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Sample records for preoperative risk factors

  1. Preoperative anemia in colon cancer: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; Gannon, Christopher J; Osborn, Tiffany M; Taylor, Michelle D; Malone, Debra L; Napolitano, Lena M

    2002-06-01

    Anemia is common in cancer patients and is associated with reduced survival. Recent studies document that treatment of anemia with blood transfusion in cancer patients is associated with increased infection risk, tumor recurrence, and mortality. We therefore investigated the incidence of preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer and assessed risk factors for anemia. Prospective data were collected on 311 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer over a 6-year period from 1994 through 1999. Patients were stratified by age, gender, presenting complaint, preoperative hematocrit, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and TNM classification. Discrete variables were compared using Pearson's Chi-square analysis. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t test. Differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. The mean age of the study cohort was 67 +/- 9.2 with 98 per cent of the study population being male. The mean AJCC stage was 2.2 +/- 1.2 and the mean preoperative hematocrit was 35 +/- 7.9 with an incidence of 46.1 per cent. The most common presenting complaints were hematochezia (n = 59), anemia (n = 51), heme-occult-positive stool (n = 33), bowel obstruction (n = 26), abdominal pain (n = 21), and palpable mass (n = 13). Preoperative anemia was most common in patients with right colon cancer with an incidence of 57.6 per cent followed by left colon cancer (42.2%) and rectal cancer (29.8%). Patients with right colon cancer had significantly lower preoperative hematocrits compared with left colon cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 36 +/- 7.4; P < 0.01) and rectal cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 38 +/- 6.0; P < 0.0001). Patients with right colon cancer also had significantly increased stage at presentation compared with left colon cancer (2.3 +/- 1.3 vs 2.1 +/- 1.2; P < 0.02). Age was not a significant risk factor for preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer. We conclude that there is a high incidence of anemia in patients with colon cancer. Patients with right colon

  2. Preoperative evaluation and risk factors of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaballo, Annarita; Corbo, Giuseppe M; Valente, Salvatore; Ciappi, Giuliano

    2004-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature on resectable lung cancer, pulmonary risk factors before, during and after surgery are discussed. The role of preoperative evaluation in order to determine the patient ability to withstand radical resection is considered. Spirometric indexes as forced expired volume (FEV1) and diffusing lung carbon monoxide capacity (DLCO) should be measured first. If FEV1 and DLCO are > 60% of predicted, patients are at low risk for complications and can undergo pulmonary resection. However, if FEV1 and DLCO are <60% of predicted, further evaluation with a quantitative lung scan is required. If predicted postoperative values for FEV1 and DLCO are >40%, patients can undergo lung resection, otherwise exercise testing is necessary. If the latter shows maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) of > 15ml/Kg, surgery can be performed; if VO2max is <15 ml/Kg, patients are inoperable.

  3. Preoperative risk factors of malnutrition for cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Donata, Ringaitienė; Dalia, Gineitytė; Vaidas, Vicka; Tadas, Žvirblis; Jūratė, Šipylaitė; Algimantas, Irnius; Juozas, Ivaškevičius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition (MN) is prevalent in cardiac surgery, but there are no specific preoperative risk factors of MN. The aim of this study is to assess the clinically relevant risk factors of MN for cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods. The nutritional state of the patients was evaluated one day prior to surgery using a bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle (PA). Two groups of patients were generated according to low PA: malnourished and well nourished. Risk factors of MN were divided into three clinically relevant groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. Variables in each different group were entered into separate multivariate logistic regression models. Results. A total of 712 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were 65-year old men after a CABG procedure. Low PA was present in 22.9% (163) of patients. The analysis of disease-related factors of MN revealed the importance of heart functions (NYHA IV class OR: 3.073, CI95%: 1.416–6.668, p = 0.007), valve pathology (OR: 1.825, CI95%: 1.182–2.819, p = 0.007), renal insufficiency (OR: 4.091, CI95%: 1.995–8.389, p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR: 0.928, CI95%: 0.890–0.968, p < 0.001). Laboratory values related to MN were levels of haemoglobin (OR: 0.967, CI95%: 0.951–0.983, p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (OR: 1.015, CI95%: 1.002–1.028, p = 0.0279). The lifestyle variables that qualified as risk factors concerned the intake of food (OR: 3.030, CI95%: 1.353–6.757, p = 0.007) and mobility (OR: 2.770, CI95%: 1.067–7.194, p = 0.036). Conclusions. MN risk factors comprise three different clinical groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. The patients who are most likely to be malnourished are those with valve pathology, severe imparted heart function, insufficient renal function and high inflammatory markers. Also these patients have decreased mobility

  4. Preoperative risk factors in total thyroidectomy of substernal goiter

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Aldo; Di Renzo, Raffaella Maria; D’Urbano, Gauro; Bellobono, Manuela; Addetta, Vincenzo D’; Lapergola, Alfonso; Bongarzoni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The definition of substernal goiter (SG) is based on variable criteria leading to a considerable variation in the reported incidence (from 0.2% to 45%). The peri- and postoperative complications are higher in total thyroidectomy (TT) for SG than that for cervical goiter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preoperative risk factors associated with postoperative complications. From 2002 to 2014, 142 (8.5%; 98 women and 44 men) of the 1690 patients who underwent TT had a SG. We retrospectively evaluated the following parameters: sex, age, histology, pre- and retrovascular position, recurrence, and extension beyond the carina. These parameters were then related to the postoperative complications: seroma/hematoma, transient and permanent hypocalcemia, transient and permanent laryngeal nerve palsy, and the length of surgery. The results were further compared with a control group of 120 patients operated on in the same period with TT for cervical goiter. All but two procedures were terminated via cervicotomy, where partial sternotomies were required. No perioperative mortality was observed. Results of the statistical analysis (Student’s t-test and Fisher’s exact test) indicated an association between recurrence and extension beyond the carina with all postoperative complications. The group that underwent TT of SG showed a statistically significant higher risk for transient hypocalcemia (relative risk =1.767 with 95% confidence interval: 1.131–2.7605, P=0.0124, and need to treat =7.1) and a trend toward significance for transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (relative risk =6.7806 with 95% confidence interval: 0.8577–53.2898, P=0.0696, and need to treat =20.8) compared to the group that underwent TT of cervical goiter. TT is the procedure to perform in SG even if the incidence of complications is higher than for cervical goiters. The major risk factors associated with postoperative complications are recurrence and extension beyond the carina. In the

  5. Preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 and 5 years after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Wylde, Vikki; Trela-Larsen, Lea; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - Psychosocial factors are important risk factors for poor outcomes in the first year after total knee replacement (TKR), however their impact on long-term outcomes is unclear. We aimed to identify preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 year and 5 years after TKR. Patients and methods - 266 patients were recruited prior to TKR surgery. Knee pain and function were assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 5 years postoperative using the WOMAC Pain score, WOMAC Function score and American Knee Society Score (AKSS) Knee score. Preoperative depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, pain self-efficacy and social support were assessed. Statistical analyses involved multiple linear regression and mixed effect linear regression. Results - Higher anxiety was a risk factor for worse pain at 1 year postoperative. No psychosocial factors were associated with any outcomes at 5 years postoperative. Analysis of change over time found that patients with higher pain self-efficacy had lower preoperative pain and experienced less improvement in pain up to 1 year postoperative. Higher pain self-efficacy was associated with less improvement in the AKSS up to 1 year postoperative but more improvement between 1 and 5 years postoperative. Interpretation - Preoperative anxiety was found to influence pain at 1 year after TKR. However, none of the psychosocial variables were risk factors for a poor outcome at 5 years post-operative, suggesting that the negative effects of anxiety on outcome do not persist in the longer-term.

  6. Right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device insertion: preoperative risk factors.

    PubMed

    Santambrogio, Luisa; Bianchi, Tiziana; Fuardo, Marinella; Gazzoli, Fabrizio; Veronesi, Roberto; Braschi, Antonio; Maurelli, Marco

    2006-08-01

    Right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device placement is the major concern on weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and it is one of the most serious complications in the postoperative period. This complication has a poor prognosis and is generally unpredictable. The identification of pre-operative risk factor for this serious complication is incomplete yet. In order to determine pre-operative risk for severe right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device support we analyzed preoperative hemodynamics, laboratory data and characteristics of 48 patients who received Novacor (World Heart Corp., Ottawa, ON, Canada). We compared the data from the patients who developed right ventricular failure and the patients who did not. Right ventricular failure occurred in 16% of the patients. There was no significant difference between the groups in demographic characteristics. We identified as preoperative risk factors the pre-operative low mean pulmonary artery and the impairment of hepatic and renal function on laboratory data. Our results confirm in part the findings of the few previous studies. This information may be useful for the patient selection for isolated left ventricular assist device implantation, but other studies are necessary before establishing criteria for patient selection for univentricular support universally accepted.

  7. Influence of Preoperative Risk Factors on Outcome After Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sternbergh, W. Charles; Money, Samuel R.

    2003-01-01

    As supported by level 1 multicenter randomized trial data, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has a very low risk of perioperative morbidity and excellent durability, and provides significant long-term reductions of the risk of stroke. At Ochsner, our 1.1% risk of major stroke or death after CEA (n=366) is a demonstration of the safety of this procedure in experienced hands. This treatment modality continues to be the gold standard for most patients with carotid artery occlusive disease. Almost half of these patients treated with CEA were considered “high-risk” as defined by ineligibility for past or present randomized carotid trials. Importantly, these “high-risk” patients had outcomes that were not statistically different from “low-risk” trial-eligible patients. Thus, evidence-based decision-making does not support the routine use of investigational carotid stenting in “high-risk” trial-ineligible patients. However, carotid stenting is clearly a valuable alternative for selected patients. Our challenge is to precisely define which patients will most benefit from medical, surgical, or catheter-based therapy for carotid artery occlusive disease. PMID:22470252

  8. Clinical analysis of preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingchao; Li, Wenyi; Pei, Yueying; Shen, Yong; Li, Jia

    2016-06-13

    The purpose of this study aimed to assess preoperative risk factors for the incidence of deep venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The diagnosis of preoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. To examine the preoperative risk factors for DVT admitted for PLIF, comparative analysis of the DVT-positive and DVT-negative groups was done. DVT was detected in 9.4 % (269/2861) patients, including 17 proximal DVT patients (6.3 %) and 252 the distal DVT patients (93.7 %). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, the age, preoperative D-dimer, and history of rheumatoid arthritis were significant risk factors relative to the onset of DVT after posterior lumbar surgery. According to the result of our study, age, positive preoperative plasma D-dimer level, and rheumatoid arthritis had the influential impact on the incidence of DVT admitted for PLIF.

  9. [Preoperative mood disorders in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: risk factors and postoperative morbidity in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Navarro-García, Miguel A; Marín-Fernández, Blanca; de Carlos-Alegre, Vanessa; Martínez-Oroz, Amparo; Martorell-Gurucharri, Ainhara; Ordoñez-Ortigosa, Esther; Prieto-Guembe, Patricia; Sorbet-Amóstegui, Maria R; Induráin-Fernández, Silvia; Elizondo-Sotro, Arantzazu; Irigoyen-Aristorena, Maria I; García-Aizpún, Yolanda

    2011-11-01

    To estimate the preoperative levels of anxiety and depression in patients awaiting heart surgery and to identify the risk factors associated with the development of these mood disorders. To evaluate the relationship between preoperative anxiety and depression and postoperative morbidity. Prospective longitudinal study in a sample of 100 patients undergoing heart surgery. We carried out a preoperative structured interview in which the patient completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sociodemographic (age, sex, marital status, and income) and surgical variables (surgical risk, type of surgery, length of preoperative hospital stay, and surgical history) were also recorded. Pain, analgesic use, and postoperative morbidity were evaluated in the intensive care unit. Thirty-two percent of the patients developed preoperative anxiety and 19%, depression. Age < 65 years (odds ratio=3.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-7.3) was the only significant risk factor for developing preoperative anxiety. A length of preoperative hospital stay ≥ 3 days was the main risk factor for preoperative depression (odds ratio=4.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-13.17). Preoperative anxiety significantly increased the postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. Neither anxiety nor depression significantly modified the rest of the postoperative variables associated with morbidity in the intesive care unit. Anxiety and depression are mood disorders that are detected in patients awaiting heart surgery, with age <65 years and a prolonged preoperative hospital stay being decisive factors in the development of these conditions. Although preoperative anxiety increased the postoperative pain in these patients, their state of mind did not modify their postoperative course. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  11. Risk factors for aerobic bacterial conjunctival flora in preoperative cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, S; Hashida, M; Urabe, K

    2016-11-01

    PurposeTo investigate the relationship between the background of preoperative cataract patients and bacterial conjunctival flora.MethodsA total of 990 cataract patients who had completed preoperative examinations in 2007 and 2008 were included. Patients using topical antibiotics at the preoperative examination or having a history of intraocular surgery were excluded. Conjunctival cultures had been preoperatively obtained. Patient characteristics were investigated via medical records. Risk factors for conjunctival flora of seven typical bacteria were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses.ResultsThe detection rate of alpha-hemolytic streptococci and Enterococcus faecalis increased with age (P=0.044 and P=0.002, respectively). The detection rate of Gram-negative bacilli was higher among patients with oral steroid use or lacrimal duct obstruction (P=0.038 and P=0.002, respectively). The detection rate of Corynebacterium species was higher among older patients and men, and lower among patients with glaucoma eye drop use (P<0.001, P=0.012 and P=0.001, respectively). The detection rate of methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative Staphylococci was higher among men and lower among patients with a surgical history in other departments (P=0.003 and P=0.046, respectively). The detection rate of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MR-CNS) was higher among patients with oral steroid use, a visit history to ophthalmic facilities, or a surgical history in other departments (P=0.002, P=0.037 and P<0.001, respectively).ConclusionsElderly patients, men, patients with lacrimal duct obstruction or immunosuppressed patients are more likely to be colonized by pathogens that cause postoperative endophthalmitis. Moreover, MR-CNS colonization was associated with healthcare-associated infection.

  12. Preoperative Assessment of Serum Albumin Level as Risk Factor for Morbidity Following Routine Oncological Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M U

    2016-04-01

    This cross-sectional observational study was to establish the preoperative assessment of serum albumin level as indicator for morbidity following cancer surgery and to reduce the incidence of related postoperative complications. Therefore this study was undertaken to assess the morbidity associated with low serum level albumin and identify it as a risk factor following cancer surgery in Bangladeshi population. This study included 312 patients with malignancy who were waiting for surgery or within 60 days of postoperative period were enrolled for the study from indoor of surgical oncology department, National Institute of Cancer Research & Hospital (NICR&H), Dhaka, Bangladesh. Then the patients were submitted for further study to evaluate the preoperative fitness in terms of nutritional assessment - both clinical and biological especially serum albumin level. All the clinical (pre & post-operative including complication, if any), investigation findings were recorded accordingly. Statistical correlation was discovered between BMI and morbidity but no statistical correlation was found between WL >10% and major surgical complications of either infectious or noninfectious origin (p=NS). Conversely, a substantial statistical correlation was found between Hb% or albumin <30gm/l and major surgical complications (either infectious or noninfectious) (p<0.001). The serum albumin level below 30gm/l is a significant risk factor for oncological postoperative major complications (MC).

  13. Risk Factors for Preoperative Seizures and Loss of Seizure Control in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Adela; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic brain tumors are the most common brain tumors in adults. Patients with metastatic brain tumors have poor prognoses with median survival of 6-12 months. Seizures are a major presenting symptom and cause of morbidity and mortality. In this article, risk factors for the onset of preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control are examined. Adult patients who underwent resection of one or more brain metastases at a single institution between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Of 565 patients, 114 (20.2%) patients presented with seizures. Factors independently associated with preoperative seizures were preoperative headaches (P = 0.044), cognitive deficits (P = 0.031), more than 2 intracranial metastatic tumors (P = 0.013), temporal lobe location (P = 0.031), occipital lobe location (P = 0.010), and bone involvement by tumor (P = 0.029). Factors independently associated with loss of seizure control after surgical resection were preoperative seizures (P = 0.001), temporal lobe location (P = 0.037), lack of postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.010), subtotal resection of tumor (P = 0.022), and local recurrence (P = 0.027). At last follow-up, the majority of patients (93.8%) were seizure-free. Thirty patients (5.30%) in total had loss of seizure control, and only 8 patients (1.41%) who did not have preoperative seizures presented with new-onset seizures after surgical resection of their metastases. The brain is a common site for metastases from numerous primary cancers, such as breast and lung. The identification of factors associated with onset of preoperative seizures as well as seizure control postoperatively could aid management strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors. Patients with preoperative seizures who underwent resection tended to have good seizure control after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preoperative pain as a risk factor for chronic post-surgical pain - six month follow-up after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gerbershagen, Hans J; Ozgür, Enver; Dagtekin, Oguzhan; Straub, Karin; Hahn, Moritz; Heidenreich, Axel; Sabatowski, Rainer; Petzke, Frank

    2009-11-01

    Chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) by definition develops for the first time after surgery and is not related to any preoperative pain. Preoperative pain is assumed to be a major risk factor for CPSP. Prospective studies to endorse this assumption are missing. In order to assess the incidence and the risk factors for CPSP multidimensional pain and health characteristics and psychological aspects were studied in patients prior to radical prostatectomy. Follow-up questionnaires were completed three and six months after surgery. CPSP incidences in 84 patients after three and six months were 14.3% and 1.2%. Preoperatively, CPSP patients were assigned to higher pain chronicity stages measured with the Mainz Pain Staging System (MPSS) (p=0.003) and higher pain severity grades (Chronic Pain Grading Questionnaire) (p=0.016) than non-CPSP patients. CPSP patients reported more pain sites (p=0.001), frequent pain in urological body areas (p=0.047), previous occurrence of CPSP (p=0.008), more psychosomatic symptoms (Symptom Check List) (p=0.031), and worse mental functioning (Short Form-12) (p=0.019). Three months after surgery all CPSP patients suffered from moderate to high-risk chronic pain (MPSS stages II and III) compared to 66.7% at baseline and 82.3% had high disability pain (CPGQ grades III and IV) compared to 41.7% before surgery. CPSP patients scored significantly less favorably in physical and mental health, habitual well-being, and psychosomatic dysfunction three months after surgery. All patients with CPSP reported on preoperative chronic pain. Patients with preoperative pain, related or not related to the surgical site were significantly at risk to develop CPSP. High preoperative pain chronicity stages and pain severity grades were associated with CPSP. CPSP patients reported poorer mental health related quality of life and more severe psychosomatic dysfunction before and 3 months after surgery.

  15. Risk Factors of Preoperative and Early Postoperative Seizures in Patients with Meningioma: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Skardelly, Marco; Rother, Christian; Noell, Susan; Behling, Felix; Wuttke, Thomas V; Schittenhelm, Jens; Bisdas, Sotirios; Meisner, Christoph; Rona, Sabine; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Roser, Florian; Tatagiba, Marcos Soares

    2017-01-01

    Well-defined risk factors for the identification of patients with meningioma who might benefit from preoperative or early postoperative seizure prophylaxis are unknown. We investigated and quantified risk factors to determine individual risks of seizure occurrence in patients with meningioma. A total of 634 adult patients with meningioma were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patient gender and age, tumor location, grade and volume, usage of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and extent of resection were determined. Preoperative and early postoperative seizures occurred in 15% (n = 97) and 5% (n = 21) of the patients, respectively. Overall, 502 and 418 patients were eligible for multivariate logistic regression analyses of preoperative and early postoperative seizures, respectively. Male gender (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; P = 0.009), a non-skull base location (OR, 4.43; P < 0.001), and a tumor volume of >8 cm(3) (OR, 3.05; P = 0.002) were associated with a higher risk of preoperative seizures and were used to stratify the patients into 3 prognostic groups. The high-risk subgroup of patients with meningioma showed a seizure rate of >40% (OR, 9.8; P < 0.001). Only a non-skull base tumor location (OR, 2.61; P = 0.046) was identified as a significant risk factor for early postoperative seizures. AEDs did not reduce early postoperative seizure occurrence. Seizure prophylaxis might be considered for patients at high risk of developing seizures who are for other reasons being considered for watchful waiting instead of resection. In contrast, our data do not provide any evidence of the efficacy of perioperative AEDs in patients with meningioma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Discordant Ki-67 Levels between Preoperative Biopsy and Postoperative Surgical Specimens in Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Sun; Park, Seho; Koo, Ja Seung; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Nam, Sanggeun; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The Ki-67 labelling index is significant for the management of breast cancer. However, the concordance of Ki-67 expression between preoperative biopsy and postoperative surgical specimens has not been well evaluated. This study aimed to find the correlation in Ki-67 expression between biopsy and surgical specimens and to determine the clinicopathological risk factors associated with discordant values. Ki-67 levels were immunohistochemically measured using paired biopsy and surgical specimens in 310 breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2013. ΔKi-67 was calculated by postoperative Ki-67 minus preoperative levels. The outliers of ΔKi-67 were defined as [lower quartile of ΔKi-67-1.5 × interquartile range (IQR)] or (upper quartile + 1.5 × IQR) and were evaluated according to clinicopathological parameters by logistic regression analysis. The median preoperative and postoperative Ki-67 levels were 10 (IQR, 15) and 10 (IQR, 25), respectively. Correlation of Ki-67 levels between the two specimens indicated a moderately positive relationship (coefficient = 0.676). Of 310 patients, 44 (14.2%) showed outliers of ΔKi-67 (range, ≤-20 or ≥28). A significant association with poor prognostic factors was found among these patients. Multivariate analysis determined that significant risk factors for outliers of ΔKi-67 were tumor size >1 cm, negative progesterone receptor (PR) expression, grade III cancer, and age ≤35 years. Among 171 patients with luminal human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative tumors, breast cancer subtype according to preoperative or postoperative Ki-67 levels discordantly changed in 46 (26.9%) patients and a significant proportion of patients with discordant cases had ≥1 risk factor. Ki-67 expression showed a substantial concordance between biopsy and surgical specimens. Extremely discordant Ki-67 levels may be associated with aggressive tumor biology. In patients with luminal subtype disease, clinical application of Ki-67 values should

  17. Pre-operative and anaesthesia-related risk factors for mortality in equine colic cases.

    PubMed

    Proudman, C J; Dugdale, A H A; Senior, J M; Edwards, G B; Smith, J E; Leuwer, M L; French, N P

    2006-01-01

    Mortality rates for horses that have undergone emergency abdominal surgery are higher than for other procedures. Here, multivariable modelling of data from 774 surgical colic cases is used to identify pre-operative and anaesthesia-related variables associated with intra- and post-operative mortality. Intra-operative mortality was significantly (P<0.05), and positively associated with heart rate and packed cell volume (PCV) at admission, and negatively associated with the severity of pain. Post-operative mortality increased with increasing age and PCV at admission. Draught horses, Thoroughbreds and Thoroughbred-cross horses carried a significantly worse prognosis. We detected a small but significant variability in the risk of intra-operative death amongst referring veterinary surgeons. Different anaesthetic induction agents, inhalation maintenance agents and the use, or not, of intermittent positive pressure ventilation had no significant effect on risk of death. We conclude that cardiovascular compromise, level of pain, age, and breed are all associated with the risk of mortality in equine surgical colic cases.

  18. Preoperative risk factors for conversion from laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy: a validated risk score derived from a prospective U.K. database of 8820 patients.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Robert P; Hollyman, Marianne; Hodson, James; Bonney, Glenn; Vohra, Ravi S; Griffiths, Ewen A

    2016-11-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is commonly performed, and several factors increase the risk of open conversion, prolonging operating time and hospital stay. Preoperative stratification would improve consent, scheduling and identify appropriate training cases. The aim of this study was to develop a validated risk score for conversion for use in clinical practice. Preoperative patient and disease-related variables were identified from a prospective cholecystectomy database (CholeS) of 8820 patients, divided into main and validation sets. Preoperative predictors of conversion were identified by multivariable binary logistic regression. A risk score was developed and validated using a forward stepwise approach. Some 297 procedures (3.4%) were converted. The risk score was derived from six significant predictors: age (p = 0.005), sex (p < 0.001), indication for surgery (p < 0.001), ASA (p < 0.001), thick-walled gallbladder (p = 0.040) and CBD diameter (p = 0.004). Testing the score on the validation set yielded an AUROC = 0.766 (p < 0.001), and a score >6 identified patients at high risk of conversion (7.1% vs. 1.2%). This validated risk score allows preoperative identification of patients at six-fold increased risk of conversion to open cholecystectomy. Copyright © 2016 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low preoperative serum albumin in colon cancer: a risk factor for poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cheng-Chou; You, Jeng-Fu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Tang, Reiping; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chin, Chih-Chien

    2011-04-01

    The number of colon cancer patients is increasing worldwide. Malnutrition and comorbidities are frequently associated with these patients. The relationships between the preoperative malnutrition and the outcomes of colon cancer patients are unclear; this study aimed to clarify these issues. A total of 3,849 consecutive colon cancer patients were enrolled in an analysis of short-term outcomes and 2,529 patients were included in an analysis of the long-term outcomes. These patients were divided into the hypoalbuminemic and normal groups according to the definition of hypoalbuminemia (serum albumin < 35 g/L). Advanced age, female gender, abnormal CEA levels, right colon or large tumors, mucinous adenocarcinoma, poor differentiation, stage II cancer, TNM advancing T stage, old cardiovascular accident, diabetes, and liver cirrhosis were more likely to be associated with hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemic patients had a higher rate of postoperative mortality and morbidity, including complications related to wounds, lungs, the urinary system, and anastomosis. The 5-year overall survival rates of patients with normal albumin and hypoalbuminemia were 78.0% and 60.0%, respectively (P < 0.0001), and the 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 78.9% and 73.5%, respectively (P = 0.0042). In a multivariate analysis, the albumin level was also significantly correlated with 5-year overall survival (<35 vs. ≥ 35, HR 1.75; 95% CI 1.49-2.08) and 5-year relapse-free survival (<35 vs. ≥ 35, HR 1.28; 95% CI 1.04-1.56). Hypoalbuminemia is a predictor of poor surgical outcomes of colon cancer and is a poor prognosis factor for long-term survival of colon cancer after curative operation.

  20. Preoperative optimization and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Joseph A

    2014-05-01

    Because most older adults with hip fractures require urgent surgical intervention, the preoperative medical evaluation focuses on the exclusion of the small number of contraindications to surgery, and rapid optimization of patients for operative repair. Although many geriatric fracture patients have significant chronic medical comorbidities, most patients can be safely stabilized for surgery with medical and orthopedic comanagement by anticipating a small number of common physiologic responses and perioperative complications. In addition to estimating perioperative risk, the team should focus on intravascular volume restoration, pain control, and avoidance of perioperative hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rate of ectasia and incidence of irregular topography in patients with unidentified preoperative risk factors undergoing femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Smedley, Jared G; Muthappan, Valliammai; Jarsted, Allison; Ostler, Erik M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the rate of postoperative ectasia after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with femtosecond laser-assisted flap creation, in a population of patients with no identified preoperative risk factors. Methods A retrospective case review of 1,992 eyes (1,364 patients) treated between March 2007 and January 2009 was conducted, with a follow up of over 4 years. After identifying cases of ectasia, all the patient charts were examined retrospectively for preoperative findings suggestive of forme fruste keratoconus (FFKC). Results Five eyes of four patients with post-LASIK ectasia were identified. All eyes passed preoperative screening and received bilateral LASIK. One of the five patients developed ectasia in both eyes. Three patients retrospectively revealed preoperative topography suggestive of FFKC, while one patient had no identifiable preoperative risk factors. Upon review of all the charts, a total 69 eyes, including four of the five eyes with ectasia, were retrospectively found to have topographies suggestive of FFKC. Conclusion We identified four cases of post-LASIK ectasia that had risk factors for FFKC on reexamination of the chart and one case of post-LASIK ectasia with no identifiable preoperative risk factors. The most conservative screening recommendations would not have precluded this patient from LASIK. The rate of purely iatrogenic post-LASIK ectasia at our center was 0.05% (1/1,992), and the total rate of post-LASIK ectasia for our entire study was 0.25% (1/398). The rate of eyes with unrecognized preoperative FFKC that developed post-LASIK ectasia was 5.8% (1/17). PMID:24363553

  2. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  3. Preoperatively Assessable Clinical and Pathological Risk Factors for Parametrial Involvement in Surgically Treated FIGO Stage IB-IIA Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Canaz, Emel; Ozyurek, Eser Sefik; Erdem, Baki; Aldikactioglu Talmac, Merve; Yildiz Ozaydin, Ipek; Akbayir, Ozgur; Numanoglu, Ceyhun; Ulker, Volkan

    2017-06-14

    Determining the risk factors associated with parametrial involvement (PMI) is of paramount importance to decrease the multimodality treatment in early-stage cervical cancer. We investigated the preoperatively assessable clinical and pathological risk factors associated with PMI in surgically treated stage IB1-IIA2 cervical cancer. A retrospective cohort study of women underwent Querleu-Morrow type C hysterectomy for cervical cancer stage IB1-IIA2 from 2001 to 2015. All patients underwent clinical staging examination under anesthesia by the same gynecological oncologists during the study period. Evaluated variables were age, menopausal status, body mass index, smoking status, FIGO (International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology) stage, clinically measured maximal tumor diameter, clinical presentation (exophytic or endophytic tumor), histological type, tumor grade, lymphovascular space invasion, clinical and pathological vaginal invasion, and uterine body involvement. Endophytic clinical presentation was defined for ulcerative tumors and barrel-shaped morphology. Two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasonography was used to measure tumor dimensions. Of 127 eligible women, 37 (29.1%) had PMI. On univariate analysis, endophytic clinical presentation (P = 0.01), larger tumor size (P < 0.001), lymphovascular space invasion (P < 0.001), pathological vaginal invasion (P = 0.001), and uterine body involvement (P < 0.001) were significantly different among the groups with and without PMI. In multivariate analysis endophytic clinical presentation (odds ratio, 11.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-95.85; P = 0.02) and larger tumor size (odds ratio, 32.31; 95% confidence interval, 2.46-423.83; P = 0.008) were the independent risk factors for PMI. Threshold of 31 mm in tumor size predicted PMI with 71% sensitivity and 75% specificity. We identified 18 patients with tumor size of more than 30 mm and endophytic presentation; 14 (77.7%) of these had PMI. Endophytic clinical

  4. Preoperative Evaluation: Estimation of Pulmonary Risk.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarasimhachar, Anand; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common after major non-thoracic surgery and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. A number of risk factors are strong predictors of PPCs. The overall goal of the preoperative pulmonary evaluation is to identify these potential, patient and procedure-related risks and optimize the health of the patients before surgery. A thorough clinical examination supported by appropriate laboratory tests will help guide the clinician to provide optimal perioperative care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. Design A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. Setting UK University Teaching Hospital Participants All patients (n = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. Outcome measures The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. Results A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection (p-value: 0.0005). Conclusion The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection. PMID:28321316

  6. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients (n = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection (p-value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  7. Preoperative risk factors of postoperative delirium after transurethral prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sheng; Xu, Lingfan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Song; Liang, Chaozhao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to investigate the occurrence of post operation delirium in the elderly patients undergoing the transurethral prostatectomy and to identify these factors associated with the delirium. 485 patients, undergoing the transurethral prostatectomy, were selected. Demographics, medical, cognitive and functional data, IPSS and NIH-CPSI score were collected as predictors for delirium. After surgery, the patients were divided on the basis of delirium onset within one week observation period, and the delirium was diagnosed by the Confusion Assessment Method. Totally, 21.23% (103) subjects were identified as the delirium and it lasted 2.9 ± 0.8 days. Patients with post operation delirium were significantly older and single, widowed and divorced, had a previous history of prehospitalization, were with the poor International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, were more impaired in the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and had poor clock drawing test (CDT) and geriatric depression scale (GDS) score. Age, marital status, IPSS and NIH-CPIS score, cognitive and functional status and previous history of hospitalization are the predictors of post operation delirium. Our study has implications in preventing delirium via an early and targeted evaluation. PMID:26064386

  8. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after laparoscopic low anterior resection with double stapling technique anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is one of the most devastating complications after rectal cancer surgery. The double stapling technique has greatly facilitated intestinal reconstruction especially for anastomosis after low anterior resection (LAR). Risk factor analyses for AL after open LAR have been widely reported. However, a few studies have analyzed the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. Laparoscopic rectal surgery provides an excellent operative field in a narrow pelvic space, and enables total mesorectal excision surgery and preservation of the autonomic nervous system with greater precision. However, rectal transection using a laparoscopic linear stapler is relatively difficult compared with open surgery because of the width and limited performance of the linear stapler. Moreover, laparoscopic LAR exhibits a different postoperative course compared with open LAR, which suggests that the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR may also differ from those after open LAR. In this review, we will discuss the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. PMID:27433085

  9. Risk Stratification For Axillary Lymph Node Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: What Clinicopathological and Radiological Factors of Primary Breast Cancer Can Predict Preoperatively Axillary Lymph Node Metastases?

    PubMed

    Yun, Seong Jong; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Seo, Mirinae

    2017-03-01

    This study was to investigate clinicopathological features including immunohistochemical subtype and radiological factors of primary breast cancer to predict axillary lymph node metastasis (ALNM) and preoperative risk stratification.From June 2004 to May 2014, 369 breast cancer patients (mean age, 54.7 years; range, 29-82 years) who underwent surgical axillary node sampling were included. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed clinicopathological features, initial mammography, and initial breast ultrasonography (US). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations between ALNM and variables. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval and risk of ALNM were calculated.Among 369 patients, 117 (31.7%) had ALNM and 252 (68.3%) had no ALNM revealed surgically. On multivariate analysis, four factors showed positive association with ALNM: the presence of symptoms (P < 0.001), triple-negative breast cancer subtype (P = 0.001), mass size on US (>10 mm, P < 0.001), and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category on US (≥4c, P < 0.001). The significant risk of ALNM was particularly seen in patients with two or more factors (2, P = 0.013; 3, P < 0.001; 4, P < 0.001).The estimated risks of ALNM increased in patients with two, three, and four factors with odds ratios of 5.5, 14.3, and 60.0, respectively.The presence of symptoms, triple-negative breast cancer subtype, larger size mass on US (>10 mm), and higher Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category on US (≥4c) were positively associated with ALNM. Radiologically, US findings are significant factors that can affect the decision making process regarding ALNM. Based on risk stratification, the possibility of ALNM can be better predicted if 2 or more associated factors existed preoperatively.

  10. Anesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify factors that influence physicians' decisions to order pre-operative tests.

    PubMed

    Patey, Andrea M; Islam, Rafat; Francis, Jill J; Bryson, Gregory L; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2012-06-09

    (delay or cancel patients' surgeries), to indifference (little or no change in patient outcomes), to positive (save money, avoid unnecessary investigations) (Beliefs about consequences). Further, while most agreed that they are motivated to reduce ordering unnecessary tests (Motivation and goals), there was still a report of a gap between their motivation and practice (Behavioural regulation). We identified key factors that anesthesiologists and surgeons believe influence whether they order pre-operative tests routinely for anesthesia management for a healthy adults undergoing low-risk surgery. These beliefs identify potential individual, team, and organisation targets for behaviour change interventions to reduce unnecessary routine test ordering.

  11. Anesthesiologists’ and surgeons’ perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify factors that influence physicians’ decisions to order pre-operative tests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    reducing testing, from negative (delay or cancel patients’ surgeries), to indifference (little or no change in patient outcomes), to positive (save money, avoid unnecessary investigations) (Beliefs about consequences). Further, while most agreed that they are motivated to reduce ordering unnecessary tests (Motivation and goals), there was still a report of a gap between their motivation and practice (Behavioural regulation). Conclusion We identified key factors that anesthesiologists and surgeons believe influence whether they order pre-operative tests routinely for anesthesia management for a healthy adults undergoing low-risk surgery. These beliefs identify potential individual, team, and organisation targets for behaviour change interventions to reduce unnecessary routine test ordering. PMID:22682612

  12. Preoperative malalignment increases risk of failure after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Merrill A; Davis, Kenneth E; Davis, Peter; Farris, Alex; Malinzak, Robert A; Berend, Michael E; Meding, John B

    2013-01-16

    Implant survival after total knee arthroplasty has historically been dependent on postoperative knee alignment, although failure may occur when alignment is correct. Preoperative knee alignment has not been thoroughly evaluated as a possible risk factor for implant failure after arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of preoperative knee alignment on implant survival after total knee arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of 5342 total knee arthroplasties performed with use of cemented Anatomic Graduated Component implants from 1983 to 2006. Each knee was independently measured preoperatively and postoperatively for overall coronal alignment. Neutral ranges for preoperative and postoperative alignment were defined by means of Cox proportional hazards regression. The overall failure rate was 1.0% (fifty-four of 5342 prostheses); failure was defined as aseptic loosening of the femoral and/or tibial component. The average preoperative anatomical alignment (and standard deviation) was 0.1° ± 7.7° of varus (range, 25° of varus to 35° of valgus), and the average postoperative anatomical alignment (and standard deviation) was 4.7° ± 2.5° of valgus (range, 12° of varus to 20° of valgus). The failure rate in knees in >8° of varus preoperatively (2.2%; p = 0.0005) or >11° of valgus preoperatively (2.4%; p = 0.0081) was elevated when compared with knees in neutral preoperatively (0.71%). Knees with preoperative deformities corrected to postoperative neutral alignment (2.5° through 7.4°) had a lower failure rate (1.9%) than undercorrected or overcorrected knees (3.0%) (p = 0.0103). Knees with postoperative neutral alignment, regardless of preoperative alignment, had a lower failure rate (0.74%) than knees with postoperative alignment of <2.5° or >7.4° of anatomic valgus (1.7%) (p < 0.0001). Patients with excessive preoperative alignment (>8° of varus or >11° of valgus) have a greater risk of failure (2.3%). Neutral

  13. [Clinical variables of preoperative risk].

    PubMed

    Saad, I A; Zambon, L

    2001-01-01

    To identify risk variables leading to early postoperative pulmonary complication (POPC) in thoracic and upper abdominal surgery. 297 patients submitted to elective surgery were classified as low, moderate and high risk for POPC using PORT scale, following Torrington & Henderson (1988). The patients were followed up for 72 hours postoperative. POPC were defined as atelectasis, pneumonia, tracheobronchitis, wheezing, prolonged intubation and/or prolonged mechanical ventilation. Univariate analysis was applied to study these independent variables: type of surgery, age, nutritional status (BMI), respiratory disease, smoking habit, spirometry and surgical time. Multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed in order to evaluate the relationship between independent and dependent (POPC) variables. POPC incidence was 12.1%. By multivariate logistic regression analysis the variables increasing chance to POPC was cough with yellow mucus (OR= 3.8), thoracic surgery (OR=2.9) compared to abdominal surgery, BMI (OR=1.13), duration of smoking (OR=1.03) and prolonged duration of surgery (OR=1.007). In the thoracic surgery group, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed: wheezing (OR=6.2), BMI (OR=1.15), long time smoking (OR= 1.04) and prolonged duration of surgery (OR= 1.007) related to POPC. The variables occurrence that increased chance to POPC in thoracic and upper abdominal surgery were: cough with yellow mucus, thoracic surgery, BMI, duration of smoking and duration of surgery. Regarding the thoracic surgery group the significance variables were wheezing, BMI, duration of smoking and duration of surgery.

  14. Risk factors for postoperative subsidence of single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: the significance of the preoperative cervical alignment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seok; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Seung-Won

    2014-07-15

    Retrospective cohort study. To investigate and analyze the preoperative risk factors affecting subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to reduce subsidence. Subsidence after ACDF may be caused by various risk factors, although the related information is scarce. Seventy-eight patients who underwent single-level ACDF between 2005 and 2011 were included. Patients were categorized into the subsidence (n = 26) and nonsubsidence groups (n = 52). Preoperative factors such as age, sex, operative level, bone mineral density, cervical alignment, segmental sagittal angle, and anterior/posterior disc height were assessed. The use of plates and the anterior/posterior disc height gap were examined as perioperative factors. The clinical outcome was assessed using a visual analogue scale for neck and arm pain. Subsidence occurred in 26 (33.3%) of 78 patients. A significant difference was found in clinical outcomes between the subsidence and nonsubsidence groups (P < 0.05). The fusion rate was 61.5% in the subsidence group. The mean time to subsidence was 4.8 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed that cervical alignment (P = 0.017), age (P = 0.022), and use of plates (P = 0.041) affected subsidence. In patients who received a stand-alone cage, the risk of subsidence was significantly greater in the kyphotic angle group than in the lordotic angle group (odds ratio = 13.56; P < 0.001). After ACDF, the main factors affecting subsidence are cervical alignment, age, and use of plates. Our data suggest that surgeons should consider the kyphotic curvature and/or age when deciding on the use of plates.

  15. Patients with Fever of Unknown Origin and Splenomegaly: Diagnostic Value of Splenectomy and Preoperative Risk Factors Suggestive of Underlying Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wei; Cai, Huacong; Cao, Xinxin; Chen, Miao; Li, Jian; Zhu, Tienan; Duan, Minghui; Wang, Shujie; Han, Bing; Zhou, Daobin

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and splenomegaly and assessed the diagnostic value of splenectomy and measured risk factors suggestive of an underlying lymphoma. FUO patients (n = 83) who had splenomegaly and underwent splenectomy were enrolled into this retrospective single-center study. Clinical presentations were documented and risk factors suggestive of an underlying lymphoma were tested. Seventy-four patients (89.2%) had a diagnosis of lymphoma or not after splenectomy and follow-up. Of those (55.4%) diagnosed with lymphoma, 29 had B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 12 had T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The remaining 33 (44.6%) had diseases other than lymphoma. Using multivariate logistic analysis, the following 3 independent risk factors were found to be related to a final diagnosis of lymphoma: age (continuous) (HR 1.086; 95% CI 1.033-1.141; p = 0.001), massively enlarged spleen (HR 7.797; 95% CI 1.267-47.959; p = 0.027), and enlarged intra-abdominal lymph nodes (HR 63.925; 95% CI 7.962-513.219; p < 0.001). The calibration of the model was satisfactory (p = 0.248 using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test), and the discrimination power was good (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.925; 95% CI 0.863-0.987). Splenectomy is an effective diagnostic procedure for patients with FUO and splenomegaly and lymphoma is a common cause. Older age, a massively enlarged spleen, and enlarged intra-abdominal lymph nodes are risk factors suggesting an underlying lymphoma, and surgery for high-risk patients should be considered. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Risk factors for adjacent segment pathology requiring additional surgery after single-level spinal fusion: impact of pre-existing spinal stenosis demonstrated by preoperative myelography.

    PubMed

    Yugué, Itaru; Okada, Seiji; Masuda, Muneaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Maeda, Takeshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-05-01

    We determined the incidence of and risk factors for clinical adjacent segment pathology (C-ASP) requiring additional surgeries among patients previously treated with one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. We retrospectively analysed 161 consecutive patients who underwent one-segment lumbar decompression and fusion surgery for L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), facet orientation and tropism, laminar inclination angle, spinal canal stenosis ratio [on myelography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)], preoperative adjacent segment instability, arthrodesis type, pseudarthrosis, segmental lordosis at L4-5, and the present L4 slip were evaluated by a log-rank test using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model was used to analyse all factors found significant by the log-rank test. Of 161 patients, 22 patients (13.7 %) had additional surgeries at cranial segments located adjacent to the index surgery's location. Pre-existing canal stenosis ≥47 % at the adjacent segment on myelography, greater facet tropism, and high BMI were significant risk factors for C-ASP. The estimated incidences at 10 years postoperatively for each of these factors were 51.3, 39.6, and 32.5 %, and the risks for C-ASP were 4.9, 3.7, and, 3.1 times higher than their counterparts, respectively. Notably, spinal canal stenosis on myelography, but not on MRI, was found to be a significant risk factor for C-ASP (log-rank test P < 0.0001 and 0.299, respectively). Pre-existing spinal stenosis, greater facet tropism, and higher BMI significantly increased C-ASP risk. Myelography is a more accurate method for detecting latent spinal canal stenosis as a risk factor for C-ASP.

  17. Acute Pre-operative Infarcts and Poor Cerebrovascular Reserve are Independent Risk Factors for Severe Ischemic Complications Following Direct Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulling, T. Michael; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Marks, Michael P.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe ischemic changes are a rare but devastating complication following direct superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA MCA) bypass in Moyamoya patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether pre-operative MR imaging and/or cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) assessment using reference standard stable xenon enhanced computed tomography (xeCT) could predict such complications. Materials and Methods Among all adult patients receiving direct bypass at our institution between 2005 and 2010 who received a clinically interpretable xeCT examination, we identified index cases (patients with >15 ml post-operative infarcts) and control cases (patients without post-operative infarcts and without transient or permanent ischemic symptoms). Differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann Whitney test. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear model regression were employed to test predictors of post-operative infarct. Results Six index cases were identified and compared with 25 controls. Infarct size in the index cases was 95±55 ml. Four of six index cases (67%), but no control patients, had pre-operative acute infarcts. Baseline CBF was similar, but CVR was significantly lower in the index cases compared with control cases. For example, in the anterior circulation, median CVR was 0.4% (range: −38.0% to 16.6%) in index vs. 26.3% (range: −8.2% to 60.5%) in control patients (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a small pre-operative infarct (regardless of location) and impaired CVR were independent, significant predictors of severe post-operative ischemic injury. Conclusion Acute infarcts and impaired CVR on pre operative imaging are independent risk factors for severe ischemic complications following STA MCA bypass in Moyamoya disease. PMID:26564435

  18. Analysis of Preoperative Metabolic Risk Factors Affecting the Prognosis of Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: The Fujian Prospective Investigation of Cancer (FIESTA) Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Hu, Dan; Lin, Xiandong; Chen, Gang; Liang, Binying; Zhang, Hejun; Dong, Xiaoqun; Lin, Jinxiu; Zheng, Xiongwei; Niu, Wenquan

    2017-02-01

    Some metabolic factors have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer; however the association with its prognosis is rarely reported. Here, we assessed the prediction of preoperative metabolic syndrome and its single components for esophageal cancer mortality by analyzing a subset of data from the ongoing Fujian prospective investigation of cancer (FIESTA) study. Between 2000 and 2010, patients who underwent three-field lymphadenectomy were eligible for inclusion. Blood/tissue specimens, demographic and clinicopathologic data were collected at baseline. Metabolic syndrome is defined by the criteria proposed by Chinese Diabetes Society. In this study, analysis was restricted to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) due to the limited number of other histological types. The median follow-up in 2396 ESCC patients (males/females: 1822/574) was 38.2months (range, 0.5-180months). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of metabolic syndrome for ESCC mortality was statistically significant in males (HR, 95% confidence interval, P: 1.45, 1.14-1.83, 0.002), but not in females (1.46, 0.92-2.31, 0.107). For single metabolic components, the multivariate-adjusted HRs were significant for hyperglycemia (1.98, 1.68-2.33, <0.001) and dyslipidemia (1.41, 1.20-1.65, <0.001) in males and for hyperglycemia (1.76, 1.23-2.51, <0.001) in females, independent of clinicopathologic characteristics and obesity. In tree-structured survival analysis, the top splitting factor in both genders was tumor-node-metastasis stage, followed by regional lymph node metastasis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that preoperative metabolic syndrome was a significant independent predictor of ESCC mortality in males, and this effect was largely mediated by glyeolipid metabolism disorder.

  19. Pre-operative factors indicating risk of multiple operations versus a single operation in women undergoing surgery for screen detected breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, E A M; Currie, R J; Mohammed, K; Allen, S D; Michell, M J

    2013-02-01

    We aim to identify preoperative factors at diagnosis which could predict whether women undergoing wide local excision (WLE) would require further operations. 1593 screen-detected invasive and non-invasive breast cancers were reviewed. Age, presence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer size on mammography, mammographic sign, tumour type, grade and confidence of the radiologist in malignancy were compared. 83%(1315/1593) of women had a WLE. Of these, 70%(919/1315) had a single operation, and 30%(396/1315) multiple operations. These included repeat WLE to clear margins (60%(238/396)), mastectomy (34%(133/396)) and axillary dissection (6%(25/396)). The presence of mammographic microcalcification, lobular carcinoma and grade 2 malignancy on core biopsy were independent risk factors for multiple operations on multivariate analysis. Women with mammographic DCIS >30 mm were 3.4 times more likely to undergo repeat surgery than those with smaller foci. The multidisciplinary team should pay particular attention to these factors when planning surgery.

  20. Risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar--a comparative study of preoperative images by panoramic radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Ri, S; Shigeta, T; Akashi, M; Imai, Y; Kakei, Y; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2013-07-01

    In this study we investigated the relationships among the risk factors for inferior alveolar nerve injury (IANI), and the difference between preoperative imaging findings on panoramic radiographs and computed tomography (CT), by univariate and multivariate analyses. We determined the following to be significant variables by multivariate analysis: panoramic radiographic signs, such as the loss of the white line of the inferior alveolar canal or the diversion of the canal; excessive haemorrhage during extraction; and a close relationship of the roots to the IAN (type 1 cases) on CT examination. CT findings of type 1 were associated with a significantly higher risk (odds ratio 43.77) of IANI. In addition, many panoramic findings were not consistent with CT findings (275 of 440 teeth; 62.5%). These results suggest that CT findings may be able to predict the development of IANI more accurately than panoramic findings. Panoramic radiography alone did not provide sufficiently reliable images required for predicting IANI. Therefore, when the panoramic image is suggestive of a close relationship between the impacted tooth and the IAN, CT should be recommended as a means of conducting further investigations.

  1. Surgical Risk Preoperative Assessment System (SURPAS): I. Parsimonious, Clinically Meaningful Groups of Postoperative Complications by Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meguid, Robert A; Bronsert, Michael R; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Hammermeister, Karl E; Henderson, William G

    2016-06-01

    To use factor analysis to cluster the 18 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) perioperative complications into a reproducible, smaller number of clinically meaningful groups of postoperative complications, facilitating and streamlining future study and application in live clinical settings. The ACS NSQIP collects and reports on eighteen 30-day postoperative complications (excluding mortality), which are variably grouped in published analyses using ACS NSQIP data. This hinders comparison between studies of this widely used quality improvement dataset. Factor analysis was used to develop a series of complication clusters, which were then analyzed to identify a parsimonious, clinically meaningful grouping, using 2,275,240 surgical cases in the ACS NSQIP Participant Use File (PUF), 2005 to 2012. The main outcome measures are reproducible, data-driven, clinically meaningful clusters of complications derived from factor solutions. Factor analysis solutions for 5 to 9 latent factors were examined for their percent of total variance, parsimony, and clinical interpretability. Applying the first 2 of these criteria, we identified the 7-factor solution, which included clusters of pulmonary, infectious, wound disruption, cardiac/transfusion, venous thromboembolic, renal, and neurological complications, as the best solution for parsimony and clinical meaningfulness. Applying the last (clinical interpretability), we combined the wound disruption with the infectious clusters resulting in 6 clusters for future clinical applications. Factor analysis of ACS NSQIP postoperative complication data provides 6 clinically meaningful complication clusters in lieu of 18 postoperative morbidities, which will facilitate comparisons and clinical implementation of studies of postoperative morbidities.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis and risk factors for preoperative death in neonates with single right ventricle and systemic outflow obstruction: screening data from the Pediatric Heart Network Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial(∗).

    PubMed

    Atz, Andrew M; Travison, Thomas G; Williams, Ismee A; Pearson, Gail D; Laussen, Peter C; Mahle, William T; Cook, Amanda L; Kirsh, Joel A; Sklansky, Mark; Khaikin, Svetlana; Goldberg, Caren; Frommelt, Michele; Krawczeski, Catherine; Puchalski, Michael D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Baffa, Jeanne M; Rychik, Jack; Ohye, Richard G

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to assess preoperative risk factors before the first-stage Norwood procedure in infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and related single-ventricle lesions and to evaluate practice patterns in prenatal diagnosis, as well as the role of prenatal diagnosis in outcome. Data from all live births with morphologic single right ventricle and systemic outflow obstruction screened for the Pediatric Heart Network's Single Ventricle Reconstruction Trial were used to investigate prenatal diagnosis and preoperative risk factors. Demographics, gestational age, prenatal diagnosis status, presence of major extracardiac congenital abnormalities, and preoperative mortality rates were recorded. Of 906 infants, 677 (75%) had prenatal diagnosis, 15% were preterm (<37 weeks' gestation), and 16% were low birth weight (<2500 g). Rates of prenatal diagnosis varied by study site (59% to 85%, P < .0001). Major extracardiac congenital abnormalities were less prevalent in those born after prenatal diagnosis (6% vs 10%, P = .03). There were 26 (3%) deaths before Norwood palliation; preoperative mortality did not differ by prenatal diagnosis status (P = .49). In multiple logistic regression models, preterm birth (P = .02), major extracardiac congenital abnormalities (P < .0001), and obstructed pulmonary venous return (P = .02) were independently associated with preoperative mortality. Prenatal diagnosis occurred in 75%. Preoperative death was independently associated with preterm birth, obstructed pulmonary venous return, and major extracardiac congenital abnormalities. Adjusted for gestational age and the presence of obstructed pulmonary venous return, the estimated odds of preoperative mortality were 10 times greater for subjects with a major extracardiac congenital abnormality. Copyright © 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Pre-operative unintentional weight loss as a risk factor for surgical outcomes after elective surgery in patients with disseminated cancer.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sanghera, Sartaj; Singla, Smit; Attwood, Kristopher; Nurkin, Steven

    2015-06-01

    With improvement in survival, elective surgical procedures are being increasingly performed on patients with metastatic disease. We aimed to study the association of pre-operative unintentional weight loss (UWL) with operative outcomes in this patient population. We extracted data on all patients with disseminated cancer undergoing elective surgeries between 2005 and 2011 from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), along with the Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes. Based on the presence of unintentional weight loss of >10% body weight in the 6-month period preceding surgery, patients were divided into 2 cohorts - (1) patients with UWL ('UWL' cohort) and (2) patients without UWL ('No UWL') cohort. Differences in patient characteristics, co-morbid conditions and outcomes were compared. There were 30,669 surgeries recorded under 1,638 CPT codes, with 8,436 surgeries involving the eight most common CPT codes. UWL was present in 11.5% of all patients. UWL patients were more commonly (P < 0.05) male, African-American, of higher ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) class, and had multiple associated comorbidities. Nearly all complications, including wound infections, prolonged ventilator requirement, unplanned intubation, cardiac arrest, DVT, sepsis and mortality were more common in UWL patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that UWL was independently associated with 21%, 22% and 49% higher risk of overall morbidity, serious morbidity and 30-day mortality, respectively. UWL is an independent risk factor associated with increased morbidity and mortality following elective surgeries in patients with disseminated cancer. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors and the preoperative assessment of right para-oesophageal lymph node metastasis in right lobe papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Qu, You; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Wenwu; He, Liang; Sun, Wei; Liu, Jinhao

    2017-06-01

    Right para-oesophageal lymph nodes (RPELN) are included among the right central compartment lymph nodes (rCLN) and located behind right recurrent laryngeal nerve (rRLN). However, due to the likelihood of increasing postoperative complications, and the extremely difficulties of RPELN dissection, the decision to perform RPELN dissection remains controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the risk factors of RPELN metastasis and evaluate RPELN metastasis by preoperative examination. We reviewed the medical records of 163 consecutive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients (125 females and 38 males) who underwent right lobe plus isthmic resection (91 patients) or total thyroidectomy (72 patients) with right or bilateral central compartment lymph node dissection. The RPELN dissections were performed in all patients and were individually dissected and recorded intraoperatively. All patients underwent thyroid ultrasound and enhanced neck computed tomography (CT) routinely during preoperative examination. RPELN metastasis was detected in 20 patients (12.3%), among whom 6 (3.7%) had RPELN metastasis without rCLN metastasis. Total rCLN metastasis and lateral compartment lymph node metastasis were confirmed in 57 (35.0%) and 24 (14.7%) patients, respectively. The tumour diameter, number of metastatic rCLN and lateral compartment lymph nodes, RPELN visible on CT, and enhanced CT value of RPELN were confirmed significantly associated with RPELN metastasis by univariate analysis (P < 0.05). The area under the ROC curve of CT values was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.59-0.95; P = 0.003). The CT value of 132.0 was used as the cut-off point, and the specificity and sensitivity were 84.1% and 71.4%, respectively. PTC patients with a large tumour (>1 cm) in the right lobe or suspected rCLN metastasis were recommended to undergo prophylactic RPELN dissection, particularly in those with a high enhanced CT value (>132) of RPELN or those with the copresence of lateral compartment lymph

  5. Risk factors for complications after ileocolonic resection for Crohn’s disease with a major focus on the impact of preoperative immunosuppressive and biologic therapy: A retrospective international multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Antonino; Suzuki, Yasuo; Saad-Hossne, Rogerio; Teixeira, Fabio Vieira; de Albuquerque, Idblan Carvalho; da Silva, Rodolff Nunes; de Barcelos, Ivan Folchini; Takeuchi, Ken; Yamada, Akihiro; Shimoyama, Takahiro; da Silva Kotze, Lorete Maria; Sacchi, Matteo; Danese, Silvio; Kotze, Paulo Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Background Author note: TY, AS, YS, FVT and PGK designed the study. All authors did data collection and gave scientific contribution to the study design and discussion. TY, AS and PGK drafted the article. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript.In the era of biologic agents, risk factors for complications following resection for Crohn’s disease have not been fully identified. In particular, the association of preoperative use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents with the incidence of complications after resection remains to be elucidated. Aim This retrospective multicentre study aimed to identify risk factors for complications after ileocolonic resection for Crohn’s disease, with a major focus on the impact of preoperative immunosuppressive and biologic therapy. Methods A total of 231 consecutive patients who underwent ileocolonic resections for active Crohn’s disease in seven inflammatory bowel disease referral centres from three countries (Japan, Brazil and Italy) were included. The following variables were investigated as potential risk factors: age at surgery, gender, behaviour of Crohn’s disease (perforating vs. non-perforating disease), smoking, preoperative use (within eight weeks before surgery) of steroids, immunosuppressants and biologic agents, previous resection, blood transfusion, surgical procedure (open vs. laparoscopic approach), and type of anastomosis (side-to-side vs. end-to-end). Postoperative complications occurring within 30 days after surgery were recorded. Results The rates of overall complications, intra-abdominal sepsis, and anastomotic leak were 24%, 12% and 8%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressive nor biologic therapy prior to surgery was significantly associated with the incidence of overall complications, intra-abdominal sepsis or anastomotic leak. In multivariate analysis, blood transfusion, perforating disease and previous resection were significant risk factors for overall complications (odds

  6. CT Findings of Risk Factors for Persistent Type II Endoleak from Inferior Mesenteric Artery to Determine Indicators of Preoperative IMA Embolization.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Naito, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    To identify the computed tomography (CT) findings of persistent type II endoleak from the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) which indicate the need for preoperative IMA embolization. Included were 120 patients (96 males, 49-93 years old, mean: 77.7) who underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) between June 2007 and October 2010. The relationship between persistent type II endoleak and CT findings of IMA orifice was examined. CT showed no type II endoleak from IMA in 106 patients (89%; Group N), and transient type II endoleak from IMA in 10 patients (8.3%; Group T). CT showed persistent type II endoleak from IMA in 4 patients (3.3%; Group P) and three of them underwent reintervention. Univariate Cox-Mantel test analysis indicated that stenosis (p = 0.0003) and thrombus (p = 0.043) in IMA orifice were significant factors for persistent type II endoleak. The ratios of patients with proximal IMA more than 2.5 mm diameter in Groups N, Y, and P were 26/106 (24%), 5/10 (50%) and 4/4 (100%), respectively. Indicators for embolization of IMA prior to EVAR for the prevention of type II endoleak appear to be: (1) more than 2.5 mm in diameter and (2) no stenosis due to calcification or mural thrombus in IMA orifice.

  7. CT Findings of Risk Factors for Persistent Type II Endoleak from Inferior Mesenteric Artery to Determine Indicators of Preoperative IMA Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hitoshi; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Naito, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the computed tomography (CT) findings of persistent type II endoleak from the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) which indicate the need for preoperative IMA embolization. Materials and Methods: Included were 120 patients (96 males, 49–93 years old, mean: 77.7) who underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) between June 2007 and October 2010. The relationship between persistent type II endoleak and CT findings of IMA orifice was examined. Results: CT showed no type II endoleak from IMA in 106 patients (89%; Group N), and transient type II endoleak from IMA in 10 patients (8.3%; Group T). CT showed persistent type II endoleak from IMA in 4 patients (3.3%; Group P) and three of them underwent reintervention. Univariate Cox-Mantel test analysis indicated that stenosis (p = 0.0003) and thrombus (p = 0.043) in IMA orifice were significant factors for persistent type II endoleak. The ratios of patients with proximal IMA more than 2.5 mm diameter in Groups N, Y, and P were 26/106 (24%), 5/10 (50%) and 4/4 (100%), respectively. Conclusion: Indicators for embolization of IMA prior to EVAR for the prevention of type II endoleak appear to be: (1) more than 2.5 mm in diameter and (2) no stenosis due to calcification or mural thrombus in IMA orifice. PMID:25298829

  8. Can we preoperatively risk stratify ovarian masses for malignancy?

    PubMed

    Oltmann, Sarah C; Garcia, Nilda; Barber, Robert; Huang, Rong; Hicks, Barry; Fischer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Given a 10% malignancy rate in pediatric ovarian masses, what preoperative factors are helpful in distinguishing those at higher risk to risk stratify accordingly? After institutional review board approval (IRB#022008-095), a 15(1/2)-year retrospective review of operative ovarian cases was performed. A total of 424 patients were identified, with a mean age 12.5 years (range, 1 day to 19 years), without an age disparity between benign (12.54 years, 89%) and malignant (11.8 years, 11%) cases. The 1- to 8-year age group had the highest percentage of malignancies (22%; odds ratio [OR], 3.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-6.86). A chief complaint of mass or precocious puberty versus one of pain had an OR for malignancy of 4.84 and 5.67, respectively (95% CI, 2.48-9.45 and 1.60-20.30). Imaging of benign neoplasms had a mean size of 8 cm (range, 0.9-36 cm) compared with malignancies at 17.3 cm (6.2-50 cm, P < .001). An ovarian mass size of 8 cm or longer on preoperative imaging had an OR of 19.0 for malignancy (95% CI, 4.42-81.69). Ultrasound or computed tomographic findings of a solid mass, although infrequent, were most commonly associated with malignancy (33%-60%), compared with reads of heterogeneous (15%-21%) or cystic (4%-5%) lesions. The malignancies (n = 46) included germ cell (50%, n = 23), stromal (28%, n = 13), epithelial (17%, n = 8), and other (4%, n = 2). Tumor markers obtained in 71% of malignancies were elevated in only 54%, whereas 6.5% of those sent in benign cases were similarly elevated. Elevated beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG), alpha fetoprotein (alphaFP), and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) were significantly associated with malignancy (P < .02) and an elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was not (P = .1880). This reported series of pediatric ovarian masses demonstrates that preoperative indicators that best predict an ovarian malignancy are a complaint of a mass or precocious puberty, a mass exceeding 8 cm or a mass with solid

  9. Preoperative IABP in high risk patients undergoing CABG.

    PubMed

    Theologou, T; Field, M L

    2011-01-01

    A recent international consensus conference on the reduction in mortality in cardiac anesthesia and intensive care included intraoperative aortic balloon pump among the ancillary (i.e. non-surgical) drugs/techniques/strategies that might influence survival rates in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The consensus conferences state that "Pre-operative intraoperative aortic balloon pump might reduce 30-day mortality in elective high risk patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery unless specifically contraindicated". The authors of this "expert opinion" presents their insights into the use of the preoperative intraoperative aortic balloon pump and conclude that based on available limited randomized controlled trials and clinical experience preoperative intraoperative aortic balloon pump saves lives in unstable patients.

  10. Development, Functioning, and Effectiveness of a Preoperative Risk Assessment Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Hassan; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Kulkarni, Salil; Hanif, Sana; Toolsie, Omesh; Abbas, Hafsa; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Lee first described the concept of preoperative assessment testing (PAT) clinic in 1949. An efficiently run clinic is associated with increased cost-effectiveness by lowering preoperative admission time and thus reducing the length of stay and the associated costs. The setup of the PAT clinic should be based on the needs, culture, and resources of the institution. Various models for the setup of PAT clinic have been described, including the concept of a perioperative surgical home, which is a patient-centered model designed to improve health and the delivery of health care and to reduce the cost of care. Although there are several constraints in the development of PAT clinics, with increasing awareness about the usefulness of pre-operative risk assessments, growing bodies of literature, and evidence-based guidelines, these clinics are becoming a medical necessity for the improvement of perioperative care. PMID:27812286

  11. Development, Functioning, and Effectiveness of a Preoperative Risk Assessment Clinic.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hassan; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Kulkarni, Salil; Hanif, Sana; Toolsie, Omesh; Abbas, Hafsa; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Lee first described the concept of preoperative assessment testing (PAT) clinic in 1949. An efficiently run clinic is associated with increased cost-effectiveness by lowering preoperative admission time and thus reducing the length of stay and the associated costs. The setup of the PAT clinic should be based on the needs, culture, and resources of the institution. Various models for the setup of PAT clinic have been described, including the concept of a perioperative surgical home, which is a patient-centered model designed to improve health and the delivery of health care and to reduce the cost of care. Although there are several constraints in the development of PAT clinics, with increasing awareness about the usefulness of pre-operative risk assessments, growing bodies of literature, and evidence-based guidelines, these clinics are becoming a medical necessity for the improvement of perioperative care.

  12. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications.

  13. Incidence of and Preoperative Risk Factors for Surgical Delay in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: Analysis From the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Phruetthiphat, Ong-Art; Gao, Yubo; Anthony, Chris A; Pugely, Andrew J; Warth, Lucian C; Callaghan, John J

    2016-11-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a proven treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee and hip that has failed conservative treatment. While most of total joint arthroplasty is considered elective with surgery on the day of admission, a small subset of patients may require delay in surgery past the day of admission. Recently, surgical delay for primary total knee arthroplasty has been identified. However, the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for delay in surgery before total hip arthroplasty (THA) have not been previously defined. In patients undergoing THA, we sought to define (1) the incidence of and risk factors for delay in surgery, (2) the postoperative complications between surgical delay and no surgical delay cohorts, and (3) association of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) in patients with delay of surgery. We retrospectively queried the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database using Current Procedural Terminology billing codes and identified 7890 THAs performed between 2006 and 2010. Univariate and subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis were then used to identify risk factors for surgical delay. Correlation between CCI and surgical delay in THA was evaluated. One-hundred seventy-nine patients (2.31%) were identified as experiencing a surgical delay before THA. Multivariate analysis identified congestive heart failure (CHF) (P = .0038), bleeding disorder (P < .0001), sepsis (P < .0001), prior operation in past 30 days (P = .0001), dependent functional status (P < .0001), American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3 (P = .0001), American Society of Anesthesiologists class 4 (P = .0023), significant weight loss (P = .0109), and hematocrit <38% (P < .0001) as independent risk factors for delay in surgery. Compared with the nondelay cohort, those experiencing surgical delay before THA had higher rates of postoperative surgical (8.9% vs 3.1%, P < .0001) and medical complications (23.5% vs 10.1%, P < .0001). Mean CCI was higher

  14. Characterization and Preoperative Risk Analysis of Leiomyosarcomas at a High-Volume Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ann; Sadecky, Amanda M; Winger, Daniel G; Guido, Richard S; Lee, Ted T M; Mansuria, Suketu M; Donnellan, Nicole M

    2017-07-01

    Uterine morcellation in minimally invasive surgery has recently come under scrutiny because of inadvertent dissemination of malignant tissue, including leiomyosarcomas commonly mistaken for fibroids. Identification of preoperative risk factors is crucial to ensure that oncologic care is delivered when suspicion for malignancy is high, while offering minimally invasive hysterectomies to the remaining patients. The aim of this study was to characterize risk factors for uterine leiomyosarcomas by reviewing preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data with an emphasis on the presence of concurrent fibroids. A retrospective case-control study of women undergoing hysterectomy with pathologic diagnosis of uterine leiomyosarcoma at a tertiary care center between January 2005 and April 2014. Thirty-one women were identified with leiomyosarcoma and matched to 124 controls. Cases with leiomyosarcoma were more likely to have undergone menopause and to present with larger uteri (19- vs 9-week sized), with the most common presenting complaint being a pelvic mass (35.5% vs 8.9%). Controls were ten times more likely to have undergone a tubal ligation (30.6% vs 3.2%). Endometrial sampling detected malignancy preoperatively in only 50% of cases. Leiomyosarcomas were more commonly present when pelvic masses were identified in addition to fibroids on preoperative imaging. Most leiomyosarcoma cases (77.4%) were performed by oncologists via an abdominal approach (83.9%), with only 2 of 31 leiomyosarcomas being morcellated. Comparative analysis of preoperative imaging and postoperative pathology showed that in patients with leiomyosarcoma, fibroids were misdiagnosed 58.1% of the time, and leiomyosarcomas arose directly from fibroids in only 6.5% of cases. Leiomyosarcoma risk factors include older age/postmenopausal status, enlarged uteri of greater than 10 weeks, and lack of previous tubal ligation. Preoperative testing failed to definitively identify leiomyosarcomas, although

  15. Preoperative Laboratory Investigations: Rates and Variability Prior to Low-risk Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Kyle R; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Pendrith, Ciara; Ng, Ryan; Tu, Jack V; Boozary, Andrew S; Tepper, Joshua; Schull, Michael J; Levinson, Wendy; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2016-04-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on low-value healthcare services. Through Choosing Wisely campaigns, routine laboratory testing before low-risk surgery has been discouraged in the absence of clinical indications. The authors investigated rates, determinants, and institutional variation in laboratory testing before low-risk procedures. Patients who underwent ophthalmologic surgeries or predefined low-risk surgeries in Ontario, Canada, between April 1, 2008, and March 31, 2013, were identified from population-based administrative databases. Preoperative blood work was defined as a complete blood count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin, or basic metabolic panel within 60 days before an index procedure. Adjusted associations between patient and institutional factors and preoperative testing were assessed with hierarchical multivariable logistic regression. Institutional variation was characterized using the median odds ratio. The cohort included 906,902 patients who underwent 1,330,466 procedures (57.1% ophthalmologic and 42.9% low-risk surgery) at 119 institutions. Preoperative blood work preceded 400,058 (30.1%) procedures. The unadjusted institutional rate of preoperative blood work varied widely (0.0 to 98.1%). In regression modeling, significant predictors of preoperative testing included atrial fibrillation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.58; 95% CI, 2.51 to 2.66), preoperative medical consultation (AOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.65 to 1.71), previous mitral valve replacement (AOR, 2.33; 95% CI, 2.10 to 2.58), and liver disease (AOR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.55 to 1.84). The median odds ratio for interinstitutional variation was 2.43. Results of this study suggest that testing is associated with a range of clinical covariates. However, an association was similarly identified with preoperative consultation, and significant variation between institutions exists across the jurisdiction.

  16. Surgical Risk Preoperative Assessment System (SURPAS): III. Accurate Preoperative Prediction of 8 Adverse Outcomes Using 8 Predictor Variables.

    PubMed

    Meguid, Robert A; Bronsert, Michael R; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Hammermeister, Karl E; Henderson, William G

    2016-07-01

    To develop accurate preoperative risk prediction models for multiple adverse postoperative outcomes applicable to a broad surgical population using a parsimonious common set of risk variables and outcomes. Currently, preoperative assessment of surgical risk is largely based on subjective clinician experience. We propose a paradigm shift from the current postoperative risk adjustment for cross-hospital comparison to patient-centered quantitative risk assessment during the preoperative evaluation. We identify the most common and important predictor variables of postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and 6 complication clusters from previously published prediction analyses that used forward selection stepwise logistic regression. We then refit the prediction models using only the 8 most common and important predictor variables, and compare the discrimination and calibration of these models to the original full-variable models using the c-index, Hosmer-Lemeshow analysis, and Brier scores. Accurate risk models for 30-day outcomes of mortality, overall morbidity, and 6 clusters of complications were developed using a set of 8 preoperative risk variables. C-indexes of the 8 variable models are between 97.9% and 99.2% of those of the full models containing up to 28 variables, indicating excellent discrimination using fewer predictor variables. Hosmer-Lemeshow analyses showed observed to expected event rates to be nearly identical between parsimonious models and full models, both showing good calibration. Accurate preoperative risk assessment of postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and 6 complication clusters in a broad surgical population can be achieved with as few as 8 preoperative predictor variables, improving feasibility of routine preoperative risk assessment for surgical patients.

  17. Preoperative Anxiety in Patients With Myasthenia Gravis and Risk for Myasthenic Crisis After Extended Transsternal Thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jianyong; Su, Chunhua; Lun, Xueping; Liu, Weibing; Yang, Weiling; Zhong, Beilong; Zhu, Haoshuai; Lei, Yiyan; Luo, Honghe; Chen, Zhenguang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A thymectomy can ameliorate the symptoms of myasthenia gravis (MG) and prevent the progression of ocular MG (OMG) to generalized MG (GMG). However, postoperative myasthenic crisis (POMC) is a serious post-thymectomy complication. Preoperative anxiety (POA) is common but typically neglected in MG patients. The association of POA with POMC has not yet been examined. From June 2007 to December 2013, 541 cases of MG were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (Guangzhou, China). All cases underwent extended transsternal thymectomy (ETT). The clinical and pathological characteristics of these patients, including POA and POMC, were analyzed. A total of 179 patients experienced POA and 67 patients experienced POMC. Patients with POA were more likely to have POMC, a thymoma, and an ectopic thymus. Univariate analysis showed that POMC correlated with POA, presence of an ectopic thymus, dose of pyridostigmine bromide (PYR), presence of a thymoma, MGFA stage, preoperative myasthenic crisis, and postoperative pneumonia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for POMC were POA, preoperative myasthenic crisis, higher dose of PYR, and postoperative pneumonia. Our results suggest that clinicians should consider the risk factors for POMC—especially preoperative anxiety—before performing a thymectomy in patients with MG. PMID:26962777

  18. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  19. Preoperative factors affecting the outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated preoperative variables contributing to adverse surgical outcome for repair of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms on data collected prospectively between October 1989 and March 2010. Putative risk factors including age, sex, smoking status, positive family history, modified Rankin Score prior to the surgery, size of the aneurysm, specific site (basilar caput and trunk, vertebral artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery), midline location, presence of calcium, thrombus or irregularity in the aneurysm on preoperative imaging, associated arteriovenous malformation and preoperative coiling were investigated using regression analyses. In a total of 121 operations, surgical mortality and morbidity was 16.3%. For patients with aneurysms less than 9mm this rate was 3.2%. Among the investigated variables we found that size, calcification of the aneurysm and age were each predictors of surgical outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms.

  20. Preoperative prognostic factors for severe diffuse secondary peritonitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Matti; Sallinen, Ville; Mentula, Panu; Leppäniemi, Ari

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse preoperative risk factors for mortality or intensive care unit admission to describe severe peritonitis. This was a single academic centre retrospective study of consecutive adult patients operated for diffuse secondary peritonitis between 2012 and 2013. Patients with appendicitis or cholecystitis were excluded. Independent risk factors were identified using binary and ordinal logistic regression. A total of 223 patients were analysed. Overall 30-day mortality was 14.5 %. Postoperatively, 32.3 % of patients were admitted into the intensive care unit (ICU). Independent risk factors for severe peritonitis were septic shock (odds ratio (OR) 37.94, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 14.52-99.13), chronic kidney insufficiency (OR 5.98 (95 % CI 1.56-22.86), severe sepsis (OR 4.80, 95 % CI 2.10-10.65) and cardiovascular disease (OR 2.58, 95 % CI 1.22-5.47). Patients lacking these factors had no mortality. ICU admission was refused in 24 (10.8 %) patients with 70.8 % mortality. In a subgroup of patients without treatment limitations (n = 190), independent risk factors for weighted outcome of ICU admission or mortality were septic shock (OR 11.89, 95 % CI 4.98-28.40), severe sepsis (OR 5.56, 95 % CI 2.39-12.89), metastatic malignant disease or lymphoma (OR 3.11, 95 % CI 1.34-7.20) and corticosteroid use (OR 2.98, 95 % CI 1.18-7.51). When receiving full level of care, patients with preoperative organ dysfunctions in this subgroup had 8.2 % 30-day mortality. Preoperative organ dysfunctions, chronic kidney insufficiency and cardiovascular disease are the most important risk factors for severe peritonitis. Without these risk factors, patients had no mortality.

  1. Preoperative factors affecting the intraoperative core body temperature in abdominal surgery under general anesthesia: an observational cohort.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Yoon, Haesang

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to identify preoperative factors affecting the intraoperative core body temperature in abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. This study was performed through prospective descriptive research design. The setting was a 1300-bed university hospital in Incheon, South Korea. The sample consisted of 147 patients who had undergone elective abdominal surgery under general anesthesia. Age, weight, and height were collected on a preoperative visit to general unit, and body mass index, body surface area, and total body fat were calculated. The basal preoperative core body temperature (CBT), preoperative blood pressure, and heart rate were measured. Core body temperature was again measured at 1, 2, and 3 hours following general anesthesia. Predictive factors of intraoperative hypothermia of less than 36°C were preoperative CBT (β = .44), weight (β = .41), preoperative heart rate (β = .20), and age (β = -.13) at 1 hour after anesthesia (R = 0.658, F = 68.3, P < .001); preoperative CBT (β = .33), weight (β = .37), preoperative heart rate (β = .22), and age (β = -.24) at 2 hours after anesthesia (R = 0.631, F = 60.8, P < .001); and age (β = -.34), weight (β = .36), preoperative CBT (β = .30), and preoperative heart rate (β = .20) at 3 hours after anesthesia (R = 0.665, F = 70.6, P < .001). Low preoperative body temperature and low weight seem to be risk factors of intraoperative hypothermia during 2 hours after anesthesia and advanced age and low weight at 3 hours following anesthesia. We recommend prewarming and intraoperative warming through forced air warming devices and covering a patient with a warm blanket during transportation. This procedure is necessary for the abdominal surgical patients of advanced age with low weight and duration of general anesthesia to last more than 1 hour.

  2. [Reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality with preoperative risk evaluation and with refined perioperative medical care].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji

    2012-05-01

    Reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality is important not only for patients' outcome but for reduction of financial burden on society. Precise and accurate preoperative evaluation of surgical risk factors is crucial to plan appropriate postoperative allocation of medical resources. American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status is a traditional measure to describe preoperative risk of patients undergoing surgery. In the last decade, several scoring systems with better sensitivity and specificity were reported and validated. Charlson Age-comorbidity Index, Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) are frequently used scoring systems. Several lines of evidence indicate that negligence of medical caregivers cause substantial numbers of errors to patients and often leads to severe complications or deaths. Full compliances to surgical checklists and implementation of medical team will help reduce these errors and lead to better patients' postoperative outcomes.

  3. Preoperative Chlorhexidine Gluconate Use Can Increase Risk for Surgical Site Infections after Ventral Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Ajita S; Krpata, David M; Phillips, Sharon; Huang, Li-Ching; Haskins, Ivy N; Rosenblatt, Steven; Poulose, Benjamin K; Rosen, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    There is varying evidence about the use of preoperative chlorhexidine gluconate to decrease surgical site infection for elective surgery. This intervention has never been studied in ventral hernia repair, the most common general surgery procedure in the US. We aimed to determine whether preoperative chlorhexidine gluconate decreases the risk of 30-day wound morbidity in patients undergoing ventral hernia repair. All patients undergoing ventral hernia repair in the Americas Hernia Society Quality Collaborative were separated into 2 groups: 1 group received preoperative chlorhexidine scrub and the other did not. The 2 groups were evaluated for 30-day wound morbidity, including surgical site occurrence (SSO), surgical site infection (SSI), and SSO requiring procedural intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate regression analysis and propensity score modeling. Multiple factors were controlled for statistical analysis, including patient-related factors and operative factors. In total, 3,924 patients were included for comparison. After multivariate logistic regression modeling, the preoperative chlorhexidine scrub group had a higher incidence of SSOs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34; 95% CI 1.11 to 1.61) and SSIs (OR = 1.46; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.07). After propensity score modeling, the increased risk of SSO and SSI persisted (SSO: OR = 1.39; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.70; SSI: OR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.011 to 2.072, respectively). Prehospital chlorhexidine gluconate scrub appears to increase the risk of 30-day wound morbidity in patients undergoing ventral hernia repair. These findings suggest that the generalized use of prehospital chlorhexidine might not be desirable for all surgical populations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  5. The Importance of Patient-Specific Preoperative Factors: An Analysis of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Kim, Sunghee; Gaynor, J. William; Tchervenkov, Christo Ivanov; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F.; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E.; Jonas, Richard A.; Edwards, Fred H.; Grover, Frederick L.; Shahian, David M.; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common fonns of risk adjustment for pediatric and congenital heart surgery used today are based mainly on the estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation. The goals of this analysis were to assess the association of patient-specific preoperative factors with mortality and to determine which of these preoperative factors to include in future pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical risk models. Methods All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) during 2010 through 2012 were eligible for inclusion. Patients weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing patent ductus arteriosus closure were excluded. Centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for discharge mortality or other key variables were excluded. Rates of discharge mortality for patients with or without specific preoperative factors were assessed across age groups and were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results In all, 25,476 operations were included (overall discharge mortality 3.7%, n = 943). The prevalence of common preoperative factors and their associations with discharge mortality were determined. Associations of the following preoperative factors with discharge mortality were all highly significant (p < 0.0001) for neonates, infants, and children: mechanical circulatory support, renal dysfunction, shock, and mechanical ventilation. Conclusions Current STS-CHSD risk adjustment is based on estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation as well as age, weight, and prematurity. The inclusion of additional patient-specific preoperative factors in risk models for pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery could lead to increased precision in predicting risk of operative mortality and comparison of observed to expected outcomes. PMID:25262395

  6. Preoperative factors as a predictor for early postoperative outcomes after repair of congenital transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Won; Gwak, Mijeung; Shin, Won-Jung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yu, Jeong Jin; Park, Pyung-Hwan

    2015-03-01

    Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) requires early surgical repair during the neonatal period. Several preoperative factors have been identified for the postoperative poor outcome after arterial switch operation (ASO). However, the data remain uncertain an association. Therefore, we investigated the preoperative factors which affect the early postoperative outcomes. Between March 2005 and May 2012, a retrospective study was performed which included 126 infants with an ASO for TGA. Preoperative data included the vasoactive inotropic score (VIS) and baseline hemodynamics. Early postoperative outcomes included the duration of mechanical ventilation, the length of stay in the intensive care unit and hospital, and early mortality. Multivariate linear regression and receiver operating characteristics analysis were performed. The duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly correlated with the preoperative mechanical ventilator support and VIS, and CPB time. On multivariate linear regression analysis, a higher preoperative VIS, preoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level, and the CPB time were identified as independent risk factors for delayed mechanical ventilation. Preoperative VIS (OR 1.154, 95 % CI 1.024-1.300) and the CPB time (OR 1.034, 95 % CI 1.009-1.060) were independent parameters predicting early mortality. A preoperative VIS of 12.5 had the best combined sensitivity (83.3 %) and specificity (85.3 %) and an AUC of 0.852 (95 % CI 0.642-1.061) predicted early mortality. Our results suggest that preoperative VIS and BNP can predict the need for prolonged postoperative mechanical ventilation. Moreover, preoperative VIS may be used as a simple and feasible indicator for predicting early mortality.

  7. A Pre-operative Risk Model for Post-operative Pneumonia following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Raymond J.; Liang, Qixing; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoting; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Theurer, Patricia F.; Fishstrom, Astrid B.; Harrington, Steven D.; DeLucia, Alphonse; Paone, Gaetano; Patel, Himanshu J.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-operative pneumonia is the most prevalent of all hospital-acquired infections following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CAB). Accurate prediction of a patient’s risk of this morbid complication is hindered by its low relative incidence. In an effort to support clinical decision-making and quality improvement, we developed a pre-operative prediction model for post-operative pneumonia following CAB. Methods We undertook an observational study of 16,084 patients undergoing CAB between Q3 2011 – Q2 2014 across 33 institutions participating in the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons – Quality Collaborative. Variables related to patient demographics, medical history, admission status, comorbid disease, cardiac anatomy and the institution performing the procedure were investigated. Logistic regression via forwards stepwise selection (p < 0.05 threshold) was utilized to develop a risk prediction model for estimating the occurrence of pneumonia. Traditional methods were employed to assess the model’s performance. Results Post-operative pneumonia occurred in 3.30% of patients. Multivariable analysis identified 17 pre-operative factors, including: demographics, laboratory values, comorbid disease, pulmonary and cardiac function, and operative status. The final model significantly predicted the occurrence of pneumonia, and performed well (C-statistic: 0.74). These findings were confirmed via sensitivity analyses by center and clinically important sub-groups. Conclusions We identified 17 readily obtainable pre-operative variables associated with post-operative pneumonia. This model may be used to provide individualized risk estimation and to identify opportunities to reduce a patient’s pre-operative risk of pneumonia through pre-habilitation. PMID:27261082

  8. Preoperative Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer. An Independent Prognostic Factor Still Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Rubino, Antonio Salvatore; Latino, Rosalia; Giannone, Fabio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Scilletta, Beniamino; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, in a sample of patients radically treated for colorectal carcinoma, the preoperative determination of the carcinoembryonic antigen (p-CEA) may have a prognostic value and constitute an independent risk factor in relation to disease-free survival. The preoperative CEA seems to be related both to the staging of colorectal neoplasia and to the patient's prognosis, although this—to date—has not been conclusively demonstrated and is still a matter of intense debate in the scientific community. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. A total of 395 patients were radically treated for colorectal carcinoma. The preoperative CEA was statistically compared with the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging, the T and N parameters, and grading. All parameters recorded in our database were tested for an association with disease-free survival (DFS). Only factors significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the DFS were used to build multivariate stepwise forward logistic regression models to establish their independent predictors. A statistically significant relationship was found between p-CEA and tumor staging (P < 0.001), T (P < 0.001) and N parameters (P = 0.006). In a multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors found were: p-CEA, stages N1 and N2 according to AJCC, and G3 grading (grade). A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was evident between the DFS of patients with normal and high p-CEA levels. Preoperative CEA makes a pre-operative selection possible of those patients for whom it is likely to be able to predict a more advanced staging. PMID:25875542

  9. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  10. A preoperative risk prediction model for 30-day mortality following cardiac surgery in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Billah, Baki; Reid, Christopher Michael; Shardey, Gilbert C; Smith, Julian A

    2010-05-01

    Population-specific risk models are required to build consumer and provider confidence in clinical service delivery, particularly when the risks may be life-threatening. Cardiac surgery carries such risks. Currently, there is no model developed on the Australian cardiac surgery population and this article presents a novel risk prediction model for the Australian cohort with the aim to provide a guide for the surgeons and patients in assessing preoperative risk factors for cardiac surgery. This study aims to identify preoperative risk factors associated with 30-day mortality following cardiac surgery for an Australian population and to develop a preoperative model for risk prediction. All patients (23016) undergoing cardiac surgery between July 2001 and June 2008 recorded in the Australian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ASCTS) database were included in this analysis. The data were divided randomly into model creation (13810, 60%) and model validation (9206, 40%) sets. The model was developed on the creation set and then validated on the validation set. The bootstrap sampling and automated variable selection methods were used to develop several candidate models. The final model was selected from this group of candidate models by using prediction mean square error (MSE) and Bayesian Information Criteria (BIC). Using a multifold validation, the average receiver operating characteristic (ROC), p-value for Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-squared test and MSE were obtained. Risk thresholds for low-, moderate- and high-risk patients were defined. The expected and observed mortality for various risk groups were compared. The multicollinearity and first-order interaction effect between clinically meaningful risk factors were investigated. A total of 23016 patients underwent cardiac surgery and the 30-day mortality rate was 3.2% (728 patients). Independent predictors of mortality in the model were: age, sex, the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, urgency of procedure

  11. Predictive factors for recurrence of cryptoglandular fistulae characterized by preoperative three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Visscher, A P; Schuur, D; Slooff, R A E; Meijerink, W J H J; Deen-Molenaar, C B H; Felt-Bersma, R J F

    2016-05-01

    Precise information regarding the location of an anal fistula and its relationship to adjacent structures is necessary for selecting the best surgical strategy. Retrospective and cross-sectional studies were performed to determine predictive factors for recurrence of anal fistula from preoperative examination by three-dimensional endoanal ultrasound (3D-EAUS). Patients in our tertiary centre and in a private centre specialized in proctology undergoing preoperative 3D-EAUS for cryptoglandular anal fistulae between 2002 and 2012 were included. A questionnaire was sent in September 2013 to assess the patient's condition with regard to recurrence. Variables checked for association with recurrence were gender, type of centre, previous fistula surgery, secondary track formation and classification of the fistula. There were 143 patients of whom 96 had a low fistula treated by fistulotomy, 28 a high fistula treated by fistulectomy and 19 a high fistula treated by fistulectomy combined with a mucosal advancement flap. The median duration of follow-up was 26 (2-118) months. The fistula recurred in 40 (27%) patients. Independent risk factors included the presence of secondary track formation [hazard ratio 2.4 (95% CI 1.2-51), P = 0.016] and previous fistula surgery [hazard ratio 1.2 (95% CI 1.0-4.6), P = 0.041]. Agreement between the 3D-EAUS examination and the evaluation under anaesthesia regarding the site of the internal opening, classification of the fistula and the presence of secondary tracks was 97%, 98% and 78%. The identification of secondary tracks by preoperative 3D-EAUS examination was the strongest independent risk factor for recurrence. This stresses the importance of preoperative 3D-EAUS in mapping the pathological anatomy of the fistula and a thorough search for secondary track formation during surgery. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Assessment of Preoperative Anxiety in Cardiac Surgery Patients Lacking a History of Anxiety: Contributing Factors and Postoperative Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Palazón, Joaquín; Fuentes-García, Diego; Falcón-Araña, Luis; Roca-Calvo, María José; Burguillos-López, Sebastián; Doménech-Asensi, Paloma; Jara-Rubio, Rubén

    2017-04-26

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery, identify any influencing clinical factors, and assess the relationship between anxiety and postoperative morbidity. A prospective and consecutive study. A single university hospital. The study comprised 200 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Each patient was asked to grade his or her preoperative anxiety level using the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and set of specific anxiety-related questions. Demographic data (age, sex, body mass index) and anesthetic and surgical data (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, EuroSCORE surgical risk, preoperative length of stay, and previous anesthetic experience) were registered. Also, postoperative morbidity was assessed. Twenty-eight percent of the patients developed high preoperative anxiety. The mean Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale score was 11.4 ± 4.3, and the mean Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety score was 48 ± 21. Patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass surgery, who had no previous anesthetic experience, and who were hospitalized before surgery, had higher anxiety scores. Coronary bypass surgery (odds ratio 3.026; 1.509-6.067; p = 0.002) was associated independently with preoperative high-level anxiety. Anxiety most commonly was caused by waiting for surgery, not knowing what is happening, fearing not being able to awaken from anesthesia, and being at the mercy of staff. Anxiety did not modify the postoperative course. In patients waiting to undergo cardiac surgery, both fear of the unknown and lack of information, especially related to the surgery, are crucial factors in high levels of preoperative anxiety in cardiac surgery. Coronary bypass surgery is a determining factor for preoperative anxiety. The anxiety level did not modify the postoperative course in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  13. Preoperative risk analysis in patients receiving Jarvik-7 artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, A T; Cabrol, C; Gandjbackhch, I; Pavie, A; Bors, V; Muneretto, C

    1991-01-01

    To distinguish high-risk patients prior to implantation of a Jarvik-7 artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation, our 37 attempts were reviewed retrospectively. Arbitrary scores of 1 to 4 were given for nine preoperative factors on the basis of results obtained by uni- and multivariate analyses between successful cases and failed attempts; transplant rejection (scored 4: S4) or postoperative heart failure (S3) as the indication, recipient height less than 175 cm (S3), body surface area less than 1.8 m2 (S3), hyperbilirubinemia greater than 24 microM/l (S2), preoperative renal failure requiring dialysis (S2), weight less than 60 kg (S2), and age greater than 40 years (S1). All except one of the 16 patients with successful bridge had a total score of less than 4, with an average score of 1.3 in contrast to 6.6 in the 21 failed cases (p less than 0.001). Among the 17 patients who scored less than 4, 15 received transplants (specificity 90%), while only one qualified for transplantation among 20 patients who scored 4 or more (sensitivity 94%). The two unpredicted failures resulted from mediastinitis and pulmonary infarction, both attributable to postoperative management. Multiple preoperative factors in combination could have successfully predicted the outcome of mechanical support in our experience. These results underscore the importance of patient selection to achieve successful and effective use of the Jarvik-7 as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  14. Preoperative delay of more than 1 hour increases the risk of surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Kris E; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Neusner, Alex; Kepler, Christopher K; Albert, Todd J; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2013-07-01

    Retrospective institutional database review. To determine whether preoperative in-room time is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI). Prior to spine surgery, while the patient is in the operating room, several procedures may be performed that may delay surgery. During this time, the sterile field may be exposed and may become contaminated. The hypothesis of this study was that the length of time in the operative room prior to surgical incision (anesthesia ready time [ART]) was related to the risk of SSI. From 2005 to 2009, we identified 276 patients who developed SSI out of 7991 cases that underwent spine surgery from 2005 to 2009. Patient demographic factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, number of levels, anatomic region, type of surgical approach, and length of surgery were extrapolated. ART was calculated as the time after the patient was brought into the operating room prior to surgical incision. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for SSI. Mean ART was significantly (P = 0.001) higher in patients with infection (68 min) compared with those without infection (60 min). The infection rate was higher in cases with ART more than 1 hour compared with those with less than 1 hour (4.9% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, ART more than 1 hour was an independent risk factor for SSI, along with number of levels, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and posterior approach. The highest percentage of cases with ART more than 1 hour occurred in August and September. Preoperative in-room time prior to the start of surgical incision is an independent risk factor for SSI. All possible steps should be taken prior to entry into the operating theater to reduce in-room time and opening of surgical sterile instrumentation be delayed until the surgery is ready to proceed.

  15. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  16. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Connors, K C; Sheehan, Timothy J; Vaughan, James S

    2005-06-01

    Minimize surprises on your financial statement by adopting a model for integrated risk management that: Examines interrelationships among operations, investments, and financing. Incorporates concepts of the capital asset pricing model to manage unexpected volatility

  17. Pre-operative patient education is associated with decreased risk of arthrofibrosis after total knee arthroplasty: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Livbjerg, Anna Emilie; Froekjaer, Sara; Simonsen, Ole; Rathleff, Michael S

    2013-09-01

    The purpose was to investigate risk factors for postoperative stiffness and long-term outcome following manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA). In one of the five Danish regions, all patients in a 4-year period who received MUA following total knee arthroplasty (N=36) were included in two case-control studies. Data on potential risk factors were extracted from the Danish Knee arthroplasty Register and from a postal questionnaire including long-term outcome measures regarding pain, function and quality of life (Oxford Knee Score and EQ-5D). Previous knee surgery and a high preoperative Knee Society Function Score were significant risk factors, whereas attending a preoperative information meeting was associated with a significantly decreased risk of postoperative stiffness requiring MUA (P<0.001). The long-term results following MUA (1-5 years) were equivalent to patients without postoperative stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative Risk Levels and Vascular Access in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation-A Single-Institute Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Akira T; Collet, Jean Philippe; Cluzel, Philippe; Makri, Ralouka; Laali, Mojgan; DeFrance, Catherine; Furuya, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Akira; Leprince, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    Although transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been indicated for patients with high surgical risk, indications for or against the procedure become more difficult as vascular access becomes more proximal and/or invasive in order to accommodate patients with even higher risks. We compared preoperative factors including the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predicted Risk of Mortality (STS) score with postoperative survival in 195 patients undergoing TAVI during 2.5 years (January 2010 to June 2012), when vascular access routes were developed from iliofemoral (IL/Fm access, n = 149), axillo-clavicular, apical, and direct aortic approaches (alternative access, n = 46). Logistic regression analyses showed that alternative access was associated with reduced 30-day survival (P = 0.024), while high surgical risk (>15% in both EuroSCORE and STS score) was associated with reduced 1-year survival (P = 0.046). Thus, patients treated via IL/Fm access had acceptable outcome regardless of preoperative risk levels while patients with low surgical risk (<15%) had favorable outcome irrespective of access route. Since the remaining patients with combined risk factors, high preoperative risk level (>15%) requiring alternative access, had a prohibitive risk in our experience, they might have been considered untreatable or not amenable even to TAVI and offered medical or alternative managements.

  19. Recurrence Risk Stratification After Preoperative Chemoradiation of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xi, Mian; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Merrell, Kenneth W; Liao, Zhongxing; Murphy, Mariela A Blum; Ho, Linus; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Mehran, Reza; Lee, Jeffrey H; Bhutani, Manoop S; Weston, Brian; Maru, Dipen M; Komaki, Ritsuko; Ajani, Jaffer A; Lin, Steven H

    2017-06-16

    To discern recurrence risk stratification and investigate its influence on postoperative surveillance in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Reports documenting recurrence risk stratification in EAC after neoadjuvant CRT are scarce. Between 1998 and 2014, 601 patients with EAC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by esophagectomy were included for analysis. The pattern, site, timing, and frequency of the first recurrence and potential prognostic factors for developing recurrences were analyzed. This cohort was used as the training set to propose a recurrence risk stratification system, and the stratification was further validated in another cohort of 172 patients. A total of 150 patients (25.0%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant CRT and the rest were defined as the non-pCR group (n = 451) in the training cohort. After a median follow-up of 63.6 months, the pCR group demonstrated a significantly lower locoregional (4.7% vs 19.1%) and distant recurrence rate (22.0% vs.44.6%) than the non-pCR group (P < 0.001). Based on independent prognostic factors, patients were stratified into 4 recurrence risk categories: pCR with clinical stage I/II, pCR with clinical stage III, non-pCR with pN0, and non-pCR with pN+, with corresponding 5-year recurrence-free survival rates of 88.7%, 65.8%, 55.3%, and 33.0%, respectively (P < 0.001). The risk stratification was reproducible in the validation cohort. We proposed a recurrence risk stratification system for EAC patients based on pathologic response and pretreatment clinical stage. Risk-based postoperative surveillance strategies could be developed for different risk categories.

  20. Routine preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Briffa, Norman P

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial effects of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) in coronary artery bypass graft surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass have been reported. However, whether preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) has any beneficial effects remains to be established. We report our experience of preoperative insertion of IABP in OPCAB.

  1. A Preoperative Personalized Risk Assessment Calculator for Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients undergoing Primary Cytoreductive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Emma L; Rutstein, Sarah; Miller, William C; Gehrig, Paola A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer has higher rates of postoperative complication than neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery. If patients at high risk of postoperative complication were identified preoperatively, primary therapy could be tailored. Our objective was to develop a predictive model to estimate the risk of major postoperative complication after primary cytoreductive surgery among elderly ovarian cancer patients. Methods Patients who underwent primary surgery for ovarian cancer between 2005-2013 were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project. Patients were selected using primary procedure CPT codes. Major complications were defined as grade 3 or higher complications on the validated Claviden-Dindo scale. Using logistic regression, we identified demographic and clinical characteristics predictive of postoperative complication. Results We identified 2,101 ovarian cancer patients of whom 35.9% were older than 65. Among women older than 65, the rate of major postoperative complication was 16.4%. Complications were directly associated with preoperative laboratory values (serum creatinine, platelets, white blood cell count, hematocrit), ascites, white race, and smoking status, and indirectly associated with albumin. Our predictive model had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.725. In order to not deny patients necessary surgery, we chose a 50% population rate of postoperative complication which produced model sensitivity of 9.8% and specificity of 98%. Discussion Our predictive model uses easily and routinely obtained objective preoperative factors to estimate the risk of postoperative complication among elderly ovarian cancer patients. This information can be used to assess risk, manage postoperative expectations, and make decisions regarding initial treatment. PMID:26432038

  2. Risk of Postoperative Complications Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Treated Preoperatively With Vedolizumab.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akihiro; Komaki, Yuga; Patel, Nayan; Komaki, Fukiko; Aelvoet, Arthur S; Tran, Anthony L; Pekow, Joel; Dalal, Sushila; Cohen, Russell D; Cannon, Lisa; Umanskiy, Konstantin; Smith, Radhika; Hurst, Roger; Hyman, Neil; Rubin, David T; Sakuraba, Atsushi

    2017-09-01

    Vedolizumab is increasingly used to treat patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), however, its safety during the perioperative period remains unclear. We compared the 30-day postoperative complications among patients treated preoperatively with vedolizumab, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or non-biological therapy. The retrospective study cohort was comprised of patients receiving vedolizumab, anti-TNF-α agents or non-biological therapy within 4 weeks of surgery. The rates of 30-day postoperative complications were compared between groups using univariate and multivariate analysis. Propensity score-matched analysis was performed to compare the outcome between groups. Among 443 patients (64 vedolizumab, 129 anti-TNF-α agents, and 250 non-biological therapy), a total of 144 patients experienced postoperative complications (32%). In multivariate analysis, age >65 (odds ratio (OR) 3.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-9.76) and low-albumin (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.28-4.00) were associated with increased risk of 30-day postoperative complications. For infectious complications, steroid use (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.57-8.57, P=0.003) and low hemoglobin (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.32-6.96, P=0.009) were associated with increased risk in multivariate analysis. Propensity score matched analysis demonstrated that the risks of postoperative complications were not different among patients preoperatively receiving vedolizumab, anti-TNF-α agents or non-biological therapy (UC, P=0.40; CD, P=0.35). In the present study, preoperative vedolizumab exposure did not affect the risk of 30-day postoperative complications in UC and CD. Further, larger studies are required to confirm our findings.

  3. Preoperative Laboratory Testing in Patients Undergoing Elective, Low-Risk Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Duncan, Casey B.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Han, Yimei; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine preoperative laboratory testing for ambulatory surgery is not recommended. Methods Patients who underwent elective hernia repair (N = 73,596) were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database (2005–2010). Patterns of preoperative testing were examined. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with testing and postoperative complications. Results A total of 46,977 (63.8%) patients underwent testing, with at least one abnormal test recorded in 61.6% of patients. In patients with no NSQIP comorbidities (N = 25,149) and no clear indication for testing, 54% received at least one test. In addition, 15.3% of tested patients underwent laboratory testing the day of the operation. In this group, surgery was done despite abnormal results in 61.6% of same day tests. In multivariate analyses, testing was associated with older age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class >1, hypertension, ascites, bleeding disorders, systemic steroids, and laparoscopic procedures. Major complications (reintubation, pulmonary embolus, stroke, renal failure, coma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, bleeding, or death) occurred in 0.3% of patients. After adjusting for patient and procedure characteristics, neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions Preoperative testing is overused in patients undergoing low-risk, ambulatory surgery. Neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative outcomes. On the basis of high rates of testing in healthy patients, physician and/or facility preference and not only patient condition currently dictate use. Involvement from surgical societies is necessary to establish guidelines for preoperative testing. PMID:22868362

  4. Preoperative Pain, Symptoms, and Psychological Factors related to Higher Acute Pain Trajectories during Hospitalization for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maren Falch; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Unrelieved postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a significant problem. This longitudinal study investigated how preoperative pain intensity, as well as a comprehensive list of preoperative and perioperative factors, influenced the severity of acute average and worst pain after TKA. Methods Prior to surgery, 203 patients completed a demographic questionnaire, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Brief Pain Inventory was completed prior to surgery as well as through postoperative days (POD) 0 to 4. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Results Several factors were associated with higher levels of preoperative and postoperative pain. Lower preoperative average and worst pain intensity scores were associated with increases in average and worst postoperative pain from POD1 to POD4. A higher number of comorbidities, higher C-reactive protein values, and higher pain interference with function were associated with higher preoperative levels of average pain. Older age, higher fatigue levels, and higher scores on identity and emotional responses to osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with higher preoperative levels of worst pain. Lower perceived consequences of OA were associated with higher pain from POD1 to POD4. Males and patients with lower preoperative scores for average pain had higher worst pain following surgery. Discussion Patients at higher risk for more severe postoperative pain can be identified through an assessment of pain and other risk factors identified in this study. Future research needs to test the efficacy of interventions that modify patients’ perceptions of living with OA and pain intensity before surgery on short and long term postoperative outcomes. PMID:27583551

  5. Predicting complications after pulmonary resection. Preoperative exercise testing vs a multifactorial cardiopulmonary risk index.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S K; Faling, L J; Daly, B D; Celli, B R

    1993-09-01

    Recent studies have used preoperative cardiopulmonary exercise testing to improve risk assessment of pulmonary resection for lung cancer. These studies have demonstrated inconsistent correlation between peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and postoperative complications but have not systematically examined other methods of risk stratification. We analyzed the findings in 42 patients who had cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to lung cancer resection. Preoperative clinical data combining pulmonary factors (obesity, productive cough, wheezing, tobacco use, ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s over the forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] < 70 percent, and PaCO2 > 45 mm Hg), and an established cardiac risk index were used to generate a cardiopulmonary risk index (CPRI). When analyzed using the risk index, the incidence of postoperative complications increased with higher CPRI scores. Those with a CPRI of 4 or greater were 22 times more likely to develop a complication, compared to a CPRI of less than 4 (p < 0.0001). We found that patients with a peak VO2 less than 500 ml/m2/min (body surface area) were 6 times more likely to experience a cardiopulmonary complication (p < 0.05). With multiple logistic regression analysis, peak VO2 was not an independent predictor of postoperative complications. Analysis also demonstrated that a CPRI of 4 or greater was associated with significant reductions in peak VO2. We conclude that both the peak VO2 during cardiopulmonary exercise testing and a multifactorial CPRI are highly predictive of complications after lung resection. Adding the peak VO2 did not enhance the risk estimation generated by the CPRI. The association between postoperative complications and peak VO2 may be explained by the correlation between identifiable cardiopulmonary disease (CPRI) and reduced oxygen uptake with exercise.

  6. Preoperative Computed Tomography to Predict and Stratify the Risk of Severe Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Sandini, Marta; Bernasconi, Davide Paolo; Ippolito, Davide; Nespoli, Luca; Baini, Melissa; Barbaro, Salvatore; Fior, Davide; Gianotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this article is to assess whether measures of abdominal fat distribution, visceral density, and antropometric parameters obtained from computed tomography (CT) may predict postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) occurrence.We analyzed 117 patients who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and had a preoperative CT scan as staging in our center. CT images were processed to obtain measures of total fat volume (TFV), visceral fat volume (VFV), density of spleen, and pancreas, and diameter of pancreatic duct. The predictive ability of each parameter was investigated by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves methodology and assessing optimal cutoff thresholds. A stepwise selection method was used to determine the best predictive model.Clinically relevant (grades B and C) POPF occurred in 24 patients (20.5%). Areas under ROC-curves showed that none of the parameters was per se significantly predictive. The multivariate analysis revealed that a VFV >2334 cm, TFV >4408 cm, pancreas/spleen density ratio <0.707, and pancreatic duct diameter <5 mm were predictive of POPF. The risk of POPF progressively increased with the number of factors involved and age.It is possible to deduce objective information on the risk of POPF from a simple and routine preoperative radiologic workup.

  7. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  8. Preoperative PTH as a marker of risk for post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, P; Sommaruga, L; Bezer, L; Arcuri, M F; Cataldo, S; Ceresini, G; Sianesi, M

    2010-06-01

    There are no common guidelines to identify the population at risk to develop hypocalcemia preoperatively or early in the postoperative course in thyroidectomized patients, therefore the authors suggest to examine the PTH value preoperatively. We divided 391 patients in two groups according to the preoperative PTH level (normal, ≤ 72 pg/mL vs. increased >73 pg/mL). In 92/391 cases (23.52%) preoperative PTH was increased (mean PTH level 112.4+/-24.8 pg/mL; normal range 12-72 pg/mL). Out of these, 43 (46.7%) had hypocalcaemia postoperatively. In 18 out of the 43 patients clinical hypocalcemia also developed. The mean follow-up was of 148+/-13 days. Of the 299 patients with normal preoperative PTH, 127 (42.47%) developed postoperative hypocalcemia (mean calcium level 7.4+/-0.33 mg/dL). In 30 patients it was also clinically evident. The difference in terms of incidence of symptomatic hypocalcemia was statistically significant (increased preoperative PTH 19.5% vs. normal preoperative PTH 10.03% , P=0.036). All candidates to thyroidectomy should be investigated for preoperative PTH abnormalities.

  9. Preoperative androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Delayed biochemical recurrence in high-risk disease

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Ruel, Nora; Voglezang, Nicholas; Chang, Mark; Wilson, Timothy G.; Jones, Jeremy O.; Yuh, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of preoperative androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for localized prostate cancer is controversial; prospective assessments have yielded varying results. We sought to define a subset of patients with a higher likelihood of benefit from preoperative ADT. Methods An institutional database including consecutive patients receiving definitive surgery for localized prostate cancer was interrogated. Patients recorded as having received preoperative ADT were matched in a 1:2 fashion to patients who had not received prior ADT. Patients were matched on the basis of clinicopathologic characteristics, use of adjuvant treatment strategies, and duration of PSA follow-up. Time to biochemical recurrence (TTBR) was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for the overall study population and in subsets defined by D’Amico risk. Results No significant differences in clinicopathologic characteristics were noted between recipients (n=101) and matched non-recipients (n=196) of preoperative ADT. Although not statistically significant, positive surgical margin rates, seminal vesicle invasion and extracapsular extension were less frequent in patients receiving preoperative ADT. Furthermore, a lesser incidence of perioperative complications was noted in this group (7.4% v 18.4%). No significant differences were noted in TTBR between recipients and non-recipients of preoperative ADT in the overall study population. However, amongst patients with high-risk disease, TTBR was significantly longer in those patients who had received preoperative ADT (P=0.004). Conclusions The data presented herein suggest a potential benefit with preoperative ADT in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Consideration should be given to enriching for this subset in preoperative studies of novel endocrine therapies. PMID:24342128

  10. Is extended preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for high-risk patients necessary before percutaneous nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Alyssa M.; Bauman, Tyler M.; Larson, Jeffrey A.; Vetter, Joel M.; Benway, Brian M.; Desai, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the rate of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in high-risk patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) between patients who received 7, 2, or 0 days of preoperative antibiotics. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed a series of consecutive PCNLs performed at our institution. Patients with infected preoperative urine cultures were excluded. High-risk patients were defined as those with a history of previous urinary tract infection (UTI), hydronephrosis, or stone size ≥2 cm. Patients were treated with 7, 2, or 0 days of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis prior to PCNL. All patients received a single preoperative dose of antibiotics within 60 minutes of the start of surgery. Fisher exact test was used to compare the rate of SIRS by preoperative antibiotic length. Results Of the 292 patients identified, 138 (47.3%) had sterile urine and met high-risk criteria, of which 27 (19.6%), 39 (28.3%), and 72 (52.2%) received 7, 2, and 0 days of preoperative antibiotics, respectively. The 3 groups were similar in age, sex, and duration of surgery (p>0.05). There was no difference in the rate of SIRS between the groups, with 1 of 27 (3.7%), 2 of 39 (5.1%) and 3 of 72 patients (4.2%) meeting criteria in the 7, 2, and 0 days antibiotic groups (p=~1). Conclusions Extended preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis was not found to reduce the risk of SIRS after PCNL in our institutional experience of high-risk patients. For these patients, a single preoperative dose of antibiotics is sufficient. PMID:27847915

  11. Preoperative Anxiety in Patients With Myasthenia Gravis and Risk for Myasthenic Crisis After Extended Transsternal Thymectomy: A CONSORT Study.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianyong; Su, Chunhua; Lun, Xueping; Liu, Weibing; Yang, Weiling; Zhong, Beilong; Zhu, Haoshuai; Lei, Yiyan; Luo, Honghe; Chen, Zhenguang

    2016-03-01

    A thymectomy can ameliorate the symptoms of myasthenia gravis (MG) and prevent the progression of ocular MG (OMG) to generalized MG (GMG). However, postoperative myasthenic crisis (POMC) is a serious post-thymectomy complication. Preoperative anxiety (POA) is common but typically neglected in MG patients. The association of POA with POMC has not yet been examined.From June 2007 to December 2013, 541 cases of MG were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (Guangzhou, China). All cases underwent extended transsternal thymectomy (ETT). The clinical and pathological characteristics of these patients, including POA and POMC, were analyzed.A total of 179 patients experienced POA and 67 patients experienced POMC. Patients with POA were more likely to have POMC, a thymoma, and an ectopic thymus. Univariate analysis showed that POMC correlated with POA, presence of an ectopic thymus, dose of pyridostigmine bromide (PYR), presence of a thymoma, MGFA stage, preoperative myasthenic crisis, and postoperative pneumonia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the independent risk factors for POMC were POA, preoperative myasthenic crisis, higher dose of PYR, and postoperative pneumonia.Our results suggest that clinicians should consider the risk factors for POMC-especially preoperative anxiety-before performing a thymectomy in patients with MG.

  12. Preoperative Cholangitis and Future Liver Remnant Volume Determine the Risk of Liver Failure in Patients Undergoing Resection for Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ribero, Dario; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Aloia, Thomas A; Shindoh, Junichi; Fabio, Forchino; Amisano, Marco; Passot, Guillaume; Ferrero, Alessandro; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The highest mortality rates after liver surgery are reported in patients who undergo resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). In these patients, postoperative death usually follows the development of hepatic insufficiency. We sought to determine the factors associated with postoperative hepatic insufficiency and death due to liver failure in patients undergoing hepatectomy for HCCA. This study included all consecutive patients who underwent hepatectomy with curative intent for HCCA at 2 centers, from 1996 through 2013. Preoperative clinical and operative data were analyzed to identify independent determinants of hepatic insufficiency and liver failure-related death. The study included 133 patients with right or left major (n = 67) or extended (n = 66) hepatectomy. Preoperative biliary drainage was performed in 98 patients and was complicated by cholangitis in 40 cases. In all these patients, cholangitis was controlled before surgery. Major (Dindo III to IV) postoperative complications occurred in 73 patients (55%), with 29 suffering from hepatic insufficiency. Fifteen patients (11%) died within 90 days after surgery, 10 of them from liver failure. On multivariate analysis, predictors of postoperative hepatic insufficiency (all p < 0.05) were preoperative cholangitis (odds ratio [OR] 3.2), future liver remnant (FLR) volume < 30% (OR 3.5), preoperative total bilirubin level >3 mg/dL (OR 4), and albumin level < 3.5 mg/dL (OR 3.3). Only preoperative cholangitis (OR 7.5, p = 0.016) and FLR volume < 30% (OR 7.2, p = 0.019) predicted postoperative liver failure-related death. Preoperative cholangitis and insufficient FLR volume are major determinants of hepatic insufficiency and postoperative liver failure-related death. Given the association between biliary drainage and cholangitis, the preoperative approach to patients with HCCA should be optimized to minimize the risk of cholangitis. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  13. The Financial Impact of a Multidisciplinary Preoperative Risk Stratification Program for Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Duplantier, Neil; Briski, David; Ochsner, John Lockwood; Meyer, Mark; Stanga, Daryl; Chimento, George F

    2015-09-01

    This study's purpose was to assess the impact of a preoperative risk stratification program on joint arthroplasty outcomes at a single institution. We hypothesized that by using a standardized preoperative risk stratification center we would see better outcomes and decreased costs. The triage cohort (T) included 1498 patients assessed at a standardized risk stratification center, and the non-triage cohort (NT) included 1100 patients who did not utilize the center. The T cohort had significantly higher ASA classification (P<0.0001) and ACCI scores (P=0.028). We found no significant difference in complication rates. The T cohort showed a significant decrease in LOS (P<0.0001) and an increase in average reimbursement (P=0.009). A standardized preoperative risk stratification center can contribute to decreased LOS, increased reimbursement and help prevent complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Pre-operative Cardiology Consultation Prior to Intermediate-risk Surgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Volkan; Biteker, Murat; Özlek, Eda; Özlek, Bülent; Başaran, Özcan; Yıldırım, Birdal; Kayataş, Kadir; Çelik, Oğuzhan; Doğan, Marwa Mouline

    2017-08-07

    Patients undergoing noncardiac, nonvascular surgery (NCNVS) are at risk of perioperative cardiovascular events. However, benefits of cardiology consultation (CC) in patients with known or suspected cardiac disease undergoing intermediate-risk NCNVS is unknown. The study group included 700 consecutive patients referred for CC before intermediate-risk NCNVS in a tertiary-care teaching hospital. The control group included 1200 age-matched and sex-matched consecutive patients proceeded to the intermediate-risk surgery without preoperative CC during the same period. Patients older than 18 yr who underwent an elective, NCNVS were enrolled. Requests for consultation were made either by surgeon or an attending anesthesiologist. All patients underwent a complete preoperative clinical evaluation. Of the 700 patients who were referred for CC in the study group, 530 patients (75.7%) had no additional recommendations, and 170 patients (24.3%) underwent additional preoperative tests or had a change in preoperative therapy. Only 20 (2.8%) patients' NCNVS were delayed based on the cardiologists' recommendation and 680 patients eventually had their surgeries. Major cardiovascular and noncardiovascular complication rates were similar in the study and in the control groups (12.9% vs 13.6%, p=0.273 and 25.2% vs 26%, p=0.432 respectively). Preoperative CC in patients who underwent intermediate-risk NCNVS does not affect either perioperative management or outcome of surgery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children aged 5-12 years 1

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Louise Amália; Dias, Iohanna Maria Guimarães; Pereira, Lilian Varanda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children who wait for outpatient surgery. Method: cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a prospective cohort study that investigates the predictors of postoperative pain in children aged 5-12 years submitted to inguinal and umbilical hernia repair. It was selected 210 children, which were interviewed in the preoperative holding area of a general hospital. Anxiety was evaluated using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS). Sociodemographic and clinical variables were analyzed as exposure and anxiety (mYPAS final score>30) as outcome. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with preoperative anxiety. Results: forty-two percent (42.0%) of children presented preoperative anxiety (CI95%: 35.7%-48.6%), with mean scores equal to 30.1 (SD=8.4). Factors associated with preoperative anxiety were: age group of 5-6 years (OR=2.28; p=0.007) and socioeconomic status classified as class C (OR=2.39; p=0.016). Conclusion: the evaluation of children who wait for outpatient surgery should be multidimensional and comprise information on age and socioeconomic status, in order to help in the identification and early treatment of preoperative anxiety. PMID:27305179

  16. Pre-operative factors that can predict neoplastic polypoid lesions of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Byung Hyo; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Jang Eon; Cho, Jai Young; Kim, Haeryoung; Kim, So Yeon

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the preoperative factors that can predict neoplastic polypoid lesions of the gallbladder (PLGs) as well as malignant PLGs. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on the 210 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent cholecystectomy due to a PLG larger than 10 mm, as was determined by preoperative trans-abdominal ultrasonography or endoscopic ultrasonography. We analyzed the medical, laboratory, radiologic data and the pathologic results. RESULTS: In 210 cases, 146 had non-neoplastic polyps (69.5%) and 64 cases were neoplastic polyps (30.5%). An older age (≥ 65 years), the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the size of polyp (≥ 15 mm) were revealed to be independent predictive variables for neoplastic polyps with odd ratios (OR) of 2.27 (P = 0.044), 2.64 (P = 0.021) and 4.94 (P < 0.01), respectively. Among the neoplastic PLGs, an older age (≥ 65 years), the presence of DM and polyp size (≥ 15 mm) were associated with malignancy with ORs of 4.97 (P = 0.005), 6.13 (P = 0.001) and 20.55 (P < 0.001), respectively. CONCLUSION: Among patients with PLGs larger than 10 mm in size, higher risk groups such as elderly patients more than 65 years old, those with DM or a large polyp size (≥ 15 mm) should be managed by cholecystectomy. PMID:21633532

  17. Impact of preoperative nutritional support on clinical outcome in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk.

    PubMed

    Jie, Bin; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Nolan, Marie T; Zhu, Shai-Nan; Yu, Kang; Kondrup, Jens

    2012-10-01

    This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002). A consecutive series of patients admitted for selective abdominal surgery in the Peking Union Medical College Hospital and the Beijing University Third Hospital in Beijing, China were recruited from March 2007 to July 2008. Data were collected on the nutritional risk screening (NRS-2002), the application of perioperative nutritional support, surgery, complications, and length of stay. A minimum of 7 d of parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition before surgery was considered adequate preoperative nutritional support. In total 1085 patients were recruited, and 512 of them were at nutritional risk. Of the 120 patients with an NRS score at least 5, the complication rate was significantly lower in the preoperative nutrition group compared with the control group (25.6% versus 50.6%, P = 0.008). The postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the preoperative nutrition group than in the control group (13.7 ± 7.9 versus 17.9 ± 11.3 d, P = 0.018). Of the 392 patients with an NRS score from 3 to 4, the complication rate and the postoperative hospital stay were similar between patients with and those without preoperative nutritional support (P = 1.0 and 0.770, respectively). This finding suggests that preoperative nutritional support is beneficial to patients with an NRS score at least 5 by lowering the complication rate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Factors affecting sentinel node localization during preoperative breast lymphoscintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Haigh, P I; Hansen, N M; Giuliano, A E; Edwards, G K; Ye, W; Glass, E C

    2000-10-01

    Variable success rates for identifying axillary (AX) sentinel nodes in breast cancer patients using preoperative lymphoscintigraphy have been reported. We evaluated the effects of age, weight, breast size, method of biopsy, interval after biopsy, and imaging view on the success of sentinel node identification and on the kinetics of radiopharmaceutical migration. Preoperative breast lymphoscintigraphy was performed in consecutive breast cancer patients from February 1998 to December 1998. The ipsilateral shoulder was elevated on a foam wedge and the arm was abducted and elevated overhead. Imaging using this modified oblique view of the axilla (MOVA) started immediately after peritumoral injection of Millipore-filtered 99mTc-sulfur colloid and continued until AX sentinel nodes were identified. Anterior views were obtained after MOVA. AX, internal mammary (IM), and clavicular (CL) basins were monitored in all patients. MOVA was compared with the anterior view for sentinel node identification. Age, weight, breast size, method of biopsy, interval after biopsy, and primary tumor location were evaluated for their effects on sentinel node localization and transit times from injection to arrival at the sentinel nodes. Seventy-six lymphoscintigrams were obtained for 75 patients. AX sentinel nodes were revealed in 75 (99%) cases. IM or CL sentinel nodes were found in 19 (25%) cases and were not related to tumor location; exclusive IM drainage was present in 1 (1%) case. Identification of AX sentinel nodes was equivalent with MOVA and anterior views in 18 (24%) patients, was better with MOVA in 20 (26%) patients, and was accomplished only with MOVA in 38 (50%) patients. Median transit time was 17.5 min (range, 1 min to 18 h) after injection, and larger breast size was associated with increased transit time. No effect of age, weight, biopsy method, interval from biopsy, or tumor location on transit time was found. Use of MOVA can improve identification of AX sentinel nodes

  19. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is still unknown. Scientists ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  20. Clinical variables of preoperative risk in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; De Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Toro, Ivan Felizardo Contrera; Zambon, Lair

    2003-05-05

    Pulmonary complications are the most common forms of postoperative morbidity in thoracic surgery, especially atelectasis and pneumonia. The first step in avoiding these complications during the postoperative period is to detect the patients that may develop them. To identify risk variables leading to early postoperative pulmonary complications in thoracic surgery. Prospective study. Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. 145 patients submitted to elective surgery were classified as low, moderate and high risk for postoperative pulmonary complications using a risk assessment scale. The patients were followed up for 72 hours after the operation. Postoperative pulmonary complications were defined as atelectasis, pneumonia, tracheobronchitis, wheezing, prolonged intubation and/or prolonged mechanical ventilation. Univariate analysis was applied in order to study these independent variables: age, nutritional status, body mass index, respiratory disease, smoking habit, spirometry and surgery duration. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed in order to evaluate the relationship between independent and dependent variables. The incidence of postoperative complications was 18.6%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables increasing the chances of postoperative pulmonary complications were wheezing (odds ratio, OR = 6.2), body mass index (OR = 1.15), smoking (OR = 1.04) and surgery duration (OR = 1.007). Wheezing, body mass index, smoking and surgery duration increase the chances of postoperative pulmonary complications in thoracic surgery

  1. Do socioeconomic factors modify the association between preoperative antidepressant use and survival following coronary artery bypass surgery?

    PubMed

    Stenman, Malin; Holzmann, Martin J; Sartipy, Ulrik

    2015-11-01

    The impact of socioeconomic factors on mortality in patients with depression and cardiovascular disease is unknown. The aim was to study if socioeconomic factors modified the association between preoperative depression and survival following CABG. In a nationwide population-based cohort study, 22,930 patients who underwent CABG in Sweden between 2006 and 2013 were included from the SWEDEHEART register. The national Prescribed Drug Register was used to ascertain preoperative antidepressant use which was utilized as a proxy for depression. Educational level, income, and civil status were extracted from the Longitudinal integration database for health insurance and labor market studies. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality and was ascertained from the Cause of Death register. Cox regression and propensity score methods were used to estimate the risk for death while controlling for differences in baseline characteristics. During a mean follow-up of 4.1 years, 340 (11%) patients died in the antidepressant group and 1923 (9.7%) patients died in the control group. The adjusted risk for death was higher in patients with preoperative antidepressant use (HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.13-1.43), and was practically unchanged after the addition of educational level, family disposable income, and civil status (HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.11-1.41). The results were confirmed in a propensity-score matched cohort, and in selected subgroup analyses. Among patients who underwent CABG in Sweden, preoperative antidepressant use was associated with worse survival even after controlling for socioeconomic factors. The clinical implication is that the impact of depression on mortality was not influenced by socioeconomic factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Does preoperative risk for delirium moderate the effects of postoperative pain and opiate use on postoperative delirium?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Sands, Laura P.; Lim, Eunjung; Tsai, Tiffany L.; Kinjo, Sakura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether preoperative risk for delirium moderates the effect of postoperative pain and opioids on the development of postoperative delirium. Design Prospective cohort study Setting University medical center Participants Patients ≥ 65 years of age scheduled for major noncardiac surgery Measurements A structured interview was conducted pre- and post-operatively to determine the presence of delirium, defined using the Confusion Assessment Method. We first developed a prediction model to determine which patients were at high vs. low risk for the development of delirium based on preoperative patient data. We then computed a logistic regression model to determine whether preoperative risk for delirium moderates the effect of postoperative pain and opioids on incident delirium. Results Of 581 patients, 40% developed delirium on days 1 or 2 after surgery. Independent preoperative predictors of postoperative delirium included lower cognitive status, a history of central nervous system disease, high surgical risk, and major spine and joint arthroplasty surgery. Compared to the patients at low preoperative risk for developing delirium, the relative risk for postoperative delirium for those in the high preoperative risk group was 2.38 (95% CI = 1.67–3.40). A significant three-way interaction indicates that preoperative risk for delirium significantly moderated the effect of postoperative pain and opioid use on the development of delirium. Among patients at high preoperative risk for development of delirium who also had high postoperative pain and received high opioid doses, the incidence of delirium was 72%, compared to 20% among patients with low preoperative risk, low postoperative pain and received low opioid doses. Conclusions High levels of postoperative pain and using high opioid doses increased risk for postoperative delirium for all patients. However, the highest incidence of delirium was among patients who had high preoperative risk for

  3. Factors Associated with Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Use among Medicare Beneficiaries with Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Weiss, Julie; Hubbard, Rebecca A; O'Donoghue, Cristina; DeMartini, Wendy B; Buist, Diana S M; Kerlikowske, Karla; Goodrich, Martha; Virnig, Beth; Tosteson, Anna N A; Lehman, Constance D; Onega, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) use among Medicare beneficiaries with breast cancer has substantially increased from 2005 to 2009. We sought to identify factors associated with preoperative breast MRI use among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or stage I-III invasive breast cancer (IBC). Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results and Medicare data from 2005 to 2009 we identified women ages 66 and older with DCIS or stage I-III IBC who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. We compared preoperative breast MRI use by patient, tumor and hospital characteristics stratified by DCIS and IBC using multivariable logistic regression. From 2005 to 2009, preoperative breast MRI use increased from 5.9% to 22.4% of women diagnosed with DCIS and 7.0% to 24.3% of women diagnosed with IBC. Preoperative breast MRI use was more common among women who were younger, married, lived in higher median income zip codes and had no comorbidities. Among women with IBC, those with lobular disease, smaller tumors (<1 cm) and those with estrogen receptor negative tumors were more likely to receive preoperative breast MRI. Women with DCIS were more likely to receive preoperative MRI if tumors were larger (>2 cm). The likelihood of receiving preoperative breast MRI is similar for women diagnosed with DCIS and IBC. Use of MRI is more common in women with IBC for tumors that are lobular and smaller while for DCIS MRI is used for evaluation of larger lesions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pulmonary function changes and its influencing factors after preoperative brace treatment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bo; Fan, Yuxin; Yuan, Feng; Guo, Kaijin; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to retrospectively investigate the changes in pulmonary function and its influencing factors in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) undergoing preoperative brace treatment or not. Methods: Total 237 AIS patients (43 boys, 194 girls) who underwent operations and had a complete record of pulmonary function tests were enrolled and were divided into preoperative brace treatment group (brace treatment group, n = 60) and without preoperative brace treatment group (control group, n = 177). The pulmonary function parameters were compared between the 2 groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore whether the variables, including age at operation, height, coronal Cobb's angle of main curve, number of involved vertebrae, sagittal Cobb's angle of thoracic curve, brace treatment time per day and brace treatment duration, influenced pulmonary function in the brace treatment group. Results: No significant differences were observed in both predicted and actually measured value of forced vital capacity (FVC) and predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) between 2 groups (P > 0.05), but actually measured FEV1, the percentage of actually measured and predicted value of FVC (FVC%) and FEV1 (FEV1%) were significantly lower in the brace treatment group than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Importantly, the above changes in actually measured FEV1 and FEV1% were obvious in AIS patients presented with a main thoracic curve (P < 0.05), but not in patients with a primary thoracolumbar/lumbar curve. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only the sagittal Cobb's angle of the thoracic curve was positively, but preoperative brace treatment duration was negatively associated with both the FVC% and FEV1% (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Preoperative brace treatment may deteriorate pulmonary function in AIS patients with thoracic curve. The small sagittal Cobb angle and

  5. Preoperative factors and early complications associated with hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher P; Buerba, Rafael A; Leslie, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are common injuries in the elderly individuals. There is controversy about the best treatment with regard to total hip arthroplasty (THA) versus hemiarthroplasty. This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) database to evaluate the preoperative risk factors associated with the decision to perform THA over hemiarthroplasty. We also evaluate the risk factors associated with postoperative complications after each procedure. Patients older than 50 years undergoing hemiarthroplasty or THA after fracture in the NSQIP database from 2007 to 2010 were compared to each other in terms of preoperative medical conditions, postoperative complications, and length of stay. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for preoperative risk factors for undergoing a THA versus a hemiarthroplasty and for complications after each procedure. In all, 783 patients underwent hemiarthroplasty and 419 underwent THA for fracture. Hemiarthroplasty patients had longer hospital stays. On multivariate logistic regression, the only significant predictor for having a THA after fracture over hemiarthroplasty was being aged 50 to 64 years. The patient characteristics/comorbidities that favored having a hemiarthroplasty were age >80 years, hemiplegia, being underweight, having a dependent functional status, being on dialysis, and having an early surgery. High body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, gender, and other comorbidities were not predictors of having one procedure over another. Disseminated cancer and diabetes were predictive of complications after THA while being overweight, obese I, or a smoker were protective. High ASA class and do-not-resuscitate status were significant predictors of complications after a hemiarthroplasty. This study identified clinical factors influencing surgeons toward performing either THA or hemiarthroplasty for elderly patients

  6. Preoperative risk score predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Su, Yu-Chieh; Wei, Chang-Kao; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Juang, Shiun-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2014-09-01

    The impact of important preexisting comorbidities, such as liver and renal disease, on the outcome of liver resection remains unclear. Identification of patients at risk of mortality will aid in improving preoperative preparations. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a population-based score based on available preoperative and predictable parameters predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection using data from a hepatitis endemic country.We identified 13,159 patients who underwent liver resection between 2002 and 2006 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In a randomly selected half of the total patients, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop a prediction score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by patient demographics, preoperative liver disease and comorbidities, indication for surgery, and procedure type. The score was validated with the remaining half of the patients.Overall 90-day mortality was 3.9%. Predictive characteristics included in the model were age, preexisting cirrhosis-related complications, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, renal disease, malignancy, and procedure type. Four risk groups were stratified by mortality scores of 1.1%, 2.2%, 7.7%, and 15%. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications were the strongest predictors. The score discriminated well in both the derivation and validation sets with c-statistics of 0.75 and 0.75, respectively.This population-based score could identify patients at risk of 90-day mortality before liver resection. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications had the strongest influence on mortality. This score enables preoperative risk stratification, decision-making, quality assessment, and counseling for individual patients.

  7. Preoperative and perioperative factors effect on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Carreon, Leah Y; Sucato, Daniel J; Sturm, Peter F; Diab, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    Prospective multicenter database. To identify factors associated with outcomes from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery outcomes and especially poor results. Because AIS is rarely symptomatic during adolescence, excellent surgical results are expected. However, some patients have poor outcomes. This study seeks to identify factors correlating with results and especially those making poor outcomes more likely. Demographic, surgical, and radiographic parameters were compared to 2-year postoperative Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) scores in 477 AIS surgical patients using stepwise linear regression to identify factors predictive of 2-year domain and total scores. Poor postoperative score patients (>2 SD below mean) were compared using t tests to those with better results. The SRS instrument exhibited a strong ceiling effect. Two-year scores showed more improvement with greater curve correction (self-image, pain, and total), and were worse with larger body mass index (pain, mental, total), larger preoperative trunk shift (mental and total), larger preoperative Cobb (self-image), and preoperative symptoms (function). Poor results were more common in those with Lenke 3 curve pattern (pain), less preoperative coronal imbalance, trunk shift and rib prominence (function), preoperative bracing (self-image), and anterior procedures (mental). Poor results also had slightly less average curve correction (50% vs. 60%) and larger curve residuals (31° vs. 23°). Complications, postoperative curve magnitude, and instrumentation type did not significantly contribute to postoperative scores, and no identifiable factors contributed to satisfaction. Curve correction improves patient's self-image whereas pain and poor function before surgery carry over after surgery. Patients with less spinal appearance issues (higher body mass index, Lenke 3 curves) are less happy with their results. Except in surgical patient selection, many of these factors are beyond physician control.

  8. CDH1 methylation in preoperative peritoneal washes is an independent prognostic factor for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qi-Ming; Wang, Xin-Bao; Luo, Jun; Wang, Shi; Fang, Xian-Hua; Yu, Jiang-Liu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives To investigate the clinical value of CDH1 methylation in preoperative peritoneal washes (PPW) from gastric cancer patients. Methods CDH1 methylation was detected by real-time methylation specific-PCR in tumor tissues and corresponding PPW from 92 gastric cancer patients, gastric mucosa from 40 chronic gastritis patients and 48 normal persons. Results CDH1 methylation was found in 75 of 92 (81.5%) gastric cancer tissues, which significantly correlated with size, growth pattern, differentiation, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage of tumor (all P < 0.05), but its relationship to age, gender, tumor site, and H. pylori infection was not found (all P > 0.05). The percentage of CDH1 methylation in PPW was 48.9%, of which the Aζ value of ROC curve was 0.8 compared to that in gastric cancer tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that there was a significant difference in disease-free survival (DFS) between the patients with or without methylated CDH1 in their PPW (χ2 = 109.64, P < 0.000). Cox regression analysis revealed CDH1 methylation in PPW was an independent risk factor for gastric cancer patients, with a remarkable decrease in DFS after postoperative 30 months. Conclusions Methylated CDH1 in PPW predicts poor prognosis for gastric cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2012; 106:765–771. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22514028

  9. Preoperative and surgical factors associated with postoperative intensive care unit admission following operative treatment for degenerative lumbar spine disease.

    PubMed

    Kay, Harrison F; Chotai, Silky; Wick, Joseph B; Stonko, David P; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2016-03-01

    Evaluate the factors associated with postoperative ICU admission in patients undergoing surgical management of degenerative lumbar spine disease. Patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine disease were enrolled into a prospective registry over a 2-year period. Preoperative variables (age, gender, ASA grade, ODI%, CAD, HTN, MI, CHF, DM, BMI, depression, anxiety) and surgical variables (instrumentation, arthrodesis, estimated blood loss, length of surgery) were collected prospectively. Postoperative ICU admission details were retrospectively determined from the electronic medical record. Student's t test (continuous variables) and Chi-square test (categorical variables) were used to determine the association of each preoperative and surgical variable with ICU admission. 808 Patients (273 laminectomy, 535 laminectomy and fusion) were evaluated. Forty-one (5.1%) patients were found to have postoperative ICU admissions. Reasons for admission included blood loss (12.2%), cardiac (29.3%), respiratory (19.5%), neurologic (31.7%), and other (7.3%). For preoperative variables, female gender (P < 0.001), history of CAD (P = 0.003), history of MI (P = 0.008), history of CHF (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.025), and ASA grade (P = 0.008) were significantly associated with ICU admission. For surgical variables, estimated blood loss (P < 0.001) and length of surgery (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with ICU admission. Age, female gender, ASA grade, cardiac comorbidities, intraoperative blood loss, and length of surgery were associated with increased risk of postoperative ICU admission. Knowledge of these factors can aid surgeons in patient selection and preoperative discussion with patients about potential need for unexpected admission to the ICU.

  10. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration <5.3 g/dL (OR 13; p=0.003), a plasma cortisol >30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <82 fL (OR 1.6; p=0.04) were associated with post-operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin <11g/dL (OR 7.5; p=0.002) were associated with SSI. The study supports the role of restrictive lung disorders and the values specified above for preoperative BMI, serum total protein and cortisol concentrations, and MCV, and of post-operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  11. Preoperative intra-aortic balloon pumping in high-risk cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chooza

    2012-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumping increases myocardial oxygen supply and decreases myocardial oxygen demand by inflation and deflation of the balloon. This leads to increased perfusion of the coronary arteries during diastole. This technology has been used for critically ill cardiac patients for more than 30 years. The literature suggests that preoperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump can be effective in high-risk coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Preoperative benefits of this technology may yield positive outcomes in terms of hemodynamic effect, decreased length of stay in both the intensive care unit and the hospital, and the reduction of complications. However, the intra-aortic balloon pump must be used with a profound understanding of proper mechanism and function, monitoring, and observation for potential complications. This requires excellent critical care nursing management.

  12. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  13. Preoperative psychosocial factors predicting patient's functional recovery after total knee or total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bletterman, Anouck N; de Geest-Vrolijk, Marcella E; Vriezekolk, Johanna E; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W; van Meeteren, Nico Lu; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of preoperative psychosocial factors on the perceived and observed postoperative patient's functional recovery during the post-hospital phase and up to 12 months after hospital discharge of patients who underwent total knee or total hip arthroplasty. A systematic review was performed. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsychINFO were systematically screened in order to find prospective longitudinal studies. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of a 27-item checklist for prognostic studies, as previously used by Veerbeek. A qualitative analysis was performed using the method of Zwikker. A total of 26 studies, with a total of 11,020 patients, were included. In total, 22 studies were judged as having a high risk of bias. Overall, no longitudinal association with perceived or observed functional recovery was found in all of the seven preoperative psychosocial categories: A: mental well-being, B: cognitions, C: beliefs, D: expectations, E: coping, F: social support or G: personality traits in total joint arthroplasty. Mental well-being seems to be the exception in one time period (>6 weeks through ≤3 months) and change score in observed functional recovery, but only in patients awaiting total knee arthroplasty (100% and 75% of the variables were significantly and consistently associated, respectively). Overall, the results of this systematic review suggest that there is no longitudinal association between preoperative psychosocial factors and perceived or observed patient's postoperative functional recovery after total joint arthroplasty. The psychological category mental well-being is related to observed postoperative recovery >6 weeks through ≤3 months and to change score after total knee arthroplasty.

  14. Multivariate analysis of factors associated with kyphotic deformity after laminoplasty in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment

    PubMed Central

    Cao, JunMing; Zhang, JingTao; Yang, DaLong; Yang, Liu; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The risk factors of post-laminoplasty kyphosis in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) without preoperative kyphotic alignment are not well known. This study aimed to compare clinical and radiological data between patients with or without post-laminoplasty kyphosis and to investigate the factors associated with post-laminoplasty kyphosis in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. Patients (n = 194) who received unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation and completed a 1-year follow-up were enrolled. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative kyphosis (P) or not (NP). Postoperative kyphosis was observed in 21 (10.8%) patients. The recovery rates of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at the 1-year follow-up in the P group were inferior to those in the NP group (31.9% vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001). Logistic regression with post-laminoplasty kyphosis as the dependent variable showed independent risks associated with an increased C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA, odds ratio [OR] = 1.085, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.025–1.203, P = 0.015), destroyed facet joints (OR = 1.132, 95% CI = 1.068–1.208, P < 0.001), and cephalad vertebral level undergoing laminoplasty (CVLL, OR = 2.860, 95% CI = 1.164–6.847, P = 0.021). These findings suggest that CVLL, C2–7 SVA, and destroyed facet joints are associated with kyphosis after laminoplasty in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. PMID:28240309

  15. Validation of the Ectasia Risk Score System for Preoperative Laser in Situ Keratomileusis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Randleman, J. Bradley; Trattler, William B.; Stulting, R. Doyle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To validate the Ectasia Risk Score System for identifying patients at high risk for developing ectasia after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).. Design Retrospective case-control study Methods Fifty eyes that developed ectasia and 50 control eyes with normal postoperative courses after LASIK were analyzed and compared using the previously described Ectasia Risk Score System, which assigns points in a weighted fashion to the following variables: topographic patter, predicted residual stromal bed thickness (RSB), age, preoperative corneal thickness (CT), and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE). Results In this series 92% of eyes with ectasia were correctly classified as being at high risk for the development of ectasia, while 6% of controls were incorrectly classified as being at high risk for ectasia. (p< 1 × 10−10). Significantly more eyes were classified as high risk by the ectasia risk score than by traditional screening parameters relying on abnormal topography or residual stromal bed thickness less than 250 μ (92% vs. 50%, p <0.00001). There was no difference in the sensitivity or specificity of the Ectasia Risk Score System in the population from which it was derived and this independent population of ectasia cases and controls. Conclusion The Ectasia Risk Score System is a valid and effective method for detecting eyes at risk for ectasia after LASIK and represents a significant improvement over previously utilized screening strategies. PMID:18328998

  16. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  17. Evaluation of the Association Between Preoperative Clinical Factors and Long-term Weight Loss After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Wood, G Craig; Benotti, Peter N; Lee, Clare J; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Still, Christopher D; Gerhard, Glenn S; Lent, Michelle R

    2016-11-01

    Weight loss after bariatric surgery varies, yet preoperative clinical factors associated with long-term suboptimal outcomes are not well understood. To evaluate the association between preoperative clinical factors and long-term weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). From June 2001 to September 2007, this retrospective cohort study followed up RYGB patients before surgery to 7 to 12 years after surgery. The setting was a large rural integrated health system. Of 1033 eligible RYGB patients who consented to participate in longitudinal research and completed surgery before October 2007, a total of 726 (70.3%) had a weight entered in the electronic medical record 7 or more years after surgery and were included in the analyses after exclusions for pregnancy and mortality. Date of the long-term weight measurement was recorded between August 2010 and January 2016. The primary outcome was percentage weight loss (%WL) at 7 to 12 years after surgery. Preoperative clinical factors (>200) extracted from the electronic medical record included medications, comorbidities, laboratory test results, and demographics, among others. Among the 726 study participants, 83.1% (n = 603) were female and 97.4% (n = 707) were of white race, with a mean (SD) preoperative body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 47.5 (7.4). From the time of surgery to long-term follow-up (median, 9.3 postoperative years), the mean (SD) %WL was 22.5% (13.1%). Preoperative insulin use, history of smoking, and use of 12 or more medications before surgery were associated with greater long-term postoperative %WL (6.8%, 2.8%, and 3.1%, respectively). Preoperative hyperlipidemia, older age, and higher body mass index were associated with poorer long-term postoperative %WL (-2.8%, -8.8%, and -4.1%, respectively). Few preoperative clinical factors associated with long-term weight loss after RYGB were identified. Preoperative insulin use was strongly

  18. Biological predictive factors in rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Negri, F V; Campanini, N; Camisa, R; Pucci, F; Bui, S; Ceccon, G; Martinelli, R; Fumagalli, M; Losardo, P L; Crafa, P; Bordi, C; Cascinu, S; Ardizzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    We analysed the expression of microsatellite instability, p53, p21, vascular endothelial growth factor and thymidylate synthase (TS) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from 57 locally advanced rectal cancers. The aim of the study was to correlate the expression of these markers with pathological response. Nineteen patients were treated with preoperative concomitant radiotherapy (RT) and fluorouracil/oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (RCT), while 38 had RT alone. Pathological complete remission (pCR) and microfoci residual tumour (micR) occurred more frequently in patients treated with RCT (P=0.002) and in N0 tumours (P=0.004). Among patients treated with RCT, high TS levels were associated with a higher response rate (pCR+micR; P=0.015). No such correlation was found in the RT group. The other molecular factors were of no predictive value. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant interaction between nodal status and the probability of achieving a pathological response (P=0.023) and between TS expression and treatment, indicating that a high TS level is predictive of a higher pathological response in the RCT subset (P=0.007). This study shows that lymph node status is the most important predictive factor of tumour response to preoperative treatment. Thymidylate synthase expression assessed immunohistochemically from pretreatment tumour biopsies may be a useful predictive marker of rectal tumour response to preoperative RCT. PMID:18087284

  19. Biological predictive factors in rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Negri, F V; Campanini, N; Camisa, R; Pucci, F; Bui, S; Ceccon, G; Martinelli, R; Fumagalli, M; Losardo, P L; Crafa, P; Bordi, C; Cascinu, S; Ardizzoni, A

    2008-01-15

    We analysed the expression of microsatellite instability, p53, p21, vascular endothelial growth factor and thymidylate synthase (TS) in pretreatment biopsy specimens from 57 locally advanced rectal cancers. The aim of the study was to correlate the expression of these markers with pathological response. Nineteen patients were treated with preoperative concomitant radiotherapy (RT) and fluorouracil/oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (RCT), while 38 had RT alone. Pathological complete remission (pCR) and microfoci residual tumour (micR) occurred more frequently in patients treated with RCT (P=0.002) and in N0 tumours (P=0.004). Among patients treated with RCT, high TS levels were associated with a higher response rate (pCR+micR; P=0.015). No such correlation was found in the RT group. The other molecular factors were of no predictive value. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant interaction between nodal status and the probability of achieving a pathological response (P=0.023) and between TS expression and treatment, indicating that a high TS level is predictive of a higher pathological response in the RCT subset (P=0.007). This study shows that lymph node status is the most important predictive factor of tumour response to preoperative treatment. Thymidylate synthase expression assessed immunohistochemically from pretreatment tumour biopsies may be a useful predictive marker of rectal tumour response to preoperative RCT.

  20. Using the NSQIP Pancreatic Demonstration Project to Derive a Modified Fistula Risk Score for Preoperative Risk Stratification in Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Olga; Talamonti, Mark S; Pitt, Henry A; Vollmer, Charles M; Riall, Taylor S; Hall, Bruce L; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Baker, Marshall S

    2017-05-01

    The Fistula Risk Score (FRS) is a clinical tool developed from single-institutional data using primarily intraoperative factors to characterize the risk of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (CR-POPF) after pancreaticoduodenectomy. We developed a modified FRS based on objective, nationally accrued data that is more readily determined before resection. The 2012 NSQIP Pancreatic Demonstration Project (PDP) was used to identify 1,731 pancreaticoduodenectomy resections over 14 months (2011 to 2012). A randomly generated 70% cohort was used for model development, and the remaining 30% for internal validation. Univariate analysis was used to identify predictors of CR-POPF. Variables with a value of p < 0.1 were included in multivariable modeling. Five significant predictors of CR-POPF were identified and assigned points based on odds ratios: sex, BMI, preoperative total bilirubin, pancreatic ductal diameter, and gland texture. The 10-point model was further applied to the 2014 PDP for external validation. In the testing group, risk scores of 0 to 2 (negligible risk), 3 to 6 (low risk), 7 to 8 (intermediate risk), and 9 to 10 (high risk) were associated with CR-POPF rates of 0%, 6.7%, 16.4%, and 33.7%, respectively. Similar values were seen using the internal validation cohort: 0%, 6.3%, 13.5%, and 31.0%, respectively. The external validation values were 2.9%, 10.2%, 16.4%, and 25.8%, respectively. This modified FRS allows for estimation of CR-POPF risk using preoperative and easily determined intraoperative factors, and will allow comparison of performance data for individual surgeons to national norms, improved perioperative counseling, and potential for scrutinizing and/or implementing interventions designed to decrease CR-POPF rates. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Preoperative cardiac-risk assessment for non-cardiac surgery: The French RICARDO survey].

    PubMed

    Sens, N; Payan, A; Sztark, F; Piriou, V; Bouaziz, H; Bruder, N; Jaber, S; Jouffroy, L; Lebuffe, G; Mantz, J; Piriou, V; Roche, S; Sztark, F; Tauzin-Fin, F

    2013-10-01

    Professional practice evaluation of anaesthesiologist for high cardiac-risk patient cares in non-cardiac surgery, and assess disparities between results and recommendations. Since June to September 2011, a self-questionnaire was sent to 5000 anesthesiologist. They were considered to be representative of national anesthesiology practitioner. Different items investigated concerned: demography, preoperative cardiac-risk assessment, modalities of specialized cardiologic advice, per- and postoperative care, and finally knowledge of current recommendations. We collected 1255 questionnaire, that is to say 25% of answers. Men were 73%, 38% were employed by public hospital; 70% worked in a shared operating theatre with a general activity. With regards to preoperative assessment, 85% of anaesthetists referred high cardiac-risk patient to a cardiologist. In only 16% of answer, Lee's score appeared in anaesthesia file to assess perioperative cardiac-risk. Only 61% considered the six necessary items to optimal estimate of cardiac-risk. On the other hand, 91% measured routinely the exercise capacities by interrogation. The most frequently doing exam (49% of anaesthetist) was an electrocardiogram in elderly patient. In 96% of case, beta-blockers were given in premedication if they were usually thought. Clopidogrel was stopped by 62% of anesthetist before surgery. In this case, 38% used another medication to take over from this one. Only 7% considered revascularization in coronary patient who were effectively treated. POISE study was know by 40% of practitioner, and 18% estimated that they have changed their practice. Preoperatively, 21% organized multidisciplinary approach for high-risk patient. During surgery, 63% monitored the ST-segment. In postoperative period for cardiac-risk patient, only 11% prescribed systematically an ECG, a troponin dosage, a postoperative monitoring of ST-segment, a cardiologic advice. In case of moderate troponin elevation, they were 70% to realize at

  2. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  3. [Factors related to renal dysfunction after liver transplantation in patients with normal preoperative function].

    PubMed

    Koo, M; Sabaté, A; Ramos, E; Dalmau, A; León, E; Fabregat, J; Rafecas, A

    2006-11-01

    To determine perioperative factors related to postoperative renal dysfunction in patients receiving liver transplants who had normal renal function before surgery. We analyzed the cases of 189 consecutive patients. Patients with hepatorenal syndrome and previously diagnosed renal insufficiency were excluded, as were patients undergoing a second transplant operation. Postoperative renal dysfunction was diagnosed when creatinine levels exceeded 1.5 mg x dL(-1) in the first postoperative week. Multivariate analysis of preoperative variables (patient characteristics; Child-Pugh score; status with the United Network for Organ Sharing; and sodium, coagulation, hemoglobin, and creatinine levels); intraoperative variables (blood product units required, duration of surgery, reperfusion syndrome, surgical technique, and crystalloids required); and postoperative variables (hemodialysis or filtration, reoperation, mortality, creatinine levels at 6 and 12 months). One hundred fifty patients with normal kidney function were included. Postoperative renal dysfunction developed in 45 (30%). Differences between patients with and without postoperative renal dysfunction were found for weight; sex; Child-Pugh score; blood transfusion requirements (mean [SD] of 2.36 [2.4] units of packed red cells in the group of patients with renal dysfunction vs 1.3 [1.8] in the patients with normal function); and reperfusion syndrome (26 [66.7%] patients with renal dysfunction and 35 [21.5%] without). The last 2 variables continued to be significantly correlated with renal dysfunction in the multivariate analysis with a relative risk of 1.25, (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.55) for units of blood transfusion and 2.41 (95% CI, 1.04-5.57) for reperfusion syndrome. Renal replacement therapy was used in 4 patients (2.7%). Mortality rates were similar. At 6 and 12 months, 26 (17.3%) and 18 (12%) patients had renal dysfunction. Acute renal dysfunction is a frequent complication following a liver

  4. Preoperative factors and outcome after lunate decompression for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Condit, D P; Idler, R S; Fischer, T J; Hastings, H

    1993-07-01

    Preoperative factors and outcome were studied after lunate decompression for Kienböck's disease. Twenty-three patients treated with radial shortening or scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion were evaluated. The mean follow-up was 59 months. Neither good nor excellent outcomes were found with either lunate-preserving procedure when the preoperative radioscaphoid angle was greater than 60 degrees. Outcomes in the radial shortening osteotomy group were superior to those in the group treated with scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion. Lunate collapse was not prevented by either treatment method. Lunate index, carpal height, and staging did not correlate with outcome. Measurement of radioscaphoid angle provides predictive information regarding the outcome of stage III (Decoulx/Lichtman) Kienböck's disease treated with radial shortening or scaphoid-trapezium-trapezoid fusion.

  5. The influence of preoperative psychological factors on weight loss after bariatric surgery: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Carlo; Aceto, Paola; Petrucci, Ilaria; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Callari, Cosimo; Giustacchini, Piero; Sollazzi, Liliana; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bellantone, Rocco; Raffaelli, Marco

    2016-11-15

    Aim of this study was to investigate relationship between preoperative psychological factors and % total weight loss after gastric bypass. 76 adult patients scheduled for bariatric surgery were preoperatively asked to complete anxiety and depression Hamilton scales and Toronto Alexithymia Scale. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, body weight was assessed. At 6-month follow-up, alexithymic patients showed a poorer % total weight loss compared with non-alexithymic patients (p = .017), and moderately depressed patients showed a lower % total weight loss compared with non-depressed patients (p = .011). Focused pre- and postoperative psychological support could be useful in bariatric patients in order to improve surgical outcome.

  6. Preoperative vaginal preparation with povidone-iodine and the risk of postcesarean endometritis.

    PubMed

    Starr, Rosally V; Zurawski, Jill; Ismail, Mahmoud

    2005-05-01

    Postcesarean endometritis and wound infection remain significant morbidities, despite use of strategies to prevent these complications. We investigated the effect of preoperative vaginal preparation with povidone-iodine as a preventive intervention against postcesarean endometritis and wound infection. A randomized controlled study was performed in 308 women undergoing nonemergent cesarean delivery. Subjects received either standard abdominal scrub alone or abdominal scrub with an additional vaginal preparation with povidone-iodine solution. All subjects received prophylactic antibiotic at the time of umbilical cord clamping. Each subject's postoperative course was reviewed for development of febrile morbidity (temperature > 38.0 degrees C), endometritis (temperature > 38.4 degrees C accompanied by fundal tenderness occurring beyond the first postoperative day, in the absence of evidence of other infection), and wound infection. Postcesarean endometritis occurred in 7.0% of subjects who received a preoperative vaginal preparation and 14.5% of controls (P < .05). There was no measurable effect of a vaginal scrub on the development of postoperative fever or wound infection. The adjusted odds ratio for developing endometritis after a vaginal preparation was 0.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.193-0.997). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of developing endometritis in association with severe anemia (adjusted OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.568-11.582), use of intrapartum internal monitors (adjusted OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.311-6.136), or history of antenatal genitourinary infection (adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.265-6.596). Preoperative vaginal scrub with povidone-iodine decreases the incidence of postcesarean endometritis. This intervention does not seem to decrease the overall risk of postoperative fever or wound infection.

  7. “IT'S BIG SURGERY”: PREOPERATIVE EXPRESSIONS OF RISK, RESPONSIBILITY AND COMMITMENT TO TREATMENT AFTER HIGH-RISK OPERATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Pecanac, Kristen E.; Kehler, Jacqueline M.; Brasel., Karen J.; Cooper, Zara; Steffens, Nicole M.; McKneally, Martin F.; Schwarze, Margaret L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the processes surgeons use to establish patient buy-in to postoperative treatments. Background Surgeons generally believe they confirm the patient's commitment to an operation and all ensuing postoperative care, before surgery. How surgeons get buy-in and whether patients participate in this agreement is unknown. Methods We used purposive sampling to identify three surgeons from different subspecialties who routinely perform high-risk operations at each of three distinct medical centers (Toronto, ON; Boston, MA; Madison, WI). We recorded preoperative conversations with three to seven patients facing high-risk surgery with each surgeon (n = 48) and used content analysis to analyze each preoperative conversation inductively. Results Surgeons conveyed the gravity of high-risk operations to patients by emphasizing the operation is “big surgery” and that a decision to proceed invoked a serious commitment for both the surgeon and the patient. Surgeons were frank about the potential for serious complications and the need for intensive care. They rarely discussed the use of prolonged life-supporting treatment, and patients’ questions were primarily confined to logistic or technical concerns. Surgeons regularly proceeded through the conversation in a manner that suggested they believed buy-in was achieved, but this agreement was rarely forged explicitly. Conclusions Surgeons who perform high-risk operations communicate the risks of surgery and express their commitment to the patient's survival. However, they rarely discuss prolonged life-supporting treatments explicitly and patients do not discuss their preferences. It is not possible to determine patients’ desires for prolonged postoperative life support based on these preoperative conversations alone. PMID:24253139

  8. It's big surgery: preoperative expressions of risk, responsibility, and commitment to treatment after high-risk operations.

    PubMed

    Pecanac, Kristen E; Kehler, Jacqueline M; Brasel, Karen J; Cooper, Zara; Steffens, Nicole M; McKneally, Martin F; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2014-03-01

    To identify the processes, surgeons use to establish patient buy-in to postoperative treatments. Surgeons generally believe they confirm the patient's commitment to an operation and all ensuing postoperative care, before surgery. How surgeons get buy-in and whether patients participate in this agreement is unknown. We used purposive sampling to identify 3 surgeons from different subspecialties who routinely perform high-risk operations at each of 3 distinct medical centers (Toronto, Ontario; Boston, Massachusetts; Madison, Wisconsin). We recorded preoperative conversations with 3 to 7 patients facing high-risk surgery with each surgeon (n = 48) and used content analysis to analyze each preoperative conversation inductively. Surgeons conveyed the gravity of high-risk operations to patients by emphasizing the operation is "big surgery" and that a decision to proceed invoked a serious commitment for both the surgeon and the patient. Surgeons were frank about the potential for serious complications and the need for intensive care. They rarely discussed the use of prolonged life-supporting treatment, and patients' questions were primarily confined to logistic or technical concerns. Surgeons regularly proceeded through the conversation in a manner that suggested they believed buy-in was achieved, but this agreement was rarely forged explicitly. Surgeons who perform high-risk operations communicate the risks of surgery and express their commitment to the patient's survival. However, they rarely discuss prolonged life-supporting treatments explicitly and patients do not discuss their preferences. It is not possible to determine patients' desires for prolonged postoperative life support on the basis of these preoperative conversations alone.

  9. [Preoperative analysis in rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Bardot, J; Duron, J B; Levet, Y; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Preoperative analysis in rhinoplasty consists in analyzing individual anatomical and functional characteristics without losing sight of the initial requirements of the patient to which priority should be given. The examination is primarily clinical but it also uses preoperative photographs taken at specific accurate angles. Detecting functional disorders or associated general pathologies, which will reduce the risk of complications. All of these factors taken into account, the surgeon can work out a rhinoplasty plan which he or she will subsequently explain to the patient and obtain his or her approbation.

  10. [Risk factors for stroke].

    PubMed

    Mandić, Milan; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the third cause of mortality both in men and in women throughout the world. In Serbia, stroke is the first cause of mortality in women older than 55 years of age and the second cause of death in men of the same age. Both ischemic heart diseases and ischemic stroke correlate with the same predisposing, potentially modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes mellitus). Stroke does not usually occur on its own. Patients with stroke have a high prevalence of associated medical problems. These conditions may predict the stroke ("preexisting conditions"), occur for the first time after stroke ("post-stroke complications"), or present as manifestations of preexisting medical conditions after stroke. Risk factors for stroke are divided into the three groups: risk factors which cannot be influenced on such as: age, gender, positive family history of stroke, race: those which are modifiable such as: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking cigarettes, obesity, physical inactivity and the third group consists of potential risk factors for stroke (consumption of alcohol, hormones, changes in fibrinolysis, changes in blood. Stroke remains a leading cause of long-term disability and premature death of both men and women. Consequently, stroke survivors are often handicapped and doomed to sedentary lifestyle which restrains performance of activities of daily living, increases the risk for falls, and may contribute to a higher risk for recurrent stroke and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of stroke is still a great medical and social problem. Further studies are required to investigate potential risk factors for the occurrence of stroke as well as the measures of primary and secondary prevention.

  11. [Quality of Outcome after Primary Total Hip Replacement at a Maximum Care Hospital in Relation to Preoperative Influencing Factors].

    PubMed

    Osmanski-Zenk, K; Steinig, N S; Glass, Ä; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2015-12-01

    As the need for joint replacements will continue to rise, the outcome of primary total hip replacement (THR) must be improved and stabilised at a high level. In this study, we investigated whether pre-operative risk factors, such as gender, age and body weight at the time of the surgery or a restricted physical status (ASA-Status > 2 or Kellgren and Lawrence grade > 2) have a negative influence on the post-operative results or on patient satisfaction. Retrospective data collection and a prospective interview were performed with 486 patients who underwent primary total hip replacement between January 2007 and December 2010 in our hospital. The patients' satisfaction and quality of life were surveyed with the WOMAC-Score, SF-36 and EuroQol-5. Differences between more than two independent spot tests were tested with the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Differences between two independent spot tests were tested with the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. The frequencies were reported and odds ratios calculated. The confidence interval was set at 95 %. The level of significance was p < 0.05. The average WOMAC-Score was 77.1 and the total score of the SF-36 was 66.9 points. The patients declared an average EuroQol Index of 0.81. Our data show that the patients' gender did not influence the duration of surgery or the scores. However, female patients tended to exhibit more postoperative complications. However, increased patient age at the time of surgery was associated with an increased OR for duration of surgery, length of stay and risk of complications. Patients who had a normal body weight at time of the surgery showed better peri- and post-operative results. We showed that the preoperative estimated Kellgren and Lawrence grade had a significant influence on the duration of surgery. The ASA classification influenced the duration of surgery as well the length of stay and the rate of complications. The quality of results after primary THR depends on

  12. Outcomes of preoperative weight loss in high-risk patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Still, Christopher D; Benotti, Peter; Wood, G Craig; Gerhard, Glenn S; Petrick, Anthony; Reed, Mary; Strodel, William

    2007-10-01

    Modest, preoperative weight loss will improve perioperative outcomes among high-risk, morbidly obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A prospective, longitudinal assessment of characteristics and outcomes of gastric bypass patients. All patients undergoing open or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity or its comorbid medical problems at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, during a 3-year period from May 31, 2002, to February 24, 2006, were included in this analysis. Patients were required to participate in a standardized multidisciplinary preoperative program that encompasses medical, psychological, nutritional, and surgical interventions and education. In addition, patients were encouraged to achieve a 10% loss of excess body weight prior to surgical intervention. Of the 884 subjects, 425 (48%) lost more than 10% of their excess body weight prior to the operation. After surgery (mean follow-up, 12 months), this group was more likely to achieve 70% loss of excess body weight (P < .001). Those who lost more than 5% of excess body weight prior to surgery were statistically less likely to have a length of stay of greater than 4 days (P = .03). This study shows that high-risk morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery who are able to achieve a loss of 5% to 10% excess body weight prior to surgery have a higher probability of a shorter length of hospital stay and more rapid postoperative weight loss.

  13. Preoperative Predictive Factors of Successful Weight Loss and Glycaemic Control 1 Year After Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Silvia; Silvestri, Marta; Giuricin, Michela; Baldini, Edoardo; Albertario, Simone; Capelli, Patrizio; Marzano, Bernardo; Fanti, Giovanni; Zompicchiatti, Aron; Millo, Paolo; Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Brachet Contul, Riccardo; Contul, Riccardo Brachet; Ponte, Elisa; Allieta, Rosaldo; de Manzini, Nicolò

    2015-11-01

    Gastric bypass (GBP) is one of the most effective surgical procedures to treat morbid obesity and the related comorbidities. This study aimed at identifying preoperative predictors of successful weight loss and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remission 1 year after GBP. Prospective longitudinal study of 771 patients who underwent GBP was performed at four Italian centres between November 2011 and May 2013 with 1-year follow-up. Preoperative anthropometric, metabolic and social parameters, the surgical technique and the previous failed bariatric procedures were analyzed. Weight, the body mass index (BMI), the percentage of excess weight lost (% EWL), the percentage of excess BMI lost (% BMIL) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were recorded at follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that BMI <50 kg/m(2) (p = 0.006) and dyslipidaemia (p = 0.05) were predictive factors of successful weight loss. Multivariate analysis of surgical technique showed significant weight loss in patients with a small gastric pouch (p < 0.001); the lengths of alimentary and biliary loops showed no statistical significance. All diabetic patients had a significant reduction of HbA1c (p < 0.001) after surgery. BMI ≥ 50 kg/m(2) (p = 0.02) and low level of preoperative HbA1c (p < 0.01) were independent risk factors of T2DM remission after surgery. This study provides a useful tool for making more accurate predictions of best results in terms of weight loss and metabolic improvement.

  14. Availability of preoperative anxiety scale as a predictive factor for hemodynamic changes during induction of anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Sung; Byeon, Gyeong-Jo; Song, Bong-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Background The current study evaluated whether the level of preoperative anxiety assessed by the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) affects cardiovascular response during anesthetic induction. Furthermore, we evaluated the utility of the preoperative anxiety scale as a predictive factor for hemodynamic changes. Methods One hundred twenty patients who were scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were asked to fill out STAI questionnaires the night before the day of surgery. For 5 minutes after tracheal intubation, changes in vital signs were recorded. The correlation between STAI scores and the percent changes in vital signs during the induction of anesthesia for each subgroup was assessed. In addition, the predictability of the 20% change in vital signs by STAI scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristics curves. Results The state anxiety scores of patients 45 years of age or older showed a significant correlation with percent changes in mean blood pressure and heart rate, whereas the state anxiety scores in other subgroups showed no significant correlation with changes in vital signs during the induction of anesthesia. Furthermore, the state anxiety scores in patients 45 years of age or older were shown to be useful in predicting a 20% change in vital signs during anesthetic induction. Conclusions The state anxiety scores of patients 45 years of age or above could be a useful tool for predicting changes in vital signs during anesthetic induction. Thus, physician should be mindful of preoperative anxiety. PMID:20508787

  15. Development of a new outcome prediction model for Chinese patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma based on preoperative serum C-reactive protein, body mass index, and standard pathological risk factors: the TNCB score group system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Mi, Qi-Wu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Qi; Li, Yong-Hong; Chen, Jie-Ping; Deng, Chuang-Zhong; Ye, Yun-Lin; Zhong, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Qin, Zi-Ke; Lin, Xiang-Tian; Liang, Wei-Cong; Han, Hui; Zhou, Fang-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the predictive value and feasibility of the new outcome prediction model for Chinese patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. Results The 3-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 92.3% in patients with < 8.70 mg/L CRP and 54.9% in those with elevated CRP (P < 0.001). The 3-year DSS was 86.5% in patients with a BMI < 22.6 Kg/m2 and 69.9% in those with a higher BMI (P = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, pathological T stage (P < 0.001), pathological N stage (P = 0.002), BMI (P = 0.002), and CRP (P = 0.004) were independent predictors of DSS. A new scoring model was developed, consisting of BMI, CRP, and tumor T and N classification. In our study, we found that the addition of the above-mentioned parameters significantly increased the predictive accuracy of the system of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) anatomic stage group. The accuracy of the new prediction category was verified. Methods A total of 172 Chinese patients with penile squamous cell cancer were analyzed retrospectively between November 2005 and November 2014. Statistical data analysis was conducted using the nonparametric method. Survival analysis was performed with the log-rank test and the Cox proportional hazard model. Based on regression estimates of significant parameters in multivariate analysis, a new BMI-, CRP- and pathologic factors-based scoring model was developed to predict disease-specific outcomes. The predictive accuracy of the model was evaluated using the internal and external validation. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the TNCB score group system maybe a precise and easy to use tool for predicting outcomes in Chinese penile squamous cell carcinoma patients. PMID:26980738

  16. Managing Multiple Risk Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cardiovascular disease among black women can be better controlled through the use of a stress reduction intervention that reduces the sympathetic nervous...All participants will have high normal (130/80) or mild hypertension and at least two additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g

  17. Factors associated with preoperative anxiety levels of Turkish surgical patients: from a single center in Ankara

    PubMed Central

    Erkilic, Ezgi; Kesimci, Elvin; Soykut, Cem; Doger, Cihan; Gumus, Tülin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    Background Preoperative anxiety and stress are undoubtedly a difficult experience in patients undergoing elective surgery. These unpleasant sensations depend on several factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the preoperative anxiety levels in a sample of Turkish population, as well as the underlying causes using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI anxiety) scale. Methods The study was conducted according to the Declaration of Helsinki and was approved by the local ethical committee. All participants gave written informed consent upon having received detailed information on the study. Upon entry in the study, state and trait anxiety questionnaires were completed by 186 patients scheduled for elective surgery. The influencing factors in regard to age, sex, educational status and others were also reported. Results There was a statistically significant positive correlation between state and trait anxiety scores in this Turkish population. While the most important predictive factors that affected state-STAI scores were age, sex and duration of sleep the night before surgery; educational status and age were the best predictors for determining the variation in trait-STAI scores. Conclusion The factors affecting anxiety levels in different populations might vary among different countries. Interestingly, in this sample of Turkish population, the trait anxiety levels were found to be higher from state-anxiety levels, especially in women and less educated people. Thus, doubts about operation and anesthesia are overlooked. This could be attributed to the low to intermediate life standards of people admitted to our hospital. PMID:28280304

  18. Lymphadenectomy can be omitted for low-risk endometrial cancer based on preoperative assessments

    PubMed Central

    Mitamura, Takashi; Todo, Yukiharu; Kato, Tatsuya; Konno, Yosuke; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Objective According to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging, some surgeons perform lymphadenectomy in all patients with early stage endometrial cancer to enable the accurate staging. However, there are some risks to lymphadenectomy such as lower limb lymphedema. The aim of this study was to investigate whether preoperative assessment is useful to select the patients in whom lymphadenectomy can be safely omitted. Methods We evaluated the risk of lymph node metastasis (LNM) using LNM score (histological grade, tumor volume measured in magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and serum CA-125), myometrial invasion and extrautrerine spread assessed by MRI. Fifty-six patients of which LNM score was 0 and myometrial invasion was less than 50% were consecutively enrolled in the study in which a lymphadenectomy was initially intended not to perform. We analyzed several histological findings and investigated the recurrence rate and overall survival. Results Fifty-one patients underwent surgery without lymphadenectomy. Five (8.9%) who had obvious myometrial invasion intraoperatively underwent systematic lymphadenectomy. One (1.8%) with endometrial cancer which was considered to arise from adenomyosis had para-aortic LNM. Negative predictive value of deep myometrial invasion was 96.4% (54/56). During the mean follow-up period of 55 months, one patient with deep myometrial invasion who refused an adjuvant therapy had tumor recurrence. The overall survival rate was 100% during the study period. Conclusion This preoperative assessment is useful to select the early stage endometrial cancer patients without risk of LNM and to safely omit lymphadenectomy. PMID:25142623

  19. Pre-operative risk scores for the prediction of outcome in elderly people who require emergency surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rix, Thomas E; Bates, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Background The decision on whether to operate on a sick elderly person with an intra-abdominal emergency is one of the most difficult in general surgery. A predictive risk-score would be of great value in this situation. Methods A Medline search was performed to identify those predictive risk-scores relevant to sick elderly patients in whom emergency surgery might be life-saving. Results Many of the risk scores for surgical patients include the operative findings or require tests which are not available in the acute situation. Most of the relevant studies include younger patients and elective surgery. The Glasgow Aneurysm Score and Hardman Index are specific to ruptured aortic aneurysm while the Boey Score and the Hacetteppe Score are specific to perforated peptic ulcer. The Reiss Index and Fitness Score can be used pre-operatively if the elements of the score can be completed in time. The ASA score, which includes a significant element of subjective clinical judgement, can be augmented with factors such as age and urgency of surgery but no test has a negative predictive value sufficient to recommend against surgical intervention without clinical input. Conclusion Risk scores may be helpful in sick elderly patients needing emergency abdominal surgery but an experienced clinical opinion is still essential. PMID:17550623

  20. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  1. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  2. Development and external validation of preoperative risk models for operative morbidities after total gastrectomy using a Japanese web-based nationwide registry.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Miyata, Hiroaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Kinji; Tomotaki, Ai; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Wakabayashi, Go; Mori, Masaki

    2017-03-11

    Total gastrectomy is a relatively difficult and invasive procedure among gastrointestinal surgeries, and major morbidities following total gastrectomy can be serious and fatal. This study aimed to develop and validate preoperative risk models of morbidities associated with total gastrectomy using a Japanese web-based nationwide registry. The national clinical database was used to retrieve the records of 39,253 patients who underwent total gastrectomy in 1,841 hospitals between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. Mean patient age was 69.1 years, and 73.8% of the patients were male. The overall morbidity rate was 21.5%, which included 8.1% with surgical site infection (SSI), 4.5% with anastomotic leak, 5.0% with pancreatic fistula, 3.7% with pneumonia, 1.9% with prolonged ventilation, and 1.2% with renal failure. Sex, splenectomy, and Brinkman index were selected as common risk factors for SSI, anastomotic leak, and pancreatic fistula. Pancreatectomy was the most significant preoperative risk factor in the risk model of SSI and pancreatic fistula. Need of assistance with activities of daily living, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, previous cerebrovascular disease, American Society of Anesthesiologists score class 3 and over, presence of esophageal cancer, and body mass index more than 25 were selected as common risk factors for pneumonia, prolonged ventilation over 48 h, and renal failure. We have created the first reported risk models of morbidities associated with total gastrectomy, using a Japanese nationwide database. The risk models developed in this study may be useful to preoperatively predict operative morbidities in patients undergoing total gastrectomy.

  3. [Risk Factor Analysis of Pneumonia after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shuichi; Nakamura, Ken; Uchida, Tetsuro; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Morikane, Keita

    2016-08-01

    Pneumonia is a major and life-threatening complication after cardiovascular surgery. The objective of our study was to describe epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2007 to December 2011, 511 consecutive patients (age 67.3±11.9;336 men, 175 women) were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia was diagnosed according to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria for healthcare associated infection. Data collection included preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative variables. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 72 cases(14.0%). The mortality in pneumonia group was significantly higher than that in non-pneumonia group (16.6% vs 4.3%, Odds ratio 4.4 p<0.001). Multi-logistic analysis revealed that elderly patient, preoperative congestive heart failure, preoperative hemodialysis, and operation of the thoracic aorta were independent risk factors for pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery.

  4. [Feasibility analysis of predicting the risk of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy by preoperative CT].

    PubMed

    Yu, M; Wang, Y D; Xue, H Z; Shen, Q; Xu, J; Zhang, X; Jia, J K; Jia, M

    2017-08-08

    Objective: To study the preoperative computed tomography (CT) data of patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and to explore the effective of predicting the risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). Methods: CT images of patients with PD were analyzed retrospectively from June 2010 to January 2017 in Zhengzhou University of People's Hospital. The pancreas index, pancreatic duct width, pancreas CT value, pancreas-spleen CT value, and pancreas thickness were collected. The relationship between the indicators and the POPF was determined, and the receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated and the area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated. The maximum predictive performance of the critical value was determined by using the different cut-off values to calculate the Youden index and other indicators. Results: A total of 154 patients with PD were involved in the study and 27 (17.5%) had POPF. Seven indicators were significantly associated with POPF. The pancreas index had the largest AUC (AUC: 0.865, P<0.001) and pancreatic duct width (AUC: 0.834, P<0.001) also had a higher predictive value. The pancreatic duct (P<0.001) was significantly associated with POPF. Pancreas thickness, pancreas and spleen CT ratio, abdominal wall fat thickness, pancreas CT value, pancreatic abdominal aorta CT ratio and POPF were also related. Using 0.15 as the cut-off value, the sensitivity, specificity, Jordan index, and accuracy of pancreatic index were 83%, 86%, 0.69, and 0.88 respectively, with the highest performance prediction. Abdominal circumference, spleen CT value and other six indicators had no correlation with POPF. Conclusion: Analysis of preoperative CT indicators of patients can predict the risk of POPF in patients after PD. The pancreas index has the greatest predictive efficacy, while pancreatic duct width, pancreatic spleen density ratio and other indicators also associated with POPF.

  5. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk by means of atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A. )

    1989-10-01

    Atrial pacing and thallium 201 scintigraphy were done in 61 patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease referred for evaluation of cardiac risk before elective vascular surgery. All patients had noncardiac limitations precluding performance of an adequate exercise stress test. Before atrial pacing all were considered to be at low risk of a postoperative cardiac event based on assessment of clinical parameters. Vascular surgery was subsequently performed in 47 patients. In these patients, pacing-induced ST segment depression greater than or equal to 1 mm occurred in 18, a fixed perfusion defect occurred in 11, and a reversible defect occurred in six. Two of the six patients with reversible perfusion defects had preoperative coronary angiography; both had significant coronary artery disease (one or more lesions greater than or equal to 50%). Two patients (one of whom had a reversible perfusion defect) underwent preoperative coronary revascularization and tolerated subsequent vascular surgery well. All other patients received only medical therapy. None of the 47 patients undergoing vascular surgery had a postoperative cardiac event (unstable angina, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, or cardiac death). Of the 14 patients in whom vascular surgery was deferred or canceled, surgery was canceled for noncardiac reasons in seven. Six of these seven patients had a normal perfusion scan; none had a reversible perfusion defect or marked (greater than or equal to 2 mm) ST segment depression. No cardiac event occurred during a 3-month period after atrial pacing in any of these patients. Six of the remaining seven patients had reversible perfusion defects.

  6. Preoperative predictive factors for gallbladder cholesterol polyp diagnosed after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for polypoid lesions of gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Park, Inseok; Cho, Hyunjin; Gwak, Geumhee; Yang, Keunho; Bae, Byung-Noe; Kim, Hong-Ju; Kim, Young Duk

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims We investigated patients' clinical and radiological data to determine preoperative factors that predict cholesterol gallbladder (GB) polyps of large size, which can be helpful for decision on further diagnostic tools. Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 126 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for GB polyps >10 mm diagnosed preoperatively by abdominal ultrasonography between February 2002 and February 2016 in Department of Surgery, Sanggye Paik Hospital. Patients were divided into non-cholesterol polyps group and cholesterol polyps group, based on the postoperative pathologic diagnosis. Clinical and radiological data, such as gender, age, body weight, height, body mass index (BMI), laboratory findings, size, number and shape of the polypoid lesions, and presence of the concurrent GB stone were compared between the two groups. Results Of the 126 cases, 73 had cholesterol polyps (57.9%) and 53 cases were non-cholesterol polyps (42.1%). The younger age (<48.5 years), size of polyp <13.25 mm and multiple polyps were independent predictive variables for cholesterol polyps, with odd ratios (OR) of 2.352 (p=0.045), 5.429 (p<0.001) and 0.472 (p<0.001), respectively. Conclusions Age, size and polyp number were used to predict cholesterol GB polyp among polypoid lesions of the gallbladder >10 mm. For cases in which these factors are not applicable, it is strongly recommended to evaluate further diagnostic tools, such as computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography and tumor markers. PMID:28261697

  7. The value of immediate preoperative vascular examination in an at-risk patient for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Garabekyan, Tigran; Oliashirazi, Ali; Winters, Kristie

    2011-01-03

    Arterial complications associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although infrequent, may be associated with the following sequelae: infection, limb loss, and rarely, death. When revascularization is undertaken in the postoperative setting, additional complications may be encountered including postischemic reperfusion injury necessitating prophylactic fasciotomies. The end result is a prolonged postoperative course leading to worse functional outcome. A preoperative history and physical examination performed by the orthopedic surgeon can determine if the patient is at increased risk for vascular complications and whether the at-risk limb can withstand the stress of the operation. Consideration should be given to obtaining ankle-brachial indexes in this patient population, noting that arterial calcification may elevate the value. This article presents a case of an immediate preoperative vascular examination, performed at the time of surgical site marking, in an at-risk patient prior to TKA. We detail the clinical course of a patient with peripheral vascular disease and indwelling superficial femoral artery stent, who developed stent thrombosis in the 2-week period between his last clinic visit and date of surgery, with no change in symptoms. This restenosis was detected on routine preoperative physical examination and resulted in cancellation of the TKA in the preoperative area, allowing the patient to undergo emergent revascularization. We emphasize the importance of an immediate preoperative vascular examination in the setting of TKA and provide a comprehensive review of the literature with guidelines on the perioperative management of antiplatelet agents and appropriate use of the tourniquet. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  9. Are patients with preoperative air travel at higher risk for venous thromboembolism following primary total hip and knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Citak, Mustafa; Klatte, Till Orla; Suero, Eduardo M; Lenhart, Johannes; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The advent of international medical travel has resulted in many patients travelling abroad to seek medical attention at foreign institutions. However, it is not known whether long-haul flights further increase the risk of VTE in patients who are to receive a joint replacement. We performed this retrospective cohort study to analyze if patients with preoperative air travel with a flight time more than four hours are at higher risk for VTE development following total knee or total hip athroplasty (THA) compared to patients without preoperative travel. Between January 2007 and December 2012, 245 patients were treated with either a primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) with preoperative air travel with a flight time more than 4 hours at our institution. One-hundred fifty five patients (n= 87 THA and n= 68 TKA) out of 245 patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this study. A total of 187 patients (n= 92 THA and n= 95 TKA) without bus, air or car travel longer than 30 minutes met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this study as controls. Patients with preoperative air travel were not at higher risk for VTE development compared to patients without preoperative air travel following TKA (HR = 0.95; 95%CI = 0.14-6.52). Gender (HR = 0.41; 95%CI = 0.05-3.56) and age (HR = 3.77; 95%CI = 0.63-22.37) did not influence the VTE development in TKA patients. Our study results show that preoperative air travel do not further increase the risk of VTE after TKA and THA.

  10. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  11. Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis.

    PubMed

    Pak, Mila; Lindseth, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common public health problems in the United States. Approximately 10%-20% of the national adult populations currently carry gallstones, and gallstone prevalence is rising. In addition, nearly 750,000 cholecystectomies are performed annually in the United States; direct and indirect costs of gallbladder surgery are estimated to be $6.5 billion. Cholelithiasis is also strongly associated with gallbladder, pancreatic, and colorectal cancer occurrence. Moreover, the National Institutes of Health estimates that almost 3,000 deaths (0.12% of all deaths) per year are attributed to complications of cholelithiasis and gallbladder disease. Although extensive research has tried to identify risk factors for cholelithiasis, several studies indicate that definitive findings still remain elusive. In this review, predisposing factors for cholelithiasis are identified, the pathophysiology of gallstone disease is described, and nonsurgical preventive options are discussed. Understanding the risk factors for cholelithiasis may not only be useful in assisting nurses to provide resources and education for patients who are diagnosed with gallstones, but also in developing novel preventive measures for the disease.

  12. Prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children aged 5-12 years.

    PubMed

    Moura, Louise Amália de; Dias, Iohanna Maria Guimarães; Pereira, Lilian Varanda

    2016-06-14

    to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with preoperative anxiety in children who wait for outpatient surgery. cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a prospective cohort study that investigates the predictors of postoperative pain in children aged 5-12 years submitted to inguinal and umbilical hernia repair. It was selected 210 children, which were interviewed in the preoperative holding area of a general hospital. Anxiety was evaluated using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (mYPAS). Sociodemographic and clinical variables were analyzed as exposure and anxiety (mYPAS final score>30) as outcome. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with preoperative anxiety. forty-two percent (42.0%) of children presented preoperative anxiety (CI95%: 35.7%-48.6%), with mean scores equal to 30.1 (SD=8.4). Factors associated with preoperative anxiety were: age group of 5-6 years (OR=2.28; p=0.007) and socioeconomic status classified as class C (OR=2.39; p=0.016). the evaluation of children who wait for outpatient surgery should be multidimensional and comprise information on age and socioeconomic status, in order to help in the identification and early treatment of preoperative anxiety. estimar a prevalência e os fatores associados à ansiedade pré-operatória em crianças que aguardam cirurgia ambulatorial. análise transversal de dados da linha de base de um estudo de coorte prospectiva que investiga os preditores de dor pós-operatória em crianças de 5 a 12 anos, submetidas à herniorrafia inguinal e umbilical. Foram selecionadas 210 crianças, entrevistadas na sala de espera de um hospital geral. Avaliou-se a ansiedade por meio da Escala de Ansiedade Pré-operatória de Yale Modificada (EAPY-m). Variáveis sociodemográficas e clínicas foram analisadas, como exposição e ansiedade (soma dos escores da EAPY-m>30) como desfecho. A regressão logística foi utilizada para identificar fatores associados à ansiedade pr

  13. Preoperative CA-125 Values as a Predictive Factor for the Postoperative Outcome in Primary Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Muallem, Mustafa Zelal; Parashkevova, Asya; Almuheimid, Jumana; Richter, Rolf; Diab, Yasser; Braicu, Elena Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the preoperative CA-125 values as a predictive factor for postoperative outcome in primary serous ovarian cancer (POC) for complete tumor resection (CTR) and evaluate the preoperative CA-125 levels with other vital clinical dynamics such as ascites, lymph node involvement, diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis, grading and staging. A cohort of 277 POC-patients aged 18-75 years, who had undergone primary cytoreductive surgery at the Department of Gynecology & Oncological Surgery, Charité, Campus Virchow Klinikum (CVK) between 2000 und 2009 was analyzed in correlation with the preoperative CA-125 values. The median preoperative CA-125 value in high-grade serous POC patients was 636 U/ml (204- 2312 U/ml) compared to 284 U/ml (148.5-1,378 U/ml) in low-grade serous POC patients (p=0.016). For the survival analyses both the cut-off values 252 and 475 U/ml, with highest sum from sensitivity (79.1% and 65.9%, respectively) and specificity (41.9% and 55.1%, respectively), were used to compare the relationship between preoperative CA-125 levels and (CTR), progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). There was no significant difference between PFS and OS in three different groups of patients (preoperative CA-125 levels <252 U/ml, CA 125 levels between 252-475 U/ml and >475 U/ml). Preoperative CA-125 is a poor, but statistically significant predictive factor for CTR after PCS. Preoperative CA-125 can predict neither the progression-free nor overall survival for POC patients. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  15. [Cardiovascular risk factors in women].

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye

    2010-03-01

    It is estimated that at least 80% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) have conventional risk factors and optimization of these risk factors can reduce morbidity and mortality due to this disease considerably. Contemporary women have increased burden of some of these risk factors such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and smoking. Turkish women have a worse CV risk profile than Turkish men in some aspects. Risk stratification systems such as Framingham have a tendency of underestimating the risk in women. Coronary artery disease remains in vessel wall for a longer period of time in women; therefore obstructive disease appear later in their lifespan necessitating risk stratification systems for estimating their lifetime risk.

  16. Factors affecting preoperative anxiety in children undergoing general anaesthesia for dental rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, S H; Mahmood, A J

    2010-02-01

    The primary aim was to examine anxiety levels, and to identify factors affecting preoperative anxiety among healthy children undergoing general anaesthesia for dental rehabilitation. A secondary aim was to assess parental distress and attitude to accompanying their children during this procedure. Observational cross sectional study. Anxiety levels of 118 children admitted to the Day Case unit of King Abdullah teaching hospital in Irbid, Jordan, for dental rehabilitation under general anaesthesia (GA) were assessed at different phases (before and during induction of GA) using the Global Mood Score (GMS) with parental presence. The effect of certain variables such as age, sex, reason for referral, past GA experience, accompanying parent, and parental distress, on children's anxiety during this procedure were assessed using multivariate analysis. The level of significance was <0.05. Parental distress and attitudes to accompanying their children were assessed using a structured questionnaire. There was a significant increase of child anxiety on GMS reaching its highest level in phase three (induction phase). A multivariate test (MANOVA) showed that previous experience of the child with GA, and reason for referral to dental rehabilitation under GA, significantly predicted child anxiety (P-value of 0.019 and 0.012) respectively. However, parental distress, accompanying person, age, and sex of the child, did not affect child anxiety. Parental distress was at its highest level in phase three, mothers were significantly more stressed than fathers and parental distress was significantly increased when a child was <5 years of age. Factors contributing to increased child anxiety during induction of GA for dental rehabilitation were age, previous GA experience, and referral for GA at a very young age. Most parents, especially mothers, were distressed during the induction phase, therefore sufficient preoperative preparation of those children and parents is necessary to achieve

  17. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  18. Pulmonary function changes and its influencing factors after preoperative brace treatment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ran, Bo; Fan, Yuxin; Yuan, Feng; Guo, Kaijin; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively investigate the changes in pulmonary function and its influencing factors in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) undergoing preoperative brace treatment or not. Total 237 AIS patients (43 boys, 194 girls) who underwent operations and had a complete record of pulmonary function tests were enrolled and were divided into preoperative brace treatment group (brace treatment group, n = 60) and without preoperative brace treatment group (control group, n = 177). The pulmonary function parameters were compared between the 2 groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore whether the variables, including age at operation, height, coronal Cobb's angle of main curve, number of involved vertebrae, sagittal Cobb's angle of thoracic curve, brace treatment time per day and brace treatment duration, influenced pulmonary function in the brace treatment group. No significant differences were observed in both predicted and actually measured value of forced vital capacity (FVC) and predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) between 2 groups (P > 0.05), but actually measured FEV1, the percentage of actually measured and predicted value of FVC (FVC%) and FEV1 (FEV1%) were significantly lower in the brace treatment group than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Importantly, the above changes in actually measured FEV1 and FEV1% were obvious in AIS patients presented with a main thoracic curve (P < 0.05), but not in patients with a primary thoracolumbar/lumbar curve. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only the sagittal Cobb's angle of the thoracic curve was positively, but preoperative brace treatment duration was negatively associated with both the FVC% and FEV1% (P < 0.05). Preoperative brace treatment may deteriorate pulmonary function in AIS patients with thoracic curve. The small sagittal Cobb angle and longer brace treatment duration may be risk factors

  19. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  20. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  1. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk using dobutamine-thallium imaging in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, J.L.; Elliott, B.M.; Robison, J.G.; Hendrix, G.H.; Spicer, K.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is frequently present in patients undergoing evaluation for reconstructive peripheral vascular surgery. Dobutamine-thallium imaging has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive noninvasive method for the detection of significant coronary artery disease. Eighty-seven candidates for vascular reconstruction underwent dobutamine-thallium imaging. Forty-eight patients had an abnormal dobutamine-thallium scan. Twenty-two patients had infarct only, while 26 had reversible ischemia demonstrated on dobutamine-thallium imaging. Fourteen of 26 patients with reversible ischemia underwent cardiac catheterization and 11 showed significant coronary artery disease. Seven patients underwent preoperative coronary bypass grafting or angioplasty. There were no postoperative myocardial events in this group. Three patients were denied surgery on the basis of unreconstructible coronary artery disease, and one patient refused further intervention. Ten patients with reversible myocardial ischemia on dobutamine-thallium imaging underwent vascular surgical reconstruction without coronary revascularization and suffered a 40% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemic events. Five patients were denied surgery because of presumed significant coronary artery disease on the basis of the dobutamine-thallium imaging and clinical evaluation alone. Thirty-nine patients with normal dobutamine-thallium scans underwent vascular reconstructive surgery with a 5% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemia. Dobutamine-thallium imaging is a sensitive and reliable screening method which identifies those patients with coronary artery disease who are at high risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia following peripheral vascular surgery.

  2. Risk factors in school shootings.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, S; Hersen, M; Thomas, J

    2000-01-01

    Nine incidents of multiple-victim homicide in American secondary schools are examined and common risk factors are identified. The literature dealing with individual, family, social, societal, and situational risk factors for youth violence and aggression is reviewed along with existing risk assessment methods. Checklists of risk factors for serious youth violence and school violence are used in reviewing each school shooting case. Commonalties among the cases and implications for psychologists practicing in clinical and school settings are discussed.

  3. Preoperative assessment of surgical risk: creation of a scoring tool to estimate 1-year mortality after emergency abdominal surgery in the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Olufajo, Olubode A; Reznor, Gally; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Cooper, Zara R; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Rangel, Erika L

    2017-04-01

    The risk of mortality after emergency general surgery (EGS) in elderly patients is prolonged beyond initial hospitalization. Our objective was to develop a preoperative scoring tool to quantify risk of 1-year mortality. Three hundred ninety EGS patients aged 70 years or more were analyzed. Risk factors for 1-year mortality were identified using stepwise-forward logistic multivariate regression and weights assigned using natural logarithm of odds ratios. A geriatric emergency surgery mortality (GEM) score was derived from the aggregate of weighted scores. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. One-year mortality was 32%. Risk factors and their weights were: acute kidney injury (2), American Society of Anesthesiology class greater than or equal to 4 (2), Charlson Comorbidity Index greater than or equal to 4 (1), albumin less than 3.5 mg/dL (1), and body mass index (less than 18.5 kg/m(2) [1]; 18.5 to 29.9 kg/m(2) [0]; ≥30 kg/m(2) [-1]). One-year mortality was: GEM 0 to 1 (0% to 7%); GEM 2 to 5 (32% to 68%); GEM 6 to 8 (94% to 100%). C-statistics were .82 and .75 in training and validation data sets, respectively. A simple score using 5 clinical variables predicts 1-year mortality after EGS with reasonable accuracy and assists in preoperative counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between preoperative characteristics and risk of anaesthesia-related death in dogs in small-animal referral hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Itami, Takaharu; Aida, Hiroko; Asakawa, Makoto; Fujii, Yoko; Iizuka, Tomoya; Imai, Ayako; Iseri, Toshie; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Kakishima, Kei; Kamata, Masatoshi; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Nagahama, Shotaro; Naganobu, Kiyokazu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Okano, Shozo; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Yanagawa, Masashi

    2017-05-01

    To explore the major risk factors linking preoperative characteristics and anaesthesia-related death in dogs in referral hospitals in Japan. Observational cohort study. From April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011, 4323 dogs anaesthetized in 18 referral hospitals in Japan. Questionnaire forms were collated anonymously. Death occurring within 48 hours after extubation was considered as an anaesthesia-related death. Patient outcome (alive or dead) was set as the outcome variable. Preoperative general physical characteristics, complete blood cell counts, serum biochemical examinations and intraoperative complications were set as explanatory variables. The risk factors for anaesthesia-related death were evaluated using chi-square test or Fisher's exact test, followed by multivariable logistic regression analysis of the data. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Thirteen dogs that died from surgical error or euthanasia were excluded from statistical analysis. The total mortality rate in this study was 0.65% [28/4310 dogs; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41-0.89]. Furthermore, 75% (95% CI, 55.1-89.3) of anaesthesia-related deaths occurred in dogs with pre-existing diseases. Most of the deaths occurred postoperatively (23/28; 82.1%; 95% CI, 63.1-93.9). Preoperative serum glucose concentration <77 mg dL(-1) (6/46; 13.0%; 95% CI, 4.9-26.3), disturbance of consciousness (6/50; 12.0%; 95% CI, 4.5-24.3), white cell count >15,200 μL(-1) (16/499; 3.4%; 95% CI, 1.9-5.5) and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade III-V (19/1092; 1.7%; 95% CI, 1.1-2.7) were identified as risk factors for anaesthesia-related death. Intraoperative hypoxaemia (8/34; 23.5%; 95% CI, 10.7-41.2) and tachycardia (4/148; 2.7%; 95% CI, 0.7-6.8) were also risk factors for anaesthesia-related death. The results revealed that certain preoperative characteristics were associated with increased odds of anaesthesia-related death, specifically low serum glucose concentration and disturbances of consciousness

  5. Infantile esotropia: risk factors associated with reoperation

    PubMed Central

    Magli, Adriano; Rombetto, Luca; Matarazzo, Francesco; Carelli, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify clinical and demographic factors associated with misalignment after first surgery performed on children affected by infantile esotropia to evaluate the reoperation rate. A retrospective study was carried out, analyzing data from 525 children who underwent bilateral medial recti recession, bilateral lateral recti resection, and inferior oblique recession and anteroposition by the same surgeon (AM). Postoperative evaluation included assessment of motor alignment at approximately 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 5 years. Statistical analysis was performed with a logistical regression model in which the dependent variable was the presence/absence of reoperation. We found that late surgery (after 3 years of age) and a family history of strabismus are associated with a higher risk of reoperation, while some clinical factors, including some classically associated with worst motor outcome as preoperative angle, dissociated vertical deviation, and amblyopia, did not influence the incidence of reoperation in infantile esotropia. Male patients and patients with hyperopia in preoperative examinations have a significantly decreased reoperation rate. PMID:27799735

  6. Preoperative Computed Tomographic Angiogram Measurement of Abdominal Muscles Is a Valuable Risk Assessment for Bulge Formation after Microsurgical Abdominal Free Flap Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kappos, Elisabeth A; Jaskolka, Jeff; Butler, Kate; O'Neill, Anne C; Hofer, Stefan O P; Zhong, Toni

    2017-07-01

    A major shortcoming associated with abdominal tissue breast reconstruction is long-term abdominal wall morbidity. Although abdominal muscle size on computed tomographic angiography has been correlated with morbidity following many abdominal operations, it has not been studied for breast reconstruction. Therefore, the authors evaluated the association between preoperative computed tomography angiography-derived measurements of abdominal core muscles and postoperative abdominal wall morbidity after abdominal tissue breast reconstruction. In this retrospective matched case-control study of women who underwent microsurgical abdominal flap breast reconstruction at one institution between January 2011 and June 2015, the authors evaluated all cases of postoperative bulge/hernia, matched by type of abdominal flap and body mass index in a ratio of 1:2 to controls without bulge/hernia. The authors obtained morphometric measurements of abdominal core muscles on preoperative computed tomographic angiographs. Using univariable and multivariable logistic regressions, the authors examined the effects of clinical risk factors and computed tomographic angiography morphometric measurements on postoperative bulge/hernia formation. Of the 589 patients who underwent abdominal free flap breast reconstruction, symptomatic bulges/hernias were identified in 35 patients (5.9 percent). When compared to the 70 matched controls, multivariable analysis showed that decreased area of rectus abdominis muscle (OR, 0.18; p < 0.01) and increased inter-rectus abdominis distance (OR, 1.14; p < 0.01) on computed tomographic angiography were significant risk factors associated with postoperative bulge/hernia. Preoperative computed tomographic angiography allows objective measurements of the patient's abdominal muscle anatomy that provide valuable prognostic information on the risk of bulge/hernia formation following abdominally based microsurgical breast reconstruction. Risk, III.

  7. Utility of preoperative in vitro platelet function tests for predicting bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Kim, Sang-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    Background It is necessary to predict the bleeding risk in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). To evaluate the adequacy of primary hemostasis, preoperative hemostatic screening tests are used. In the present study, we determined whether there is a positive correlation between prolonged closure time (CT) with collagen/epinephrine (CT-epi), prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and bleeding during FESS. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of 90 patients without bleeding histories who had undergone FESS from March 2013 to June 2014. More than 200 mL of blood loss was defined as moderate bleeding during surgery. With respect to bleeding during surgery, we determined the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT. Results Of the 90 patients, 17 (18.9%) patients had preoperative prolonged CT values and three (17.6%) patients had bleeding. In comparison, five (6.8%) of the 73 (81.1%) patients who had undergone FESS with preoperative normal PFA values experienced bleeding (P=0.171). On the other hand, patients with prolonged PT values (2, 2.2%), prolonged INR values (3, 3.3%) or prolonged PTT values (1, 1.1%) had no bleeding episode. Preoperative CT had low sensitivity (44.4%) and PPV (23.5%). Conclusion During preoperative period, the hemostatic screening may not be helpful to detect the bleeding tendency in adult patients undergoing FESS. Routine measurement of CT-epi, PT, INR and aPTT for preoperative screening may not be recommended for FESS patients. PMID:27799837

  8. Risk factors analysis of consecutive exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qianwen; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Xu; Li, Ziyuan; Liu, Longqian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate clinical factors associated with the onset of consecutive exotropia (XT) following esotropia surgery. By a retrospective nested case-control design, we reviewed the medical records of 193 patients who had undergone initial esotropia surgery between 2008 and 2015, and had follow-up longer than 6 months. The probable risk factors were evaluated between groups 1 (consecutive XT) and 2 (non-consecutive exotropia). Pearson chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U test were used for univariate analysis, and conditional logistic regression model was applied for exploring the potential risk factors of consecutive XT. Consecutive exotropia occurred in 23 (11.9%) of 193 patients. Patients who had undergone large bilateral medial rectus recession (BMR) (P = 0.017) had a high risk of developing consecutive XT. Oblique dysfunction (P = 0.001), adduction limitation (P = 0.000) were associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which was confirmed in the conditional logistic regression analysis. In addition, large amount of BMR (6 mm or more) was associated with higher incidence of adduction limitation (P = 0.045). The surgical methods and preoperative factors did not appear to influence the risk of developing consecutive XT (P > 0.05). The amount of surgery could be optimized to reduce the risk of consecutive XT. The presence of oblique overaction and postoperative adduction limitation may be associated with a high risk of consecutive XT, which may require close supervision, and/or even earlier operation intervention. PMID:27977611

  9. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Marc P.; Inge, Thomas H.; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M.; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L.; Harmon, Carroll M.; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. OBJECTIVE To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children’s Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. RESULTS The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit

  10. Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Olsson, Birgit; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-12-02

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients.

  11. Morphomic analysis as an aid for preoperative risk stratification in patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rinkinen, Jacob; Agarwal, Shailesh; Beauregard, Jeff; Aliu, Oluseyi; Benedict, Matthew; Buchman, Steven R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Levi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing major head and neck cancer surgery (MHNCS) may develop significant postoperative complications. To minimize the risk of complications, clinicians often assess multiple measures of preoperative health in terms of medical comorbidities. One emerging method to decrease surgical complications is preoperative assessment of patient frailty measured by specific tissue characteristics. We hypothesize that morphomic characteristics of the temporalis region serve as predictive markers for the development of complications after MHNCS. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 69 patients with available computed tomography (CT) imaging who underwent MHNCS from 2006–2012. To measure temporalis region characteristics, we used morphomic analysis of available preoperative CT scans to map out the region. All available CT scans had been performed as part of the patient’s routine work-up and were not ordered for morphomic analysis. We describe the correlation among temporalis fat pad volume (TFPV), mean zygomatic arch thickness, and incidence of postoperative complications. Results We noted significant difference in the zygomatic bone thickness and TFPV between patients who had medical complications, surgical complications, or total major complications and those who did not. Furthermore, by use of binary logistic regression, our data suggest decreased TFPV and zygomatic arch thickness are stronger predictors of developing postoperative complications than previously studies preoperative characteristics. Conclusions We describe morphomic analysis of the temporalis region in patients undergoing MHNCS to identify patients at risk for complications. Regional anatomic morphology may serve as a marker to objectively determine a patient’s overall health. Use of the temporalis region is appropriate in patients undergoing MHNCS because of the availability of preoperative scans as part of routine work up for head and/or neck cancer. PMID:25456114

  12. Preoperative serum thyroglobulin concentration as a predictive factor of malignancy in small follicular and Hürthle cell neoplasms of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Petric, Rok; Besic, Hana; Besic, Nikola

    2014-09-12

    Cytologic examination of a fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimen cannot distinguish between benign and malignant follicular or Hürthle cell neoplasms. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) concentrations are higher in follicular and Hürthle cell carcinomas than in benign follicular or Hürthle cell tumors, but preoperative measurement of Tg is not recommended for initial evaluation of thyroid nodules. The aim of this study was to find out whether preoperative serum Tg concentration is a predictive factor of malignant disease in patients with a follicular or Hürthle cell neoplasm with a diameter of 2 cm or less. From 1988 to 2013, a total of 244 patients (214 female, 30 male, age range 9 to 82 years, median age 52 years) had a surgical procedure at our institute because of follicular or Hürthle cell neoplasms with a tumor diameter of 2 cm or less. In these patients a preoperative concentration of Tg was determined and Tg-autoantibodies were negative. The risk factors for malignancy were identified by a chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression. The histopathologic diagnoses were carcinoma, adenoma, and benign goiter in 62 (25.5%), 115 (47%), and 67 (27.5%) patients, respectively. The median preoperative Tg concentration in benign tumors, papillary carcinomas, follicular carcinomas, and Hürthle cell carcinomas was 41, 87, 72, and 106 ng/ml (P = 0.05), respectively. The predictive factors for carcinoma shown by the chi-square test were: sex, thyroid volume, and preoperative Tg concentration. The independent predictors of malignancy as shown by multivariate logistic regression were: male sex (odds ratio, 2.57; P = 0.02), and a Tg concentration of more than 80 ng/ml (odds ratio, 2.35; P = 0.005). The independent predictors of malignancy in follicular or Hürthle cell neoplasms are sex and preoperative Tg concentration.

  13. [Use of preoperative glucocorticoid to risk reduction of complications after esophagectomy by esophagus carcinoma: meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Antônio Marcos

    2006-12-01

    Preoperative glucocorticoid administration has been proposed for reducing postoperative morbidity. This is not widely used before esophageal resection because of incomplete knowledge regarding its effectiveness. The aim here was to assess the effects of preoperative glucocorticoid administration in adults undergoing esophageal resection for esophageal carcinoma. Studies were identified by searching the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CancerLit, SCIELO and Cochrane Library, and by manual searching from relevant articles. The last search for clinical trials for this systematic review was performed in December 2005. This review included randomized studies of patients with potentially resectable carcinomas of the esophagus that compared preoperative glucocorticoid administration with placebo. Data were extracted by the reviewer, and the trial quality was assessed using Jadad scoring. Odds ratio with 95% confidence limits and bayesian relative risk were used to assess the significance of the difference between the treatment arms. Four randomized trials involving 169 patients were found. There were no differences in postoperative mortality, anastomotic leakage, hepatic and renal failure between the glucocorticoid and placebo groups. There were fewer postoperative respiratory complications (95% CI = 0.09-0.46), sepsis (95% CI = 0.10-0.81), and total postoperative complications (95% CI = 0.06-0.23) with preoperative glucocorticoid administration. Prophylactic administration of glucocorticoids is associated with decreased postoperative complications.

  14. Risk factors for postoperative complications in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Caulley, Lisa; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Luo, Lindy; Javidnia, Hedyeh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing, and with it, an increase in total thyroidectomy. There are limited studies comparing outcomes in total thyroidectomy performed in the inpatient versus outpatient setting. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of risk factors and outcomes of postoperative morbidity and mortality in total thyroidectomy performed as an inpatient versus outpatient surgery. Retrospective cohort study of data from the 2005 to 2014 multi-institutional, risk-adjusted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. A multivariate regression model with corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used to determine 30-day morbidity and mortality after total thyroidectomies, and also risk factors of postoperative outcomes. From 2005 to 2014, 40,025 total thyroidectomies were performed (48.5% inpatient, 51.5% outpatient). The 30-day complication rate for all total thyroidectomies was 7.74%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to control for potential confounding variables. Preoperative factors that affected complications rates for inpatient thyroidectomies included: age ≥70, non-Caucasian race, dependent functional status, history of congestive heart failure, smoking history, bleeding disorder, wound infection, and preoperative sepsis (P < 0.05). In addition, preoperative factors affecting complications in thyroidectomy performed as an outpatient surgery included malignant thyroid pathology (P  0.05). We identified a subset of preoperative conditions that affect risk of complications after total thyroidectomy. Recommendations for patient selection for outpatient total thyroidectomies should be modified to account for pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of postoperative morbidity. PMID:28151852

  15. Risk factors for coagulopathy after liver resection.

    PubMed

    Ramspoth, Tina; Roehl, Anna B; Macko, Stephan; Heidenhain, Cristoph; Junge, Karsten; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schmeding, Maximilian; Neumann, Ulf P; Rossaint, Rolf; Hein, Marc

    2014-12-01

    To identify risk factors for coagulopathy in patients undergoing liver resection. A retrospective cohort study. Patients who underwent liver resection at a university hospital between April 2010 and May 2011 were evaluated within seven days after surgery. One hundred forty-seven patients were assessed for eligibility. Thirty needed to be excluded because of incomplete data (23) or a preexisting coagulopathy (7). Coagulopathy was defined as 1 or more of the following events: international normalized ratio ≥1.4, platelet count <80,000/μL, and partial thromboplastin time >38 seconds. Related to the time course and coagulation profile thresholds, 3 different groups could be distinguished: no coagulopathy, temporary coagulopathy, and persistent coagulopathy. Seventy-seven patients (65.8%) had no coagulopathy, whereas 33 (28.2%) developed temporary coagulopathy and 7 (6%) developed persistent coagulopathy until day 7. Preoperative international normalized ratio (P = .001), postoperative peak lactate levels (P = .012), and resected liver weight (P = .005) were identified as independent predictors. Preoperative liver transaminases and transfusion volumes of red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma were significantly higher in patients with persistent coagulopathy. Epidural anesthesia is feasible in patients scheduled for liver resection. Caution should be observed for patients with extended resection (≥3 segments) and increased postoperative lactate. In patients with preexisting liver disease, epidural catheters should be avoided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Preoperative Albumin to Globulin Ratio (AGR) as Prognostic Factor in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Guo, Shengjie; Chen, Dong; Yang, Guangwei; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yijun; He, Qiuming; Qin, Zike; Liu, Zhuowei; Xue, Yunfei; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ruiwu; Zhou, Fangjian; Han, Hui; Yao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition and systemic inflammatory response are frequently associated with prognosis in patients with several types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The study is aimed to investigate the ability of preoperative serum albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) to predict the long-term mortality of RCC patients. Methods: The study is a retrospective study of an unselected cohort of 895 RCC patients who underwent a curative radical or partial nephrectomy at the Department of Urology in the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between January 2000 and December 2012 and had documented preoperative serum total protein and albumin (ALB) levels. The preoperative AGR was calculated as the ratio of ALB to (total protein-ALB) and its association with other clinical indices was assessed using survival analysis. Results: Low preoperative AGR was associated with older population, lower hemoglobin, higher total protein, lower ALB, lower body mass index and advanced stage. The univariate and multivariate Cox analyses demonstrated that preoperative AGR was an independent prognostic indicator of overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio (HR): 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43 to 0.93, P=0.022). In addition, patients with low preoperative AGR at pT1-2, pT3-4, pN0, pN1, pM0 and pM1 stages had significantly shorter OS than patients with high preoperative AGR. Conclusion: Preoperative AGR is a proven objective, reproducible, inexpensive survival predictor of RCC patients following surgical resection and should be considered for routine clinical use. PMID:28243330

  17. Risk factors of surgical site infections in patients with Crohn's disease complicated with gastrointestinal fistula.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kun; Ren, Jianan; Li, Guanwei; Hu, Qiongyuan; Wu, Xiuwen; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Jieshou

    2017-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common complication following surgical procedures. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with SSI in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) complicated with gastrointestinal fistula. This was a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgical resection in gastrointestinal fistula patients with CD between January 2013 and January 2015, identified from a prospectively maintained gastrointestinal fistula database. Demographic information, preoperative medication, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcome data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was carried out to assess possible risk factors for SSI. A total of 118 patients were identified, of whom 75.4% were men, the average age of the patients was 34.1 years, and the average body mass index (BMI) was 18.8 kg/m(2). The rate of SSI was 31.4%. On multivariate analysis, preoperative anemia (P = 0.001, OR 7.698, 95% CI 2.273-26.075), preoperative bacteria present in fistula tract (P = 0.029, OR 3.399, 95% CI 1.131-10.220), and preoperative enteral nutrition (EN) <3 months (P < 0.001, OR 11.531, 95% CI 3.086-43.079) were predictors of SSI. Notably, preoperative percutaneous abscess drainage was shown to exert protection against SSI in fistulizing CD (P = 0.037, OR 0.258, 95% CI 0.073-0.920). Preoperative anemia, bacteria present in fistula tract, and preoperative EN <3 months significantly increased the risk of postoperative SSI in gastrointestinal fistula complicated with CD. Preoperative identification of these risk factors may assist in risk assessment and then to optimize preoperative preparation and perioperative care.

  18. [Risk factors of atelectasis following pulmonary lobectomy].

    PubMed

    Stolz, A J; Petrík, F; Simonek, J; Schützner, J; Lischke, R; Pafko, P

    2008-01-01

    The aim our study was to determine incidence and predisposing factors of atelectasis following pulmonary lobectomy. Retrospective study of our prospective database included 282 patients. Postlobectomy atelectasis (APL) was defined as ipsi- or contralateral atelectasis with whiteout of the involved lobe or segment on the chest radiograph requiring bronchoscopy. Postlobectomy atelectasis occurred in 18 (6.4%) patients. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remained the only preoperative variable predicted of APL (p < 0.05). Patients undergoing right upper lobectomy (RUL), either alone or in combination with the right middle lobe had a significantly greater incidence of APL when compared with all other types of resections (p < 0.05). Postlobectomy atelectasis is an important postlobectomy complication occurring in 6.4% of all lobectomies. Patients with COPD and undergoing RUL are at the higher risk for APL and prophylactic measures to prevent it are necessary.

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang . E-mail: k423j@cnu.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Shengjin; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Song, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Nam, Ji Sook; Cho, Moon-June

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  20. Prognostic preoperative factors for successful outcome of surgery in horizontal strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Namita; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Ashraf, Mohammad; Grover, Shivani; Khan, Ashiya; Sonwani, Prabha

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Surgery for horizontal strabismus reportedly has a success rate of 60%–80%. However, which preoperative factors are predictive of this success is not clear. AIMS: To identify prognostic factors those are predictive of successful outcome in horizontal strabismus surgery. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Observational analytical study using multiple logistic regression (MLR). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We assessed the medical records of patients who had undergone first-time horizontal muscle strabismus surgery between 2002 and 2013, where complete follow-up data were available for ≥6 weeks, and also, we collected data prospectively on patients operated between January 2014 and September 2015. Successful outcome was defined as a postoperative angle of deviation within 10 prism diopter of orthophoria at ≥6 weeks postoperatively. Independent variables considered were age at onset, age at surgery, duration, gender, deviation - type and amount, logMAR visual acuity (VA) - mean and of the poorer eye, mean refractive error, amount of anisometropia, and presence of dense amblyopia. Only those with P < 0.2 on univariate analyses (UAs) were included in the MLR, with significance set at P ≤ 0.05. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: UA (Chi-square for categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables), followed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 113 patients, on UA, type of deviation (P = 0.01), age at surgery (P = 0.16), absence of dense amblyopia (P = 0.002), and logMAR VA of the poorer eye (P = 0.005) qualified for the inclusion in MLR. On MLR, esotropia (ET) (odds ratio [OR]: 4.46) and absence of dense amblyopia (OR: 5.90) were associated with success. CONCLUSIONS: With an overall success rate of 83%, ET and absence of dense amblyopia were significantly predictive of surgical success. PMID:28757690

  1. Risk factors for surgical infections.

    PubMed

    Dominioni, Lorenzo; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Rovera, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    Many risk factors for postoperative infections have been identified that can be used individually or in combination as scoring indices. Infection risk scores can be applied in clinical practice to identify high-risk surgical patients, to indicate the need to implement risk-reduction strategies, and to stratify risk for comparison of outcome among different patient series. In the hierarchy of patient-related risk factors, serum albumin concentration and advanced age rank at the top of the list. Among the treatment-related factors, the quality of the surgical technique is a most important determinant, although most surgical site infections are attributable to patient-related risk factors rather than to flawed surgical care. Scoring systems can identify the patients at highest risk, thus prompting the implementation of therapy to improve modifiable conditions, but most clinicians outside the academic and research setting do not use them. Risk assessment also can be performed by expert clinical judgment. Discussion with the patient and informed consent are essential. Carefully collected scores of patient risk factors may be valuable to document the relations between the risk and the outcome of surgery. Ideally, each institution should select a validated scoring system to audit postoperative infectious morbidity and surgical performance in the various specialties.

  2. Stroke - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... a higher risk. Diseases such as cancer, chronic kidney disease, and some types of arthritis. Weak areas in an artery wall or abnormal arteries and veins . Pregnancy. Both during and in the weeks right after ...

  3. The need for breast cancer screening in women undergoing elective breast surgery: an assessment of risk and risk factors for breast cancer in young women.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Safa E; Bullocks, Jamal M; Dempsey, Peter J; Singletary, S Eva

    2010-01-01

    Given the 11% lifetime risk of breast cancer and increasing popularity of elective breast surgery, the role of preoperative screening begs further investigation. There are currently no guidelines that indicate which women younger than 40 years of age should be screened preoperatively. A meta-analysis of studies regarding the odds ratio (OR) and relative risk ratio for breast cancer risk factors in women younger than 40 was completed. Of a total of 240 results in the PubMed database for articles referencing breast cancer risk factors in young women, eight were selected for review. A total of 5381 patients were included in the studies in this meta-analysis; 26 risk factors were identified. A meta-analysis was performed to determine the OR of each specific risk factor, with a 95% confidence interval. The most significant risk factors were having a sister with breast cancer (OR, 11.66), having a first-degree relative with breast cancer (OR, 2.66), having a mother with breast cancer (OR, 2.31), never having breastfed (OR, 1.77), and having undergone a breast biopsy (OR, 1.66). From these data, the authors developed a clinical questionnaire to estimate the risk of breast cancer in young women. In addition, an algorithm was developed for preoperative breast cancer screening for women of all ages undergoing elective breast procedures. For women younger than 40, the preoperative risk assessment involves two steps. First, the possibility of existing breast cancer should be evaluated with a preoperative screening survey. Second, the patient's risk for future development of cancer should be assessed, with a focus on genetic mutations. Women older than 40 years of age should be stratified to receive either a preoperative mammogram or MRI. The clinical questionnaire and preoperative screening algorithm provide an evidence-based guideline on which to base the discussion with patients regarding preoperative breast cancer screening.

  4. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation and repair of inguinal hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy decreases risk of developing post-prostatectomy hernia.

    PubMed

    Marien, Tracy; Taouli, Bachir; Telegrafi, Shpetim; Babb, James S; Lepor, Herbert

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Some studies have evaluated preoperative and intraoperative examination for inguinal hernias and their repair, noting a decrease in the rate of post-prostatectomy hernias. However, this did not eradicate post-prostatectomy hernias, indicating that this method probably missed subclinical hernias. Other studies looked at prophylactic procedures to prevent the formation of inguinal hernias at the time of prostatectomy and showed a decrease in the rate of postoperative hernias. To our knowledge this is the only series evaluating a multi-modal approach with magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and examination to identify all clinical and subclinical hernias and repair them at the time of prostatectomy. This approach only subjects those patients at risk for symptomatic hernias to an additional procedure and decreases the post-prostatectomy hernia rate to <1%. • To assess if a comprehensive evaluation to diagnose clinical and subclinical hernias and repair of these hernias at the time of open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP) decreases the incidence of clinical inguinal hernias (IHs) after ORRP. • Between 1 July 2007 and 31 July 2010, 281 consecutive men underwent ORRP by a single surgeon. • Of these men, 207 (74%) underwent comprehensive preoperative screening for IH, which included physical examination, upstanding ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. • Between 12 and 24 months after ORRP, 178 (86%) of these men completed a questionnaire designed to capture development of clinical IHs. • Of the 178 evaluable patients, 92 (52%) were diagnosed preoperatively with IH by at least one diagnostic modality. • Forty-one and 51 of the men had bilateral or unilateral IHs, respectively for a total of 133 IHs. • No preoperative factor was significantly associated with the presence of an IH before prostatectomy. • No groin subjected to IH repair (IHR) at the time of ORRP developed a

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer: factors affecting the accuracy of preoperative lesion sizing.

    PubMed

    Mennella, Simone; Garlaschi, Alessandro; Paparo, Francesco; Perillo, Marco; Celenza, Matteo; Massa, Tiberio; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo

    2015-03-01

    Accurate preoperative sizing of breast cancer with imaging modalities has a great importance in the surgical planning. To assess the influence of tumor size and histology on the accuracy of measurement of cancer local extension by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and eighty-six patients with primary breast cancer, for a total of 221 lesions, were included in this retrospective study. Tumors were divided into five histological groups: invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), IDC with extensive intraductal component (EIC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and "other histology" (mucinous, papillary, medullary, tubular, and apocrine breast cancer). Microscopic measurement of the largest diameter of tumors at pathology was chosen as reference standard and compared with MRI measurement. Concordance was defined as a difference ≤ 5 mm between MRI and pathology. The mean size of tumors at pathology was 24.8 ± 19.4 mm, while at MRI it was 29.7 ± 20 mm (P < 0.05), with a significant overestimation of MRI. MRI-pathology concordance was found in 98/221 cases (44.3%), while MRI overestimated the size of 81/221 tumors (36.7%). The extent of overestimation was significantly different among the five histological groups (P < 0.05). At multivariate analysis, DCIS histology was the factor more significantly associated with MRI-pathology discordance (P = 0.0005), while the influence of tumor dimension at pathology was less significant (P = 0.0073). DCIS histology is strongly associated with discordance between MRI and pathology sizing of breast cancer. Lesion size can also influence the accuracy of MRI measurements, but to a lesser extent. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Risk factors for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Genco, Robert J; Borgnakke, Wenche S

    2013-06-01

    Risk factors play an important role in an individual's response to periodontal infection. Identification of these risk factors helps to target patients for prevention and treatment, with modification of risk factors critical to the control of periodontal disease. Shifts in our understanding of periodontal disease prevalence, and advances in scientific methodology and statistical analysis in the last few decades, have allowed identification of several major systemic risk factors for periodontal disease. The first change in our thinking was the understanding that periodontal disease is not universal, but that severe forms are found only in a portion of the adult population who show abnormal susceptibility. Analysis of risk factors and the ability to statistically adjust and stratify populations to eliminate the effects of confounding factors have allowed identification of independent risk factors. These independent but modifiable, risk factors for periodontal disease include lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. They also include diseases and unhealthy conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and low dietary calcium and vitamin D. These risk factors are modifiable and their management is a major component of the contemporary care of many periodontal patients. Genetic factors also play a role in periodontal disease and allow one to target individuals for prevention and early detection. The role of genetic factors in aggressive periodontitis is clear. However, although genetic factors (i.e., specific genes) are strongly suspected to have an association with chronic adult periodontitis, there is as yet no clear evidence for this in the general population. It is important to pursue efforts to identify genetic factors associated with chronic periodontitis because such factors have potential in identifying patients who have a high susceptibility for development of this disease. Many of the systemic risk factors

  7. Environmental risk factors for autism

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Dietert, Janice M.; Dewitt, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a devastating childhood condition that has emerged as an increasing social concern just as it has increased in prevalence in recent decades. Autism and the broader category of autism spectrum disorders are among the increasingly seen examples in which there is a fetal basis for later disease or disorder. Environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors all play a role in determining the risk of autism and some of these effects appear to be transgenerational. Identification of the most critical windows of developmental vulnerability is paramount to understanding when and under what circumstances a child is at elevated risk for autism. No single environmental factor explains the increased prevalence of autism. While a handful of environmental risk factors have been suggested based on data from human studies and animal research, it is clear that many more, and perhaps the most significant risk factors, remain to be identified. The most promising risk factors identified to date fall within the categories of drugs, environmental chemicals, infectious agents, dietary factors, and other physical/psychological stressors. However, the rate at which environmental risk factors for autism have been identified via research and safety testing has not kept pace with the emerging health threat posed by this condition. For the way forward, it seems clear that additional focused research is needed. But more importantly, successful risk reduction strategies for autism will require more extensive and relevant developmental safety testing of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24149029

  8. [Preeclampsia as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Heida, Karst Y; Franx, Arie; Bots, Michiel L

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the primary cause of death in women. Guidelines for identifying high-risk individuals have been developed, e.g. the Dutch Guideline on Cardiovascular Risk Management. In the most recent version of this guideline, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cited as cardiovascular risk factors; therefore, individuals with these conditions are identified as being at high risk. As with DM and RA, there is strong evidence that the experience of having a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy is a cardiovascular risk factor. This is particularly the case for early preeclampsia, which constitutes a 7-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease. However, in the Netherlands, there are no guidelines and there is no consensus on how to screen or treat these women. Trial evidence is therefore urgently needed to substantiate the value of cardiovascular risk management for those women with a history of hypertension during pregnancy.

  9. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Lawrence H. C.; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs), irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), or a positive surgical margin (PSM). The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index) for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups. Results Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001) and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS) ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36) and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05). Conclusion The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an

  10. Preoperative factors predicting poor outcomes following laparoscopic choledochotomy: a multivariate analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoming; Hong, Xiaoming; Ni, Kaiyuan; Teng, Xiaoping; Xie, Kaigang

    2013-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery for common bile duct stones varies procedurally from a transcystic approach to laparoscopic choledochotomy (LC) with or without biliary drainage. However, LC is a difficult procedure with higher documented morbidity than the transcystic approach. We retrospectively investigated risk factors for adverse outcomes of LC. Methods We used logistic regression models to assess 4 categories of adverse outcomes: overall, complications, conversion to open operation and failed surgical clearance. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Results We included 201 patients who underwent LC in our analysis. Adverse outcomes occurred in 48 (23.9%) patients, complications occurred in 43 (21.4%), retained stones were observed in 8 (4%), and conversion to laparotomy occurred in 7 (3.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that total bilirubin (BIL) and the presence of medical risk factors (MRFs) were significant predictors of adverse outcomes and complications. We calculated the probability of adverse outcomes (p) using the following formula: logit(p) = 0.977 (MRFs) + 0.014 (BIL) − 2.919. p = EXP (logit(p)) ÷ [1+EXP (logit(p))]. According to their logit(p), all patients were divided into a low-risk group (logit(p) ≤ −1.32, n = 130) and a high-risk group (logit(p) > −1.32, n = 71). Patients in the low-risk group had about a 1 in 10 chance (12 of 130) of adverse outcomes developing. Of the 71 patients in the high-risk group, 36 (50.7%) experienced adverse outcomes. Conclusion High BIL and the presence of MRFs could predict adverse outcomes in patients undergoing LC. PMID:23883491

  11. Patient-related risk factors that predict poor outcome after total hip replacement.

    PubMed Central

    MacWilliam, C H; Yood, M U; Verner, J J; McCarthy, B D; Ward, R E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with poor outcome after total hip replacement (THR) surgery. DATA SOURCES: This article is the first to present results from the American Medical Group Association (AMGA) THR consortium. STUDY DESIGN: The outcomes evaluated were pain and physical function. Eight patient risk factors were evaluated. These included the age, sex, race, marital status, and education of the patient; whether the patient had polyarticular disease or other comorbid conditions; and the patient's preoperative pain and physical function score. DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected from patients using AMGA-approved, self-administered questionnaires preoperatively and at six weeks, three months, six months, one year, and two years postoperatively. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the patient risk factors studied, race, education, number of comorbid conditions, and preoperative Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ) score were found to be associated with poor outcome. These risk factors were found to have an effect on both pain and physical function at six months postoperatively. Patients with higher preoperative scores were found to have higher postoperative scores, but substantially fewer of these patients received any benefit from their surgery. For each 10-point increase in preoperative score, patients could expect at least a 6-point decrease in postoperative improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that preoperative status is an important predictor of outcome for THR. PMID:8943994

  12. The PER (Preoperative Esophagectomy Risk) Score: A Simple Risk Score to Predict Short-Term and Long-Term Outcome in Patients with Surgically Treated Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reeh, Matthias; Metze, Johannes; Uzunoglu, Faik G.; Nentwich, Michael; Ghadban, Tarik; Wellner, Ullrich; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Kluge, Stefan; Izbicki, Jakob R.; Vashist, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal resection in patients with esophageal cancer (EC) is still associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We aimed to develop a simple preoperative risk score for the prediction of short-term and long-term outcomes for patients with EC treated by esophageal resection. In total, 498 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma, who underwent esophageal resection, were included in this retrospective cohort study. Three preoperative esophagectomy risk (PER) groups were defined based on preoperative functional evaluation of different organ systems by validated tools (revised cardiac risk index, model for end-stage liver disease score, and pulmonary function test). Clinicopathological parameters, morbidity, and mortality as well as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to the PER score. The PER score significantly predicted the short-term outcome of patients with EC who underwent esophageal resection. PER 2 and PER 3 patients had at least double the risk of morbidity and mortality compared to PER 1 patients. Furthermore, a higher PER score was associated with shorter DFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P < 0.001). The PER score was identified as an independent predictor of tumor recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 2.1; P < 0.001) and OS (HR 2.2; P < 0.001). The PER score allows preoperative objective allocation of patients with EC into different risk categories for morbidity, mortality, and long-term outcomes. Thus, multicenter studies are needed for independent validation of the PER score. PMID:26886613

  13. Hidden Risk Factors for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... previous history of clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and livedo reticularis, a mottled purplish discoloration of the skin. “Risk factors are cumulative,” Dr. Kittner adds. “Reducing even one ...

  14. What Are the Risk Factors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Home What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... those who smoke. Personal or Family History of Lung Cancer If you are a lung cancer survivor, there ...

  15. Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

    2014-06-01

    Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to third hand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk.

  16. [Perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martinez, A M; Martínez-Sanchez, C; Pérez-Segura, J

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk perception on several factors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing an educational intervention based on detected needs. 405 women between 12 and 44 years were interviewed at home. 62.2% perceived the risk of pregnancy at 17 years and younger; 78.8% the risk of pregnancy at 35 years and older; 76.6% the risk of parity of 5 and higher; and 55.1% the risk of birth interval of 2 years and less. 60.5% recognized family history of birth defects, 80.2% age 35 years and older, and 84.4% rubella during pregnancy, as risk factors for newborns with congenital malformations. 27.7% identified history of a low birth weight and 61.0% birth interval of 1 year and less, as risk factors for low birth weight. The majority perceived the risk of tobacco, alcohol and drugs consumption during pregnancy, diseases with no treatment and deficient nutrition. There was an inconsistent influence of social and obstetric variables on risk perception. No linear correlation was detected. Health educators should recognize differences on knowledge and behavior of future receptors before an educational intervention starts.

  17. The influence of preoperative risk stratification on fast-tracking patients after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Cerfolio, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    Fast-tracking protocols or postoperative care computerized algorithms have been shown to reduce hospital length of stay and reduce costs; however, not all patients can be fast-tracked. Certain patient characteristics may put patients at increased risk to fail fast-tracking. Additionally some patients have multiple risk factors that have an additive effect that puts them at an even increased risk to fail fast-tracking, and more importantly, to significant morbidity. It is a mistake to force these protocols on all patients because it can lead to increased complications, readmissions, and low patient and family satisfaction. By carefully analyzing surgical results via accurate prospective databases, the types of patients who fail fast-tracking and the reasons they fail can be identified. Once these characteristics are pinpointed, specific changes to the postoperative algorithm can be implemented, and these alterations can lead to improved outcomes. The authors have shown that by using pain pumps instead of epidurals in elderly patients we can improve outcomes and still fast-track octogenarians with minimal morbidity and high-patient satisfaction. We have also shown that the increased use of physical therapy and respiratory treatments (important parts of the care of all patients after pulmonary resection, but a limited resource in most hospitals) may also lead to improved surgical results for those who have low FEV1% and DLco%. Further studies are needed. Although fast-tracking protocols cannot be applied to all, the vast majority of patients who undergo elective pulmonary resection, even those at high risk, can undergo safe, efficient, and cost-saving care via preset postoperative algorithms. When the typical daily events are convened each morning and the planned date of discharge is frequently communicated with the patient and family before surgery and each day in the hospital, most patients can be safely fast-tracked with high satisfaction and outstanding results.

  18. [Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tokuhei; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly patients. Identification of risk factors for AD would contribute to the understanding of AD pathogenesis and thus, help in the development of preventive methods. Early-onset familial AD is associated with mutations of the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PS-1), or PS-2, resulting in the overproduction of amyloid beta-protein. Epidemiological and case-control studies have led to the identification of several risk factors for sporadic AD. The most concrete genetic risk factor for AD is the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). In addition, several genes such as CTNNA3, GAB2, PVRL2, TOMM40, and APOC1 are known to be the risk factors that contribute to AD pathogenesis. On the other hand, nongenetic risk factors, such as age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, depression, head injury, and nutrition have also been reported. Although aging is the strongest risk factor for AD, the mechanisms underlying the development of AD as a result of ageing remain to be elucidated.

  19. Complete pathologic response following preoperative chemoradiation therapy for middle to lower rectal cancer is not a prognostic factor for a better outcome.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Toppan, Paola; Friso, Maria Luisa; Russo, Valentina; Pasetto, Lara; Urso, Emanuele; Marino, Filippo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Lise, Mario

    2004-11-01

    carboplatin with oxaliplatin was added to the chemotherapy schedule in 71 cases. Patients were given Regimen A in 47 cases and Regimen B in 59. The median interval between chemoradiation therapy and surgery was 42.5 (range, 19-136) days, and 94 patients underwent a sphincter-saving procedure. Tumor regression grade, available in 104 cases, was 1, n = 19; 2, n = 18; 3, n = 15; 4, n = 13; and 5, n = 39. At a median follow-up of 42 (range, 1-110) months, 11 patients had died, and 95 were alive. None of the patients had local recurrences, but 13 had distant recurrences. At logistic regression analysis, the chemoradiation therapy regimen used was the only independent predictor of tumor response following preoperative chemoradiation therapy (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.67, P = 0.003). At Cox's regression analysis, pretreatment T stage was the only independent prognostic factor for both disease-free survival (relative risk = 7.13, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-21.8, P = 0.001) and overall survival (relative risk = 4.83, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-19.9, P = 0.029). Tumor response following preoperative chemoradiation therapy is mainly related to the preoperative regimen used. For patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation therapy, pretreatment T stage, but not tumor response to preoperative chemoradiation therapy, is prognostic for outcome (both disease-free and overall survival).

  20. Analysis of risk factors for pharyngocutaneous fistula after total laryngectomy with particular focus on nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, F; Bettini, M; Molteni, G; Piccinini, A; Valoriani, F; Gabriele, S; Presutti, L

    2015-10-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistula (PCF) is the most common complication following total laryngectomy and the most difficult to manage. It often causes increased morbidity, delays starting adjuvant therapy, prolongs hospitalisation, increases treatment costs and reduces the quality of life (QoL). The objective of this study is to analyse the predisposing factors and the most important nutritional parameters related to the development of PCF in patients undergoing total laryngectomy and to suggest medical alternatives that might improve results. We performed a retrospective study of 69 patients who underwent either primary or salvage total laryngectomy in our department between January 2008 and January 2012. Risk factors for fistula formation were analysed including tumour characteristics (histology, grading, AJCC stage), treatment (primary or salvage surgery, extent of resection, flap reconstruction, preoperative radiotherapy), comorbidity and nutritional status (preoperative haemoglobin, albumin and prealbumin levels and their changes during hospitalisation). Twenty-four patients developed a PCF (overall incidence 34.8%). Fistula formation was significantly higher in patients with diabetes, preoperative malnutrition (identified from low preoperative albumin and prealbumin levels). After specific nutritional evaluation and support, no patient developed a PCF. Risk factors for PCF formation are extensively treated in the literature but identification of high-risk patients is still controversial. Our study demonstrates that nutritional status of the patient, assessed by preoperative albumin, is also an important risk factor for PCF formation in addition to classical factors. Maintenance of a normal perioperative nutritional status can be helpful to avoid this complication.

  1. Preoperative serum CA 72.4 as prognostic factor of recurrence and death, especially at TNM stage II, for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, evaluation of colorectal cancer prognosis and decision-making for treatment continues to be based primarily on TNM tumour stage. Administration of adjuvant chemotherapy is especially challenging for stage II patients that can have very different disease-related outcomes. Therefore, more reliable prognostic markers need to be developed to improve the selection of stage II patients at high risk for recurrence. Our purpose is to assess the prognostic value of preoperative serum CA 72.4 to improve the risk stratification of CRC patients. Methods Preoperative sera collected from 71 unselected patients between January 1994 and February 1997 was assayed for CA 72.4 and CEA levels. Patients were followed-up for at least 30 months or until relapse. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the prognostic value was determined using Log-Rank test and Cox regression analysis. Results Preoperative CA 72.4 levels above 7 U/mL correlate with a worse prognosis, with associated recurrence and death percentages exceeding the displayed by CEA. In a multivariate analysis, its combination with CEA proved the most important independent factor predicting survival. Remarkably, at stage II CA 72.4 also discriminates better than CEA those patients that will relapse or die from those with a favourable prognosis; however, CEA has not a negligible effect on survival. Conclusions The most outstanding finding of the present work is the correct classification of nearly every patient with bad prognosis (relapse or death) at TNM stage II when CEA and CA 72.4 are used altogether. This could improve the decision-making involved in the treatment of stage II colon cancer. Certainly further large-scale studies must be performed to determine whether CA 72.4 can be effectively used in the clinical setting. PMID:24215576

  2. Preoperative serum CA 72.4 as prognostic factor of recurrence and death, especially at TNM stage II, for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayude, Daniel; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Ayude, José; Blanco-Prieto, Sonia; Vázquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Vázquez-Cedeira, Marta; Páez de la Cadena, María

    2013-11-12

    Nowadays, evaluation of colorectal cancer prognosis and decision-making for treatment continues to be based primarily on TNM tumour stage. Administration of adjuvant chemotherapy is especially challenging for stage II patients that can have very different disease-related outcomes. Therefore, more reliable prognostic markers need to be developed to improve the selection of stage II patients at high risk for recurrence. Our purpose is to assess the prognostic value of preoperative serum CA 72.4 to improve the risk stratification of CRC patients. Preoperative sera collected from 71 unselected patients between January 1994 and February 1997 was assayed for CA 72.4 and CEA levels. Patients were followed-up for at least 30 months or until relapse. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the prognostic value was determined using Log-Rank test and Cox regression analysis. Preoperative CA 72.4 levels above 7 U/mL correlate with a worse prognosis, with associated recurrence and death percentages exceeding the displayed by CEA. In a multivariate analysis, its combination with CEA proved the most important independent factor predicting survival. Remarkably, at stage II CA 72.4 also discriminates better than CEA those patients that will relapse or die from those with a favourable prognosis; however, CEA has not a negligible effect on survival. The most outstanding finding of the present work is the correct classification of nearly every patient with bad prognosis (relapse or death) at TNM stage II when CEA and CA 72.4 are used altogether. This could improve the decision-making involved in the treatment of stage II colon cancer. Certainly further large-scale studies must be performed to determine whether CA 72.4 can be effectively used in the clinical setting.

  3. Risk stratification by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing improves outcomes following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2009, the NHS evidence adoption center and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a review of the use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). They recommended the development of a risk-assessment tool to help identify AAA patients with greater or lesser risk of operative mortality and to contribute to mortality prediction. A low anaerobic threshold (AT), which is a reliable, objective measure of pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness, as determined by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is associated with poor surgical outcomes for major abdominal surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a CPET-based risk-stratification strategy upon perioperative mortality, length of stay and non-operative costs for elective (open and endovascular) infra-renal AAA patients. Methods A retrospective cohort study was undertaken. Pre-operative CPET-based selection for elective surgical intervention was introduced in 2007. An anonymized cohort of 230 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2007 to 2011) was studied. A historical control group of 128 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2003 to 2007) was identified for comparison. Comparative analysis of demographic and outcome data for CPET-pass (AT ≥ 11 ml/kg/min), CPET-fail (AT < 11 ml/kg/min) and CPET-submaximal (no AT generated) subgroups with control subjects was performed. Primary outcomes included 30-day mortality, survival and length of stay (LOS); secondary outcomes were non-operative inpatient costs. Results Of 230 subjects, 188 underwent CPET: CPET-pass n = 131, CPET-fail n = 35 and CPET-submaximal n = 22. When compared to the controls, CPET-pass patients exhibited reduced median total LOS (10 vs 13 days for open surgery, n = 74, P < 0.01 and 4 vs 6 days for EVAR, n = 29, P < 0.05), intensive therapy unit requirement (3 vs 4 days for open repair only, P < 0.001), non-operative costs (£5,387 vs £9,634 for open repair, P < 0

  4. Preoperative evaluation and comprehensive risk assessment for children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lewanda, Amy Feldman; Matisoff, Andrew; Revenis, Mary; Harahsheh, Ashraf; Futterman, Craig; Nino, Gustavo; Greenberg, Jay; Myseros, John S; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N; Summar, Marshall

    2016-04-01

    Down syndrome is a common chromosome disorder affecting all body systems. This creates unique physiologic concerns that can affect safety during anesthesia and surgery. Little consensus exists, however, on the best way to evaluate children with Down syndrome in preparation for surgery. We review a number of salient topics affecting these children in the perioperative period, including cervical spine instability, cardiovascular abnormalities, pulmonary hypertension, upper airway obstruction, hematologic disturbances, prematurity, low birth weight, and the use of supplements and alternative therapies. Recommendations include obtaining a complete blood count to detect an increased risk for bleeding or stroke, and cardiology evaluation to identify patients with pulmonary hypertension, as well as undiagnosed or residual heart disease. Pediatric cardiac anesthesiologists and intensivists should be involved as needed. The potential for cervical spine instability should be considered, and the anesthesiologist may wish to have several options available both for the medications and equipment used. The child's family should always be asked if he or she is on any nutritional supplements, as some products marketed to families may have secondary effects such as inhibition of platelet function. Using this evaluation in presurgical planning will allow physicians to better consider the individual circumstances for their patients with Down syndrome. Our goal was to optimize patient safety by choosing the most appropriate setting and perioperative personnel, and to mitigate those risk factors amenable to intervention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. What is the best pre-operative risk stratification tool for major adverse cardiac events following elective vascular surgery? A prospective observational cohort study evaluating pre-operative myocardial ischaemia monitoring and biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Biccard, B M; Naidoo, P; de Vasconcellos, K

    2012-04-01

    Although brain natriuretic peptide has been shown to be superior to the revised cardiac risk index for risk stratification of vascular surgical patients, it remains unknown whether it is superior to alternative dynamic risk predictors, such as other pre-operative biomarkers (C-reactive protein and troponins) or myocardial ischaemia monitoring. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine the relative clinical utility of these risk predictors for the prediction of postoperative cardiac events in elective vascular surgical patients. Only pre-operative troponin elevation (OR 56.8, 95% CI 6.5-496.0, p < 0.001) and brain natriuretic peptide above the optimal discriminatory point (OR 6.0, 95% CI 2.7-12.9, p < 0.001) were independently associated with cardiac events. Both brain natriuretic peptide and troponin risk stratification significantly improved overall net reclassification (74.6% (95% CI 51.6%-97.5%) and 38.5% (95% CI 22.4-54.6%, respectively)); however, troponin stratification decreased the correct classification of patients with cardiac complications (-59%, p < 0.001). Pre-operative brain natriuretic peptide evaluation was the only clinically useful predictor of postoperative cardiac complications. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Arthroscopic Partial Repair of Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Preoperative Factors Associated With Outcome Deterioration Over 2 Years.

    PubMed

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Kim, Won Ju; Kim, Kyung Cheon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial repair is a treatment option in irreparable large-to-massive rotator cuff tears without arthritic changes. However, there are indications that arthroscopic partial repair does not yield satisfactory outcomes. To report the clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic partial repairs in patients with irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears. In addition, an analysis was performed regarding preoperative factors that may influence patient outcomes and patient-rated satisfaction over time. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic partial repair for irreparable large-to-massive cuff tears were retrospectively evaluated. Partial repair was defined as posterior cuff tissue repair with or without subscapularis tendon repair to restore the transverse force couple of the cuff. Pain visual analog scale (PVAS), questionnaire results (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]), and radiographic changes (acromiohumeral distance and degenerative change) were assessed preoperatively, at first follow-up (roughly 1 year postoperatively), and at final follow-up (>2 years postoperatively). Patients rated their satisfaction level at each postoperative follow-up as well. Preoperative factors that might influence outcomes, such as patient demographics, tear size, and fatty infiltration, were investigated. The preoperative, first follow-up, and final follow-up results for mean PVAS (5.13, 2.13, and 3.16, respectively) and questionnaires (ASES: 41.97, 76.37, and 73.78; SST: 3.61, 6.33, and 6.07, respectively) improved significantly (all P < .05). Radiographic evaluation showed no difference compared with preoperative status. Nevertheless, patient-rated satisfaction at final evaluation was inferior: 16 good responses ("very satisfied" and "satisfied") and 15 poor responses ("rather the same" and "dissatisfied"). Despite initial improvements in both groups (P < .05

  7. Predictive Modeling of Risk Factors and Complications of Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Gregory L; Pershing, Suzann; Cole, Tyler S; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the relationship between aggregated preoperative risk factors and cataract surgery complications, as well as to build a model predicting outcomes on an individual-level—given a constellation of demographic, baseline, preoperative, and intraoperative patient characteristics. Setting Stanford Hospital and Clinics between 1994 and 2013. Design Retrospective cohort study Methods Patients age 40 or older who received cataract surgery between 1994 and 2013. Risk factors, complications, and demographic information were extracted from the Electronic Health Record (EHR), based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition (ICD-9) codes, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, drug prescription information, and text data mining using natural language processing. We used a bootstrapped least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) model to identify highly-predictive variables. We built random forest classifiers for each complication to create predictive models. Results Our data corroborated existing literature on postoperative complications—including the association of intraoperative complications, complex cataract surgery, black race, and/or prior eye surgery with an increased risk of any postoperative complications. We also found a number of other, less well-described risk factors, including systemic diabetes mellitus, young age (<60 years old), and hyperopia as risk factors for complex cataract surgery and intra- and post-operative complications. Our predictive models based on aggregated outperformed existing published models. Conclusions The constellations of risk factors and complications described here can guide new avenues of research and provide specific, personalized risk assessment for a patient considering cataract surgery. The predictive capacity of our models can enable risk stratification of patients, which has utility as a teaching tool as well as informing quality/value-based reimbursements. PMID:26692059

  8. Elevated preoperative plasma D-dimer levels and the incidence of venous thromboembolism in Japanese females with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Junichi; Seki, Noriko; Fukushima, Chikako; Kusumoto, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Hongo, Atsushi; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the incidence of increased levels of D-dimer and associated factors in preoperative patients with gynecological cancer. Furthermore, we determined the incidence and risk factors associated with preoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, 456 patients with invasive gynecological cancer scheduled to undergo surgery were recruited. Preoperative plasma D-dimer levels were measured and patients whose plasma D-dimer concentration exceeded the pre-set cut-off value underwent computed tomography scanning. The incidence of elevated D-dimer and VTE was identified as significantly higher in patients with ovarian cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed that advanced age, low hemoglobin levels and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were independent factors for preoperative elevations in plasma D-dimer levels. Advanced age was an independent risk factor for preoperative VTE. Massive ascites and the presence of co-morbidities were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE in ovarian cancer. Advanced age and stage were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE in endometrial cancer. Advanced age was an independent risk factor for preoperative VTE in cervical cancer. Plasma D-dimer levels and the incidence of preoperative VTE were higher in patients with ovarian cancer compared with those with other gynecological cancers. Advanced age, low hemoglobin levels and elevated CRP levels were significant factors associated with elevated plasma D-dimer levels and age was an independent risk factor for preoperative VTE in gynecological cancer.

  9. [Risk factors for arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Madoery, Roberto; Rubin, Graciela; Luquez, Hugo; Luquez, Cecilia; Cravero, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    The risk factors of arterial disease (FREA) predict a future damage over the vascular system of the human body. Its detection are considered a key for the diagnostic as well as for the preventive and even curative strategies. For a long time, scientist considered those factors originated as a consecuence of large studies during the middle of the last century, with current validity up to our days. A simple classification spoke of them as traditionals. Further investigations described the so called new or emergents.factors that where joint together accordingly to their actions: coagulation factors, psicosocial, inflamatories and infectious. A recent classification, taking into account the type of impact, divided them into; causatives, predisposals and conditionals. Also, it was described a mechanism, the oxidative power, with consecuences over the endothelium, in the last part of the process. Before, another mechanism was described: the insulin resistance and the hiperinsulinism, bases for the Metabolic Syndrome, that includes a number of traditional risk factors.

  10. Preoperative lymphocyte count is a favorable prognostic factor of disease-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Huang, Shao-Hong; Li, Hui; Li, Yun; Chen, Xiu-Ling; Zhang, Wei-Qing; Chen, Hui-Guo; Gu, Li-Jia

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the prognostic value of cancer-related inflammatory response has been revealed. Previous studies showed that peripheral neutrophils and lymphocytes had significant impact on the prognosis of advanced and early-node-negative non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of preoperative lymphocyte and neutrophil counts in patients with NSCLC who underwent lobectomy and lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy. Retrospective analyses were performed to examine the impact of preoperative peripheral lymphocyte and neutrophil counts on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) and to analyze the relationships of these factors to clinicopathological factors. A total of 142 patients with NSCLC were evaluated of which 57 (40.1 %) patients had local recurrence or metastasis. Multivariate analyses revealed that peripheral lymphocyte count was an independent favorable prognostic factor of DFS (hazard ratio 0.548; 95 % confidence interval 0.351-0.857; P = 0.008) but not OS (P = 0.164). The maximum logrank statistical value was 9.504 (P = 0.002) when the cutoff value of lymphocyte was 1,800 mm(-3). The median DFS was 318.0 days (95 % confidence interval 226.0-410.0) for lymphocyte ≤1,800 mm(-3) group and 669.0 days (95 % confidence interval 0.0-1,431.0) for lymphocyte >1,800 mm(-3) group. Low lymphocyte count was related with lymphatic invasion (P = 0.012) and recurrence of NSCLC (P = 0.022). Peripheral neutrophil count had no impact on DFS or OS when analysis included all the 142 patients. Preoperative peripheral lymphocyte count, which is related with lymphatic invasion, is an independent favorable prognostic factor of DFS in patients with NSCLC who underwent lobectomy and lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyer, R.A.; Korach, K.S. ); Epstein, S. ); Bhattacharyya, M. ); Pounds, J. )

    1994-04-01

    Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

  12. Sacral Neuromodulation Implant Infection: Risk Factors and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Calvin; Pizarro-Berdichevsky, Javier; Clifton, Marisa M; Vasavada, Sandip P

    2017-02-01

    Device infection is one of the most common complications of sacral nerve stimulator placement and occurs in approximately 3-10% of cases. Infection is a serious complication, as it often requires complete explantation of the device. Not much is known regarding risk factors for and methods of preventing infection in sacral nerve stimulation. Multiple risk factors have been linked to device infection including prolonged percutaneous testing and choice of preoperative antibiotic. Methods of infection prevention have also been studied recently, including antibiotic-impregnated collage and type of skin preparation. This review will discuss the recent literature identifying risk factors and means of preventing infection in sacral nerve stimulation. Finally, we will outline a protocol we have enacted at our institution which has resulted in an incidence of infection of 1.6%.

  13. Development and Validation of a Preoperative Surgical Site Infection Risk Score for Primary or Revision Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Everhart, Joshua S; Andridge, Rebecca R; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Glassman, Andrew H; Lemeshow, Stanley

    2016-09-21

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major complication following total joint arthroplasty. Host susceptibility to infection has emerged as an important predictor of SSI. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative SSI risk-assessment tool for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. Data for 6,789 patients who underwent total joint arthroplasty (from the years 2000 to 2011) were obtained from a single hospital system. SSI was defined as a superficial infection within 30 days or deep infection within 1 year. Logistic regression modeling was utilized to create a risk scoring system for a derivation sample (n = 5,789; 199 SSIs), with validation performed on a hold-out sample (a subset of observations chosen randomly from the initial sample to form a testing set; n = 1,000; 41 SSIs). On the basis of logistic regression modeling, we created a scoring system to assess SSI risk (range, 0 to 35 points) that is the point sum of the following: primary hip arthroplasty (0 points); primary knee (1); revision hip (3); revision knee (3); non-insulin-dependent diabetes (1); insulin-dependent diabetes (1.5); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (1); inflammatory arthropathy (1.5); tobacco use (1.5); lower-extremity osteomyelitis or pyogenic arthritis (2); pelvis, thigh, or leg traumatic fracture (2); lower-extremity pathologic fracture (2.5); morbid obesity (2.5); primary bone cancer (4); reaction to prosthesis in the last 3 years (4); and history of staphylococcal septicemia (4.5). The risk score had good discriminatory capability (area under the ROC [receiver operating characteristic] curve = 0.77) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test, p = 0.34) and was validated using the independent sample (area under the ROC curve = 0.72). A small subset of patients (5.9%) had a >10% estimated infection risk. The patient comorbidities composing the risk score heavily influenced SSI risk for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. We

  14. Identification of Factors for the Preoperative Prediction of Tumour Subtype and Prognosis in Patients with T1 Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Kui; Chai, Zhen-da; Hu, Xiao-fei; Tan, Lin-lin; Wang, Zhao-yu; Chen, Zhi-jun

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Identification of factors that can predict the subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma preoperatively is important for selecting the appropriate surgical procedure and for predicting postoperative survival. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 87 patients with lung adenocarcinomas ≤30 mm. Results. Preoperative radiological findings, serum CEA level, serum microRNA-183 (miR-183) level, and tumour size differed significantly between patients with adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and those with invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC). Receiver operating characteristic curves and univariate analysis revealed that patients who were older than 57 years or had a pure solid nodule or a tumour with mixed ground-glass opacity (mGGO), a tumour >11 mm, a serum CEA level >2.12 ng/mL, or a serum miR-183 level >1.233 (2−ΔΔCt) were more likely to be diagnosed with IAC than with AIS or MIA. The combination of all five factors had an area under the curve of 0.946, with a sensitivity of 89.13% and a specificity of 95.12%. Moreover, patients with a cut-off value >0.499 for the five-factor combination had poor overall survival. Conclusions. The five-factor combination enables clinicians to distinguish AIS or MIA from IAC, thereby aiding in selecting the appropriate treatment, and to predict the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28115792

  15. Disparity in preoperative patient factors between insurance types in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher T; Callaghan, John J; Liu, Steve S; Gao, Yubo; Johnston, Richard C

    2012-12-01

    Equity in health care has become a focal point of debate. However, the disparity between insurance payer types in total joint arthroplasty is poorly defined. The authors identified 1312 consecutive patients who underwent elective primary total hip or knee arthroplasty with available preoperative Short Form 36 and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index surveys and stratified them into groups based on insurance type (Iowa Care [a state-run insurance program for patients who are indigent], Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance) to compare demographics, access to care, and functional data. Significance was a P value less than .05 after a Turkey-Kramer adjustment for multiple comparisons. A multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of Short Form 36 and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index preoperative functional status. Few differences existed between patients with Iowa Care and Medicaid, but both groups had significantly lower Short Form 36 and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index scores across every category compared with patients with Medicare or private insurance (P<.05 for each comparison). In addition, patients with Iowa Care and Medicaid had a higher incidence of current smoking and higher mean body mass index and traveled an average of 29 to 30 miles farther for access to care (P<.05 for each comparison). Payer type was an independent predictor of preoperative Short Form 36 and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index functional scores in the multivariate analysis (P<.02). Significant differences exist between payer types in total joint arthroplasty. Further research is necessary to better inform health policy decisions. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Preoperative predictive factors for intensive care unit admission after pulmonary resection*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Liana; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Perfeito, João Aléssio Juliano; Izbicki, Meyer; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the use of a set of preoperative variables can predict the need for postoperative ICU admission. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study of 120 patients undergoing elective pulmonary resection between July of 2009 and April of 2012. Prediction of ICU admission was based on the presence of one or more of the following preoperative characteristics: predicted pneumonectomy; severe/very severe COPD; severe restrictive lung disease; FEV1 or DLCO predicted to be < 40% postoperatively; SpO2 on room air at rest < 90%; need for cardiac monitoring as a precautionary measure; or American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status ≥ 3. The gold standard for mandatory admission to the ICU was based on the presence of one or more of the following postoperative characteristics: maintenance of mechanical ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure or need for noninvasive ventilation; hemodynamic instability or shock; intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications (clinical or surgical); or a recommendation by the anesthesiologist or surgeon to continue treatment in the ICU. Results: Among the 120 patients evaluated, 24 (20.0%) were predicted to require ICU admission, and ICU admission was considered mandatory in 16 (66.6%) of those 24. In contrast, among the 96 patients for whom ICU admission was not predicted, it was required in 14 (14.5%). The use of the criteria for predicting ICU admission showed good accuracy (81.6%), sensitivity of 53.3%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 66.6%, and negative predictive value of 85.4%. Conclusions: The use of preoperative criteria for predicting the need for ICU admission after elective pulmonary resection is feasible and can reduce the number of patients staying in the ICU only for monitoring. PMID:25750672

  17. Heart Rate Recovery as a Preoperative Test of Perioperative Complication Risk.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Fuster, Mark; Ries, Andrew L; Wagner, Peter D; Mazzone, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays important physiologic roles in a variety of organ systems. Autonomic dysfunction has been shown to be predictive of increased mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its importance in patients with chronic respiratory disorders has been described in recent years. Here, we summarize the prognostic value of autonomic dysfunction, as reflected by impaired heart rate recovery (HRR), in patients with chronic respiratory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. We suggest that HRR may be clinically useful in the preoperative physiologic evaluation, specifically in lung cancer patients being considered for surgery. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative and Intraoperative Predictive Factors of Immediate Extubation After Neonatal Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Joby; Kutty, Shelby; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Hall, Sandra; Shostrom, Valerie; Hammel, James M

    2016-11-01

    We sought to identify preoperative and intraoperative predictors of immediate extubation (IE) after open heart surgery in neonates. The effect of IE on the postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), cost of postoperative ICU care, operating room turnover, and reintubation rates was assessed. Patients younger than 31 days who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (January 2010 to December 2013) at a tertiary-care children's hospital were studied. Immediate extubation was defined as successful extubation before termination of anesthetic care. Data on preoperative and intraoperative variables were compared using descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistics to identify the predictors of IE. Propensity scores were used to assess effects of IE on ICU LOS, the cost of ICU care, reintubation rates, and operating room turnover time. One hundred forty-eight procedures done at a median age of 7 days resulted in 45 IEs (30.4%). The IE rate was 22.2% with single-ventricle heart disease. Independent predictors of IE were the absence of the need for preoperative ventilatory assistance, higher gestational age, anesthesiologist, and shorter cardiopulmonary bypass. Immediate extubation was associated with shorter ICU LOS (8.3 versus 12.7 days; p < 0.0001) and lower cost of ICU care (mean postoperative ICU charges, $157,449 versus $198,197; p < 0.0001) with no significant difference in the probability of reintubation (p = 0.7). Immediate extubation was associated with longer operating room turnover time (38.4 versus 46.7 minutes; p = 0.009). Immediate extubation was accomplished in 30.4% of neonates undergoing open heart surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass. Immediate extubation was associated with lesser ICU LOS, postoperative ICU costs, and minimal increase in operating room turnover time, but without an increase in reintubation rates. Low gestational age, preoperative ventilatory support requirement, and prolonged cardiopulmonary

  19. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  20. Preoperative Factors Affecting Postoperative Early Quality of Life During the Learning Curve of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Jun; Kim, Hyo Sin; Koh, Jun Sung; Han, Seung Bum; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the preoperative factors related to early quality of life (QoL) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) during the surgeon's learning curve. Methods The medical records of 82 patients with a follow-up period of at least 3 months who were treated with HoLEP during the time of a surgeon's learning curve were analyzed retrospectively. We divided the patients into two groups on the basis of the QoL component of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) 3 months after HoLEP: the high QoL group (IPSS/QoL≤3) and the low QoL group (IPSS/QoL≥4). Preoperative factors in each group were compared, including prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen, history of acute urinary retention (AUR), urgency incontinence, IPSS, and urodynamic parameters. Detrusor underactivity was defined as a bladder contractility index less than 100 on urodynamic study. Results A total of 61 patients (74.3%) had a high QoL, whereas 21 (25.7%) had a low QoL. A history of AUR, detrusor pressure on maximal flow (PdetQmax), bladder outlet obstruction grade, bladder contractility index, and detrusor underactivity were associated with postoperative QoL in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, a history of AUR and PdetQmax were independent factors affecting postoperative QoL. Conclusions A history of AUR and bladder contractility affect early QoL, and preoperative urodynamic study plays an important role in the proper selection of patients during the HoLEP learning curve. PMID:23869273

  1. Preoperative clinicopathologic factors and breast magnetic resonance imaging features can predict ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive components.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Lai, Hung-Wen; Wu, Wen-Pei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Chen, Chih-Jung; Kuo, Shou-Jen

    2016-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive cancerous breast lesion; however, from 10% to 50% of patients with DCIS diagnosed by core needle biopsy (CNB) or vacuum-assisted core biopsy (VACB) are shown to have invasive carcinoma after surgical excision. In this study, we evaluated whether preoperative clinicopathologic factors and breast magnetic resonance image (MRI) features are predictive of DCIS with invasive components before surgery. Patients comprised 128 adult women with a diagnosis of DCIS as determined by pathological analysis of CNB or VACB specimens and positive MRI findings who underwent breast surgery during the period January 2011 to December 2013 at the Changhua Christian Hospital. Clinicopathologic and breast MRI factors were compared between patients with postoperative pathology indicative of true DCIS and those with postoperative pathology showing DCIS with invasive components. Of the 128 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of DCIS, 73 (57.0%) had postoperative histopathologic evidence of true DCIS and 55 (43.0%) showed evidence of DCIS with invasive components. Results of statistical analyses revealed that MRI evidence of a mass-like lesion (P=0.025), nipple-areolar complex (NAC) invasion (P=0.029), larger tumor volume (P=0.010), larger maximum measurable apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) area (P=0.039), heterogenous or rim enhancement pattern (P=0.010), as well as immunohistochemical evidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression (P=0.010) were predictive of DCIS with an invasive component in postoperative surgical specimens. Invasive component should be considered in biopsy proven DCIS patients with preoperative MRI evidence of a mass-like lesion, nipple-areolar complex invasion, large tumor volume, a larger maximum measurable ADC area, or a rim or heterogenous enhancement pattern, as well as in patients with immunohistochemical evidence of HER-2 overexpression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  2. Radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer defined by preoperative criteria: oncologic follow-up in national multicenter study in 813 patients and assessment of easy-to-use prognostic substratification.

    PubMed

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Masson-Lecomte, Alexandra; Beauval, Jean-Baptiste; Ouzzane, Adil; Bonniol, Romain; Buge, François; Fadli, Saad; Rouprêt, Morgan; Rebillard, Xavier; Gaschignard, Nicolas; Pfister, Christian; Villers, Arnauld; Soulié, Michel; Salomon, Laurent

    2011-09-01

    To estimate the effect of predictive factors for oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) for high-risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 813 patients underwent RP for high-risk PCa in a national retrospective multi-institutional study. High-risk PCa was defined as follows: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level>20 ng/mL, Gleason score 8-10, and/or clinical Stage T2c-T4 disease. The preoperative criteria of high-risk PCa were studied in a logistic regression model to assess the correlations with the pathologic findings in the RP specimens. The predictive factors isolated or combined in scores were assessed by Cox multivariate and Kaplan-Meier analyses in predicting PSA failure (recurrence-free survival [RFS]) and overall survival (OS). The median follow-up was 64 months. Organ-confined disease was reported in 36.5%. The 5-year RFS, metastasis-free survival, and OS rate was 74.1%, 96.1%, and 98.6%, respectively. Each preoperative criteria of high-risk PCa was an independent predictor of PSA failure. The PSA failure risk was increased by 1.5- and 2.8-fold in men with 2 and 3 criteria, respectively. The RFS, but not the OS, was significantly different according to the preoperative score (P<.001). The postoperative score was significantly predictive for RFS and OS (P<.001 and P<.035, respectively). The risk of PSA failure was significantly increased with an increasing postoperative score (2-4.6-fold). National data support evidence that RP can result in encouraging midterm oncologic outcomes for the management of high-risk PCa. At 5 years after surgery, 75% of patients remain disease free. Our easy-to-use risk stratification might help clinicians to better predict the clinical and PSA outcomes of high-risk patients after surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple Pre-operative and Intra-operative Factors Predict Early Fistula Thrombosis in the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation Study

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Alik; Imrey, Peter B.; Huber, Thomas S.; Kaufman, James M.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Larive, Brett; Li, Liang; Feldman, Harold I.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Early thrombosis (ET) contributes to autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failure. We studied patients undergoing AVF placement in the Hemodialysis Fistula Maturation (HFM) Study, a prospective, observational cohort study, using a nested case-control analysis to identify pre-operative and intra-operative predictors of ET. METHODS ET cases were compared to controls who were matched on gender, age, diabetes, dialysis status, and surgeon fistula volume. ET was defined as thrombosis diagnosed by physical exam or ultrasound within 18 days of AVF creation. Conditional logistic regression models were fit to identify risk factors for ET. RESULTS Thirty-two ET cases (5.3%) occurred among 602 study participants; 198 controls were matched. ET was associated with female gender (OR=2.75, CI 1.19–6.38, P=0.018), fistula location (forearm vs. upper arm) (OR=2.76, CI 1.05–7.23, P=0.039), feeding artery (radial vs. brachial) (OR=2.64, CI 1.03–6.77, P=0.043) and arterial diameter (OR=1.52, CI 1.02–2.26, P=0.039, per mm smaller). Draining vein diameter was nonlinearly associated with ET, with highest risk in 2–3 mm veins. Surprisingly, ET risk was lower in diabetics (OR=0.19, CI 0.07–0.47, P=0.0004), lower with less nitroglycerin-mediated brachial artery dilatation (NMD%) (OR=0.42, CI 0.20–1.92, P=0.029 for each 10% lower) and higher with lower carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (OR=1.49, CI 1.02–2.20, P=0.041, for each m/sec lower). Intraoperative protamine use was associated with a higher ET risk (OR 3.26, CI 1.28-∞, P=0.038). Surgeon’s intraoperative perceptions were associated with ET: surgeons’ greater concern about maturation success (likely, marginal, unlikely) was associated with higher thrombosis risk (OR 8.09, CI 4.03-∞, p<0.0001, per category change), as were absence vs. presence of intraoperative thrill (OR 21.0, CI 5.07-∞, P=0.0002) and surgeons’ reported frustration during surgery (OR 6.85, CI 2.70-∞, P=0.0004). Reduced extent

  4. Preoperative glucocorticoid use and risk of postoperative bleeding and infection after gastric bypass surgery for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Gribsholt, Sigrid Bjerge; Svensson, Elisabeth; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Richelsen, Bjørn; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that patients using glucocorticoids may be at increased risk of postoperative bleeding and infection after major surgery. The objective was to investigate the association between preoperative glucocorticoid use and risk of bleeding and infection after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). Nationwide cohort study of 13,195 patients, who underwent RYGB 2006-2012 using Danish population-based medical databases. Information was obtained on current (redeemed prescription<60 d before surgery), recent (prescription 60-180 d before surgery), or no glucocorticoid use, and postoperative bleeding or infection within 30 days of surgery. We computed risk differences and odds ratios (ORs) as a measure of relative risk with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between glucocorticoid use and bleeding or infection, adjusting for gender, age, and co-morbidities by logistic regression. Among RYGB patients, 325 (2.5%) were current glucocorticoid users, and 365 (2.8%) were recent users. The risk of bleeding was increased in current users: 2.8% versus 1.6% among nonusers (risk difference: 1.2%, 95% CI: -.6, 3.0) corresponding to an adjusted OR of 1.5 (95% CI: .8, 3.0). For recent users, the adjusted OR for bleeding was 1.2 (95% CI: .5, 2.5). The risk of infection did not differ materially between current (1.8%), recent (1.0%) and nonusers (1.7%), corresponding to an adjusted OR of .9 (95% CI: .4, 2.1) among current versus nonusers. Current use of glucocorticoids is associated with a slightly increased risk of postoperative bleeding, but not infection, after RYGB. No increased risks were found for recent users. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair: functional outcome, repair integrity, and preoperative factors related to postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Rimmke, Nathan; Maerz, Tristan; Cooper, Ross; Yadavalli, Sailaja; Anderson, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    To assess the retear rate, retear size and location, the clinical impact of a retear, and preoperative patient factors related to postoperative outcome after arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair. Fifty six patients with an isolated, full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear who underwent arthroscopic suture bridge rotator cuff repair were retrospectively identified. Patients were evaluated and rotator cuff integrity was assessed using ultrasonography. Visual analog score (VAS), the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) score, shoulder range of motion and strength were used for clinical evaluation. Retears were assessed for size and location on ultrasonography. Forty two patients (75%) aged a mean 59.7 ± 8.6 years (range 41-79 years) were available for follow-up at a mean 13.5 months. Postoperative evaluation indicated significant improvements in ASES score (49.76 ± 18.2 to 86.57 ± 13.4, P < 0.001), VAS pain score (4.69 ± 2.17 to 0.63 ± 1.29, P < 0.001), forward elevation range of motion (144.1° ± 29.9 to 159.69° ± 13.9, P = 0.002), and internal rotation ROM (44.13° ± 12.0 to 52.09° ± 12.0, P = 0.003). The retear rate was 14.28% (6/42). Patients with retears were not older (P = 0.526) but had a larger preoperative tear size (3.25 cm ± 0.5 vs. 2.05 cm ± 0.48, P < 0.001). Preoperative tear size was significantly associated with a postoperative retear (P < 0.001). The duration of preoperative symptoms was significantly associated with pain (P = 0.029), pain improvement (P = 0.013), internal rotation ROM (P = 0.002), and internal rotation strength (P = 0.004). Arthroscopic suture bridge repair provides good clinical results with a low retear rate. The duration of preoperative symptoms was associated with postoperative outcome, indicating that delaying surgery may result in inferior outcomes. IV, Case Series.

  6. Sexual harassment: identifying risk factors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, E A; O'Donohue, W

    1998-12-01

    A new model of the etiology of sexual harassment, the four-factor model, is presented and compared with several models of sexual harassment including the biological model, the organizational model, the sociocultural model, and the sex role spillover model. A number of risk factors associated with sexually harassing behavior are examined within the framework of the four-factor model of sexual harassment. These include characteristics of the work environment (e.g., sexist attitudes among co-workers, unprofessional work environment, skewed sex ratios in the workplace, knowledge of grievance procedures for sexual harassment incidents) as well as personal characteristics of the subject (e.g., physical attractiveness, job status, sex-role). Subjects were 266 university female faculty, staff, and students who completed the Sexual Experience Questionnaire to assess the experience of sexual harassment and a questionnaire designed to assess the risk factors stated above. Results indicated that the four-factor model is a better predictor of sexual harassment than the alternative models. The risk factors most strongly associated with sexual harassment were an unprofessional environment in the workplace, sexist atmosphere, and lack of knowledge about the organization's formal grievance procedures.

  7. Risk factors for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) originates, in most of the cases (95 %), from a full trisomy of chromosome 21. The remaining cases are due to either mosaicism for chromosome 21 or the inheritance of a structural rearrangement leading to partial trisomy of the majority of its content. Full trisomy 21 and mosaicism are not inherited, but originate from errors in cell divisions during the development of the egg, sperm or embryo. In addition, full trisomy for chromosome 21 should be further divided into cases of maternal origin, the majority, and cases of paternal origin, less than 10 %. Among cases of maternal origin, a further stratification should be performed into errors that have occurred or originated during the first meiotic division in the maternal grandmother's body and errors that occurred later in life during the second maternal meiotic division. This complex scenario suggests that our understanding of the risk factors for trisomy 21 should take into account the above stratification as it reflects different individuals and generations in which the first error has occurred. Unfortunately, most of the available literature is focused on maternal risk factors, and the only certain risk factors for the birth of a child with DS are advanced maternal age at conception and recombination errors, even though the molecular mechanisms leading to chromosome 21 nondisjunction are still a matter of debate. This article critically reviews the hypotheses and the risk factors which have been suggested to contribute to the birth of a child with DS, including folate metabolism, dietary, lifestyle, environmental, occupational, genetic and epigenetic factors, with focus on maternal and paternal risk factors, and taking into account the possible contribution of the maternal grandmother and that of the developing trisomic embryo, in a complex scenario depicting the birth of a child with DS as the result of complex gene-environment interactions and selection processes involving different

  8. Preoperative psychosocial characteristics may predict body image and sexuality two years after risk-reducing mastectomy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Hemming; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Background Risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM) in patients at high risk has become more available and the rates of both bilateral (BRRM) and contralateral (CRRM) procedures are increasing. For women opting for RRM, psychosocial well-being, body image and sexuality are known to be important patient-reported outcomes. The aim of the present study was to investigate baseline health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and emotional distress (anxiety and depression) as predictors of body image and sexuality two years after RRM in women undergoing CRRM and BRRM. Methods This is a prospective cohort study including consecutive women opting for BRRM and breast cancer patients considering CRRM at Karolinska University Hospital during 1998–2010. The women were given a set of questionnaires to be completed at baseline before RRM (The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and The Sexual Activity Questionnaire) and two years after RRM (all the above-mentioned questionnaires along with The Body Image Scale). Mean scores for all questionnaires were analysed using linear regression models and adjusted for age at RRM as well as calendar year. Results In total, 253 patients consented to participate in the study. Response rate at baseline and 2 years was 88% and 71%, respectively. In the BRRM group (healthy women), preoperative HRQoL and emotional distress were associated with body image and sexual problems two years after the procedure. No similar associations were found for the patients with breast cancer who underwent CRRM. Conclusions The current study suggests that preoperative HRQoL and emotional distress may predict body image and sexual problems two years after RRM in healthy women, but not in breast cancer patients. Baseline psychosocial characteristics may be useful to identify women at risk for long-term body image and sexual problems following BRRM, but not among breast cancer patients opting for CRRM. PMID:28210554

  9. Preoperative maximal flow rate may be a predictive factor for the outcome of tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Paick, Jae-Seung; Kim, Soo Woong; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Oh, Seung-June; Son, Hwancheol; Park, Jae Young

    2004-01-01

    This study examined factors potentially predicting on the outcome of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure for stress urinary incontinence. A total of 60 women (aged 35-71 years, mean 57) with at least follow-up of 2 years were included in the study. The tension-free vaginal tape procedure was performed under local anesthesia except in two patients. At the latest follow-up 50 (83.3%) were cured of stress urinary incontinence. Two patients had new-onset urge symptoms without urge incontinence episodes. Multivariate regression analysis showed maximal flow rate to be associated with 0.9-fold risk of the failure; no other parameters had statistical significance. Our results confirm the feasibility and safety of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure and demonstrate that preoperative low maximal flow rate may be associated with the failure of the tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

  10. Preoperative Plasma Fibrinogen Level as a Significant Prognostic Factor in Patients With Localized Renal Cell Carcinoma After Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hakmin; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kwak, Cheol; Hong, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate the association of preoperative fibrinogen levels with clinicopathologic outcomes after surgical treatment of nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma. We reviewed the records of 1511 patients who had their fibrinogen levels measured preceding surgery. The associations between preoperative fibrinogen level and risk of adverse clinicopathologic outcomes were tested using the multivariate logistic regression and multiple Cox-proportional hazards model, respectively. Based on plasma fibrinogen levels, we stratified the patients into 2 groups with a cut-off value of 328  mg/dL. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly inferior survival outcomes in progression-free (P < 0.001), cancer-specific (P < 0.001), and overall survival (P < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, a high fibrinogen level (≥328  mg/dL) was significantly related to a higher Fuhrman grade (hazard ratio [HR] 1.374, P = 0.006) and a larger tumor size (≥7  cm) (HR 2.364, P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox analysis also revealed that a high preoperative fibrinogen level is a significant predictor for poor disease progression (HR 1.857, P < 0.001), cancer-specific survival (HR 3.608, P = 0.003), and overall survival (HR 1.647, P = 0.027). Increased plasma fibrinogen levels were significantly associated with poor pathological features and worse survival outcomes in patients with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma after surgical treatment. Further evaluations such as prospective randomized trials are needed to understand the underlying mechanism for these associations.

  11. Risk factors and classifications of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Munoz, Miguel Angel; Fernandez-Aguilar, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Perez, Belinda; Perez-Daga, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Albiach, Beatriz; Pulido-Roa, Ysabel; Marin-Camero, Naiara; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2013-07-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma is the second most common primary malignant tumor of the liver. Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma or Klatskin tumor represents more than 50% of all biliary tract cholangiocarcinomas. A wide range of risk factors have been identified among patients with Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma including advanced age, male gender, primary sclerosing cholangitis, choledochal cysts, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, parasitic infection (Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis), inflammatory bowel disease, alcoholic cirrhosis, nonalcoholic cirrhosis, chronic pancreatitis and metabolic syndrome. Various classifications have been used to describe the pathologic and radiologic appearance of cholangiocarcinoma. The three systems most commonly used to evaluate Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma are the Bismuth-Corlette (BC) system, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the TNM classification. The BC classification provides preoperative assessment of local spread. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering cancer center proposes a staging system according to three factors related to local tumor extent: the location and extent of bile duct involvement, the presence or absence of portal venous invasion, and the presence or absence of hepatic lobar atrophy. The TNM classification, besides the usual descriptors, tumor, node and metastases, provides additional information concerning the possibility for the residual tumor (R) and the histological grade (G). Recently, in 2011, a new consensus classification for the Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma had been published. The consensus was organised by the European Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association which identified the need for a new staging system for this type of tumors. The classification includes information concerning biliary or vascular (portal or arterial) involvement, lymph node status or metastases, but also other essential aspects related to the surgical risk, such as remnant hepatic volume or the possibility of underlying disease.

  12. PRA in Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-Operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/NRC Workshop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, Robert; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Siu, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers' confidence in PRA results, especially at a pre-operational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues'? (c) What more can be done ? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  13. PRA In Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/ NRC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Youngblood

    2010-06-01

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers’ confidence in PRA results, especially at a preoperational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues? (c) What more can be done? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  14. Prediction of fracture risk. II: Other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1996-12-01

    Many osteoporotic fractures are probably preventable-by definition, prevention requires identification of those at risk prior to fracture. There is a continuum in fracture risk and a very wide range in risk among individuals. Bone density, previous fractures, and the frequency and types of falls are important risk factors for fractures. There are also many other risk factors for bone loss, falls, and fractures. People with multiple risk factors are at greater risk than those with either a single risk factor or none. Identification of risk factors can help when planning interventions. For example, dietary deficiencies are amenable to dietary modification or supplementation; however, the effects of many risk factors have not been quantified separately, making it difficult to determine the importance. In addition, it is not possible to accurately predict current bone density and fracture risk from risk factors for bone loss; bone density should always be measured directly.

  15. [Risk factors associated to preclampsia].

    PubMed

    López-Carbajal, Mario Joaquín; Manríquez-Moreno, María Esther; Gálvez-Camargo, Daniela; Ramírez-Jiménez, Evelia

    2012-01-01

    preeclampsia constitutes one of the main causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The aim was to identify the risk factors associated to the developmental of preeclampsia mild-moderate and severe, as well as the force of association of these factors in a hospital of second-level medical care. study of cases and controls, a relation 1:1, in women withdrawn of the Service of Gynecology and Obstetrics during 2004 to 2007. Pregnant women with more than 20 weeks gestation were included. In the cases group we included patients with diagnosis of preeclampsia mild-moderate or severe (corroborated clinical and laboratory). In the controls group that had a normal childbirth without pathology during the pregnancy. 42 cases and 42 controls. The average age was of 27 years. The associated risk factors were overweight, obesity, irregular prenatal control, short or long intergenesic period, history of caesarean or preeclampsia in previous pregnancies. the knowledge of the risk factors will allow the accomplishment of preventive measures and decrease the fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality due to preeclampsia.

  16. Estimating mortality risk in preoperative patients using immunologic, nutritional, and acute-phase response variables.

    PubMed Central

    Christou, N V; Tellado-Rodriguez, J; Chartrand, L; Giannas, B; Kapadia, B; Meakins, J; Rode, H; Gordon, J

    1989-01-01

    We measured the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test response, along with additional variables of host immunocompetence in 245 preoperative patients to determine which variables are associated with septic-related deaths following operation. Of the 14 deaths (5.7%), 12 were related to sepsis and in 2 sepsis was contributory. The DTH response (p less than 0.00001), age (p less than 0.0002), serum albumin (p less than 0.003), hemoglobin (p less than 0.02), and total hemolytic complement (p less than 0.03), were significantly different between those who died and those who lived. By logistic regression analysis, only the DTH skin test response (log likelihood = 41.7, improvement X2 = 6.24, p less than 0.012) and the serum albumin (log likelihood = 44.8, improvement X2 = 17.7, p less than 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with the deaths. The resultant probability of mortality calculation equation was tested in a separate validation group of 519 patients (mortality = 5%) and yielded a good predictive capability as assessed by (1) X2 = 0.08 between observed and expected deaths, NS; (2) Goodman-Kruskall G statistic = 0.673) Receiver-Operating-Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis with an area under the ROC curve, Az = 0.79 +/- 0.05. We conclude that a reduced immune response (DTH skin test anergy) plus a nutritional deficit and/or acute-phase response change are both associated with increased septic-related deaths in elective surgical patients. PMID:2472781

  17. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels and the risk of postoperative delirium in elderly hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and neurodegenerative disease predispose to delirium and are both associated with increased activity of the innate immune system resulting in an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in the brain. We examined whether hip fracture patients who develop postoperative delirium have altered levels of inflammatory mediators in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior to surgery. Methods Patients were 75 years and older and admitted for surgical repair of an acute hip fracture. CSF samples were collected preoperatively. In an exploratory study, we measured 42 cytokines and chemokines by multiplex analysis. We compared CSF levels between patients with and without postoperative delirium and examined the association between CSF cytokine levels and delirium severity. Delirium was diagnosed with the Confusion Assessment Method; severity of delirium was measured with the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98. Mann–Whitney U tests or Student t-tests were used for between-group comparisons and the Spearman correlation coefficient was used for correlation analyses. Results Sixty-one patients were included, of whom 23 patients (37.7%) developed postsurgical delirium. Concentrations of Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (P=0.021), Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (P=0.032) and Interleukin-6 (P=0.005) were significantly lower in patients who developed delirium postoperatively. Conclusions Our findings fit the hypothesis that delirium after surgery results from a dysfunctional neuroinflammatory response: stressing the role of reduced levels of anti-inflammatory mediators in this process. Trial registration The Effect of Taurine on Morbidity and Mortality in the Elderly Hip Fracture Patient. Registration number: NCT00497978. Local ethical protocol number: NL16222.094.07. PMID:24093540

  18. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  19. Neighborhood risk factors for obesity.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Russ P

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study was to explore neighborhood environmental factors associated with obesity in a sample of adults living in a major U.S. metropolitan area. This was a multi-level study combining data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System with data from the U.S. Census. A total of 15,358 subjects living in 327 zip code tabulation areas were surveyed between 1998 and 2002. The outcome was obesity (BMI >30), and independent variables assessed included individual level variables (age, education, income, smoking status, sex, black race, and Hispanic ethnicity), and zip code level variables (percentage black, percentage Hispanic, percentage with more than a high school education, retail density, establishment density, employment density, population density, the presence of a supermarket, intersection density, median household income, and density of fast food outlets). After controlling for individual level factors, median household income [relative risk (RR) = 0.992; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.990, 0.994], population density (RR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.972, 0.990), employment density (RR = 1.004; 95% CI = 1.001, 1.009), establishment density (RR = 0.981 95% CI = 0.964, 0.999), and the presence of a supermarket (RR = 0.893; 95% CI = 0.815, 0.978) were associated with obesity risk. Fast food establishment density was poorly associated with obesity risk. Where one lives may affect obesity status. Given the influence of the presence of a supermarket on obesity risk, efforts to address food access might be a priority for reducing obesity.

  20. Risk factors of striae gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Kasielska-Trojan, A; Sobczak, M; Antoszewski, B

    2015-04-01

    Stretch marks are a common skin disorder. Pregnancy-related lesions are defined as striae gravidarum. The root cause of striae formation remains unknown. The aim of this paper was to identify the risk factors associated with striae gravidarum (SG) development. The study was conducted at Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic and Obstetrics Outpatient Department among 299 Caucasian women maximum 6 months after the delivery, regardless of whether they were primiparas or multiparas. Among the women participating in the study, 71.2% (213 of 299) developed striae gravidarum at least in one site. Logistic regression analysis showed that four of the analysed factors were independent predictors of striae gravidarum occurrence: family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, the lack of chronic diseases and birthweight (P < 0.0001). It has been found that the presence of striae distensae on the breasts increases the risk of SG development (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P = 0.0008), whereas the presence of these lesions on the thighs decreases the risk (23% vs. 77%, P = 0.0076). In this study, we presented a model that can help to predict the risk of SG formation, including family history of SG, BMI before pregnancy, birthweight and chronic diseases. Moreover, women with stretch marks on their breasts should know that the risk of SG development is significantly higher, whereas lesions on the thighs do not increase such a risk. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  1. [Preoperative screening and nutritional support of nutritional deficiencies].

    PubMed

    Zazzo, J-F

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies have to be considered as an independent risk factor for postoperative morbidity. Peri-operative nutritional support reduce this risk in elective abdominal surgery for cancer and cardiac surgery. Preoperative nutritional support for 7-10 days reduce postoperative complications in undernourished patients by 10% but is not operant when administered after surgery. Enteral route is as effective. Recent studies using immunonutrients conclude that a short preoperative oral intake is able to reduce complications even in well-nourished patients. Then, a preoperative nutritional screening must be routinely performed leading to a nutritional programme.

  2. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  3. Does preoperative neutrophil lymphocyte ratio predict risk of recurrence and occult central nodal metastasis in papillary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Lang, Brian Hung-Hin; Ng, Cathy Po-Ching; Au, Kin Bun; Wong, Kai Pun; Wong, Kandy K C; Wan, Koon Yat

    2014-10-01

    Preoperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) might be prognostic in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Given the controversy of prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) in clinically nodal-negative (cN0) PTC, our study evaluated whether preoperative NLR predicted disease-free survival (DFS) and occult central nodal metastasis (CNM) in cN0 PTC. A total of 191 patients who underwent pCND were analyzed. Complete blood counts with differential counts were taken before operation. NLR was calculated by dividing preoperative neutrophil count with lymphocyte count. Patients were categorized into NLR tertiles: first (NLR < 1.93; n = 63), second (NLR = 1.93-2.79; n = 64), and third tertile (NLR > 2.79; n = 64). Four other patient types, namely, benign nodular goiter, clinically nodal-positive (cN1) PTC, poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), were used as references. Age at operation (p < 0.001) and tumor size (p = 0.037) significantly increased with higher NLR. First tertile had significantly more TNM stage I tumors (p = 0.01) and lowest MACIS score (p = 0.002). Tumor size [hazard ratio (HR) 1.422, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.119-1.809, p = 0.004] and multicentricity (HR = 2.545, 95% CI 1.073-6.024, p = 0.034) independently predicted DFS, whereas old age [odds ratio (OR) 1.026, 95% CI 1.006-1.046, p = 0.009), male (OR 2.882, 95% CI 1.348-6.172, p = 0.006), and large tumor (OR 1.567, 95% CI 1.209-2.032, p = 0.001) independently predicted occult CNM. NLR was not significantly associated with DFS or occult CNM. ATC had significantly higher NLR than cN1 PTC (7.28 vs. 2.74, p < 0.001). Although a higher NLR may imply a poorer tumor profile, it was not significantly associated with a worse DFS or higher risk of occult CNM in cN0 PTC. Perhaps, future research should focus on the prognostic value in other thyroid cancer types with a poorer prognosis.

  4. Surgical Risk Preoperative Assessment System (SURPAS): II. Parsimonious Risk Models for Postoperative Adverse Outcomes Addressing Need for Laboratory Variables and Surgeon Specialty-specific Models.

    PubMed

    Meguid, Robert A; Bronsert, Michael R; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Hammermeister, Karl E; Henderson, William G

    2016-07-01

    To develop parsimonious prediction models for postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and 6 complication clusters applicable to a broad range of surgical operations in adult patients. Quantitative risk assessment tools are not routinely used for preoperative patient assessment, shared decision making, informed consent, and preoperative patient optimization, likely due in part to the burden of data collection and the complexity of incorporation into routine surgical practice. Multivariable forward selection stepwise logistic regression analyses were used to develop predictive models for 30-day mortality, overall morbidity, and 6 postoperative complication clusters, using 40 preoperative variables from 2,275,240 surgical cases in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data set, 2005 to 2012. For the mortality and overall morbidity outcomes, prediction models were compared with and without preoperative laboratory variables, and generic models (based on all of the data from 9 surgical specialties) were compared with specialty-specific models. In each model, the cumulative c-index was used to examine the contribution of each added predictor variable. C-indexes, Hosmer-Lemeshow analyses, and Brier scores were used to compare discrimination and calibration between models. For the mortality and overall morbidity outcomes, the prediction models without the preoperative laboratory variables performed as well as the models with the laboratory variables, and the generic models performed as well as the specialty-specific models. The c-indexes were 0.938 for mortality, 0.810 for overall morbidity, and for the 6 complication clusters ranged from 0.757 for infectious to 0.897 for pulmonary complications. Across the 8 prediction models, the first 7 to 11 variables entered accounted for at least 99% of the c-index of the full model (using up to 28 nonlaboratory predictor variables). Our results suggest that it will be possible to develop

  5. The pre-operative levels of haemoglobin in the blood can be used to predict the risk of allogenic blood transfusion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maempel, J F; Wickramasinghe, N R; Clement, N D; Brenkel, I J; Walmsley, P J

    2016-04-01

    The pre-operative level of haemoglobin is the strongest predictor of the peri-operative requirement for blood transfusion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). There are, however, no studies reporting a value that could be considered to be appropriate pre-operatively. This study aimed to identify threshold pre-operative levels of haemoglobin that would predict the requirement for blood transfusion in patients who undergo TKA. Analysis of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves of 2284 consecutive patients undergoing unilateral TKA was used to determine gender specific thresholds predicting peri-operative transfusion with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (area under ROC curve 0.79 for males; 0.78 for females). Threshold levels of 13.75 g/dl for males and 12.75 g/dl for females were identified. The rates of transfusion in males and females, respectively above these levels were 3.37% and 7.11%, while below these levels, they were 16.13% and 28.17%. Pre-operative anaemia increased the rate of transfusion by 6.38 times in males and 6.27 times in females. Blood transfusion was associated with an increased incidence of early post-operative confusion (odds ratio (OR) = 3.44), cardiac arrhythmia (OR = 5.90), urinary catheterisation (OR = 1.60), the incidence of deep infection (OR = 4.03) and mortality (OR = 2.35) one year post-operatively, and increased length of stay (eight days vs six days, p < 0.001). Uncorrected low pre-operative levels of haemoglobin put patients at potentially modifiable risk and attempts should be made to correct this before TKA. Target thresholds for the levels of haemoglobin pre-operatively in males and females are proposed. Low pre-operative haemoglobin levels put patients at unnecessary risk and should be corrected prior to surgery. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. What is the utility of preoperative frailty assessment for risk stratification in cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Bagnall, Nigel Mark; Faiz, Omar; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether frailty scoring can be used either separately or combined with conventional risk scores to predict survival and complications. Five hundred and thirty-five papers were found using the reported search, of which nine cohort studies represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There is a paucity of evidence, as advanced age is a criterion for exclusion in most randomized controlled trials. Conventional models of risk following cardiac surgery are not calibrated to accurately predict the outcomes in the elderly and do not currently include frailty parameters. There is no universally accepted definition for frailty, but it is described as a physiological decline in multiple organ systems, decreasing a patient's capacity to withstand the stresses of surgery and disease. Frailty is manifest clinically as deficits in functional capacity, such as slow ambulation and impairments in the activities of daily living (ADL). Analysis of predictive models using area under receiver operating curves (AUC) suggested only a modest benefit by adding gait speed to a Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS score)-Predicted Risk of Mortality or Major Morbidity (PROM) risk score (AUC 0.04 mean difference). However, a specialist frailty assessment tool named FORECAST was found to be superior at predicting adverse outcomes at 1 year compared with either EuroSCORE or STS score (AUC 0.09 mean difference). However, risk models incorporating frailty parameters require further validation and have not been widely adopted. Routine collection of objective frailty measures such as 5-metre walk time and ADL assessment will help to provide data to develop new risk-assessment models to facilitate risk stratification and

  7. Progression of localised Wilms' tumour during preoperative chemotherapy is an independent prognostic factor: a report from the SIOP 93-01 nephroblastoma trial and study.

    PubMed

    Ora, Ingrid; van Tinteren, Harm; Bergeron, Christophe; de Kraker, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The SIOP nephroblastoma clinical trials have previously demonstrated that preoperative chemotherapy is advantageous for patients with nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumour). However, some primary tumours increase in size during preoperative chemotherapy, and to investigate the clinical relevance of this progression we studied the patient cohort with increasing tumours included in the SIOP 93-01 study (June 1993 to June 2000). Patients were considered eligible if they had a confirmed localised Wilms' tumour that had been measured in at least two dimensions at diagnosis and before surgery. Tumour response to preoperative chemotherapy was defined according to criteria set by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Patient characteristics in the different response groups were compared and related to event-free survival and overall survival. Patient records were studied regarding compliance with protocol. Tumour progression during preoperative chemotherapy was observed in 57 of 1090 patients (5%) with localised Wilms' tumours. In those cases, the tumours were significantly smaller at diagnosis and were more often stage III (p=0.05) and associated with high risk histopathology (p=0.03). After adjustment for stage and risk group, progression was proved to be correlated with poorer event-free and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.9, p=0.026 and 3.2, p=0.002 respectively). In summary, progression of localised Wilms' tumours is rarely seen in patients during preoperative chemotherapy. However, independent of stage distribution and histopathological risk group, those whose tumours do increase in size have poorer event-free and overall survival.

  8. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  9. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  10. Obesity and related risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, H; Nabaei, B

    2007-03-01

    To study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Iranian schoolgirls and to identify risk factors which lead to obesity. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2002 and a sample of 1800 female students between 7-12 years old was obtained using a multistage cluster sampling method from Tehran. Height and weight were measured and related socio-economic information was collected. The overall percent of overweight and obesity was 13.3% and 7.7% respectively. BMI (Body Mass Index) was directly and significantly(r=+0.28, P< 0.001) correlated with increasing age. Physical activity was significantly different between obese and non-obese children. (P=0.03) Also, economical factors such as the type of school (private&public) were different in these children. (P=0.03) The statistical analysis of the data revealed a significant and inverse correlation(r=-0.03, P=0.04) between maternal education and occurrence of overweight and obesity in children. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in young Iranian girls was high. Advanced age, lack of physical inactivity, low economical factors and maternal educational status could be risk factors for obesity in children.

  11. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  12. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (≥120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  13. Predictive and prognostic factors in definition of risk groups in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sorbe, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim was to evaluate predictive and prognostic factors in a large consecutive series of endometrial carcinomas and to discuss pre- and postoperative risk groups based on these factors. Material and Methods. In a consecutive series of 4,543 endometrial carcinomas predictive and prognostic factors were analyzed with regard to recurrence rate and survival. The patients were treated with primary surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Two preoperative and three postoperative risk groups were defined. DNA ploidy was included in the definitions. Eight predictive or prognostic factors were used in multivariate analyses. Results. The overall recurrence rate of the complete series was 11.4%. Median time to relapse was 19.7 months. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, FIGO grade, myometrial infiltration, and DNA ploidy were independent and statistically predictive factors with regard to recurrence rate. The 5-year overall survival rate was 73%. Tumor stage was the single most important factor with FIGO grade on the second place. DNA ploidy was also a significant prognostic factor. In the preoperative risk group definitions three factors were used: histology, FIGO grade, and DNA ploidy. Conclusions. DNA ploidy was an important and significant predictive and prognostic factor and should be used both in preoperative and postoperative risk group definitions.

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Eye Cancer? A risk factor is ... may have few or no known risk factors. Risk factors for eye melanoma Race/ethnicity The risk ...

  15. [Risk factors related to surgical site infection in elective surgery].

    PubMed

    Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Morales-Márquez, Lucy Isabel; Sandoval-Balanzarios, Miguel Antonio; Velázquez-García, José Arturo; Maldonado-Torres, Lulia; Méndez-Cano, Andrea Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors for surgical site infections in surgery should be measured and monitored from admission to 30 days after the surgical procedure, because 30% of Surgical Site Infection is detected when the patient was discharged. Calculate the Relative Risk of associated factors to surgical site infections in adult with elective surgery. Patients were classified according to the surgery contamination degree; patient with surgery clean was defined as no exposed and patient with clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery was defined exposed. Risk factors for infection were classified as: inherent to the patient, pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative. Statistical analysis; we realized Student t or Mann-Whitney U, chi square for Relative Risk (RR) and multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards. Were monitored up to 30 days after surgery 403 patients (59.8% women), 35 (8.7%) developed surgical site infections. The factors associated in multivariate analysis were: smoking, RR of 3.21, underweight 3.4 hand washing unsuitable techniques 4.61, transfusion during the procedure 3.22, contaminated surgery 60, and intensive care stay 8 to 14 days 11.64, permanence of 1 to 3 days 2.4 and use of catheter 1 to 3 days 2.27. To avoid all risk factors is almost impossible; therefore close monitoring of elective surgery patients can prevent infectious complications.

  16. Preoperative characteristics of the P.R.O.S.T.A.T.E. scores: a novel predictive tool for the risk of positive surgical margin after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ben; Luo, Cheng; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Jie

    2017-04-01

    To propose a novel scoring system to predict the risk of positive surgical margin (PSM) after radical prostatectomy (RP) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Eight reproducible variables available from preoperative characteristics of PCa patients were measured: PSA level (P), ratio of positive biopsy needles (R), obesity (O), scores of Gleason (S), T stage by preoperative MRI scan (T), age (A), tumor volume (T) and experience of the surgeon (E). Of the eight components, seven were scored on a 0-, 1- or 2-point scale, with only the "A" component on a 0- or 1-point scale. The P.R.O.S.T.A.T.E. scores can range from 0 to 15. A total of 441 patients were included from the Peking University First Hospital between November 2007 and March 2016, among whom 195 patients (44.2%) had a PSM identified by a postoperative pathological examination. The preoperative P.R.O.S.T.A.T.E. scores statistically correlated with the postoperative SM status (p < 0.001) when the 441 consecutive patients were divided into three groups (low-risk group: score of 0-4, moderate-risk group: score of 5-9 and high-risk group: score of 10-15). The risk of PSM after RP in the low-risk, moderate-risk and high-risk groups was 21.1, 40.1 and 87.0%, respectively. The novel scoring system of P.R.O.S.T.A.T.E. that we presented was found to predict the risk of PSM after RP. A combination of reproducible, standardized parameters obtained from preoperative characteristics of PCa patients can be used as a tool for predicting PSM, thus assisting in the strategy of performing surgical procedures. More careful manipulation or wider resection may be of utmost importance in the high-risk group.

  17. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  18. Preoperative administration of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse reduces the risk of bacteraemia associated with intra-alveolar tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Ugwumba, Chinedu U; Adeyemo, Wasiu L; Odeniyi, Olalekan M; Arotiba, Godwin T; Ogunsola, Folasade T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of preoperative 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash on the risk of bacteraemia following routine intra-alveolar tooth extraction. The study was a randomized controlled clinical study of 101 subjects who underwent intra-alveolar dental extractions under local anaesthesia. Subjects were randomly assigned to either chlorhexidine or a control group. The chlorhexidine group had 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash administered for 1 min before any dental manipulation, and the control group had a mouthrinse of sterile water. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 1 min and 15 min after the dental extractions. Subculture and further identification of the isolated bacteria were performed by conventional microbiological techniques. There was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of bacteraemia between the control group (52.4%) and chlorhexidine group (27.1%) (P = 0.012). Bacteraemia was most frequently detected at 1 min after extraction (33.3%). Of the 30 subjects who had positive blood culture at 1 min, bacteraemia persisted in 8 (26.7%) of the subjects after 15 min. Bacteria isolated included Staphylococcus aureus, Actinomycetes naesulendi, Prevotella species, Streptococcus spp., and Acinetobacter iwoffii. Routine use of 0.20% chlorhexidine mouthwash before dental extraction is recommended to reduce the risk of bacteraemia following tooth extraction.

  19. [Responsibility of the anaesthetist in preoperative risk management. Comments on the legal implications of medical publications in this field].

    PubMed

    Bock, R-W; Dudziak, R; Wilke, H J

    2004-06-01

    There is an increasing number of publications in the medical literature which address the medical and legal obligations of a specialist in a given field. These articles, mostly editorials, seek to delineate the optimal course of treatment based on the current state of the art and science of medicine. However, we believe that the unreflected adoption of these often highly theoretical ideas and suggestions carries its own dangers. For one thing, there is the threatening financial crisis in the public health system. In addition, the feasibility of implementing these suggestions in routine medical and surgical practice is questionable. Last but not least, suggestions and guidelines for preoperative risk management by, for instance, Lingnau and Strohmenger 2002 cross the well established boundaries of the various medical and surgical specialties, which obviously demands careful deliberations among the specialties involved. So far, few specialty boards have seen fit to act on these suggestions. Our article on the medical and legal responsibilities of the anaesthesiologist in perioperative risk management restates the aforementioned concerns. We attempt to point out medical and legal points of controversy. In particular, we caution against the ever present danger of a bona fide adoption of visionary guidelines as the "standard of care" by both medical and legal experts. We feel that it is imperative to carefully evaluate editorial comments and suggestions, however well meaning, in the light of established teaching and practice, lest these comments and suggestions become the basis of an unjustified determination of a physicians innocence or guilt in a court of law.

  20. Risk factors for renal impairment revealed after unilateral adrenalectomy in patients with primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hee; Kwon, Hee Jin; Ji, Sang A; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Jung, Sin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Han; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Jung Eun; Huh, Wooseong; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha Young

    2016-07-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) may induce significant decline of renal function and structural damage of kidney. However, it is difficult to evaluate accurate renal function in patients with PA, because glomerular hyperfiltration and aldosterone escape can conceal renal impairment. In this retrospective cohort study, we compared changes in renal function after unilateral adrenalectomy between patients with PA and patients with other adrenal diseases. Risk factors associated with postoperative renal impairment in patients with PA were analyzed.A total of 558 patients who received unilateral adrenalectomy between January 2002 and June 2013 were included: 136 patients with PA and 422 patients with other adrenal diseases (control). Postoperative serial changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were analyzed in both groups. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors of renal impairment after adrenalectomy in all patients and the PA group. Postoperative renal impairment was defined as postoperative eGFR decline of >25% from preoperative eGFR. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m.There were no differences in preoperative eGFR between groups. The PA group showed a significant decrease in eGFR 3 days, 2 weeks, and 6 months after surgery compared to the control group. The PA group showed significant improvement of hypertension after surgery. In the PA group, 53 (39.0%) patients showed postoperative renal impairment. Multivariate regression analysis identified long-standing hypertension, low body mass index, low serum potassium, and high preoperative eGFR as risk factors for postoperative renal impairment. Among the 89 patients with preoperative eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m, 29 (32.6%) patients developed CKD postoperatively. Age, low serum potassium, low preoperative eGFR, and high serum cholesterol or uric acid were associated with the postoperative CKD development.Our study demonstrates that patients with PA

  1. [Risk factors for birth injuries].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia; Rubio-Espíritu, Jorge; Islas-Rodríguez, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    To identify risk factors associated with birth trauma. Servicio de Neonatología, Hospital General "Dr. Manuel Gea González", Secretaría de Salud. Case-control, prolective study. There were 129 cases and 134 controls. We recorded the following variables: a) maternal and delivery: age, weight, height, prenatal care, pre-existing disease or gestational disease, mode of delivery, anesthetic management during labor, use of external maneuvers or forceps; b) newborn: birth weight, gestational age, academic degree of attendant physician at delivery, and type of birth injury. The independent risk factors associated to birth injury were: for ecchymoses; general anesthesia (OR 13.7, 95% CI = 3 - 62.6), breech presentation (OR 6.4, 95% IC 95% = 1.4 - 27.9) and gestational age < or = 32 weeks (OR 6.4, 95% CI = 1.3 - 31.1); for lacerations, vaginal dystocic delivery or cesarean section (OR 19, 95% CI = 4.4 - 81.1) and use of external maneuvers (OR 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5 - 21.6); for cephalhematoma maternal height < or = 1.54 m (OR 7.4, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7) and external maneuvers (OR 7.2, 95% CI = 2.3 - 23.7); for caput succedaneum, external maneuvers (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.5-7.7) and maternal age < or = 19 or > or = 36 years (OR 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4 - 6.4). Risk factors associated with birth injuries identified in this study involved maternal conditions, neonatal conditions and mechanism of delivery.

  2. Modifications of Coronary Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers. PMID:16813737

  3. Weighing of risk factors for penetrating keratoplasty graft failure: application of Risk Score System

    PubMed Central

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Sánchez-Huerta, Valeria; De Wit, Guillermo; Martínez, Jaime D.; Mingo, David; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Jiménez-Alfaro, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the relationship between the score obtained in the Risk Score System (RSS) proposed by Hicks et al with penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) graft failure at 1y postoperatively and among each factor in the RSS with the risk of PKP graft failure using univariate and multivariate analysis. METHODS The retrospective cohort study had 152 PKPs from 152 patients. Eighteen cases were excluded from our study due to primary failure (10 cases), incomplete medical notes (5 cases) and follow-up less than 1y (3 cases). We included 134 PKPs from 134 patients stratified by preoperative risk score. Spearman coefficient was calculated for the relationship between the score obtained and risk of failure at 1y. Univariate and multivariate analysis were calculated for the impact of every single risk factor included in the RSS over graft failure at 1y. RESULTS Spearman coefficient showed statistically significant correlation between the score in the RSS and graft failure (P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed no statistically significant relationship (P>0.05) between diagnosis and lens status with graft failure. The relationship between the other risk factors studied and graft failure was significant (P<0.05), although the results for previous grafts and graft failure was unreliable. None of our patients had previous blood transfusion, thus, it had no impact. CONCLUSION After the application of multivariate analysis techniques, some risk factors do not show the expected impact over graft failure at 1y. PMID:28393027

  4. Long-term seizure outcome and risk factors for recurrence after extratemporal epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Anne M; Averill, Clare A; Kalnins, Renate M; Mitchell, L Anne; Fabinyi, Gavin C A; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to assess long-term seizure outcome and risk factors for seizure recurrence in a cohort of patients who have undergone extratemporal resection for management of refractory seizures. Eighty-one patients underwent extratemporal resection at Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia (1991-2004). Seizure recurrence was any postoperative disabling seizure (complex partial seizure [CPS] ± secondary generalization). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models examined potential preoperative and perioperative risk factors and the risk associated with early postoperative seizures (≤ 28 days postsurgery). The change between preoperative and postoperative seizure frequency was also measured. Median follow-up was 10.3 years (range 1-17.7). The probabilities of freedom from disabling seizures (on or off antiepileptic medication) were 40.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30-51) at 1 month, 23.5% (95% CI 15-33) at 1 year, and 14.7% (95% CI 8-23) at 5 years postoperative. Reduction of disabling seizures to at least 20% of preoperative frequency was attained by 57% of patients at 5 postoperative years. Of the preoperative/perioperative factors, focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type 1 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.90, 95% CI 1.08-3.34, p = 0.025) and incomplete resection (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.06-2.76, p = 0.028) were independent recurrence risks. After surgery, an early postoperative seizure was the only factor associated with higher risk (HR 4.28 [2.42-7.57], p = 0.00). Distinction between subtypes of focal cortical dysplasia, which can be made using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria, may be useful for preoperative prognostication. Early seizures after surgery are not benign and may be markers of factors that contribute to seizure recurrence. Most patients achieve substantial reduction in seizure frequency. Further study of the significance of this reduction in terms of surgical "success" or otherwise is required. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League

  5. Preoperative therapy with pazopanib in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma: a phase II window-of-opportunity study by the German Interdisciplinary Sarcoma Group (GISG-04/NOPASS)

    PubMed Central

    Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Jakob, Jens; Kasper, Bernd; Nowak, Kai; Pilz, Lothar R; Attenberger, Ulrike; Gaiser, Timo; Egerer, Gerlinde; Fröhling, Stefan; Derigs, Hans-Günter; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Hohenberger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For resectable soft tissue sarcoma (STS), radical surgery, usually combined with radiotherapy, is the mainstay of treatment and the only potentially curative modality. Since surgery is often complicated by large tumour size and extensive tumour vasculature, preoperative treatment strategies with the aim of devitalising the tumour are being explored. One option is treatment with antiangiogenic drugs. The multikinase inhibitor pazopanib, which possesses pronounced antiangiogenic effects, has shown activity in metastatic and unresectable STS, but has so far not been tested in the preoperative setting. Methods and analysis This open-label, multicentre phase II window-of-opportunity trial assesses pazopanib as preoperative treatment of resectable STS. Participants receive a 21-day course of pazopanib 800 mg daily during wait time for surgery. Major eligibility criteria are resectable, high-risk adult STS of any location, or metachronous solitary STS metastasis for which resection is planned, and adequate organ function and performance status. The trial uses an exact single-stage design. The primary end point is metabolic response rate (MRR), that is, the proportion of patients with >50% reduction of the mean standardised uptake value (SUVmean) in post-treatment compared to pre-treatment fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography CT. The MRR below which the treatment is considered ineffective is 0.2. The MRR above which the treatment warrants further exploration is 0.4. With a type I error of 5% and a power of 80%, the sample size is 35 evaluable patients, with 12 or more responders as threshold. Main secondary end points are histopathological and MRI response, resectability, toxicity, recurrence-free and overall survival. In a translational substudy, endothelial progenitor cells and vascular epithelial growth factor receptor are analysed as potential prognostic and predictive markers. Ethics and dissemination Approval by the ethics committee II

  6. Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, Farzad; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Over the past several decades, alcohol abuse and cigarette smoke exposure have been identified as risk factors for the development of ARDS. The mechanisms underlying these relationships are complex and remain under investigation but are thought to involve pulmonary immune impairment as well as alveolar epithelial and endothelial dysfunction. This review summarizes the epidemiologic data supporting links between these exposures and ARDS susceptibility and outcomes and highlights key mechanistic investigations that provide insight into the pathways by which each exposure is linked to ARDS. PMID:25453414

  7. Psychological factors as risk factors for poor hip function after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, Achim; Jansen, Petra; Schaible, Jan; Roll, Christina; Grifka, Joachim; Götz, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is influenced by several psychological aspects, such as depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits. We hypothesized that preoperative depression impedes early functional outcome after THA (primary outcome measure). Additional objectives were perioperative changes in the psychological status and their influence on perioperative outcome. This observational study analyzed depression, anxiety, resilience, and personality traits in 50 patients after primary unilateral THA. Hip functionality was measured by means of the Harris Hip Score. Depression, state anxiety, and resilience were evaluated preoperatively as well as 1 and 5 weeks postoperatively. Trait anxiety and personality traits were measured once preoperatively. Patients with low depression and anxiety levels had significantly better outcomes with respect to early hip functionality. Resilience and personality traits did not relate to hip functionality. Depression and state anxiety levels significantly decreased within the 5-week stay in the acute and rehabilitation clinic, whereas resilience remained at the same level. Our study suggests that low depression and anxiety levels are positively related to early functionality after THA. Therefore, perioperative measurements of these factors seem to be useful to provide the best support for patients with risk factors. PMID:28260910

  8. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for acute kidney injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bredt, Luis Cesar; Peres, Luis Alberto Batista

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify risk factors for the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the postoperative period of partial hepatectomies. METHODS Retrospective analysis of 446 consecutive resections in 405 patients, analyzing clinical characteristics, preoperative laboratory data, intraoperative data, and postoperative laboratory data and clinical evolution. Adopting the International Club of Ascites criteria for the definition of AKI, potential predictors of AKI by logistic regression were identified. RESULTS Of the total 446 partial liver resections, postoperative AKI occurred in 80 cases (17.9%). Identified predictors of AKI were: Non-dialytic chronic kidney injury (CKI), biliary obstruction, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, the extent of hepatic resection, the occurrence of intraoperative hemodynamic instability, post-hepatectomy haemorrhage, and postoperative sepsis. CONCLUSION The MELD score, the presence of non-dialytic CKI and biliary obstruction in the preoperative period, and perioperative hemodynamics instability, bleeding, and sepsis are risk factors for the occurrence of AKI in patients that underwent partial hepatectomy. PMID:28706580

  10. Preoperative management of factor XI deficiency with therapeutic plasma exchange: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Monica B; Konkle, Barbara A; Wu, Yanyun; Josephson, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Patients with factor XI deficiency may have bleeding complications during surgery. Because bleeding severity and factor levels correlate poorly, factor replacement needs to be personalized based on bleeding history and type of procedure. We report a 65-year-old male with factor XI deficiency (7 IU dL(-1) ) who presented before scheduled hip arthroplasty. He had a history of total hip arthroplasty complicated by bleeding, delayed healing and prosthesis removal, despite receiving prophylactic treatment with plasma infusion. For the current surgery a factor XI ≥50 IU dL(-1) level was targeted. The calculated plasma infusion needed to achieve this goal was 3100 mL (14 U). Because of concerns about circulatory overload and inability to achieve target by simple infusion, prophylactic treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was requested. TPE was performed the morning before the surgery, using 100% plasma as replacement fluid (3912 mL of plasma), and a positive fluid balance of 631 mL. Factor XI activity level was 51 IU dL(-1) immediately post TPE. The patient received daily infusions of 3 U (∼ 660 mL) of plasma to maintain a factor XI level of 30 IU dL(-1) until post-operative day 7. Aminocaproic acid was given during the surgery and until post-operative day 10. There were no bleeding or thrombotic complications. TPE was effective in increasing factor XI levels; it was well tolerated and did not result in circulatory overload. TPE can be considered when therapeutic factor levels cannot be achieved by simple plasma infusion, or when circulatory overload is a concern. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:579-583, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  12. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  13. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? In women, high triglycerides combined ... information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart Disease Fact ...

  14. Risk Factors and Causes of Syncope

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes of Sy... Back to Fainting Risk Factors & Causes of Syncope Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Syncope The ... heart. LQTS is believed to be a common cause of sudden and unexplained death in children and ...

  15. The ability of preoperative factors to predict patient-reported disability following surgery for rotator cuff pathology.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Jason D; Bost, James E; Piva, Sara R; Kelley Fitzgerald, G; Rodosky, Mark W; Irrgang, James J

    2017-10-01

    Minimal research has examined the prognostic ability of shoulder examination data or psychosocial factors in predicting patient-reported disability following surgery for rotator cuff pathology. The purpose of this study was to examine these factors for prognostic value in order to help clinicians and patients understand preoperative factors that impact disability following surgery. Sixty-two patients scheduled for subacromial decompression with or without supraspinatus repair were recruited. Six-month follow-up data were available for 46 patients. Patient characteristics, history of the condition, shoulder impairments, psychosocial factors, and patient-reported disability questionnaires were collected preoperatively. Six months following surgery, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) and global rating of change dichotomized subjects into responders versus nonresponders. Logistic regression quantified prognostic ability and created the most parsimonious model to predict outcome. Being on modified job duty (OR = .17, 95%CI: 0.03-0.94), and having a worker's compensation claim (OR = 0.08, 95%CI: 0.01-0.74) decreased probability of a positive outcome, while surgery on the dominant shoulder (OR = 11.96, 95%CI: 2.91-49.18) increased probability. From the examination, only impaired internal rotation strength was a significant univariate predictor. The Fear-avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) score (OR = 0.95, 95%CI: 0.91-0.98) and the FABQ_work subscale (OR = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.87-0.97) were univariate predictors. In the final model, surgery on the dominant shoulder (OR = 8.9, 95%CI 1.75-45.7) and FABQ_work subscale score ≤25 (OR = 15.3, 95%CI 2.3-101.9) remained significant. Surgery on the dominant arm resulted in greater improvement in patient-reported disability, thereby increasing the odds of a successful surgery. The predictive ability of the FABQ_work subscale highlights the potential impact of psychosocial factors on patient

  16. Ventilator associated pneumonia following liver transplantation: Etiology, risk factors and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Aurini, Lucia; Benini, Beatrice; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Nava, Stefano; Viale, Pierluigi; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence, etiology, risk factors and outcome of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). METHODS: This retrospective study considered 242 patients undergoing deceased donor OLT. VAP was diagnosed according to clinical and microbiological criteria. RESULTS: VAP occurred in 18 (7.4%) patients, with an incidence of 10 per 1000 d of mechanical ventilation (MV). Isolated bacterial etiologic agents were mainly Enterobacteriaceae (79%). Univariate logistic analysis showed that model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, pre-operative hospitalization, treatment with terlipressin, Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, days of MV and red cell transfusion were risk factors for VAP. Multivariate analysis, considering significant risk factors in univariate analysis, demonstrated that pneumonia was strongly associated with terlipressin usage, pre-operative hospitalization, days of MV and red cell transfusion. Mortality rate was 22% in the VAP group vs 4% in the group without VAP. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that VAP is an important cause of nosocomial infection during postoperative period in OLT patients. MELD score was a significant risk factor in univariate analysis. Multiple transfusions, treatment with terlipressin, preoperative hospitalization rather than called to the hospital while at home and days of MV constitute important risk factors for VAP development. PMID:27358784

  17. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  18. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  19. Preoperative Evaluation for Noncardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Steven L

    2016-12-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of preoperative evaluation for noncardiac surgery, focusing on risk factors, elements of evaluation, medication management, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  20. Stroke Risk Factors, Genetics, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; Esenwa, Charles; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-02-03

    Stroke is a heterogeneous syndrome, and determining risk factors and treatment depends on the specific pathogenesis of stroke. Risk factors for stroke can be categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Age, sex, and race/ethnicity are nonmodifiable risk factors for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, while hypertension, smoking, diet, and physical inactivity are among some of the more commonly reported modifiable risk factors. More recently described risk factors and triggers of stroke include inflammatory disorders, infection, pollution, and cardiac atrial disorders independent of atrial fibrillation. Single-gene disorders may cause rare, hereditary disorders for which stroke is a primary manifestation. Recent research also suggests that common and rare genetic polymorphisms can influence risk of more common causes of stroke, due to both other risk factors and specific stroke mechanisms, such as atrial fibrillation. Genetic factors, particularly those with environmental interactions, may be more modifiable than previously recognized. Stroke prevention has generally focused on modifiable risk factors. Lifestyle and behavioral modification, such as dietary changes or smoking cessation, not only reduces stroke risk, but also reduces the risk of other cardiovascular diseases. Other prevention strategies include identifying and treating medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, that increase stroke risk. Recent research into risk factors and genetics of stroke has not only identified those at risk for stroke but also identified ways to target at-risk populations for stroke prevention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Phase I/II Study of Pre-operative Docetaxel and Mitoxantrone for High-risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garzotto, Mark; Higano, Celestia S.; O’Brien, Catherine; Rademacher, Brooks L.S.; Janeba, Nicole; Fazli, Ladan; Lange, Paul H.; Lieberman, Stephen; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2009-01-01

    Background To determine the 5-year recurrence-free survival in patients with high-risk prostate cancer after neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy followed by surgery. Secondary endpoints included safety, pathologic effects of chemotherapy and predictors of disease recurrence. Patients and Methods Fifty seven patients were enrolled in a Phase I/II study of weekly docetaxel 35 mg/m2 and escalating mitoxantrone to 4 mg/m2 prior to prostatectomy. Patients were treated with 16 weeks of chemotherapy administered weekly on a 3 of every 4 week schedule. A tissue micro-array, constructed from the prostatectomy specimens served to facilitate the exploratory evaluation of biomarkers. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Relapse was defined as a confirmed serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 0.4 ng/ml. Results Of the 57 patients, 54 received 4 cycles of docetaxel and mitoxantrone prior to radical prostatectomy. Grade 4 toxicities were limited to leucopenia, neutropenia and hyperglycemia. Serum testosterone levels remained stable after chemotherapy. Negative surgical margins were attained in 67% of cases. Lymph node involvement was detected in 18.5% of cases. With a median follow-up of 63 months, 27 of 57 (47.4%) patients recurred. The Kaplan-Meier relapse-free survival at 2 years was 65.5% (95%CI 53.0% to 78.0%) and 49.8% at 5 years (95%CI 35.5% to 64.1%). Pretreatment serum PSA, lymph node involvement, and post-chemotherapy tissue VEGF expression were independent predictors of early relapse. Conclusions Preoperative chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone is feasible. Approximately half of the high risk patients remain relapse free at 5 years and clinical and molecular predictors of early relapse were identified. PMID:20143429

  2. Preoperative three-dimensional echocardiography to assess risk of right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, Michael S; French, Amy L; DeNofrio, David; Parmar, Yuvrajsinh J; Pham, Duc Thinh; Kapur, Navin K; Pandian, Natesa G; Patel, Ayan R

    2015-03-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) is associated with significant morbidity after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) surgery. Hemodynamic, clinical, and 2-dimensional echocardiographic variables poorly discriminate patients at risk of RVF. We examined the utility of 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) right ventricular (RV) volumetric assessment to identify patients at risk for RVF. RVF was defined as the need for inotropic infusion for >14 days after LVAD surgery or the need for biventricular assist device support. Preoperative RV volumes and ejection fraction (EF) were measured, blinded to clinical data, from transthoracic 3DE full volume data sets in 26 patients. Baseline variables and 3DE RV indices were compared between patients with and without RVF. Twenty-four patients received continuous-flow LVADs, and 2 required biventricular support devices. Ten patients required prolonged inotropes after LVAD placement. Baseline characteristics associated with RVF included higher right atrial pressure, higher right atrial pressure to pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ratio, and lower cardiac index and RV stroke work index (RVSWI). Echocardiographic indices associated with RVF included 3DE indexed RV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (RVEDVI and RVESVI) and RV ejection fraction (RVEF). The relationship between 3DE quantification of RV volumes and the development of RVF was independent from RVSWI: RVEDVI: odds ratio (OR) 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.33 (P = .04); RVESVI: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28 (P = .03). Quantitative 3DE is a promising method for pre-LVAD RV assessment. RV volumes assessed by 3DE are predictive of RVF in LVAD recipients independently from hemodynamic correlates of RV function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pre-operative clinical and instrumental factors as antireflux surgery outcome predictors.

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Gualtieri, Giorgia; Savarino, Edoardo; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Furnari, Manuele; Casalino, Giuseppina; Parisi, Simona; Savarino, Vincenzo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2016-11-27

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is nowadays a highly prevalent, chronic condition, with 10% to 30% of Western populations affected by weekly symptoms. Many patients with mild reflux symptoms are treated adequately with lifestyle modifications, dietary changes, and low-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). For those with refractory GERD poorly controlled with daily PPIs, numerous treatment options exist. Fundoplication is currently the most commonly performed antireflux operation for management of GERD. Outcomes described in current literature following laparoscopic fundoplication indicate that it is highly effective for treatment of GERD; early clinical studies demonstrate relief of symptoms in approximately 85%-90% of patients. However it is still unclear which factors, clinical or instrumental, are able to predict a good outcome after surgery. Virtually all demographic, esophagogastric junction anatomic conditions, as well as instrumental (such as presence of esophagitis at endoscopy, or motility patterns determined by esophageal high resolution manometry or reflux patterns determined by means of pH/impedance-pH monitoring) and clinical features (such as typical or atypical symptoms presence) of patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD can be factors associated with symptomatic relief. With this in mind, we sought to review studies that identified the factors that predict outcome after laparoscopic total fundoplication.

  4. Pre-operative clinical and instrumental factors as antireflux surgery outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Tolone, Salvatore; Gualtieri, Giorgia; Savarino, Edoardo; Frazzoni, Marzio; de Bortoli, Nicola; Furnari, Manuele; Casalino, Giuseppina; Parisi, Simona; Savarino, Vincenzo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is nowadays a highly prevalent, chronic condition, with 10% to 30% of Western populations affected by weekly symptoms. Many patients with mild reflux symptoms are treated adequately with lifestyle modifications, dietary changes, and low-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). For those with refractory GERD poorly controlled with daily PPIs, numerous treatment options exist. Fundoplication is currently the most commonly performed antireflux operation for management of GERD. Outcomes described in current literature following laparoscopic fundoplication indicate that it is highly effective for treatment of GERD; early clinical studies demonstrate relief of symptoms in approximately 85%-90% of patients. However it is still unclear which factors, clinical or instrumental, are able to predict a good outcome after surgery. Virtually all demographic, esophagogastric junction anatomic conditions, as well as instrumental (such as presence of esophagitis at endoscopy, or motility patterns determined by esophageal high resolution manometry or reflux patterns determined by means of pH/impedance-pH monitoring) and clinical features (such as typical or atypical symptoms presence) of patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD can be factors associated with symptomatic relief. With this in mind, we sought to review studies that identified the factors that predict outcome after laparoscopic total fundoplication. PMID:27933133

  5. Modifying Risk Factors: Strategies That Work Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 29.1 million Americans are currently diagnosed with diabetes, and this number is expected to increase to 48.3 million Americans by 2050. Correspondingly, the present burden of diabetes among patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty is significant and rising. Diabetes as a chronic condition is a well-established risk factor for complication after total joint arthroplasty. A growing body of evidence also indicates that hyperglycemia in the perioperative period, and not the diagnosis of diabetes alone, is similarly associated with increased complication risk. As a result, a coordinated approach to preoperative screening and optimization, combined with judicious perioperative glycemic control, may present an opportunity to improve outcomes, reduce complications, and avoid complication-related costs for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

  6. Preoperative lymphocyte count is an independent prognostic factor in node-negative non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Usui, Shingo; Kikuchi, Shinji; Goto, Yukinobu; Sakai, Mitsuaki; Onizuka, Masataka; Sato, Yukio

    2012-02-01

    A number of prognostic factors have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although lymph node metastasis is the most poorly predictive value in completely resected NSCLC, a significant number of patients have a fatal recurrence even in node-negative curative NSCLC. Recently inflammatory response has been shown as a predictive value in NSCLC. Neutrophils and lymphocytes play an important role in cancer immune response. In this study, we retrospectively examined the impact of preoperative peripheral neutrophil and lymphocyte counts on survival, and investigated the relationships of these factors to clinicopathological factors in node-negative NSCLC. A total 237 patients were evaluated. When the cut-off value of neutrophil count was 4500 mm(-3) with a maximum log-rank statistical value, overall 5-year survival rates were 79.7% for the low-neutrophil-count group and 69.5% for the high-neutrophil-count group (P=0.04). When the cut-off value of lymphocyte count was 1900 mm(-3) with a maximum log-rank statistical value, overall survival rates were 67.9% for the low-lymphocyte group and 87.7% for the high-lymphocyte group (P<0.001). High-neutrophil-counts were associated with tumor size (P=0.002) and pleural invasion (P<0.001). Low-lymphocyte-counts were correlated with vascular invasion (P=0.018) and recurrence of NSCLC (P=0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that the lymphocyte count was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 3.842; 95% confidence interval: 1.827-8.078; P<0.001), but the neutrophil count was not (P=0.185). We conclude that a peripheral lymphocyte count, which is associated with vascular invasion, is an independent prognostic factor in node-negative NCSLC.

  7. [The colorectal carcinoma risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Andrzej; Wawrzyn-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria

    2005-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma constitutes the second, as for the rate, death cause due to a malignant disease both in the western countries and in Poland. Despite deep knowledge concerning morphogenesis and spread of colorectal carcinoma as well as vast achievements in surgery, chemo- and radiotherapy, the percentage of 5-year-survivals still reaches 40%. According to most authors there are 4 risk factor categories: epidemiological, intestinal, dietetic, and mixed. It is well-known that colorectal carcinoma, like neoplasms localized in other organs and systems, is a disease, in which genetic mutations of somatic cells are the molecular base/source of the disease. The inner innervation of the colon seems to play an important role in carcinoma pathogenesis and spread. At present, 80% of colorectal carcinomas are diagnosed in the advanced stage, with infiltration exceeding the intestinal wall or spreading to neighboring organs, which gives full clinical symptoms. The prognosis as to survival and disease progression is usually poor. Therefore, the ways of early diagnosis, monitoring, and the knowledge of etiological factors are so important in medical practice.

  8. Withholding Preoperative Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Knee Prosthesis Revision: A Retrospective Analysis on Culture Results and Risk of Infection.

    PubMed

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Tornero, Eduard; Claret, Guillem; Bosch, Jordi; Martinez-Pastor, Juan Carlos; Combalia, Andreu; Soriano, Alex

    2017-09-01

    A significant amount of patients undergoing revision surgery of a prosthetic joint turn out to have an infection. Withholding preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in these patients to optimize culture yield during revision surgery remains a matter of debate. The aim of our study was to determine (1) the rate of positive intraoperative cultures with or without preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis and (2) the incidence of a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) during the follow-up in the 2 groups. Medical files of patients in whom preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis was withheld until culture samples were taken (2007-2010, n = 284) and in whom antibiotic prophylaxis was given during the induction of anesthesia (2010-2013, n = 141) were retrospectively reviewed. The percentage of ≥1 positive cultures was the same in the group without (26%) and with preoperative prophylaxis (27%; P value, .7). PJI was diagnosed during revision surgery according to the Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria in 6.7% patients not receiving preoperative prophylaxis and in 7.0% receiving it (P value, .79). We found no important differences in the type of microorganisms that were isolated in both groups. During a 3-month follow-up, an early PJI developed in patients undergoing total revision surgery in 6.4% of the nonpreoperative prophylaxis group vs 1.6% in the preoperative prophylaxis group (P value, .1). Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis does not reduce culture yield in patients undergoing knee revision surgery. Our data show a trend toward a higher PJI rate in the postoperative period of total revision surgery when preoperative prophylaxis is withheld. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for gallbladder contractility after cholecystolithotomy in elderly high-risk surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Luo, Hao; Yan, Hong-tao; Zhang, Guo-hu; Liu, Wei-hui; Tang, Li-jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective Cholecystolithiasis is a common disease in the elderly patient. The routine therapy is open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the previous study, we designed a minimally invasive cholecystolithotomy based on percutaneous cholecystostomy combined with a choledochoscope (PCCLC) under local anesthesia. Methods To investigate the effect of PCCLC on the gallbladder contractility function, PCCLC and laparoscope combined with a choledochoscope were compared in this study. Results The preoperational age and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, as well as postoperational lithotrity rate and common biliary duct stone rate in the PCCLC group, were significantly higher than the choledochoscope group. However, the pre- and postoperational gallbladder ejection fraction was not significantly different. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that the preoperational thickness of gallbladder wall (odds ratio [OR]: 0.540; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.317–0.920; P=0.023) and lithotrity (OR: 0.150; 95% CI: 0.023–0.965; P=0.046) were risk factors for postoperational gallbladder ejection fraction. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.714 (P=0.016; 95% CI: 0.553–0.854). Conclusion PCCLC strategy should be carried out cautiously. First, restricted by the diameter of the drainage tube, the PCCLC should be used only for small gallstones in high-risk surgical patients. Second, the usage of lithotrity should be strictly limited to avoid undermining the gallbladder contractility and increasing the risk of secondary common bile duct stones. PMID:28138229

  10. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  11. Risk factors for recurrent laryngeal nerve neuropraxia postthyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Patrick; O'Connor, Ann; Murphy, Matthew S

    2012-06-01

    Despite preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), transient vocal cord paralysis (VCP) occurs after 1.2% to 10.9% of thyroidectomies. The objective of this study was to study risk factors for transient VCP after thyroidectomy. Prospective cohort study. Academic teaching hospital. Two hundred fifteen consecutive thyroid surgeries performed by a single surgeon. All patients underwent preoperative and postoperative laryngoscopy. Patients with preexisting VCP or without postoperative laryngoscopy were excluded. Clinical and operative data were recorded prospectively at the time of thyroid surgery. The association between possible risk factors and occurrence of postoperative transient VCP was studied. Six patients were excluded (2 with preexisting VCP and 4 without postoperative laryngoscopy). There was 1 intentional sacrifice of an RLN and 1 unintentional RLN transection. Of the remaining 322 RLNs at risk, 15 (4.7%) had postoperative VCP. Operative findings of cancer invading the RLN requiring sharp dissection to separate the nerve (P = .006) and operative findings of RLN extensively draped along the thyroid or intimately associated with the thyroid parenchyma at Berry's ligament (P = .03) were significantly associated with VCP. Revision surgery (P = .06) trended toward significance. Malignancy, central compartment neck dissection, extralaryngeal RLN branching, hyperthyroidism, and retrosternal extension were not significant. Of cases with follow-up laryngoscopic documentation of vocal function, 85% (11/13) showed full resolution of VCP, with 1 further case showing partial recovery. Invasive cancer and variants in the anatomic course of the RLN are risk factors for transient VCP after thyroidectomy.

  12. Family Factors Predicting Categories of Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Brooke P.; Wang, Wen-Ling; Herting, Jerald R.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared family risk and protective factors among potential high school dropouts with and without suicide-risk behaviors (SRB) and examined the extent to which these factors predict categories of SRB. Subjects were randomly selected from among potential dropouts in 14 high schools. Based upon suicide-risk status, 1,083 potential high school…

  13. Suicide Risk Factors in Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motto, Jerome A.

    1980-01-01

    A current focus in evaluating suicide risk is the "clinical model" approach, which determines those factors associated with high risk for suicide. The sociological factors identified as estimators of suicide risk included impaired health, job instability, multiple unit residence, no change in living setting, and modest financial resources. (JAC)

  14. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided.

  15. Hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma larger than 10 cm: preoperative risk stratification to prevent futile surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chetana; Compagnon, Philippe; Sebagh, Mylène; Salloum, Chady; Calderaro, Julien; Luciani, Alain; Pascal, Gérard; Laurent, Alexis; Levesque, Eric; Maggi, Umberto; Feray, Cyrille; Cherqui, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Azoulay, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Appropriate patient selection is important to achieving good outcomes and obviating futile surgery in patients with huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to identify independent predictors of futile outcomes, defined as death within 3 months of surgery or within 1 year from early recurrence following hepatectomy for huge HCC. Methods The outcomes of 149 patients with huge HCCs who underwent resection during 1995–2012 were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify preoperative independent predictors of futility. Results Independent predictors of 3-month mortality (18.1%) were: total bilirubin level <34 μmol/l [P = 0.0443; odds ratio (OR) 16.470]; platelet count of <150 000 cells/ml (P = 0.0098; OR 5.039), and the presence of portal vein tumour thrombosis (P = 0.0041; OR 5.138). The last of these was the sole independent predictor of 1-year recurrence-related mortality (17.2%). Rates of recurrence-related mortality at 3 months and 1 year were, respectively, 6.3% and 7.1% in patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage A disease, 12.5% and 14% in patients with BCLC stage B disease, and 37.8% (P = 0.0002) and 75% (P = 0.0002) in patients with BCLC stage C disease. Conclusions According to the present data, among patients submitted to hepatectomy for huge HCC, those with a high bilirubin level, low platelet count and portal vein thrombosis are at higher risk for futile surgery. The presence of portal vein tumour thrombosis should be regarded as a relative contraindication to surgery. PMID:25980326

  16. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Genetic risk factors in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fabisch, H; Kroisel, P M; Fabisch, Karin

    2005-11-01

    The high pathogenetic relevance of genetic factors in schizophrenia is beyond doubt based on the findings of epidemiological studies. By means of a complex mode of transmission, it is likely that several genes with weak to moderate effect jointly constitute a genetic basis for a vulnerability to schizophrenia that may well vary for different individuals. Other organic and psychosocial factors also play an individually different -- in some cases significant -- role in terms of pathogenesis, as a result of which an oligogenic/polygenic multifactor model is assumed from the standpoint of aetiopathogenetics. Molecular genetic methods consist in linkage analyses and association analyses. Positive linkage findings accumulate particularly for the chromosomes 1q, 6p, 8p, 13q and 22q. By themselves, individual mutations contribute little to the range of schizophrenic feature characteristics, it was not possible -- irrespective of some subtypes -- to replicate genes of major effect. From the large number of possible candidate genes, although studies on DRD3, DRD2 and HTR2A produced positive results, the magnitudes of effect were low. The findings for alleles of dysbindin, neuregulin 1, DAO, COMT, PRODH, ZDHHC and DISC are less clear. The search for schizophrenia-relevant mutations is hampered by the possibility of a heterogeneous phenotype of schizophrenia in case of a homogeneous genotype as much as by the possibility of inter-individually homogeneous phenotypical characteristics in case of schizophrenia-relevant heterotype in the genome. With the aid of the concept of endo-phenotypes, based on neurobiological phenomena, it might be possible to take a more direct approach that leads from relevant mutations to the risk of schizophrenias. However, replacing schizophrenic alienation with neurobiological aspects leads to difficulties in explaining these complex disorder profiles. Schizophrenic diseases require an explanatory approach that also incorporates personality and

  18. [Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer disease risk: epidemiological studies review].

    PubMed

    Cowppli-Bony, Pascale; Dartigues, Jean-François; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    Etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still undefined in its most frequent sporadic type, but a role of vascular risk factor is more and more evocated in its pathophysiology. This role enables to hope that preventive or curative care of vascular risk factors could decrease AD incidence. Among these factors, high blood pressure, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and tobacco consumption were the most studied. We review the risk for AD, which had been associated with each of these factors in epidemiological studies. High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of AD in most studies while the results are more controversial for the others factors. All these four vascular risk factors have variable interaction with the presence of cerebrovascular diseases and of the epsilon 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene which is a predisposition factor for sporadic AD.

  19. Risk Factors For Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, Yüksel; KURT, Semiha; KARAER ÜNALDI, Hatice; ERKORKMAZ, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for distal symmetric sensory-motor polyneuropathy (DSP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Method Sixty seven patients with type 2 DM (33 males and 34 females) were included in the study. In addition to a detailed neurological examination, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was administered to all patients and their total neuropathy scores were calculated. Nerve conduction examinations were performed for all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.83±.87 years. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) value was 8.56±2.07% (normal: 3–6.5%). The total neuropathy score significantly correlated with diabetes duration, hypertension, retinopathy, and HbA1C. Conclusion This study confirms the previous reports regarding the association of neuropathy with poor glycaemic control and duration of the disease. The association of neuropathy with retinopathy and hypertension is important.

  20. In patients stratified by preoperative risk, endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms has a lower in-hospital mortality and morbidity than open repair.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba M; Flahive, Julie; Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle R; Messina, Louis M; Robinson, William P

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs) has lower postoperative mortality than open repair (OR). However, comparisons involved heterogeneous populations that lacked adjustment for preoperative risk. We hypothesize that for RAAA patients stratified by a validated measure of preoperative mortality risk, EVAR has a lower in-hospital mortality and morbidity than does OR. In-hospital mortality and morbidity after EVAR and OR of RAAA were compared in patients from the Vascular Quality Initiative (2003-2013) stratified by the validated Vascular Study Group of New England RAAA risk score into low-risk (score 0-1), medium-risk (score 2-3), and high-risk (score 4-6) groups. Among 514 patients who underwent EVAR and 651 patients who underwent OR of RAAA, EVAR had lower in-hospital mortality (25% vs 33%, P = .001). In risk-stratified patients, EVAR trended toward a lower mortality in the low-risk group (n = 626; EVAR, 10% vs OR, 15%; P = .07), had a significantly lower mortality in the medium-risk group (n = 457; EVAR, 37% vs OR, 48%; P = .02), and no advantage in the high-risk group (n = 82; EVAR, 95% vs OR, 79%; P = .17). Across all risk groups, cardiac complications (EVAR, 29% vs OR, 38%; P = .001), respiratory complications (EVAR, 28% vs OR, 46%; P < .0001), renal insufficiency (EVAR, 24% vs OR, 38%; P < .0001), lower extremity ischemia (EVAR, 2.7% vs OR, 8.1%; P < .0001), and bowel ischemia (EVAR, 3.9% vs OR, 10%; P < .0001) were significantly lower after EVAR than after OR. Across all risk groups, median (interquartile range) intensive care unit length of stay (EVAR, 2 [1-5] days vs OR, 6 [3-13] days; P < .0001) and hospital length of stay (EVAR, 6 [4-12] days vs OR, 13 [8-22] days; P < .0001) were lower after EVAR. This novel risk-stratified comparison using a national clinical database showed that EVAR of RAAA has a lower mortality and morbidity compared with OR in low-risk and medium-risk patients

  1. Elevated Preoperative Serum Hs-CRP Level as a Prognostic Factor in Patients Who Underwent Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Bin; Ying, Jie; Kuang, Su-Juan; Jin, Hao-Sheng; Yin, Zi; Chang, Liang; Yang, Hui; Ou, Ying-Liang; Zheng, Jiang-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Li, Chuan-Sheng; Jian, Zhi-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of preoperative highly sensitive C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) in serum on the prognostic outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following hepatic resection in Chinese samples.From January 2004 to December 2008, a total of 624 consecutive HCC patients who underwent hepatic resection were incorporated. Serum levels of Hs-CRP were tested at preoperation via a collection of venous blood samples. Survival analyses adopted the univariate and multivariate analyses.In our study, among the 624 screened HCC patients, 516 patients were eventually incorporated and completed follow-up. Positive correlations were found regarding preoperative serum Hs-CRP level and tumor size, Child-Pugh class, or tumor stage (all P < 0.0001). Patients with recurrence outcomes and nonsurvivors had increased Hs-CRP levels at preoperation (both P < 0.0001). When compared to the Hs-CRP-normal group, the overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival rates were evidently decreased in the Hs-CRP-elevated group. Further, preoperative serum Hs-CRP level might be having possible prediction effect regarding survival and recurrence of HCC patients after hepatic section in the multivariate analysis.Preoperative increased serum Hs-CRP level was an independent prognostic indicator in patients with HCC following hepatic resection in Chinese samples.

  2. Risk Factors for Complications After Esophageal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Viklund, Pernilla; Lindblad, Mats; Lu, Ming; Ye, Weimin; Johansson, Jan; Lagergren, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify risk factors for complications after resection for esophageal or cardia cancer. Summary Background Data: Knowledge of risk factors for complications after esophageal resection for cancer is sparse, and prospective population-based studies are lacking. Methods: A prospective, nationwide, population-based study was conducted in Sweden in April 2, 2001 through December 31, 2003. Details about tumor characteristics and stage, surgical procedures, and complications were collected prospectively from the Swedish Esophageal and Cardia Cancer register. Medical records and specific charts from surgical procedures, histopathology reports, and intensive care units were continuously scrutinized. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals. Results: Among 275 patients undergoing surgical resection for esophageal or cardia cancer, 122 (44%) had at least one predefined complication. Operation by low-volume surgeons (<5 operations annually) were followed by more anastomotic leakages than those by surgeons with higher volume (odds ratio, 7.86; 95% confidence interval, 2.13–29.00). Hand-sewn and stapled anastomoses did not differ regarding risk of anastomotic leakage. Among cardia cancer patients, transthoracic approach resulted in more respiratory complications compared with transhiatal (abdominal only) approach (odds ratio, 4.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.66–13.76). Older age, adjuvant oncologic therapy, and higher preoperative bleeding volume nonsignificantly increased the risks of complications, while no influence of sex or tumor stage was found. Conclusions: High-volume esophageal surgeons seem to lower the risk of anastomotic leakage. More large-scale studies are warranted to establish the roles of the other potentially important risk factors suggested in our study. PMID:16432353

  3. [Preoperative monitoring of blood coagulation in urologic operations: diagnosis of familial factor XI deficiency within the scope of preoperative blood coagulation studies].

    PubMed

    Haushofer, A; Halbmayer, W M; Toth, E; Pflüger, H

    1993-01-01

    Presurgical coagulation diagnosis should--apart from coagulation monitoring in the laboratory based on a stepwise diagnosis for detection of coagulations disorders, starting with global tests (NT/APTT) followed by appropriate specific investigation in case of pathological findings--consist of an adequate hemostaseological anamnesis and physical checkup of the patient. This would allow detection of important signs of hemostaseological impairment during the pre-analytical phase already and permit subsequent initiation of more specific coagulation tests. The casuistics of a patient with factor XI-deficiency ("Minor Form"), a condition which is extremely infrequent in our country, demonstrates the coagulation diagnostic procedure which led to detection of his inherited factor XI-deficiency. In addition the pre-, peri- and postsurgical therapeutical management of this particular patient using an antifibrinolytic drug (tranexamic acid) is presented.

  4. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  5. Pressure ulcer prevalence and risk factors during prolonged surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Mike; Friend, Michael; McClure, Connie; Nardi, Scott; Fix, Lisa; Schafer, Marianne; Savochka, Kathlyn; McNett, Molly

    2011-12-01

    Pressure ulcer formation related to positioning while in the OR increases the length of hospital stay and hospital costs, but there is little evidence documenting how positioning devices used in the OR influence pressure ulcer development when examined with traditional risk factors. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to identify the prevalence of and risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development among patients undergoing surgical procedures lasting longer than three hours. Participants included all adult same-day admission patients scheduled for a three-hour surgical procedure during an eight-month period (N = 258). Data were gathered preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively on pressure ulcer risk factors. Bivariate analyses indicated that the type of positioning (ie, heels elevated) (χ(2) = 7.897, P = .048), OR bed surface (ie, foam table pad) (χ(2) = 15.848, P = .000), skin assessment in the postanesthesia care unit (χ(2) = 41.652, P = .000), and male gender (χ(2) = 6.984, P = .030) were associated with pressure ulcer development. Logistic regression analyses indicated that the use of a foam pad (β = 2.691, P = .024) and a lower day-one Braden score (β = .244, P = .003) were predictive of pressure ulcers.

  6. [Assessment of dynamic violent behavior risk factors].

    PubMed

    Folino, Jorge Oscar; Cáceres, María Soledad; Campos, María Laura; Silveri, Marina; Ucín, Silvana; Ascazibar, Mariel

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic violent behavior risk factors have special significance since they constitute the main target for preventive intervention. Different dynamic factors as well as violent recidivism were assessed with, among other instruments, the environmental risk (Risk Management) section of the Argentinean version of the HCR-20 in 25 parolees from the Province of Buenos Aires Penitentiary System. Among other findings, the prevalence of the risk factors linked to substance abuse and socioeconomic deprivation, and the heterogeneous perception of the official institutions are very significant. Exposure to destabilizers was the factor most associated with violent recidivism.

  7. Pathologic Nodal Classification Is the Most Discriminating Prognostic Factor for Disease-Free Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Curative Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Yong

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively evaluated the effects of clinical and pathologic factors on disease-free survival (DFS) with the aim of identifying the most discriminating factor predicting DFS in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and curative resection. Methods and Materials: The study involved 420 patients who underwent preoperative CRT and curative resection between August 2001 and October 2006. Gender, age, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, cT, cN, cStage, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and tumor regression grade (TRG) were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with DFS. To compare the discriminatory prognostic ability of four tumor response-related pathologic factors (ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG), the Akaike information criteria were calculated. Results: The 5-year DFS rate was 75.4%. On univariate analysis, distance from the anal verge, histologic type, histologic grade, pretreatment CEA level, cT, circumferential resection margin, type of surgery, preoperative chemotherapeutic regimen, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were significantly associated with DFS. Multivariate analysis showed that the four parameters ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were, consistently, significant prognostic factors for DFS. The ypN showed the lowest Akaike information criteria value for DFS, followed by ypStage, ypT, and TRG, in that order. Conclusion: In our study, ypT, ypN, ypStage, and TRG were important prognostic factors for DFS, and ypN was the most discriminating factor.

  8. Pre-operative Screening and Manual Drilling Strategies to Reduce the Risk of Thermal Injury During Minimally Invasive Cochlear Implantation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Neal P; Fichera, Loris; Kesler, Kyle; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Mitchell, Jason E; Webster, Robert J; Labadie, Robert F

    2017-05-18

    This article presents the development and experimental validation of a methodology to reduce the risk of thermal injury to the facial nerve during minimally invasive cochlear implantation surgery. The first step in this methodology is a pre-operative screening process, in which medical imaging is used to identify those patients that present a significant risk of developing high temperatures at the facial nerve during the drilling phase of the procedure. Such a risk is calculated based on the density of the bone along the drilling path and the thermal conductance between the drilling path and the nerve, and provides a criterion to exclude high-risk patients from receiving the minimally invasive procedure. The second component of the methodology is a drilling strategy for manually-guided drilling near the facial nerve. The strategy utilizes interval drilling and mechanical constraints to enable better control over the procedure and the resulting generation of heat. The approach is tested in fresh cadaver temporal bones using a thermal camera to monitor temperature near the facial nerve. Results indicate that pre-operative screening may successfully exclude high-risk patients and that the proposed drilling strategy enables safe drilling for low-to-moderate risk patients.

  9. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10–20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10–20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3–8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69–0.81). Interpretation Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  10. Risk Factor Modification and Projections of Absolute Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Background Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Methods Using data from a case–control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. Results The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. Conclusions These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions. PMID:21705679

  11. Risk factor modification and projections of absolute breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Petracci, Elisabetta; Decarli, Adriano; Schairer, Catherine; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pee, David; Masala, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Gail, Mitchell H

    2011-07-06

    Although modifiable risk factors have been included in previous models that estimate or project breast cancer risk, there remains a need to estimate the effects of changes in modifiable risk factors on the absolute risk of breast cancer. Using data from a case-control study of women in Italy (2569 case patients and 2588 control subjects studied from June 1, 1991, to April 1, 1994) and incidence and mortality data from the Florence Registries, we developed a model to predict the absolute risk of breast cancer that included five non-modifiable risk factors (reproductive characteristics, education, occupational activity, family history, and biopsy history) and three modifiable risk factors (alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity, and body mass index). The model was validated using independent data, and the percent risk reduction was calculated in high-risk subgroups identified by use of the Lorenz curve. The model was reasonably well calibrated (ratio of expected to observed cancers = 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.26), but the discriminatory accuracy was modest. The absolute risk reduction from exposure modifications was nearly proportional to the risk before modifying the risk factors and increased with age and risk projection time span. Mean 20-year reductions in absolute risk among women aged 65 years were 1.6% (95% CI = 0.9% to 2.3%) in the entire population, 3.2% (95% CI = 1.8% to 4.8%) among women with a positive family history of breast cancer, and 4.1% (95% CI = 2.5% to 6.8%) among women who accounted for the highest 10% of the total population risk, as determined from the Lorenz curve. These data give perspective on the potential reductions in absolute breast cancer risk from preventative strategies based on lifestyle changes. Our methods are also useful for calculating sample sizes required for trials to test lifestyle interventions.

  12. Evaluation of HE4, CA-125, Risk of Ovarian Malignancy Algorithm (ROMA) and Risk of Malignancy Index (RMI) in the Preoperative Assessment of Patients with Adnexal Mass.

    PubMed

    Al Musalhi, Khawla; Al Kindi, Manal; Al Aisary, Faiza; Ramadhan, Fatma; Al Rawahi, Thuraya; Al Hatali, Khalsa; Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the validity and compare the performance of cancer antigen-125 (CA-125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), the risk of malignancy index (RMI), and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer in patients with ovarian lesions discovered during their preoperative work-up investigations. This prospective, cross-sectional study looked at patients who attended the gynecology department at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, from 1 March 2014 to 30 April 2015, for the evaluation of an ovarian lesion. The inclusion criteria included women who underwent surgical intervention and who had a preoperative pelvic ultrasound with laboratory investigation for CA-125 and HE4. The study validated the diagnostic performance of CA-125, RMI, HE4, and ROMA using histopathological diagnosis as the gold standard. The study population had a total of 213 cases of various types of benign (77%) and malignant (23%) ovarian tumors. CA-125 showed the highest sensitivity (79%) when looking at the total patient population. When divided by age, the sensitivity was 67% in premenopausal women. In postmenopausal women, CA-125 had lower sensitivity (89%) compared to RMI, HE4, and ROMA (93% each). A high specificity of 90% was found for HE4 in the total patient population, 93% in premenopausal women and 75% in postmenopausal women. CA-125 had the highest specificity (79%) in postmenopausal women. Both CA-125 and RMI were frequently elevated in benign gynecological conditions particularly in endometriosis when compared to HE4 and ROMA. We also studied modifications of the optimal cut-offs for the four parameters. Both CA-125 and RMI showed a significant increase in their specificity if the cut-off was increased to ≥ 60 U/mL for CA-125 and to ≥ 250 for RMI. For HE4, we noted an improvement in its specificity in postmenopausal women when its cut-off was increased to140 pmol/L. HE4 and ROMA showed a very high specificity, but were less sensitive than CA-125 and

  13. PINCH is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients without preoperative radiotherapy--a study in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Annica; Gao, Jingfang; Holmlund, Birgitta; Adell, Gunnar; Carstensen, John; Langford, Dianne; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-02-10

    The clinical significance between particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) expression and radiotherapy (RT) in tumours is not known. In this study, the expression of PINCH and its relationship to RT, clinical, pathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients. PINCH expression determined by immunohistochemistry was analysed at the invasive margin and inner tumour area in 137 primary rectal adenocarcinomas (72 cases without RT and 65 cases with RT). PINCH expression in colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18 Co) was determined by western blot. In patients without RT, strong PINCH expression at the invasive margin of primary tumours was related to worse survival, compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage and differentiation (P = 0.03). No survival relationship in patients with RT was observed (P = 0.64). Comparing the non-RT with RT subgroup, there was no difference in PINCH expression in primary tumours (invasive margin (P = 0.68)/inner tumour area (P = 0.49). In patients with RT, strong PINCH expression was related to a higher grade of LVD (lymphatic vessel density) (P = 0.01) PINCH expression at the invasive margin was an independent prognostic factor in patients without RT. RT does not seem to directly affect the PINCH expression.

  14. Postpartum depression risk factors: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Ghaedrahmati, Maryam; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Bahrami, Masood

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a debilitating mental disorder with a high prevalence. The aim of this study was review of the related studies. In this narrative review, we report studies that investigated risk factors of postpartum depression by searching the database, Scopus, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Uptodate, Proquest in the period 2000-2015 published articles about the factors associated with postpartum depression were assessed in Farsi and English. The search strategy included a combination of keywords include postpartum depression and risk factors or obstetrical history, social factors, or biological factors. Literature review showed that risk factors for postpartum depression in the area of economic and social factors, obstetrical history, and biological factors, lifestyle and history of mental illness detected. Data from this study can use for designing a screening tools for high-risk pregnant women and for designing a prevention programs.

  15. Risk factors for unavoidable removal of instrumentation after surgical site infection of spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Kawamura, Hideki; Kawamura, Ichiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Tanabe, Fumito; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Surgical site infection (SSI) after spine instrumentation is difficult to treat, and often requires removal of instrumentation. The removal of instrumentation after spine surgery is a severe complication that can lead to the deterioration of activities of daily living and poor prognosis. Although there are many reports on SSI after spine surgery, few reports have investigated the risk factors for the removal of instrumentation after spine surgery SSI. This study aimed to identify the risk factors for unavoidable removal of instrumentation after SSI of spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 511 patients who underwent spine surgery with instrumentation at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2006 to December 2014. Risk factors associated with SSI were analyzed via multiple logistic regression analysis. Parameters of the group that needed instrumentation removal were compared with the group that did not require instrumentation removal using the Mann–Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. The posterior approach was used in most cases (453 of 511 cases, 88.6%). SSI occurred in 16 of 511 cases (3.14%) of spine surgery with instrumentation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified 2 significant risk factors for SSI: operation time, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification ≥ 3. Twelve of the 16 patients with SSI (75%) were able to keep the instrumentation after SSI. Pseudarthrosis occurred in 2 of 4 cases (50%) after instrumentation removal. Risk factors identified for instrumentation removal after spine SSI were a greater number of past surgeries, low preoperative hemoglobin, high preoperative creatinine, high postoperative infection treatment score for the spine, and the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In these high risk cases, attempts should be made to decrease the risk factors preoperatively, and careful postoperative monitoring should be conducted. PMID:27787365

  16. Does preoperative heparin increase the postoperative bleeding risk in women undergoing prosthetic breast implant surgery? A review of the data from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Sharon E; Roehl, Kendall R; Mahabir, Raman C

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the authors' institution adopted a policy requiring that all patients, regardless of preoperative risk, receive both sequential compression devices and a single preoperative subcutaneous 5000 unit injection of heparin. A previously published 12-year review at this same institution before this policy demonstrated a 1.5% 30-day postoperative incidence of hematoma in primary augmentation or delayed tissue expander based breast reconstructions. To determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding complications associated with preoperative administration of 5000 units of subcutaneous heparin and compare that incidence with previously published data. Patient data were collected prospectively and maintained in a secure database at a single institution with institutional review board approval. Current procedural terminology and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coding was then used to identify all patients who received either primary breast augmentation or delayed tissue expander based breast reconstruction during a five-year period. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative bleeding complication. A bleeding complication was defined as any hemorrhagic event that required a return to the operating room. The overall incidence of significant postoperative bleeding was 1.47% (five of 340 [1.16% augmentation, 2.50% expander]). Comparing the current results with the previously published data, demonstrated an OR of 0.98 (95% CI 0.38 to 2.55). In women undergoing primary breast augmentation or delayed tissue expander breast reconstruction, heparin prophylaxis did not increase the risk for significant postoperative bleeding compared with historical controls.

  17. Does preoperative heparin increase the postoperative bleeding risk in women undergoing prosthetic breast implant surgery? A review of the data from a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Sharon E; Roehl, Kendall R; Mahabir, Raman C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2008, the authors’ institution adopted a policy requiring that all patients, regardless of preoperative risk, receive both sequential compression devices and a single preoperative subcutaneous 5000 unit injection of heparin. A previously published 12-year review at this same institution before this policy demonstrated a 1.5% 30-day postoperative incidence of hematoma in primary augmentation or delayed tissue expander based breast reconstructions. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding complications associated with preoperative administration of 5000 units of subcutaneous heparin and compare that incidence with previously published data. METHODS: Patient data were collected prospectively and maintained in a secure database at a single institution with institutional review board approval. Current procedural terminology and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coding was then used to identify all patients who received either primary breast augmentation or delayed tissue expander based breast reconstruction during a five-year period. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative bleeding complication. A bleeding complication was defined as any hemorrhagic event that required a return to the operating room. RESULTS: The overall incidence of significant postoperative bleeding was 1.47% (five of 340 [1.16% augmentation, 2.50% expander]). Comparing the current results with the previously published data, demonstrated an OR of 0.98 (95% CI 0.38 to 2.55). CONCLUSION: In women undergoing primary breast augmentation or delayed tissue expander breast reconstruction, heparin prophylaxis did not increase the risk for significant postoperative bleeding compared with historical controls. PMID:26361622

  18. Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Lee, Bea J; DeStefano, Sherilyn; Waryasz, Gregory R; Kane, Patrick M; Gallacher, Stacey E; Fava, Joseph; Green, Andrew G

    2016-03-01

    To identify risk factors for infection after rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that patient characteristics and surgical technique would affect the rate of infection. The records of 1,824 rotator cuff repairs performed by a single surgeon from 1995 to 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fourteen patients had an early deep postoperative wound infection that was treated with surgical irrigation and debridement. One hundred eighty-five control patients who were treated with rotator cuff repair and did not develop an infection were selected randomly for comparison and statistical analysis. Data regarding preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for infection were recorded, and a multiple logistic regression was conducted to investigate predictors of infection. The infection rate was 0.77% (14/1,822). On average 2.1 (range 1 to 4) surgical debridements were performed in addition to treatment with intravenous antibiotics. Patients who had open or miniopen rotator cuff repair had a significantly greater risk of acute postoperative infection (odds ratio [OR] = 8.63, P = .002). Seventy-nine percent of the patients in the infection group had an open or miniopen repair, whereas only 28% of the control group had an open or miniopen repair. Male patients also had a significantly greater risk of acute postoperative infection (OR = 9.52, P = .042). A total of 92% of the infection patients were male compared with 58% of the control group. In addition, as body mass index increased there was a reduction in the odds of infection (OR = 0.81, P = .023). The results of this case control study demonstrate that open or miniopen surgical technique and male sex are significant risk factors for infection after rotator cuff repair. In our study, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair reduced the risk of infection compared with open techniques. Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection After Cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Warren, David K; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Tian, Fang; Symons, William J; Fraser, Victoria J; Olsen, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A retrospective cohort of commercially insured persons aged 18-64 years was assembled using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, 4th edition codes for cholecystectomy from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010. Complex procedures and patients (eg, cancer, end-stage renal disease) and procedures with pre-existing infection were excluded. Surgical site infections within 90 days after cholecystectomy were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent risk factors for SSI. Surgical site infections were identified after 472 of 66566 (0.71%) cholecystectomies; incidence was higher after open (n = 51, 4.93%) versus laparoscopic procedures (n = 421, 0.64%; P < .001). Independent risk factors for SSI included male gender, preoperative chronic anemia, diabetes, drug abuse, malnutrition/weight loss, obesity, smoking-related diseases, previous Staphylococcus aureus infection, laparoscopic approach with acute cholecystitis/obstruction (hazards ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-1.96), open approach with (HR, 4.29; 95% CI, 2.45-7.52) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.96-8.34), conversion to open approach with (HR, 4.71; 95% CI, 2.74-8.10) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 7.11; 95% CI, 3.87-13.08), bile duct exploration, postoperative chronic anemia, and postoperative pneumonia or urinary tract infection. Acute cholecystitis or obstruction was associated with significantly increased risk of SSI with laparoscopic but not open cholecystectomy. The risk of SSI was similar for planned open and converted procedures. These findings suggest that stratification by operative factors is important when comparing SSI rates between facilities.

  20. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  1. The preoperative alkaline phosphatase-to-platelet ratio index is an independent prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Qun; Li, Jun; Liao, Yan; Chen, Qian; Liao, Wei-Jia; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A simple, inexpensive, and readily available prognostic index is highly needed to accurately predict the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to develop a simple prognostic index using routine laboratory tests, alkaline phosphatase-to-platelet count ratio index (APPRI), to predict the likelihood of postoperative survival in HCC patients. A total of 246 patients with HCC undergoing curative resection were retrospectively analyzed. Cutoff point for APPRI was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, and then the patients were divided into the low-APPRI group (APPRI ≤ 4.0) and the high-APPRI group (APPRI > 4.0). The influences of APPRI on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were tested by the Kaplan–Meier method, and multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Elevated APPRI was associated with age, cirrhosis, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in HCC. Univariate analysis showed that APPRI > 4.0, tumor size >6 cm, multiple tumors, Barcelona-clinic liver cancer stages B to C, and AST > 40 U/L were significant predictors of worse DFS and OS. A multivariate analysis suggested that APPRI > 4.0 was an independent factor for DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.689; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.139–2.505; P = 0.009) and OS (HR = 1.664; 95% CI, 1.123–2.466; P = 0.011). Preoperative APPRI > 4.0 was a powerful prognostic predictor of adverse DFS and OS in HCC after surgery. The APPRI may be a promising prognostic marker for HCC after surgical resection. PMID:28002346

  2. Cement Leakage in Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation for Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weixing; Jin, Daxiang; Ma, Hui; Ding, Jinyong; Xu, Jixi; Zhang, Shuncong; Liang, De

    2016-05-01

    The risk factors for cement leakage were retrospectively reviewed in 192 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral augmentation (PVA). To discuss the factors related to the cement leakage in PVA procedure for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. PVA is widely applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Cement leakage is a major complication of this procedure. The risk factors for cement leakage were controversial. A retrospective review of 192 patients who underwent PVA was conducted. The following data were recorded: age, sex, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, number of treated vertebrae, severity of the treated vertebrae, operative approach, volume of injected bone cement, preoperative vertebral compression ratio, preoperative local kyphosis angle, intraosseous clefts, preoperative vertebral cortical bone defect, and ratio and type of cement leakage. To study the correlation between each factor and cement leakage ratio, bivariate regression analysis was employed to perform univariate analysis, whereas multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to perform multivariate analysis. The study included 192 patients (282 treated vertebrae), and cement leakage occurred in 100 vertebrae (35.46%). The vertebrae with preoperative cortical bone defects generally exhibited higher cement leakage ratio, and the leakage is typically type C. Vertebrae with intact cortical bones before the procedure tend to experience type S leakage. Univariate analysis showed that patient age, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, and vertebral cortical bone were associated with cement leakage ratio (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the main factors influencing bone cement leakage are bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect, with standardized partial regression coefficients of -0.085 and 0.144, respectively. High bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect are

  3. Risk Factor Intervention for Health Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Lester

    1978-01-01

    Risk factors for disease consist of personal habits such as cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, and bodily characteristics such as hypertension and high serum cholesterol. Progress in identifying, quantifying, and controlling risk factors is opening the way to the prevention of disease. (BB)

  4. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  5. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  6. Risk factors across the eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen; Goldschmidt, Andrea; Wilfley, Denise; Fairburn, Christopher; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Walsh, Timothy; Weissman, Ruth Striegel

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine risk and onset patterns in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Women with AN (n=71), BN (n=66), BED (n=160) and non-psychiatric controls (n=323) were compared retrospectively on risk factors, symptom onset, and diagnostic migration. Eating disorder groups reported greater risk exposure than non-psychiatric controls. AN and BED differed on premorbid personality/behavioral problems, childhood obesity, and family overeating. Risk factors for BN were shared with AN and BED. Dieting was the most common onset symptom in AN, whereas binge eating was most common in BN and BED. Migration between AN and BED was rare, but more frequent between AN and BN and between BN and BED. AN and BED have distinct risk factors and onset patterns, while BN shares similar risk factors and onset patterns with both AN and BED. Results should inform future classification schemes and prevention programs. PMID:25103674

  7. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients. By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration. Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m2, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior

  8. Incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sen; Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders, and hope to provide references in decision making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeon and surgically treated patients.By retrieving the medical records from January 2011 to December 2013 in our hospital, 237 patients were retrospectively reviewed. According to the occurrence of ASD at follow up, patients were divided into 2 groups: ASD and N-ASD group. To investigate risk values for the occurrence of ASD, 3 categorized factors were analyzed statistically: Patient characteristics: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bone mineral density (BMD), duration. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, intraoperative superior facet joint violation. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative angular motion at adjacent segment, preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration.Postoperative ASD was developed in 15 of 237 patients (6.3%) at final follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups in patient characteristics of age, sex composition, BMD, duration, while the BMI was higher in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in surgical variables of surgical strategy, number of fusion level, surgery segment, surgery time, blood loss, while intraoperative superior facet joint violation was more common in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. There was no difference in radiographic parameters of preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration, while preoperative adjacent segment disc degeneration were more severe in ASD group than that in N-ASD group. The Logistic regression analysis revealed that, BMI >25 kg/m, preoperative disc degeneration, and superior facet joint

  9. Persistent diarrhea: risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, B; Biswal, Niranjan; Adhisivam, B; Parija, S C; Srinivasan, S

    2010-08-01

    To identify risk factors associated with Persistent diarrhea (PD) and deaths due to PD. This prospective case control study included 60 children with PD (cases) and 60 children (controls) with acute diarrhoea (AD). Detailed history, examination and appropriate investigations were done for all children. Crude Odds ratio was calculated for each risk factor by univariate analysis and adjusted odds ratio was calculated by multivariate logistic regression. Prior antibiotic use, steroid use, anemia, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition, LRI, UTI, oral candidiasis, and hyponatremia, were statistically significant risk factors by univariate analysis. Prior antibiotic use, vitamin A deficiency, malnutrition and LRI were independently associated with PD by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk factors for mortality were stool frequency more than 10 times per day, severe malnutrition, oral candidiasis, hypoalbuminemia and HIV positivity. The presence of these risk factors should alert the clinician to take appropriate measures, to decrease the mortality.

  10. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  11. Clinical Risk Factors for Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James C.; Kawut, Steven M.; Shah, Rupal J.; Localio, A. Russell; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Lederer, David J.; Cantu, Edward; Kohl, Benjamin A.; Lama, Vibha N.; Bhorade, Sangeeta M.; Crespo, Maria; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Sonett, Joshua; Wille, Keith; Orens, Jonathan; Shah, Ashish S.; Weinacker, Ann; Arcasoy, Selim; Shah, Pali D.; Wilkes, David S.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Palmer, Scott M.; Christie, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is the main cause of early morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results for PGD risk factors. Objectives: We sought to identify donor, recipient, and perioperative risk factors for PGD. Methods: We performed a 10-center prospective cohort study enrolled between March 2002 and December 2010 (the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group). The primary outcome was International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade 3 PGD at 48 or 72 hours post-transplant. The association of potential risk factors with PGD was analyzed using multivariable conditional logistic regression. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 1,255 patients from 10 centers were enrolled; 211 subjects (16.8%) developed grade 3 PGD. In multivariable models, independent risk factors for PGD were any history of donor smoking (odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–2.6; P = 0.002); FiO2 during allograft reperfusion (OR, 1.1 per 10% increase in FiO2; 95% CI, 1.0–1.2; P = 0.01); single lung transplant (OR, 2; 95% CI, 1.2–3.3; P = 0.008); use of cardiopulmonary bypass (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.2–5.3; P < 0.001); overweight (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2–2.7; P = 0.01) and obese (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3–3.9; P = 0.004) recipient body mass index; preoperative sarcoidosis (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.6; P = 0.03) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6–7.7; P = 0.002); and mean pulmonary artery pressure (OR, 1.3 per 10 mm Hg increase; 95% CI, 1.1–1.5; P < 0.001). PGD was significantly associated with 90-day (relative risk, 4.8; absolute risk increase, 18%; P < 0.001) and 1-year (relative risk, 3; absolute risk increase, 23%; P < 0.001) mortality. Conclusions: We identified grade 3 PGD risk factors, several of which are potentially modifiable and should be prioritized for future research aimed at preventative strategies. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT

  12. [Risk factors of main cancer sites].

    PubMed

    Uleckiene, Saule; Didziapetriene, Janina; Griciūte, Liudvika Laima; Urbeliene, Janina; Kasiulevicius, Vytautas; Sapoka, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a system of various measures devoted to avoid this disease. Primary cancer prevention means the identification, avoidance, or destruction of known risk factors. The main risk factors are smoking, diet, alcohol consumption, occupational factors, environmental pollution, electromagnetic radiation, infection, medicines, reproductive hormones, and lack of physical activity. Approximately one-third of cancers can be avoided by implementing various preventive measures. The aim of this article was to acquaint medical students, family doctors with risk factors of main cancer sites (lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate).

  13. Risk Factors for Early Revision after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Christopher J.; Bozic, Kevin J.; Pan, Ting Jung; Wright, Timothy M.; Padgett, Douglas E.; Lyman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is associated with increased cost, morbidity, and technical challenge compared to primary THA. A better understanding of the risk factors for early revision is needed to inform strategies to optimize patient outcomes. Methods 207,256 patients who underwent primary THA between 1997–2005 in California and New York were identified from statewide databases. Unique patient identifiers were used to identify early revision THA (<10 years from index procedure). Patient characteristics (demographics, comorbidities, insurance type, preoperative diagnosis), community characteristics (education level, poverty, population density), and hospital characteristics (annual THA volume, bed size, teaching status) were evaluated using multivariable regression to determine risk factors for early revision. Results The probabilities of undergoing early aseptic revision and early septic revision were 4% and less than 1% at 5 years, respectively. Women were 29% less likely than men to undergo early septic revision (p<0.001). Patients with Medicaid and Medicare were 91% and 24%, respectively, more likely to undergo early septic revision than privately-insured patients (p=0.01; p<0.001). Hospitals performing <200 THA annually had a 34% increased risk of early aseptic revision compared to hospitals performing >400 THA annually (p<0.001). Conclusion A number of identifiable factors, including younger age, Medicaid, and low hospital volume increase the risk of undergoing early revision THA. Patient-level characteristics distinctly affect the risk of revision within 10 years, particularly if due to infection. Our findings reinforce the need for continued investigation of the predictors of early failure following THA. PMID:24285406

  14. Association of Preoperative Anemia With Postoperative Mortality in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Goobie, Susan M; Faraoni, David; Zurakowski, David; DiNardo, James A

    2016-09-01

    Neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk for adverse outcomes. Preoperative anemia is a strong independent risk factor for postoperative mortality in adults. To our knowledge, this association has not been investigated in the neonatal population. To assess the association between preoperative anemia and postoperative mortality in neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery in a large sample of US hospitals. Using data from the 2012 and 2013 pediatric databases of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a retrospective study of neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery. Analysis of the data took place between June 2015 and December 2015. All neonates (0-30 days old) with a recorded preoperative hematocrit value were included. Anemia defined as hematocrit level of less than 40%. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to assess the association between preoperative hematocrit and mortality, and the Youden J Index was used to determine the specific hematocrit cutoff point to define anemia in the neonatal population. Demographic and postoperative outcomes variables were compared between anemic and nonanemic neonates. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with postoperative neonatal mortality. An external validation was performed using the 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Neonates accounted for 2764 children (6%) in the 2012-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Neonates inlcuded in the study were predominately male (64.5%), white (66.3%), and term (69.9% greater than 36 weeks' gestation) and weighed more than 2 kg (85.0%). Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.4% in neonates and 0.6% in all age groups (0-18 years). A preoperative hematocrit level of less than 40% was the optimal cutoff (Youden) to predict in-hospital mortality

  15. Preoperative CA125 and fibrinogen in patients with endometrial cancer: a risk model for predicting lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the risk of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods From December 2010 to June 2013, 211 patients with EC undergoing surgery at Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital were enrolled in this retrospective study. Those patients were divided into a positive LVSI group and a negative LVSI group. The clinical and pathological characteristics were compared between the two groups; logistic regression was used to explore risk factors associated with LVSI occurrence. The threshold values of significant factors were calculated to build a risk model and predict LVSI. Results There were 190 patients who were negative for LVSI and 21 patients were positive for LVSI out of 211 patients with EC. It was found that tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion, number of pelvic lymph nodes, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p<0.05) were associated with LVSI occurrence. However, cervical involvement and age (p>0.05) were not associated with LVSI. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves revealed that the threshold values of the following factors were correlated with positive LVSI: 28.1 U/mL of CA19-9, 21.2 U/mL of CA125, 2.58 mg/dL of fibrinogen (Fn), 1.84 U/mL of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and (6.35×109)/L of white blood cell (WBC). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CA125 ≥21.2 (p=0.032) and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL (p=0.014) were significantly associated with LVSI. Conclusion Positive LVSI could be predicted by CA125 ≥21.2 U/mL and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL in women with EC. It could help gynecologists better adapt surgical staging and adjuvant therapies. PMID:27894164

  16. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  17. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after

  18. Risk Factors for Hospital Readmission after Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Lou, Neng; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission is gathering increasing attention as a measure of health care quality and a potential cost-saving target. The purpose of this prospective study was to determine risk factors for readmission within 30 days of discharge after gastrectomy for patients with gastric cancer. Methods We conducted a prospective study of patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer from October 2013 to November 2014 in our institution. The incidence, cause and risk factors for 30-day readmission were determined. Results A total of 376 patients were included in our analysis without loss in follow-up. The 30-day readmission rate after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer was 7.2% (27of 376). The most common cause for readmission included gastrointestinal complications and postoperative infections. On the basis of multivariate logistic regression analysis, preoperative nutritional risk screening 2002 score ≥ 3 was an independent risk factor for 30-day readmission. Factors not associated with a higher readmission rate included a history of a major postoperative complication during the index hospitalization, prolonged primary length of hospital stay after surgery, a history of previous abdominal surgery, advanced age, body mass index, pre-existing cardiopulmonary comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiology grade, type of resection, extent of node dissection and discharge disposition. Conclusions Readmission within 30 days of discharge after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer is common. Patients with nutritional risk preoperatively are at high risk for 30-day readmission. Preoperative optimization of nutritional status of patients at nutritional risk may effectively decrease readmission rates. PMID:25915547

  19. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Butler, J.P.

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often by as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per=kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessment for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  20. Vehicle emission unit risk factors for transportation risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Biwer, B M; Butler, J P

    1999-12-01

    When the transportation risk posed by shipments of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials is being assessed, it is necessary to evaluate the risks associated with both vehicle emissions and cargo-related risks. Diesel exhaust and fugitive dust emissions from vehicles transporting hazardous shipments lead to increased air pollution, which increases the risk of latent fatalities in the affected population along the transport route. The estimated risk from these vehicle-related sources can often be as large or larger than the estimated risk associated with the material being transported. In this paper, data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Motor Vehicle-Related Air Toxics Study are first used to develop latent cancer fatality estimates per kilometer of travel in rural and urban areas for all diesel truck classes. These unit risk factors are based on studies investigating the carcinogenic nature of diesel exhaust. With the same methodology, the current per-kilometer latent fatality risk factor used in transportation risk assessments for heavy diesel trucks in urban areas is revised and the analysis expanded to provide risk factors for rural areas and all diesel truck classes. These latter fatality estimates may include, but are not limited to, cancer fatalities and are based primarily on the most recent epidemiological data available on mortality rates associated with ambient air PM-10 concentrations.

  1. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  2. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young people].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Contreras, Mónica; Moreno-Gómez, Germán A; Marín-Grisales, Marta E; García-Ortiz, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) involves several disorders related to the formation and development of atherosclerotic processes. Several risk factors are involved in CVD aetiology; some of them (i.e. age, hypertension, obesity, dislipidemia and diabetes) have been clearly associated, whereas others have a variable level of association. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors has been recently reported in the young population; studies of cardiovascular risk factors in this population have shown that its cardiovascular risk profile could be different from that presented by older populations. This review presents a summary of reported cardiovascular risk factors in the young population and their causes which have been released and indexed in different databases. Most factors discussed are life-habit risk factors and represent direct targets for clinical intervention. We propose that primary CVD prevention should include a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the risk factors concerning the young population and could have a positive impact on CVD prevalence during the next few years.

  3. Relationship Satisfaction and Risk Factors for Suicide.

    PubMed

    Till, Benedikt; Tran, Ulrich S; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that troubled romantic relationships are associated with higher risk factors for mental health. However, studies examining the role of relationship satisfaction in suicide risk factors are scarce. We investigated differences in risk factors for suicide between individuals with high relationship satisfaction, individuals with low relationship satisfaction, and singles. Furthermore, we explored patterns of experiencing, and dealing with, conflicts in the relationship and examined associations with suicide risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed relationship status, relationship satisfaction, specific types of relationship conflicts, and suicide risk factors (i.e., suicidal ideation, hopelessness, depression) with questionnaires among 382 individuals in Austria. Risk factors for suicide were higher among singles than among individuals in happy relationships, but lower among those with low relationship satisfaction. Participants reporting a high number of unsolved conflicts in their relationship had higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression than individuals who tend to solve issues with their partner amicably or report no conflicts. Relationship satisfaction and relationship conflicts reflect risk factors for suicide, with higher levels of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and depression reported by individuals who mentioned unsolved conflicts with their partner and experienced low satisfaction with their relationship.

  4. Concussion risk factors and strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Hamish A

    2014-12-01

    Concussion in children is frequently related to participation in sports. It requires a traumatic event to occur that transmits acceleration to the brain. Some children may have intrinsic risk factors that place them at greater risk for this type of injury. Comorbidities such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, migraine headaches, and mood disorders may place athletes at increased risk of more severe injury. A previous concussion is probably the most important influence on risk for future injury. Extrinsic risk factors include coaching techniques, officiating, and choice of sport. Helmet choice does not diminish concussion risk, nor does the use of mouth guards. Education of athletes, coaches, parents, and physicians is very important in improving recognition of potential concussive injury and helping child athletes and their parents understand the risks involved in sport participation.

  5. Symptomatic spinal metastasis: A systematic literature review of the preoperative prognostic factors for survival, neurological, functional and quality of life in surgically treated patients and methodological recommendations for prognostic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Anick; Martin, Allan R.; Sahgal, Arjun; Choi, David

    2017-01-01

    Purpose While several clinical prediction rules (CPRs) of survival exist for patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis (SSM), these have variable prognostic ability and there is no recognized CPR for health related quality of life (HRQoL). We undertook a critical appraisal of the literature to identify key preoperative prognostic factors of clinical outcomes in patients with SSM who were treated surgically. The results of this study could be used to modify existing or develop new CPRs. Methods Seven electronic databases were searched (1990–2015), without language restriction, to identify studies that performed multivariate analysis of preoperative predictors of survival, neurological, functional and HRQoL outcomes in surgical patients with SSM. Individual studies were assessed for class of evidence. The strength of the overall body of evidence was evaluated using GRADE for each predictor. Results Among 4,818 unique citations, 17 were included; all were in English, rated Class III and focused on survival, revealing a total of 46 predictors. The strength of the overall body of evidence was very low for 39 and low for 7 predictors. Due to considerable heterogeneity in patient samples and prognostic factors investigated as well as several methodological issues, our results had a moderately high risk of bias and were difficult to interpret. Conclusions The quality of evidence for predictors of survival was, at best, low. We failed to identify studies that evaluated preoperative prognostic factors for neurological, functional, or HRQoL outcomes in surgical patients with SSM. We formulated methodological recommendations for prognostic studies to promote acquiring high-quality evidence to better estimate predictor effect sizes to improve patient education, surgical decision-making and development of CPRs. PMID:28225772

  6. Cardiovascular disease and modifiable cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and many parts of the world. Potentially modifiable risk factors for CVD include tobacco use, physical inactivity, hypertension, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and a cluster of interrelated metabolic risk factors. Over the last several decades, efforts to prevent or treat CVD risk factors have resulted in significantly lower rates of CVD-related mortality. However, many patients never achieve adequate control of CVD risk factors even when these factors have been identified. In addition, the growing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) threatens to undermine the improvements in CVD that have been achieved. In the United States, approximately two thirds of adults are overweight or obese, and even modest excess body weight is associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD-related mortality. Lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss reduce the risk of CVD-related illness but are difficult for patients to sustain over long periods of time. The increased incidence of obesity has also contributed to significant increases in the prevalence of other important CVD risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 DM. Pharmacologic therapies are currently available to address individual CVD risk factors, and others are being evaluated, including endocannabinoid receptor antagonists, inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor subtypes alpha and gamma, and several agents that modulate the activity of glucagon-like peptide-1. The new agents have the potential to significantly improve several CVD risk factors with a single medication and may provide clinicians with several new strategies to reduce the long-term risk of CVD.

  7. Is Asymptomatic Bacteriuria a Risk Factor for Prosthetic Joint Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ricardo; Muñoz-Mahamud, Ernesto; Quayle, Jonathan; Dias da Costa, Luis; Casals, Cristina; Scott, Phylip; Leite, Pedro; Vilanova, Paz; Garcia, Sebastian; Ramos, Maria Helena; Dias, Joana; Soriano, Alex; Guyot, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background. Infection is a major complication after total joint arthroplasty. The urinary tract is a possible source of surgical site contamination, but the role of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) before elective surgery and the subsequent risk of infection is poorly understood. Methods. Candidates for total hip or total knee arthroplasty were reviewed in a multicenter cohort study. A urine sample was cultured in all patients, and those with ASB were identified. Preoperative antibiotic treatment was decided on an individual basis, and it was not mandatory or randomized. The primary outcome was prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in the first postoperative year. Results. A total of 2497 patients were enrolled. The prevalence of ASB was 12.1% (303 of 2497), 16.3% in women and 5.0% in men (odds ratio, 3.67; 95% confidence interval, 2.65–5.09; P < .001). The overall PJI rate was 1.7%. The infection rate was significantly higher in the ASB group than in the non-ASB group (4.3% vs 1.4%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.67–6.27; P = .001). In the ASB group, there was no significant difference in PJI rate between treated (3.9%) and untreated (4.7%) patients. The ASB group had a significantly higher proportion of PJI due to gram-negative microorganisms than the non-ASB group, but these did not correlate to isolates from urine cultures. Conclusions. ASB was an independent risk factor for PJI, particularly that due to gram-negative microorganisms. Preoperative antibiotic treatment did not show any benefit and cannot be recommended. PMID:24723280

  8. Atherosclerosis risk factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Surabhi; Elliott, Jennifer R; Manzi, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Growing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from initial endothelial dysfunction to rupture of atheromatous plaques. The increased frequency of atherosclerosis in SLE is likely due to a complex interplay among traditional risk factors, disease-related factors such as medications and disease activity, and inflammatory and immunogenic factors. Identification of these novel risk factors will lead to a better understanding of CVD pathogenesis and may also provide targets for potential treatment strategies. When caring for SLE patients, clinicians should be aware of the increased CVD risk and treat the known modifiable risk factors in addition to controlling disease activity and inflammation.

  9. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  10. Risk factors for vitreous complications in resident-performed phacoemulsification surgery.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Preston H; Morales, Marlene E; Tong, Liyue; Ahn, Chul

    2012-02-01

    To identify risk factors for intraoperative vitreous complications in resident-performed phacoemulsification surgery. Two urban public county hospitals. Case series. Phacoemulsification cataract surgeries performed by residents between January 4, 2005, and January 8, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical characteristics of patients with and without intraoperative vitreous complications were compared and independent factors associated with vitreous complications identified using univariate and multivariate analysis. Of 2434 cases meeting inclusion criteria, there were 92 vitreous complications (3.8%). On univariate analysis, significant preoperative risk factors for vitreous complications included older age (P=.020), poor preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) (P=.007), left eye (P=.043), history of trauma (P=.045), prior pars plana vitrectomy (P=.034), dementia (P=.020), phacodonesis (P=.014), zonule dehiscence (P<.0001), posterior polar cataract (P=.037), white/mature cataract (P=.005), dense nuclear sclerotic cataract (P=.0006), and poor red reflex (P=.002). Factors that remained significant on multivariate analysis were older age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.05), poor preoperative CDVA (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.14-2.03), left eye (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.51), prior pars plana vitrectomy (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.51), dementia (OR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.20-11.17), and zonule dehiscence (OR, 8.55; 95% CI, 3.92-18.63). Elements of the preoperative history and examination can identify patients at higher risk for intraoperative complications during resident-performed phacoemulsification surgery. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Perks, Anna; Chakravarti, Sucharita; Manninen, Pirjo

    2009-04-01

    Anxiety is common in surgical patients, with an incidence of 60% to 92%. There is little information on the incidence and severity of preoperative anxiety in patients scheduled for neurosurgery. The aim of this study was to measure the level of preoperative anxiety in neurosurgical patients and to assess any influencing factors. After the Institutional Review Board approval and informed written consent, 100 patients booked for neurosurgery were interviewed preoperatively. Each patient was asked to grade their preoperative anxiety level on a verbal analog scale, Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, and a set of specific anxiety-related questions. The anxiety scores and the responses to the questions were compared between the sex, age, weight, diagnosis, and history of previous surgery. The mean age (+/-SD) was 50+/-13 years. The preoperative diagnosis was tumor (n=64), aneurysm (n=14), and other (n=22). Overall verbal analog scale was 5.2+/-2.7; the score was higher for female (5.8+/-2.8) than male patients (4.6+/-2.5) (P<0.05). Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale anxiety and knowledge scores were greater for surgery than for anesthesia. Questionnaire results showed that the most common anxieties were waiting for surgery, physical/mental harm, and results of the operation. In conclusion, our study showed that neurosurgical patients have high levels of anxiety, with a higher incidence in females. There was a moderately high need for information, particularly in patients with a high level of preoperative anxiety.

  12. [Risk factors for preterm encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kornacka, Maria K; Bokiniec, Renata; Bargiel, Agata

    2009-08-01

    Encephalopathy in a common neonatological sense is a term referring to a complex of clinical symptoms occurring in term infants in the first days of their life as a result of hypoxic-ischemic lesions. However, if we accept the encyclopedic definition of encephalopathy as a vast or multifocal brain lesions caused by a variety of factors, we may use the term to describe all patients with traumatic, hypoxic or toxic brain lesions, and therefore also newborns at different levels of maturity. Contrary to term newborns, in which case the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are mostly intrauterine, for preterm infants there is a number of factors which destroy neural tissue postnatally The occurrence of those factors is often influenced by elements of essential intensive care. The article describes the most common biochemical disturbances and clinical causes.

  13. Risk Factors in Adolescent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D. Rose; Haldeman, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex and multifaceted disease, with many contributing factors. While diet and nutrition are important influences, the confounding effects of overweight and obesity, metabolic and genetic factors, racial and ethnic predispositions, socioeconomic status, cultural influences, growth rate, and pubertal stage have even more influence and make diagnosis quite challenging. The prevalence of hypertension in adolescents far exceeds the numbers who have been diagnosed; studies have found that 75% or more go undiagnosed. This literature review summarizes the challenges of blood pressure classification in adolescents, discusses the impact of these confounding influences, and identifies actions that will improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes. PMID:27335997

  14. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  15. Developmental risk factors for sexual offending.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph K P; Jackson, Henry J; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the general, common, and specific developmental risk factors for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, and multiple paraphilia, and to address five methodological issues observed in this area of research. This study involved 64 sex offenders and 33 nonsex, nondrug-related, and nonviolent property offenders. The group of 64 sex offenders was further divided into eight subgroups, some of which overlapped in memberships because of multiple diagnoses. To overcome the methodological problem associated with overlapping group memberships, a special approach involving comparisons of sets of logistic regression analyses was adopted. Offenders were clinically assessed for evidence of paraphilias, and their adverse childhood experiences were measured by a battery of tests. Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction, Childhood Behavior Problems, and Childhood Sexual Abuse were found to be general developmental risk factors for paraphilias. Furthermore, Childhood Emotional Abuse and Family Dysfunction was found to be a common developmental risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple paraphilia. Additional analyses revealed that childhood emotional abuse contributed significantly as a common developmental risk factor compared to family dysfunction. Besides, Childhood Sexual Abuse was found to be a specific developmental risk factor for pedophilia. The study has supported the value of conceptualizing certain childhood adversities as developmental risk factors for paraphilic behaviors. The role of childhood emotional abuse as an important developmental risk contributor, and the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and pedophilia are of theoretical significance. Furthermore, the results have significant implications for the prevention of childhood abuse and treatment of sex offenders.

  16. Glaucoma history and risk factors.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    Apart from the risk of developing glaucoma there is also the risk that it is not detected and irreversible loss of vision ensues. Some studies of methods of glaucoma diagnosis have examined the results of instrument-based examinations with great if not complete reliance on objective findings in arriving at a diagnosis. The very valuable advances in glaucoma detection instrument technologies, and apparent increasing dependence on them, may have led to reduced consideration of information available from a patient history in those studies. Dependence on objective evidence of glaucomatous pathology may reduce the possibility of detecting glaucoma suspects or patients at risk for becoming glaucoma suspects. A valid positive family history of glaucoma is very valuable information. However, negative family histories can often be unreliable due to large numbers of glaucoma cases being undiagnosed. No evidence of family history is appropriate rather than no family history. In addition the unreliability of a negative family history is increased when patients with glaucoma fail to inform their family members. A finding of no family history can only be stated as no known family history. In examining the potential diagnostic contribution from a patient history, this review considers, age, frailty, race, type and degree of refractive error, systemic hyper- and hypotension, vasospasm, migraine, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, diabetes, medication interactions and side effects, the degree of exposure to intraocular and intracranial pressure elevations and fluctuations, smoking, and symptoms in addition to genetics and family history of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  18. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  19. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  20. Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogério S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century. PMID:23515212

  1. Risk Factors for Severity and Type of the Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cauley, Jane A.; Lui, Li-Yung; Genant, Harry K.; Salamone, Loran; Browner, Warren; Fink, Howard A.; Cohen, Peter; Hillier, Teresa; Bauer, Doug C.; Cummings, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    More severe hip fractures such as displaced femoral neck (FN) fractures and unstable intertrochanteric (IT) fractures lead to poorer outcomes, but risk factors for severe fractures have not been studied. To identify risk factors for severe types of hip fracture, we performed a prospective cohort study and obtained preoperative hip radiographs from women who sustained an incident hip fracture (excluding traumatic fractures). A single radiologist scored the severity of FN fractures by the Garden System: grades I and II, undisplaced; grades III and IV, displaced. The severity of IT hip fractures was rated by the Kyle System: grades I and II, stable; grades III and IV, unstable. A total of 249 women had FN fractures: 75 (30%) were undisplaced. A total of 213 women had IT fractures: 59 (28%) were stable. Both types of hip fracture increased with age, but older age was even more strongly associated with more severe hip fractures. Low BMD was more strongly related to undisplaced FN fractures (p interaction BMD × FN type, p = 0.0008) and stable IT fractures (p interaction BMD × IT type, p = 0.04). Similar findings were observed for estimated volumetric BMD and hip geometric parameters. Corticosteroid use was only associated with displaced FN fractures, and Parkinson's disease was only associated with stable IT fractures. Little difference was reported in the self-reported circumstances surrounding each type of fracture. In conclusion, the lower the BMD, the greater the likelihood of experiencing a hip fracture that is less displaced and more stable. PMID:19113930

  2. [Oral cancer surgery and oral cutaneous fistulas: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gyl Henrique A; Crivelaro, André Luiz Soares; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Pedruzzi, Paola Andrea G; de Freitas, Rosyane Rena

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the oral cutaneous fistulae after surgery and to identify possible risk factors. A retrospective study, interesting patients that were submitted to surgery, with a two years minimum post-operative follow up. The considered variables were: sex, concomitant diseases, tabacco and alcohol use, the anesthesic and pulmonary risks, clinical stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, accidents during the surgery, wound infection and or hematoma, pulmonary infection, surgery and reconstruction extension. In 159 patients, oral cutaneous fistulae occurred in 48 patients (30,3%): Patients stage T1 in 26,6 %,T2 in 1,8 %,T3 in 16%, and T4 in 40,3% (p=0,0138). The cases N+ developed fistulae in 22.9%, (N2c with 42,8%, (p=0,0136), those with preoperative radiotherapy in 63,6% (p=0,0346) Those with wound infection in 47,3% (p=0,0146), and those with wound deiscense in 53,7 % (p=0,0030). The fistulae rate was of 60% in the regional mucocutaneous flaps reconstruction cases, 39,2% in the myocutaneous ones and 12,5% of microsurgery ones (p=0,0286). The general rate of oral cutaneous fistulae was 30,3%. The significant factors were: T stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, wound infection and deiscense, and the use of flaps.

  3. [Midwives' perception of reproductive risk factors].

    PubMed

    García-Barrios, C; Castañeda-Camey, X; Romero-Guerrero, X; González-Hernández, D; Langer-Glas, A

    1993-01-01

    Midwives in rural areas of the State of Morelos are one of the most important resources used by rural women for health care of pregnancy, delivery and the puerperium. This work was aimed at identifying midwives perceptions of pregnant women's risk factors, in order to include this knowledge in reproductive health programs which articulate institutional and traditional health systems. We applied a questionnaire to all midwives in the Municipalities of Ocuituco, yecapixtla and Zacualpan, Morelos (n = 35). Four key informants were selected and interviewed. These instruments enabled us to measure variability in perception of risk factors. Knowledge of risk factors is defective among midwives. Previous training made a big difference. Sixty three per cent of midwives who attended training courses are better qualified from an academic medicine point of view. Only 28.7 per cent of non-trained midwives (43% for both groups), indicating that sociocultural aspects prevail over technical training in midwives perceptions of reproductive risk factors.

  4. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  5. Stroke risk after abrupt internal carotid artery sacrifice: Accuracy of preoperative assessment with balloon test occlusion and stable xenon-enhanced CT

    SciTech Connect

    Linskey, M.E.; Jungreis, C.A.; Yonas, H.; Hirsch, W.L. Jr.; Sekhar, L.N.; Horton, J.A.; Janosky, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow with balloon test occlusion as a predictor of stroke risk in internal carotid artery sacrifice. Abrupt internal carotid artery occlusion was performed by surgical or endovascular means below the origin of the ophthalmic artery in 31 normotensive patients who were assessed preoperatively by a 15-minute clinical balloon test occlusion followed by an internal carotid artery-occluded xenon CT cerebral blood flow study. One patient, who passed the clinical test occlusion but exhibited regions of cerebral blood flow less than 30 mL/100 g per minute on the occlusion xenon CT cerebral blood flow study went on to have a fatal stroke corresponding exactly to the region of assessment. Neuroimaging demonstrated possible flow-related infarctions, which subsequently developed in three patients. Two patients were asymptomatic, and one patient was left with a mild residual hemiparesis. Our protocol provided a statistically significant reduction in subsequent infarction rate and infarction-related death rate when compared with a control group of normotensive abrupt internal carotid artery occlusion patients who did not undergo any preoperative stroke-risk assessment (reported in the literature). The estimated false-negative rate for our preoperative assessment protocol ranged from 3.3% to 10% depending on the assessment of the cause of the three potentially flow-related infarctions. Although life-threatening major vascular territory infarctions have been avoided, our protocol is less sensitive to changes predicting smaller, often minimally symptomatic, vascular border zone infarctions and does not predict postoperative thromboembolic strokes. 94 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Concurrent risk factors for adolescent violence.

    PubMed

    Saner, H; Ellickson, P

    1996-08-01

    To examine the risk and protective factors for different types of violent behavior in a sample of high school age adolescents drawn from the general population, illuminate the multiple and cumulative nature of the different risk factors, and characterize gender differences in explanatory variables that foster involvement in violent activities. Using data from a 6-year longitudinal self-report survey of over 4,500 high school seniors and high school dropouts from California and Oregon, we developed weighted estimates of the proportions of youth exhibiting different risk factors who are also involved in violent activities. We use risk scales to show the cumulative effects of multiple factors within substantive domains, and logistic regression techniques to pinpoint the effects of each risk factor relative to others included in the models. Major risk factors for violence include gender and deviant behaviors, such as using and selling drugs, committing nonviolent felonies, and engaging in other forms of nonviolent delinquency. Low academic orientation, lack of parental affection and support, and perceptions of parents' substance use also show strong links with violent behavior. As the number of risk factors increases, so does the likelihood of engaging in violent behavior. Boys and girls show somewhat different paths to violence, with girls being comparatively more susceptible to the effects of family problems or disruption and impaired relationships with parents. For boys, engaging in other deviant behaviors provides the most information about their propensity to commit violent acts. Weak bonds with school and family also have an impact on serious violence for boys. Risk factors from multiple domains--demographic, environmental, and behavioral--contribute to involvement in various types of violent behavior. The strong links between violence, drug use, and delinquency argue for prevention/intervention programs that take into account the clustering of these behaviors

  7. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  8. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  9. Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

  10. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  11. Successful Access Rate and Risk Factor of Vascular Access Surgery in Arm for Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Woo; Yoon, Myunghee; Jun, Hee Jae

    2014-03-01

    Preservation of adequate vascular access is of vital importance for patients undergoing chronic dialysis in renal failure. The aim of this study is to evaluate the successful access rate and risk factors of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in the arm for dialysis at a single center. Patients undergoing vascular access operation between January 2006 and December 2011 were retrospectively identified. A total of 362 vascular access operations were performed. There were 338 autologous AVFs (93.4%) and 24 prosthetic grafts (6.6%). Men comprised 58.3% of all subjects. Mean age was 59.5±14.7 years. There were 187 diabetes mellitus patients (51.7%). There was a mean duration of 70.3±21.1 days between access creation to first cannulation. Overall successful access rate for dialysis was 95.9%. Of 338 autologous AVFs, 326 patients had patent AVFs for dialysis (96.4% surgical success rate), while 21 of 24 prosthetic grafts were patent (87.5% surgical success rate). A total of 141 patients (38.9%) came to surgery with preoperative central venous catheters (CVC) of which 130 (35.9%) AVFs had a patent fistula in the arm. The only risk factor related to successful access rate of AVF was preoperative CVC placement (P=0.012). Successful vascular access rate was 95.9%. The only risk factor related to patent access of AVF was preoperative CVC placement. At least 6 months prior to expected dialysis, AVF surgery is recommended, which may overcome the challenge of co-morbid conditions from having a preoperative CVC.

  12. Risk factors for atherosclerotic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    von Eckardstein, A

    2005-01-01

    Several controlled interventional trials have shown the benefit of anti-hypertensive and hypolipidaemic drugs for the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). International guidelines for the prevention of CHD agree in their recommendations for tertiary prevention and recommend lowering the blood pressure to below 140 mm/90 mm Hg and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol to below 2.6 mmol/l in patients with manifest CHD. Novel recommendations for secondary prevention are focused on the treatment of the pre-symptomatic high-risk patient with an estimated CHD morbidity risk of higher than 20% per 10 years or an estimated CHD mortality risk of higher than 5% per 10 years. For the calculation of this risk, the physician must record the following risk factors: sex, age, family history of premature myocardial infarction, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride. This information allows the absolute risk of myocardial infarction to be computed by using scores or algorithms which have been deduced from results of epidemiological studies. To improve risk prediction and to identify new targets for intervention, novel risk factors are sought. High plasma levels of C-reactive protein has been shown to improve the prognostic value of global risk estimates obtained by the combination of conventional risk factors and may influence treatment decisions in patients with intermediate global cardiovascular risk (CHD morbidity risk of 10%-20% per 10 years or CHD mortality risk of 2%-5% per 10 years).

  13. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  14. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among US Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. PMID:25595171

  15. Risk factors for homelessness among US veterans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jack; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. The strongest and most consistent risk factors were substance use disorders and mental illness, followed by low income and other income-related factors. There was some evidence that social isolation, adverse childhood experiences, and past incarceration were also important risk factors. Veterans, especially those who served since the advent of the all-volunteer force, were at greater risk for homelessness than other adults. Homeless veterans were generally older, better educated, and more likely to be male, married/have been married, and to have health insurance coverage than other homeless adults. More studies simultaneously addressing premilitary, military, and postmilitary risk factors for veteran homelessness are needed. This review identifies substance use disorders, mental illness, and low income as targets for policies and programs in efforts to end homelessness among veterans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  17. Preoperative factors affecting length of stay after elective ACDF with and without corpectomy: a multivariate analysis of an academic center cohort

    PubMed Central

    Basques, Bryce A.; Bohl, Daniel D.; Golinvaux, Nicholas S.; Gruskay, Jordan A.; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study of 183 patients who underwent elective anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) at a single institution over a two-year period. Objective To determine which preoperative factors were independently associated with a prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS) following ACDF. Summary of Background Data ACDF has become the most common treatment modality for addressing cervical spine pathology. Extended LOS following ACDF is associated with increased costs and complications. There is a lack of conclusive data for factors affecting LOS after ACDF. This study aims to create a multivariate model to determine the association of various patient and operative characteristics with LOS after ACDF. Methods Patients who underwent elective ACDF at a single academic institution between January 2011 and February 2013 were identified using billing records. Their charts were reviewed to collect variables available preoperatively such as patient demographics, comorbidities, and surgery planned. Patients were categorized as normal or extended LOS, with extended LOS defined as LOS > 75th percentile. A multivariate logistic regression was used to determine which factors were independently associated with extended LOS. Results A total of 183 ACDF patients were identified. The average LOS for this cohort was 2.0 ± 2.5 days (Mean ± Standard Deviation). Extended LOS was defined as ≥ 3 days. Multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative factors independently associated with extended LOS were history of non-spinal malignancy (Odds Ratio [OR] = 4.9), history of pulmonary disease (OR = 4.0), and procedures that included corpectomy (OR = 4.5). Conclusion Patients with a history of non-spinal malignancy or pulmonary disease, as well as patients who underwent corpectomy, were more likely to have an extended LOS (ORs 4.0–4.9). Of significant note, other factors that one might expect to be associated with extended LOS did not independently predict

  18. Patellar clunk syndrome after total knee arthroplasty; risk factors and functional outcomes of arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, James A; Aynardi, Michael C; Peters, John D; Kopolovich, Daniel M; Purtill, James J

    2014-09-01

    This study reports the incidence, risk factors, and functional outcomes of the largest reported series of patients treated arthroscopically for patella clunk syndrome (PCS). All patients treated arthroscopically for PCS were identified. Patients were matched with controls by sex and date of surgery. Follow-up was conducted using SF-12 and WOMAC questionnaires. Operative notes and preoperative and postoperative radiographs were reviewed. Seventy-five knees in 68 patients were treated arthroscopically for PCS. Average follow-up was 4.2 years. Functional scores demonstrated no statistical difference. PCS patients had a significantly more valgus preoperative alignment, greater change in posterior femoral offset and smaller patellar component size. PCS is a relatively common complication following TKA. Arthroscopy yields functional results comparable to controls. Radiographic and technical factors are associated with PCS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors.

  20. Vascular risk factors and cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Debette, S

    2013-10-01

    Delaying the onset of dementia by just a few years could have a major impact on the prevalence of the disease at the population level. Vascular risk factors are modifiable and may offer an important opportunity for preventive approaches. Several studies have shown that diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and smoking are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, but other groups have not observed such a relation. Positive associations were observed mainly in studies where risk factors were assessed in midlife, suggesting that age is an important modulator in the relation between vascular risk factors and cognition. The population attributable risk of dementia is particularly high for hypertension. Associations of vascular risk factors with cognitive decline and dementia are probably mediated largely by cerebrovascular disease, including both stroke and covert vascular brain injury, which can have additive or synergistic effects with coexisting neurodegenerative lesions. To date, randomized trials have not convincingly demonstrated that treating vascular risk factors is associated with a reduction in cognitive decline or dementia risk. Of eight randomized trials testing the effect of antihypertensive agents on dementia risk, only one was positive, and another in a subgroup of individuals with recurrent stroke. In most trials, cognition and dementia were secondary outcomes, follow-up was short and treatment was initiated at an older age. No effect on cognitive decline or dementia could be demonstrated for statins and intensive glycemic control. Future areas of investigation could include differential class effects of antihypertensive drugs on cognitive outcomes and identification of high risk individuals as target population for clinical trials initiated in midlife. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. [Aflatoxins--health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Miliţă, Nicoleta Manuela; Mihăescu, Gr; Chifiriuc, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a group of strains, mainly Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These mycotoxins are bifurano-coumarin derivatives group with four major products B1, B2, G1 and G2 according to blue or green fluorescence emitted in ultraviolet light and according to chromatographic separation. After metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in the mammalian body, result two metabolites M1 and M2 as hydroxylated derivatives of the parent compound. Aflatoxins have high carcinogenic potential, the most powerful carcinogens in different species of animals and humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified aflatoxin B1 in Group I carcinogens. The target organ for aflatoxins is the liver. In chronic poisoning, aflatoxin is a risk to health, for a long term causing cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and in acute intoxications aflatoxin is lethal. This work purpose to discuss aflatoxins issue: the synthesis, absorption and elimination of aflatoxins, the toxicity mechanisms, and measures to limit the content of aflatoxins in food

  2. Pre-operative anaemia.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, B; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative anaemia is a relatively common finding, affecting a third of patients undergoing elective surgery. Traditionally associated with chronic disease, management has historically focused on the use of blood transfusion as a solution for anaemia in the peri-operative period. Data from large series now suggest that anaemia is an independent risk associated with poor outcome in both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Furthermore, blood transfusion does not appear to ameliorate this risk, and in fact may increase the risk of postoperative complications and hospital length of stay. Consequently, there is a need to identify, diagnose and manage pre-operative anaemia to reduce surgical risk. Discoveries in the pathways of iron metabolism have found that chronic disease can cause a state of functional iron deficiency leading to anaemia. The key iron regulatory protein hepcidin, activated in response to inflammation, inhibits absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract and further reduces bioavailability of iron stores for red cell production. Consequently, although iron stores (predominantly ferritin) may be normal, the transport of iron either from the gastrointestinal tract or iron stores to the bone marrow is inhibited, leading to a state of 'functional' iron deficiency and subsequent anaemia. Since absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is blocked, increasing oral iron intake is ineffective, and studies are now looking at the role of intravenous iron to treat anaemia in the surgical setting. In this article, we review the incidence and impact of anaemia on the pre-operative patient. We explain how anaemia may be caused by functional iron deficiency, and how iron deficiency anaemia may be diagnosed and treated.

  3. Failed subacromial decompression. Risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, A; Garret, J; Favard, L; Charles, H; Ollat, D

    2014-12-01

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (acromioplasty) is widely held to be effective, although pain may persist after the procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion of patients with residual pain (i.e., the failure rate) after isolated subacromial decompression and to look for predictors of failure. We conducted a retrospective multicentre study of 108 patients managed with isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression between 2007 and 2011, for any reason. We excluded patients in whom surgical procedures on the rotator cuff tendons were performed concomitantly. Data were collected from the medical records, a telephone questionnaire, and radiographs obtained before surgery and at last follow-up. Failure was defined as persistent pain (visual analogue scale score>3) more than 6 months after surgery and at last follow-up. The failure rate was 29% (31/108). Two factors significantly predicted failure, namely, receiving workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition and co-planing. Heterogeneous calcific tendinopathy and deep partial-thickness rotator cuff tears were also associated with poorer outcomes, but the effect was not statistically significant. Co-planing may predict failure of subacromial decompression, although whether this effect is due to an insufficient degree of co-planing or to the technique itself is unclear. Nevertheless, in patients with symptoms from the acromio-clavicular joint, acromio-clavicular resection is probably the best option. Receiving workers' compensation benefits was also associated with treatment failure, as a result of well-known parameters related to the social welfare system. Isolated arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective in 70% of cases. We recommend the utmost caution if co-planing is considered and/or the patient receives workers' compensation benefits for the shoulder condition, as these two factors are associated with a significant increase in the failure rate. IV

  4. Environmental factors and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2004-11-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the most important risk factors for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. HBV is the primary cause of HCC in high-risk areas including China and Africa, whereas in developed countries such as the United States, HCV plays a more prominent role and is at least partially responsible for the increase in HCC incidence in this country. Humans are exposed to hepatocarcinogenic aflatoxins through ingestion of moldy foods, a consequence of poor storage of susceptible grains. Highly exposed populations are primarily in sub-Sahara Africa and Asia, where dietary aflatoxins significantly enhance the carcinogenic effects of viral hepatitis. Heavy, long-term alcohol use is a risk factor for HCC, whereas moderate use (1-3 drinks/day) is not. Constituents of cigarette smoke are hepatic carcinogens in animals, and there is mounting evidence that the liver is an organ susceptible to tobacco carcinogenicity. Diabetic patients are at risk for HCC probably as a result of the hepatic injury, fibrosis, and eventual cirrhosis resulting from fatty liver disease. Given the current epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States, this risk factor will be increasingly important. Increased risk for HCC is evident in young noncirrhotic users of oral contraceptives in the United States and Europe. In summary, risk factors for HCC are identifiable in most patients and primarily are associated with chronic hepatic injury.

  5. Bone metastasis risk factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Catarina; Vendrell, Inês; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Casimiro, Sandra; Mansinho, André; Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís

    2017-01-01

    Bone is the single most frequent site for bone metastasis in breast cancer patients. Patients with bone-only metastasis have a fairly good prognosis when compared with patients with visceral disease. Nevertheless, cancer-induced bone disease carries an important risk of developing skeletal related events that impact quality of life (QoL). It is therefore particularly important to stratify patients according to their risk of developing bone metastasis. In this context, several risk factors have been studied, including demographic, clinicopathological, genetic, and metabolic factors. Most of them show conflicting or non-definitive associations and are not validated for clinical use. Nonetheless, tumour intrinsic subtype is widely accepted as a major risk factor for bone metastasis development and luminal breast cancer carries an increased risk for bone disease. Other factors such as gene signatures, expression of specific cytokines (such as bone sialoprotein and bone morphogenetic protein 7) or components of the extracellular matrix (like bone crosslinked C-telopeptide) might also influence the development of bone metastasis. Knowledge of risk factors related with bone disease is of paramount importance as it might be a prediction tool for triggering the use of targeted agents and allow for better patient selection for future clinical trials. PMID:28194227

  6. Prenatal and perinatal risk factors for autism.

    PubMed

    Burd, L; Severud, R; Kerbeshian, J; Klug, M G

    1999-01-01

    To identify pre- and perinatal risk factors for autism. Case control study. We matched names of patients from North Dakota who met DSM criteria for autism, a pervasive developmental disorder, and autistic disorder with their birth certificates. Five matched controls were selected for each case. Univariate analysis of the 78 cases and 390 controls identified seven risk factors. Logistic modeling to control for confounding produced a five variable model. The model parameters were chi 2 = 36.6 and p < 0.001. The five variables in the model were decreased birth weight, low maternal education, later start of prenatal care, and having a previous termination of pregnancy. Increasing father's age was associated with increased risk of autism. This methodology may provide an inexpensive method for clinics and public health providers to identify risk factors and to identify maternal characteristics of patients with mental illness and developmental disorders.

  7. Risk factors associated with venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Piper, Keaton; Algattas, Hanna; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Kimmell, Kristopher T; Li, Yan Michael; Walter, Kevin A; Silberstein, Howard J; Vates, G Edward

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients undergoing spinal surgery are at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The authors sought to identify risk factors for VTE in these patients. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database for the years 2006-2010 was reviewed for patients who had undergone spinal surgery according to their primary Current Procedural Terminology code(s). Clinical factors were analyzed to identify associations with VTE. RESULTS Patients who underwent spinal surgery (n = 22,434) were identified. The rate of VTE in the cohort was 1.1% (pulmonary embolism 0.4%; deep vein thrombosis 0.8%). Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed 13 factors associated with VTE. Preoperative factors included dependent functional status, paraplegia, quadriplegia, disseminated cancer, inpatient status, hypertension, history of transient ischemic attack, sepsis, and African American race. Operative factors included surgery duration > 4 hours, emergency presentation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists Class III-V, whereas postoperative sepsis was the only significant postoperative factor. A risk score was developed based on the number of factors present in each patient. Patients with a score of ≥ 7 had a 100-fold increased risk of developing VTE over patients with a score of 0. The receiver-operating-characteristic curve of the risk score generated an area under the curve of 0.756 (95% CI 0.726-0.787). CONCLUSIONS A risk score based on race, preoperative comorbidities, and operative characteristics of patients undergoing spinal surgery predicts the postoperative VTE rate. Many of these risks can be identified before surgery. Future protocols should focus on VTE prevention in patients who are predisposed to it.

  8. Engaging Patients, Health Care Professionals, and Community Members to Improve Preoperative Decision Making for Older Adults Facing High-Risk Surgery.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nicole M; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Nabozny, Michael J; Schmick, Andrea E; Brasel, Karen J; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2016-10-01

    Older patients are at greater risk for postoperative complications, yet they are less likely than younger patients to ask questions about surgery. To design an intervention to improve preoperative decision making and manage postoperative expectations. A Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) was created to help identify preoperative decisional needs. The PFAC included 4 men and women who had previous experience with high-risk surgery as older patients or their family members; the PFAC met monthly at a local library from May 2014 to April 2015 to examine findings from a prior qualitative study and to integrate themes with PFAC members' experiences. Patient observations included 91 recorded conversations between patients and surgeons and 61 patient interviews before and after surgery. The PFAC members and other stakeholders evaluated 118 publicly available questions and selected 12 corresponding to identified needs to generate a question prompt list (QPL). Three focus groups, including 31 community members from diverse backgrounds, were conducted at community centers in Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to refine the QPL. A clinical pilot with 42 patients considering surgery was conducted in one outpatient surgical clinic in Madison. Generation of a QPL to address patients' preoperative informational and decisional needs. Through exploration of qualitative data, the PFAC noted 3 critical problems. Patients and family members believed surgery had to be done, were surprised that postoperative recovery was difficult, and lacked knowledge about the perioperative use of advance directives. The PFAC identified a need for more information and decisional support during preoperative conversations that included clarification of treatment options, setting postoperative expectations, and advance care planning. The following 3 question prompt categories arose: "Should I have surgery?" "What should I expect if everything goes well?" and "What happens if things go wrong?" The

  9. Vascular risk factors in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Claudia; Langer, Claus; Stoll, Wolfgang; Rust, Stephan; Walter, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) and fibrinogen apheresis was recently reported to be an effective therapy in sudden hearing loss (SHL). In this study, we investigated whether lipoprotein and/or fibrinogen plasma concentrations, related gene polymorphisms and other cardiovascular risk factors are also risk factors for SHL. Total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol plasma concentrations, fibrinogen levels, and two functionally relevant fibrinogen polymorphisms were determined in 142 consecutive patients and in 84 age- and sex-matched control subjects of the same ethnic background, using routine laboratory methods and PCR analysis. In addition, we determined the platelet glycoprotein Ia (GPIa) C807T polymorphism, which was recently proposed to be a genetic risk factor for SHL, and we compared the patients' and controls' clinical characteristics. Total and LDL cholesterol concentrations were not different between patients and controls. Fibrinogen plasma levels were significantly increased in SHL patients (260+/-57 vs. 239+/-110 mg/dl, p=0.002). However, fibrinogen was not related to SHL in multivariate analysis, and none of the investigated fibrinogen polymorphisms was associated with SHL. By contrast, T allele carriers of the GPIa 807 polymorphic site had an increased risk to develop SHL (OR 1.81) and were more likely not to recover from SHL, compared to C allele carriers (OR 3.0). Moreover, significantly more SHL patients were current smokers (56.3% vs. 19.3% in the control group, p<0.0001). In conclusion, there is a partial overlap between classical coronary risk factors and risk factors for SHL. Hypercholesterolemia and hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL cholesterol levels) are apparently no major risk factors for SHL, whereas the GPIa C807T polymorphism, elevated fibrinogen levels, and smoking are associated with an increased risk for SHL. Altogether these findings suggest a vascular involvement in the pathogenesis of SHL and may have important implications for the

  10. Incidence and risk factors of persistent low back pain following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for lumbar disk herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qian; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the incidence and risk factors of persistent low back pain (PLBP) following posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for lumbar disk herniation and to provide references in decision-making and surgical planning for both spinal surgeons and surgically treated patients. By retrieving the medical records from January 2013 to December 2016, 221 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified as having PLBP if numeric rating scale (NRS) scores were >50 at all postoperative follow-up time points (3 months, 6 months, and 12 months). According to the occurrence of PLBP, patients were divided into two groups: PLBP group and non (N)-PLBP group. To investigate risk values for PLBP, the following three categorized factors were analyzed statistically. Patient characteristics: age, gender, body mass index (BMI), preoperative low back pain, comorbidity, smoking, and drinking. Surgical variables: surgical strategy, surgical segment, the number of fusion levels, surgery time, blood loss, and size of incision. Radiographic parameters: preoperative lumbar lordosis (LL), correction of LL at immediate postoperation, Modic changes, and preoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration. PLBP was detected in 16 patients and were enrolled into the PLBP group. There was no difference between the two groups in age, gender, BMI, comorbidity, smoking, and drinking. The preoperative low back pain was more severe in the PLBP group than that in the N-PLBP group. There was no difference in surgery time, blood loss, surgical strategy, number of fusion levels, and the size of incision. Surgery segment at L5-S1 was more prevalent in the PLBP group than that in the N-PLBP group, and there was no difference in preoperative LL, correction of LL, preoperative lumbar mobility, and Modic changes. The fatty infiltration rate (FIR) was larger in the PLBP group than that in the N-PLBP group. Multivariate logistic regression model revealed that

  11. Cannabis use motives and personality risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hecimovic, Karen; Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine; Stewart, Sherry H

    2014-03-01

    According to the model of substance abuse of Conrod, Pihl, Stewart, and Dongier (2000), four personality factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity [AS], introversion/hopelessness [I/H], sensation seeking [SS], and impulsivity [IMP]) are associated with elevated risk for substance use/misuse, with each personality factor being related to preference for particular drugs of abuse (e.g., AS with anxiolytics). However, cannabis use has not been consistently linked to any one of these personality factors. This may be due to the heterogeneity in cannabis use motives. The present study explored the association between these four personality risk factors and different cannabis use motives. Cannabis users completed an interview about their motives for cannabis use as well as the self-report Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS; Woicik, Conrod, Stewart, & Pihl, 2009), which measures the four personality risk factors. Results showed that AS was associated with conformity motives and I/H was associated with coping motives for cannabis use. SS was positively associated with expansion motives and IMP was associated with drug availability motives. Thus, personality risk factors in the model of Conrod et al. (2000) are associated with distinct cannabis use motives in a pattern consistent with theory.

  12. [Risk factors associated to female infertility].

    PubMed

    Romero Ramos, Ricardo; Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Abortes Monroy, Ignacio; Medina Sánchez, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of female infertility is growing worldwide and the its rate varies from 10 to 20%. It has been reported diverse risk factors associated with this medical complication. To identify the risk factors with significant association with female infertility. A case-control study was carried out. There were included 440 patients, divided into 220 women with primary or secondary female infertility (cases) and 220 women without infertility recruited at mediate postpartum (controls). Twenty sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for female infertility were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard error, Student t test and chi squared. An alpha value was set at 0.05. There were 6 factors with statistical significance: advanced age (p < 0.001), elevated body mass index (p < 0.001), age of onset of sexual activity (p < 0.001), prior pelvic surgeries (p < 0.001), and presence of stress (p < 0.001). Other risk factors such as smoking, chemical and radiological treatments, pelvic inflammatory disease, exercise, contraceptive use, alcohol intake, drugs, coffee, solvents, glue and insecticides, were not significant. There are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with female infertility. Them identification in women at reproductive age could diminish the frequency of female infertility and, thus, avoid them consequences.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Cheol; Huh, Jung Wook; Lim, Hyun Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Hui Gyeong; Bang, Yu Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to investigate the incidence of and potential risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 300 patients who underwent laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We assessed the presence of rectal pain and categorized patients into Group N (no rectal pain) or Group P (rectal pain). Results In total, 288 patients were included. Of these patients, 39 (13.5%) reported rectal pain and 14 (4.9%) had rectal pain that persisted for >3 months. Univariate analysis revealed that patients in Group P had more preoperative chemoradiotherapy, more ileostomies, longer operation times, more anastomotic margins of <2 cm from the anal verge, more anastomotic leakage, and longer hospital stays. Multivariate analysis identified an anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time as risk factors. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Conclusions In this study, the incidence of rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery was 13.5%. An anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time were risk factors for rectal pain. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Thus, the possibility of postoperative rectal pain should be discussed preoperatively with patients with these risk factors. PMID:28415928

  14. Sunburn risk factors at Galveston beaches.

    PubMed

    Shoss-Glaich, Adrienne B; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2004-07-01

    Although the beach is a well-recognized environment for sunburn injury, specific risk factors for sunburn and their interactions are poorly understood. In this epidemiologic study, variables related to sunburn injury at the beach were analyzed. Beachgoers exposed to more than 4 hours of sun at the beach were significantly more likely to sunburn compared with those with less exposure. Other significant sunburn risk factors were lack of sunscreen use or use of sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor of 15 or less and Fitzpatrick Skin Types I and II. Reasonable sunburn avoidance strategies should include limiting duration of sun exposure to fewer than 4 hours per day.

  15. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  16. [Risk factors of ISUP Modified Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-dong; Qu, Gen-yi; Xu, Ning; Xue, Xue-yi; Wei, Yong; Zheng, Qing-shui; Li, Jun-feng; Cai, Hai; Lin, Yun-zhi

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the factors upgrading the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Gleason score using the specimens from preoperative prostatic biopsy and radical prostatectomy. A total of 164 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer by biopsy underwent radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analyzed their age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA level, PSA density (PSAD) , the time interval between biopsy and surgery, the number of positive punctures, positive surgical margin, seminal vesicle invasion, lymphatic invasion, and Gleason scores from biopsy and prostatectomy. We also determined the predictors of Gleason score upgrading by logistic regression analysis. Of the 164 cases analyzed, 95 (57.93% ) showed a consistency between the Gleason score of preoperative prostatic biopsy and that after radical prostatectomy, 55 (33.54% ) increased and 14 (8.52%) decreased after prostatectomy as compared with preoperative biopsy. The prostate volume (P < 0.01) and biopsy score (P < 0.05) were independent predictors of Gleason score upgrading. The risk of Gleason score upgrading was 27 times higher in the patients with the prostate volume ≤ 25 ml and 9 times higher in the 25-40 ml group than in the > 60 ml group (P < 0.05). Low Gleason score of biopsy (≤ 6) and small prostate volume (≤ 40 ml) may be the predictors of Gleason score upgrading after radical prostatectomy.

  17. Dry Eye Following Phacoemulsification Surgery and its Relation to Associated Intraoperative Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, P. K.; Das, G. K.; Malik, Aman; Biakthangi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to study dry eye following phacoemulsification surgery and analyze its relation to associated intra-operative risk factors. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out on 100 eyes of 100 patients without preoperative dry eye. Schirmer's Test I, tear meniscus height, tear break-up time, and lissamine green staining of cornea and conjunctiva were performed preoperatively and at 5 days, 10 days, 1-month, and 2 months after phacoemulsification surgery, along with the assessment of subjective symptoms, using the dry eye questionnaire. The correlations between these values and the operating microscope light exposure time along with the cumulative dissipated energy (CDE) were investigated. Results: There was a significant deterioration of all dry eye test values following phacoemulsification surgery along with an increase in subjective symptoms. These values started improving after 1-month postoperatively, but preoperative levels were not achieved till 2 months after surgery. Correlations of dry eye test values were noted with the operating microscope light exposure time and CDE, but they were not significant. Conclusion: Phacoemulsification surgery is capable of inducing dry eye, and patients should be informed accordingly prior to surgery. The clinician should also be cognizant that increased CDE can induce dry eyes even in eyes that were healthy preoperatively. In addition, intraoperative exposure to the microscopic light should be minimized. PMID:26692720

  18. Defining Incidence and Risk Factors of Venous Thromboemolism after Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Aslam; Spolverato, Gaya; Kim, Yuhree; Lucas, Donald L.; Lau, Brandyn; Weiss, Matthew; Johnston, Fabian M.; Kheng, Marian; Hirose, Kenzo; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Haut, Elliott; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among patients undergoing hepatic surgery is poorly defined, leading to varied use of VTE prophylaxis among surgeons. We sought to define the incidence of VTE after liver surgery and identify risk factors associated with VTE. Methods Incidence of VTE and associated risk factors within 90 days of hepatic resection between 2006 and 2012 at a major academic center was analyzed. Risk factors for VTE were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 599 patients were included in the study cohort; 30 (5.0 %) had a prior history of VTE. The indications for surgery were malignant (90.8 %) and benign lesions (9.2 %). The majority of patients underwent a minor hepatectomy (<3 Couinaud segments; n =402, 67.1 %) while 195 (32.6 %) patients underwent a major hepatectomy (≥3 Couinaud segments). Three hundred seven (51.3 %) patients were started on VTE chemoprophylaxis preoperatively with 407 (67.8 %) patients receiving VTE chemoprophylaxis within 24 h of surgery. Twenty-eight (4.7 %) patients developed VTE; 20 (3.3 %) had deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 11 (1.8 %) had pulmonary embolism (PE), and three (0.5 %) developed both DVTand PE. Among the VTE patients, 23 (82.1 %) had received VTE chemoprophylaxis. On multivariate analyses, history of VTE (odds ratio [OR] 4.51, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.81–17.22, P =0.03), prolonged operative time (OR 1.17 per additional hour, 95 % CI 1.04–1.32, P =0.009), and increased length of stay (LOS) (OR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.02–1.12, P =0.01) were independent risk factors for VTE. Conclusion VTE within 90 days of hepatic resection is common, occurring in nearly one in 20 patients. Most VTE events occurred among patients who received current best practice prophylaxis for VTE. More aggressive strategies to identify and reduce the risk of VTE in patients at highest risk of VTE, including those with a history of VTE, extended operative time, and prolonged LOS

  19. Risk factors for and assessment of constipation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sherree; Hungerford, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Constipation commonly occurs in older people, particularly in hospital or residential care settings, and leads to decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. Despite its frequency, however, nurses often overlook the condition. One possible reason for this may be the lack of appropriate tools or scales for nurses to assess risk factors for developing constipation. This article identifies, from the academic literature, 14 risk factors for developing constipation in older people. These factors are then considered in light of four common constipation assessment charts. The article concludes by arguing the need for more comprehensive assessment tools to, firstly, identify risk factors; and, secondly, support the implementation of appropriate preventative strategies that will enable better health outcomes for older people.

  20. [The risk factors of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Gerber, J; Sozański, L; Suchocki, S

    2001-12-01

    Authors presents the risk factors in endometrial cancer underlying such problems like hyperestrogenism, both external and internal caused by hormonally active ovarian masses, polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenocortical hyperfunction and role of obesity in this pathological state. Other factors have been also described diabetes mellitus and hypertension, oral contraception, genetics factors, patient's obstetric history and other diseases where the increase of aromatization activity of androstendion to estron has been noted.

  1. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: Epidemiology, microbiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruna; Ferreira, Carina; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Silva, Sónia

    2016-11-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by Candida species that affects millions of women every year. Although Candida albicans is the main cause of VVC, the identification of non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, especially Candida glabrata, as the cause of this infection, appears to be increasing. The development of VVC is usually attributed to the disturbance of the balance between Candida vaginal colonization and host environment by physiological or nonphysiological changes. Several host-related and behavioral risk factors have been proposed as predisposing factors for VVC. Host-related factors include pregnancy, hormone replacement, uncontrolled diabetes, immunosuppression, antibiotics, glucocorticoids use and genetic predispositions. Behavioral risk factors include use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine device, spermicides and condoms and some habits of hygiene, clothing and sexual practices. Despite a growing list of recognized risk factors, much remains to be elucidated as the role of host versus microorganisms, in inducing VVC and its recurrence. Thus, this review provides information about the current state of knowledge on the risk factors that predispose to VVC, also including a revision of the epidemiology and microbiology of VVC, as well as of Candida virulence factors associated with vaginal pathogenicity.

  2. Risk Factors for Postoperative Unplanned Intubation: Analysis of a National Database.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Martin P; Samayoa-Mendez, Andres X; Naglak, Mary C; Yuschak, James V; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-08-01

    Postoperative unplanned intubation (PUI) is a significant complication and is associated with severe adverse events and mortality. By participating in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), we learned that PUI occurred more frequently than expected at our institution. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors that are predictors of PUI at our institution. We reviewed the NSQIP data from our institution and the NSQIP national database for surgery patients from 2010 through 2013. The rate of PUI at our institution was 1.54 per cent compared with the national rate of 1.03 per cent. Perioperative risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Analysis of the national NSQIP database identified 14 independent risk factors for PUI. Analysis of the NSQIP data at our institution demonstrated that emergent cases, preoperative ventilator status, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and older age were independent risk factors. In conclusion, patients at our institution with these five risk factors were at higher risk of requiring PUI. These risk factors could be used to help identify patients at high risk and possibly help prevent postoperative respiratory failure and unplanned intubation.

  3. Preoperative chemotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk rectal adenocarcinoma selected by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging: the GEMCAD 0801 Phase II Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Brown, Gina; Estevan, Rafael; Salud, Antonieta; Montagut, Clara; Maurel, Joan; Safont, Maria Jose; Aparicio, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gallego, Javier; Martin, Marta; Pera, Miguel; Sierra, Enrique; Serra, Javier; Delgado, Salvadora; Roig, Jose V; Santos, Jesus; Pericay, Carles

    2014-10-01

    The need for preoperative chemoradiation or short-course radiation in all T3 rectal tumors is a controversial issue. A multicenter phase II trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab in patients with intermediate-risk rectal adenocarcinoma. We recruited 46 patients with T3 rectal adenocarcinoma selected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) who were candidates for (R0) resection located in the middle third with clear mesorectal fascia and who were selected by pelvic MRI. Patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab (final cycle without bevacizumab) before total mesorectal excision (TME). In case of progression, preoperative chemoradiation was planned. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). On an intent-to-treat analysis, the ORR was 78% (n = 36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 63%-89%) and no progression was detected. Pathologic complete response was observed in nine patients (20%; 95% CI: 9-33), and T downstaging was observed in 48%. Forty-four patients proceeded to TME, and all had R0 resection. During preoperative therapy, two deaths occurred as a result of pulmonary embolism and diarrhea, respectively, and one patient died after surgery as a result of peritonitis secondary to an anastomotic leak (AL). A 13% rate of AL was higher than expected. The 24-month disease-free survival rate was 75% (95% CI: 60%-85%), and the 2-year local relapse rate was 2% (95% CI: 0%-11%). In this selected population, initial chemotherapy results in promising activity, but the observed toxicity does not support further investigation of this specific regimen. Nevertheless, these early results warrant further testing of this strategy in an enriched population and in randomized trials. ©AlphaMed Press; the data published online to support this summary is the property of the authors.

  4. Preoperative Chemotherapy in Patients With Intermediate-Risk Rectal Adenocarcinoma Selected by High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The GEMCAD 0801 Phase II Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gina; Estevan, Rafael; Salud, Antonieta; Montagut, Clara; Maurel, Joan; Safont, Maria Jose; Aparicio, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Vera, Ruth; Alonso, Vicente; Gallego, Javier; Martin, Marta; Pera, Miguel; Sierra, Enrique; Serra, Javier; Delgado, Salvadora; Roig, Jose V.; Santos, Jesus; Pericay, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Background. The need for preoperative chemoradiation or short-course radiation in all T3 rectal tumors is a controversial issue. A multicenter phase II trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab in patients with intermediate-risk rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods. We recruited 46 patients with T3 rectal adenocarcinoma selected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) who were candidates for (R0) resection located in the middle third with clear mesorectal fascia and who were selected by pelvic MRI. Patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant capecitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab (final cycle without bevacizumab) before total mesorectal excision (TME). In case of progression, preoperative chemoradiation was planned. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR). Results. On an intent-to-treat analysis, the ORR was 78% (n = 36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 63%–89%) and no progression was detected. Pathologic complete response was observed in nine patients (20%; 95% CI: 9–33), and T downstaging was observed in 48%. Forty-four patients proceeded to TME, and all had R0 resection. During preoperative therapy, two deaths occurred as a result of pulmonary embolism and diarrhea, respectively, and one patient died after surgery as a result of peritonitis secondary to an anastomotic leak (AL). A 13% rate of AL was higher than expected. The 24-month disease-free survival rate was 75% (95% CI: 60%–85%), and the 2-year local relapse rate was 2% (95% CI: 0%–11%). Conclusion. In this selected population, initial chemotherapy results in promising activity, but the observed toxicity does not support further investigation of this specific regimen. Nevertheless, these early results warrant further testing of this strategy in an enriched population and in randomized trials. PMID:25209376

  5. Is ambient ethene a cancer risk factor?

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, M

    1994-01-01

    Ethene is, on a molar basis, a major urban air pollutant. It has been shown beyond doubt that a fraction of inhaled ethene is metabolized in mammals (including humans) via ethylene oxide, an electrophilic reagent that has been shown to be mutagenic and carcinogenic. To the extent that the linearity hypothesis for dose-response relationships at low levels is accepted, exposure to ethene is therefore expected to lead to a risk increment. In order to judge whether ethene as a single compound should be considered a risk factor, it has to be evaluated whether this risk increment is negligibly small or of concern to individuals or societies. The magnitude of the cancer risk from ethene cannot be inferred from animal experiments. Because of saturation of the metabolism of ethene, sufficient statistical power cannot be attained in long-term animal tests with about 100 animals per dose. By application of the radiation-dose equivalent of the unit of target dose of ethylene oxide and using the best (although still uncertain) value for the conversion factor (about 5%), exposure to 10 ppb ethene--a level occurring in urban areas--is expected to lead to a lifetime risk of cancer death amounting to approximately 70 per 100,000. According to a recent estimate the average exposure in Sweden to ethene is some six times lower. These figures are uncertain by a factor of at least three. They indicate ethene to be a risk factor of concern. PMID:7821290

  6. Incidence and risk factors for anastomotic stenosis of continuous hepaticojejunostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomonari; Natsume, Seiji; Senda, Yoshiki; Sano, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Hara, Kazuo; Ito, Seiji; Yamao, Kenji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    There have been no reports showing the incidence of anastomotic stenosis of continuous hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) and identifying its risk factors for patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We retrospectively investigated 200 patients whose HJ was established by unified method, single layered continuous suture. HJ stenosis was diagnosed with endoscopic or radiologic examinations. Uni and multivariable unconditional logistic modeling were performed to explore the predictive factors and to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Sixteen patients (8.0%) were diagnosed as HJ stenosis. Multivariable analysis showed that body mass index (BMI) (OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.03-1.51), absence of preoperative biliary stenting (OR: 11.10; 95% CI: 1.22-101.12), operative time (OR: 1.74 per one hour increase; 95% CI: 1.01-2.98), age (OR: 1.58 per 10 years increase; 95% CI: 0.88-2.85), and absence of nodal metastasis (OR: 3.43; 95% CI: 0.90-13.12) correlated with HJ stenosis. Among these, BMI and preoperative biliary stenting were associated with stenosis with a lower P-value than the others (P = 0.026 and 0.033, respectively). The incidence of HJ stenosis was 8.0%. Close attention would be needed especially for patients at high risk of HJ stenosis, such as high BMI or absence of preoperative biliary stenting. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  7. Jaundice: an important, poorly recognized risk factor for diminished survival in patients with adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, Steven M; Gao, Feng; Sanford, Dominic; Linehan, David C; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan; Carpenter, Danielle H; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Phillips, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Jaundice impairs cellular immunity, an important defence against the dissemination of cancer. Jaundice is a common mode of presentation in pancreatic head adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an association between preoperative jaundice and survival in patients who have undergone resection of such tumours. Methods: Thirty possible survival risk factors were evaluated in a database of over 400 resected patients. Univariate analysis was used to determine odds ratio for death. All factors for which a P-value of <0.30 was obtained were entered into a multivariate analysis using the Cox model with backward selection. Results: Preoperative jaundice, age, positive node status, poor differentiation and lymphatic invasion were significant indicators of poor outcome in multivariate analysis. Absence of jaundice was a highly favourable prognostic factor. Interaction emerged between jaundice and nodal status. The benefit conferred by the absence of jaundice was restricted to patients in whom negative node status was present. Five-year overall survival in this group was 66%. Jaundiced patients who underwent preoperative stenting had a survival advantage. Conclusions: Preoperative jaundice is a negative risk factor in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Additional studies are required to determine the exact mechanism for this effect. PMID:23600768

  8. [Cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students].

    PubMed

    García-Gulfo, María H; García-Zea, Jerson A

    2012-10-01

    Determining cardiovascular risk factor prevalence in university students from Medellin. A descriptive study of 112 students determined their lipid profile and a survey was conducted to assess their life-style and family history. There results were analyzed by gender using Chi² test and simple binary logistic regression. 82.1 % of the sample was female. A modifiable risk factor was found for at least 99.1 % of the study population: sedentary life-style (79.5 %), smoking (17 %), alcohol consumption (75.0 %), atherogenic diet (78.6 %), hypertension (1.8 %), some form of dyslipidemia (48.3 % BMI >25 (4.5 %)) and stress (86.7 %). At least one non-modifiable risk factor was identified in 77.7 % of the students. New intervention strategies are needed given the significant percentage of the target population ± 19 mean age having cardiovascular disease risk factors and young people must be encouraged to develop healthy life-styles to reduce cardiovascular risk factor prevalence.

  9. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  10. Risk factors predictive of right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device implantation.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Stavros G; Janicki, Lindsay; Horne, Benjamin D; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Reid, Bruce B; Clayson, Stephen; Horton, Kenneth; Haddad, Francois; Li, Dean Y; Renlund, Dale G; Fisher, Patrick W

    2010-04-01

    Right ventricular failure (RVF) after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation appears to be associated with increased mortality. However, the determination of which patients are at greater risk of developing postoperative RVF remains controversial and relatively unknown. We sought to determine the preoperative risk factors for the development of RVF after LVAD implantation. The data were obtained for 175 consecutive patients who had received an LVAD. RVF was defined by the need for inhaled nitric oxide for >/=48 hours or intravenous inotropes for >14 days and/or right ventricular assist device implantation. An RVF risk score was developed from the beta coefficients of the independent variables from a multivariate logistic regression model predicting RVF. Destination therapy (DT) was identified as the indication for LVAD implantation in 42% of our patients. RVF after LVAD occurred in 44% of patients (n = 77). The mortality rates for patients with RVF were significantly greater at 30, 180, and 365 days after implantation compared to patients with no RVF. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, 3 preoperative factors were significantly associated with RVF after LVAD implantation: (1) a preoperative need for intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, (2) increased pulmonary vascular resistance, and (3) DT. The developed RVF risk score effectively stratified the risk of RV failure and death after LVAD implantation. In conclusion, given the progressively growing need for DT, the developed RVF risk score, derived from a population with a large percentage of DT patients, might lead to improved patient selection and help stratify patients who could potentially benefit from early right ventricular assist device implantation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molodecky, Natalie A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  12. Risk factors for postoperative complications in total thyroidectomy: A retrospective, risk-adjusted analysis from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Caulley, Lisa; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Luo, Lindy; Javidnia, Hedyeh

    2017-02-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing, and with it, an increase in total thyroidectomy. There are limited studies comparing outcomes in total thyroidectomy performed in the inpatient versus outpatient setting.The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of risk factors and outcomes of postoperative morbidity and mortality in total thyroidectomy performed as an inpatient versus outpatient surgery.Retrospective cohort study of data from the 2005 to 2014 multi-institutional, risk-adjusted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. A multivariate regression model with corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used to determine 30-day morbidity and mortality after total thyroidectomies, and also risk factors of postoperative outcomes.From 2005 to 2014, 40,025 total thyroidectomies were performed (48.5% inpatient, 51.5% outpatient). The 30-day complication rate for all total thyroidectomies was 7.74%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to control for potential confounding variables. Preoperative factors that affected complications rates for inpatient thyroidectomies included: age ≥70, non-Caucasian race, dependent functional status, history of congestive heart failure, smoking history, bleeding disorder, wound infection, and preoperative sepsis (P < 0.05). In addition, preoperative factors affecting complications in thyroidectomy performed as an outpatient surgery included malignant thyroid pathology (P  0.05).We identified a subset of preoperative conditions that affect risk of complications after total thyroidectomy. Recommendations for patient selection for outpatient total thyroidectomies should be modified to account for pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of postoperative morbidity.

  13. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists.

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Thymus Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... Cancer? Can Thymus Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Kidney Cancer? A risk factor is anything that affects ... not cancer). Other risk factors Family history of kidney cancer People with a strong family history of ...

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  18. Perinatal risk factors and infantile autism.

    PubMed

    Maimburg, R D; Vaeth, M

    2006-10-01

    Suboptimal conditions during pregnancy and birth have been suggested as a cause of infantile autism. We have studied the association between obstetric factors and infantile autism. A population-based, matched case-control study of infantile autism. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The risk of infantile autism was increased for mothers aged >35 years, with foreign citizenship, and mothers who used medicine during pregnancy. A higher risk of infantile autism was seen among children with low birth weight and with congenital malformations. Birth interventions, pathological cardiotocography, green amnion fluid and acidosis during delivery were not associated with increased risk for infantile autism. Our findings suggest that suboptimal birth conditions are not an independent risk factor for infantile autism. A high prevalence of low birth weight and birth defects among autism cases seems to explain the suboptimal birth outcome.

  19. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection After Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Katelin B.; Wallace, Anna E.; Mines, Daniel; Tian, Fang; Symons, William J.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Olsen, Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. There are limited data on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods. A retrospective cohort of commercially insured persons aged 18–64 years was assembled using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revi