls (+53 %; 6.0 ± 1.5 vs. 9.2 ± 0.5 days respectively). Under constant darkness, PNH and control rats had a similar period of activity (24.27 ± 0.20 vs. 24.40 ± 0.13) but the response of PNH rats to a light pulse in the early subjective night was less marked than that of control rats (101 ± 9 vs. 158 ± 13 min). When submitted to acute restraint stress, PNH rats had a prolonged secretion of corticosterone compared to controls. These results indicate that prenatal hypoxia is a factor that has long lasting consequences for the functional output of the biological clock and the hormonal response to stress. PMID:12181309

  4. Evaluation of a novel electronic genetic screening and clinical decision support tool in prenatal clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin; O'Leary, James; Vasquez, Lisa; Copeland, Sara; Galvin, Shelley L; DeGroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Gregory Feero, W; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-07-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile" (PHP) is a free prenatal genetic screening and clinical decision support (CDS) software tool for prenatal providers. PHP collects family health history (FHH) during intake and provides point-of-care risk assessment for providers and education for patients. This pilot study evaluated patient and provider responses to PHP and effects of using PHP in practice. PHP was implemented in four clinics. Surveys assessed provider confidence and knowledge and patient and provider satisfaction with PHP. Data on the implementation process were obtained through semi-structured interviews with administrators. Quantitative survey data were analyzed using Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, paired t tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Open-ended survey questions and interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Of the 83% (513/618) of patients that provided feedback, 97% felt PHP was easy to use and 98% easy to understand. Thirty percent (21/71) of participating physicians completed both pre- and post-implementation feedback surveys [13 obstetricians (OBs) and 8 family medicine physicians (FPs)]. Confidence in managing genetic risks significantly improved for OBs on 2/6 measures (p values ≤0.001) but not for FPs. Physician knowledge did not significantly change. Providers reported value in added patient engagement and reported mixed feedback about the CDS report. We identified key steps, resources, and staff support required to implement PHP in a clinical setting. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report on the integration of patient-completed, electronically captured and CDS-enabled FHH software into primary prenatal practice. PHP is acceptable to patients and providers. Key to successful implementation in the future will be customization options and interoperability with electronic health records.

  5. Developmental Enamel Defects in Children Prenatally Exposed to Anti-Epileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Some anti-epileptic drugs (AED) have well-known teratogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to AED and the risk of enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. Methods A total of 38 exposed and 129 non-exposed children, 6–10 years of age, were recruited from the Aarhus Birth Cohort and the Department of Neurology, Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. Medication during pregnancy was confirmed by the Danish Prescription Database. All children had their teeth examined and outcomes in terms of enamel opacities and enamel hypoplasia were recorded. Results Children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (11% vs. 4%, odds ratio (OR) = 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 15.4]), diffuse opacities (18% vs. 7%, OR = 3.0; [95% CI: 1.0 to 8.7, p<0.05]), and numerous (>3) white opacities (18% vs. 10%, OR = 2.2; [95% CI: 0.8 to 6.1]) in the primary dentition. In the permanent dentition, an increased risk of numerous (>3) white opacities (34% vs. 12%, OR = 3.3; [95% CI: 1.3 to 8.4]) was found. Conclusions The present study shows that children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased risk of developing numerous teeth with white opacities in their primary and permanent dentition. In addition, they also have an increased risk of developing diffuse opacities and enamel hypoplasia in their primary teeth. PMID:23520494

  6. Prenatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene-Contaminated Drinking Water and the Risk of Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, Ann; Weinberg, Janice; Rogers, Sarah; Gallagher, Lisa; Winter, Michael; Vieira, Veronica; Webster, Thomas; Ozonoff, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Prior studies of prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have shown mixed results regarding its effect on birth weight and gestational age. Objectives In this retrospective cohort study we examined whether PCE contamination of public drinking-water supplies in Massachusetts influenced the birth weight and gestational duration of children whose mothers were exposed before the child’s delivery. Methods The study included 1,353 children whose mothers were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water and a comparable group of 772 children of unexposed mothers. Birth records were used to identify subjects and provide information on the outcomes. Mothers completed a questionnaire to gather information on residential histories and confounding variables. PCE exposure was estimated using EPANET water distribution system modeling software that incorporated a fate and transport model. Results We found no meaningful associations between PCE exposure and birth weight or gestational duration. Compared with children whose mothers were unexposed during the year of the last menstrual period (LMP), adjusted mean differences in birth weight were 20.9, 6.2, 30.1, and 15.2 g for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure during the LMP year ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similarly, compared with unexposed children, adjusted mean differences in gestational age were −0.2, 0.1, −0.1, and −0.2 weeks for children whose mothers’ average monthly exposure ranged from the lowest to highest quartile. Similar results were observed for two other measures of prenatal exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that prenatal PCE exposure does not have an adverse effect on these birth outcomes at the exposure levels experienced by this population. PMID:18560539

  7. Prenatal androgens time neuroendocrine sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Wood, R I; Ebling, F J; I'Anson, H; Bucholtz, D C; Yellon, S M; Foster, D L

    1991-05-01

    The present study determined whether exposure to gonadal steroids in utero dictates the postnatal control of gonadotropin secretion in the lamb. There is a marked sex difference in the timing of neuroendocrine sexual maturation in sheep; while male lambs undergo a reduction in sensitivity to inhibitory gonadal steroid feedback by 10 weeks of age, females remain hypersensitive until 30 weeks. The hypothesis was tested that prenatal androgens advance the time of the decrease in feedback sensitivity, and hence the pubertal increase in pulsatile gonadotropin secretion. Pregnant ewes were injected each week with 100 mg testosterone cypionate im from 30-90 days of gestation (term is approximately 150 days). Five female lambs were born with masculinized external genitalia (penis and scrotum). These females, together with eight androgenized males, eight control males, and eight control females, were gonadectomized at 2 weeks of age and implanted with a Silastic capsule of estradiol to produce a constant steroid feedback signal. Blood samples were collected twice weekly to monitor trends in LH secretion. For determination of LH pulse frequency, samples were collected frequently (every 12 min for 4 h) at various intervals between 5 and 32 weeks of age. In males, a sustained increase in LH from biweekly blood samples, indicative of reduced sensitivity to inhibitory steroid feedback, began at 10.1 +/- 1.4 weeks (mean +/- SE) of age in control males and at 5.4 +/- 0.1 weeks in androgenized males. By contrast, control females remained hypersensitive much longer as evidenced by the delay in the LH rise until 27.2 +/- 0.8 weeks. The response of the five androgenized females was intermediate; LH increased at 4, 7, 16, 20, and 21 weeks of age with an early increase of LH being associated with more pronounced masculinization of the genitalia. Patterns of pulsatile LH secretion reflected differences in serum LH measured from biweekly blood samples. For example, at 20 weeks of age

  8. The Association between Prenatal Yoga and the Administration of Ritodrine Hydrochloride during Pregnancy: An Adjunct Study of the Japan Environment and Children’s Study

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Yasuyuki; Saijo, Yasuaki; Yoshioka, Eiji; Nakagi, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Takahiko; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Sengoku, Kazuo; Ito, Yoshiya; Miyashita, Chihiro; Araki, Atsuko; Kishi, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While the beneficial effects of prenatal yoga have been reported in recent years, little is known about its effectiveness in pregnant Japanese women. Despite several adverse effects, ritodrine hydrochloride is frequently prescribed to suppress preterm labor in Japan, and its usage may therefore indicate cases of preterm labor. This study aimed to clarify the association between prenatal yoga and ritodrine hydrochloride use during pregnancy. Methods An observational study was conducted as an adjunct study by the Hokkaido unit of the Japan Environment and Children’s Study. Information on prenatal yoga practice was collected using a self-questionnaire between March 21, 2012, and July 7, 2015, targeting women who had recently delivered. Ritodrine hydrochloride use was identified from medical records. A total of 2,692 women were analyzed using logistic regression models that adjusted for possible confounders. Results There were 567 (21.1%) women who practiced prenatal yoga, which was associated with a lower risk of ritodrine hydrochloride use (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.77; 95% CI 0.61–0.98). This was especially evident in women with a total practice duration that exceeded 900 minutes throughout their pregnancy (adjusted OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.38–0.76). A sensitivity analysis that excluded patients with threatened abortion during the study period produced similar results. Conclusions Prenatal yoga was associated with a lower risk of ritodrine hydrochloride use, particularly in women with more than 900 minutes of practice time over the course of their pregnancy. Prenatal yoga may be a beneficial option for pregnant women in the selection of alternative therapies. PMID:27348869

  9. A sonographic approach to prenatal classification of congenital spine anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meiri; Sia, Sock Bee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a classification system for congenital spine anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasound. Methods: Data were collected from fetuses with spine abnormalities diagnosed in our institution over a five‐year period between June 2005 and June 2010. The ultrasound images were analysed to determine which features were associated with different congenital spine anomalies. Findings of the prenatal ultrasound images were correlated with other prenatal imaging, post mortem findings, post mortem imaging, neonatal imaging, karyotype, and other genetic workup. Data from published case reports of prenatal diagnosis of rare congenital spine anomalies were analysed to provide a comprehensive work. Results: During the study period, eighteen cases of spine abnormalities were diagnosed in 7819 women. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 18.8w ± 2.2 SD. While most cases represented open NTD, a spectrum of vertebral abnormalities were diagnosed prenatally. These included hemivertebrae, block vertebrae, cleft or butterfly vertebrae, sacral agenesis, and a lipomeningocele. The most sensitive features for diagnosis of a spine abnormality included flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length. While reported findings at the time of diagnosis were often conservative, retrospective analysis revealed good correlation with radiographic imaging. 3D imaging was found to be a valuable tool in many settings. Conclusions: Analysis of the study findings showed prenatal ultrasound allowed detection of disruption to the normal appearances of the fetal spine. Using the three features of flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length, an algorithm was devised to aid with the diagnosis of spine anomalies for those who perform and report prenatal ultrasound. PMID:28191204

  10. Prenatal development of the human epicardiac Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Saburkina, I; Pauziene, N; Pauza, D H

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the developmental anatomy of intrinsic cardiac ganglia with respect to epicardiac ganglionated nerve plexus in the human fetuses at different gestation stages. Twenty fetal hearts were investigated applying a technique of histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase to visualize the epicardiac neural ganglionated plexus with its subsequent examinations on total (non-sectioned) hearts. Most epicardiac ganglia embodied multilayered neurons and were oval in shape, but some ganglia involved neurons lying in one layer or had the irregular appearance because of their extensions along inter-ganglionic nerves. The mean ganglion area of fetuses at gestation stages of 15-40 weeks was 0.03 +/- 0.008 mm(2). The largest epicardiac ganglia, reaching in area 0.4 mm(2), were concentrated on the dorsal surface of both atria. The particular fused or "dual" ganglia were identified at the gestation stages of 23-40 weeks, but they composed only 2.3 +/- 0.7% of all found epicardiac ganglia. A direct positive correlation was determined between the fetal age and the ganglion area (mm(2)) as well as between the fetal age and the number of inter-ganglionic nerves. The revealed appearance of epicardiac ganglia in the human fetuses at 15-40 weeks of gestation confirms their prenatal development and presumable intrinsic remodelling.

  11. Prenatal screening: when and for whom?

    PubMed

    Holtzman, N A

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the role of prenatal screening in preventing congenital abnormalities or, when prevention is not possible, in avoiding the conception or the birth of those who would have untreatable abnormalities. Women who are found by screening not to be immune to rubella can be safely vaccinated prior to pregnancy; those found to be at risk of having children with genetic disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease or thalassemia have the option of avoiding the conception of affected offspring. Screening during pregnancy permits the primary prevention of Rh disease and its sequelae when it results in the prophylactic administration of Rh-immune globulin to unsensitized Rh-negative women. Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein screening identifies pregnant women who are at increased risk of carrying fetuses with neural tube defects or Down's syndrome, giving them the option of avoiding the birth of affected fetuses through abortion. Recombinant DNA technology will permit screening for many more genetic disorders as the disease-related genes and mutations are identified. For many of these disorders, the ability to predict the risk of disease will antedate preventive and therapeutic interventions by many years. During this lag phase, issues concerning the validity of the tests, the severity of the conditions for which screening is offered, the safety of the interventions, and the autonomy of the pregnant women in deciding to be screened are important.

  12. Transcriptional Landscape of the Prenatal Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Ding, Song-Lin; Sunkin, Susan M.; Smith, Kimberly A; Ng, Lydia; Szafer, Aaron; Ebbert, Amanda; Riley, Zackery L.; Aiona, Kaylynn; Arnold, James M.; Bennet, Crissa; Bertagnolli, Darren; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Caldejon, Shiella; Carey, Anita; Cuhaciyan, Christine; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Facer, Benjamin A. C.; Feng, David; Fliss, Tim P.; Gee, Garrett; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Benjamin W.; Gu, Guangyu; Howard, Robert E.; Jochim, Jayson M.; Kuan, Chihchau L.; Lau, Christopher; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Felix; Lemon, Tracy A.; Lesnar, Phil; McMurray, Bergen; Mastan, Naveed; Mosqueda, Nerick F.; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Ngo, Nhan-Kiet; Nyhus, Julie; Oldre, Aaron; Olson, Eric; Parente, Jody; Parker, Patrick D.; Parry, Sheana E.; Player, Allison Stevens; Pletikos, Mihovil; Reding, Melissa; Royall, Joshua J.; Roll, Kate; Sandman, David; Sarreal, Melaine; Shapouri, Sheila; Shapovalova, Nadiya V.; Shen, Elaine H.; Sjoquist, Nathan; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Smith, Michael; Sodt, Andy J.; Williams, Derric; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Gerstein, Mark B.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Glass, Ian A.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hevner, Robert F.; Huang, Hao; Jones, Allan R.; Knowles, James A.; Levitt, Pat; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Dang, Chinh; Bernard, Amy; Hohmann, John G.; Lein, Ed S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The anatomical and functional architecture of the human brain is largely determined by prenatal transcriptional processes. We describe an anatomically comprehensive atlas of mid-gestational human brain, including de novo reference atlases, in situ hybridization, ultra-high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and microarray analysis on highly discrete laser microdissected brain regions. In developing cerebral cortex, transcriptional differences are found between different proliferative and postmitotic layers, wherein laminar signatures reflect cellular composition and developmental processes. Cytoarchitectural differences between human and mouse have molecular correlates, including species differences in gene expression in subplate, although surprisingly we find minimal differences between the inner and human-expanded outer subventricular zones. Both germinal and postmitotic cortical layers exhibit fronto-temporal gradients, with particular enrichment in frontal lobe. Finally, many neurodevelopmental disorder and human evolution-related genes show patterned expression, potentially underlying unique features of human cortical formation. These data provide a rich, freely-accessible resource for understanding human brain development. PMID:24695229

  13. Transcriptional landscape of the prenatal human brain.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy A; Ding, Song-Lin; Sunkin, Susan M; Smith, Kimberly A; Ng, Lydia; Szafer, Aaron; Ebbert, Amanda; Riley, Zackery L; Royall, Joshua J; Aiona, Kaylynn; Arnold, James M; Bennet, Crissa; Bertagnolli, Darren; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Caldejon, Shiella; Carey, Anita; Cuhaciyan, Christine; Dalley, Rachel A; Dee, Nick; Dolbeare, Tim A; Facer, Benjamin A C; Feng, David; Fliss, Tim P; Gee, Garrett; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Benjamin W; Gu, Guangyu; Howard, Robert E; Jochim, Jayson M; Kuan, Chihchau L; Lau, Christopher; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Felix; Lemon, Tracy A; Lesnar, Phil; McMurray, Bergen; Mastan, Naveed; Mosqueda, Nerick; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Ngo, Nhan-Kiet; Nyhus, Julie; Oldre, Aaron; Olson, Eric; Parente, Jody; Parker, Patrick D; Parry, Sheana E; Stevens, Allison; Pletikos, Mihovil; Reding, Melissa; Roll, Kate; Sandman, David; Sarreal, Melaine; Shapouri, Sheila; Shapovalova, Nadiya V; Shen, Elaine H; Sjoquist, Nathan; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Smith, Michael; Sodt, Andy J; Williams, Derric; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Gerstein, Mark B; Geschwind, Daniel H; Glass, Ian A; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Hevner, Robert F; Huang, Hao; Jones, Allan R; Knowles, James A; Levitt, Pat; Phillips, John W; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Dang, Chinh; Bernard, Amy; Hohmann, John G; Lein, Ed S

    2014-04-10

    The anatomical and functional architecture of the human brain is mainly determined by prenatal transcriptional processes. We describe an anatomically comprehensive atlas of the mid-gestational human brain, including de novo reference atlases, in situ hybridization, ultra-high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and microarray analysis on highly discrete laser-microdissected brain regions. In developing cerebral cortex, transcriptional differences are found between different proliferative and post-mitotic layers, wherein laminar signatures reflect cellular composition and developmental processes. Cytoarchitectural differences between human and mouse have molecular correlates, including species differences in gene expression in subplate, although surprisingly we find minimal differences between the inner and outer subventricular zones even though the outer zone is expanded in humans. Both germinal and post-mitotic cortical layers exhibit fronto-temporal gradients, with particular enrichment in the frontal lobe. Finally, many neurodevelopmental disorder and human-evolution-related genes show patterned expression, potentially underlying unique features of human cortical formation. These data provide a rich, freely-accessible resource for understanding human brain development.

  14. Prenatal Chemical Exposures and Child Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Dzwilewski, Kelsey LC; Schantz, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence that prenatal and/or early postnatal exposure to certain chemicals, both man made (insulating materials, flame retardants, pesticides) and naturally occurring (e.g. lead, mercury), may be associated with delays or impairments in language development. We focus primarily on a subset of more extensively studied chemicals—polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, and methyl mercury—for which a reasonable body of literature on neurodevelopmental outcomes is available. We also briefly summarize the smaller body of evidence for other chemicals including polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs) and organophosphate pesticides. Very few studies have used specific assessments of language development and function. Therefore, we included discussion of aspects of cognitive development such as overall intellectual functioning and verbal abilities that rely on language, as well as aspects of cognition such as verbal and auditory working memory that are critical underpinnings of language development. A high percentage of prospective birth cohort studies of PCBs, lead and mercury have reported exposure-related reductions in overall IQ and/or verbal IQ that persist into middle or late childhood. Given these findings, it is important that clinicians and researchers in communication sciences and disorders are aware of the potential for environmental chemicals to impact language development. PMID:26255253

  15. Aneuploidy among prenatally detected neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, R.F. Jr.; Lampinen, J.; Martin, L.S.; Johnson, M.P.; Evans, M.I.

    1996-01-11

    We have reported previously a 10% aneuploidy detection rate among 39 cases of fetal neural tube defects (NTD). Subsequently we amassed an additional experience of over 17,000 prenatal diagnosis cases over a 5-year period. During this period 106 cases of NTDs were identified; 44 with anencephaly, 62 with open spina bifida. The average maternal age of this population with NTDs was 29 years (15-40); 6 patients declined amniocentesis. Six of 100 cytogenetic studies were aneuploid; on anencephalic fetus had inherited a maternal marker chromosome, and 5 NTD cases had trisomy 18. The average maternal age of the aneuploid cases was 21 (19-40); 3 were 35 years or older. Four of 5 trisomy 18 cases had multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The overall aneuploidy detection rate in our cohort was 5-6, while aneuploidy occurred in 2% of the isolated NTD cases, and 24% of the MCA cases. Combining the earlier experience, 4/39 aneuploidy (2 trisomy 18, 4p+, del 13q) yields an aneuploidy detection frequency of 10/145 (7%), of which most (7/10) had trisomy 18. These data support fetal karyotyping for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and recurrence-risk counseling. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Annotation and Classification of Argumentative Writing Revisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the annotation and classification of students' revision behaviors in argumentative writing. A sentence-level revision schema is proposed to capture why and how students make revisions. Based on the proposed schema, a small corpus of student essays and revisions was annotated. Studies show that manual annotation is reliable with…

  17. 78 FR 48667 - Revised Company Registration System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Revised Company Registration System AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This document revises the effective date of the Revised Company... in Docket No. RM07-16-000, et al. (February 7, 2013 Order) directing revisions to the...

  18. Practice Bulletin No. 162: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  19. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  20. Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and risk of early childhood cancers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jo Kay C; Heck, Julia E; Cockburn, Myles; Su, Jason; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

    2013-10-15

    Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has been linked to the risk of childhood cancer, but the evidence remains inconclusive. In the present study, we used land use regression modeling to estimate prenatal exposures to traffic exhaust and evaluate the associations with cancer risk in very young children. Participants in the Air Pollution and Childhood Cancers Study who were 5 years of age or younger and diagnosed with cancer between 1988 and 2008 were had their records linked to California birth certificates, and controls were selected from birth certificates. Land use regression-based estimates of exposures to nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides were assigned based on birthplace residence and temporally adjusted using routine monitoring station data to evaluate air pollution exposures during specific pregnancy periods. Logistic regression models were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, educational level, parity, insurance type, and Census-based socioeconomic status, as well as child's sex and birth year. The odds of acute lymphoblastic leukemia increased by 9%, 23%, and 8% for each 25-ppb increase in average nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxide levels, respectively, over the entire pregnancy. Second- and third-trimester exposures increased the odds of bilateral retinoblastoma. No associations were found for annual average exposures without temporal components or for any other cancer type. These results lend support to a link between prenatal exposure to traffic exhaust and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bilateral retinoblastoma.

  1. Prenatal Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Risk of Early Childhood Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Jo Kay C.; Heck, Julia E.; Cockburn, Myles; Su, Jason; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has been linked to the risk of childhood cancer, but the evidence remains inconclusive. In the present study, we used land use regression modeling to estimate prenatal exposures to traffic exhaust and evaluate the associations with cancer risk in very young children. Participants in the Air Pollution and Childhood Cancers Study who were 5 years of age or younger and diagnosed with cancer between 1988 and 2008 were had their records linked to California birth certificates, and controls were selected from birth certificates. Land use regression–based estimates of exposures to nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxides were assigned based on birthplace residence and temporally adjusted using routine monitoring station data to evaluate air pollution exposures during specific pregnancy periods. Logistic regression models were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, educational level, parity, insurance type, and Census-based socioeconomic status, as well as child's sex and birth year. The odds of acute lymphoblastic leukemia increased by 9%, 23%, and 8% for each 25-ppb increase in average nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrogen oxide levels, respectively, over the entire pregnancy. Second- and third-trimester exposures increased the odds of bilateral retinoblastoma. No associations were found for annual average exposures without temporal components or for any other cancer type. These results lend support to a link between prenatal exposure to traffic exhaust and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bilateral retinoblastoma. PMID:23989198

  2. [Missed opportunities for cervical cancer prevention during prenatal care].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; Duarte, Geraldo; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina

    2011-05-01

    Pregnancy constitutes an excellent opportunity for the prevention of cervical carcinoma since the gynecological examination is part of routine prenatal care. A transversal study was conducted in which a total of 445 postnatal women were interviewed using standardized questionnaires. The prevalence of an up-to-date cytopathological exam was 38.9% at the beginning of pregnancy, reaching 59.1% during the postnatal period (p>0.001). Postnatal women aged 19 years or less, non-white, with less than 11 years schooling, family income of less than one minimum wage, sexually active at 15 years of age or less, with the beginning of prenatal care after the 1st trimester, and receiving prenatal care at healthcare units of the Unified Health System had a lower prevalence of cytopathological examination. Adjusted analysis revealed that the variables under study were not significantly associated with cytopathological coverage, though the incidence of prenatal care showed a prevalence ratio of 1.18 (95% CI: 0.98-1.42). The local health service proved ineffective, recvealing the need to increase cytopathological coverage and train health professionals regarding the importance of routine prenatal procedures.

  3. Pallister-Killian syndrome: difficulties of prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice; Girard-Lemaire, Françoise; Gasser, Bernard; Baldauf, Jean-Jacques; De Geeter, Bernard; Spizzo, Michèle; Zeidan, Charles; Flori, Elisabeth

    2002-06-01

    The first prenatal diagnosis of Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) was reported by Gilgenkrantz et al. in1985. Since this report, about 60 prenatal cases have been reported but both sonographic and cytogenetic diagnoses remain difficult. Although ultrasound anomalies such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia, polyhydramnios and rhizomelic micromelia in association with fetal overgrowth are very suggestive of the syndrome, they are inconstant and they may even be absent. The mosaic distribution of the supernumerary isochromosome 12p greatly increases these difficulties. No prenatal cytogenetic technique is sensitive enough to ensure prenatal diagnosis and false-negative results have been described on fetal blood, chorionic villi and amniocentesis. We report here two prenatal cases of PKS which illustrate the great variability of the fetal phenotype. In reviewing the 63 reported cases, we attempt to determine ultrasound indicators of the syndrome and to define a cytogenetic strategy. In cases where ultrasound indicators are present, our proposal is first to perform chorionic villus or placental sampling and then amniocentesis when the first cytogenetic result is normal. Fetal blood sampling is the least indicated method because of the low frequency of the isochromosome in lymphocytes. In this cytogenetic strategy, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and especially interphase FISH on non-cultured cells increases the probability or identifying the isochromosome. A misdiagnosis remains possible when ultrasound is not contributory; the identification of new discriminating ultrasound indicators would be very helpful in this context.

  4. Prenatal irradiation-induced brain neuropathology and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Ren, Bo Xu; Tang, Feng Ru

    2017-01-01

    Embryo/fetus is much more radiosensitive than neonatal and adult human being. The main potential effects of pre-natal radiation exposure on the human brain include growth retardation, small head/brain size, mental retardation, neocortical ectopias, callosal agenesis and brain tumor which may result in a lifetime poor quality of life. The patterns of prenatal radiation-induced effects are dependent not only on the stages of fetal development, the sensitivity of tissues and organs, but also on radiation sources, doses, dose rates. With the increased use of low dose radiation for diagnostic or radiotherapeutic purposes in recent years, combined with postnatal negative health effect after prenatal radiation exposure to fallout of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, the great anxiety and unnecessary termination of pregnancies after the nuclear disaster, there is a growing concern about the health effect of radiological examinations or therapies in pregnant women. In this paper, we reviewed current research progresses on pre-natal ionizing irradiation-induced abnormal brain structure changes. Subsequent postnatal neuropsychological and neurological diseases were provided. Relationship between irradiation and brain aging was briefly mentioned. The relevant molecular mechanisms were also discussed. Future research directions were proposed at the end of this paper. With limited human data available, we hoped that systematical review of animal data could relight research interests on prenatal low dose/dose rate irradiation-induced brain microanatomical changes and subsequent neurological and neuropsychological disorders.

  5. Prenatal HIV tests. Routine testing or informed choice?

    PubMed Central

    Guenter, Dale; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Carroll, June; Sellors, John

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how prenatal care providers responded to a new provincial policy of offering HIV testing to all prenatal patients, and to determine factors associated with self-reported high testing rates. DESIGN: Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING: Outpatient practices in three Ontario health-planning regions. PARTICIPANTS: Prenatal care providers: 784 family physicians, 200 obstetricians, and 103 midwives were sent questionnaires and were eligible to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported testing of 80% or more prenatal patients ("high testers") and associated practice characteristics, attitudes, and counseling practices. RESULTS: Response rate was 57% (622/1087): 43% of respondents were high testers. Family physicians were most likely and midwives least likely to be high testers. High testers tended to report that they had adequate knowledge of HIV testing, that HIV risk among their patients warranted testing all of them, and that testing should be routine. Encouraging women to test and not providing written information or choice were independently associated with high testing rates. CONCLUSION: Strongest predictors of high prenatal HIV testing rates were attitudes and practices that favoured a routine approach to testing and that placed little emphasis on informed consent. PMID:14594102

  6. Costs of prenatal detection of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jegatheeswaran, Anusha; Oliveira, Carol; Batsos, Constantine; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Silverman, Norman H; Hornberger, Lisa K; Coyte, Peter; Friedberg, Mark K

    2011-12-15

    Little information is available about the transportation costs incurred from the missed prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD). The objectives of the present study were to analyze the costs of emergency transportation related to the postnatal diagnosis of major CHD and to perform a cost/benefit analysis of additional training for ultrasound technicians to study the implications of improved prenatal detection rates. The 1-year costs incurred for emergency transportation of pre- and postnatally diagnosed infants with CHD in Northern California and North Western Nevada were calculated and compared. The prenatal detection rate in our cohort (n = 147) was 30.6%. Infants postnatally diagnosed were 16.5 times more likely (p <0.001) to require emergency transport. The associated emergency transportation costs were US$542,143 in total for all patients with CHD. The mean cost per patient was $389.00 versus $5,143.51 for prenatally and postnatally diagnosed infants, respectively (p <0.001). Assuming an improvement in detection rates after 1-day training for ultrasound technicians, the investment in training cost can be recouped in 1 year if the detection rate increased by 2.4% to 33%. Savings of $6,543,476 would occur within 5 years if the detection rate increased to 50%. In conclusion, CHD diagnosed postnatally results in greater costs related to emergency transportation of ill infants. Improving the prenatal detection rates through improved ultrasound technician training could result in considerable cost savings.

  7. Knowledge-Directed Theory Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kamal; Leung, Kevin; Konik, Tolga; Choi, Dongkyu; Shapiro, Dan

    Using domain knowledge to speed up learning is widely accepted but theory revision of such knowledge continues to use general syntactic operators. Using such operators for theory revision of teleoreactive logic programs is especially expensive in which proof of a top-level goal involves playing a game. In such contexts, one should have the option to complement general theory revision with domain-specific knowledge. Using American football as an example, we use Icarus' multi-agent teleoreactive logic programming ability to encode a coach agent whose concepts correspond to faults recognized in execution of the play and whose skills correspond to making repairs in the goals of the player agents. Our results show effective learning using as few as twenty examples. We also show that structural changes made by such revision can produce performance gains that cannot be matched by doing only numeric optimization.

  8. Prenatal Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, Adiposity, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) γ Methylation in Offspring, Grand-Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhonghai; Zhang, Hanjie; Maher, Christina; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Champagne, Frances A.; Wu, Licheng; McDonald, Jacob D.; Yan, Beizhan; Schwartz, Gary J.; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Greater levels of prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) have been associated with childhood obesity in epidemiological studies. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Objectives We hypothesized that prenatal PAH over-exposure during gestation would lead to weight gain and increased fat mass in offspring and grand-offspring mice. Further, we hypothesized that altered adipose gene expression and DNA methylation in genes important to adipocyte differentiation would be affected. Materials and Methods Pregnant dams were exposed to a nebulized PAH mixture versus negative control aerosol 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Body weight was recorded from postnatal day (PND) 21 through PND60. Body composition, adipose cell size, gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) α, cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and adiponectin, and DNA methylation of PPAR γ, were assayed in both the offspring and grand-offspring adipose tissue. Findings Offspring of dams exposed to greater PAH during gestation had increased weight, fat mass, as well as higher gene expression of PPAR γ, C/EBP α, Cox2, FAS and adiponectin and lower DNA methylation of PPAR γ. Similar differences in phenotype and DNA methylation extended through the grand-offspring mice. Conclusions Greater prenatal PAH exposure was associated with increased weight, fat mass, adipose gene expression and epigenetic changes in progeny. PMID:25347678

  9. Moving towards universal prenatal detection of critical congenital heart disease in southern Nevada: a community-wide program.

    PubMed

    Evans, William; Castillo, William; Rollins, Robert; Luna, Carlos; Kip, Katrinka; Ludwick, Joseph; Madan, Nitin; Ciccolo, Michael; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Mayman, Gary; Cass, Kathleen; Thomas, Vincent; Restrepo, Humberto; Acherman, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    This study compares the current, prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada with the previously reported rate, after developing and expanding a comprehensive, community-wide fetal cardiology program. For the current-period analysis, we inquired our database and electronic health records for patients born in Clark County, Nevada, with critical congenital heart disease between May 2012 and April 2014, and we compared the results with the previous period between May 2003 and April 2006. The major components of the community-wide program include fetal congenital heart disease screening via general obstetric ultrasound studies performed in obstetrician's offices, radiology imaging centers, or maternal-fetal medicine specialty practices; subsequent referral for comprehensive fetal echocardiography performed in maternal-fetal medicine offices under the on-site supervision by fetal cardiologists; and recurring community educational programs teaching the 5-axial plane, fetal echocardiographic screening protocol to general obstetric sonographers and instructing perinatal sonographers in advanced imaging topics. For the current period, the prenatal detection rate for critical congenital heart disease in Southern Nevada was 71 versus 36% for the previous period (p < 0.001). The temporal improvement in prenatal detection of critical congenital heart disease may be related to our expanded decentralized, community-wide fetal cardiology program, and our experiences may be applicable to other metropolitan areas.

  10. Client views and attitudes to non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for sickle cell disease, thalassaemia and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Melissa; Compton, Cecilia; Karunaratna, Madhavi; Lewis, Celine; Chitty, Lyn

    2014-12-01

    In the near future the availability of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for single gene disorders will change the prenatal diagnosis options available to couples who are carriers of conditions such as cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disorder and thalassaemia. Client opinions about NIPD are needed to inform the implementation of NIPD for single gene disorders. This qualitative study used two focus groups (n = 12) and one-to-one interviews (n = 16) with carriers and support group representatives of sickle cell disease, thalassaemia and cystic fibrosis. Discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Opinions about NIPD were very positive and participants valued the opportunity to have safe and early testing. Uptake of prenatal testing is likely to increase as women who had previously declined invasive testing expressed interest in having NIPD. Participant concerns about NIPD centred on the need for accuracy to be high to be used for subsequent decision making about termination of pregnancy. Participants also raised concerns that less thought may be given to having a blood test compared to an invasive test and that the perceived ease of a blood test may bring increased pressure to have testing. Participants thought NIPD should be offered through existing specialist services to ensure appropriate genetic counseling and support. Maintaining all testing options is important as some people may prefer invasive testing over NIPD if invasive testing was more accurate or if invasive testing could give information about other conditions such as Down syndrome.

  11. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Prenatal Care: Perinatal Outcomes Among Adolescents in New York City Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie; Lewis, Jessica B.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Magriples, Urania; Stasko, Emily; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Cassells, Andrea; Cunningham, Shayna; Bernstein, Peter; Tobin, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We compared an evidence-based model of group prenatal care to traditional individual prenatal care on birth, neonatal, and reproductive health outcomes. Methods. We performed a multisite cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 health centers in New York City (2008–2012). We analyzed 1148 pregnant women aged 14 to 21 years, at less than 24 weeks of gestation, and not at high obstetrical risk. We assessed outcomes via medical records and surveys. Results. In intention-to-treat analyses, women at intervention sites were significantly less likely to have infants small for gestational age (< 10th percentile; 11.0% vs 15.8%; odds ratio = 0.66; 95% confidence interval = 0.44, 0.99). In as-treated analyses, women with more group visits had better outcomes, including small for gestational age, gestational age, birth weight, days in neonatal intensive care unit, rapid repeat pregnancy, condom use, and unprotected sex (P = .030 to < .001). There were no associated risks. Conclusions. CenteringPregnancy Plus group prenatal care resulted in more favorable birth, neonatal, and reproductive outcomes. Successful translation of clinical innovations to enhance care, improve outcomes, and reduce cost requires strategies that facilitate patient adherence and support organizational change. PMID:26691105

  12. 76 FR 12549 - Public Availability of Government Accountability Office Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... this part. The revisions also clarify that records compiled for law enforcement purposes by another agency and records provided by GAO to another agency for law enforcement purposes are not subject to... compiled for law enforcement purposes. Such documents are not subject to disclosure under this...

  13. 18 CFR 401.105 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indexes of certain... ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Public Access to Records and Information § 401.105 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised at least quarterly, for...

  14. 77 FR 40921 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... and organizational changes. II. Rationale for Changes to USPS Privacy Act Systems of Records The... their amended systems of records in the Federal Register when there is a revision, change, or addition... reflect changes in the identity or title of responsible officials. III. Description of Changes to...

  15. 36 CFR 1225.12 - How are records schedules developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... records, including descriptions and disposition instructions for each item, using an SF 115. (g) Obtain... categories that require GAO approval). (i) Submit an SF 115 covering only new or revised record items to NARA for approval (see § 1225.18(d)). (j) The disposition instructions on SF 115s approved by the...

  16. 36 CFR 1225.12 - How are records schedules developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... records, including descriptions and disposition instructions for each item, using an SF 115. (g) Obtain... categories that require GAO approval). (i) Submit an SF 115 covering only new or revised record items to NARA for approval (see § 1225.18(d)). (j) The disposition instructions on SF 115s approved by the...

  17. 36 CFR 1225.12 - How are records schedules developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... records, including descriptions and disposition instructions for each item, using an SF 115. (g) Obtain... categories that require GAO approval). (i) Submit an SF 115 covering only new or revised record items to NARA for approval (see § 1225.18(d)). (j) The disposition instructions on SF 115s approved by the...

  18. 36 CFR 1225.12 - How are records schedules developed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... records, including descriptions and disposition instructions for each item, using an SF 115. (g) Obtain... categories that require GAO approval). (i) Submit an SF 115 covering only new or revised record items to NARA for approval (see § 1225.18(d)). (j) The disposition instructions on SF 115s approved by the...

  19. 21 CFR 20.26 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indexes of certain records. 20.26 Section 20.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.26 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised...

  20. 21 CFR 20.26 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indexes of certain records. 20.26 Section 20.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.26 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised...

  1. 21 CFR 20.26 - Indexes of certain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indexes of certain records. 20.26 Section 20.26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.26 Indexes of certain records. (a) Indexes shall be maintained, and revised...

  2. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  3. Associations between prenatal physical activity, birth weight, and DNA methylation at genomically imprinted domains in a multiethnic newborn cohort.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Lauren E; Mendez, Michelle A; Miller, Erline E; Murtha, Amy P; Murphy, Susan K; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Birth weight is a commonly used indicator of the fetal environment and a predictor of future health outcomes. While the etiology of birth weight extremes is likely multifactorial, epidemiologic data suggest that prenatal physical activity (PA) may play an important role. The mechanisms underlying this association remain unresolved, although epigenetics has been proposed. This study aimed to estimate associations between prenatal PA, birth weight, and newborn DNA methylation levels at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) regulating 4 imprinted genes known to be important in fetal development. Study participants (N = 1281) were enrolled as part of the Newborn Epigenetics Study. Prenatal PA was ascertained using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire, and birth weight data obtained from hospital records. Among 484 term mother-infant pairs, imprinted gene methylation levels were measured at DMRs using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Generalized linear and logistic regression models were used to estimate associations. After adjusting for preterm birth and race/ethnicity, we found that infants born to mothers in the highest quartile of total non-sedentary time had lower birth weight compared to infants of mothers in the lowest quartile (β = -81.16, SE = 42.02, P = 0.05). These associations appeared strongest among male infants (β = -125.40, SE = 58.10, P = 0.03). Methylation at the PLAGL1 DMR was related to total non-sedentary time (P < 0.05). Our findings confirm that prenatal PA is associated with reduced birth weight, and is the first study to support a role for imprinted gene plasticity in these associations. Larger studies are required.

  4. Prenatal Choline Availability Alters the Context Sensitivity of Pavlovian Conditioning in Adult Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Jeffrey A.; Meck, Warren H.; Williams, Christina L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of prenatal choline availability on Pavlovian conditioning were assessed in adult male rats (3-4 mo). Neither supplementation nor deprivation of prenatal choline affected the acquisition and extinction of simple Pavlovian conditioned excitation, or the acquisition and retardation of conditioned inhibition. However, prenatal choline…

  5. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Is Associated with Conduct Disorder in Adolescence: Findings from a Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkby, Cynthia A.; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Day, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between prenatal alcohol exposure and the rate of conduct disorder in exposed compared with unexposed adolescents. Method: Data for these analyses are from a longitudinal study of prenatal substance exposures. Women were interviewed at their fourth and seventh prenatal months, and with their children, at…

  6. Prenatal Transportation Stress Alters Temperament and Serum Cortisol Concentrations in Suckling Brahman Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment examined the relationship between prenatal stress and subsequent calf temperament through weaning. The prenatal stressor utilized was repeated transportation of pregnant Brahman cows for 2 hours at 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 days of gestation. Prenatally stressed calves (n = 41) were ...

  7. Prenatal stress due to a natural disaster predicts insulin secretion in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Dancause, Kelsey N; Veru, Franz; Andersen, Ross E; Laplante, David P; King, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Prenatal stress might increase cardiometabolic disease risk. We measured prenatal stress due to an ice storm in 1998, and measured glucose tolerance among a subsample of 32 exposed adolescents in 2011. Severity of stress was positively associated with insulin secretion, suggesting that prenatal stress independently predicts metabolic outcomes in adolescence.

  8. Does Maternal Prenatal Stress Adversely Affect the Child's Learning and Memory at Age Six?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutteling, Barbara M.; de Weerth, Carolina; Zandbelt, Noortje; Mulder, Eduard J. H.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2006-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress has been shown to affect postnatal development in animals and humans. In animals, the morphology and function of the offspring's hippocampus is negatively affected by prenatal maternal stress. The present study prospectively investigated the influence of prenatal maternal stress on learning and memory of 112 children (50…

  9. The Relationship between Prenatal Care, Personal Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Abuse in the Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grekin, Emily R.; Ondersma, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Nearly one-fourth of African-American women receive no prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy. The aim of the current study is to identify factors that underlie inadequate prenatal care among African-American women. Maternal alcohol abuse has been examined as one risk factor for inadequate prenatal care, but findings have been…

  10. Prenatal Stress and Risk for Psychopathology: Specific Effects or Induction of General Susceptibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizink, Anja C.; Mulder, Edu J. H.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on prenatal stress as a risk factor for psychopathology. Evidence from animal studies is summarized, and the relevance of prenatal stress models in animals for human studies is discussed. In the offspring of prenatally stressed animals, overactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal…

  11. New developments in prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Diya; Bailey, Jack; Yau, Maggie; Abu-Amer, Wahid; Kumar, Ameet; Low, Merly; Yuen, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. Females affected with classical CAH are at risk for genital ambiguity, but can be treated in utero with dexamethasone before 9 gestational weeks to prevent virilization. Early genetic diagnosis is unavailable through current invasive methods of chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis. New developments in prenatal genetic testing utilize fetal DNA extracted from maternal blood through noninvasive methods, which allow the determination of fetal gender and the diagnosis of CAH at an early gestational age (<9 weeks). Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis allows for the establishment of early and effective management plans in fetuses at risk for CAH and avoids unnecessary prenatal dexamethasone treatment.

  12. Disrupted development of the dominant hemisphere following prenatal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Loganovsky, Konstantin N; Loganovskaja, Tatiana K; Nechayev, Stanislav Yu; Antipchuk, Yekaterina Yu; Bomko, Mariya A

    2008-01-01

    One hundred children, exposed prenatally to radiation after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, and 50 nonexposed classmates were examined between the ages of 11 and 13 years old using neuropsychiatric tests, WISC, EEG, and visual evoked potentials. Individual prenatal radiation doses were reconstructed for all examined children. The exposed children were found to have more neuropsychiatric disorders, left-brain neurological signs, lower full-scale and verbal IQ, IQ discrepancies with verbal decrement, disorganized EEG patterns, an excess of lateralized-to-left frontotemporal region delta and beta power with depression of theta and alpha power, and interhemispheric inversion visual information processing. Mothers' mental health, stress, and prenatal irradiation contributed to these effects, along with several confounding factors.

  13. An atlas of prenatal development of the human orofacial region.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert

    2010-08-01

    There are several atlases available showing prenatal human development. However, none is focused on prenatal orofacial development during maxillary and mandibular bone formation. These events, together with dental development and formation of the temporomandibular joint, take place during several fetal stages. While photographic atlases are limited to depicting the outer shape, and atlases based on histological sections only show a series of single sections, an atlas based on three-dimensional reconstructions from serial sections can show both the outer skin and the structures underneath, which can be electronically dissected layer by layer. In this Focus article, we present our atlas on prenatal human orofacial development, which is accessible online at the Journal's website.

  14. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities: role of fetal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ermito, Santina; Dinatale, Angela; Carrara, Sabina; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Imbruglia, Laura; Recupero, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Fetal ultrasonografy is the most important tool to provide prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies. The detection of limb abnormalities may be a complex problem if the correct diagnostic approch is not established. A careful description of the abnormality using the rigth nomenclature is the first step. Looking for other associated abnormalities is the threshold to suspect chromosomal abnormalities or single gene disorder. According to the patogenic point of view, limb abnormalities may be the result of malformation, deformation, or disruption. The prenatal diagnosis and the management of limb abnormalities involve a multidisciplinary team of ostetrician, radiologist/sonologist, clinical geneticist, neonatologist, and orthopedic surgeons to provide the parents with the information regarding etiology of the disorder, prognosis, option related to the pregnancy and recurrence risk for future pregnancies. The aim of this review is to describe the importance of detailed fetal ultrasonography in prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities. PMID:22439035

  16. [Prenatal stem cell transplantation: from bench to bedside].

    PubMed

    Surbek, D V; Holzgreve, W

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal stem cell transplantation is a novel, promising therapeutic option for genetic disorders, which is now at the edge of moving from preclinical research into clinical application. The first clinical experience shows that inborn diseases, which lead to a severe immunodeficiency, can be treated successfully inutero. No therapeutic success has been achieved in genetic disorders which do not severely affect the immune system. Therefore, new strategies to improve the success are being developed, including e.g., graft modification, prenatal conditioning of the fetus, postnatal re-transplantation after prenatal induction of immune tolerance, and fetal gene therapy using autologous fetal stem cells. The use of non-hematopoietic (e.g. mesenchymal) or pluripotent stem cells will most probably lead to an expansion of the spectrum of indications in genetic diseases for this novel treatment. At the same time, however, ethical implications, in particular regarding fetal gene therapy and the use of pluripotent stem cells must be evaluated.

  17. Anatomy of corpus callosum in prenatally malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Ricardo; Morgan, Carlos; Pérez, Hernán; Hernández, Alejandro; Aboitiz, Francisco; Soto-Moyano, Rubén; Gil, Julio; Ortiz, Alexis; Flores, Osvaldo; Gimeno, Miguel; Laborda, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The effect of prenatal malnutrition on the anatomy of the corpus callosum was assessed in adult rats (45-52 days old). In the prenatally malnourished animals we observed a significant reduction of the corpus callosum total area, partial areas, and perimeter, as compared with normal animals. In addition, the splenium of corpus callosum (posterior fifth) showed a significant decrease of fiber diameters in the myelinated fibers without changing density. There was also a significant decrease in diameter and a significant increase in density of unmyelinated fibers. Measurements of perimeter's fractal dimensions from sagittal sections of the brain and corpus callosum did not show significant differences between malnourished and control animals. These findings indicate that cortico-cortical connections are vulnerable to the prenatal malnutrition, and suggest this may affect interhemispheric conduction velocity, particularly in visual connections (splenium).

  18. Physician liability and non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Toews, Maeghan; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    Although non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) marks a notable development in the field of prenatal genetic testing, there are some physician liability considerations raised by this technology. As NIPT is still emerging as the standard of care and is just starting to receive provincial funding, the question arises of whether physicians are obligated to disclose the availability of NIPT to eligible patients as part of the physician-patient discussion about prenatal screening and diagnosis. If NIPT is discussed with patients, it is important to disclose the limitations of this technology with respect to its accuracy and the number of disorders that it can detect when compared with invasive diagnostic options. A failure to sufficiently disclose these limitations could leave patients with false assurances about the health of their fetuses and could raise informed consent and liability issues, particularly if a child is born with a disability as a result.

  19. Prenatal screening for trisomy 21: recent advances and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Canick, Jacob

    2012-06-01

    The performance of prenatal screening tests for the identification of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) has markedly improved since the 1970s and early 1980s when maternal age was the sole mode of screening the general pregnant population. With the discovery of second trimester serum markers in the 1980s and 1990s and implementation of double, triple, and quad marker testing; the discovery of first trimester serum and ultrasound markers in the 1990s and implementation of the combined test; and the development of the integrated test and sequential screening strategies over the past decade, the performance of screening has improved to a detection rate of 90%–95% at a false positive rate of 2%–5%. In this review, I will describe the advances in prenatal screening for trisomy 21, present current screening strategies, and discuss guidelines published by professional societies and regulatory bodies, with a focus on current prenatal screening practice in the USA.

  20. Prenatal Chlamydia trachomatis infection increases the risk of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Catherine L.; Klebanoff, Mark A.; Panum, Inge; Uldum, Soren A.; Bass, Debra C.; Olsen, Jorn; Roberts, James M.; Ness, Roberta B.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and preeclampsia was examined longitudinally among 205 cases and 423 normotensive controls nested within the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Antibodies were analyzed at a first prenatal visit (mean 14.2 weeks) and at delivery. Prenatal infections were identified as IgG/IgM seroconversion or a four-fold rise in IgG antibody titers. Although serological evidence of incident prenatal CT infection was uncommon (n=9, 1.4%) in this general pregnant population, infected women were more likely to develop preeclampsia, after adjustment for maternal age, body mass index, smoking status, race and time between blood draws (ORadj 7.2, 95% CI 1.3 – 39.7). PMID:24058897

  1. Prenatal and neonatal irradiation in dogs: hematologic and hematopoietic responses

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, J.B.; Miller, G.K.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1987-12-01

    Hematologic and hematopoietic responses were evaluated in beagle dogs following a single prenatal (35 days gestation) or neonatal (10 days postpartum) exposure to 1.5 Gy /sup 60/Co gamma radiation. Hematopoiesis was studied by the in vitro culture of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM). Prenatally irradiated dogs exhibited a progressive, significant reduction in CFU-GM which was accompanied by decreases in peripheral blood leukocytes up to 24 weeks of age. Dogs which were neonatally irradiated also demonstrated a significant reduction in CFU-GM which was accompanied by significant alterations in peripheral white and red blood cell parameters. This was transient, however, and these dogs showed partial recovery of CFU-GM and hematologic parameter by 24 weeks of age. The persistent CFU-GM deficit in prenatally irradiated dogs suggests a relatively greater sensitivity of fetal marrow as compared to neonatal bone marrow for long-term damage by ionizing radiation.

  2. Alterations in immune responses in prenatally irradiated dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, J.B.; Benjamin, S.A.; Miller, G.K.

    1988-09-01

    Immunologic responses were studied in beagle dogs following prenatal (35 days gestation) irradiation to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing immune system. Each dog received 1.5 Gy /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation or sham irradiation. Prenatally irradiated dogs exhibited a significant reduction in primary humoral antibody responses to inoculated sheep red blood cells, a T-dependent antigen, and a concurrent decrease in T-helper lymphocyte subpopulations in the peripheral blood at 3 to 4 months of age. Similarly, irradiated fetuses have been shown to have defects in epitheliostromal development of the thymus. It is suggested that the postnatal immunologic deficits may relate to the prenatal thymic injury.

  3. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  4. Congenital toxoplasmosis and prenatal care state programs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Control programs have been executed in an attempt to reduce vertical transmission and the severity of congenital infection in regions with a high incidence of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women. We aimed to evaluate whether treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin associated with a lack of monitoring for toxoplasmosis seroconversion affects the prognosis of patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 246 newborns (NB) at risk for congenital toxoplasmosis in Goiânia (Brazil) between October 2003 and October 2011. We analyzed the efficacy of maternal treatment with spiramycin. Results A total of 40.7% (66/162) of the neonates were born seriously infected. Vertical transmission associated with reactivation during pregnancy occurred in 5.5% (9/162) of the NB, with one showing severe infection (systemic). The presence of specific immunoglobulins (fetal IgM and NB IgA) suggested the worst prognosis. Treatment of pregnant women by spiramycin resulted in reduced vertical transmission. When infected pregnant women did not undergo proper treatment, the risk of severe infection (neural-optical) in NB was significantly increased. Fetal IgM was associated with ocular impairment in 48.0% (12/25) of the fetuses and neonatal IgA-specific was related to the neuro-ophthalmologic and systemic forms of the disease. When acute toxoplasmosis was identified in the postpartum period, a lack of monitoring of seronegative pregnant women resulted in a higher risk of severe congenital infection. Conclusion Treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin reduces the possibility of transmission of infection to the fetus. However, a lack of proper treatment is associated with the onset of the neural-optical form of congenital infection. Primary preventive measures should be increased for all pregnant women during the prenatal period and secondary prophylaxis through surveillance of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant woman should be introduced to reduce the

  5. Results and Pitfalls in Prenatal Cytogenetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lillian Y. F.; Dubin, Elyse C.; Kerenyi, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Kurt

    1973-01-01

    Since 1969, we have cultured over 200 diagnostic amniotic fluids. Of these, 183 were for cytogenetic diagnosis. The chromosome analysis was successful in 168 cases. The indications and the results of the affected fetuses (followed by therapeutic abortion) are: (1) previous child with Down's syndrome: 62 cases (1:47,XX,+21); (2) advanced maternal age: 54 cases (1:47,XXY; 1:45,X/46,XY mosaicism; 1:47,+18); (3) previous child with multiple anomalies: 12 cases; (4) previous child with 47,XY,+18 or 47,+13: five cases; (5) translocation carrier: two cases; (6) parental mosaicism: three cases; (7) X-linked disorders: six cases (3:XY); (8) others: 24 cases. We have found firstly, that for prenatal sex determination, karyotype analysis of the cultured amniotic fluid cells is the only accurate means and that caution must be taken if sex chromatin and Y-fluorescent body determination from the uncultured amniotic fluid cells is used. Secondly, that diagnosis of chromosomal mosaicism can be problematic as exemplified by our case of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, where only 45,X cells were recovered from the first culture. Thirdly, that in cases with enlarged satellites, cells of late prophase or early metaphase must be used to eliminate confusion with translocations. We encountered three cases of enlarged satellites—one in the D group and two in the G group—and all three resulted in normal infants. Fourthly, that the karyotype may be altered by contamination and/or treatment or other unknown factors. We have observed two such cases where each mother delivered a normal infant. Images PMID:4268389

  6. Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J.

    2006-03-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

  7. Maternal glucocorticoids and prenatal programming of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lori L

    2006-10-01

    Maternal glucocorticoids have been postulated to play an important role in prenatal programming for adult hypertension in the offspring. However, we have shown previously that offspring hypertension caused by maternal dexamethasone subcutaneous administration at 100 microg x kg(-1) x day(-1) can be accounted for by the corresponding reduction in food intake that these mothers experience. The present studies were designed to determine whether there is a lower dose of dexamethasone that does not reduce maternal food intake yet still causes hypertension in the adult offspring. Pregnant rats were treated with subcutaneous dexamethasone at 50 (D50) or 25 (D25) microg x kg(-1) x day(-1) on days 15-20 of pregnancy. An additional group was untreated or received vehicle injections (control). D25 and D50 dams reduced their food intake by 17% during and after treatment and gained 31% less weight than control over the course of gestation. In adulthood ( approximately 21 wk), chronically instrumented male offspring of D50 and D25 had normal blood pressures (D50: 131 +/- 2 mmHg and D25: 127 +/- 3 mmHg vs. 127 +/- 2 mmHg in control). Qualitatively similar results were found in female offspring. Thus neither dexamethasone per se at these doses nor the accompanying modest reductions in maternal food intake and weight gain have blood pressure programming effects. As far as has been tested, there does not appear to be a dose of dexamethasone that, given over this time period in the rat, programs offspring hypertension without reducing maternal food intake and weight gain. These data do not support the hypothesis that maternal glucocorticoids program offspring hypertension directly.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis: Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body and often causes problems with digestion and breathing. It does not affect a person’s ... in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission ...

  9. Prenatal Inflammation Linked to Autism Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH ... National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is ...

  10. Prenatal screening: current practice, new developments, ethical challenges.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Antina; Maya, Idit; van Lith, Jan M M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal screening pathways, as nowadays offered in most Western countries consist of similar tests. First, a risk-assessment test for major aneuploides is offered to pregnant women. In case of an increased risk, invasive diagnostic tests, entailing a miscarriage risk, are offered. For decades, only conventional karyotyping was used for final diagnosis. Moreover, several foetal ultrasound scans are offered to detect major congenital anomalies, but the same scans also provide relevant information for optimal support of the pregnancy and the delivery. Recent developments in prenatal screening include the application of microarrays that allow for identifying a much broader range of abnomalities than karyotyping, and non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) that enables reducing the number of invasive tests for aneuploidies considerably. In the future, broad NIPT may become possible and affordable. This article will briefly address the ethical issues raised by these technological developments. First, a safe NIPT may lead to routinisation and as such challenge the central issue of informed consent and the aim of prenatal screening: to offer opportunity for autonomous reproductive choice. Widening the scope of prenatal screening also raises the question to what extent 'reproductive autonomy' is meant to expand. Finally, if the same test is used for two different aims, namely detection of foetal anomalies and pregnancy-related problems, non-directive counselling can no longer be taken as a standard. Our broad outline of the ethical issues is meant as an introduction into the more detailed ethical discussions about prenatal screening in the other articles of this special issue.

  11. Prenatal Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Early Childhood BMI

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Joe M.; Daniels, Julie L.; Poole, Charles; Olshan, Andrew F.; Hornung, Richard; Bernert, John T.; Khoury, Jane; Needham, Larry L.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Lanphear, Bruce P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of childhood overweight body mass index (BMI). Less is known about the association between prenatal secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure and childhood BMI. We followed 292 mother-child dyads from early pregnancy to 3 years of age. Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy was quantified using self-report and serum cotinine biomarkers. We used linear mixed models to estimate the association between tobacco smoke exposure and BMI at birth, 4 weeks, and 1, 2, and 3 years. During pregnancy, 15% of women reported SHS exposure and 12% reported active smoking, but 51% of women had cotinine levels consistent with SHS exposure and 10% had cotinine concentrations indicative of active smoking. After adjustment for confounders, children born to active smokers had higher BMI at 2 and 3 years of age (self-report or serum cotinine), compared to unexposed children. Children born to women with prenatal serum cotinine concentrations indicative of SHS exposure had higher BMI at 2 (Mean Difference [MD]:0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]:−0.1, 0.7) and 3 (MD:0.4; [0, 0.8]) years compared to unexposed children. Using self-reported prenatal exposure resulted in non-differential exposure misclassification of SHS exposures that attenuated the association between SHS exposure and BMI compared to serum cotinine concentrations. These findings suggest active and secondhand prenatal tobacco smoke exposure may be related to an important public health problem in childhood and later life. In addition, accurate quantification of prenatal secondhand tobacco smoke exposures is essential to obtaining valid estimates. PMID:20955230

  12. Prenatal exposure to ethanol affects postnatal neurogenesis in thalamus.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Sandra M; Miller, Michael W

    2010-06-01

    The number of neurons in the ventrobasal thalamus (VB) in the adolescent rat is unaffected by prenatal exposure to ethanol. This is in sharp contrast to other parts of the trigeminal-somatosensory system, which exhibit 30-35% fewer neurons after prenatal ethanol exposure. The present study tested the hypothesis that prenatal ethanol exposure affects dynamic changes in the numbers of VB neurons; such changes reflect the sum of cell proliferation and death. Neuronal number in the VB was determined during the first postnatal month in the offspring of pregnant Long-Evans rats fed an ethanol-containing diet or pair-fed an isocaloric non-alcoholic liquid diet. Offspring were examined between postnatal day (P) 1 and P30. The size of the VB and neuronal number were determined stereologically. Prenatal exposure to ethanol did not significantly alter neuronal number on any individual day, nor was the prenatal generation of VB neurons affected. Interestingly, prenatal ethanol exposure did affect the pattern of the change in neuronal number over time; total neuronal number was stable in the ethanol-treated pups after P12, but it continued to rise in the controls until P21. In addition, the rate of cell proliferation during the postnatal period was greater in ethanol-treated animals. Thus, the rate of neuronal acquisition is altered by ethanol, and by deduction, there appears to be less ethanol-induced neuronal loss in the VB. A contributor to these changes is a latent effect of ethanol on postnatal neurogenesis in the VB and the apparent survival of new neurons.

  13. Prenatal exposure to amphetamines. Risks and adverse outcomes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Plessinger, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on findings in humans and the confirmation of prenatal exposures in animals, amphetamines and methamphetamines increase the risk of an adverse outcome when abused during pregnancy. Clefting, cardiac anomalies, and fetal growth reduction deficits that have been seen in infants exposed to amphetamines during pregnancy have all been reproduced in animal studies involving prenatal exposures to amphetamines. The differential effects of amphetamines between genetic strains of mice and between species demonstrate that pharmacokinetics and the genetic disposition of the mother and developing embryo can have an enormous influence on enhancing or reducing these potential risks. The effects of prenatal exposure to amphetamines in producing altered behavior in humans appear less compelling when one considers other confounding variables of human environment, genetics, and polydrug abuse. In view of the animal data concerning altered behavior and learning tasks in comparison with learning deficits observed in humans, the influence of the confounding variables in humans may serve to increase the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to prenatal exposure to amphetamines. These factors and others may predispose the developing conceptus to the damaging effects of amphetamines by actually lowering the threshold of susceptibility at the sites where damage occurs. Knowledge of the effects of prenatal exposure of the fetus and the mother to designer amphetamines is lacking. Based on the few studies in which designer drugs have been examined in animal models, more questions are raised than answered. Possible reasons why no malformations or significant fetal effects were found in the study by St. Omer include the genetic strain of rat used, the conservative exposure profile, or the fact that the placenta metabolized MDMA before reaching the embryo. These questions underscore the need for further investigations concerning the prenatal exposure effects of designer compounds and

  14. Standard for University of California Union Catalog Input Records; Standard for Brief Machine-Readable Bibliographic Records for University of California Libraries; [and] Record Format for the MELVYL Catalog. Technical Reports Nos. 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Oakland. Div. of Library Automation.

    Three reports describe the standards and format to be used when contributing bibliographic records to MELVYL, the University of California (UC) online library catalog. The first report, which was revised and approved in May 1990, defines record format standards, record maintenance information standards, bibliographic fields, local data fields,…

  15. Differences in pregnancy outcomes, prenatal care utilization, and maternal complications between teenagers and adult women in Korea: A nationwide epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyung; Lee, Seung Mi; Lim, Nam Gu; Kim, Hyun Joo; Bae, Sung-Hee; Ock, Minsu; Kim, Un-Na; Lee, Jin Yong; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Teenage mothers are at high risk for maternal and neonatal complications. This study aimed to evaluate the socioeconomic circumstances of teenage pregnancy, and determine whether these increased risks remained after adjustment for socioeconomic circumstances in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance Corporation database, we selected women who terminated pregnancy, by delivery or abortion, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Abortion, delivery type, and maternal complications were defined based on the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision. We compared teenagers (13-19 years at the time of pregnancy termination) with other age groups and investigated differences based on socioeconomic status, reflected by Medical Aid (MA) and National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries. We used multivariate analysis to define the factors associated with preterm delivery. Among 463,847 pregnancies, 2267 (0.49%) involved teenagers. Teenage mothers were more likely to have an abortion (33.4%) than deliver a baby when compared with other age groups (20.8%; P < 0.001). About 14.4% of teenage mothers had never received prenatal care throughout pregnancy. Among teenage mothers, 61.7% of MA recipients made fewer than 4 prenatal care visits (vs 38.8% of NHI beneficiaries) (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers more often experienced preterm delivery and perineal laceration (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers (<20 years) were 2.47 times more likely to have preterm delivery than older mothers (20-34 years; P < 0.001). Teenage mothers had higher risk of inadequate prenatal care and subsequently of preterm delivery, which remained significantly higher after adjusting for socioeconomic confounding variables and adequacy of prenatal care in Korean teenagers (P < 0.001).

  16. ATTENTION FUNCTIONING IN CHILDREN WITH PRENATAL DRUG EXPOSURE.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Dominique A; Suchan, Boris; Schölmerich, Axel; Schneider, Dominik T; Gawehn, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Children born to drug abusers are exposed to teratogenic influences on intrauterine brain development and undergo postnatal withdrawal. We investigated the interplay of different domains and levels of attention functioning in 24 prenatally exposed and 25 nonexposed children who were 5 to 6 years old. Assessment included parent ratings and neuropsychological and electrophysiological methods. Exposed children had a higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms, tended to have poorer performance in an attention test battery, and showed EEG alterations in P3 and N2c. Findings suggest long-term effects of prenatal drug exposure on specific domains and on different levels of attention functioning.

  17. Prenatal Diagnosis of Concurrent Achondroplasia and Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Carbajo, Esther; Sanfrutos-Llorente, Luis; Cruz-Melguizo, Sara; Martinez-Payo, Cristina; Iglesias-Goy, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most frequent nonlethal skeletal dysplasia, with a prevalence of 1 : 5000 to 1 : 40,000 live births, and it is caused by a fibroblast growth factor receptor alteration. The combination of achondroplasia and Klinefelter syndrome is extremely rare and just four reports have been published in the literature, which were all diagnosed postnatally. We report the fifth case described of this uncommon association and its prenatal diagnosis. In cases of prenatal diagnosis of achondroplasia with additional suspicious morphological abnormalities, an invasive test such as amniocentesis must be carried out to assess the karyotype normality. PMID:25789188

  18. [Toward healthy offspring: early prenatal testing in Spain].

    PubMed

    Santesmases, María Jesús

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with prenatal diagnosis practices in Spain. For pursuing this aim it reviews both literature on the origins of these practices in foreign countries as well as some of the early publications by Spanish practitioners. Those publications appeared to be connected to previous genetic testing in children such as the case of Down syndrome. Socio-political norms and values of Franco's regime together with clinicians' interests on introducing new testing techniques resulted in the stabilization of these practices associated to a reconceptualisation of pregnancy. Although prenatal diagnosis techniques made the body of pregnant women invisible, women's bodies remained at the core of the technicalisation of contemporary reproductive options.

  19. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Prenatal Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Sanín-Blair, José Enrique; Gutiérrez-Márquez, Carolina; Herrera, Diego A; Vossough, Arastoo

    2017-03-14

    Brain lesions and malformations have been described on ultrasonography of prenatal Zika infection; however, there are scarce reports about fetal magnetic resonance (MR) findings. We report 3 cases of fetuses with confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection evaluated by ultrasound and fetal MR. Various morphometric measurements were assessed and brain maturation was calculated with the fetal total maturation score. Fetuses with prenatal Zika virus infection showed retardation in brain maturation indexes evaluated by fetal MR. Brain calcifications were demonstrated by neurosonography in all cases, while fetal MR characterized the specific type of cortical development malformation.

  20. [First facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy prenatal diagnosis in a Bulgarian family].

    PubMed

    Buzhkov, B Ts; Vŭzharova, R; Dimitrova, V; Dimova, I; Tŭrnev, I; van der Wielen, M; van der Maarel, S; Bakker, B

    2005-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the third most common myopathy. It is characterized by progressive descendent involvement of facial, shoulder girdle, truncal and lower extremities muscles. FSHD locus was mapped on the terminal part of the long arm of chromosome 4 (4q35). The disease is caused by a deletion of an integral number of tandem D4Z4 repeats and dimension of the pathological fragments < or = 38kb. Prenatal diagnosis of FSHD is possible but it is potentially difficult because of the big amount and high quality of DNA required. Hereby we describe the first prenatal tests performed for a Bulgarian family.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary agenesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung A; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Seung Mi; Jun, Jong Kwan; Kang, Jieun; Seo, Jeong-Wook

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral pulmonary agenesis (BPA), which was suspected during a prenatal US examination and diagnosed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BPA is an extremely rare congenital anomaly and, although many fetal structural defects can be detected with a high degree of confidence after introducing high-resolution US, the prenatal diagnosis of BPA remains problematic. Other thoracic abnormalities, such as a congenital diaphragmatic hernia, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, and pulmonary sequestration, should be excluded from the list of possible diagnoses before coming to the conclusion of BPA, because BPA is absolutely incompatible with extrauterine life, and an accurate internal diagnosis can prevent a futile intervention from being performed.

  2. Revised Extended Grid Library

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Roger L.

    2016-07-15

    The Revised Eolus Grid Library (REGL) is a mesh-tracking library that was developed for use with the MCNP6TM computer code so that (radiation) particles can track on an unstructured mesh. The unstructured mesh is a finite element representation of any geometric solid model created with a state-of-the-art CAE/CAD tool. The mesh-tracking library is written using modern Fortran and programming standards; the library is Fortran 2003 compliant. The library was created with a defined application programmer interface (API) so that it could easily integrate with other particle tracking/transport codes. The library does not handle parallel processing via the message passing interface (mpi), but has been used successfully where the host code handles the mpi calls. The library is thread-safe and supports the OpenMP paradigm. As a library, all features are available through the API and overall a tight coupling between it and the host code is required. Features of the library are summarized with the following list: • can accommodate first and second order 4, 5, and 6-sided polyhedra • any combination of element types may appear in a single geometry model • parts may not contain tetrahedra mixed with other element types • pentahedra and hexahedra can be together in the same part • robust handling of overlaps and gaps • tracks element-to-element to produce path length results at the element level • finds element numbers for a given mesh location • finds intersection points on element faces for the particle tracks • produce a data file for post processing results analysis • reads Abaqus .inp input (ASCII) files to obtain information for the global mesh-model • supports parallel input processing via mpi • support parallel particle transport by both mpi and OpenMP

  3. EPA's proposal to revise the PM standards

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Page

    2006-06-15

    Over the next few months, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be finalizing its proposal to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine and coarse particulate matter (PM). Since issuing the proposal in December 2005, the agency has sought comments from all interested parties, and will base its final decision on the record that was established through the comment period, which ended on April 17. In this issue articles present perspectives from some of the many non-EPA stakeholders who have played an important role in this review process. This article summarizes EPA's proposal, as well as the extensive process EPA goes through when setting air quality standards. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. [Profile of adolescents with repeated pregnancies attended at a prenatal clinic].

    PubMed

    Persona, Lia; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda; Tarallo, Maria Celina

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the biopsychosocial profile of adolescent with repeated pregnancies, who were attended at a prenatal clinic. Data were collected through patient records and interviews and were subject to quantitative analysis. Based on the obtained results and in accordance with literature, factors that are strongly associated with the occurrence of pregnancy repetition were selected in the adolescents' profiles. These are: early menarche; first sexual intercourse shortly after menarche; school repetition; school dropout; non remunerated occupation; low family income; involvement with older partners; living with the partner; consensual union with the partner; one partner; low condom use; family history of adolescent pregnancy; father's absence because of death or abandonment; positive family reaction to previous pregnancy; previous abortion; adolescent's positive concepts about previous delivery; and absence from previous postpartum consultations.

  5. Exogenous prenatal corticosterone exposure mimics the effects of prenatal stress on adult brain stress response systems and fear extinction behavior.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Brian C; Sheela Rani, C S; Frazer, Alan; Strong, Randy; Morilak, David A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to early-life stress is a risk factor for the development of cognitive and emotional disorders later in life. We previously demonstrated that prenatal stress (PNS) in rats results in long-term, stable changes in central stress-response systems and impairs the ability to extinguish conditioned fear responding, a component of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Maternal corticosterone (CORT), released during prenatal stress, is a possible mediator of these effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether fetal exposure to CORT at levels induced by PNS is sufficient to alter the development of adult stress neurobiology and fear extinction behavior. Pregnant dams were subject to either PNS (60 min immobilization/day from ED 14-21) or a daily injection of CORT (10mg/kg), which approximated both fetal and maternal plasma CORT levels elicited during PNS. Control dams were given injections of oil vehicle. Male offspring were allowed to grow to adulthood undisturbed, at which point they were sacrificed and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampus, hypothalamus, and a section of the rostral pons containing the locus coeruleus (LC) were dissected. PNS and prenatal CORT treatment decreased glucocorticoid receptor protein levels in the mPFC, hippocampus, and hypothalamus when compared to control offspring. Both treatments also decreased tyrosine hydroxylase levels in the LC. Finally, the effect of prenatal CORT exposure on fear extinction behavior was examined following chronic stress. Prenatal CORT impaired both acquisition and recall of cue-conditioned fear extinction. This effect was additive to the impairment induced by previous chronic stress. Thus, these data suggest that fetal exposure to high levels of maternal CORT is responsible for many of the lasting neurobiological consequences of PNS as they relate to the processes underlying extinction of learned fear. The data further suggest that adverse prenatal environments constitute a

  6. A revision of the Chinese Aulacidae (Hymenoptera, Evanioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-yan; Turrisi, Giuseppe Fabrizio; Xu, Zai-fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Chinese Aulacidae are revised, keyed and illustrated for the first time. In total twenty-five species are recorded from China, included within two genera Aulacus Jurine, 1807 and Pristaulacus Kieffer, 1900, with five and twenty species respectively. Among the treated species, six are newly described for science: Aulacus magnus sp. n., Pristaulacus calidus sp. n., Pristaulacus centralis sp. n., Pristaulacus fopingi sp. n., Pristaulacus obscurus sp. n., and Pristaulacus pseudoiosephi sp. n. Three species are newly recorded from China: Pristaulacus excisus Turner, 1922, Pristaulacus iosephi Turrisi & Madl, 2013, and Pristaulacus rufobalteatus Cameron, 1907. PMID:27408528

  7. Revision of Primary Series Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a 50-year effort to provide primary series map coverage of the United States. Many of these maps now need to be updated to reflect the construction of new roads and highways and other changes that have taken place over time. The USGS has formulated a graphic revision plan to help keep the primary series maps current. Primary series maps include 1:20,000-scale quadrangles of Puerto Rico, 1:24,000- or 1:25,000-scale quadrangles of the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and U.S. Territories, and 1:63,360-scale quadrangles of Alaska. The revision of primary series maps from new collection sources is accomplished using a variety of processes. The raster revision process combines the scanned content of paper maps with raster updating technologies. The vector revision process involves the automated plotting of updated vector files. Traditional processes use analog stereoplotters and manual scribing instruments on specially coated map separates. The ability to select from or combine these processes increases the efficiency of the National Mapping Division map revision program.

  8. Prenatal Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene Impairs Later-Life Cortical Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Monique M.; Maguire, Mark; Ramesh, Aramandla; Aimin, Qiao; Liu, Sheng; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Aschner, Michael; Ebner, Ford F.; Hood, Darryl B.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants, such as Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] has been shown to impair brain development. The overarching hypothesis of our work is that glutamate receptor subunit expression is crucial for cortical evoked responses and that prenatal B(a)P exposure modulates the temporal developmental expression of glutamatergic receptor subunits in the somatosensory cortex. To characterize prenatal B(a)P exposure on the development of cortical function, pregnant Long Evans rats were exposed to low-level B(a)P (300μg/kg BW) by oral gavage on gestational days 14 to 17. At this exposure dose, there was no significant effect of B(a)P on 1) the number of pups born per litter, 2) the pre-weaning growth curves and 3) initial and final brain to body weight ratios. Control and B(a)P-exposed offspring were profiled for B(a)P metabolites in plasma and whole brain during the pre-weaning period. No detectable levels of metabolites were found in the control offspring. However, a time-dependent decrease in total metabolite concentration was observed in B(a)P-exposed offspring. On PND100-120, cerebrocortical mRNA expression was determined for the glutamatergic NMDA receptor subunit (NR2B) in control and B(a)P-exposed offspring. Neural activity was also recorded from neurons in primary somatic sensory (barrel) cortex. Semiquantitative PCR from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed a significant 50% reduction in NR2B mRNA expression in B(a)P-exposed offspring relative to controls. Recordings from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor -dependent neuronal activity in barrel cortex evoked by whisker stimulation was also significantly reduced (70%) as compared to controls. Analysis showed that the greatest deficit in cortical neuronal responses occurred in the shorter latency epochs from 5-20ms post-stimulus. The results suggest that in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene results in diminished mRNA expression of the NMDA NR2B receptor

  9. World Weather Extremes. Revision,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Sahara at 320 32’N.13°01’E., eleva- a International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico , "Flow of the Colorado River and Other...rainfall, 124.79 centimeters (49.13 inches), occurred during Typhoon Gloria, and it was measured in a recording 114 Ibid. 1 lbid. 116 S. Marx, ’ Uber die...from New Mexico to Alberta. This area averages more hail days, more hailstorms, more and bigger hailstones, and thus a greater hail intensity than any

  10. The California Prenatal Screening Program: "options and choices" not "coercion and eugenics".

    PubMed

    Flessel, Monica C; Lorey, Fred W

    2011-08-01

    The California Prenatal Screening Program is designed to make prenatal screening available to the state's large and diverse population. The Program provides information to women which will allow them to make informed choices regarding prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis. Since the Program's inception in 1986, women in California have had the option to participate in prenatal screening or to decline prenatal screening. The California Program offers prenatal diagnostic services to women whose screening tests indicate an increased risk for birth defects, including Down syndrome. Women can decline any or all of these follow-up services. Genetic counseling, diagnostic services, and the presentation of diagnostic results are performed by medical professionals (not State staff) who follow established guidelines for nondirective counseling. Program data clearly demonstrate that women in California have a wide range of options and make a wide range of choices regarding prenatal screening and prenatal diagnosis. California's comprehensive Prenatal Screening Program promotes optimal care for all women within all options and choices. The important and necessary communication among organizations and stakeholders involved in prenatal screening and diagnosis, and in related care for pregnant women and for people with Down syndrome, is not served by misrepresentation and inflammatory rhetoric.

  11. [Prenatal diagnosis. Review, personal and prospective studies].

    PubMed

    Engel, E; Empson, J; DeLozier, D; McGee, B; da Costa Woodson, E; Engel-de Montmollin, M; Carter, T; Lorber, C; Cassidy, S B; Millis, J; Heller, R M; Boehm, F; Vanhooydonk, J

    1979-07-07

    instruments is particularly useful in cases where a severe fetal morphologic malformation cannot currently be identified by indirect visualization (ultrasound) or by analysis of cytogenetic or molecular markers. 6. Pathological accumulations of alpha-fetoprotein which are associated with diverse feto-placental abnormalities (particularly open malformations of the neural tube) can be detected in the amniotic fluid and/or maternal blood. In extension of this approach, it is foreseeable that conditions existing prenatally will be diagnosed in a growing number of cases from the study of fetal cells and molecules which can be isolated from the venous blood of pregnant women. This will become feasible as a result of some well-developed techniques which allow separation of fetal from maternal cells and metabolites, and also to some extremely fine analytic techniques, notably examination of the DNA itself by means of restriction enzymes.

  12. Least explored factors associated with prenatal smoking.

    PubMed

    Masho, Saba W; Bishop, Diane L; Keyser-Marcus, Lori; Varner, Sara B; White, Shannon; Svikis, Dace

    2013-09-01

    Poor pregnancy and birth outcomes are major problems in the United States, and maternal smoking during pregnancy has been identified as one of the most preventable risk factors associated with these outcomes. This study examines less explored risk factors of smoking among underserved African American pregnant women. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at an outpatient obstetrics-gynecology clinic of an inner-city university hospital in Virginia from March 2009 through January 2011 in which pregnant women (N = 902) were interviewed at their first prenatal care visit. Survey questions included items related to women's sociodemographic characteristics as well as their pregnancy history; criminal history; receipt of social services; child protective services involvement; insurance status; and history of substance abuse, domestic violence, and depression. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to calculate odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals depicting the relationship between these factors and smoking during pregnancy. The analysis reported that maternal age [OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.12], less than high school education [OR = 4.30, 95 % CI = 2.27-8.14], unemployed [OR = 2.33, 95 % CI = 1.35-4.04], criminal history [OR = 1.66, 95 % CI = 1.05-2.63], receipt of social services [OR = 2.26, 95 % CI = 1.35-3.79] alcohol use [OR = 2.73, 95 % CI = 1.65-4.51] and illicit drug use [OR = 1.97, 95 % CI = 1.04-3.74] during pregnancy were statistically significant risk factors associated with smoking during pregnancy. In addition to the well known risk factors, public health professionals should be aware that criminal history and receipt of social services are important factors associated with smoking during pregnancy. Social service providers such as WIC and prisons and jails may offer a unique opportunity for education and cessation interventions during the preconception or interconception period.

  13. The revised classification of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Adl, Sina M.; Simpson, Alastair. G.; Lane, Christopher E.; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S.; Brown, Matt; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; leGall, Line; Lynn, Denis H.; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E.; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. (2005), retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information. PMID:23020233

  14. The revised classification of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Adl, Sina M; Simpson, Alastair G B; Lane, Christopher E; Lukeš, Julius; Bass, David; Bowser, Samuel S; Brown, Matthew W; Burki, Fabien; Dunthorn, Micah; Hampl, Vladimir; Heiss, Aaron; Hoppenrath, Mona; Lara, Enrique; Le Gall, Line; Lynn, Denis H; McManus, Hilary; Mitchell, Edward A D; Mozley-Stanridge, Sharon E; Parfrey, Laura W; Pawlowski, Jan; Rueckert, Sonja; Shadwick, Laura; Shadwick, Lora; Schoch, Conrad L; Smirnov, Alexey; Spiegel, Frederick W

    2012-09-01

    This revision of the classification of eukaryotes, which updates that of Adl et al. [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 52 (2005) 399], retains an emphasis on the protists and incorporates changes since 2005 that have resolved nodes and branches in phylogenetic trees. Whereas the previous revision was successful in re-introducing name stability to the classification, this revision provides a classification for lineages that were then still unresolved. The supergroups have withstood phylogenetic hypothesis testing with some modifications, but despite some progress, problematic nodes at the base of the eukaryotic tree still remain to be statistically resolved. Looking forward, subsequent transformations to our understanding of the diversity of life will be from the discovery of novel lineages in previously under-sampled areas and from environmental genomic information.

  15. Early prenatal detection of double outlet right ventricle by echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, P A; Wladimiroff, J W; Becker, A E

    1985-01-01

    A double outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary ventricular septal defect and right sided hypoplastic aorta was diagnosed in a 22 week fetus of a mother with diabetes mellitus. Elective termination of pregnancy was carried out and the echocardiographic findings were confirmed. Early prenatal detection of congenital heart disease may allow elective termination of pregnancy when the fetus has severe defects. Images PMID:4041305

  16. Intervention Strategies for the Child with Prenatal Drug Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Jean Gardner

    The behavior of the infant with prenatal drug exposure (PDE) is different from a nonexposed infant, and it is a difference that changes the rules of interaction for the caregiver. Infants exposed to opiates such as heroin or methadone demonstrate very specific signs of neurobehavioral dysfunction as they go through classic withdrawal symptoms.…

  17. [State of the art prenatal care from the Swiss viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Hüsler, M; Krähenmann, F; Streicher, A; Zimmermann, R

    2002-12-01

    Prenatal care has significantly reduced perinatal and maternal mortality. Screening for maternal disease allows us to reduce or to prevent an unfavourable fetal or obstetrical outcome. Prenatal care should start with a first preconceptional visit. Folic acid intake is recommended for all reproductive-age women who are capable of becoming pregnant. The fetal nuchal translucency measurement has revolutionized prenatal care as a non-invasive, effective screening for chromosomal abnormalities and other diseases of the fetus. Vertical transmission of infections has to be prevented if possible. As an example caesarean section in combination with antiretroviral therapy reduces the transmission of HIV significantly. Screening for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) remains important as at present the incidence of STD is increasing again. In this short review on prenatal care as it is done in Switzerland, we try to enlighten its most important aspects. For the patients and your own benefit as a physician it is important to follow guidelines, although of course each patient has to be treated individually.

  18. Prenatal stress: Role in psychotic and depressive diseases

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The birth of neurons, their migration to appropriate positions in the brain, and their establishment of the proper synaptic contacts happen predominately during the prenatal period. Environmental stressors during gestation can exert a major impact on brain development and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as depression and psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Objective The objectives here are to present recent preclinical studies of the impact of prenatal exposure to gestational stressors on the developing fetal brain and discuss their relevance to the neurobiological basis of mental illness. The focus is on maternal immune activation, psychological stresses, and malnutrition, due to the abundant clinical literature supporting their role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Results Prenatal maternal immune activation, viral infection, unpredictable psychological stress, and malnutrition all appear to foster the development of behavioral abnormalities in exposed offspring that may be relevant to the symptom domains of schizophrenia and psychosis, including sensorimotor gating, information processing, cognition, social function, and subcortical hyperdopaminergia. Depression-related phenotypes, such as learned helplessness or anxiety, are also observed in some model systems. These changes appear to be mediated by the presence of proinflammatory cytokines and/or corticosteroids in the fetal compartment that alter the development the neuroanatomical substrates involved in these behaviors. Conclusion Prenatal exposure to environmental stressors alters the trajectory of brain development and can be used to generate animal preparations that may be informative in understanding the pathophysiological processes involved in several human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:20949351

  19. Together Forever? Romantic Relationship Characteristics and Prenatal Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert

    2008-01-01

    Using Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Data (N = 4,871), this paper examines why relationship status matters for prenatal health behaviors. The paper argues that a mother's potential investments in her child's health are conditioned by socioeconomic and interpersonal resources, including the quality of her relationship with the child's father.…

  20. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P.; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor—NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  1. Prenatal and Perinatal Risk Factors for Autism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xin; Lv, Cong-Chao; Tian, Jiang; Miao, Ru-Juan; Xi, Wei; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Qi, Lihong

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study using 190 Han children with and without autism to investigate prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism in China. Cases were recruited through public special education schools and controls from regular public schools in the same region (Tianjin), with frequency matching on sex and birth year. Unadjusted…

  2. The Relationship between Prenatal Parental Stress and Pregnancy Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neihardt, Joanne E.

    To explore the relationship between prenatal parental stress and pregnancy outcome, this study investigated the hypothesis that parents of infants with defects would report greater amounts of stress in the year prior to their infant's birth than would parents of normally developing infants. Data on levels of parental stress were obtained from 37…

  3. Patterns of compliance with prenatal iron supplementation among Peruvian women.

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Nelly; Caulfield, Laura E; Figueroa, Alberto; Chen, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Prenatal iron supplementation is recommended to control anaemia during pregnancy. Low compliance and side effects have been claimed as the main obstacles for adequate impact of the supplementation. As part of a double-blind supplementation study carried out in a hospital located in a shantytown in Lima, Peru, we monitored compliance throughout pregnancy and evaluated factors associated with variation in compliance over time. Overall, 985 pregnant women were enrolled in a supplementation study that was administered through their prenatal care from 10 to 24 weeks of gestation until 4 weeks postpartum. They received 60 mg iron and 250 µg folate with or without 15 mg zinc. Women had monthly care visits and were also visited weekly to query regarding compliance, overall health status, and potential positive and negative effects of supplement consumption. Median compliance was 79% (inter-quartile range: 65-89%) over pregnancy, and the median number of tablets consumed was 106 (81-133). Primpara had lower average compliance; positive health reports were associated with greater compliance, and negative reports were associated with lower compliance. There was no difference by type of supplement. Women with low initial compliance did achieve high compliance by the end of pregnancy, and women who reported forgetting to take the supplements did have lower compliance. Compliance was positively associated with haemoglobin concentration at the end of pregnancy. In conclusion, women comply highly with prenatal supplementation within a prenatal care model in which supplies are maintained and reinforcing messages are provided.

  4. Designing prenatal care messages for low-income Mexican women.

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, R; Ghee, A; Scrimshaw, S

    1993-01-01

    Communication theories and research data were used to design cross-cultural health education messages. A University of California Los Angeles-Universidad Autonoma in Tijuana, Mexico, research team used the methods of ethnographic and survey research to study behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge concerning prenatal care of a sample of pregnant low-income women living in Tijuana. This audience provided information that served as a framework for a series of messages to increase awareness and change prenatal care behaviors. The message design process was guided by persuasion theories that included Petty and Caccioppo's elaboration likelihood model, McGuire's persuasion matrix, and Bandura's social learning theory. The results from the research showed that poor women in Tijuana tend to delay or not seek prenatal care. They were not aware of symptoms that could warn of pregnancy complications. Their responses also revealed pregnant women's culturally specific beliefs and behaviors regarding pregnancy. After examination of these and other results from the study, prenatal care messages about four topics were identified as the most relevant to communicate to this audience: health services use, the mother's weight gain, nutrition and anemia, and symptoms of high-risk complications during pregnancy. A poster, a calendar, a brochure, and two radio songs were produced and pretested in focus groups with low-income women in Tijuana. Each medium included one or more messages addressing informational, attitudinal, or behavioral needs, or all three, of the target population. PMID:8497574

  5. Visual Evoked Potentials in Children Prenatally Exposed to Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Choi, Anna L; Weihe, Pal; Grandjean, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to methylmercury can cause both neurobehavioral deficits and neurophysiological changes. However, evidence of neurotoxic effects within the visual nervous system is inconsistent, possibly due to incomplete statistical adjustment for beneficial nutritional factors. We evaluated the effect of prenatal methylmercury exposure on visual evoked potential (VEP) latencies in Faroese children with elevated prenatal methylmercury exposure. A cohort of 182 singleton term births was assembled in the Faroe Islands during 1994–1995. At age 7 years, VEP tracings were obtained from 139 cohort subjects after exclusion of subjects with abnormal vision conditions. We used multiple regression analysis to evaluate the association of mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair at parturition with VEP latencies after adjustment for potential confounders that included the cord-serum phospholipid concentration of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and the duration of breastfeeding. Unadjusted correlations between mercury exposure and VEP latencies were equivocal. Multiple regression models showed that increased mercury concentrations, especially in maternal hair, were associated with delayed latencies for VEP peak N145. After covariate adjustment, a delay of 2.22 ms (p=0.02) was seen for each doubling of the mercury concentration in maternal hair. In agreement with neuropsychological findings, the present study suggests that prenatal methylmercury exposure may have an adverse effect on VEP findings despite the absence of clinical toxicity to the visual system. However, this association was apparent only after adjustment for n-3 PUFA status. PMID:23548974

  6. Effects of prenatal cocaine on hearing, vision, growth, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Church, M W; Crossland, W J; Holmes, P A; Overbeck, G W; Tilak, J P

    1998-06-21

    The illicit use of cocaine has increased dramatically over the last 10-12 years. There has been a corresponding increase in cocaine abuse among obstetric patients and in the number of "cocaine babies." According to some estimates, these children make up more than half of the drug-associated births. This problem is therefore a major public health concern. Consequently, our laboratory investigated the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on hearing, vision, growth, and exploratory/stress behavior. This chapter summarizes the literature on animals and humans on these topics and presents new observations from our laboratory. In terms of maternal toxicity, prenatal cocaine exposure causes hypertension, placental abruption, spontaneous abortion, poor pregnancy weight gain, and undernutrition secondary to appetite suppression. Some offspring effects include in utero growth retardation, cephalic hemorrhage, fetal edema, altered body composition, congenital malformations, and even pre- and postnatal death. The offspring can also exhibit a variety of behavioral, visual, hearing, and language disorders. Differential effects of animal strain and late gestational cocaine exposure are discussed. Comparisons are made between prenatal cocaine, the fetal alcohol syndrome, and the effects of prenatal undernutrition. Recommendations for clinical assessment and intervention are made.

  7. Does participation in prenatal courses lead to heavier babies?

    PubMed Central

    Robitaille, Y; Kramer, M S

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective epidemiologic survey of 1,676 primiparous women delivering in four Montreal hospitals during an eight-month period, we studied the impact of prenatal courses on birthweight, maternal weight gain, and cigarette smoking. Women who participated in prenatal courses were older and of higher socioeconomic status and were less likely to be smokers than non-participants. After adjustment for these differences, newborns of course participants had similar mean birthweights compared to those of non-participants (3286 grams vs 3271 grams), and the difference for maternal weight gain was substantially reduced. Most of the reduction in cigarette consumption occurred during the first three months of pregnancy, even among later participants, suggesting that something other than prenatal courses influenced cigarette smoking reduction in course participants. We conclude that as far as the birthweight objective is concerned, the format and content of prenatal courses (as currently constituted in the Montreal region) require re-examination, and new ideas and interventions need to be developed and tested. PMID:4037161

  8. Germline mosaicism in Rett syndrome identified by prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mari, F; Caselli, R; Russo, S; Cogliati, F; Ariani, F; Longo, I; Bruttini, M; Meloni, I; Pescucci, C; Schurfeld, K; Toti, P; Tassini, M; Larizza, L; Hayek, G; Zappella, M; Renieri, A

    2005-03-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental dominant disorder that affects almost exclusively girls. The vast majority of cases are sporadic and are caused by de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene, located in Xq28. Only few familial cases have been reported: in four cases, the mother was an asymptomatic carrier and in other four cases, the germline mosaicism in the mother was postulated. Owing to the above reported cases of germline mosaicism, we decided to offer prenatal diagnosis to all expectant mothers with a Rett daughter despite the absence of the causative mutation in parents' blood. We describe here the outcome of the first nine cases of prenatal diagnosis followed by our center. In eight cases, the fetus did not carry the mutation. In one case, the female fetus did carry the same mutation of the affected sister. The couple decided to interrupt the pregnancy and to devolve fetal tissues for research purposes. Our results indicate that prenatal diagnosis should be proposed to all couples with a Rett daughter, even when the mutation is apparently de novo. Moreover, one positive prenatal test among the first nine cases indicates that germline mosaicism may be seriously considered for the assessment of recurrence risk during genetic counseling.

  9. Reactivity and Regulation in Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Tracy; Bendersky, Margaret; Ramsay, Douglas; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Children prenatally exposed to cocaine may be at elevated risk for adjustment problems in early development because of greater reactivity and reduced regulation during challenging tasks. Few studies have examined whether cocaine-exposed children show such difficulties during the preschool years, a period marked by increased social and cognitive…

  10. Promoting Prenatal Health in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKirgan, Irene

    The continuing surge of women into the work force and the tendency for women to remain on the job throughout pregnancy and to return to work within months after delivery have led companies to initiate and place increasing importance on prenatal health promotion. Such programs have been found to improve employees' prospects for healthy pregnancies…

  11. Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Intelligence Test Performance at Age 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt, Lidush; Richardson, Gale A.; Willford, Jennifer; Day, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted on lower income population women who were moderate users of marijuana to examine the effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on children's intellectual development at the age of six. Results concluded that the Cognitive deficits noticed at the age of six were specific to verbal and quantitative reasoning and short-term memory.

  12. Adolescent Initiation of Drug Use: Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Gale A.; Larkby, Cynthia; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Day, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on adolescent drug use, while controlling for other predictors of adolescent use. Method: Data are from a longitudinal study of PCE in which women and their offspring were assessed throughout childhood. Adolescents were interviewed at 15 years about their age at…

  13. Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura H.; Gintner, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide counselors with an overview of best practices for the treatment of women who experience prenatal depression (PND). The authors first discuss issues in the screening and diagnosis of PND. Next, the 2 most common treatments, antidepressants and psychotherapy, are reviewed and discussed in relation to current…

  14. Prenatal ethanol exposure increases brain cholesterol content in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content are known to occur in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43 %, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of postnatal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats.

  15. Prenatal screening for cystic fibrosis carriers: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, P T; Loader, S; Kaplan, R M

    1998-01-01

    The cloning of the CFTR gene has made it technically possible to avert the unwanted birth of a child with cystic fibrosis (CF). Several large trials offering prenatal CF carrier screening suggest that such screening is practical and that identified carriers generally use the information obtained. Therefore, a critical question is whether the cost of such screening is justified. Decision analysis was performed that used information about choices that pregnant women were observed to make at each stage in the Rochester prenatal carrier-screening trial. The cost of screening per CF birth voluntarily averted was estimated to be $1,320,000-$1,400,000. However, the lifetime medical cost of the care of a CF child in today's dollars was estimated to be slightly>$1,000,000. Therefore, despite both the high cost of carrier testing and the relative infrequency of CF conceptions in the general population, the averted medical-care cost resulting from choices freely made are estimated to offset approximately 74%-78% of the costs of a screening program. At present, if it is assumed that a pregnancy terminated because of CF is replaced, the marginal cost for prenatal CF carrier screening is estimated to be $8,290 per quality-adjusted life-year. This value compares favorably with that of many accepted medical services. The cost of prenatal CF carrier screening could fall to equal the averted costs of CF patient care if the cost of carrier testing were to fall to $100. PMID:9758600

  16. Another case of prenatally diagnosed 48,XYY,+21

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.

    1995-02-13

    We report on a 20-month-old boy with 48,XYY,+21, the third prenatally diagnosed patient with this rare double aneuploidy syndrome. A review of 14 literature cases suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype appears unaltered by the extra Y chromosome. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Getting to Know Your Baby and Yourself: Prenatal to Birth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Grace C.

    This illustrated booklet on prenatal care and birth is part of a related curriculum on parenting and child development designed for school-age mothers. Conception, embryonic and fetal development, the birth process, nutrition during pregnancy, and emotional and physical characteristics of pregnant women are explained. Short quizzes and answers are…

  18. Prenatal exposure to MDMA alters noradrenergic neurodevelopment in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, V.B.; Koprich, J.B.; Chen, E.Y.; Kordower, J.H.; Terpstra, B.; Lipton, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) binds with high affinity to the norepinephrine transporter (NET), making the noradrenergic system a potential target during fetal exposure. Recent data indicates that adult rats that had been prenatally exposed to MDMA display persistent deficits in working memory and attention; behaviors consistent with abnormal noradrenergic signaling in the forebrain. The present study was designed to investigate whether prenatal exposure to MDMA from embryonic days 14–20 affects the structure and/or function of the noradrenergic system of the rat on postnatal day 21. Offspring that were prenatally exposed to MDMA exhibited an increase in noradrenergic fiber density in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and the CA1 region of the hippocampus that was not accompanied by an increase in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Direct tissue autoradiography using tritiated nisoxetine demonstrated that while NET binding was not altered in the prelimbic cortex, the dentate gyrus, or the locus coeruleus, it was increased in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Basal levels of norepinephrine were increased in the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens of MDMA-exposed rats, as compared to saline-treated controls. These findings indicate that prenatal exposure to MDMA results in structural changes in the noradrenergic system as well as functional alterations in NE neurotransmission in structures that are critical in attentional processing. PMID:21978916

  19. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA.

  20. Maternal prenatal stress and infant regulatory capacity in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Betty; Crnic, Keith A; Luecken, Linda J; Gonzales, Nancy A

    2014-11-01

    The early postpartum period lays important groundwork for later self-regulation as infants' dispositional traits interact with caregivers' co-regulatory behaviors to produce the earliest forms of self-regulation. Although emerging literature suggests that fetal exposure to maternal stress may be integral in determining child self-regulatory capacity, the complex pathways that characterize these early developmental processes remain unclear. The current study considers these complex, transactional processes in a low income, Mexican American sample. Data were collected from 295 Mexican American infants and their mothers during prenatal, 6- and 12-week postpartum home interviews. Mother reports of stress were obtained prenatally, and mother reports of infant temperament were obtained at 6 weeks. Observer ratings of maternal sensitivity and infant regulatory behaviors were obtained at the 6- and 12-week time points. Study results indicate that prenatal stress predicts higher levels of infant negativity and surgency, both of which directly or interactively predict later engagement in regulatory behaviors. Unexpectedly, prenatal stress also predicted more engagement in orienting, but not self-comforting behaviors. Advancing understandings about the nature of these developmental pathways may have significant implications for targets of early intervention in this high risk population.

  1. Challenging the rhetoric of choice in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Seavilleklein, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal screening, consisting of maternal serum screening and nuchal translucency screening, is on the verge of expansion, both by being offered to more pregnant women and by screening for more conditions. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have each recently recommended that screening be extended to all pregnant women regardless of age, disease history, or risk status. This screening is commonly justified by appeal to the value of autonomy, or women's choice. In this paper, I critically examine the value of autonomy in the context of prenatal screening to determine whether it justifies the routine offer of screening and the expansion of screening services. I argue that in the vast majority of cases the option of prenatal screening does not promote or protect women's autonomy. Both a narrow conception of choice as informed consent and a broad conception of choice as relational reveal difficulties in achieving adequate standards of free informed choice. While there are reasons to worry that women's autonomy is not being protected or promoted within the limited scope of current practice, we should hesitate before normalizing it as part of standard prenatal care for all.

  2. Prenatal Foundations: Fetal Programming of Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    The fetal programming and developmental origins of disease models suggest that experiences that occur before birth can have consequences for physical and mental health that persist across the lifespan. Development is more rapid during the prenatal period as compared to any other stage of life. This introductory article considers evidence that…

  3. Differential Effects of Prenatal Rhythmic Stimulation on Neonatal Arousal States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Corinne R.; Steinschneider, Alfred

    1975-01-01

    This study tested Salk's hypothesis that the human fetus is prenatally imprinted to the repetitive intermittent sound of the maternal heartbeat. The prediction that neonates would quiet most to their own mother's heart rate compared with the unfamiliar heart rate was not supported. (Author/CS)

  4. Maternal Prenatal Stress and Infant Regulatory Capacity in Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Betty; Crnic, Keith A.; Luecken, Linda J.; Gonzales, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The early postpartum period lays important groundwork for later self-regulation as infants' dispositional traits interact with caregivers' co-regulatory behaviors to produce the earliest forms of self-regulation. Although emerging literature suggests that fetal exposure to maternal stress may be integral in determining child self-regulatory capacity, the complex pathways that characterize these early developmental processes remain unclear. The current study considers these complex, transactional processes in a low income, Mexican American sample. Data were collected from 295 Mexican American infants and their mothers during prenatal, 6- and 12-week postpartum home interviews. Mother reports of stress were obtained prenatally, and mother reports of infant temperament were obtained at 6 weeks. Observer ratings of maternal sensitivity and infant regulatory behaviors were obtained at the 6- and 12-week time points. Study results indicate that prenatal stress predicts higher levels of infant negativity and surgency, both of which directly or interactively predict later engagement in regulatory behaviors. Unexpectedly, prenatal stress also predicted more engagement in orienting, but not self-comforting behaviors. Advancing understandings about the nature of these developmental pathways may have significant implications for targets of early intervention in this high risk population. PMID:25113917

  5. The impact of prenatal diagnosis on neural tube defect (NTD) pregnancy versus birth incidence in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Van Allen, Margot I; Boyle, Erin; Thiessen, Paul; McFadden, Deborah; Cochrane, Douglas; Chambers, G Keith; Langlois, Sylvie; Stathers, Patricia; Irwin, Beverly; Cairns, Elizabeth; MacLeod, Patrick; Delisle, Marie-France; Uh, Soo-Hong

    2006-01-01

    The birth incidence of neural tube defect (NTD) cases in British Columbia (B.C.), and elsewhere in North America, is reported to be declining. This decline is being attributed to folic acid (FA) supplementation and food fortification, but 2nd trimester prenatal screening of pregnancies for NTDs and other congenital anomalies has increased during this timeframe, as well. This descriptive, population-based study evaluates the impact of prenatal screening of NTD-affected pregnancies on (1) pregnancy outcome and (2) reporting of NTD births to the provincial Health Status Registry (B.C.H.S.R.); and it assesses (3) the use of periconceptional FA supplementation. NTD cases were ascertained from medical records of health centres providing care to families with NTD-affected pregnancies and newborns; and from NTD cases reported to the B.C.H.S.R. In 1997-1999, the B.C.H.S.R. published a NTD incidence of 0.77/1000. In this study, 151 NTD-affected pregnancies were identified, with an incidence of 1.16/1000. Partial Reporting of induced abortions in a NTD incidence 45.5% low than the actual incidence. Medical records were available for review on 144/151 pregnancies. Prenatal screening identified 86.1% (124/144) of NTD-affected pregnancies, with 72.6% (90/124) resulting in pregnancy termination, and 27.4% (34/124) continuing to term. Use of FA supplementation in the periconceptional period was recorded in 36.4% of pregnancies (39/107). Thus in B.C. the decline in the NTD incidence is due predominantly to pregnancy terminations following prenatal diagnosis, which reduces the NTD incidence by 60%, from 1.16/1000 to 0.47/1000. Continued efforts for primary and the option of secondary prevention of NTDs are recommended in order to improve newborn health in B.C. and elsewhere. These interventions need to be monitored, however, for optimal health care planning.

  6. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies.

  7. Primary and revision cleft lip repairs using octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua M; Paige, Keith T

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of our retrospective review is to examine our method and outcomes for the application of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the repair of primary and revision cleft lips in both pediatric and adult patients. Records and photographs were reviewed and analyzed for patient age, type of cleft, revision or primary repair, complications, length of follow-up, and aesthetic outcomes. Eighteen patients, both children and adults, who underwent cleft lip repairs using tissue adhesive performed by a single surgeon between 1999 and 2003 were included. Twelve patients underwent primary repair and 6 patients underwent revision repair. Repairs were performed using the Millard rotation advancement technique and the Mohler variant. The lateral advancement flap was kept long and redundant in its transverse dimension to create a pressure fit everting the skin edges with minimal sutures to set up the closure for application of the tissue adhesive. Seventeen of eighteen patients had excellent cosmetic outcomes. One patient had minor necrosis of the tip of the advancement flap. No allergic reactions, wound infections, or dehiscences occurred. The use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the skin closure of primary and revision cleft lip repairs in both children and adults results in excellent cosmetic outcomes. Employing our pressure-fit technique for skin eversion prior to application of the tissue adhesive may be advantageous. The lack of suture removal in the pediatric population and decreased operative time are additional benefits.

  8. Barriers related to prenatal care utilization among women

    PubMed Central

    Roozbeh, Nasibeh; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Hajiyan, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate barriers related to prenatal care utilization among women. Methods Data was collected in both English and Persian databases. English databases included: the International Medical Sciences, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar. The Persian databases included: the Iranmedex, the State Inpatient Databases (SID) with the use of related keywords, and on the basis of inclusion-exclusion criteria. The keywords included are barrier, prenatal care, women, access, and preventive factors. OR and AND were Boolean operators. After the study, articles were summarized, unrelated articles were rejected, and related articles were identified. Inclusion criteria were all published articles from 1990 to 2015, written in English and Persian languages. The titles and abstracts are related, and addressed all subjects about barriers related to prenatal care utilization. At the end, all duplicated articles were excluded. There were no restrictions for exclusion or inclusion of articles. Exclusion criteria were failure in reporting in studies, case studies, and lack of access to the full text. Results After searching various databases, 112 related articles were included. After reviewing articles’ titles, 67 unrelated articles and abstracts were rejected, 45 articles were evaluated, 20 of them were duplicated. Then, the qualities of 25 articles were analyzed. Therefore, 5 articles were excluded due to not mentioning the sample size, mismatches between method and data, or results. Total of 20 articles were selected for final analysis. Prenatal care utilization barrier can be divided into various domains such as individual barriers, financial barriers, organizational barriers, social, and cultural barriers. Conclusion To increase prenatal care coverage, it is necessary to pay attention to all domains, especially individual and financial barriers.

  9. Recommendations for the use of microarrays in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Suela, Javier; López-Expósito, Isabel; Querejeta, María Eugenia; Martorell, Rosa; Cuatrecasas, Esther; Armengol, Lluis; Antolín, Eugenia; Domínguez Garrido, Elena; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Rosell, Jordi; García Planells, Javier; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz

    2017-04-07

    Microarray technology, recently implemented in international prenatal diagnosis systems, has become one of the main techniques in this field in terms of detection rate and objectivity of the results. This guideline attempts to provide background information on this technology, including technical and diagnostic aspects to be considered. Specifically, this guideline defines: the different prenatal sample types to be used, as well as their characteristics (chorionic villi samples, amniotic fluid, fetal cord blood or miscarriage tissue material); variant reporting policies (including variants of uncertain significance) to be considered in informed consents and prenatal microarray reports; microarray limitations inherent to the technique and which must be taken into account when recommending microarray testing for diagnosis; a detailed clinical algorithm recommending the use of microarray testing and its introduction into routine clinical practice within the context of other genetic tests, including pregnancies in families with a genetic history or specific syndrome suspicion, first trimester increased nuchal translucency or second trimester heart malformation and ultrasound findings not related to a known or specific syndrome. This guideline has been coordinated by the Spanish Association for Prenatal Diagnosis (AEDP, «Asociación Española de Diagnóstico Prenatal»), the Spanish Human Genetics Association (AEGH, «Asociación Española de Genética Humana») and the Spanish Society of Clinical Genetics and Dysmorphology (SEGCyD, «Sociedad Española de Genética Clínica y Dismorfología»).

  10. Maternal prenatal stress is associated with the infant intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, Maartje A C; Korpela, Katri; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Vos, Willem M; de Weerth, Carolina

    2015-03-01

    Maternal prenatal stress has been often associated with infant physical development and health, as well as psychological functioning and behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying these relations remain elusive. The goal of the present study was to prospectively investigate the development of the intestinal microbiota as a potential pathway linking maternal prenatal stress and infant health. The development of the infant intestinal microbiota was followed over the first 110 days after birth in a healthy cohort of 56 vaginally born Dutch infants. Additionally, the relation between infant intestinal microbiota and gastrointestinal and allergic symptoms was examined. Results showed that maternal prenatal stress, i.e., either reported stress or elevated basal maternal salivary cortisol concentrations or both, was strongly and persistently associated with the infants' microbiota composition as determined by a phylogenetic microarray. Infants of mothers with high cumulative stress (i.e., high reported stress and high cortisol concentrations) during pregnancy had significantly higher relative abundances of Proteobacterial groups known to contain pathogens (related to Escherichia, Serratia, and Enterobacter), and lower relative abundances of lactic acid bacteria (i.e., Lactobacillus, Lactoccus, Aerococcus) and Bifidobacteria, altogether characteristics of a potentially increased level of inflammation. Furthermore, this aberrant colonization pattern was related to more maternally reported infant gastrointestinal symptoms and allergic reactions. In conclusion, clear links were found between maternal prenatal stress and the infant intestinal microbiota and health. Although causality cannot be concluded, the results suggest a possible mechanism by which maternal prenatal stress influences the offspring development. These results suggest a potential for bacterial interventions to enhance offspring health and development in pregnant women with stress.

  11. Revision Process and Practice: A Kindergarten Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Many educators teach students that are reluctant about the revisions process in writing. However, this longitudinal study follows a group of students from kindergarten through 8th grade who embraced the importance of the revision process. (Contains 8 figures.)

  12. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Cancer.gov

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  13. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  14. Use of liposuction for secondary revision of irradiated and nonirradiated free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duc T; Mehrara, Babak J; Disa, Joseph J; Cordeiro, Peter G

    2004-06-01

    A number of patients with free tissue transfer require secondary revision to improve contour and regional definition to maximize function or appearance. However, there is controversy with regard to whether irradiated free flaps can be revised safely using liposuction. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of revisionary procedures requiring liposuction in irradiated versus nonirradiated flaps. From December 1992 to July 2001, office and hospital records were reviewed retrospectively to identify patients who had undergone free tissue transfer and subsequent flap revision at a single institution. The number of revisions, amount of fat aspirated, timing of revision and the postoperative complications including infection, hematoma, wound dehiscence, and flap loss were reviewed. A total of 41 flap revisions using liposuction alone or with direct excision were performed on 33 free flaps (31 head and neck, 1 chest wall, and 1 extremity). The rectus musculocutaneous flap was the most commonly revised (88%). The average length of time to secondary revision of patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy to their flaps was significantly higher that those whose flaps had not been irradiated (P < 0.05). There were no postoperative complications except for 1 partial (20%) flap loss in a patient whose flap was irradiated. The difference in complication rates between the irradiated and nonirradiated group was not statistically significant. Secondary free flap revision using liposuction and direct excision is a safe technique for recontouring free flaps. There was no significant difference in complication rates for irradiated and nonirradiated flaps. Postoperative radiation therapy is therefore not a contraindication to secondary revision. However, these procedures should be delayed for several months after the acute effects of radiation have resolved.

  15. Prenatal stress puzzle, the oxytocin piece: Prenatal stress alters the behaviour and autonomic regulation in piglets, insights from oxytocin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental changes in response to prenatal stressors (PNS) may represent an adaptive strategy to enhance survival traits in the offspring. Yet, PNS could be maladaptive for captive animals, causing anxiety and abnormal social development. Oxytocin (OT) reduces anxiety, whereas OT deficiencies are...

  16. Impact of combined prenatal ethanol and prenatal stress exposures on markers of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Staples, Miranda C; Porch, Morgan W; Savage, Daniel D

    2014-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress can each cause long-lasting deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and disrupt learning and memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying these perturbations following a learning event are still poorly understood. We examined the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress exposure, either alone or in combination, on the cytosolic expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) protein and the synaptosomal expression of AMPA-glutamate receptor subunits (GluA1 and GluA2) in dentate gyrus of female adult offspring under baseline conditions and after 2-trial trace conditioning (TTTC). Surprisingly, baseline cytoplasmic ARC expression was significantly elevated in both prenatal treatment groups. In contrast, synaptosomal GluA1 receptor subunit expression was decreased in both prenatal treatment groups. GluA2 subunit expression was elevated in the prenatal stress group. TTTC did not alter ARC levels compared to an unpaired behavioral control (UPC) group in any of the 4 prenatal treatment groups. In contrast, TTTC significantly elevated both synaptosomal GluA1 and GluA2 subunit expression relative to the UPC group in control offspring, an effect that was not observed in any of the other 3 prenatal treatment groups. Given ARC's role in regulating synaptosomal AMPA receptors, these results suggest that prenatal ethanol-induced or prenatal stress exposure-induced increases in baseline ARC levels could contribute to reductions in both baseline and activity-dependent changes in AMPA receptors in a manner that diminishes the role of AMPA receptors in dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-sensitive learning.

  17. Impact of Combined Prenatal Ethanol and Prenatal Stress Exposures on Markers of Activity-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Porch, Morgan W.; Savage, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress can each cause long-lasting deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and disrupt learning and memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying these perturbations following a learning event are still poorly understood. We examined the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress exposure, either alone or in combination, on the cytosolic expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) protein and the synaptosomal expression of AMPA-glutamate receptor subunits (GluA1 and GluA2) in dentate gyrus of female adult offspring under baseline conditions and after 2-trial trace conditioning (TTTC). Surprisingly, baseline cytoplasmic ARC expression was significantly elevated in both prenatal treatment groups. In contrast, synaptosomal GluA1 receptor subunit expression was decreased in both prenatal treatment groups. GluA2 subunit expression was elevated in the prenatal stress group. TTTC did not alter ARC levels compared to an unpaired behavioral control (UPC) group in any of the 4 prenatal treatment groups. In contrast, TTTC significantly elevated both synaptosomal GluA1 and GluA2 subunit expression relative to the UPC group in control offspring, an effect that was not observed in any of the other 3 prenatal treatment groups. Given ARC's role in regulating synaptosomal AMPA receptors, these results suggest that prenatal ethanol-induced or prenatal stress exposure-induced increases in baseline ARC levels could contribute to reductions in both baseline and activity-dependent changes in AMPA receptors in a manner that diminishes the role of AMPA receptors in dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-sensitive learning. PMID:25129673

  18. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  19. Automated revision of CLIPS rule-bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick M.; Pazzani, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes CLIPS-R, a theory revision system for the revision of CLIPS rule-bases. CLIPS-R may be used for a variety of knowledge-base revision tasks, such as refining a prototype system, adapting an existing system to slightly different operating conditions, or improving an operational system that makes occasional errors. We present a description of how CLIPS-R revises rule-bases, and an evaluation of the system on three rule-bases.

  20. Access to Medical and Exposure Records

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Access to Medical and Exposure Records U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA 3110 2001 (Revised) U.S...Department of Labor Elaine L. Chao, Secretary Occupational Safety and Health Administration John L. Henshaw, Assistant Secretary This booklet provides a...standards and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Because interpretations and enforcement policy may change over time, the best sources for

  1. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  2. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  3. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)...

  4. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)...

  5. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)...

  6. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  7. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)...

  8. Competencies Revisited: Revising the Overseas ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kharde, Linda Smith; Corey, Kathleen

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the review and revision of the Overseas Refugee Training Program's curriculum in English as a second language. The discussion focuses on the rationale and guidelines for the revision, the resources used to guide the process, and the criteria used in the selection of competencies. Specific intentions in revising the list of…

  9. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form...

  10. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2)...

  11. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  12. Revising: New Essays for Teachers of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudol, Ronald A., Ed.

    Intended to help writing teachers better understand how to help students effectively revise their written work, this book contains essays that, as a group, focus on the problem of the definition of revision. The first half of the book discusses the background of revision, while the second half discusses contexts and techniques for application. The…

  13. The evolution of a manual revision.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2012-10-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® provides an in-depth overview of the Magnet Recognition Program's Application Manual revision process. The history of the 2005 Manual revision, an evidence-based review of the literature, and revisions to the 2008 Manual are key elements of this article.

  14. 78 FR 53012 - Agency Information Collection (Availability of Educational, Licensing, and Certifications Records...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ...: Availability of Educational, Licensing, and Certifications Records; 38 CFR 21.4209. OMB Control Number: 2900-0696. Type of Review: Revision of a currently approved collection. Abstract: Educational institutions... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Availability of Educational, Licensing, and Certifications...

  15. Air Pollution Primer. Revised Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Rena

    This revised and updated book is written to inform the citizens on the nature, causes, and effects of air pollution. It is written in terms familiar to the layman with the purpose of providing knowledge and motivation to spur community action on clean air policies. Numerous charts and drawings are provided to support discussion of air pollution…

  16. Nuffield Chemistry: Revised and Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, B. E.

    1980-01-01

    Presents data from a survey of schools, colleges, and other institutions and entering candidates for the special GCE examination using Nuffield O-level materials. Examines the effects of curriculum design on subject choice in these institutions. Reviews teacher comments on the publications associated with revision of course materials. (Author/CS)

  17. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian…

  18. How Adults Learn. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, J. R.

    The book's emphasis is on learning during the years of adulthood and examines present-day practice of adult education for practitioners. This revised edition brings up to date advances in such areas of learning as controversial theory; the effects of environment; sensory processes; intellectual capacities; motivation and attitude; transactional…

  19. Ethical considerations in revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wayne, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The problems that arise when reviewing another surgeon's work, the financial aspects of revision surgery, and the controversies that present in marketing and advertising will be explored. The technological advances of computer imaging and the Internet have introduced new problems that require our additional consideration.

  20. Error Correction, Revision, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John; Hsu, Angela Yi-ping

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that corrective feedback on an assignment helps learners reduce their errors on that assignment during the revision process. Does this finding constitute evidence that learning resulted from the feedback? Differing answers play an important role in the ongoing debate over the effectiveness of error correction,…